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Sample records for jeg-3 human choriocarcinoma

  1. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Choriocarcinoma Stem-Like Cells from the Human Choriocarcinoma Cell-Line JEG-3.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jingting; Peng, Tianfang; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jingli; Hu, Hui; Tang, Dihong; Chu, Chaonan; Yang, Ting; Liu, Huining

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) exhibit enhanced proliferative capacity and resistance to chemotherapy; however, choriocarcinoma CSCs have not yet been reported. In this study the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3 was cultured in serum free media, and the characteristics of suspension and parental adherent JEG-3 cells were compared. Cell proliferation, colony-formation, soft agar clonogenicity, and transwell invasion assays were performed in vitro, and tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice were used to evaluate stem cell properties. In serum-supplemented medium (SSM), JEG-3 cells were 4.51 ± 1.71% CD44+, 7.67 ± 2.67% CD133+, and 13.85 ± 2.95% ABCG2+. In serum-free medium (SFM), the expression of these markers increased to 53.08 ± 3.15%, 47.40 ± 2.67%, and 78.70 ± 7.16%, respectively. Moreover, suspension JEG-3 cells exhibited enhanced colony-formation capability as well as invasive and proliferative ability in vitro, alongside enhanced tumorigenic properties in vivo. Suspension JEG-3 cells also exhibited resistance to the chemotherapeutic drugs methotrexate, fluorouracil and etoposide. When seeded in serum supplemented medium, suspension JEG-3 cells readopted an adherent phenotype and continued to differentiate with no significant difference in the morphology between suspension and parent cells. In this study, choriocarcinoma stem-like cells (CSLCs) were isolated from the human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell line by SFM culture and characterized. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. In vitro approaches to evaluate placental drug transport by using differentiating JEG-3 human choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kenji; Utoguchi, Naoki; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Yamaue, Satoko; Homemoto, Manami; Nakao, Erina; Hukunaga, Yumi; Yamasaki, Kyohei; Myotoku, Michiaki; Hirotani, Yoshihiko

    2011-02-01

    Human choriocarcinoma cells have been used as models for studying transcellular drug transport through placental trophoblasts. However, these models allow the transport of low-molecular-weight drugs through intercellular gap junctions. This study aimed at investigating the differentiation patterns of JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells under different culture conditions and establishing the appropriate model of in vitro syncytiotrophoblast drug transport. Paracellular permeability was estimated by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) across JEG-3 cell layers. The mRNA expression levels of non-expressed in choriocarcinoma clone 1 (NECC1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and those of E-cadherin (ECAD) and cadherin-11 (CDH11), which are adherens junction-associated proteins related to fusogenic ability of syncytiotrophoblasts differentiated from cytotrophoblasts, protein expression levels were considered as the differentiation signals. The highest TEER values were obtained in the JEG-3 cells cultured in the Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/Ham's F-12 (1:1) mixed medium (CS-C(®) ; Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan). By comparing the TEER values and the differentiation signals, the authors identified at least five JEG-3 cell-differentiation patterns. The differentiation pattern of JEG-3 cultured in CS-C resembled the syncytiotrophoblast-like differentiation signal characterizations in vivo. In conclusion, the syncytiotrophoblast-like models of differentiating JEG-3 cells cultured in CS-C might be appropriate for evaluating drug transport across the placental trophoblast. © 2010 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2010 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  3. Altered folate metabolism modifies cell proliferation and progesterone secretion in human placental choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Carolyne; Ross, Nikia; Jolette, Philippe; MacFarlane, Amanda J

    2015-09-28

    Folate is an essential B vitamin required for de novo purine and thymidylate synthesis, and for the remethylation of homocysteine to form methionine. Folate deficiency has been associated with placenta-related pregnancy complications, as have SNP in genes of the folate-dependent enzymes, methionine synthase (MTR) and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1). We aimed to determine the effect of altered folate metabolism on placental cell proliferation, viability and invasive capacity and on progesterone and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion. Human placental choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cells cultured in low folic acid (FA) (2 nM) demonstrated 13% (P<0.001) and 26% (P<0.001) lower proliferation, 5.5% (P=0.025) and 7.5% (P=0.004) lower invasion capacity, and 5 to 7.5% (P=0.004-0.025) lower viability compared with control (20 nM) or supplemented (100 nM) cells, respectively. FA concentration had no effect on progesterone or hCG secretion. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of MTR gene and protein expression resulted in 17.7% (P<0.0001) lower proliferation and 61% (P=0.014) higher progesterone secretion, but had no effect on cell invasion and hCG secretion. siRNA knockdown of MTHFD1 gene expression in the absence of detectable changes in protein expression resulted in 10.3% (P=0.001) lower cell proliferation, but had no effect on cell invasion and progesterone or hCG secretion. Our data indicate that impaired folate metabolism can result in lower trophoblast proliferation, and could alter viability, invasion capacity and progesterone secretion, which may explain in part the observed associations between folate and placenta-related complications.

  4. MicroRNA-218 inhibits the proliferation of human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell line by targeting Fbxw8

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dazun; Tan, Zhihui; Lu, Rong; Yang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yi

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The miR-218 expression was decreased in choriocarcinoma cell lines. • The Fbxw8 protein expression was increased in choriocarcinoma cell lines. • We show that Fbxw8 is bona-fide target of miR-218 in JEG-3. • Ectopic miR-218 expression inhibits the proliferation of JEG-3 via Fbxw8. • Overexpression of miR-218 affected cyclin A and p27 expression via Fbxw8. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous 19–25 nucleotide noncoding single-stranded RNAs that regulate gene expression by blocking the translation or decreasing the stability of mRNAs. In this study, we showed that miR-218 expression levels were decreased while Fbxw8 expression levels were increased in human choriocarcinoma cell lines, and identified Fbxw8 as a novel direct target of miR-218. Overexpression of miR-218 inhibited cell growth arrest at G2/M phase, suppressed the protein levels of cyclin A and up-regulated the expression levels of p27 through decreasing the levels of Fbxw8. On the other hand, forced expression of Fbxw8 partly rescued the effect of miR-218 in the cells, attenuated cell proliferation decrease the percentage of cells at G2/M phase, induced cyclin A protein expression and suppressed the protein level of p27 through up-regulating the levels of Fbxw8. Taken together, these findings will shed light the role to mechanism of miR-218 in regulating JEG-3 cells proliferation via miR-218/Fbxw8 axis, and miR-218 may serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in human choriocarcinoma in the future.

  5. Calreticulin associates with non-HLA-A,-B class I proteins in the human choriocarcinoma cell lines JEG-3 and BeWo.

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, S D; Simpson, K L; Holmes, C H

    1998-01-01

    Human placental trophoblast expresses as unusual repertoire of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products that appears to reflect the unique role of this epithelium in mediating feto-maternal relations during pregnancy. Trophoblast is devoid of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A,-B antigens but can express one or more non-HLA-A,-B class I proteins. The human choriocarcinoma cell lines JEG-3, BeWo and JAR are widely used as models to study trophoblast. During attempts to isolate non-HLA-A,-B class I from JEG-3 and BeWo by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to beta 2-microglobulin we observed a 55,000 MW protein co-purifying with class I. N-terminal amino acid sequencing and immunoblotting using a specific antiserum identified this product as calreticulin, a molecule recently shown to be involved in the assembly of classical class I in human B-lymphoblastoid cells. In our hands JEG-3 and BeWo were found to express 45,000 MW non-HLA-A,-B class I proteins while the 40,000 MW HLA-G product was identified only in JEG-3. Our data suggest that calreticulin associates with non-HLA-A,-B class I heterodimers and with free 45,000 MW non-HLA-A,-B class I H chains in JEG-3. JAR was found to be devoid of detectable class I H chains but contained beta 2-microglobulin and calreticulin. However, calreticulin-beta 2-microglobulin complexes were not detected in JAR. Calreticulin and class I were apparently co-localized within the endoplasmic reticulum of JEG-3 cells whereas only class I was expressed at the cell surface. These studies demonstrate that calreticulin is associated with non-HLA-A,-B class I products in human choriocarcinoma cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9640257

  6. Specific estradiol biosynthetic pathway in choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mélanie; Labrie, Fernand; Luu-The, Van

    2009-09-01

    Estradiol (E2) plays a crucial role in all reproduction processes. In the placenta, it is well recognized that E2 is synthesized from fetal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). However, there is some controversy about the biosynthetic pathway involved, some authors suggest that E2 is produced by aromatization of testosterone (T), while others suggest that E2 is produced by the conversion of estrone (E1) into E2 by type 1 17beta-HSD, subsequent to the aromatization of 4-androstenedione (4-dione) into E1. In the present report, using the precursor [(14)C]DHEA, inhibitors of steroidogenic enzymes (chemical inhibitors and siRNA) and a choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line that expresses all the enzymes necessary to transform DHEA into E2, we could determine the sequential steps and the specific steroidogenic enzymes involved in the transformation of DHEA into E2. Quantification of mRNA expression levels using real-time PCR, strongly suggests that type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD1), aromatase and type 1 17beta-HSD (17beta-HSD1) that are highly expressed in JEG-3 cells are the enzymes responsible for the transformation of DHEA into E2. Analysis of the intermediates produced in the absence and presence of 3beta-HSD, aromatase and 17beta-HSD1 inhibitors permits to determine the following sequential steps: DHEA is transformed into 4-dione by 3beta-HSD1, then 4-dione is aromatized into E1 by aromatase and E1 is finally transformed into E2 by 17beta-HSD1. Our data are clearly in favor of the pathway in which the step of aromatization precedes the step of reduction by 17beta-HSD.

  7. Low molecular weight hyaluronan induces migration of human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells mediated by RHAMM as well as by PI3K and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Mascaró, Marilina; Pibuel, Matías A; Lompardía, Silvina L; Díaz, Mariangeles; Zotta, Elsa; Bianconi, Maria I; Lago, Néstor; Otero, Silvina; Jankilevich, Gustavo; Alvarez, Elida; Hajos, Silvia E

    2017-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is the major glycosaminoglycan present in the extracellular matrix. It is produced by some tumours and promotes proliferation, differentiation and migration among others cellular processes. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is composed by non-tumour entities, such as hydatidiform mole (HM), which is the most common type of GTD and also malignant entities such as choriocarcinoma (CC) and placental site trophoblastic tumour (PSTT), being CC the most aggressive tumour. Although there is a growing understanding of GTD biology, the role of HA in the pathogenesis of this group of diseases remains largely unknown. The aim of this work was to study the role of HA in the pathogenesis of GTD by defining the expression pattern of HA and its receptors CD44 and RHAMM, as well as to determine if HA can modulate proliferation, differentiation and migration of CC cells. Receptors and signalling pathways involved were also analyzed. We demonstrated that HA and RHAMM are differently expressed among GTD entities and even among trophoblast subtypes. We also showed that HA is able to enhance the expression of extravillous trophoblast markers and also to induce migration of JEG-3 cells, the latter mediated by RHAMM as well as PI3K and MAPK pathways. These findings indicate a novel regulatory mechanism for CC cell biology and also contribute to the understanding of GTD pathophysiology.

  8. Effect of puerarin on human choriocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lidao, Bao; Yi, Wang; Ruilian, Ma; Xianhua, Ren; Agula, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the effect of puerarin on human choriocarcinoma cells. Methods Survival rates under puerarin monotherapy, fluorouracil (5-FU) monotherapy and puerarin in combination with 5-FU were detected by MTT assay. Apoptotic morphology was observed with Hoechst 33258 staining. Apoptosis rates were detected with flow cytometry. Expressions of AKT, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and P70S6K mRNAs and phosphorylated proteins were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Tumor-bearing mice were administered puerarin and puerarin+5-FU, and serum levels of β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG) were measured. Results Proliferation inhibition and apoptosis rates of JEG-3 cells were positively correlated with puerarin concentration, which increased in the puerarin+5-FU group. Expression levels of AKT, mTOR, P70S6K mRNAs, and phosphorylated proteins decreased significantly after action of puerarin at different concentrations. With increasing puerarin concentration, expression of cleaved-caspase-3 in JEG-3 cells increased, whereas that of Bcl-2 decreased. Puerarin significantly inhibited tumor growth in choriocarcinoma-bearing SCID mice. Serum β-HCG levels were significantly lower than those of control group after administration. Magnitude of β-HCG decline was positively correlated with concentration.. Conclusion Puerarin+5-FU inhibited proliferation of JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells and promoted their apoptosis, being associated with the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:28352705

  9. Crosstalk between the p38 and TGF-β signaling pathways through TβRI, TβRII and Smad3 expression in plancental choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yusi; Xu, Qian; Li, Yuhong; Mao, Xiaodan; Zhang, Kongyan

    2014-09-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor that develops from germ cells. Some choriocarcinomas originate in the testes or ovaries, while others may develop in the uterus after a normal pregnancy or after miscarriage. The tumor is characterized by early hematogenous spread to distal organs, such as the lung and brain. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is key in regulating tumor cell proliferation and invasion through a variety of Smad-dependent and -independent pathways, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. There appears to be crosstalk between the TGF-β/Smad and p38 MAPK pathways; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk are not fully understood. The present study validated the role of TGF-β signaling in cancer progression and explored the interaction between Smad and p38 MAPK signaling on transduction mediators in choriocarcinoma using the JEG-3 cell line. MTT assay was used to detect the effect of TGF-β1 on JEG-3 cell proliferation. Cells were treated with p38 MAPK inhibitor and TGF-β receptor inhibitor, followed by TGF-β1, and reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the transcriptional levels of Smad3 and TGF-β receptors. The data demonstrated that TGF-β can enhance the viability of JEG-3 cells. Blockade of the TGF-β and p38 MAPK pathways attenuated the expression of Smad3, TGF-β receptor type I (TβRI) and TβRII, and inhibited their expression in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis revealed that p38 MAPK is involved in and contributes to the TGF-β pathway, dependent on the regulation of TβRI, TβRII and Smad3. Further investigation of the interactions between the TGF-β and p38 MAPK pathways may offer potential venues for therapeutic intervention for choriocarcinoma.

  10. Effect of hepatitis B virus infection on trophoblast cell line (HTR-8/SVneo) and choriocarcinoma cell line (JEG3) is linked to CD133-2 (AC141) expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Chen, Jing; Na, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays an important role in the chronic carrier state in China. In our studies, the response of trophoblast cell and choriocarcinoma cell to HBV infection regarding the expression of CD133-2 (AC141) was evaluated. Western blot and RT-PCR showed that a high level of CD133-2 protein and mRNA in HTR-8/SVneo cells, but a low level in JEG-3 cells. Lower proliferation and mobility, and higher apoptosis were observed in HTR-8/SVneo cells and JEG-3-CD133-2(+) cells after HBV infection than those in HTR-8-CD133-2(-) cells and JEG-3 cells. Our main finding is that CD133-negative cells (HTR-8-CD133-2(-) and JEG-3) are prone to HBV infection. In the last, our data indicated that the activation of Smad signaling pathway and the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CD133-negative cells after HBV infection. In summary, our study demonstrated that CD133 is a key factor that mediated HBV infection to trophoblast cell and choriocarcinoma cell.

  11. Dickkopf-1 induced apoptosis in human placental choriocarcinoma is independent of canonical Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Sha; Miao Chenglin; Li Jing; Fan Xiujun; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui . E-mail: duane@ioz.ac.cn

    2006-11-24

    Placental choriocarcinoma, a reproductive system carcinoma in women, has about 0.81% occurrence frequency in China, which leads to over 90% lethality due to indistinct pathogenesis and the absence of efficient therapeutic treatment. In the present study, using immunostaining and reverse transcription PCR, we reported that Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is prominently expressed in human cytotrophoblast (CTB) cell, but absent in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JAR and JEG3, implicating an unknown correlation between Dkk-1 and carcinogenesis of placental choriocarcinoma. Further, through exogenous introduction of Dkk-1, we found repressed proliferation in JAR and JEG3, induced apoptosis in JAR, and discovered significant tumor suppression effects of Dkk-1 in placental choriocarcinoma. Moreover we found that this function of Dkk-1 is achieved through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), whereas the canonical Wnt pathway may not have a great role. This discovery is not symphonic to previous functional understanding of Dkk-1, a canonical Wnt signaling antagonist. Together, our data indicate the possible correlation between Dkk-1 and human placental choriocarcinoma and suggest potential applications of Dkk-1 in treatment of human placental choriocarcinomas.

  12. Comparative analysis of the invasion-associated genes expression pattern in first trimester trophoblastic (HTR-8/SVneo) and JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Suman, P; Gupta, S K

    2012-10-01

    Several cellular models of trophoblast have been proposed to understand their invasion. We had reported that JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cells show differential invasive behavior in response to IL-11 treatment. So, the present study aims to compare the expression of invasion-associated molecules in these two cell lines by performing cDNA microarray followed by quantitative RT-PCR. We have observed that HTR-8/SVneo cells have significantly higher invasiveness than JEG-3 cells, which might be due to higher expression of proteases and signaling intermediates of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways. Like extravillous trophoblasts (EVTs), a higher expression of functionally significant proteases like MMP1, MMP2, MMP9, PLAU etc in HTR-8/SVneo cells, project them as a close mimic of EVTs under in vitro conditions.

  13. MyD88 and TRIF mediate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) induced corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression in JEG3 choriocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Uh, Andy; Simmons, Charles F; Bresee, Catherine; Khoury, Nasif; Gombart, Adrian F; Nicholson, Richard C; Kocak, Hande; Equils, Ozlem

    2009-07-17

    Classically protein kinase A (PKA) and transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) mediate the cyclic AMP (cAMP) induced-corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) expression in the placenta. However enteric Gram (-) bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may also induce-CRH expression via Toll like receptor (TLR)4 and its adaptor molecule Myd88. Here we investigated the role of MyD88, TRIF and IRAK2 on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of LPS/TLR4 stimulation. JEG3 cells were transfected with CRH-luciferase and Beta-galactosidase expression vectors and either empty or dominant-negative (DN)-MyD88, DN-TRIF or DN-IRAK2 vectors using Fugene6 (Roche). cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation was examined by using a luminometer and luciferase assay. Calorimetric Beta-galactosidase assays were performed to correct for transfection efficiency. Luciferase expression vectors of cAMP-downstream molecules, CRE and AP-1, were used to further examine the signaling cascades. cAMP stimulation induced AP-1 and CRE promoter expression and led to dose-dependent CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells. Inhibition of MyD88 signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRE and CRH promoter activation. Inhibition of TRIF signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRH but not CRE expression, while inhibition of IRAK2 did not have an effect on cAMP-induced CRH expression. MyD88 and TRIF exert direct regulatory effect on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of infection. MyD88 most likely interacts with molecules upstream of IRAK2 to regulate cAMP-induced CRH expression.

  14. Comparative toxicity, oxidative stress and endocrine disruption potential of plasticizers in JEG-3 human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Fernandes, Denise; Lacorte, Silvia; Porte, Cinta

    2017-02-01

    Plasticizers are suspected to be toxic and/or to modulate or disrupt the endocrine system of humans and to cross the placental barrier, being embryonic and fetal development a particularly vulnerable period. This work investigates the comparative toxicity and ability to interfere with the synthesis of steroids and to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) of a selected number of plasticizers, including bisphenol A (BPA), nonyl- (NP) and octylphenol (OP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and dimethyl phthalate (DMP), in the human placenta JEG-3 cells. Moreover, the bioavailability of chemicals in culture medium has been investigated. After 24h exposure, OP and NP showed the highest cytotoxicity (EC50: 36-40μM) followed by BPA (138-219μM), whereas no significant toxicity was observed for phthalates. Notwithstanding, BBP and DBP significantly decreased P450 aromatase activity (experimental IC50: 14-15μM), while NP and OP (20μM) increased the activity. Overall, this study evidences the differential toxicity and ability to modulate placental aromatase activity of some of the compounds nowadays used as plasticizers, and highlights the need of an accurate determination of the bioavailability of chemicals to improve the sensitivity of in-vitro tests.

  15. Choriocarcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetus. Choriocarcinoma is a type of gestational trophoblastic disease . ... Goldstein DP, Berkowitz RS. Gestational trophoblastic disease. ... Clinical Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill ...

  16. Purified vitexin compound 1 suppresses tumor growth and induces cell apoptosis in a mouse model of human choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhihui; Zhang, Yi; Deng, Jun; Zeng, Guangyao; Zhang, Yu

    2012-03-01

    In our previous study, we had isolated a series of lignan compounds, termed vitexins, from the seed of Chinese herb Vitex negundo and found broad antitumor activities of these compounds in many cancer xenograft models and cell lines. This study was aimed to determine the antitumor effect of purified vitexin compound 1 (VB1) on choriocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model of choriocarcinoma was established to investigate the in vivo effect of VB1. Its effect on proliferation and apoptosis in JEG-3 cell line was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2, and some molecules involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling was detected by Western blot. Vitexin compound 1 significantly inhibited the growth of choriocarcinoma in severe combined immunodeficient mice and reduced the serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin level. Vitexin compound 1 inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and inhibited the mTOR signaling in JEG-3 cell line. Vitexin compound 1 could inhibit choriocarcinoma via inducing cell apoptosis and suppressing the mTOR pathway.

  17. Aromatase activity modulation by lindane and bisphenol-A in human placental JEG-3 and transfected kidney E293 cells.

    PubMed

    Nativelle-Serpentini, C; Richard, S; Séralini, G-E; Sourdaine, P

    2003-08-01

    Aromatase is the cytochrome P-450 involved in converting androgens to estrogens. The cytochrome P-450 family plays a central role in the oxidative metabolism of compounds including environmental pollutants. Since lindane and bisphenol-A (BPA) are two well-characterized endocrine disruptors that have been detected in animals and humans, it was important to learn whether they could affect aromatase activity and consequently estrogen biosynthesis. The present study investigates the effects of BPA and lindane on cytotoxicity, aromatase activity and mRNA levels in human placental JEG-3 cells and transfected human embryonal kidney 293 cells. Both cell lines were exposed to increasing concentrations of lindane (25, 50 and 75 microM) and bisphenol-A (25, 50 and 100 microM) over different time periods (10 min-18 h). As a result, none of these concentrations showed cytotoxicity. After short pre-incubation times (10 min-6 h), aromatase activity was enhanced by both compounds. Longer time incubation (18 h), however, produced dose-related inhibition. Lindane and BPA had no significant effects on CYP19 mRNA levels. Therefore, lindane and BPA modulate aromatase activity suggesting an interaction with the cytochrome P-450 aromatase. This study highlights the endocrine-modulating properties of lindane and bisphenol-A.

  18. Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Elsholz, Floriana A; Kersten, Astrid; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schumacher, Udo; Schempp, Christoph M

    2016-03-03

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide)-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting.

  19. Treatment of Human Placental Choriocarcinoma Cells with Formaldehyde and Benzene Induced Growth and Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition via Induction of an Antioxidant Effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Miru; Kim, Soo-Min; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2017-07-29

    Cigarette smoke (CS) causes about 480,000 deaths each year worldwide, and it is well-known to have harmful effects on the human body, leading to heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, and cardiovascular problems. In this study, the effects of formaldehyde (FA) and benzene (Bz), the main components of CS, on cell proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of JEG-3 human choriocarcinoma cells were examined to confirm the relationship between CS components and placenta carcinoma. Upon MTT assay, FA (10(-8) M to 10(-5) M) and Bz (10(-11) M to 10(-8) M) increased JEG-3 cell proliferation. Western blot assay revealed that the protein expression of cyclin D1 and E1 increased, while the levels of p21 and p27 were reduced following treatment. In Scratch assay, FA (10(-8) M and 10(-5) M) and Bz (10(-11) M and 10(-8) M) increased migration of JEG-3 cells at 24 h and 48 h compared with that at 0 h. In addition, the expression of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, was significantly decreased, while the expression of the mesenchymal marker, N-cadherin, was significantly increased by FA (10(-8) M and 10(-5) M) and Bz (10(-11) M and 10(-8) M). snail and slug transcriptional factors were associated with EMT, which were also up-regulated by FA and Bz, indicating that FA and Bz lead to an increase in the EMT process in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. We further evaluated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of antioxidant effect using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) and Western blot assay. FA and Bz increased the ROS production and an antioxidant related marker, Nrf2, in JEG-3 cells. However, eIF2α levels were reduced by FA and Bz via activation of the antioxidant reaction. Taken together, these results indicated that FA and Bz induce the growth and migration of human choriocarcinoma cells via regulation of the cell cycle and EMT and activation of ROS and antioxidant related markers.

  20. Effects of Methoxychlor and Its Metabolite Hydroxychlor on Human Placental 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 and Aromatase in JEG-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiwen; Mao, Baiping; Bai, Yanfang; Liu, Jianpeng; Li, Huitao; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone and estradiol produced by the human placenta are critical for maintenance of pregnancy and fetal development. In the human placenta, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1) is responsible for the formation of progesterone from pregnenolone and aromatase (CYP19A1) for the production of estradiol from androgen. Insecticide methoxychlor (MXC) and its metabolite hydroxychlor (HPTE) may disrupt the activities of these 2 enzymes. In this study, we investigated the effects of MXC and HPTE on steroid production in human placental JEG-3 cells and on HSD3B1 and CYP19A1 activities. MXC and HPTE inhibited progesterone and estradiol production in JEG-3 cells. MXC and HPTE were potent HSD3B1 inhibitors with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.339 ± 0.096 and 1.918 ± 0.078 μmol/l, respectively. MXC had no inhibition on CYP19A1 at 100 μmol/l, while HPTE was a weak inhibitor with IC50 of 97.16 ± 0.10 μmol/l. When pregnenolone was used to determine the inhibitory mode, MXC and HPTE were found to be competitive inhibitors of HSD3B1. When cofactor NAD+ was used, MXC and HPTE were the noncompetitive inhibitors of HSD3B1. When testosterone was used, HPTE was a mixed inhibitor of CYP19A1. In conclusion, MXC and HPTE are potent inhibitors of human HSD3B1, and HPTE is a weak CYP19A1 inhibitor.

  1. The heat shock protein 60 promotes progesterone synthesis in mitochondria of JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Monreal-Flores, Jessica; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; García-Regalado, Alejandro; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian; Martínez, Federico

    2017-06-01

    Progesterone synthesis in human placenta is essential to maintain pregnancy. The limiting step in placental progesterone synthesis is cholesterol transport from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane. Multiple proteins located in mitochondrial contact sites seem to play a key role in this process. Previously, our group identified the heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) as part of mitochondrial contact sites in human placenta, suggesting its participation in progesterone synthesis. Here, we examined the role of HSP60 in progesterone synthesis. Our results show that over-expression of HSP60 in human placental choriocarcinoma cells (JEG-3) and human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293) promotes progesterone synthesis. Furthermore, incubation of the HSP60 recombinant protein with intact isolated mitochondria from JEG-3 cells also promotes progesterone synthesis in a dose-related fashion. We also show that HSP60 interacts with STARD3 and P450scc proteins from mitochondrial membrane contact sites. Finally, we show that the HSP60 recombinant protein binds cholesterol. Ours results demonstrate that HSP60 participates in mitochondrial progesterone synthesis. These findings provide novel insights into progesterone synthesis in the human placenta and its role in maintaining pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Carrier-mediated placental transport of cimetidine and valproic acid across differentiating JEG-3 cell layers.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Ueda, C; Yamada, K; Nakamura, A; Hatsuda, Y; Kawanishi, S; Nishii, S; Ogawa, M

    2015-07-01

    Human choriocarcinoma has been used as a model to study trophoblast transcellular drug transport in the placenta. Previous models had limitations regarding low molecular weight drug transport through the intracellular gap junction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate placental carrier-mediated transport across a differentiating JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell (DJEGs) layer model in which the intracellular gap junction was restricted. Cimetidine is the substrate of an efflux transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). BCRP highly expressed in the placenta, and its function in the DJEGs model was investigated. In addition, the placental drug transport of another efflux transporter, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and an influx transporter, monocarboxylate transporter (MCT), were examined with various substrates. Cimetidine permeated from the fetal side to the maternal side at significantly high levels and saturated in a dose-dependent manner. The permeability coefficient of a MRP substrate, fluorescein, across the DJEGs model was significantly increased by inhibiting MRP function with probenecid. On the other hand, permeation in the influx direction to the fetal side with a substrate of MCT, valproic acid, had a gentle dose-dependent saturation. These findings suggest that the DJEGs model could be used to evaluate transcellular placental drug transport mediated by major placental transporters.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from human decidua inhibits the binding and biological action of IGF-I in cultured choriocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ritvos, O.; Ranta, T.; Jalkanen, J.; Suikkari, A.M.; Voutilainen, R.; Bohn, H.; Rutanen, E.M.

    1988-05-01

    The placenta expresses genes for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and possesses IGF-receptors, suggesting that placental growth is regulated by IGFs in an autocrine manner. We have previously shown that human decidua, but not placenta, synthesizes and secretes a 34 K IGF-binding protein (34 K IGF-BP) called placental protein 12. We now used human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell monolayer cultures and recombinant (Thr59)IGF-I as a model to study whether the decidual 34 K IGF-BP is able to modulate the receptor binding and biological activity of IGFs in trophoblasts. JEG-3 cells, which possess type I IGF receptors, were unable to produce IGF-BPs. Purified 34 K IGF-BP specifically bound (125I)iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. Multiplication-stimulating activity had 2.5% the potency of (Thr59)IGF-I, and insulin had no effect on the binding of (125I) iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. 34 K IGF-BP inhibited the binding of (125I) iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I to JEG-3 monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner by forming with the tracer a soluble complex that could not bind to the cell surface as demonstrated by competitive binding and cross-linking experiments. After incubating the cell monolayers with (125I)iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I in the presence of purified binding protein, followed by cross-linking, no affinity labeled bands were seen on autoradiography. In contrast, an intensely labeled band at 40 K was detected when the incubation medium was analyzed, suggesting that (Thr59)IGF-I and 34 K IGF-BP formed a complex in a 1:1 molar ratio. Also, 34 K IGF-BP inhibited both basal and IGF-I-stimulated uptake of alpha-(3H)aminoisobutyric acid in JEG-3 cells. RNA analysis revealed that IGF-II is expressed in JEG-3 cells.

  4. JEG-3 Trophoblast Cells Producing Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Promote Conversion of Human CD4+FOXP3- T Cells into CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells and Foster T Cell Suppressive Activity.

    PubMed

    Poloski, Eileen; Oettel, Anika; Ehrentraut, Stefanie; Luley, Lydia; Costa, Serban Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2016-03-09

    The pregnancy hormone human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) reportedly modulates innate and adaptive immune responses and contributes thereby to fetal survival. More precisely, hCG has been shown to support human Treg cell homing into the fetal-maternal interface and enhance number and function of Treg cells in murine pregnancy. Here, we aimed to study whether hCG and hCG-producing human trophoblast cell lines induce Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells and promote T cell suppressive activity. CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of normal pregnant women and cultured in the presence of hCG-producing (JEG-3, HTR-8) and non-producing (SWAN-71) cell lines. To confirm the participation of hCG in Treg cell conversion, the experiments were performed in the presence of anti-hCG and additional experiments were run with recombinant or urine-purified hCG. After culture the number of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells as well as the suppressive capacity of total T cells was assessed. hCG-producing JEG-3 cells as well as recombinant and urine-purified hCG induced CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells. Blockage of hCG impaired Treg cell induction. Moreover, hCG-producing JEG-3 cells increased suppressive activity of CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells through an antigen-independent pathway. Our results propose another mechanism through which hCG modulates the female immune system during pregnancy in favor of the fetus.

  5. Interaction of Choriocarcinoma Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    August, Charles S.; Cox, Sheila T.; Naughton, Michael A.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured choriocarcinoma (Be Wo) cells exist that share many of the morphologic and bio-synthetic properties of normal human trophoblasts. In an attempt to develop a model for the immunologic relationship between a sensitized mother and fetus, we mixed Be Wo cells with mitogen-activated cytotoxic lymphocytes in vitro. Be Wo cells were resistant to the cytolytic effects of the activated lymphocytes despite 24-h exposure and intimate cell-to-cell contact as determined by microscopy. Control target cells, a line of human hepatoma cells, were readily destroyed. Cytotoxicity was measured by determining residual radioactivity of [3H]thymidine-labeled target cells after exposure to activated lymphocytes. Employing the quantitative assay, we confirmed the morphologic results and showed that Be Wo and a number of other choriocarcinoma cell lines were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes activated by phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, and allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures. Moreover, Be Wo cells were resistant to injury over a wide range of killer to target cell ratios. Significant killing of the Be Wo cells occurred only after prolonged exposure (48 and 72 h) to the activated lymphocytes. We suggest that one mechanism that may assist the fetus (or a choriocarcinoma) in its immunologic survival is the intrinsic resistance of trophoblast cells to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Images PMID:570981

  6. The human leukocyte antigen G promotes trophoblast fusion and β-hCG production through the Erk1/2 pathway in human choriocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji-meng; Zhao, Hong-xi; Wang, Li; Gao, Zhi-ying; Yao, Yuan-qing

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HLA-G expression promotes BeWo cells fusion and fusogenic gene expression. •HLA-G is capable of inducing β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cell lines. •Up-regulation of β-hCG production by HLA-G is mediated via the Erk1/2 pathway. -- Abstract: The human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is expressed on the fetal–maternal interface and plays a role in protecting fetal-derived trophoblasts from the maternal immune response, allowing trophoblasts to invade the uterus. However, HLA-G also possesses immune suppressing-independent functions. We found that HLA-G expressing BeWo choriocarcinoma cells increased cell–cell fusion compared to control BeWo cells under forskolin treatment. Regardless of forskolin treatment, the expression of fusogenic gene mRNAs, including syncytin-1, the transcription factor glial cell missing 1 (Gcm1), and beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) were elevated. HLA-G up-regulates β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cells because HLA-G knockdown in JEG-3 cells induces a dramatic decrease in β-hCG compared with control cells. The defect in β-hCG production in HLA-G knocked-down cells could not be completely overcome by stimulating hCG production through increasing intracellular cAMP levels. HLA-G expressing cells have increased phosphorylation levels for extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) in BeWo cells. The Erk1/2 pathway is inactivated after the inhibition of HLA-G expression in JEG-3 cells. Finally, Erk1/2 inhibition was able to suppress the increased hCG production induced by HLA-G expression. Together, these data suggest novel roles for HLA-G in regulating β-hCG production via the modulation of the Erk1/2 pathway and by inducing trophoblast cell fusion.

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Quercetin on Progression of Human Choriocarcinoma Cells Are Mediated Through PI3K/AKT and MAPK Signal Transduction Cascades.

    PubMed

    Lim, Whasun; Yang, Changwon; Park, Sunwoo; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2017-06-01

    As a major dietary flavonol, quercetin mitigates proliferation and progression of cancer due to its anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and apoptotic biological effects on cells. Although its apoptotic effects have been reported for various cancers, little is known of the functional role of quercetin in gestational choriocarcinoma. Results of the present study indicated that quercetin reduced proliferation and induced cell death in two choriocarcinoma cell lines, JAR and JEG3 cells, with an increase in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, quercetin induced mitochondrial dysfunction significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both JAR and JEG3 cells. Further, quercetin inhibited phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K and S6 proteins whereas, it increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, P38, JNK and P90RSK proteins in JAR and JEG3 cells. The decrease in viability of choriocarcinoma cells treated with quercetin was confirmed by using combinations of quercetin and pharmacological inhibitors of the PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways. Classical chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin (a platinum-based drug) and paclitaxel (a taxene-based drug), inhibited proliferation of JAR and JEG3 cells, and when combined with quercetin, the antiproliferative effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel were enhanced for both choriocarcinoma cell lines. Collectively, these results suggest that quercetin prevents development of choriocarcinoma and may be a valuable therapeutic agent for treatment of choriocarcinoma through its regulation of PI3K and MAPK signal transduction pathways. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1428-1440, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Activation of beta-catenin signalling increases StarD7 gene expression in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Rena, V; Angeletti, S; Panzetta-Dutari, G; Genti-Raimondi, S

    2009-10-01

    StarD7 gene encodes a protein that belongs to the StAR-related lipid transfer proteins involved in intracellular transport and metabolism of lipids. It has been previously documented that StarD7 has a wide-spread mRNA expression in trophoblastic tissues and several tumour cell lines with highest levels in both choriocarcinoma JEG-3 and JAR cells, hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of the human StarD7 gene, we have cloned and characterized the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Transient transfections of several 5'deleted StarD7-promoter-firefly luciferase constructs into JEG-3 cells indicated that the -312/+157 region contains the gene minimal promoter. In addition, sequence analysis of a 1.6kb gene fragment revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter as well as multiple regulatory motifs, including one regulatory element corresponding to the T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) binding site. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta), a component of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling, increased both StarD7 mRNA and protein expression as well as its promoter activity. Co-transfection experiments in JEG-3 cell line revealed that the StarD7 promoter is activated by TCF4 transcription factor and by its beta-catenin coactivator. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of the TCF4 site located -614/-608bp relative to the transcription start site markedly diminished StarD7 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that beta-catenin and TCF4 are bound in vivo to the StarD7 gene promoter in JEG-3 cells treated with lithium chloride. Collectively, these studies show that beta-catenin and TCF4 activate the human StarD7 gene interacting with its promoter region through Wnt/beta-catenin signalling.

  9. B-esterase determination and organophosphate insecticide inhibitory effects in JEG-3 trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Marlon; Rivero Osimani, Valeria; Sánchez, Victoria; Rosenbaum, Enrique; Guiñazú, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The placenta and trophoblasts express several B-esterases. This family includes acethylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CES) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), which are important targets of organophosphate insecticide (OP) toxicity. To better understand OP effects on trophoblasts, B-esterase basal activity and kinetic behavior were studied in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell cultures. Effects of the OP azinphos-methyl (Am) and chlorpyrifos (Cp) on cellular enzyme activity were also evaluated. JEG-3 cells showed measurable activity levels of AChE and CES, while BChE was undetected. Recorded Km for AChE and CES were 0.33 and 0.26 mM respectively. Native gel electrophoresis and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated CES1 and CES2 isoform expression. Cells exposed for 4 and 24 h to the OP Am or Cp, showed a differential CES and AChE inhibition profiles. Am inhibited CES and AChE at 4 h treatment while Cp showed the highest inhibition profile at 24 h. Interestingly, both insecticides differentially affected CES1 and CES2 activities. Results demonstrated that JEG-3 trophoblasts express AChE, CES1 and CES2. B-esterase enzymes were inhibited by in vitro OP exposure, indicating that JEG-3 cells metabolization capabilities include phase I enzymes, able to bioactivate OP. In addition, since CES enzymes are important for medicinal drug activation/deactivation, OP exposure may interfere with trophoblast CES metabolization, probably being relevant in a co-exposure scenario during pregnancy.

  10. Methotrexate induces DNA damage and inhibits homologous recombination repair in choriocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lisha; Zhao, Tiancen; Cai, Jing; Su, You; Wang, Zehua; Dong, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of sensitivity to methotrexate (MTX) in human choriocarcinoma cells regarding DNA damage response. Methods Two choriocarcinoma cancer cell lines, JAR and JEG-3, were utilized in this study. An MTX-sensitive osteosarcoma cell line MG63, an MTX-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and an MTX-resistant cervical adenocarcinoma cell line Hela served as controls. Cell viability assay was carried out to assess MTX sensitivity of cell lines. MTX-induced DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the mRNA levels of BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and RAD52. The protein levels of γH2AX, RAD 51 and p53 were analyzed by Western blot. Results Remarkable DNA strand breaks were observed in MTX-sensitive cell lines (JAR, JEG-3 and MG63) but not in MTX-resistant cancer cells (A2780 and Hela) after 48 h of MTX treatment. Only in the choriocarcinoma cells, the expression of homologous recombination (HR) repair gene RAD51 was dramatically suppressed by MTX in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied with the increase in p53. Conclusion The MTX-induced DNA strand breaks accompanied by deficiencies in HR repair may contribute to the hypersensitivity to chemotherapy in choriocarcinoma. PMID:27895503

  11. Cytotoxicity induced by nanobacteria and nanohydroxyapatites in human choriocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingjun; Yang, Jinmei; Shu, Jing; Fu, Changhong; Liu, Shengnan; Xu, Ge; Zhang, Dechun

    2014-11-01

    We explored the cytotoxic effects of nanobacteria (NB) and nanohydroxyapatites (nHAPs) against human choriocarcinoma cells (JAR) and the mechanisms of action underlying their cytotoxicity. JAR cells were co-cultured with NB and nHAPs for 48 h, and ultrastructural changes were more readily induced by NB than nHAPs. Autophagy in the plasma of JAR cells were observed in the NB group. The rate of apoptosis induced by NB was higher than that for nHAPs. The expression of Bax and FasR proteins in the NB group was stronger than that for the nHAP group. NB probably resulted in autophagic formation. Apoptosis was possibly activated via FasL binding to the FasR signaling pathway.

  12. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T A; Tin, A W; Sussman, H H

    1979-01-01

    The coincident expression of two structurally distinct isoenzymes of human alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in two independently derived gestational choriocarcinoma cell lines. These proteins were shown to have enzymatic, antigenic, and physical-chemical properties resembling those of isoenzymes from term placenta and adult liver. The regulation of these isoenzymes has been studied during the exposure of both cell lines to 5-bromodeoxyuridine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The responses of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes to these agents have also been compared with the response of another protein phenotypic to placenta, the alpha subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. The results show that (i) the separate structural genes coding for placental and liver alkaline phosphatases are regulated in a noncoordinate fashion; (ii) both alkaline phosphatase genes respond independently of the alpha subunit; and (iii) the induction of the placental type isoenzyme occurs via at least two independent pathways. Images PMID:218197

  13. Effects of phytoestrogen extracts isolated from flax on hormone production of trophoblast tumour cells Jeg 3 and BeWo.

    PubMed

    Richter, D U; Abarzua, S; Chrobak, M; Piechulla, B; Vrekoussis, T; Makrigiannakis, A; Scholz, C; Kuhn, C; Schulze, S; Kupka, M S; Friese, K; Jeschke, U

    2012-04-01

    AIM AND SETTING: To test the effects of crude extracts from flax (Linum usitatissimum) on progesterone and estradiol and ERα and β/PR production in choriocarcinoma cell lines Jeg 3 and BeWo. Tumor trophoblast cells (Jeg 3 and BeWo) were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of the flax crude extracts. Estradiol and progesterone production was measured. Estrogen receptor α and β as well as progesterone receptor expressions were also assessed. In Jeg 3 cells, progesterone production was downregulated by flax root and leaves extract, while in BeWo cells only flax root extract did manage to downregulate progesterone production. ERβ expression was significantly downregulated by flax root and flax leaves extract in both cell lines; on the contrary, ERα expression was increased by flax leaves extract in BeWo cells. PR expression was downregulated by flax leaves extract in Jeg 3 and by flax root extract in BeWo cells. Flax extracts derived from leaves and especially from roots can modify progesterone and possibly estradiol production, while at the same time they seem to alter ERβ expression. Further studies on animal models and adequately designed retrospective epidemiological studies are imperative to clarify this role upon progesterone.

  14. Insulin stimulates synthesis and release of human chorionic gonadotropin by choriocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, S.G.; Braunstein, G.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that insulin regulates placental lactogen, progesterone, and estrogen production from human trophoblast cells. This study was performed to examine whether insulin also regulates the production of hCG by this type of cell. After 24-36 h of preincubation, JEG-3 and JAR cells (2-3 x 10(5) cells/ml.well) or human term trophoblast cells (1 x 10(6) cells/ml.well) were exposed to the test hormone in serum-free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium for 24-96 h. Secretion of hCG from JEG-3 cells was stimulated by human insulin, human proinsulin, or porcine insulin in a dose-dependent manner, with lowest effective doses of 6.7, 96, and 53 mg/L, respectively. Time-course studies showed that hCG secretion peaked at 72-96 h with insulin exposure; in contrast, no decernable peak was seen without insulin in serum-free media. Exposure of JEG-3 cells for 24 h to 209 mg/liter insulin stimulated hCG synthesis, with 40 +/- 3% more immunoreactive intracellular hCG (P less than 0.05). Cells grown in the presence of insulin and (35S)methionine had 47 +/- 21% more labeled intracellular hCG and 56 +/- 13% more immunoprecipitable (35S)methionine-hCG secreted into the medium than the control cultures (P less than 0.05). During this time period, human placental lactogen release and total trichloroacetice acid-precipitable (35S)methionine protein were not increased. The insulin-induced stimulation of hCG synthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide. Additionally, insulin did not significantly affect total intracellular protein during 24-96 h of incubation. Insulin also increased hCG release from JAR cells, but not from human term trophoblast cells. A mouse monoclonal antibody to the IGF-I receptor inhibited the stimulation of insulin in JEG-3 cells.

  15. Pharmacological concentration of resveratrol suppresses aromatase in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Leung, Lai K

    2007-09-28

    Estrogen is crucial in preparing of pregnancy, and its role in the maintenance of pregnancy has yet to be elucidated. During the course of pregnancy, the placenta is responsible for the provision of estrogen. The hormone biosynthesis is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 19 or aromatase. In the present study, we screened several common dietary components and identified the grape polyphenol resveratrol to be a potential inhibitor in the hormone synthesis. In a recombinant protein system resveratrol inhibited the aromatase activity with an IC(50) value of approximately 40 microM. Subsequent analysis was performed in the human placental JEG-3 cells, and 25 microM resveratrol significantly reduced the mRNA abundance in these cells. Since the transcriptional control of CYP19 gene is tissue-specific and the proximal promoter region of exon Ia has previously been shown to be crucial in CYP19 expression in placental cells, we also evaluated the promoter activity of this gene. Reporter gene assays revealed that resveratrol repressed the transcriptional control of promoter Ia. The present study illustrated the possibility that dietary supplementation of resveratrol interfered with the normal functioning of placental cells.

  16. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53.

  17. Expression of serum amyloid A4 in human trophoblast-like choriocarcinoma cell lines and human first trimester/term trophoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, C.; Hammer, A.; Koyani, C.N.; Kovacevic, A.; Siwetz, M.; Desoye, G.; Poehlmann, T.G.; Markert, U.R.; Huppertz, B.; Sattler, W.; Malle, E.

    2014-01-01

    Trophoblast invasion into uterine tissues represents a hallmark of first trimester placental development. As expression of serum amyloid A4 (SAA4) occurs in tumorigenic and invasive tissues we here investigated whether SAA4 is present in trophoblast-like human AC1-M59/Jeg-3 cells and trophoblast preparations of human first trimester and term placenta. SAA4 mRNA was expressed in non-stimulated and cytokine-treated AC1-M59/Jeg-3 cells. In purified trophoblast cells SAA4 mRNA expression was upregulated at weeks 10 and 12 of pregnancy. Western-blot and immunohistochemical staining of first trimester placental tissue revealed pronounced SAA4 expression in invasive trophoblast cells indicating a potential role of SAA4 during invasion. PMID:24951172

  18. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 promotes migration and invasion of human trophoblast cells through activation of MAPK, PI3K and NOTCH signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Massimiani, M; Vecchione, L; Piccirilli, D; Spitalieri, P; Amati, F; Salvi, S; Ferrazzani, S; Stuhlmann, H; Campagnolo, L

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (Egfl7) is a gene that encodes a partially secreted protein and whose expression is largely restricted to the endothelia. We recently reported that EGFL7 is also expressed by trophoblast cells in mouse and human placentas. Here, we investigated the molecular pathways that are regulated by EGFL7 in trophoblast cells. Stable EGFL7 overexpression in a Jeg3 human choriocarcinoma cell line resulted in significantly increased cell migration and invasiveness, while cell proliferation was unaffected. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways showed that EGFL7 promotes Jeg3 cell motility by activating both pathways. We show that EGFL7 activates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in Jeg3 cells, resulting in downstream activation of extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs). In addition, we provide evidence that EGFL7-triggered migration of Jeg3 cells involves activation of NOTCH signaling. EGFL7 and NOTCH1 are co-expressed in Jeg3 cells, and blocking of NOTCH activation abrogates enhanced migration of Jeg3 cells overexpressing EGFL7. We also demonstrate that signaling through EGFR and NOTCH converged to mediate EGFL7 effects. Reduction of endogenous EGFL7 expression in Jeg3 cells significantly decreased cell migration. We further confirmed that EGFL7 stimulates cell migration by using primary human first trimester trophoblast (PTB) cells overexpressing EGFL7. In conclusion, our data suggest that in trophoblast cells, EGFL7 regulates cell migration and invasion by activating multiple signaling pathways. Our results provide a possible explanation for the correlation between reduced expression of EGFL7 and inadequate trophoblast invasion observed in placentopathies.

  19. Gestational choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baergen, R N

    1997-11-01

    The malignant transformation of trophoblast is interesting to contemplate, as trophoblast normally behaves in a manner that is interpreted as indicative of malignancy. First of all, trophoblasts show "controlled invasion" at the placental site as part of the normal process of implantation. Secondly, it is estimated that 100,000 syncytiotrophoblastic cells are deported to the maternal circulation daily and these are commonly identified in the pulmonary circulation of pregnant women (38). These trophoblastic cells do not ordinarily produce disease and presumably are rejected by the mother, unlike true metastases. When trophoblastic malignancy does develop, however, the trophoblast continues to invade and grow without limit, eventually metastasizing and ultimately leading to death. Choriocarcinoma is, therefore, unique in that it represents a malignant transformation of a tissue that inherently has "invasive" and "metastatic" properties. It is also the only tumor which contains DNA foreign to the host, as it is derived from a conception which contains paternal genetic material. Thus, choriocarcinoma is a complex neoplasm, and to study it, one must study and understand graft rejection, immunologic mechanisms and a multitude of genetic concepts in addition to the mechanisms of invasion and metastasis.

  20. D21S418E identifies a cAMP-regulated gene located on chromosome 21q22. 3 that is expressed in placental syncytiotrophoblast and choriocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, S.; Sakuragi, N.; Bronner, M.P.; Sayegh, R.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Berger, R.; Patterson, D. )

    1993-07-01

    A partial cDNA (D21S418E) whose nucleotide sequence has no significant homologies with known mammalian DNA sequences was isolated from a human placental library. The cDNA hybridized with a 10-kb transcript present in term placenta. Messages of 10 and 7.5 kb were induced in BeWo and JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells by treatment with 8-Br-cAMP. The mRNA was not detected in human brain, liver, lung, kidney, pancreas, heart, skeletal muscle, or myometrium. The D21S418E locus was assigned to a 3.5-Mb region of chromosome 21q22.3. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 modulates estrogen-induced trophoblast proliferation and invasion in HTR-8 and JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Kun; Liu, Hai-Yan; Fang, Wen-Ning; Yang, Ying; Wang, Hong-Mei; Peng, Jing-Pian

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has reported that IGFBP7 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in different tumors, but its role in the trophoblast has not been elucidated. In this research, we studied the regulation mechanism of IGFBP7 in trophoblast proliferation and invasion in HTR-8 and JEG-3 cell lines. We found that IGFBP7 was abundantly expressed in normal human syncytiotrophoblast tissue samples but that this was lacking in hydatidiform moles. The proliferation and invasion capacities of HTR-8 and JEG-3 cells were significantly inhibited by recombinant IGFBP7. Estrogen (E2) stimulated the expression of IGFBP7 at a concentration of 5-10 ng/mL. This stimulation was inhibited by the estrogen receptor antagonist Fulvestrant (ICI182.780) and a TGFβ-neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, our data reveals that estrogen stimulates the expression of IGFBP7 through estrogen receptors and TGFβ. The expression of IGFBP7 could be stimulated by TGFβ in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited by IFNγ in HTR-8 and JEG-3 cells. IGFBP7 could also inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK and the expression of PCNA, MMP2 and MMP9 in HTR-8 and JEG-3 cells. These findings suggest that IGFBP7 is a key regulator of E2-induced trophoblast proliferation and invasion.

  2. Choriocarcinoma presenting with thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Sotello, David; Test, Victor J.; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 26-year-old man with metastatic choriocarcinoma who presented with hyperthyroidism associated with elevated β-human chorionic gonadotropin (B-HCG) and respiratory failure secondary to diffuse lung metastasis. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, the concentration of B-HCG dramatically decreased and the patient became euthyroid, allowing us to discontinue antithyroid medications. The patient's hyperthyroidism was caused by stimulation of the thyroid gland by high B-HCG levels, as shown by the marked improvement of the patient's thyroid function panel after chemotherapy. PMID:26722165

  3. Choriocarcinoma: blocking factor and monoclonal antibody iodine 131 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pattillo, R.A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Ruckert, A.C.; Hussa, R.O.; Collier, B.D.; Beierwaltes, W.; Mattingly, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Postoperative iodine 131 monoclonal antibody localization in metastatic choriocarcinoma was accomplished in this study. The monoclonal antibody was prepared to male choriocarcinoma which cross reacted with gestational choriocarcinoma. The antibody was raised against whole choriocarcinoma cells and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cross reactivity was excluded. The purified antibody was iodinated with /sup 131/I and successfully imaged BeWo choriocarcinoma transplanted in nude mice; however, imaging of choriocarcinoma in a patient was verified only after resection. It is our belief that failure to sufficiently concentrate the antibody in the tumor before operation was due to blocking factor in the serum of the patient. Blocking factor and hCG dropped postoperatively. Blocking factor activity in 15 patients with metastatic trophoblastic disease was monitored and, like hCG, was found to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of disease. Its efficacy may be in the small number of patients without hCG but with persistent disease.

  4. FBI-1 Is Overexpressed in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease and Promotes Tumor Growth and Cell Aggressiveness of Choriocarcinoma via PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Esther S Y; Ng, Wai-Yan; Wong, Richard W C; Chan, Ka-Kui; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2015-07-01

    Human placental trophoblasts can be considered pseudomalignant, with tightly controlled proliferation, apoptosis, and invasiveness. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) represents a family of heterogeneous trophoblastic lesions with aberrant apoptotic and proliferative activities and dysregulation of cell signaling pathways. We characterize the oncogenic effects of factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of HIV-1 [FBI-1, alias POZ and Krüppel erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (POKEMON)/ZBTB7A] in GTD and its role in promoting cell aggressiveness in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. IHC studies showed increased nuclear expression of FBI-1, including hydatidiform moles, choriocarcinoma (CCA), and placental site trophoblastic tumor, in GTD. In JAR and JEG-3 CCA cells, ectopic FBI-1 expression opposed apoptosis through repression of proapoptotic genes (eg, BAK1, FAS, and CASP8). FBI-1 overexpression also promoted Akt activation, as indicated by Akt-pS473 phosphorylation. FBI-1 overexpression promoted mobility and invasiveness of JEG-3 and JAR, but not in the presence of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings suggest that FBI-1 could promote cell migration and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling. In vivo, nude mice injected with CCA cells with stable FBI-1 knockdown demonstrated reduced tumor growth compared with that in control groups. These findings suggest that FBI-1 is clinically associated with the progression of, and may be a therapeutic target in, GTD, owing to its diverse oncogenic effects on dysregulated trophoblasts. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ablation of Stat3 by siRNA alters gene expression profiles in JEG-3 cells: a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Jiang, K; Krous, L C; Knowlton, N; Chen, Y; Frank, M B; Cadwell, C; Centola, M; Jarvis, J N

    2009-09-01

    Control of inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface is a critical element in mammalian pregnancy. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that Stat3 may be a placental mediator involved in maintaining immunologic homeostasis at the maternal-fetal interface. The aim of the current study is to further elucidate the role of Stat3 in response to inflammation. As ablation of Stat3 in mice results in embryonic lethality, we evaluated the role of Stat3 in vitro using an siRNA approach. Trophoblast-like JEG-3 cells were transfected with an siRNA construct specific to Stat3. Experimental and control cells were exposed to conditioned medium from PHA-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and incubated for 45 min. Cells were then collected and RNA isolated for transcriptional profiling using human Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 GeneChips. Differences in gene expression between control and Stat3-ablated cells were evaluated using conventional statistical methods. Fifty-two genes were detected as up-regulated in conditioned medium in both mock transfected and in Stat3 siRNA transfected JEG-3 cells. Two genes (EPAS1 and RASGEF1B) were up-regulated only in cells transfected with negative control siRNA, while 36 genes were up-regulated only in cells transfected with Stat3 siRNA. Sixty genes were differentially expressed between Stat3 siRNA transfected cells relative to mock transfected cells both in basal and conditioned medium. These included 31 genes up-regulated with Stat3 siRNA transfected cells and 29 genes down-regulated with Stat3 siRNA. Eleven genes were differentially expressed only in basal medium. Seven of these were up-regulated in the presence of Stat3 siRNA and four were down-regulated. Nine genes were differentially expressed only in conditioned medium. Six of these were up-regulated and three down-regulated in the presence of Stat3 siRNA. Off-target effects were excluded in a second set of experiments in which Stat3 mRNA was targeted at a different site and

  6. Aflatoxin B1 disrupts transient receptor potential channel activity and increases COX-2 expression in JEG-3 placental cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Tan, Yan Qin; Leung, Lai K

    2016-12-25

    Aflatoxins are fungal metabolites which pose a major threat to food safety. Although these mycotoxins are established hepatocarcinogens, their effect on the reproductive organ is unknown. Transient Receptor Potential Channels (TRPs) are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, including the placenta. These channels are associated with various functions in the placenta. The fetus and the placenta are especially sensitive to xenobiotic assault; therefore, exposure to the aflatoxins during gestation might lead to the undesirable outcome. Previously we have shown that aflatoxin B1 administered in late gestation may increase cox-2 expression in mouse placentae. In the present study, we examined the effect of aflatoxin B1 on COX-2 by using the placental cell model JEG-3 and the respective signaling pathway. In our result, COX-2 expression was induced by the mycotoxin administration. The intracellular calcium levels were also increased in cells by aflatoxin B1 treatment as little as 1 nM. Immunoblot result showed that some TRP expressions were elevated. As inflated intracellular calcium might activate MAPKs, the underlying signaling pathway was investigated. With the help of TRP-specific inhibitors, the mycotoxin appeared to increase the expression of TRPC-3 and activate PKCβ and ERK. The significance of COX-2 in pregnancy has been well established. Exposure to this mycotoxin may perturb the physiological processes dictated by COX-2 in pregnancy.

  7. Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Snoj, Ziga; Kocijancic, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to establish whether there are different clinical entities of primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) that deserve different diagnostic approach and the most optimal treatment. Patients and methods A systematic review with PubMed search was conducted to identify studies that reported cases of PPC. The eligibility criteria were histological diagnosis of pulmonary choriocarcinoma and thorough examination of the reproductive organs to exclude potential primary choriocarcinoma in the gonads. Furthermore, to illustrate the review we additionally present a patient referred at our institution. Results 55 cases (17 men) were included in the review with a median age of 34 years. Women with the history of gestational event showed better survival outcome than women without the history of gestational event. Patients treated with combined modality treatment (surgery and chemotherapy) survived longer than the patients without combined modality treatment. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of prognostic factors showed that the combined modality treatment had independent prognostic significance. Size of the tumour showed significant prognostic influence in univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions PPC is an extreme rarity with variable clinical characteristics and outcome. It is important to capture and treat patients in the early stages of the disease. Women with the history of gestational event may show better survival, therefore genetic examination could help us to predict patient’s prognosis. Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy appears to represent the best treatment for PPC. PMID:28265226

  8. Epidemiological features of choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baltazar, Jane C.

    1976-01-01

    By means of hospital records and death certificates, 91 cases of choriocarcinoma were identified in the cities of Manila, Quezon, Pasay, and Caloocan in the Philippines during the 5 years 1970-74. The overall incidence was 17.4 per 100 000 live births. The other principal findings in this population-based study concerned maternal age, history of fetal wastage, and number of pregnancies. Very high incidence rates for choriocarcinoma were registered for mothers aged 40 years and over and there was a slightly higher than average risk for women under 20 years of age. Risk increased with the number of fetal losses. The effect of number of pregnancies was evident only for very old and very young mothers. A case—control study was also conducted on 28 patients with choriocarcinoma and on 187 age-matched controls; for all of these women, the disease had been diganosed (cases) or children had been born (controls) between 1970 and 1975. Compared with the control group, a higher proportion of the case group had a history of pulmonary tuberculosis and had previously used contraceptive pills. Because of the low and unequal levels of cooperation among patients and controls, these findings need further confirmation. PMID:1088402

  9. Disseminated gestational choriocarcinoma presenting with hepatic and uveal metastases, hook effect, and choriocarcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aswani, Yashant; Thakkar, Hemangini; Hira, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG)-secreting tumor that comprises vascular channels. It has a tendency for widespread metastasis, common sites for which include the lung, vagina, brain, liver, bone, intestine, and kidney. We describe a 30-year-old female who presented with hepatitis-like features and bilateral diminution of vision, and subsequently developed hemothorax and hemoperitoneum—all rare and seemingly unrelated manifestations which were finally attributable to metastases from gestational choriocarcinoma. To further complicate the clinical scenario, the serum HCG of the patient was mildly raised (due to a phenomenon called hook effect). Subsequently, the patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation and succumbed to her illness. In this report, we discuss the imaging findings of choriocarcinoma, its potential sites of metastases, and the hook effect. PMID:28104943

  10. Bisphenol A induces corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in the placental cells JEG-3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Tan, Wenjuan; Wang, C C; Leung, Lai K

    2012-11-01

    Bisphenol A is utilized to make polycarbonate plastics and is an environmental pollutant. Recent research has indicated that it is an endocrine disruptor and may interfere with reproduction. Placental corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a peptide hormone which is involved in fetal development. Increased plasma CRH is associated with elevated risk of premature delivery. In the present study, we demonstrated that bisphenol A increased CRH mRNA expression in the placental JEG-3 cells at or above 25μM. Reporter gene assay also demonstrated that bisphenol A could induce CRH gene transactivity. Since cyclic AMP response element (CRE) is a major regulatory element located in CRH promoter, the sequence-specific binding activity was investigated by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Our data indicated that bisphenol A increased the CRE binding activity. Western analysis further illustrated that PKA could be the signal triggering the CRE binding and CRH gene transactivation. In summary, the present study demonstrated that bisphenol A could induce CRH expression in placental cells and the underlying signal transduction pathway was also described.

  11. Metastatic intracerebral choriocarcinoma in a teenager.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, G. W.

    1997-01-01

    Intracerebral metastatic carcinoma is one of the most common tumors of the central nervous system. Intracerebral choriocarcinoma, however, is rare, but may occur as the initial manifestation of choriocarcinoma. This case report describes the treatment and outcome of a teenager with metastatic intracerebral choriocarcinoma. PMID:9375481

  12. Testicular choriocarcinoma: a rare variant that requires a unique treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Reilley, Matthew James; Pagliaro, Lance C

    2015-02-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors represent the most common malignancy among young men. While 5-year overall survival and cure for this population is greater than 95%, choriocarcinoma is an aggressive subtype of this disease with far worse prognosis--5-year survival for choriocarcinoma is less than 80%. In order to be able to treat these patients appropriately, a provider must recognize characteristic features of choriocarcinoma including elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young man with testicular mass; the astute clinician should also know the signs and symptoms of choriocarcinoma syndrome, characterized by bleeding from metastatic sites, which represents a medical emergency and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Treatment should be directed towards a goal of tumor marker normalization, and patients with refractory disease should be considered for advanced therapies and clinical trials. Choriocarcinoma is a unique and aggressive germ cell malignancy, and these patients require early aggressive treatment to improve their chance of survival.

  13. Cell surface antigens of human trophoblast: definition of an apparently unique system with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, U W; Hawes, C S; Jones, W R

    1986-01-01

    An epitope with apparent specificity for the surface of human syncytiotrophoblast was defined by a murine monoclonal antibody, FDO46B (IgG1, kappa). The epitope was predominantly expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy. Binding was detected on frozen tissue sections and on cultured trophoblast by the immunoperoxidase technique. It was also detected on the surface of a small percentage (less than 10%) of cultured choriocarcinoma cells (JEG-3). A panel of human tissues was negative, as were normal and malignant human lymphocytes. The antigen bearing the FDO46B epitope was still expressed by trophoblast after culture in the presence of tunicamycin, indicating that it is possibly protein in nature. This antigen may have potential utility as a target for a contraceptive vaccine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2428734

  14. Class-Specific Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote 11-Beta Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Expression in JEG-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Togher, Katie L.; Kenny, Louise C.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to maternal cortisol plays a crucial role in fetal organogenesis. However, fetal overexposure to cortisol has been linked to a range of short- and long-term adverse outcomes. Normally, this is prevented by the expression of an enzyme in the placenta called 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) which converts active cortisol to its inactive metabolite cortisone. Placental 11β-HSD2 is known to be reduced in a number of adverse pregnancy complications, possibly through an epigenetic mechanism. As a result, a number of pan-HDAC inhibitors have been examined for their ability to promote 11β-HSD2 expression. However, it is not known if the effects of pan-HDAC inhibition are a general phenomenon or if the effects are dependent upon a specific class of HDACs. Here, we examined the ability of pan- and class-specific HDAC inhibitors to regulate 11β-HSD2 expression in JEG3 cells. We find that pan-, class I, or class IIa HDAC inhibition promoted 11β-HSD2 expression and prevented cortisol or interleukin-1β-induced decrease in its expression. These results demonstrate that targeting a specific class of HDACs can promote 11β-HSD2 expression in JEG3 cells. This adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that HDACs may be crucial in maintaining normal fetal development. PMID:28321257

  15. AP-1 transcription factors, mucin-type molecules and MMPs regulate the IL-11 mediated invasiveness of JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo trophoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Suman, Pankaj; Godbole, Geeta; Thakur, Ravi; Morales-Prieto, Diana M; Modi, Deepak N; Markert, Udo R; Gupta, Satish K

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the IL-11 mediated activation of downstream signaling and expression of effector molecules to resolve the controversies associated with the IL-11 mediated regulation of the invasiveness of two commonly used trophoblastic cell models viz. JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cells. It has been reported that IL-11 increases the invasiveness of JEG-3 cells while, reduces the invasiveness of HTR-8/SVneo cells. Invasion assay performed simultaneously for both the cell lines confirmed the above findings. In addition, HTR-8/SVneo cells showed a higher basal invasiveness than JEG-3 cells. Western blot showed the IL-11 mediated activation of STAT3(tyr705) and STAT1(tyr701) in both the cell lines. However, IL-11 activated the ERK1/2 phosphorylation in JEG-3 cells but, inhibited it in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Within 10 min of IL-11 treatment, p-STAT3(tyr705) was localized inside the nucleus of both the cell lines but, there was enhanced co-localization of protein inhibitor of activated STAT1/3 (PIAS1/3) and p-STAT3(tyr705) in HTR-8/SVneo cells and not in JEG-3 cells. This could be reason for the poor responsiveness of STAT3 responsive genes like mucin 1 (MUC1) in HTR-8/SVneo cells and not in JEG-3 cells. Further, microarray analysis of the IL-11 treated cells revealed differential responsiveness of JEG-3 as compared to HTR-8/SVneo cells. Several family of genes like activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors (Jun and Fos), mucin-type molecules, MMP23B etc showed enhanced expression in IL-11 treated JEG-3 cells while, there was no response or decrease in their expression in IL-11 treated HTR-8/SVneo cells. Expression of these molecules was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. In addition, HTR-8/SVneo cells also showed a significant decrease in the expression of MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 upon IL-11 treatment. Hence, IL-11 mediated differential activation of signaling and expression of effector molecules is responsible for the differential invasive response of JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo

  16. AP-1 Transcription Factors, Mucin-Type Molecules and MMPs Regulate the IL-11 Mediated Invasiveness of JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo Trophoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Pankaj; Godbole, Geeta; Thakur, Ravi; Morales-Prieto, Diana M.; Modi, Deepak N.; Markert, Udo R.; Gupta, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the IL-11 mediated activation of downstream signaling and expression of effector molecules to resolve the controversies associated with the IL-11 mediated regulation of the invasiveness of two commonly used trophoblastic cell models viz. JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cells. It has been reported that IL-11 increases the invasiveness of JEG-3 cells while, reduces the invasiveness of HTR-8/SVneo cells. Invasion assay performed simultaneously for both the cell lines confirmed the above findings. In addition, HTR-8/SVneo cells showed a higher basal invasiveness than JEG-3 cells. Western blot showed the IL-11 mediated activation of STAT3(tyr705) and STAT1(tyr701) in both the cell lines. However, IL-11 activated the ERK1/2 phosphorylation in JEG-3 cells but, inhibited it in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Within 10 min of IL-11 treatment, p-STAT3(tyr705) was localized inside the nucleus of both the cell lines but, there was enhanced co-localization of protein inhibitor of activated STAT1/3 (PIAS1/3) and p-STAT3(tyr705) in HTR-8/SVneo cells and not in JEG-3 cells. This could be reason for the poor responsiveness of STAT3 responsive genes like mucin 1 (MUC1) in HTR-8/SVneo cells and not in JEG-3 cells. Further, microarray analysis of the IL-11 treated cells revealed differential responsiveness of JEG-3 as compared to HTR-8/SVneo cells. Several family of genes like activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors (Jun and Fos), mucin-type molecules, MMP23B etc showed enhanced expression in IL-11 treated JEG-3 cells while, there was no response or decrease in their expression in IL-11 treated HTR-8/SVneo cells. Expression of these molecules was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. In addition, HTR-8/SVneo cells also showed a significant decrease in the expression of MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 upon IL-11 treatment. Hence, IL-11 mediated differential activation of signaling and expression of effector molecules is responsible for the differential invasive response of JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo

  17. Modulation of glucose uptake in a human choriocarcinoma cell line (BeWo) by dietary bioactive compounds and drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Araújo, João R; Gonçalves, Pedro; Martel, Fátima

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the putative modulation of glucose uptake in trophoblast cells by several dietary compounds and by drugs of abuse. For this, the acute (26 min) and chronic (48 h) effect of these substances on the apical uptake of 3H-2-deoxy-D-glucose (3H-DG) by a human choriocarcinoma cell line (BeWo) was determined. 3H-DG apical uptake by BeWo cells was time dependent, displayed saturable kinetics (Vmax=1210+/-29 nmol mg protein(-1) 6 min(-1) and Km=13.4+/-0.5 mM) and was insulin-insensitive and cytochalasin B-sensitive (by up to 60%). Acutely, acetaldehyde (30-100 mM), resveratrol, xanthohumol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (100 microM), chrysin and quercetin (10-100 microM) decreased 3H-DG apical uptake, whereas rutin, catechin (10-100 microM), epicatechin (100 microM) and ethanol (10 mM) increased it. Quercetin and xanthohumol seem to be non-competitive inhibitors of 3H-DG apical uptake, whereas both epigallocatechin-3-gallate and acetaldehyde decreased both the Km and Vmax values. Chronically, rutin and myricetin increased the apical uptake of 3H-DG both isolated (0.1-1 microM) and in combination (both at 1 microM), whereas theophylline (0.1-1 microM) and amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (0.25-1 microM) and Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (1 nM) decreased it. In conclusion, 3H-DG apical uptake by BeWo cells is differentially modulated by different compounds present in drinks and by drugs of abuse.

  18. Secondary brain choriocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mandong, Barnabas M; Emmanuel, Innocent; Vandi, Kwaghe B; Shilong, Danaan; Karshima, Jonathan A; Olowu, Babatunde A

    2015-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma metastasizes widely. One in every ten choriocarcinoma that leaves its primary site, metastasizes to the brain. This 27 years old patient presented with symptoms of space occupying lesion that was confirmed by CT-SCAN. There was no history of vaginal bleeding and amenorrhoea was concealed by unmarried patient. Chest X-ray was normal. Tumor was excised after craniotomy. Histology of tumor was that of secondary choriocarcinoma. Patient responded excellently to chemotherapy and was well one year after. We strongly recommend a high index of suspicion of choriocarcinoma in management of brain tumors. β-HCG assay should be included in investigation of all patients with intracranial tumors irrespective of sex.

  19. Primary pure choriocarcinoma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Fernández Alonso, J; Sáez, C; Pérez, P; Montaño, A; Japón, M A

    1992-04-01

    We report a pure choriocarcinoma of the liver studied at necropsy. The tumour was diagnosed ante-mortem and treated by chemotherapy with no satisfactory response. Previous cases of hepatic choriocarcinoma are reviewed and criteria to diagnose this extragonadal neoplasm are recommended.

  20. Pure ovarian choriocarcinoma: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Mood, Narges Izadi; Samadi, Nasrin; Rahimi-Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Sarmadi, Soheila; Eftekhar, Zahra; Yarandi, Fariba

    2009-01-01

    Pure primary ovarian choriocarcinoma is an extremely rare condition of gestational or nongestational origin. The possibility of gestational origin can be suspected by the presence of a corpus luteum of pregnancy but definite diagnosis would be based on genetic analysis. Here, we present two cases of pure ovarian choriocarcinoma in the forth decade of life with the possibility of gestational origin. PMID:21772904

  1. Intussusception in gestational choriocarcinoma (not histologically proven), resolving spontaneously with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ramessur, Anisha; Openshaw, Mark; Sarwar, Naveed

    2015-09-29

    We present a rare case of advanced gestational choriocarcinoma with small bowel metastatic involvement and intussusception, which presented acutely as a lower gastrointestinal bleed with symptomatic anaemia and haemoglobin 3.8 g/dL in a young woman. A diagnosis of gestational choriocarcinoma was made without biopsy, using a combination of clinical history, isolated elevated human chorionic gonadotropin markers of 77,000 IU/mL and radiological findings. Surgical intervention was too high risk due to the presence of active bleeding and increased vascularity surrounding the intussusception. Owing to the highly responsive nature of gestational choriocarcinoma to chemotherapy, frontline chemotherapy alone was used to reduce the size of the metastatic small bowel deposits, with subsequent resolution of the bleeding and intussusception. This is the first time chemotherapy alone has been used to successfully resolve small bowel intussusception secondary to metastatic choriocarcinoma that has been documented according to PubMed searches. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Casas, Josefina; Lacorte, Sílvia; Porte, Cinta

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  3. Perfluorinated chemicals: differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Casas, Josefina; Lacorte, Sílvia; Porte, Cinta

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs--PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA--showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA>PFOS≫PFNA>PFOA>PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57-80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells.

  4. Pit-1/growth hormone factor 1 splice variant expression in the rhesus monkey pituitary gland and the rhesus and human placenta.

    PubMed

    Schanke, J T; Conwell, C M; Durning, M; Fisher, J M; Golos, T G

    1997-03-01

    We have examined the expression of Pit-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) splice variants in the nonhuman primate pituitary and in rhesus and human placenta. Full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) representing Pit-1 and the Pit-1 beta splice variants were cloned from a rhesus monkey pituitary cDNA library and were readily detectable by RT-PCR with rhesus pituitary gland RNA. The Pit-1T variant previously reported in mouse pituitary tumor cell lines was not detectable in normal rhesus pituitary tissue, although two novel splice variants were detected. A cDNA approximating the rat Pit-1 delta 4 variant was cloned but coded for a truncated and presumably nonfunctional protein. Only by using a nested RT-PCR approach were Pit-1 and Pit-1 beta variants consistently detectable in both human and rhesus placental tissue. The Pit-1 beta variant mRNA was not detectable in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells unless the cells were stimulated with 8-Br-cAMP. Immunoblot studies with nuclear extracts from primary rhesus syncytiotrophoblast cultures or JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells indicated that although mRNA levels were very low, Pit-1 protein was detectable in differentiated cytotrophoblasts, and levels increased after treatment with 8-Br-cAMP. Two major species of Pit-1 protein were detected that corresponded to the two major bands in rat pituitary GH3 cell nuclear extracts. Low levels of slightly larger bands also were seen, which may represent Pit-1 beta protein or phosphorylated species. We conclude that Pit-1 splice variants expressed in the primate pituitary gland differ from those in the rodent gland and that the Pit-1 and Pit-1 beta mRNAs expressed in the placenta give rise to a pattern of protein expression similar to that seen in pituitary cells, which is inducible by treatment with 8-Br-cAMP.

  5. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa promotes invasion of choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Kimihiro; Yamamoto, Eiko; Niimi, Kaoru; Sekiya, Yoko; Yamashita, Yoriko; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2017-07-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) results from the malignant transformation of placental trophoblasts which secrete human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) as do normal placenta or hydatidiform mole. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IV (GnT-IV) is a glycosyltransferase which catalyses the formation of β1,4GlcNAc branches on the mannose core of N-glycans. Previous studies reported that β1,4GlcNAc branches on hCG were detected in GTN but not in normal pregnancy or hydatidiform mole. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of GnT-IVa in choriocarcinoma and find the target proteins for GnT-IVa glycosylation which contribute to the malignancy of choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed that Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-II staining and GnT-IVa staining were intense in trophoblastic cells of invasive mole and choriocarcinoma. We established a choriocarcinoma cell line with GnT-IVa overexpression (Jar-GnT4a), and examined its malignant potential and target proteins for GnT-IVa glycosylation. GnT-IVa overexpression increased the cell migration and invasion (2.5- and 1.4-fold) as well as the ability to adhere to the extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including fibronectin and collagen type I and IV. The tumour formation potential of Jar-GnT4a in mice was significantly higher than that of control (P=0.0407), and the cumulative survival rate of mice with Jar-GnT4a was relatively lower than those with control. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that β1,4GlcNAc branches of N-glycans on integrin β1 in choriocarcinoma cells were increased by GnT-IVa overexpression. Nano-LC/MS/MS analysis suggested that lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 2 (LAMP-2) was a target protein for glycosylation by GnT-IVa. The increase in β1,4GlcNAc branches on LAMP-2 by GnT-IVa overexpression was confirmed by lectin blot analysis using whole cell lysate and conditioned medium. Our results suggest that highly branched N-glycans generated by the action of Gn

  6. Activation of endocrine-related gene expression in placental choriocarcinoma cell lines following DNA methylation knock-down.

    PubMed

    Hogg, K; Robinson, W P; Beristain, A G

    2014-07-01

    Increasingly, placental DNA methylation is assessed as a factor in pregnancy-related complications, yet the transcriptional impact of such findings is not always clear. Using a proliferative in vitro placental model, the effect of DNA methylation loss on gene activation was evaluated at a number of genes selected for being differentially methylated in pre-eclampsia-associated placentae in vivo. We aimed to determine whether reduced DNA methylation at specific loci was associated with transcriptional changes at the corresponding gene, thus providing mechanistic underpinnings for previous clinical findings and to assess the degree of transcriptional response amongst our candidate genes. BeWo and JEG3 choriocarcinoma cells were exposed to 1 μM 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) or vehicle control for 48 h, and re-plated and cultured for a further 72 h in normal media before cells were harvested for RNA and DNA. Bisulphite pyrosequencing confirmed that DNA methylation was reduced by ∼30-50% points at the selected loci studied in both cell lines. Gene activation, measured by qRT-PCR, was highly variable and transcript specific, indicating differential sensitivity to DNA methylation. Most notably, loss of DNA methylation at the leptin (LEP) promoter corresponded to a 200-fold and 40-fold increase in LEP expression in BeWo and JEG3 cells, respectively (P < 0.01). Transcripts of steroidogenic pathway enzymes CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 were up-regulated ∼40-fold in response to 5-Aza-CdR exposure in BeWo cells (P < 0.01). Other transcripts, including aromatase (CYP19), HSD11B2, inhibin (INHBA) and glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) were more moderately, although significantly, affected by loss of associated DNA methylation. These data present a mixed effect of DNA methylation changes at selected loci supporting cautionary interpretation of DNA methylation results in the absence of functional data.

  7. High expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa promotes invasion of choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Niimi, K; Yamamoto, E; Fujiwara, S; Shinjo, K; Kotani, T; Umezu, T; Kajiyama, H; Shibata, K; Ino, K; Kikkawa, F

    2012-12-04

    Gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTDs) are related to trophoblasts, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is secreted by GTDs as well as normal placentas. However, the asparagine-linked sugar chains on hCG contain abnormal biantennary structures in invasive mole and choriocarcinoma, but not normal pregnancy or hydatidiform mole. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IV (GnT-IV) catalyses β1,4-N-acetylglucosamine branching on asparagine-linked oligosaccharides, which are consistent with the abnormal sugar chain structures on hCG. We investigated GnT-IVa expression in GTDs and placentas by immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR. We assessed the effects of GnT-IVa knockdown in choriocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The GnT-IVa was highly expressed in trophoblasts of invasive mole and choriocarcinoma, and moderately in extravillous trophoblasts during the first trimester, but not in hydatidiform mole or other normal trophoblasts. The GnT-IVa knockdown in choriocarcinoma cells significantly reduced migration and invasive capacities, and suppressed cellular adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. The extent of β1,4-N-acetylglucosamine branching on β1 integrin was greatly reduced by GnT-IVa knockdown, although the expression of β1 integrin was not changed. In vivo studies further demonstrated that GnT-IVa knockdown suppressed tumour engraftment and growth. These findings suggest that GnT-IVa is involved in regulating invasion of choriocarcinoma through modifications of the oligosaccharide chains of β1 integrin.

  8. Coexistence of Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Choriocarcinoma: Complete Response to Trastuzumab and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Seyda; Elpek, Gulsum Ozlem; Uysal, Mukremin; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Tatli, Murat; Arslan, Deniz; Coskun, Hasan Senol; Bozcuk, Hakan; Savas, Burhan; Ozdogan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Gastric choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm and usually accompanies gastric adenocarcinoma. The prognosis is poor due to the aggressive course of the disease. A 57-year-old female patient with weight loss and abdominal pain was examined. The patient was operated following the examination, and pathological analysis revealed the presence of a gastric adenocarcinoma associated with choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a positive reaction with antibodies to beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and overexpression of the cErbB2 proto-oncogene. Staging revealed multiple metastases in the liver. A complete response was obtained with a combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy. The diagnosis of gastric choriocarcinomas without pathological examination is difficult due to their rare occurrence. A complete response can be obtained with trastuzumab in the treatment of cases with overexpression of the cErbB2 protein. PMID:23525369

  9. Molecular Regulation of Human Placental Growth Factor (PlGF) Gene Expression in Placental Villi and Trophoblast Cells is Mediated via the Protein Kinase A Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Depoix, Christophe; Tee, Meng Kian; Taylor, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a critical second messenger for human trophoblasts and regulates the expression of numerous genes. It is known to stimulate in vitro the fusion and differentiation of BeWo choriocarcinoma cells, which acquire characteristics of syncytiotrophoblasts. A DNA microarray analysis of BeWo cells undergoing forskolin-induced syncytialization revealed that among the induced genes, placental growth factor (PlGF) was 10-fold upregulated. We verified this result in two choriocarcinoma cell lines, BeWo and JEG-3, and also in first trimester placental villous explants by quantifying PlGF mRNA (real time PCR) and PlGF protein secreted into the supernatant (ELISA). Similar effects were noted for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expression. Treatment with cholera toxin and the use of a specific inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA) blocked these effects, indicating that the cAMP/PKA pathway is responsible for the cAMP-induced upregulation of PlGF and that one or more G protein coupled receptor(s) was involved. We identified two functional cAMP responsive elements (CRE) in the PlGF promoter and demonstrated that the CRE binding protein, CREB, contributes to the regulation of PlGF gene expression. We speculate that defects in this signaling pathway may lead to abnormal secretion of PlGF protein as observed in the pregnancy-related diseases preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. PMID:21135203

  10. Choriocarcinoma with Uterine Rupture and Shock: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manika; Pyrbot, Jupirika; Singh, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm and a malignant form of gestational trophoblastic disease. Choriocarcinoma is frequently preceded by a complete mole, ectopic pregnancy, nonmolar intrauterine abortion, and uncommonly by a partial mole. It is treated medically with chemotherapeutic drugs usually. However, we managed to save a life with appropriate and timely surgical intervention in a case of choriocarcinoma who presented with uterine rupture, haemoperitoneum, anaemia and hypovolemic shock. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and hysterectomy followed by systemic chemotherapy. PMID:26557535

  11. Primary hepatic choriocarcinoma in a 49-year-old man: Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Ryosuke; Hyodo, Masanobu; Kojima, Masayuki; Meguro, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Akifumi; Yokoyama, Taku; Lefor, Alan T; Hirota, Norio

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of hepatic choriocarcinoma in a man diagnosed at autopsy after a rapid downhill clinical course. The patient was a 49-year-old man who presented with acute right-sided abdominal pain. There were no masses palpable on physical examination. Radiographic findings showed large multi-nodular tumors mainly in the right lobe of the liver. Fludeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan showed uptake only in the liver, and no uptake in the testes. We initially planned to perform a liver resection for the presumed diagnosis of intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. However, the tumors grew rapidly and ruptured. Multiple lung metastases rapidly developed resulting in respiratory failure, preventing liver resection or even biopsy. He died 60 d after initial presentation with no pathological diagnosis. Postmortem studies included histopathological and immunohistological examinations which diagnosed a primary choriocarcinoma of the liver. Primary hepatic choriocarcinoma is very rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a liver tumor in a middle aged man. Establishing this diagnosis may enable treatment of the choriocarcinoma. Liver biopsy and evaluation of serum human chorionic gonadotropin are recommended in these patients. PMID:24409080

  12. High expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa promotes invasion of choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, K; Yamamoto, E; Fujiwara, S; Shinjo, K; Kotani, T; Umezu, T; Kajiyama, H; Shibata, K; Ino, K; Kikkawa, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTDs) are related to trophoblasts, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is secreted by GTDs as well as normal placentas. However, the asparagine-linked sugar chains on hCG contain abnormal biantennary structures in invasive mole and choriocarcinoma, but not normal pregnancy or hydatidiform mole. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IV (GnT-IV) catalyses β1,4-N-acetylglucosamine branching on asparagine-linked oligosaccharides, which are consistent with the abnormal sugar chain structures on hCG. Methods: We investigated GnT-IVa expression in GTDs and placentas by immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT–PCR. We assessed the effects of GnT-IVa knockdown in choriocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Results: The GnT-IVa was highly expressed in trophoblasts of invasive mole and choriocarcinoma, and moderately in extravillous trophoblasts during the first trimester, but not in hydatidiform mole or other normal trophoblasts. The GnT-IVa knockdown in choriocarcinoma cells significantly reduced migration and invasive capacities, and suppressed cellular adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. The extent of β1,4-N-acetylglucosamine branching on β1 integrin was greatly reduced by GnT-IVa knockdown, although the expression of β1 integrin was not changed. In vivo studies further demonstrated that GnT-IVa knockdown suppressed tumour engraftment and growth. Conclusion: These findings suggest that GnT-IVa is involved in regulating invasion of choriocarcinoma through modifications of the oligosaccharide chains of β1 integrin. PMID:23169300

  13. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for choriocarcinoma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiko; Niimi, Kaoru; Fujikake, Kayo; Nishida, Tetsuya; Murata, Makoto; Mitsuma, Ayako; Ando, Yuichi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) and one of the curable types of gynecological cancer. However, 10% of choriocarcinoma patients have a poor prognosis, particularly when they have metastasis, apart from pulmonary metastasis, or do not go into remission by the second chemotherapeutic regimen. We herein present the case of a 36-year-old patient who had choriocarcinoma with metastases to the lungs, liver and kidneys. The 5th and 6th regimens with cisplatin for choriocarcinoma failed and the patient developed brain metastases. She was then treated with four cycles of high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide (ICE) with blood progenitor cell support after confirming the effectiveness of ICE at normal doses. The serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) level was 140,009 mIU/ml at the start of high-dose ICE and the patient tolerated this regimen well. However, the beneficial effect was decreasing with each successive course of treatment, with the lowest level of hCG at 103 mIU/ml after the fourth course. The patient did not achieve complete remission and succumbed to the disease 4 months after the last chemotherapy. The findings of the present case and a review of the related literature suggest that high-dose ICE with stem cell rescue may be considered as a viable treatment option for a multi-drug resistant choriocarcinoma or GTN. PMID:27900108

  14. In vitro and in vivo models for the evaluation of new inhibitors of human steroid sulfatase, devoid of residual estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Shields-Botella, J; Bonnet, P; Duc, I; Duranti, E; Meschi, S; Cardinali, S; Prouheze, P; Chaigneau, A M; Duranti, V; Gribaudo, S; Rivière, A; Mengual, L; Carniato, D; Cecchet, L; Lafay, J; Rondot, B; Sandri, J; Pascal, J C; Delansorne, R

    2003-02-01

    The goal of our research project is to develop a new class of orally active drugs, estrone sulfatase inhibitors, for the treatment of estrogen-dependent (receptor positive) breast cancer. Several compounds were synthesized and their pharmacological potencies explored. Based on encouraging preliminary results, three of them, TX 1299, TX 1492 and TX 1506 were further studied in vitro as well as in vivo. They proved to be strong inhibitors of estrone sulfatase when measured on the whole human JEG-3 choriocarcinoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cells and their IC(50)s found to be in the range of known standard inhibitors. Their residual estrogenic activity was checked as negative in the test of induction of alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity in whole human endometrial adenocarcinoma Ishikawa cells. In addition, their effect on aromatase activity in JEG-3 cells was also examined, since the goal of inhibiting both sulfatase and aromatase activities appears very attractive. However, it has been unsuccessful so far. Then, in vivo potencies of TX 1299, the lead compound in our chemical series, were evaluated in comparison with 6,6,7-COUMATE, a non-steroidal standard, in two different rat models and by oral route. First, the absence of any residual estrogenic activity for these compounds was checked in the uterotrophic model in prepubescent female rats. Second, antiuterotrophic activity in adult ovariectomized rat supplemented with estrone sulfate (E(1)S), showed that both compounds were potent inhibitors, the power of TX 1299 relative to 6,6,7-COUMATE being around 80%. This assay was combined with uterine sulfatase level determination and confirmed the complete inhibition of this enzyme within the target organ. Preliminary studies indicated that other non-steroid compounds in the Théramex series were potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitors of estrone sulfatase in rats and further studies are in progress.

  15. Evolution of the human brain, chorionic gonadotropin and hemochorial implantation of the placenta: insights into origins of pregnancy failures, preeclampsia and choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cole, Laurence A; Khanlian, Sarah A; Kohorn, Ernest I

    2008-08-01

    Hyperglycosylated chorionic gonadotropin (CG-H) signals placental cytotrophoblast cell growth and invasion, and chorionic gonadotropin (CG) promotes uterine vascularization. A hypothesis is presented relating the evolution of these molecules to the evolution of human hemochorial implantation and that of the human brain. Deep placental invasion, vascularization and hemochorial placentation, under the influence of CG and CG-H, are a critical part of the nutrition and energy-generating mechanisms needed for human brain development and thus for the evolution of humans. Insufficient CG-H production and the resulting inappropriate implantation is associated with an unduly high incidence of pregnancy failures in humans. Low levels of CG-H and inappropriate hemochorial placentation also appear to be associated with subsequent preeclampsia. It is also of note that human CG-H drives invasion by gestational trophoblastic neoplasms that have been described only in humans.

  16. Effects of chloro-s-triazine herbicides and metabolites on aromatase activity in various human cell lines and on vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, J T; Letcher, R J; Heneweer, M; Giesy, J P; van den Berg, M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a potential mechanism for the estrogenic properties of three chloro-s-triazine herbicides and six metabolites in vitro in several cell systems. We determined effects on human aromatase (CYP19), the enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens, in H295R (adrenocortical carcinoma), JEG-3 (placental choriocarcinoma), and MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells; we determined effects on estrogen receptor-mediated induction of vitellogenin in primary hepatocyte cultures of adult male carp (Cyprinus carpio). In addition to atrazine, simazine, and propazine, two metabolites--atrazine-desethyl and atrazine-desisopropyl--induced aromatase activity in H295R cells concentration-dependently (0.3-30 microM) and with potencies similar to those of the parent triazines. After a 24-hr exposure to 30 microM of the triazines, an apparent maximum induction of about 2- to 2.5-fold was achieved. The induction responses were confirmed by similar increases in CYP19 mRNA levels, determined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In JEG-3 cells, where basal aromatase expression is about 15-fold greater than in H295R cells, the induction responses were similar but less pronounced; aromatase expression in MCF-7 cells was neither detectable nor inducible under our culture conditions. The fully dealkylated metabolite atrazine-desethyl-desisopropyl and the three hydroxylated metabolites (2-OH-atrazine-desethyl, -desisopropyl, and -desethyl-desisopropyl) did not induce aromatase activity. None of the triazine herbicides nor their metabolites induced vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes; nor did they antagonize the induction of vitellogenin by 100 nM (EC(50) 17beta-estradiol. These findings together with other reports indicate that the estrogenic effects associated with the triazine herbicides in vivo are not estrogen receptor-mediated, but may be explained partly by their ability to induce aromatase in vitro. PMID:11675267

  17. The C-terminal domain of the nuclear factor I-B2 isoform is glycosylated and transactivates the WAP gene in the JEG-3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S. . E-mail: suditmukhopadhy@yahoo.com; Rosen, Jeffrey M. . E-mail: jrosen@bcm.tmc.edu

    2007-07-06

    The transcription factor nuclear factor I (NFI) has been shown previously both in vivo and in vitro to be involved in the cooperative regulation of whey acidic protein (WAP) gene transcription along with the glucocorticoid receptor and STAT5. In addition, one of the specific NFI isoforms, NFI-B2, was demonstrated in transient co-transfection experiments in JEG cells, which lack endogenous NFI, to be preferentially involved in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene expression. A comparison of the DNA-binding specificities of the different NFI isoforms only partially explained their differential ability to activate the WAP gene transcription. Here, we analyzed the transactivation regions of two NFI isoforms by making chimeric proteins between the NFI-A and B isoforms. Though, their DNA-binding specificities were not altered as compared to the corresponding wild-type transcription factors, the C-terminal region of the NFI-B isoform was shown to preferentially activate WAP gene transcription in cooperation with GR and STAT5 in transient co-transfection assays in JEG-3 cells. Furthermore, determination of serine and threonine-specific glycosylation (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) of the C-terminus of the NFI-B isoform suggested that the secondary modification by O-GlcNAc might play a role in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene transcription by NFI-B2 and STAT5.

  18. Arteriovenous Fistula Embolization in Suspected Parauterine Choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Almarzooqi, Mohamed-Karji; Oliva, Vincent; Gilbert, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This is a case of choriocarcinoma that did not regress after chemotherapy treatment. A 30-year-old female patient (gravida 2, para 2), presented to our ER with stroke and persistent mild pelvic pain 2 months after a Caesarean section. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an ischemic left hemicerebellar region and a hypervascular mass in the pelvic region. This mass was not present on routine fetal ultrasound during pregnancy. The lesion was treated by chemotherapy after closure of a foramen ovale and insertion of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. After that, 2 courses of EMACO (Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide, and Vincristine) chemotherapy regimen were given. Posttreatment CT showed the hypervascular mass without any changes. Arteriography showed the arteriovenous fistulae that were embolized successfully with plugs, coils, and glue. Embolization was considered due to the risk of acute hemorrhagic life-threatening complications. Eight chemotherapy courses were added after embolization. Treatment by endovascular approach and reduction of the hypervascular mass can be a valuable adjunct to chemotherapy treatment of choriocarcinoma. PMID:27403360

  19. Metastatic Testicular Choriocarcinoma: A Rare Cause of Upper GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jacqueline; Armstrong, Sharon; Walsh, Shaun; Groome, Max; Mowat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old man who presented with melena. Endoscopy revealed an ulcerated mass in the stomach and pathology confirmed this to be a malignant, poorly differentiated choriocarcinoma. Further imaging showed a left testicular mass with evidence of pulmonary, gastric, and brain metastases, and blood tests revealed an hCG level of 32,219 U/L. He was diagnosed with advanced metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma and underwent intensive induction chemotherapy and an orchidectomy. Metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26504875

  20. A case report: metastatic choriocarcinoma to the gum.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Mohamad Nasir; Ismail, Norazlin Mohamed; Shan, Lim Pei; Kampan, Nirmala; Omar, Mohd Hashim; Dali, Hatta Mohd

    2011-04-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasia with a tendency of distant metastasis although highly sensitive to chemotherapy renders a good prognosis and outcome. Lungs, liver and cerebral metastasis are commonly implicated with maxillofacial region rarely involved. We illustrate a case of overwhelming metastatic choriocarcinoma to lungs, liver, brain and to the extreme of gum metastasis. Decompressive craniectomy for intracranial bleeding, multiple transfusions to correct anaemia and coagulopathy were done before high-risk-regime chemotherapy. Despite this, due to fulminant multi-organs involvement she finally succumbed to death. In conclusion, gum bleeding in choriocarcinoma may suggest metastasis and poor prognosis.

  1. Human chorionic gonadotropin and its free β-subunit stimulate trophoblast invasion independent of LH/hCG receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Chiu, Philip C N; Hautala, Laura; Salo, Tuula; Yeung, William S B; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2013-08-15

    Both paracrine and autocrine factors are involved in the regulation of trophoblast invasion. One of these factors is human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which stimulates trophoblast invasion. The stimulatory activity has especially been ascribed to a hyperglycosylated form of hCG (hCG-h) that is expressed in early pregnancy. We compared the stimulatory activities of different forms of hCG and its free β-subunit (hCGβ) on trophoblast invasion. hCG, hCG-h, hCGβ, and its hyperglycosylated form (hCGβ-h) stimulated the invasion of JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. The stimulatory effect of hCGβ was also confirmed with primary human trophoblasts. Down-regulation of the LH/hCG receptor by RNA-interference did not significantly reduce the effect of hCGβ and hCG on cell invasion. Increased invasion was associated with increased levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and activity of uPA. Our findings suggest that hCG, hCGβ and their hyperglycosylated forms stimulate the invasion of trophoblast cells independent of the classical LH/hCG-receptor.

  2. The expression of the imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 in placental tissues of preeclampsia and its effects on the proliferation, migration and invasion of trophoblast cells JEG-3.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Qiao, Chong; Luan, Nannan; Shang, Tao

    2015-11-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the most common hypertensive disorders and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for pregnant women and perinatal babies. Additionally, pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 (PHLDA2) is associated with placental dysfunction. However, the effect of PHLDA2 on trophoblast cell proliferation, migration and invasion has not been investigated. In this study, 15 PE patients and 15 normal pregnant women were recruited and clinical characteristics were summarized. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 levels in placental tissues were examined using real-time PCR and western blot. Overexpression plasmid and PHLDA2 siRNA was introduced into JEG-3 cells, respectively. Cell proliferation was measured using MTT assay and flow cytometry. Cell migration and invasion capacities were assessed by wound healing and Transwell assays. It was found that PE patients collectively presented proteinuria, elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and lower gestational ages and birth weights. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 levels in the preeclamptic placenta were significantly upregulated. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 overexpression significantly arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase, inhibited cell proliferation and suppressed the migration and invasion of JEG-3 cells. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 knockdown significantly blocked the cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Knockdown of PHLDA2 alleviated the inhibition on the migration and invasion of trophoblast cells JEG-3. These findings illustrate that PHLDA2 may participate in PE pathogenesis and indicate its potential application in the early diagnosis of PE. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Choriocarcinoma in Ongoing Pregnancy Presenting with Intracranial Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Vanita; Sikka, Pooja; Aggarwal, Neelam; Chopra, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma presents usually as persistent trophoblastic disease, with prognosis worsening with duration from antecedent pregnancy. We present a unique case of a woman with choriocarcinoma who presented in the third trimester of pregnancy with eclampsia. She was managed with magnesium sulphate and underwent a caesarean section. However, she developed seizures in the post-partum period that were further investigated and attributed to intracranial metastatic lesions of Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia (GTN). We discussed the diagnostic challenge in this rare case of GTN and the grave potential it can have in such a presentation, as in our patient. PMID:28050451

  4. Effects of Phytoestrogen Extracts Isolated from Elder Flower on Hormone Production and Receptor Expression of Trophoblast Tumor Cells JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Lennard; Richter, Dagmar Ulrike; Piechulla, Birgit; Chrobak, Mareike; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Abarzua, Sybille; Jeschke, Udo; Weissenbacher, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Herein we investigated the effect of elderflower extracts (EFE) and of enterolactone/enterodiol on hormone production and proliferation of trophoblast tumor cell lines JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 breast cancer cells. The EFE was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of EFE. Untreated cells served as controls. Supernatants were tested for estradiol production with an ELISA method. Furthermore, the effect of the EFE on ERα/ERβ/PR expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. EFE contains a substantial amount of lignans. Estradiol production was inhibited in all cells in a concentration-dependent manner. EFE upregulated ERα in JEG-3 cell lines. In MCF7 cells, a significant ERα downregulation and PR upregulation were observed. The control substances enterolactone and enterodiol in contrast inhibited the expression of both ER and of PR in MCF7 cells. In addition, the production of estradiol was upregulated in BeWo and MCF7 cells in a concentration dependent manner. The downregulating effect of EFE on ERα expression and the upregulation of the PR expression in MFC-7 cells are promising results. Therefore, additional unknown substances might be responsible for ERα downregulation and PR upregulation. These findings suggest potential use of EFE in breast cancer prevention and/or treatment and warrant further investigation. PMID:27740591

  5. The Heroes' Journey: A Young Couple's Experience with Choriocarcinoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Dan; Hodgson, Jennifer; Lamson, Angela

    2010-01-01

    A 20 year retrospective qualitative case study was conducted to investigate the relational impact of choriocarcinoma (a type of gestational cancer) on a couple of child-bearing age. A unique feature to the study was that the primary investigator was the couple's biological son, initiating the first known auto-case study design. Using holistic…

  6. Primary Tubal Choriocarcinoma Presented as Ruptured Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Orkun; Kolusari, Ali; Bayram, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    The primary tubal choriocarcinoma associated with ectopic pregnancy is very rare. A 31-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to amenorrhea, left lower abdominal pain and fatigue. Her β-Hcg level was 29251.4 mIU/ml and transvaginal ultrasund revealed a 24x21 mm of left tubal ectopic pregancy mass with large amount of free fluid in pelvic cavity. The patient was diagnosed with ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy and thus, she underwent laparotomy with left total salpingectomy. The pathological assessment was reported as primary tubal choriocarcinoma with the involvement of whole tubal layer. The patient was defined to have stage I choriocarcinoma with good prognostic factors and methotrexate monotherapy was administered. Serum β- Hcg levels of the patient gradually declined and eventually became negative at the first month of the treatment. With this case report we aimed to implicate that when diagnosing the ectopic pregnancy, even very rare, the tubal choriocarcinoma should be kept in mind. PMID:26500968

  7. Primary Tubal Choriocarcinoma Presented as Ruptured Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Erbil; Çetin, Orkun; Kolusari, Ali; Bayram, Irfan

    2015-09-01

    The primary tubal choriocarcinoma associated with ectopic pregnancy is very rare. A 31-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to amenorrhea, left lower abdominal pain and fatigue. Her β-Hcg level was 29251.4 mIU/ml and transvaginal ultrasund revealed a 24x21 mm of left tubal ectopic pregancy mass with large amount of free fluid in pelvic cavity. The patient was diagnosed with ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy and thus, she underwent laparotomy with left total salpingectomy. The pathological assessment was reported as primary tubal choriocarcinoma with the involvement of whole tubal layer. The patient was defined to have stage I choriocarcinoma with good prognostic factors and methotrexate monotherapy was administered. Serum β- Hcg levels of the patient gradually declined and eventually became negative at the first month of the treatment. With this case report we aimed to implicate that when diagnosing the ectopic pregnancy, even very rare, the tubal choriocarcinoma should be kept in mind.

  8. STOX1 Overexpression in Choriocarcinoma Cells Mimics Transcriptional Alterations Observed in Preeclamptic Placentas

    PubMed Central

    Rigourd, Virginie; Chauvet, Caroline; Chelbi, Sonia T.; Rebourcet, Régis; Mondon, Françoise; Letourneur, Franck; Mignot, Thérèse-Marie; Barbaux, Sandrine; Vaiman, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background Mutations in STOX1 were proposed to be causal for predisposing to preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder originating from placental defects, affecting up to 10% of human pregnancies. However, after the first study published in 2005 three other groups have dismissed the polymorphism described in the first paper as a causal mutation. Methodology and Principal Findings In the present study, we have produced a choriocarcinoma cell line overexpressing STOX1. This overexpression results in transcriptional modification of 12.5% of the genes, some of them being direct targets as shown by chromatin immunoprecipitation. STOX1 overexpression correlates strongly and specifically with transcriptomic alterations in preeclamptic placentas (r = 0.30, p = 9.10−7). Numerous known key modulators of preeclampsia (such as Endoglin, Syncytin, human chorionic gonadotrophin -hCG-, and Glial Cell Missing Homolog -GCM1-) were modified in these transformed choriocarcinoma cells. Conclusions Our results contribute to reconcile contradictory data concerning the involvement of STOX1 in preeclampsia. In addition, they strongly suggest that anomalies in STOX1 expression are associated with the onset of preeclampsia, thus indicating that this gene should be the target of future studies. Our cellular model could constitute an invaluable resource for studying specific aspects of this human disease. PMID:19079545

  9. Metastatic choriocarcinoma induced separate simultaneous intracerebral haemorrhages: a very rare occurrence and its novel association with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joret, Maximilian Olavi; Starke, Robert M; Scotter, John; Heppner, Peter

    2015-11-12

    Non-traumatic separate simultaneous intracerebral haemorrhages (SSIHs) are rare. Relevant aetiologies are diverse and their diagnosis challenging. We report a unique case of SSIH in an 18-year-old male with a background of previously undiagnosed testicular choriocarcinoma and Klinefelter syndrome. The patient was admitted to Auckland City Hospital with headaches, drowsiness and vomiting. A CT scan revealed SSIH in a background of tumorous lesions. His β human chorionic gonadotropin titre was elevated at 355 000 IU/L. The SSIH and the associated tumorous lesions were acutely surgically resected and the patient started on bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin combination chemotherapy with excellent results. In this article, we underline choriocarcinoma as a rare aetiology of SSIH and present an example of the clinical presentation, investigation and management of this very rare pathological entity.

  10. Quantification of new antiepileptic drugs by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and its application to cellular uptake experiment using human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Ayako; Takamura, Shigeo; Narumi, Katsuya; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-10-01

    A method for quantification of new antiepileptic drugs, including lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM), in cellular samples, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed to better understand the membrane transport mechanisms of these drugs. Cell lysate was deproteinized by methanol containing LEV-d3 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with methanol-water-formic acid (10:90:0.1, v/v/v) and methanol-formic acid (100:0.1, v/v). Analytes were detected in positive ion electrospray mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This method was applicable for a linear range of 5 to 500pmol for LTG; 5 to 1000pmol for LEV; 10 to 10,000pmol for GBP; and 5 to 5000pmol for TPM. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and accuracy data were assessed and found to be acceptable. This developed and validated method was then successfully applied to the investigation of uptake of the new antiepileptic drugs in placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells. The intracellular concentration of these drugs in BeWo cells, accumulating over 30min at 37°C was in the order of GBP>LTG>LEV≈TPM. Furthermore, the uptake of GBP at 4°C was much lower than that at 37°C. The uptake of GBP was saturated at high concentrations. The kinetic parameters calculated for GBP uptake in BeWo cells were determined as Km of 105.4±6.4μM and Vmax at 8153±348pmol/mg protein/min. The novel method described here should enable investigators to elucidate the transport mechanisms of these antiepileptic drugs in BeWo cells.

  11. Effects of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) on cell viability and differentiation in the human BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line: a potential syncytialisation inducer distinct from cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP).

    PubMed

    Chen, YuXia; Allars, Megan; Pan, Xin; Maiti, Kaushik; Angeli, Giavanna; Smith, Roger; Nicholson, Richard C

    2013-04-15

    Placental production of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) rises exponentially as pregnancy progresses, and has been linked with the onset of normal and preterm labour. CRH is produced in syncytiotrophoblast cells and production is increased by glucocorticoids and cAMP. It remains unclear whether cAMP acts by inducing differentiation of cytotrophoblasts and/or through induction of syncytialisation. As CRH can stimulate cAMP pathways we have tested whether a feed-forward system may exist in placental cells during syncytialisation. The choriocarcinoma BeWo cell line was treated with cAMP, CRH or vehicle. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay, while apoptosis was analysed by DAPI staining and by FACS. Differentiation was measured by assaying message for hCG and ERVW-1 (syncytin1) by qRT-PCR, as well as the respective protein by ELISA. Fusion of BeWo cells was assessed by co-staining cell membrane and nuclei with CellMask and Hoechst 33342. CRHR1 and CRHR2 mRNA levels were measured by qRT-PCR. We show that cAMP has an inductive effect on syncytialisation, as evidenced by induction of hCG secretion, by ERVW-1 mRNA expression and by formation of multinuclear cells. CRH mRNA expression was found to increase prior to the changes in the other syncytialisation markers. cAMP had an inhibitory effect on BeWo cell viability, but exogenous CRH did not. However, CRH did mimic the differentiation inducing effect of cAMP, suggesting a link between CRH and cAMP signalling in syncytialisation. We also found that treatment of BeWo cells with exogenous CRH resulted in elevated cellular CRHR1 levels. This study suggests a positive feed-forward role exists for CRH in trophoblast cell differentiation, which may underlie the exponential rise in CRH observed as gestation advances.

  12. Prenatal findings in a case of massive fetomaternal hemorrhage associated with intraplacental choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aso, Kaai; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Yumoto, Yasuo; Hojo, Satoshi; Fukushima, Kotaro; Koga, Takaomi; Sueishi, Katsuo; Takahata, Yasushi; Hara, Toshiro; Wake, Norio

    2009-01-01

    We describe biochemical assessment of maternal circulation in a case of massive fetomaternal hemorrhage at term associated with intraplacental choriocarcinoma. Markedly elevated maternal serum hCG level at 37 weeks of gestation suggested choriocarcinoma as a cause of fetomaternal hemorrhage in this case. Measurement of maternal hCG may be a useful parameter when intraplacental choriocarcinoma is in the differential diagnosis. In addition, the placenta should be examined in all cases of fetomaternal hemorrhage.

  13. A Literature Review and Case Report of Metastatic Pure Choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Diwei; Tan, Amanda Jia Hui; Singh-Rai, Rajinder

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, testicular cancer was estimated to account for 940 disability adjusted life years in Australia; of these, 450 were years lost due to premature death and 500 were years of healthy life lost due to disease, disability, or injury (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and Australasian Association of Cancer Registries, 2012). Testicular choriocarcinoma is one of the rarest variants of testicular germ cell tumours, accounting for less than 1% of testicular germ cell tumours and only about 0.19% of all testicular tumours. Management involves radical orchidectomy and chemotherapy. Even then, prognosis is poor. This case report describes a 20-year-old male with pure testicular choriocarcinoma with pulmonary metastases which showed sustained and complete response to adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin. PMID:26649213

  14. Expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor neuropilin-1 at the human embryo-maternal interface.

    PubMed

    Baston-Buest, Dunja M; Porn, Anne C; Schanz, Andrea; Kruessel, Jan-S; Janni, Wolfgang; Hess, Alexandra P

    2011-02-01

    Angiogenesis is required for successful implantation of the invading blastocyst. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important key player in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling during the implantation process. Besides its well-characterized receptors VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) has been shown to play an additional role in the signaling process of angiogenesis in human endometrium during the menstrual cycle, as a co-receptor of VEGF. These findings led to the hypothesis that NRP-1 might play a role in the vascular remodeling process during embryo implantation and the establishment of a pregnancy. NRP-1 mRNA transcript and protein expression were investigated in human choriocarcinoma cell lines (JEG-3, Jar and BeWo) aiming to evaluate the expression of NRP-1 in vitro, as well as in human decidua of all three trimesters of pregnancy, by western blot analysis (three samples of each trimester of pregnancy). The localization of NRP-1 in human decidua of all three trimesters of pregnancy was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (five samples of each trimester of pregnancy). NRP-1 transcript and protein were expressed in all cell lines examined. Corresponding to the analysis of human tissue by western blot and the localization by immunohistochemistry, NRP-1 protein higher expressed in samples of early pregnancy in comparison to the end of pregnancy. NRP-1 was expressed in the decidua, villi and invading cytotrophoblast of all samples investigated. This is the first study clearly showing the expression of NRP-1 in human decidua and trophoblast, suggesting an important role for the VEGF co-receptor NRP-1 besides the established receptor VEGFR2 at the embryo-maternal interface during embryonic implantation and placentation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Secretion and transfer of the thyroid hormone binding protein transthyretin by human placenta.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, R H; Landers, K A; Balakrishnan, B; Li, H; Mitchell, M D; Patel, J; Richard, K

    2012-04-01

    The thyroid hormone and retinol binding protein transthyretin (TTR) is synthesised by human trophoblasts. Polarised JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells grown in bicameral chambers secrete TTR predominantly apically but also basally and these cells and human trophoblasts also take up TTR suggesting that there may be a placental TTR shuttle that participates in materno-fetal transfer of thyroid hormones and retinol. Our objective was to investigate TTR secretion into the maternal and fetal circuits of the ex vivo dually perfused placental lobule to confirm that placenta secretes TTR into the fetal circulation. We also investigated translocation of Alexa Fluor-594 labelled TTR from incubation medium into the fetal placental capillaries in early (14-15 weeks) and term placental villus explants. The perfused placental lobule secretes TTR into the maternal and fetal circuits. Secretion in both circuits is linear with time and is predominantly into the maternal circuit (mean maternal/fetal ratio 99.4 ± 25.6). The mean data fitted well to a three compartment mathematical model (maternal circuit, placenta and fetal circuit, constant secretion of TTR and return of maternal circuit TTR to the placental compartment). Explants from early (14-15 weeks) and late (38-40 weeks) placentas translocated fluorescently labelled TTR from medium to villus (fetal) capillaries. Our results confirm that human placenta secretes TTR into maternal and fetal circulations and supports the hypothesis that placental TTR secreted into the maternal placental circulation can be taken up by trophoblasts and translocated to the fetal circulation, forming a TTR shuttle system. This may have important implications for materno-fetal transfer of thyroid hormones, retinol/retinol binding protein and xenobiotics (such as polychlorinated biphenyls) all of which bind to TTR. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Choriocarcinoma developed in a tubal pregnancy - a case report.

    PubMed

    Petre, Izabella; Bernad, Elena; Mureşan, Anca; Bordianu, Anca; Bernad, Sandor I; Băcean, Onuţ; Folescu, Roxana; Milulescu, Amelia; Pantea, Stelian

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of the Fallopian tube is the least frequent tumor of the female genital tract. The diagnosis is difficult but could be made more frequently if the causes of abnormal bleeding were thoroughly investigated by means of cytology and endometrial curettage. Treatment is by resection of the tumor, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by chemotherapy. A 25-year-old patient, presented herself at the emergency room, accusing intense lower abdominal pains, accompanied by vaginal bleeding. The histological aspect corroborated with the Ki-67 index is strongly suggestive for a choriocarcinoma developed in a tubal ectopic pregnancy.

  17. Pure choriocarcinoma of the testis presenting with jaundice: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Testicular cancer is the most common malignancy in men 15- to 35-years-old. The North American standard classification divides testicular cancers into germ cell tumors and non-germ cell tumors. The lymphatic spread of germ cell tumors usually involves the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. However, this spread to the retroperitoneum rarely involves the hepatic hilum. We describe an unusual case of metastatic choriocarcinoma of the testis that was clinically mimicked by a cholestatic jaundice. This is an unusual presentation of testicular cancer and, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of this kind in the literature. Case presentation A 28-year-old Moroccan man presented with a four-week history of progressive obstructive jaundice, and weight loss to our emergency department. Abdominal ultrasound showed a dilatation of the biliary ducts due to pathologically enlarged lymph nodes of the hepatic hilum. A complete clinical and radiologic assessment to discover the primary tumor was negative except for pulmonary metastasis. In the laboratory findings at admission there were signs of cholestasis with an abnormal increase in the rate of testicular tumor markers (serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin level was 11,000IU/ml), which subsequently led to the suspicion of a testicular tumor. Further evaluation included testicular palpation and ultrasound which revealed a testicular nodule. The patient underwent an inguinal orchidectomy of the right testis and histopathological examination confirmed a pure choriocarcinoma. The prognosis was poor due to lymph node involvement at the hepatic hilum. He died one month later, despite general chemotherapy. Conclusions The clinical presentation of the disease and the rarity of this entity are two remarkable characteristics described in this case report which are rarely reported in literature. PMID:22938171

  18. Placental site trophoblastic tumor and choriocarcinoma: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Gari, Abdulrahim

    2015-11-23

    Mixed trophoblastic tumor composed of choriocarcinoma and placental site trophoblastic tumor was diagnosed on histopathology slides review, is a very rare mixed tumor and cured after adjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty-nine years old, Para 2 female presented with 4 months history of irregular vaginal bleeding after an uncomplicated vaginal delivery. Abdominal examination showed 14 weeks uterus with β-hCG level of 14,889 mIU/ml. Slides review confirmed the diagnosis of placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT). Patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and resection of anterior vaginal wall mass. Post operative (48 h) β-hCG level was 6016 mIU/ml. Final pathology showed mixed trophoblastic tumor composed of choriocarcinoma (CC) and PSTT. Adjuvant chemotherapy started and continued for three cycles after achieving normal β-hCG. PSTT is a rare disease and potentially curable. Differential diagnosis in women presented with vaginal bleeding and a uterine mass in the post partum period must include gestational trophoblastic disease.

  19. Dynamic regulation of HIF1Α stability by SUMO2/3 and SENP3 in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Jayonta; Alahari, Sruthi; Sallais, Julien; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1A (HIF1A) stability is tightly regulated by hydroxylation and ubiquitination. Emerging evidence indicates that HIF1A is also controlled by the interplay between SUMO-specific ligases, which execute protein SUMOylation, and Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases that de-SUMOylate target proteins. Given the significance of HIF1A in the human placenta, we investigated whether placental HIF1A is subject to SUMOylation in physiological and pathological conditions. Placentae were obtained from normal and pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Human choriocarcinoma JEG3 cells were maintained at either 21% or 3% oxygen or exposed to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Cells were transfected with SUMO2/3 constructs with and without Mg132, a proteasome inhibitor. Expression, distribution and associations of SUMO/SENPs and HIF1A were evaluated by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. HIF1A-SUMO2/3 associations peaked at 9-10 weeks, while its deSUMOylation by SENP3 was greatest at 10-12 weeks. In E-PE, HIF1A deSUMOylation by SENP3 was significantly elevated, while HIF1A-SUMO2/3 associations remained constant. In vitro, overexpression of SUMO2/3 de-stabilized HIF1A in hypoxia, and abrogated HIF1A expression following Mg132 treatment in normoxia. Hypoxia and SNP treatments promoted SENP3 nuclear redistribution from nucleoli to the nucleoplasm where it associates with HIF1A. During early placental development, SUMOylation events control HIF1A stability in an oxygen-dependent manner. In E-PE, enhanced deSUMOylation of HIF1A by SENP3 may in part contribute to increased HIF1A activity and stability found in this pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SALL4 expression in gestational trophoblastic tumors: a useful tool to distinguish choriocarcinoma from placental site trophoblastic tumor and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor.

    PubMed

    Stichelbout, Morgane; Devisme, Louise; Franquet-Ansart, Hélène; Massardier, Jérôme; Vinatier, Denis; Renaud, Florence; Kerdraon, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    SALL4 has important functions in embryonic stem cells. The aim of this study was to investigate SALL4 expression in gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. We hypothesized that it could help to distinguish choriocarcinoma, the presumed most primitive form of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, from placental site trophoblastic tumor and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor, which would be more differentiated variants. This study included 31 gestational trophoblastic neoplasias: 19 choriocarcinomas, 9 placental site trophoblastic tumors, 1 epithelioid trophoblastic tumor, and 2 mixed tumors comprising a placental site trophoblastic tumor and an epithelioid trophoblastic tumor. Unlike usual markers of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (p63, human chorionic gonadotrophin and human placental lactogen), SALL4 was expressed in 100% of choriocarcinomas and it was not detected in any placental site trophoblastic tumor and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor. However, the proportion of positive cells varied in a wide range, from 10% to 70%, reflecting the fact that SALL4 was specifically present in mononuclear cells consistent with neoplastic cytotrophoblast. So, SALL4 may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Choriocarcinoma complicated by a vaginal fistula, sepsis and hemorrhagic shock. Case report.

    PubMed

    Murta, E F C; Nomelini, R S; Rua, A M O; Adad, S J

    2006-01-01

    A case of poor prognostic choriocarcinoma developing sepsis is described. The patient was treated with vaginal drainage of pelvic abscess metastases, bilateral hypogastric artery ligation to prevent hemorrhage and single-agent chemotherapy.

  2. [Fatal amnioinfusion with previous choriocarcinoma in a parturient woman].

    PubMed

    Hrgović, Z; Bukovic, D; Mrcela, M; Hrgović, I; Siebzehnrübl, E; Karelovic, D

    2004-04-01

    The case of 36-year-old tercipare is described who developed choriocharcinoma in a previous pregnancy. During the first term labour the patient developed cardiac arrest, so reanimation and sectio cesarea was performed. A male new-born was delivered in good condition, but even after intensive therapy and reanimation occurred death of parturient woman with picture of disseminate intravascular coagulopathia (DIK). On autopsy and on histology there was no sign of malignant disease, so it was not possible to connect previous choricarcinoma with amniotic fluid embolism. Maybe was place of choriocarcinoma "locus minoris resistentiae" which later resulted with failure in placentation what was hard to prove. On autopsy we found embolia of lung with a microthrombosis of terminal circulation with punctiformis bleeding in mucous, what stands for DIK.

  3. Immunohistochemistry of choriocarcinoma: an aid in differential diagnosis and in elucidating pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Tsui-Lien; Kurman, Robert J; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2007-11-01

    Choriocarcinoma is traditionally described as being composed of cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast. Microscopically, these 2 types of cells are intimately associated with each other, forming a characteristic biphasic plexiform pattern, however, the nature of these 2 types of trophoblastic cells is not well understood. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry for several trophoblastic markers to analyze the trophoblastic subpopulations in 36 gestational choriocarcinomas. Eighty-one specimens including placenta, complete mole, placental site nodule, epithelioid trophoblastic tumor, and placental site trophoblastic tumor were analyzed. The antibodies included Mel-CAM, HLA-G, MUC-4, and beta-catenin. A semiquantitative assessment of positive cells and the cellular localization of these markers were recorded. We found diffuse strong membranous and cytoplasmic staining for MUC-4 in mononucleate cells in all 36 cases (100%) and a similar pattern of localization in 28 cases (78%) for HLA-G. This distribution was similar to that in normal placentas, where MUC-4 and HLA-G are expressed in the trophoblastic cells of the trophoblastic columns and implantation site. In choriocarcinoma, mononucleate trophoblastic cells showed moderate immunoreactivity for Mel-CAM, a specific marker for implantation site intermediate trophoblast, in 78% of the cases. The MUC-4, HLA-G, and Mel-CAM-positive trophoblastic cells were larger than cytotrophoblastic cells, with more abundant cytoplasm, consistent with the morphology of intermediate trophoblast. In contrast, 31% of the choriocarcinomas contained a very small proportion (<5%) of mononucleate trophoblastic cells compatible with cytotrophoblast that was positive for nuclear beta-catenin, a cytotrophoblast-associated marker. These results suggest that choriocarcinoma is composed predominantly of a mixture of syncytiotrophoblast and intermediate trophoblast with only a small proportion of cytotrophoblast. The presence of nuclear beta

  4. Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma in a male that was successfully diagnosed and treated

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ran; Jia, Congwei; Yan, Jie; Luo, Yufeng; Huo, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) is extremely rare, especially in males. It is characterized by a poor response to therapy and shortened survival times. Here, we report a successful diagnosis and modified treatment for PPC in a male and a review of the literature. Case presentation: This case report describes a 67-year-old male who was discovered to have a left pulmonary mass. The patient underwent a pulmonary lobectomy. Pathological examination showed a poorly biphasic differential tumor. Immunostaining displayed that beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG), CD10, and GATA3 were positive, and the increase of postoperative serum β-HCG secretion was also confirmed. Systemic and genital screening was performed, but other abnormal findings were not observed. The diagnosis of PPC was confirmed. Then, the patient received 4 cycles of modified chemotherapy according the condition of his body. The patient has been alive for >13 months without recurrence, and the level of serum β-HCG has already decreased to normal. In addition to reporting this case, we have also summarized the similar previously published cases. Conclusions: Currently, there is no standard treatment for PPC. A rapid and correct diagnosis is necessary. Surgery and modified chemotherapy, based on the physical condition of the patient, may currently be the best therapy for PPC. PMID:28033262

  5. Ectopic pregnancy with associated gestational choriocarcinoma in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Fravel, Vanessa A; Lowenstine, Linda J; Koehne, Amanda

    2016-07-07

    A wild-born, captive-reared, 14 yr old, primiparous female California sea lion Zalophus californianus presented for anorexia of 14 d duration and abdominal distention. Routine complete blood cell count revealed leukocytosis with a neutrophilia, and serum chemistry revealed hypoalbumenemia and hyponatremia. Treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories were started, but the animal continued to decline. Abdominal radiographs revealed a mature mineralized fetal skull and spine in the caudal abdomen and abdominal ultrasound revealed ascites but could not confirm the fetus. The patient was taken to surgery where a full term fetus was found outside of the uterus but within the fetal membranes, representing a secondary ectopic pregnancy. The patient passed away during surgery and was taken to necropsy. Gross necropsy revealed a diffuse peritonitis with yellow deposits over the serosal surfaces of the abdominal organs. The uterus appeared intact grossly and the ovaries appeared abnormal. The mesenteric, renal, and sub-lumbar nodes were enlarged and edematous. Histopathology revealed choriocarcinoma in the right uterine horn with evidence of chronic uterine rupture and protrusion of the placental tissue into the abdomen. The choriocarcinoma had metastasized locally as well as to the liver, spleen and lung. Choriocarcinoma is a highly malignant trophoblastic neoplasm that is rare in domestic animals. This case represents, to the authors' knowledge, the first report of gestational choriocarcinoma causing secondary ectopic pregnancy in a California sea lion and presents questions regarding pregnancy monitoring and management in a population of captive, minimally trained California sea lions.

  6. Chemotherapy Used to Halt Lower GI Bleeding in a Rare Case of Metastatic Choriocarcinoma to the GI Tract.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Ralph; Seoud, Talal; Oluwadamilola, Teniola; Karass, Michael; Grossniklaus, Emily; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Goldstein, Daniel A; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma, a nonseminomatous germ cell tumor, is a rare type of testicular malignancy that tends to occur in young males. It is, however, exceedingly rare for choriocarcinoma to involve the GI tract. In this article, we present a rare case of a 31-year-old male, diagnosed with choriocarcinoma of the left testes, along with several metastases to distant sites. The patient presented with headaches and severe lower GI bleeding due to metastases to the GI tract, which was eventually controlled with systemic chemotherapy, while requiring several units of packed RBCs during his admission to the hospital. An extensive literature review found very few cases of the occurrence of GI bleeding as a consequence of choriocarcinoma due to metastases to the GI tract.

  7. Treatment of Pulmonary Tumor Embolism from Choriocarcinoma: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge through Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Heun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Hyun Myung; Jang, Jin Ook; Ye, Byung Min; Yoon, Gun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dohyung; Cho, Woo Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman with a 1-month history of shortness of breath that was treated as a case of tuberculosis and pulmonary embolism was referred to the authors’ hospital. Because of the hemodynamic instability in this patient, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was administered in the intensive care unit. She underwent a pulmonary embolectomy for the treatment of progressive circulatory collapse secondary to a pulmonary embolism. The histopathologic result was consistent with a metastatic choriocarcinoma. Despite the surgical management, persistent refractory cardiogenic shock occurred. Subsequently, the patient was treated with chemotherapy in the presence of ECMO and responded well to chemotherapy. She was discharged after 3 months. This case suggests that metastatic choriocarcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in women of childbearing age presenting with a pulmonary embolism, and ECMO may be beneficial in patients with pulmonary embolism for bridging to surgical embolectomy and chemotherapy. PMID:27384162

  8. Treatment of Pulmonary Tumor Embolism from Choriocarcinoma: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge through Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Heun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Hyun Myung; Jang, Jin Ook; Ye, Byung Min; Yoon, Gun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dohyung; Cho, Woo Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman with a 1-month history of shortness of breath that was treated as a case of tuberculosis and pulmonary embolism was referred to the authors' hospital. Because of the hemodynamic instability in this patient, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was administered in the intensive care unit. She underwent a pulmonary embolectomy for the treatment of progressive circulatory collapse secondary to a pulmonary embolism. The histopathologic result was consistent with a metastatic choriocarcinoma. Despite the surgical management, persistent refractory cardiogenic shock occurred. Subsequently, the patient was treated with chemotherapy in the presence of ECMO and responded well to chemotherapy. She was discharged after 3 months. This case suggests that metastatic choriocarcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in women of childbearing age presenting with a pulmonary embolism, and ECMO may be beneficial in patients with pulmonary embolism for bridging to surgical embolectomy and chemotherapy.

  9. Epithelioid trophoblastic tumor after induced abortion with previous broad choriocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Shi, Haiyan; Chen, Xiaoduan

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid trophoblastic tumor (ETT) is a rare trophoblastic tumor originating from chorionic-type intermediate trophoblasts (ITs). It is usually associated with a prior gestational event. We present a 44-year-old woman who had unusual pregnancy related history. The patient received her second spontaneous abortion at the age of 25 years and had suffered from choriocarcinoma in left board ligament at the age of 29 years. She admitted no more treatment after 3 courses of multiagent chemotherapy when serum β-hCG returned to normal. Then she had Full-term delivery, induced abortion at the ages of 32, 33 years. The patient had high serum levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (6587 IU/L). Microscopically, the tumor was composed of mainly mononuclear tumor cells, grew in cords, nests, and sheets within which were aggregates of hyaline material. Most were with distinct cell borders, eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical staining revealed strong diffuse reactivity for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, CK18), P63, focal reactivity for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, human placental lactogen, and inhibin-alpha. The Ki-67 index was 77%. The histological and immunohistochemical features were characteristic of epithelioid trophoblastic tumor. This is the first reported case of these two gestational trophoblastic tumor happened on one person with the intervening normal pregnancy. PMID:25550880

  10. [Successful treatment of locally invasive, nonmetastatic choriocarcinoma after ectopic pregnancy by monochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kornovski, Ia; Gorchev, G; Kozovski, I; Manevska, B; Taskova, V; Trendafilova, E

    2008-01-01

    A case of choriocarcinoma in 33-year old woman after ectopic pregnancy has been reported. CT-scan established an invasion of the vagina, posterior wall of the bladder and rectum. The patient's leading symptoms were: severe genital bleeding,haematuria, acute postbleeding anaemia, haemorrhagical shock. After treatment with Metothrexate and symptomatic therapy the patient achieved complete clinical remission and she is free of disease 18 months after the onset of the therapy.

  11. Choriocarcinoma of unknown origin with multiple organ metastasis and cerebral hemorrhage: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    WEI, HONGTAO; ZHANG, TIANPENG; LIU, BING; XUE, XIAOWEI; WANG, GUOXING

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old man was admitted to Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University (Beijing, China) with a 4-day history of headache, moderate fever and numbness in the right upper limb. Prior to this, the patient had been diagnosed with cerebral hemorrhage by computed tomography (CT) scan upon visiting a local hospital. Chest X-ray revealed multiple lesions in the lungs. Following referral, no abnormalities were found elsewhere, including in the testes, during a physical examination. Additional examination of other tumor biomarkers was unremarkable, and the initial suspicion of parasitic infection was ruled out. Tests revealed extremely high levels of β-human chorionic gonadotropin (>200,000 mIU/ml). In addition, CT scans showed multiple metastases in the head, lungs, liver and kidneys. An ultrasound-guided Tru-Cut biopsy of the liver was performed in order to form a definitive diagnosis. Although the patient was treated with mannitol to reduce intracranial pressure, and with cefoperazone sodium and sulbactam sodium to fight infection, the patient succumbed to a cerebral hernia on the fourth day of hospitalization. Following this, the ultrasound-guided Tru-Cut liver biopsy result was received, which suggested a diagnosis of choriocarcinoma. PMID:27313687

  12. [Pure choriocarcinoma of the testis: report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Sahraoui, S; Hassani, A T; Ouhtatou, F; Acharki, A; Benider, A; Kahlain, A

    2001-03-01

    We report a case of a young man 31 years old treated at the Ibn Rochd Oncology Center for a pure choriocarcinoma of the right testis. The first examination note a skin metastasis without another localization. The beta HCG level was 328 mu/mL. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathological examination of the testis after orchidectomy. The adjuvant treatment consisted in chemotherapy like using in germ cell neoplasm's of the testis. During the evolution, partial remission (50%) was obtained after the third course and complete remission one month after the end of treatment. The patient still alive after 20 months.

  13. Intraplacental Choriocarcinoma: Rare or Underdiagnosed? Report of 2 Cases Diagnosed after an Incomplete Miscarriage and a Preterm Spontaneous Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Paula; Scigliano, Horácio; Nogueira, Rosete; Araújo, Célia; Ferreira, Soledade

    2017-01-01

    Intraplacental choriocarcinoma is a rare malignant tumor diagnosed after an abortion, an ectopic pregnancy, or a term or preterm pregnancy or following the diagnosis of a hydatidiform mole. During pregnancy, it may be more common than reported, as most patients are asymptomatic and placental choriocarcinomas are usually inconspicuous macroscopically and are often mistaken for an infarct. Based upon a case study methodology, we describe 2 cases of intraplacental choriocarcinoma: the first case was identified in the product of a uterine curettage following an incomplete miscarriage and the second in one of the placentas of a bichorionic twin pregnancy. Maternal investigation did not reveal evidence of metastatic disease and neither did the infants' one in the second case. The two cases underwent maternal surveillance with serum hCG and remained disease-free until the present. In conclusion, intraplacental choriocarcinoma is easily underdiagnosed but with current treatment, even in the presence of metastasis, the prognosis is excellent. A routine microscopic examination of all the placentas and products of miscarriage can increase the real incidence of this entity and consequently improve its management. PMID:28567059

  14. Ruptured cerebral oncotic aneurysm from choriocarcinoma: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zairi, Fahed; De Saint Denis, Timothe; Thines, Laurent; Bourgeois, Philippe; Lejeune, Jean Paul

    2011-02-01

    The study design involved case reports and review of the literature. Oncotic aneurysm from choriocarcinoma is an extremely rare event that should be known by all neurosurgeons and suspected in women of childbearing age. The purpose of this article is to report the authors' experience and to provide insight on clinical presentation and radiological signs to aware the reader to this entity and then to prevent misdiagnosis. The authors report two cases of ruptured oncotic aneurysm treated at their institution in 2010. A review of the literature was performed to discuss the pathogenesis and the role of the neurosurgeon. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice making surgery necessary only for patients with large intracerebral haematoma that represents an immediate threat.

  15. Gestational Choriocarcinoma Presenting with Lacrimal Gland Metastasis: A First Reported Case

    PubMed Central

    Sait, Khalid; Anfnan, Nisreen; Farwan, Khader; Nizamuddin, S. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Gestational choriocarcinoma (GC) is a recognized clinicopathological subtype of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia that usually metastasizes hematogenously to highly vascular organs like the lung, liver, and brain. However, orbital metastasis to the choroid and lacrimal gland is a rare occurrence. Case Presentation. A 21-year-old female presented with headache and left orbital swelling one year after resection of a complete hydatidiform mole followed by adjuvant methotrexate chemotherapy. A metastatic imaging screening revealed multiple metastases in the lungs, brain, and adrenal gland, in addition to the choroid and lacrimal gland. Based on her modified WHO risk factors scoring she was started on chemotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy, which resulted in a complete response. At two-year follow-up, serum b-HCG level was with normal limits; imaging surveillance was uneventful. Conclusion. We present the first case of lacrimal gland metastasis in a young girl from GC relapse. PMID:26075121

  16. Apical uptake of choline and cationic drugs in epithelial cell lines derived from human placenta.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Born, I; Neubert, R H; Brandsch, M

    2005-01-01

    Many cationic drugs are administered during pregnancy and might enter the fetal circulation by transplacental passage. This study was performed to characterize the apical uptake of choline and several cationic drugs at cultured epithelial cells of the human placenta. Total uptake of [3H]choline in BeWo cells was H(+)-independent and to 65% Na(+)-independent. Uptake rates into both cell lines were saturable with Michaelis-Menten constants (Kt) of 108 microM (BeWo) and 206 microM (JEG-3), respectively. Cationic drugs such as etilefrine, clonidine, ranitidine, diphenhydramine, imipramine and butylscopolamine strongly inhibited the [3H]choline uptake in BeWo cells and in JEG-3 cells, with Ki values ranging from 0.18 to 3.3 mM. In contrast, tetraethylammonium had only little inhibitory effect on [3H]choline uptake. Using high-performance capillary electrophoresis for quantitative analyses, uptake of etilefrine and diphenhydramine into JEG-3 or BeWo cells was measured. Diphenhydramine was transported into JEG-3 cells in a saturable manner with a Kt value of 0.75 mM. In the presence of sodium, diphenhydramine uptake at BeWo cells was inhibited to 69% by the addition of 50 mM choline chloride. Like choline uptake, total diphenhydramine uptake was to 68% Na(+)-independent in BeWo cells. We conclude that in addition to choline, several cationic drugs, in particular diphenhydramine, are taken up by placental epithelial cells from the maternal blood by carrier-mediated processes. Etilefrine, clonidine, ranitidine, diphenhydramine and butylscopolamine interact with the Na(+)-independent placental choline transport system.

  17. Throughput expression of multiple G-protein coupled receptors for HIV infection in choriocarcinoma cells, trophoblasts, and breast milk cells.

    PubMed

    Usami, Masashi; Trinh, Quang Duy; Yagyu, Fumihiro; Hayakawa, Yuuko; Inaba, Noriyuki; Okitsu, Shoko; Phan, Tung Gia; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine receptors, which belong to G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and become co-receptors when HIV enters the cell, have been mentioned in recent research. Numerous studies have reported that the cellular mechanism of HIV crossing the placental barrier is still not totally understood. This study was conducted to investigate whether the mRNAs of nineteen typs of GPCRs and CD4 were expressed in choriocarcinoma cell lines, trophoblasts, and breast milk cells by using RT-PCR. It was found that the expression of GPCRs varied in different cell lines. Of note is that CD4 could not be expressed in either choriocarcinoma cells or trophoblasts. It was noteworthy that mRNAs of multiple GPCRs were identified in choriocarcinoma cells, trophoblasts, and breast milk cells for the first time. The expression amounts of these mRNAs were further measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Interestingly, mRNAs of CCR9/CCR10 were strongly expressed in trophoblasts. This study provided further insights to the cellular mechanism of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

  18. Interaction of human trophoblast cells with gland-like endometrial spheroids: a model system for trophoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Buck, V U; Gellersen, B; Leube, R E; Classen-Linke, I

    2015-04-01

    Do maternal endometrial epithelial cell (EEC) differentiation and polarity impact the invasive capacity of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells during early human implantation? In a three dimensional (3D) confrontation co-culture the invasiveness of the human trophoblast cell line AC-1M88 was inversely correlated with the degree of differentiation and polarization of human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell spheroids. In a previous study desmosomal and adherens junction proteins were shown to spread from a subapically restricted lateral position to the entire lateral membrane in human glandular EECs during the implantation window of the menstrual cycle. Whether this change in EEC junction localization has an impact on the interaction of EVT cells with glandular EECs during early human implantation is not known. A new 3D cell culture system was developed in order to mimic early implantation events in humans. As a model for the invasion of endometrial glands by EVT cells, spheroids of three differently differentiated and polarized endometrial adenocarcinoma cell lines were confronted with an EVT cell line in co-culture experiments. Three human adenocarcinoma EEC lines were chosen for this study because of their differences in differentiation and polarization: HEC-1-A, which is well differentiated and highly polarized, Ishikawa, which is well differentiated and moderately polarized, and RL95-2, which is moderately differentiated and poorly polarized. When the cell lines were grown in reconstituted basement membrane, they formed gland-like, multicellular spheroids. The degree of polarization within the different EEC spheroids was assessed by 3D confocal immunofluorescence microscopy detecting the basal membrane protein integrin α6, the apical tight junction-associated protein ZO-1 and the desmosomal plaque protein desmoplakin 1/2 (Dsp). Cells of the human EVT cell line AC-1M88, which is a fusion cell line of primary EVT cells and choriocarcinoma-derived JEG-3 cells, were

  19. A fibroid or cancer? A rare case of mixed choriocarcinoma and epithelioid trophoblastic tumour.

    PubMed

    Luk, Wan Yu; Friedlander, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a rare complication of pregnancy which is characterised by abnormal growth of the trophoblasts at the placental site. It is categorised into benign and malignant forms, which include hydatidiform moles (HMs) and gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), respectively. A mixed choriocarcinoma (CC) and epithelioid trophoblastic tumour (ETT) is an extremely rare subgroup of GTN, which is a highly curable but aggressive form of malignancy. Case. We report a case of mixed CC and ETT in a 41-year-old patient who presented with a 2-year history of menorrhagia and fibroid uterus in the absence of previous history of molar pregnancy. She had a 12-year interval between the antecedent pregnancy and presentation. She was treated with intensive regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy, etoposide, methotrexate, and actinomycin-D with etoposide and cisplatin (EMA-EP). She has remained disease free for more than 5 years. Conclusion. This case highlights the importance of considering GTN as one of the differential diagnoses value of β -HCG in patients presented with menorrhagia and growing fibroids.

  20. Unusual clinical presentations of choriocarcinoma: A systematic review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Mishu; Singla, Deepak; Kaur, Harpreet; Sharma, Sushmita

    2017-02-01

    Choriocarcinoma (CC) is a highly malignant tumor originating in the trophoblastic tissue. The clinical presentation of CC is so much varied that every case may be one of its kinds and thus can be a diagnostic challenge. Numerous case reports have been published in various journals regarding the unusual clinical presentations of this cancer. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of all case reports in English language on gestational CC published in PubMed-indexed journals from 1998 to 2015. The main aim was to provide a summary and critical analysis of all the data and evidence published regarding the atypical clinical presentations of CC in recent years. In total, 121 case reports pertaining to unusual clinical manifestations of gestational CC were analyzed. The age of patients in whom cases were reported ranged from 17 to 67 years, and the time period between the index pregnancy and development of CC varied from 4 weeks to as long as 25 years. Cardiopulmonary complaints (20.66%) followed by gastrointestinal (18.43%) and central nervous system manifestations (17.67%) were found to be the most common. Through this review, the authors have made an attempt to discuss various manifestations with which a patient with gestational CC can present to clinician so that early diagnosis and timely management can be initiated, thus improving clinical prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Taiwan Association of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Coexistence of a choriocarcinoma and a gonadoblastoma in the gonad of a 46,XY female: a single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu Bergeron, Mélanie; Soglio, Dorothée Bouron-Dal; Maietta, Antonio; Fournet, Jean-Christophe; Blumenkrantz, Miriam; Brochu, Pierre; Lemieux, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Females with 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis are at significant risk of developing germ cell tumors, mostly gonadoblastomas. We present here the case of 2 half-sisters, sharing the same father, diagnosed with 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis. The 1st sister developed a gonadoblastoma and an invasive dysgerminoma, whereas the 2nd sister developed a gonadoblastoma and an invasive choriocarcinoma within the same gonad. No SRY mutation, chromosome abnormalities, or mosaicism were detected in blood. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profiling of the choriocarcinoma revealed a complex hyperdiploid pattern with gains of 1 to 4 copies of material from several autosomes, as well as the loss of the Y chromosome and a homozygous SNP profile without copy number change for the X chromosome. Our results are in agreement with the recurrent chromosome gains and losses previously published in germ cell tumors, and the coexistence of both tumors within the same gonad suggests that choriocarcinomas may derive from gonadoblastomas.

  2. Pancreatic and Hepatic Metastasis of an Undiagnosed Choriocarcinoma: An Exceptional Cause of Haemoperitoneum in Young Women - Report of a Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Fatema, Nishat; Arora, Neeru Vinod; Al Abri, Fatma Majid; Khan, Yaseer Muhammad Tareq

    2016-01-01

    Haemoperitoneum in women of reproductive age usually suggests either ruptured ectopic pregnancy or ruptured ovarian cysts. Metastatic choriocarcinoma is considered the least common cause of haemoperitoneum in women of childbearing age. We report a rare case of pancreatic and hepatic metastasis of choriocarcinoma in a young, 30-year-old female who had delivered 10 months prior at term gestation with no previous history of gestational trophoblastic disease or molar pregnancy. She had a short history of fever and pain in the right hypochondrium, with findings of hypovolaemic shock due to intraperitoneal haemorrhage. Unfortunately, the patient expired with massive uncontrolled bleeding from liver metastasis despite 2 emergency laparotomies within 12 h. This case report is an apt reminder to clinicians to include metastatic choriocarcinoma on the list of differential diagnoses for haemoperitoneum with a positive pregnancy test in women of reproductive age to diagnose early and to avoid life-threatening consequences.

  3. Pancreatic and Hepatic Metastasis of an Undiagnosed Choriocarcinoma: An Exceptional Cause of Haemoperitoneum in Young Women – Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Fatema, Nishat; Arora, Neeru Vinod; Al Abri, Fatma Majid; Khan, Yaseer Muhammad Tareq

    2016-01-01

    Haemoperitoneum in women of reproductive age usually suggests either ruptured ectopic pregnancy or ruptured ovarian cysts. Metastatic choriocarcinoma is considered the least common cause of haemoperitoneum in women of childbearing age. We report a rare case of pancreatic and hepatic metastasis of choriocarcinoma in a young, 30-year-old female who had delivered 10 months prior at term gestation with no previous history of gestational trophoblastic disease or molar pregnancy. She had a short history of fever and pain in the right hypochondrium, with findings of hypovolaemic shock due to intraperitoneal haemorrhage. Unfortunately, the patient expired with massive uncontrolled bleeding from liver metastasis despite 2 emergency laparotomies within 12 h. This case report is an apt reminder to clinicians to include metastatic choriocarcinoma on the list of differential diagnoses for haemoperitoneum with a positive pregnancy test in women of reproductive age to diagnose early and to avoid life-threatening consequences. PMID:27920694

  4. Mixed Testicular Germ Cell Tumor Presenting as Metastatic Pure Choriocarcinoma Involving Multiple Lung Metastases That Was Effectively Treated with High-dose Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Nam Su; Park, Hee Sook

    2009-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma in the testis is very rare, and it represents less than 1% (0.3%) of all the testicular germ cell tumors. It is a particularly aggressive variant of non-seminoma tumor, which is characterized by a high serum β-HCG level and multiple lung metastases. The optimal management for this disease remains undefined. We report here on a case of choriocarcinoma with multiple lung metastases, and the patient has achieved continuous remission for 2 years after combination chemotherapy of BEP (bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin) and sequential high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral stem cell rescue. PMID:20057969

  5. Dose-dependent and cell type-specific cell death and proliferation following in vitro exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Hochstrasser, Tanja; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave (rESW) therapy is widely used in musculoskeletal disorders and wound repair. However, the mechanisms of action are still largely unknown. The current study compared the effects of rESWs on two cell types. Human fetal foreskin fibroblasts (HFFF2) and human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3 were exposed to 0, 100, 200, 500 or 5000 rESWs generated with a Swiss DolorClast device (2.5 bar, 1 Hz). FACS analysis immediately after rESW exposure showed that initially, rESWs rather induced mechanical cell destruction than regulated or programmed cell death. Cell damage was nearly negated by reducing cavitation. Furthermore, cell viability decreased progressively with higher numbers of rESWs. Exposure to rESWs had no impact on growth potential of JEG-3 cells, but dose-dependently increased growth potential of HFFF2 cells. Cultivation of cells that were initially exposed to sham-rESWs in conditioned media increased the growth potential of HFFF2 cells, nevertheless, an even stronger effect was achieved by direct exposure to rESWs. Additionally, cell cycle distribution analysis demonstrated a shift in proportion from G0/G1 to G2/M phase in HFFF2 cells, but not in JEG-3 cells. These data demonstrate that rESWs leads to initial and subsequent dose-dependent and cell type-specific effects in vitro. PMID:27477873

  6. Methylation status and transcriptional expression of the MHC class I loci in human trophoblast cells from term placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaudeux, T.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Girr, M.

    1995-04-01

    Of the various molecular regulatory mechanisms that may be used by human trophoblast cells to down-regulate expression of HLA class I genes, we chose to investigate the methylation of DNA, generally associated with inhibition of transcription. We analyzed the methylation status of different HLA class I loci in villous and extravillous cytotrophoblast cells and in vitro-differentiated syncytiotrophoblast, purified from human term placenta, as well as in the human trophoblast-derived JAR and JEG-3 cell lines. We then compared methylation status and transcriptional activity. An inverse relationship was established between JAR and JEG-3: HLA-A, -B, and -G are methylated and repressed in JAR, whereas in JEG-3, HLA-A is methylated and repressed but HLA-B and -G are partially methylated and transcribed. HLA-E is unmethylated and transcribed in both cell lines. Apart from HLA-E, which is always unmethylated and transcribed, no such relationship exists for the other class I loci in trophoblast cells. Whereas nonclassical HLA-G and classical HLA-A and -B class I genes are undermethylated in both cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast, they are clearly transcribed in the former but minimally transcribed in the latter subpopulation. Thus, the down-regulation of class I gene expression in the in vitro-differentiated synctiotrophoblast is unlikely to be caused by DNA methylation. Furthermore, there is no detectable expression of any class I molecule at the cell surface of either trophoblast cell subpopulation, suggesting a negative control on translation and/or on the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane. 50 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Segregation patterns of polymorphic restriction sites of the gene encoding the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin in trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshina, M; Boothby, M R; Hussa, R D; Pattillo, R A; Camel, H M; Boime, I

    1984-01-01

    The gene encoding the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin contains at least two polymorphic sites in its 3' flanking region detected by restriction enzymes HindIII and EcoRI. We used these polymorphic sites as markers of tissue genotype in normal placenta, hydatidiform mole, choriocarcinoma, and peripheral leukocytes. As expected, inheritance patterns of most hydatidiform moles showed only a paternal genetic contribution. However, one uncommon DNA polymorphism pattern, homozygosity for the absence of the EcoRI site and the presence of the HindIII site, predominated in choriocarcinoma. Thus, our results suggest that moles which have this uncommon polymorphism pattern appear particularly likely to develop into choriocarcinoma. Images PMID:6201859

  8. Sera of patients with recurrent miscarriages containing anti-trophoblast antibodies (ATAB) reduce hCG and progesterone production in trophoblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    von Schönfeldt, Viktoria; Rogenhofer, Nina; Ruf, Katharina; Thaler, Christian J; Jeschke, Udo

    2016-09-01

    Reproductive failure including RM has been suggested to correlate with antibodies that cross react with HLA-negative syncytiotrophoblasts and we have reported that 17% of women with 2 or more miscarriages and 34% of women with 3 or more miscarriages express anti-trophoblast antibodies (ATAB). Until now, the mechanism, how ATAB interfere with pregnancy success is not known. HCG and progesterone both play fundamental roles in supporting human pregnancy. Therefore we investigated the effects of sera of RM patients containing ATAB on the hCG and progesterone production of cells of the choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. In vitro study to investigate effects of patient sera with and without ATAB on hCG and progesterone secretion of JEG-3 cells. The presence of ATAB was detected as described earlier. Effects of sera from ATAB positive and ATAB negative RM patients on hCG and progesterone secretion by JEG-3 cells were analysed 12 and 24h after plating. Sera of women without pregnancy pathologies served as controls. Sera of ATAB-positive RM patients significantly inhibit hCG secretion of JEG-3 cells for 12h after plating compared to sera of healthy controls (p=0.019) and significantly reduce progesterone production for 12h (p=0.046) and 24h (p=0.027) of co-culture. Sera of ATAB-negative RM patient show no significant effect on progesterone secretion. Inhibition of hCG and progesterone production might point to a mechanism, how ATAB interfere with early pregnancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Blazquez, Alba G.; Briz, Oscar; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Perez, Maria J.; Ghanem, Carolina I.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2014-05-15

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48 h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen induces changes in placental BCRP expression in vitro. • This drug reduces the ability of placental cells to export BCRP substrates. • Acetaminophen induces changes in Bcrp expression in rat placenta. • Placental barrier to bile acids is impaired in rats treated with this drug.

  10. Calcium-dependent trichosanthin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species involved in apoptosis of human choriocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-04-01

    The type-I ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin (TCS) has a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities, including abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-HIV. We found for the first time that TCS induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in JAR cells by using fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate with confocal laser scanning microscopy. TCS-induced ROS showed dependence on the increase in intracellular calcium and on the presence of extracellular calcium. The production of ROS increased rapidly after the application of TCS, which paralleled TCS-indued increase in intracellular calcium monitored using fluo 3-AM, suggesting that TCS-induced ROS might mediate by the increase in intracellular Ca2PLU concentration. Simultaneous observation of the nuclear morphological changes and production of ROS in JAR cells with two-photon laser scanning microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells, which was confirmed by that antioxidant (alpha) -tocopherol prevented TCS-induced ROS formation and cell death. The finding that calcium-dependent TCS-induced ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells might provide new insight into the anti-tumor and anti-HIV mechanism of TCS.

  11. [Primary ovarian choriocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pikula, B; Brujić, B; Plamenac, P; Curić, F

    1979-01-01

    This rare tumour was evidenced in a 14-year-old girl. She died two and a half months following the operation, with the symptoms of respiratory insufficiency. The Metotrexate therapy did not produce the disappearance of the chorionic gonadotropin in the urine.

  12. Aflatoxin B1 augments the synthesis of corticotropin releasing hormone in JEG-3 placental cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Wenjuan, Tan; Wang, C C; Leung, Lai K

    2015-07-25

    Aflatoxins pose a major threat to food safety. These toxins are classified as hepatocarcinogens; however, their effect on the other tissues is unclear. During pregnancy, the fetus and placental tissues are especially sensitive to toxin exposure. In the present study aflatoxin B1 was found to induce the mRNA expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) in placental cells. A corresponding increase in CRH peptide in the culture medium was also observed. Since signal transduction pathways have been described previously in the control of CRH transcription, the status of protein kinase Cs (PKCs) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were determined by Western analysis. In the aflatoxin B1-treated cultures, PKC α/βII/δ and ERK-1/2 were activated. As the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I and the ERK inhibitor PD98059 could revert the induced CRH expression, the pathways dictated by PKC and ERK were likely involved in the transcriptional regulation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that C/EBP could be the ultimate activated transcription factor. Taken together, this study demonstrated that aflatoxin B1 could increase the parturition-related placental hormone in vitro. These findings might have significant implications for public health.

  13. The biochemical properties of urinary human chorionic gonadotropin from the patients with trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R; Endo, Y; Tanabe, K; Ashitaka, Y; Tojo, S

    1981-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was extracted and purified from urine of normal pregnant women and patients with hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma using the sam methods. Both hCG-hydatidiform mole and hCG-choriocarcinoma as well as hCG-normal pregnancy was separated into alpha and beta subunits by SDS disc electrophoresis upon treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol and showed the same immunoreactivities against anti-hCG, -alpha hCG, and -beta hCG as hCG in each radioimmunoassay. In vivo bioassay, bioactivities of hCG- normal pregnancy and hCG-hydatidiform mole were approximately 7,000 IU/mg (2nd IS), while that of hCG--choriocarcinoma was only 400 IU/mg. Conversely, the receptor binding activities in vitro of hCG-chorio carcinoma was about 3 times more effective than the other 2. Although the amino acid composition of these hCG preparations were practically identical, a great difference in the carbohydrate composition was observed. The significant difference was that while sialic acid was undetectable in hCG-choriocarcinoma approximately 8.5% of sialic acid was found in hCG-normal pregnancy and hCG-hydatidiform mole. A parallel finding was that iodinated hCG-choriocarcinoma was taken up in large quantities by the liver in comparison to the ovary which differed from that observed with hCG-normal pregnancy and hCG-hydatidiform mole in Parlow rats. The present findings support the thesis that neoplastic or malignant transformation of trophoblasts may result in an alteration of the glycosylation process, especially the sialylation, in the biosynthesis of hCG rather than the translation steps.

  14. Transcriptional enhancer within the human placental lactogen and growth hormone multigene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, B L; Sobnosky, M G; Saunders, G F

    1986-01-01

    Human placental lactogen (hPL) and human growth hormone (hGH) are members of a multigene family that share amino acid sequence homology and similarity in gene structure and nucleotide sequence, but differ in both function and expression. To determine the sequence requirements for tissue specific expression recombinant plasmids containing the members of the hPL-hGH multigene family and flanking regions were analyzed by both transient and stable transfection assays. We have identified a transcriptional enhancer in a 1.0 kb region located 2.0 kb downstream of the hPL3 structural gene. This enhancer sequence is not strictly cell-type specific since it functions in cell lines of both placental (JEG-3) and pituitary (18-54,SF) origin. However, its efficiency is several fold higher in placental cells than in pituitary cells. Images PMID:3774541

  15. Absence of TGF-β Receptor Activation by Highly Purified hCG Preparations.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, Hannu; Hautala, Laura; Koli, Katri; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2015-12-01

    Recently, several LH/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) receptor-independent activities for hCG have been described, including activation of the TGF-β receptor (TGFβR) by hyperglycosylated hCG and stimulation of trophoblast invasion. Because the hCG concentrations used in these studies have been rather high, reflecting physiological hCG levels in pregnancy, even a minor contamination with growth factors, which act at very low concentrations, may be significant. Several commercial hCG preparations have been found to contain significant amounts of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which we also confirmed here. Furthermore, we found that some hCG preparations also contain significant amounts of TGF-β1. These hCG preparations were able to activate ERK1/2 in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells or TGFβR in mink lung epithelial cells transfected with a reporter gene for TGFβR activation. No such activation was found with highly purified hCG or its free β-subunit (hCGβ), irrespective of whether they were hyperglycosylated or not. Taken together, our results suggest that the growth factor contaminations in the hCG preparations can cause activation of TGFβR and, at least in JEG-3 cells, MAPK signaling. This highlights the importance to carefully control for potential contaminations and that highly purified hCG preparations have to be used for biological studies.

  16. Absence of TGF-β Receptor Activation by Highly Purified hCG Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Hautala, Laura; Koli, Katri; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several LH/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) receptor-independent activities for hCG have been described, including activation of the TGF-β receptor (TGFβR) by hyperglycosylated hCG and stimulation of trophoblast invasion. Because the hCG concentrations used in these studies have been rather high, reflecting physiological hCG levels in pregnancy, even a minor contamination with growth factors, which act at very low concentrations, may be significant. Several commercial hCG preparations have been found to contain significant amounts of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which we also confirmed here. Furthermore, we found that some hCG preparations also contain significant amounts of TGF-β1. These hCG preparations were able to activate ERK1/2 in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells or TGFβR in mink lung epithelial cells transfected with a reporter gene for TGFβR activation. No such activation was found with highly purified hCG or its free β-subunit (hCGβ), irrespective of whether they were hyperglycosylated or not. Taken together, our results suggest that the growth factor contaminations in the hCG preparations can cause activation of TGFβR and, at least in JEG-3 cells, MAPK signaling. This highlights the importance to carefully control for potential contaminations and that highly purified hCG preparations have to be used for biological studies. PMID:26495869

  17. Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, R-Methadone, and S-Methadone Upregulate BCRP/ABCG2 Expression by Activating Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Human Placental Trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Neradugomma, Naveen K; Liao, Michael Z; Mao, Qingcheng

    2017-03-01

    Opioid dependence during pregnancy is a rising concern. Maintaining addicted pregnant women on long-acting opioid receptor agonist is the most common strategy to manage drug abuse in pregnant women. Methadone (MET) and buprenorphine (BUP) are widely prescribed for opiate maintenance therapy. Norbuprenorphine (NBUP) is the primary active metabolite of BUP. These medications can cross the placenta to the fetus, leading to postpartum neonatal abstinence syndrome. Despite their use during pregnancy, little is known about the cellular changes in the placenta brought about by these drugs. In this study, we showed that BUP, NBUP, and MET at clinically relevant plasma concentrations significantly induced BCRP mRNA up to 10-fold in human model placental JEG3 and BeWo cells and in primary human villous trophoblasts, and this induction was abrogated by CH223191, an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-specific antagonist. These drugs increased AhR recruitment onto the AhR-response elements and significantly induced breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) gene transcription. AhR overexpression further increased BCRP mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of AhR by shRNA decreased BCRP expression, and this decrease was reversed by rescuing AhR expression. Finally, induction of BCRP expression in JEG3 and BeWo cells was accompanied by an increase in its efflux activity. Collectively, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that BUP, NBUP, and MET are potent AhR agonists and can induce BCRP in human placental trophoblasts by activating AhR. Given the critical role of BCRP in limiting fetal exposure to drugs and xenobiotics, long-term use of these medications may affect fetal drug exposure by altering BCRP expression in human placenta. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Combination Effects of (Tri)Azole Fungicides on Hormone Production and Xenobiotic Metabolism in a Human Placental Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Rieke, Svenja; Koehn, Sophie; Hirsch-Ernst, Karen; Pfeil, Rudolf; Kneuer, Carsten; Marx-Stoelting, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (tri)azole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl) were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol) and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP) enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence of this effect. PMID

  19. Combination effects of (tri)azole fungicides on hormone production and xenobiotic metabolism in a human placental cell line.

    PubMed

    Rieke, Svenja; Koehn, Sophie; Hirsch-Ernst, Karen; Pfeil, Rudolf; Kneuer, Carsten; Marx-Stoelting, Philip

    2014-09-17

    Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (tri)azole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl) were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol) and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP) enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence this effect.

  20. Nicotine, cotinine, and anabasine inhibit aromatase in human trophoblast in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, R L; Gochberg, J; Ryan, K J

    1986-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that women who smoke have lower endogenous estrogen than nonsmokers. To explore the possible link between cigarette smoking and decreased endogenous estrogens, we have examined the effects of constituents of tobacco on estrogen production in human choriocarcinoma cells and term placental microsomes. In choriocarcinoma cell cultures, nicotine, cotinine (a major metabolite of nicotine), and anabasine (a minor component of cigarette tobacco) all inhibited androstenedione conversion to estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. Removal of nicotine, cotinine, and anabasine from the culture medium resulted in the complete reversal of the inhibition of aromatase. In the choriocarcinoma cell cultures, a supraphysiologic concentration of androstenedione (73 microM) in the culture medium blocked the inhibition of aromatase caused by nicotine, cotinine, and anabasine. In preparations of term placental microsomes, nicotine, cotinine, and anabasine inhibited the conversion of testosterone to estrogen. Kinetic analysis demonstrated the inhibition to be competitive with respect to the substrate. These findings suggest that some nicotinic alkaloids directly inhibit aromatase. This mechanism may explain, in part, the decreased estrogen observed in women who smoke. PMID:3711333

  1. [From human andro- and parthenogenesis (hydatidiform moles and benign ovarian teratomas) to cancer].

    PubMed

    Coullin, P

    2005-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that appeared in mammals. This phenomenon blocks the normal development of parthenogenic and androgenic conceptuses, that is to say benign ovarian teratomas and hydatidiform moles respectively. Pathological modifications of these conceptuses depend on whether the chromosomes come from the mother or father. These pathologies are associated with an accidental anomaly during gametogenesis and/or fertilizing. These reproductive anomalies are sporadic and some familial cases may exist suggesting a genetic control of such diseases. The human andro- and parthenogenetic conceptuses, but more frequently the moles, may be invasive (choriocarcinoma). An imbalance of the imprinting genes may initiate the deregulation of other genes, including oncogenes and anti-oncogenes, which can explain the cancerous modification. Immunological and environmental factors must be also considered (presence of the only paternal chromosomes in the choriocarcinoma). Numerous works on this subject are published and some recent important discoveries underline the roles of genes HOX, Tim P3, E-cad and p-16, and the recurrent chromosome anomalies 7q21+and 8p21- in the mole to choriocarcinoma processing. Although these phenomena are complex and heterogeneous, the andro- and parthenogenote conceptuses are particularly interesting models with which to understand developmental disorders and cancerous progression.

  2. A 15-year-old female with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated human chorionic gonadotropin: pregnancy, right? Not so fast….

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Arun; Ocon, Anthony J; Nibhanipudi, Kumara

    2012-10-01

    Nongestational choriocarcinoma, a rare ovarian tumor, may present in young women with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), all of which may be mistaken for pregnancy. A 15-year-old Hispanic female, who reported no sexual activity, presented with 6 months of amenorrhea, abdominal pain, and progressive abdominal distension. Initially, suspicion of pregnancy was considered. Physical examination was significant for abdominal distension, but no uterine fundus or fetal anatomy could be palpated, and auscultation did not reveal any fetal heart sounds or bruits. Laboratory values showed elevated urine hCG, cancer antigen 125, and cancer antigen 19.9 levels but normal serum hCG level and was inconsistent with pregnancy. Computed tomographic scans revealed a large abdominal heterogeneous mass and pleural effusions. Salpingo-oophorectomy with total omentectomy and inversion appendectomy removed a 21 × 20.5 × 16.5-cm tumor. Pathological testing determined it to be a nongestational choriocarcinoma. This rare tumor is more common in the pediatric adolescent population than in adults. Surgical resection and chemotherapy often result in a positive prognosis. In female adolescent patients presenting with elevated hCG level, amenorrhea, and abdominal distention, choriocarcinoma should be considered, especially in those with no history of sexual activity or before menarche.

  3. Human NR5A1/SF-1 mutations show decreased activity on BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), an important regulator of energy balance: testing impact of novel SF-1 mutations beyond steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Malikova, Jana; Camats, Núria; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Heath, Karen; González, Isabel; Caimarí, María; del Campo, Miguel; Albisu, Marian; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Audí, Laura; Flück, Christa E

    2014-01-01

    Human NR5A1/SF-1 mutations cause 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with broad phenotypic variability, and rarely cause adrenal insufficiency although SF-1 is an important transcription factor for many genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, the Sf-1 knockout mouse develops obesity with age. Obesity might be mediated through Sf-1 regulating activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an important regulator of energy balance in the ventromedial hypothalamus. To characterize novel SF-1 gene variants in 4 families, clinical, genetic and functional studies were performed with respect to steroidogenesis and energy balance. 5 patients with 46,XY DSD were found to harbor NR5A1/SF-1 mutations including 2 novel variations. One patient harboring a novel mutation also suffered from adrenal insufficiency. SF-1 mutations were studied in cell systems (HEK293, JEG3) for impact on transcription of genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2) and in energy balance (BDNF). BDNF regulation by SF-1 was studied by promoter assays (JEG3). Two novel NR5A1/SF-1 mutations (Glu7Stop, His408Profs*159) were confirmed. Glu7Stop is the 4th reported SF-1 mutation causing DSD and adrenal insufficiency. In vitro studies revealed that transcription of the BDNF gene is regulated by SF-1, and that mutant SF-1 decreased BDNF promoter activation (similar to steroid enzyme promoters). However, clinical data from 16 subjects carrying SF-1 mutations showed normal birth weight and BMI. Glu7Stop and His408Profs*159 are novel SF-1 mutations identified in patients with 46,XY DSD and adrenal insufficiency (Glu7Stop). In vitro, SF-1 mutations affect not only steroidogenesis but also transcription of BDNF which is involved in energy balance. However, in contrast to mice, consequences on weight were not found in humans with SF-1 mutations.

  4. Human NR5A1/SF-1 Mutations Show Decreased Activity on BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor), an Important Regulator of Energy Balance: Testing Impact of Novel SF-1 Mutations Beyond Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Malikova, Jana; Camats, Núria; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Heath, Karen; González, Isabel; Caimarí, María; del Campo, Miguel; Albisu, Marian; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Audí, Laura; Flück, Christa E.

    2014-01-01

    Context Human NR5A1/SF-1 mutations cause 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with broad phenotypic variability, and rarely cause adrenal insufficiency although SF-1 is an important transcription factor for many genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, the Sf-1 knockout mouse develops obesity with age. Obesity might be mediated through Sf-1 regulating activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an important regulator of energy balance in the ventromedial hypothalamus. Objective To characterize novel SF-1 gene variants in 4 families, clinical, genetic and functional studies were performed with respect to steroidogenesis and energy balance. Patients 5 patients with 46,XY DSD were found to harbor NR5A1/SF-1 mutations including 2 novel variations. One patient harboring a novel mutation also suffered from adrenal insufficiency. Methods SF-1 mutations were studied in cell systems (HEK293, JEG3) for impact on transcription of genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2) and in energy balance (BDNF). BDNF regulation by SF-1 was studied by promoter assays (JEG3). Results Two novel NR5A1/SF-1 mutations (Glu7Stop, His408Profs*159) were confirmed. Glu7Stop is the 4th reported SF-1 mutation causing DSD and adrenal insufficiency. In vitro studies revealed that transcription of the BDNF gene is regulated by SF-1, and that mutant SF-1 decreased BDNF promoter activation (similar to steroid enzyme promoters). However, clinical data from 16 subjects carrying SF-1 mutations showed normal birth weight and BMI. Conclusions Glu7Stop and His408Profs*159 are novel SF-1 mutations identified in patients with 46,XY DSD and adrenal insufficiency (Glu7Stop). In vitro, SF-1 mutations affect not only steroidogenesis but also transcription of BDNF which is involved in energy balance. However, in contrast to mice, consequences on weight were not found in humans with SF-1 mutations. PMID:25122490

  5. The tumor suppressor gastrokine-1 is expressed in placenta and contributes to the regulation of trophoblast migration.

    PubMed

    Fahlbusch, F B; Ruebner, M; Huebner, H; Volkert, G; Zuern, C; Thiel, F; Koch, M; Menendez-Castro, C; Wachter, D L; Hartner, A; Rascher, W

    2013-11-01

    Gastrokine-1 (GKN1) is a secreted auto-/paracrine protein, described to be expressed in the gastric mucosa. In gastric cancers GKN1 expression is commonly down-regulated. While current research focusses on the exploration of tumor-suppressive properties of GKN1 with regard to its potential clinical use in the treatment of gastroenterologic tumor disease, nothing is known about GKN1 expression and function in other organ systems. We investigated GKN1 expression in placental tissue and cells. GKN1 was localized using immunohistochemistry in first and third trimester placental tissue, hydatidiform moles and various gestational trophoblastic neoplasias. We determined the expression of GKN1 in immunomagnetic bead-separated term placental cells and in choriocarcinoma cell lines. The role of GKN1 for JEG-3 migration was studied using live cell imaging. E-cadherin, MMP-2 and -9, TIMP-1 and -2, as well as urokinase (uPA) expression levels were determined. GKN1 is expressed in healthy third trimester placentas. Its expression is specifically limited to the extravillous trophoblast (EVT). GKN1 expression is significantly reduced in choriocarcinoma cell lines and gestational trophoblastic neoplasias. GKN1 attenuates the migration of JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells in vitro, possibly via AKT-mediated induction of E-cadherin. GKN1 treatment reduced MMP-9 expression in JEG-3. Besides its role in gastric physiology our results clearly indicate regulatory functions of GKN1 in the EVT at the feto-maternal interface during pregnancy. Based on our findings in the JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell line, an auto-/paracrine role of GKN1 for EVT motility and villous anchorage at the basal plate is conceivable. Thus, the tumor suppressor GKN1 is expressed in placental EVT and might contribute to the regulation of EVT migration/invasion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Placenta-on-a-chip: a novel platform to study the biology of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Soo; Romero, Roberto; Han, Yu Mi; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, Chong Jai; Hong, Joon-Seok; Huh, Dongeun

    2016-01-01

    Studying the biology of the human placenta represents a major experimental challenge. Although conventional cell culture techniques have been used to study different types of placenta-derived cells, current in vitro models have limitations in recapitulating organ-specific structure and key physiological functions of the placenta. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to leverage microfluidic and microfabrication technologies to develop a microengineered biomimetic model that replicates the architecture and function of the placenta. A "Placenta-on-a-Chip" microdevice was created by using a set of soft elastomer-based microfabrication techniques known as soft lithography. This microsystem consisted of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels separated by a thin extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane. To reproduce the placental barrier in this model, human trophoblasts (JEG-3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded onto the opposite sides of the ECM membrane and cultured under dynamic flow conditions to form confluent epithelial and endothelial layers in close apposition. We tested the physiological function of the microengineered placental barrier by measuring glucose transport across the trophoblast-endothelial interface over time. The permeability of the barrier study was analyzed and compared to that obtained from acellular devices and additional control groups that contained epithelial or endothelial layers alone. Our microfluidic cell culture system provided a tightly controlled fluidic environment conducive to the proliferation and maintenance of JEG-3 trophoblasts and HUVECs on the ECM scaffold. Prolonged culture in this model produced confluent cellular monolayers on the intervening membrane that together formed the placental barrier. This in vivo-like microarchitecture was also critical for creating a physiologically relevant effective barrier to glucose transport. Quantitative investigation of barrier function was

  7. A transcriptional cofactor YAP regulates IFNT expression via transcription factor TEAD in bovine conceptuses.

    PubMed

    Kusama, K; Bai, R; Sakurai, T; Bai, H; Ideta, A; Aoyagi, Y; Imakawa, K

    2016-10-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT) is the pregnancy recognition protein in all ruminants, and its expression is restricted to trophoblast cells. Interferon tau production increases as the conceptus elongates; however, its expression is downregulated soon after the initiation of conceptus attachment to the uterine epithelium. Our previous study identified that among 8 bovine IFNT genes, only 2 forms of IFNTs, IFNT2 and IFN-tau-c1, were expressed by the conceptuses during the periattachment period. To characterize whether Hippo signaling including a transcription cofactor yes-associated protein (YAP) was involved in the IFNT regulation, we examined the expression and effects of YAP and/or TEAD in human choriocarcinoma JEG3 and bovine trophoblast CT-1 cells, and in bovine conceptuses obtained from day 17, 20 or 22 pregnant animals (pregnant day 19.5 = day of conceptus attachment to the endometrium). YAP was expressed in bovine conceptuses and transfection of YAP or TEAD4, a transcription factor partner of YAP, expression plasmid increased the luciferase activity of IFNT2 and IFN-tau-c1 reporter plasmids in JEG3 cells. In the presence of YAP expression plasmid, TEAD2 or TEAD4 expression plasmid further upregulated transcriptional activity of IFNT2 or IFN-tau-c1 constructs, which were substantially reduced in the absence of the TEAD-binding site on IFNT2 or IFN-tau-c1 promoter region in JEG3 cells. In CT-1 cells, treatment with TEAD2, TEAD4, or YAP small-interfering RNA downregulated endogenous IFNT expression. It should be noted that TEAD2 and TEAD4 were predominantly localized in the nuclei of trophectoderm of Day 17 conceptuses, but nuclear localization appeared to be lower in those cells of conceptuses on days 20 and 22 of pregnancy. Moreover, the binding of TEAD4 to the TEAD-binding site of the IFN-tau-c1 promoter region in day 17 conceptuses was less in day 20 and 22 conceptuses. Furthermore, the level of YAP phosphorylation increased in day 20 and 22 conceptuses. These

  8. Gossypol enantiomers potently inhibit human placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and aromatase activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaoyao; Mao, Baiping; Li, Linxi; Guan, Hongguo; Su, Ying; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Gossypol is a chemical isolated from cotton seeds. It exists as (+) or (-) enantiomer and has been tested for anticancer, abortion-inducing, and male contraception. Progesterone formed from pregnenolone by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1) and estradiol from androgen by aromatase (CYP19A1) are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy or associated with some cancers. In this study we compared the potencies of (+)- and (-)-gossypol enantiomers in the inhibition of HSD3B1 and aromatase activities as well as progesterone and estradiol production in human placental JEG-3 cells. (+) Gossypol showed potent inhibition on human placental HSD3B1 with IC50 value of 2.3 μM, while (-) gossypol weakly inhibited it with IC50 over 100 μM. In contrast, (-) gossypol moderately inhibited CYP19A1 activity with IC50 of 23 μM, while (+) gossypol had no inhibition when the highest concentration (100 μM) was tested. (+) Gossypol enantiomer competitively inhibited HSD3B1 against substrate pregnenolone and showed mixed mode against NAD(+). (-) Gossypol competitively inhibited CYP19A1 against substrate testosterone. Gossypol enantiomers showed different potency related to their inhibition on human HSD3B1 and CYP19A1. Whether gossypol enantiomer is used alone or in combination relies on its application and beneficial effects.

  9. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin.

  10. RKIP suppresses the proliferation and invasion ofchoriocarcinoma cells through inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Di; Fan, Qingxia

    2015-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), an inhibitor of Raf-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK), has been identified as a metastasis suppressor gene. However, the role of RKIP in human choriocarcinoma remains undetermined. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the expression of RKIP in human choriocarcinoma cells and evaluated the effects of RKIP on choriocarcinoma cell proliferation and invasion. Our results indicated that RKIP was lowly expressed in human choriocarcinoma cells. Overexpression of RKIP inhibits choriocarcinoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion, promotes the apoptosis of choriocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, overexpression of RKIP significantly inhibited the expression of MEK and ERK phosphorylation in choriocarcinoma cells. Taken together, these data suggest that RKIP suppresses cell proliferation and invasion in choriocarcinoma cells through inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway, implying that RKIP may serve as a potential molecular target for the treatment of human choriocarcinoma.

  11. Change in human chorionic gonadotropin in gestational trophoblastic disease observed during the course of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, S C; Hsieh, C Y; Ouyang, P C

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the physicochemical characteristics of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), with special reference to the clinical course of chemotherapy and prognosis. In gel high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the hCG molecules from normal pregnancy and from the hydatidiform mole had the same molecular form as standard purified hCG, whereas hCG from choriocarcinoma was inconsistent in molecular form, containing molecules which are smaller, the same or larger than those of standard purified hCG. In two fatal choriocarcinoma patients, large hCG and large hCG alpha were found in the urine samples collected within one month prior to death. In a chromatofocusing study, the chromatofocusing pattern of hCG from GTD was acidic and similar to that of early pregnancy. The chromatofocusing patterns did not alter or were altered only slightly during the course of chemotherapy. In a Concanavalin A-Sepharose (Con A) chromatography study, the Con A binding shifted from low to high binding in patients with GTD who were responsive to chemotherapy. In summary, the molecular form, electric charge and Con A binding of hydatidiform mole hCG are similar to those of early pregnancy hCG and standard purified hCG, whereas the molecular form and Con A binding of choriocarcinoma are different from those of early pregnancy hCG and standard purified hCG. The presence of smaller or larger molecular forms of hCG may be an ominous sign, whereas the presence of high Con A binding may be a favorable sign. The chromatofocusing pattern seems to be unrelated to the clinical course of chemotherapy.

  12. No evidence for the in vivo activity of aromatase-inhibiting flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, N; Joshi, S C; Ahotupa, M; Li, X; Ammälä, J; Mäkelä, S; Santti, R

    2001-09-01

    Measurements of the aromatase-inhibiting and antioxidative capacities of flavonoids in vitro showed that slight changes in flavonoid structure may result in marked changes in biological activity. Several flavonoids such as 7-hydroxyflavone and chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) were shown to inhibit the formation of 3H-17beta-estradiol from 3H-androstenedione (IC(50)<1.0 microM) in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells and in human embryonic kidney cells HEK 293 transfected with human aromatase gene (Arom+HEK 293). Flavone and quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) showed no inhibition (IC(50)>100 microM). None of the requirements for optimal antioxidative capacity (2,3-double bond with 4'-hydroxy group, 3-hydroxyl group, 5,7-dihydroxy structure and the orthodihydroxy structure in the B-ring) is relevant for the maximum inhibition of aromatase by flavonoids. After oral administration to immature rats at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, which considerably exceeds amounts found in daily human diets, neither aromatase-inhibiting nonestrogenic flavonoids, such as chrysin, nor estrogenic flavonoids, such as naringenin and apigenin, induced uterine growth or reduced estrogen- or androgen-induced uterine growth. The inability of flavonoids to inhibit aromatase and, consequently, uterine growth in short-term tests may be due to their relatively poor absorption and/or bioavailability.

  13. Effects of nutrition relevant mixtures of phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis, aromatase, estrogen, and androgen activity.

    PubMed

    Taxvig, Camilla; Elleby, Anders; Sonne-Hansen, Katrine; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Nellemann, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are naturally occurring plant components produced in a large range of plants. They can induce biologic responses in vertebrates by mimicking or modulating the action or production of endogenous hormones. This study examined mixtures of 12 food relevant PEs for effects on steroid hormone production, aromatase activity, estrogenic activity, and for interaction with the androgen receptor. The results show that a mixture of all tested PEs increased estradiol production and decreased testosterone production in H295R human adrenal corticocarcinoma cells, indicating an induced aromatase activity. Furthermore, exposure of the H295R cells to isoflavonoids caused a decrease in testosterone production, and various mixtures of PEs significantly stimulated MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cell growth and induced aromatase activity in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. The estrogenic effect in the MCF7 cells of the isoflavonoid mixture and coumestrol was supported by an observed increase in progesterone receptor protein expression as well as a decreased ERalpha expression. Overall, the results support that nutrition-relevant concentrations of PEs both alone and in mixtures possess various endocrine disrupting effects, all of which need to be considered when assessing the effects on human health.

  14. Differential Effects of Glyphosate and Roundup on Human Placental Cells and Aromatase

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Sophie; Moslemi, Safa; Sipahutar, Herbert; Benachour, Nora; Seralini, Gilles-Eric

    2005-01-01

    Roundup is a glyphosate-based herbicide used worldwide, including on most genetically modified plants that have been designed to tolerate it. Its residues may thus enter the food chain, and glyphosate is found as a contaminant in rivers. Some agricultural workers using glyphosate have pregnancy problems, but its mechanism of action in mammals is questioned. Here we show that glyphosate is toxic to human placental JEG3 cells within 18 hr with concentrations lower than those found with agricultural use, and this effect increases with concentration and time or in the presence of Roundup adjuvants. Surprisingly, Roundup is always more toxic than its active ingredient. We tested the effects of glyphosate and Roundup at lower nontoxic concentrations on aromatase, the enzyme responsible for estrogen synthesis. The glyphosate-based herbicide disrupts aromatase activity and mRNA levels and interacts with the active site of the purified enzyme, but the effects of glyphosate are facilitated by the Roundup formulation in microsomes or in cell culture. We conclude that endocrine and toxic effects of Roundup, not just glyphosate, can be observed in mammals. We suggest that the presence of Roundup adjuvants enhances glyphosate bioavailability and/or bioaccumulation. PMID:15929894

  15. Differential effects of glyphosate and roundup on human placental cells and aromatase.

    PubMed

    Richard, Sophie; Moslemi, Safa; Sipahutar, Herbert; Benachour, Nora; Seralini, Gilles-Eric

    2005-06-01

    Roundup is a glyphosate-based herbicide used worldwide, including on most genetically modified plants that have been designed to tolerate it. Its residues may thus enter the food chain, and glyphosate is found as a contaminant in rivers. Some agricultural workers using glyphosate have pregnancy problems, but its mechanism of action in mammals is questioned. Here we show that glyphosate is toxic to human placental JEG3 cells within 18 hr with concentrations lower than those found with agricultural use, and this effect increases with concentration and time or in the presence of Roundup adjuvants. Surprisingly, Roundup is always more toxic than its active ingredient. We tested the effects of glyphosate and Roundup at lower nontoxic concentrations on aromatase, the enzyme responsible for estrogen synthesis. The glyphosate-based herbicide disrupts aromatase activity and mRNA levels and interacts with the active site of the purified enzyme, but the effects of glyphosate are facilitated by the Roundup formulation in microsomes or in cell culture. We conclude that endocrine and toxic effects of Roundup, not just glyphosate, can be observed in mammals. We suggest that the presence of Roundup adjuvants enhances glyphosate bioavailability and/or bioaccumulation.

  16. Major Pesticides Are More Toxic to Human Cells Than Their Declared Active Principles

    PubMed Central

    Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides are used throughout the world as mixtures called formulations. They contain adjuvants, which are often kept confidential and are called inerts by the manufacturing companies, plus a declared active principle, which is usually tested alone. We tested the toxicity of 9 pesticides, comparing active principles and their formulations, on three human cell lines (HepG2, HEK293, and JEG3). Glyphosate, isoproturon, fluroxypyr, pirimicarb, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole, and prochloraz constitute, respectively, the active principles of 3 major herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 3 fungicides. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. Fungicides were the most toxic from concentrations 300–600 times lower than agricultural dilutions, followed by herbicides and then insecticides, with very similar profiles in all cell types. Despite its relatively benign reputation, Roundup was among the most toxic herbicides and insecticides tested. Most importantly, 8 formulations out of 9 were up to one thousand times more toxic than their active principles. Our results challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake for pesticides because this norm is calculated from the toxicity of the active principle alone. Chronic tests on pesticides may not reflect relevant environmental exposures if only one ingredient of these mixtures is tested alone. PMID:24719846

  17. Major pesticides are more toxic to human cells than their declared active principles.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Defarge, Nicolas; Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides are used throughout the world as mixtures called formulations. They contain adjuvants, which are often kept confidential and are called inerts by the manufacturing companies, plus a declared active principle, which is usually tested alone. We tested the toxicity of 9 pesticides, comparing active principles and their formulations, on three human cell lines (HepG2, HEK293, and JEG3). Glyphosate, isoproturon, fluroxypyr, pirimicarb, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole, and prochloraz constitute, respectively, the active principles of 3 major herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 3 fungicides. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. Fungicides were the most toxic from concentrations 300-600 times lower than agricultural dilutions, followed by herbicides and then insecticides, with very similar profiles in all cell types. Despite its relatively benign reputation, Roundup was among the most toxic herbicides and insecticides tested. Most importantly, 8 formulations out of 9 were up to one thousand times more toxic than their active principles. Our results challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake for pesticides because this norm is calculated from the toxicity of the active principle alone. Chronic tests on pesticides may not reflect relevant environmental exposures if only one ingredient of these mixtures is tested alone.

  18. Basal expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene is dependent on protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, R A; Matthews, R P; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1995-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel that becomes activated after phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We demonstrate that PKA also plays a crucial role in maintaining basal expression of the CFTR gene in the human colon carcinoma cell line T84. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of a dominant-negative regulatory subunit or treatment with the PKA-selective inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89) caused a complete suppression of CFTR gene expression without affecting other constitutively active genes. Basal expression of a 2.2-kb region of the CFTR promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene (CFTR-luc) exhibited the same dependence on PKA. The ability of cAMP to induce CFTR over basal levels is cell-type specific. In T84 cells, both the endogenous CFTR gene and CFTR-luc exhibited only a modest inducibility (approximately 2-fold), whereas in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3, CFTR-luc could be induced at least 4-fold. A variant cAMP-response element is present at position -48 to -41 in the CFTR promoter, and mutation of this sequence blocks basal expression. We conclude that cAMP, acting through PKA, is an essential regulator of basal CFTR gene expression and may mediate an induction of CFTR in responsive cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7543684

  19. Distinct functional roles for the Menkes and Wilson copper translocating P-type ATPases in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Belinda; Michalczyk, Agnes; Greenough, Mark; Camakaris, James; Mercer, Jjulian; Ackland, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The copper transporting ATPases, Menkes (ATP7A; MNK) and Wilson (ATP7B; WND) are essential for normal copper transport in the human body. The placenta is the key organ in copper supply to the fetus during pregnancy and it is one of the few organs in the body to express both of the ATPases. The placenta therefore provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the specific roles of these transporters within the one cell type. Using polarized placental Jeg-3 cells, siRNA technology and radio-labelled 64Cu transport assays, MNK and WND were shown to have distinct roles in the vectorial transport of copper. MNK transported copper from the cell via the basolateral membrane and in contrast, WND transported copper from the apical membrane. Inactivation of MNK resulted in decreased activity of two important cuproenzymes, lysyl oxidase and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase. Overall, these results provide definitive evidence for distinct roles of MNK and WND in the human placenta, and are consistent with a role for MNK in the transport of copper into the fetal circulation, and through delivery of copper to placental cuproenzymes, whilst WND contributes to the maintenance of placental copper homeostasis by transporting copper to the maternal circulation.

  20. The appetite suppressant d-fenfluramine induces apoptosis in human serotonergic cells.

    PubMed

    Bengel, D; Isaacs, K R; Heils, A; Lesch, K P; Murphy, D L

    1998-09-14

    Fenfluramine is an amphetamine analogue which has been widely used in the treatment of obesity. In rodents, non-human primates, and humans, fenfluramine is associated with some indices of neurotoxicity, as well as pulmonary hypertension and cardiac valve pathology. In the present study, d-fenfluramine was found to be cytotoxic to the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) expressing human placental choriocarcinoma cells. d-Fenfluramine caused DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. Apoptosis was not observed after the 5-HTT had been blocked by fluoxetine, indicating that intact 5-HTT function is required for d-fenfluramine to induce programmed cell death. These observations in a human cell line may reflect a possible mechanism associated with the risks of fenfluramine administration in several species, including humans.

  1. Human labour is associated with decreased cytoplasmic FoxO4.

    PubMed

    Lim, R; Riley, C; Barker, G; Rice, G E; Lappas, M

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box O (FoxO) proteins function primarily as transcription factors in the nucleus where they bind to their cognate DNA targeting sequences. FoxO regulated genes include those involved in cellular stress responses, inflammation and apoptosis; all of which are involved in the processes of human labour and delivery. We have previously identified Forkhead box O4 (FoxO4) proteins in human gestational tissues; there is, however, no data is available on the role of FoxO4 in the processes of human labour and delivery. Thus the aim of this study was to determine the effect of (i) human labour, preterm chorioamnionitis and pro-inflammatory stimuli on the expression of FoxO4 in human placenta and fetal membranes; and (ii) FoxO4 knockdown by siRNA on the expression of pro-labour mediators. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry and/or Western blotting was used to analyse the expression of FoxO4 (n = 6 per group). Human labour and preterm chorioamnionitis significantly decreased cytoplasmic FoxO4 expression in placenta and/or choriodecidua. Knockdown of FoxO4 mRNA and protein in JEG-3 cells using siRNA was associated with decreased COX-2 mRNA expression concomitant with lower PGF(2α) secretion. However, in BeWo cells, siRNA inhibition of FoxO4 was not associated with inflammation, oxidative stress or apoptosis. In summary, human term labour and chorioamnionitis is characterised by lower FoxO4 mRNA and/or protein expression in placenta and/or choriodecidua. Although the exact role of FoxO4 in human pregnancy remains to be fully elucidated, our data demonstrate that it can regulate COX-2 expression and subsequent prostaglandin expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MSX2 Induces Trophoblast Invasion in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junjie; Yang, Genling; Tian, Na; Wang, Xiaojie; Tan, Yi; Tan, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Normal implantation depends on appropriate trophoblast growth and invasion. Inadequate trophoblast invasion results in pregnancy-related disorders, such as early miscarriage and pre-eclampsia, which are dangerous to both the mother and fetus. Msh Homeobox 2 (MSX2), a member of the MSX family of homeobox proteins, plays a significant role in the proliferation and differentiation of various cells and tissues, including ectodermal organs, teeth, and chondrocytes. Recently, MSX2 was found to play important roles in the invasion of cancer cells into adjacent tissues via the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the role of MSX2 in trophoblastic invasion during placental development has yet to be explored. In the present study, we detected MSX2 expression in cytotrophoblast, syncytiotrophoblast, and extravillous cytotrophoblast cells of first or third trimester human placentas via immunohistochemistry analysis. Furthermore, we found that the in vitro invasive ability of HTR8/SVneo cells was enhanced by exogenous overexpression of MSX2, and that this effect was accompanied by increased protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), vimentin, and β-catenin. Conversely, treatment of HTR8/SVneo cells with MSX2-specific siRNAs resulted in decreased protein expression of MMP-2, vimentin, and β-catenin, and reduced invasion levels in a Matrigel invasion test. Notably, however, treatment with the MSX2 overexpression plasmid and the MSX2 siRNAs had no effect on the mRNA expression levels of β-catenin. Meanwhile, overexpression of MSX2 and treatment with the MSX2-specific siRNA resulted in decreased and increased E-cadherin expression, respectively, in JEG-3 cells. Lastly, the protein expression levels of MSX2 were significantly lower in human pre-eclamptic placental villi than in the matched control placentas. Collectively, our results suggest that MSX2 may induce human trophoblast cell invasion, and dysregulation of MSX2 expression may be associated

  3. Lantana macrophylla Schauer (Verbenaceae) ethanolic extract induces activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs pathway and Ca2+ imbalance in human trophoblasts derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Aline O; de Oliveira, Fernando F; de Oliveira, Rosilene A; de J da S Junior, Ademir; Takser, Larissa; Reyes-Moreno, Carlos; Lafond, Julie

    2012-03-01

    Lantana macrophylla Schauer (Verbenaceae) a medicinal plant used to treat menstrual and respiratory disorders was investigated. The ethanolic extract from leaves was subjected to phytochemical and biological analysis. BeWo and JEG-3 cells were used to evaluate human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCG) production, syncytial formation, Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ handling protein expression. The cAMP production and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) phosphorylation were also investigated. Phytochemical analysis yield three triterpenes: oleanolic, ursolic and latonolic acid. Viability assay showed no significant cytotoxic effect. A significant decrease in hCG production but not a disturbance on BeWo cell fusion were observed. The cAMP pathway was not affected by L. macrophylla extract alone; although the cAMP production inducted by forskolin was diminished. Both ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs pathways were activated. Increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was observed after 24 h treatment in a time and dose dependent manner; however only L. macrophylla at 10 μg/mL induced increased [Ca2+]i after 10 min treatment. CaBP28K and PMCA1/4 were modulated at protein and mRNA levels, respectively. This study showed for the first time the effect of triterpenoids from L. macrophylla leaves on trophoblasts-like cells and indicates a potential toxic effect of this plant in the placental development and fetal growth.

  4. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor.

  5. Molecular analysis of the human SLC13A4 sulfate transporter gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferis, J.; Rakoczy, J.; Simmons, D.G.; Dawson, P.A.

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Basal promoter activity of SLC13A4 −57 to −192 nt upstream of transcription initiation site. ► Human SLC13A4 5′-flanking region has conserved motifs with other placental species. ► Putative NFY, SP1 and KLF7 motifs in SLC13A4 5′-flanking region enhance transcription. -- Abstract: The human solute linked carrier (SLC) 13A4 gene is primarily expressed in the placenta where it is proposed to mediate the transport of nutrient sulfate from mother to fetus. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of SLC13A4 expression remain unknown. To investigate the regulation of SLC13A4 gene expression, we analysed the transcriptional activity of the human SLC13A4 5′-flanking region in the JEG-3 placental cell line using luciferase reporter assays. Basal transcriptional activity was identified in the region −57 to −192 nucleotides upstream of the SLC13A4 transcription initiation site. Mutational analysis of the minimal promoter region identified Nuclear factor Y (NFY), Specificity protein 1 (SP1) and Krüppel like factor 7 (KLF7) motifs which conferred positive transcriptional activity, as well as Zinc finger protein of the cerebellum 2 (ZIC2) and helix–loop–helix protein 1 (HEN1) motifs that repressed transcription. The conserved NFY, SP1, KLF7, ZIC2 and HEN1 motifs in the SLC13A4 promoter of placental species but not in non-placental species, suggests a potential role for these putative transcriptional factor binding motifs in the physiological control of SLC13A4 mRNA expression.

  6. Glyphosate formulations induce apoptosis and necrosis in human umbilical, embryonic, and placental cells.

    PubMed

    Benachour, Nora; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the toxicity of four glyphosate (G)-based herbicides in Roundup formulations, from 10(5) times dilutions, on three different human cell types. This dilution level is far below agricultural recommendations and corresponds to low levels of residues in food or feed. The formulations have been compared to G alone and with its main metabolite AMPA or with one known adjuvant of R formulations, POEA. HUVEC primary neonate umbilical cord vein cells have been tested with 293 embryonic kidney and JEG3 placental cell lines. All R formulations cause total cell death within 24 h, through an inhibition of the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity, and necrosis, by release of cytosolic adenylate kinase measuring membrane damage. They also induce apoptosis via activation of enzymatic caspases 3/7 activity. This is confirmed by characteristic DNA fragmentation, nuclear shrinkage (pyknosis), and nuclear fragmentation (karyorrhexis), which is demonstrated by DAPI in apoptotic round cells. G provokes only apoptosis, and HUVEC are 100 times more sensitive overall at this level. The deleterious effects are not proportional to G concentrations but rather depend on the nature of the adjuvants. AMPA and POEA separately and synergistically damage cell membranes like R but at different concentrations. Their mixtures are generally even more harmful with G. In conclusion, the R adjuvants like POEA change human cell permeability and amplify toxicity induced already by G, through apoptosis and necrosis. The real threshold of G toxicity must take into account the presence of adjuvants but also G metabolism and time-amplified effects or bioaccumulation. This should be discussed when analyzing the in vivo toxic actions of R. This work clearly confirms that the adjuvants in Roundup formulations are not inert. Moreover, the proprietary mixtures available on the market could cause cell damage and even death around residual levels to be expected, especially in food and feed

  7. Ethoxylated adjuvants of glyphosate-based herbicides are active principles of human cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, R; Bernay, B; Séralini, G-E

    2013-11-16

    Pesticides are always used in formulations as mixtures of an active principle with adjuvants. Glyphosate, the active ingredient of the major pesticide in the world, is an herbicide supposed to be specific on plant metabolism. Its adjuvants are generally considered as inert diluents. Since side effects for all these compounds have been claimed, we studied potential active principles for toxicity on human cells for 9 glyphosate-based formulations. For this we detailed their compositions and toxicities, and as controls we used a major adjuvant (the polyethoxylated tallowamine POE-15), glyphosate alone, and a total formulation without glyphosate. This was performed after 24h exposures on hepatic (HepG2), embryonic (HEK293) and placental (JEG3) cell lines. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. The compositions in adjuvants were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Here we demonstrate that all formulations are more toxic than glyphosate, and we separated experimentally three groups of formulations differentially toxic according to their concentrations in ethoxylated adjuvants. Among them, POE-15 clearly appears to be the most toxic principle against human cells, even if others are not excluded. It begins to be active with negative dose-dependent effects on cellular respiration and membrane integrity between 1 and 3ppm, at environmental/occupational doses. We demonstrate in addition that POE-15 induces necrosis when its first micellization process occurs, by contrast to glyphosate which is known to promote endocrine disrupting effects after entering cells. Altogether, these results challenge the establishment of guidance values such as the acceptable daily intake of glyphosate, when these are mostly based on a long term in vivo test of glyphosate alone. Since pesticides are always used with adjuvants that could change their toxicity, the necessity to assess their whole formulations as mixtures becomes obvious. This challenges

  8. Expression of human LINE-1 elements in enhanced by isochromosome 12p; evidence from testicular germ cell tumors and the Pallister-Killian syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Swergold, D.

    1994-09-01

    Expression of the human LINE-1 (L1Hs) transposable element is restricted to a narrow range of cell types. Specific expression of either endogenous elements or transfected recombinant elements has been reported primarily in tumors and cell lines of germ cell origin, including the NTera2D1, 2102EP, and JEG3 cell lines. These tumors and cell lines often contain one or more copies of isochromosome 12p, or translocations of 12p. Another human condition, the Pallister-Killian syndrome, is also characterized by the mosaic presence of an isochromosome 12p in patient`s cells. M28, a previously described somatic hybrid cell line, contains a human isochromosone 12p derived from fibroblasts of a patient with Pallister-Killian syndrome in a mouse LMTK-background. I asked whether the M28 cell line would exhibit enhanced expression of endogenous or transfected L1Hs elements. Expression of transfected recombinant L1Hs elements was 10-20 fold higher in M28 than in LMTK-cells. Expression of L1Hs elements was not increased in the GM10868A somatic cell hybrid line which contains a complete human chromosome 12 in a Chinese Hamster Ovary background. Somatic cell hybrid lines containing various human chromosomes in a LMTK-background also exhibited no enhanced L1Hs expression. P40, the protein encoded by the L1Hs first open reading frame, was detected in NTera2D1 but not in non-transfected M28 cells. Preliminary promoter deletion experiments indicate that similar, but non-identical regions of the L1Hs 5{prime} UTR, contribute to high level expression in the NTera2D1 and the M28 cell lines. These data suggest that the enhanced expression of human LINE-1 elements in tumors of germ cell origin is due in part to the presence of the isochromosome 12p.

  9. Differential cell line susceptibility to the emerging Zika virus: implications for disease pathogenesis, non-vector-borne human transmission and animal reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Yip, Cyril Chik-Yan; Tsang, Jessica Oi-Ling; Tee, Kah-Meng; Cai, Jian-Piao; Chik, Kenn Ka-Heng; Zhu, Zheng; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Choi, Garnet Kwan-Yue; Sridhar, Siddharth; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Lu, Gang; Chiu, Kin; Lo, Amy Cheuk-Yin; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-08-24

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is unique among human-pathogenic flaviviruses by its association with congenital anomalies and trans-placental and sexual human-to-human transmission. Although the pathogenesis of ZIKV-associated neurological complications has been reported in recent studies, key questions on the pathogenesis of the other clinical manifestations, non-vector-borne transmission and potential animal reservoirs of ZIKV remain unanswered. We systematically characterized the differential cell line susceptibility of 18 human and 15 nonhuman cell lines to two ZIKV isolates (human and primate) and dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2). Productive ZIKV replication (⩾2 log increase in viral load, ZIKV nonstructural protein-1 (NS1) protein expression and cytopathic effects (CPE)) was found in the placental (JEG-3), neuronal (SF268), muscle (RD), retinal (ARPE19), pulmonary (Hep-2 and HFL), colonic (Caco-2),and hepatic (Huh-7) cell lines. These findings helped to explain the trans-placental transmission and other clinical manifestations of ZIKV. Notably, the prostatic (LNCaP), testicular (833KE) and renal (HEK) cell lines showed increased ZIKV load and/or NS1 protein expression without inducing CPE, suggesting their potential roles in sexual transmission with persistent viral replication at these anatomical sites. Comparatively, none of the placental and genital tract cell lines allowed efficient DENV-2 replication. Among the nonhuman cell lines, nonhuman primate (Vero and LLC-MK2), pig (PK-15), rabbit (RK-13), hamster (BHK21) and chicken (DF-1) cell lines supported productive ZIKV replication. These animal species may be important reservoirs and/or potential animal models for ZIKV. The findings in our study help to explain the viral shedding pattern, transmission and pathogenesis of the rapidly disseminating ZIKV, and are useful for optimizing laboratory diagnostics and studies on the pathogenesis and counter-measures of ZIKV.

  10. Differential cell line susceptibility to the emerging Zika virus: implications for disease pathogenesis, non-vector-borne human transmission and animal reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Yip, Cyril Chik-Yan; Tsang, Jessica Oi-Ling; Tee, Kah-Meng; Cai, Jian-Piao; Chik, Kenn Ka-Heng; Zhu, Zheng; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Choi, Garnet Kwan-Yue; Sridhar, Siddharth; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Lu, Gang; Chiu, Kin; Lo, Amy Cheuk-Yin; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is unique among human-pathogenic flaviviruses by its association with congenital anomalies and trans-placental and sexual human-to-human transmission. Although the pathogenesis of ZIKV-associated neurological complications has been reported in recent studies, key questions on the pathogenesis of the other clinical manifestations, non-vector-borne transmission and potential animal reservoirs of ZIKV remain unanswered. We systematically characterized the differential cell line susceptibility of 18 human and 15 nonhuman cell lines to two ZIKV isolates (human and primate) and dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2). Productive ZIKV replication (⩾2 log increase in viral load, ZIKV nonstructural protein-1 (NS1) protein expression and cytopathic effects (CPE)) was found in the placental (JEG-3), neuronal (SF268), muscle (RD), retinal (ARPE19), pulmonary (Hep-2 and HFL), colonic (Caco-2),and hepatic (Huh-7) cell lines. These findings helped to explain the trans-placental transmission and other clinical manifestations of ZIKV. Notably, the prostatic (LNCaP), testicular (833KE) and renal (HEK) cell lines showed increased ZIKV load and/or NS1 protein expression without inducing CPE, suggesting their potential roles in sexual transmission with persistent viral replication at these anatomical sites. Comparatively, none of the placental and genital tract cell lines allowed efficient DENV-2 replication. Among the nonhuman cell lines, nonhuman primate (Vero and LLC-MK2), pig (PK-15), rabbit (RK-13), hamster (BHK21) and chicken (DF-1) cell lines supported productive ZIKV replication. These animal species may be important reservoirs and/or potential animal models for ZIKV. The findings in our study help to explain the viral shedding pattern, transmission and pathogenesis of the rapidly disseminating ZIKV, and are useful for optimizing laboratory diagnostics and studies on the pathogenesis and counter-measures of ZIKV. PMID:27553173

  11. Development and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to human embryonal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Khazaeli, M.B.; Beierwaltes, W.H.; Pitt, G.S.; Kabza, G.A.; Rogers, K.J.; LoBuglio, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    A monoclonal anti-testicular carcinoma antibody was obtained via the somatic cell fusion technique by immunization of BALB/c mice with freshly prepared single cell suspension from a patient with testicular embryonal carcinoma with choriocarcinoma components. The hybridoma supernates were screened against the testicular carcinoma cells used in the immunization as well as normal mononuclear white blood cells isolated from the same patient. An antibody (5F9) was selected which bound to fresh tumor cells from two patients with embryonal testicular carcinoma and failed to bind to fresh tumor cells from 24 patients (2 seminoma, 2 melanoma, 3 neck, 2 esophageal, 1 ovarian, 3 colon, 1 prostate, 2 breast, 1 liposarcoma, 3 endometrial, 1 kidney, 1 adrenal, 1 larynx and 1 bladder tumors) or cell suspensions prepared from normal liver, lung, spleen, ovary, testes, kidney, red blood cells or white blood cells. The antibody was tested for its binding to several well established cancer cell lines, and was found to bind to the BeWo human choriocarcinoma and two human embryonal carcinoma cell lines. The antibody did not react with 22 other cell lines or with hCG. The antibody was labeled with /sup 131/I and injected into nude mice bearing BeWo tumors and evaluated for tumor localization by performing whole body scans with a gamma camera 5 days later. Six mice injected with the antibody showed positive tumor localization without the need for background subtraction while six mice injected with MOPC-21, a murine myeloma immunoglobulin, demonstrated much less tumor localization. Tissue distribution studies performed after scanning showed specific tumor localization (8:1 tumor: muscle) for the monoclonal antibody and no specific localization for MOPC-21.

  12. PD-L1 Expression in Human Placentas and Gestational Trophoblastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Veras, Emanuela; Kurman, Robert J; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2017-03-01

    One of the major immune checkpoints responsible for immune evasion in cancer cells is the interaction between programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1). As human trophoblastic cells display many of the features of malignant cells such as the ability to invade normal tissue including blood vessels and are apparently not eradicated by the host immune system, we undertook the present study to determine whether PD-L1 was upregulated in different types of trophoblastic cells during normal pregnancy and in gestational trophoblastic diseases. Immunohistochemistry using an anti-PD-L1-specific antibody demonstrated that in early and term normal placentas, PD-L1 was highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast and to a much lower extent in intermediate trophoblastic cells located in the chorion laeve and implantation site. PD-L1 immunoreactivity was undetectable in cytotrophoblastic cells. This staining pattern in normal placenta was recapitulated in various types of gestational trophoblastic disease. PD-L1 was highly expressed by syncytiotrophoblast in complete moles and choriocarcinomas. The intermediate trophoblastic neoplasms, placental site trophoblastic tumors, and epithelioid trophoblastic tumors showed variable PD-L1 immunoreactivity but at a lower intensity than in the neoplastic syncytiotrophoblast in choriocarcinoma. In addition, we observed PD-1-positive lymphocytes located within the implantation site and in trophoblastic tumors. In summary, this study describes a novel mechanism for trophoblastic cells to create a tolerogenic feto-maternal interface by upregulating PD-L1 in syncytiotrophoblast and in intermediate trophoblast. Trophoblastic tumors may also use PD-L1 expression to evade the host immune response thereby promoting their survival.

  13. Human chorionic gonadotropin is expressed virtually in all intracranial germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Takami, Hirokazu; Fukushima, Shintaro; Fukuoka, Kohei; Suzuki, Tomonari; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Matsushita, Yuko; Nakamura, Taishi; Arita, Hideyuki; Mukasa, Akitake; Saito, Nobuhito; Kanamori, Masayuki; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Nagane, Motoo; Iuchi, Toshihiko; Tamura, Kaoru; Maehara, Taketoshi; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Nonaka, Masahiro; Yokogami, Kiyotaka; Takeshima, Hideo; Narita, Yoshitaka; Shibui, Soichiro; Nakazato, Yoichi; Nishikawa, Ryo; Ichimura, Koichi; Matsutani, Masao

    2015-08-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) production has been utilized as a diagnostic marker for germinoma with syncytiotrophoblastic giant cells (STGC) and choriocarcinoma. Elevated hCG in germinoma is considered to predict less favorable prognosis, and an intensive treatment strategy may accordingly be applied. However, there is some evidence that any germinoma may produce hCG to varying extent. We investigated mRNA expression of the hCG β subunit (hCGβ) using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 94 germ cell tumors (GCTs). Most (93.3 %) GCTs showed higher expression levels compared with that of normal brain tissue (1.09 × 10(0)-1.40 × 10(5) fold). The expression was the highest in GCTs which harbor choriocarcinoma or STGC components. The expression level of hCGβ in germinoma was highly variable (1.09 × 10(0)-5.88 × 10(4) fold) in linear but not bimodal distribution. hCG concentrations in serum and CSF correlated with gene expression, especially when GCTs with single histological component were analyzed separately. The expression was not significantly associated with recurrence in pure germinoma. These results suggest that the serum/CSF hCG levels may need to be interpreted with caution as most GCTs appear to have the capacity of producing hCG irrespective of their histology. The clinical significance of ubiquitous hCG expression in GCTs needs further investigation.

  14. Dysregulated activation of c-Src in gestational trophoblastic disease contributes to its aggressive progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Wang, Y; Xu, Y; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Zhang, H

    2014-10-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a heterogeneous group of pregnancy-related disorders. Hydatidiform mole (HM) is the most common type of GTD, whereas gestational choriocarcinoma is the most aggressive. Non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Src contributes to the transformation to a malignant phenotype in various cancers. However, the role of c-Src in the pathogenesis of GTD remains largely unknown. The expression level of phosphorylated c-Src was determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting assay. JAR and JEG-3 cells were treated with hCG, specific c-Src inhibitor saracatinib and PP2, and PKA specific inhibitor, PKI. Cell growth rate and cell migration/invasion ability was determined by cell proliferation and transwell assays respectively. c-Src was highly activated in HM tissues and choriocarcinoma cells (JAR and JEG-3). c-Src was activated by hCG in a time and concentration-dependent manner, which was abrogated by specific c-Src and PKA inhibitors. Inhibition of c-Src activity in JAR and JEG-3 cells by saracatinib leaded to a decrease in the rate of cell growth and cell migration/invasion ability. Furthermore, inhibition of c-Src phosphorylation induced cell cycle arrest and reduced expressions of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, cyclin E1, FOXD3 and NANOG. Moreover, inhibition of c-Src activity resulted in decreased p-FAK(Tyr397) phosphorylation. Our findings indicate an important role of c-Src in the pathogenesis of GTD, and we propose that c-Src inhibitors are potential adjuvant chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of GTD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Currently used pesticides and their mixtures affect the function of sex hormone receptors and aromatase enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Lisbeth Stigaard; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-10-15

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of pesticides is of health concern, since they are found ubiquitously in the environment and in food items. We investigated in vitro effects on estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity, and aromatase enzyme activity, of the following pesticides: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb, cypermethrin, tau fluvalinate, malathion and the metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU). The pesticides were analyzed alone and in selected mixtures. Effects of the pesticides on ER and AR function were assessed in human breast carcinoma MVLN cells and hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells, respectively, using luciferase reporter gene assays. Effects on aromatase enzyme activity were analyzed in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells, employing the classical [(3)H](2)O method. Five pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole, prothioconazole, cypermethrin and malathion) weakly induced the ER transactivity, and three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole and mancozeb) antagonized the AR activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Three pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole and prothioconazole) weakly induced the aromatase activity. In addition, two mixtures, consisting of three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin) and five pesticides (terbuthylazine, bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion), respectively, induced the ER transactivity and aromatase activity, and additively antagonized the AR transactivity. In conclusion, our data suggest that currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting potential in vitro which can be mediated via ER, AR and aromatase activities. The observed mixture effects emphasize the importance of considering the combined action of pesticides in order to assure proper estimations of related health effect risks. © 2013

  16. Currently used pesticides and their mixtures affect the function of sex hormone receptors and aromatase enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldsen, Lisbeth Stigaard; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-10-15

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of pesticides is of health concern, since they are found ubiquitously in the environment and in food items. We investigated in vitro effects on estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity, and aromatase enzyme activity, of the following pesticides: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb, cypermethrin, tau fluvalinate, malathion and the metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU). The pesticides were analyzed alone and in selected mixtures. Effects of the pesticides on ER and AR function were assessed in human breast carcinoma MVLN cells and hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells, respectively, using luciferase reporter gene assays. Effects on aromatase enzyme activity were analyzed in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells, employing the classical [{sup 3}H]{sub 2}O method. Five pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole, prothioconazole, cypermethrin and malathion) weakly induced the ER transactivity, and three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole and mancozeb) antagonized the AR activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Three pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole and prothioconazole) weakly induced the aromatase activity. In addition, two mixtures, consisting of three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin) and five pesticides (terbuthylazine, bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion), respectively, induced the ER transactivity and aromatase activity, and additively antagonized the AR transactivity. In conclusion, our data suggest that currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting potential in vitro which can be mediated via ER, AR and aromatase activities. The observed mixture effects emphasize the importance of considering the combined action of pesticides in order to assure proper estimations of related health effect risks

  17. A monoclonal antibody that specifically reacts with human embryonal carcinomas, spermatogonia and oocytes is able to induce human EC cell death.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Umezawa, A; Abe, H; Suzuki, N; Yamada, T; Nozawa, S; Hata, J

    1995-02-01

    We developed a mouse monoclonal antibody, 6E2 (IgG3), against a human embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line, NCR-G3, that possesses totipotent differentiation capabilities. Culturing human EC cells in the presence of 6E2 causes their death. It has been shown that 6E2 kills EC cells dose dependently. In immunohistochemical examination with normal human germ cells, 6E2 reacted specifically with spermatogonia and oocytes. Among human germ cell tumor tissues on aceton-fixed frozen sections, 6E2 reacted with embryonal carcinomas, seminomas and dysgerminomas, but it did not react with choriocarcinomas or with yolk sac tumors. Consistently, in flow cytometric analysis of cultured human germ cell tumor cell lines, 6E2 reacted exclusively with EC cells including NCR-G3 cells. It was revealed, by preserving its antigenicity after treatment with periodic acid and tunicamycin and by radiolabeling cells followed by immunoprecipitation, that the molecule defined by 6E2 is a cell surface protein having a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. These data illustrate that the molecule defined by 6E2 links human germ cell tumors, especially embryonal carcinoma, seminoma and dysgerminoma, to their normal counterparts and that it may play a role in survival and proliferation of human EC cells.

  18. Methylation pattern of H19 exon 1 is closely related to preeclampsia and trophoblast abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linshan; Hou, Zheng; Li, Li; Yang, Yanhong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Beilei; Ren, Mo; Zhao, Dan; Miao, Zhuo; Yu, Lili; Yao, Yuanqing

    2014-09-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced disorder characterized by the overproliferation of trophoblasts. Hydatidiform moles, which are associated with a high risk of developing PE, are characterized by the excessive proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. H19 is highly expressed in placental tissue; however, its biological function remains unclear. A fundamental modification of the H19 gene is DNA methylation, which typically occurs in CG-rich regions at the promoter or the first exon region. In this study, in order to investigate the DNA methylation pattern of the H19 exon 1 region in placental tissues and trophoblast cells, placental specimens were collected from women in the first trimester of pregrancy (FTP) and the third trimester of pregnancy (TTP), as well as from from women with severe preeclampsia (sPE). We found that the DNA methylation levels of H19 exon 1 were significantly higher in the tissues obtained from women in TTP than from those obtained from women in FFP. The methylation status of CpG 1 sites within exon 1 of H19 was markedly higher in the placental tissues obtained from women with sPE than in the tissues obtained from women in TTP. In addition, we used the human choriocarcinoma cell line, JEG-3, and treated the cells with the methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza‑Dc). Following treatment with 5-Aza-Dc, the methylation levels at this CpG site showed marked hypomethylation. In addtion, the cell proliferative, migratory and invasive capacities of the cells were remarkably inhibited. Our data suggest that hypermethylation at individual CpG sites within exon 1 of H19 may be involved in the dysfunction of trophoblasts and the pathogenesis of PE.

  19. Kinetics of silica nanoparticles in the human placenta

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Mose, Tina; Maroun, Lisa Leth; Mathiesen, Line; Knudsen, Lisbeth Ehlert; Rytting, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The potential medical applications of nanoparticles warrant their investigation in terms of biodistribution and safety during pregnancy. The transport of silica nanoparticles (NPs) across the placenta was investigated using two models of maternal-fetal transfer in human placenta, namely, the BeWo b30 choriocarcinoma cell line and the ex vivo perfused human placenta. Nanotoxicity in BeWo cells was examined by the MTT assay and demonstrated decreased cell viability at concentrations greater than 100 μg/mL. In the placental perfusion experiments, antipyrine crossed the placenta rapidly, with a fetal/maternal ratio of 0.97 ± 0.10 after 2 hours. In contrast, the percentage of silica NPs reaching the fetal perfusate after 6 hours was limited to 4.2 ± 4.9% and 4.6 ± 2.4% for 25-nm and 50-nm NPs, respectively. The transport of silica NPs across the BeWo cells was also limited, with an apparent permeability of only 1.54 × 10−6 ± 1.56 × 10−6 cm/sec. Using confocal microscopy, there was visual confirmation of particle accumulation in both BeWo cells and in perfused placental tissue. Despite the low transfer of silica NPs to the fetal compartment, questions regarding biocompatibility could limit the application of unmodified silica NPs in biomedical imaging or therapy. PMID:23742169

  20. Time- and dose-dependent effects of roundup on human embryonic and placental cells.

    PubMed

    Benachour, N; Sipahutar, H; Moslemi, S; Gasnier, C; Travert, C; Séralini, G E

    2007-07-01

    Roundup is the major herbicide used worldwide, in particular on genetically modified plants that have been designed to tolerate it. We have tested the toxicity and endocrine disruption potential of Roundup (Bioforce on human embryonic 293 and placental-derived JEG3 cells, but also on normal human placenta and equine testis. The cell lines have proven to be suitable to estimate hormonal activity and toxicity of pollutants. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) of Roundup with embryonic cells is 0.3% within 1 h in serum-free medium, and it decreases to reach 0.06% (containing among other compounds 1.27 mM glyphosate) after 72 h in the presence of serum. In these conditions, the embryonic cells appear to be 2-4 times more sensitive than the placental ones. In all instances, Roundup (generally used in agriculture at 1-2%, i.e., with 21-42 mM glyphosate) is more efficient than its active ingredient, glyphosate, suggesting a synergistic effect provoked by the adjuvants present in Roundup. We demonstrated that serum-free cultures, even on a short-term basis (1 h), reveal the xenobiotic impacts that are visible 1-2 days later in serum. We also document at lower non-overtly toxic doses, from 0.01% (with 210 microM glyphosate) in 24 h, that Roundup is an aromatase disruptor. The direct inhibition is temperature-dependent and is confirmed in different tissues and species (cell lines from placenta or embryonic kidney, equine testicular, or human fresh placental extracts). Furthermore, glyphosate acts directly as a partial inactivator on microsomal aromatase, independently of its acidity, and in a dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxic, and potentially endocrine-disrupting effects of Roundup are thus amplified with time. Taken together, these data suggest that Roundup exposure may affect human reproduction and fetal development in case of contamination. Chemical mixtures in formulations appear to be underestimated regarding their toxic or hormonal impact.

  1. Human placental cell and tissue uptake of doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Suvi K; Repo, Jenni K; Karttunen, Vesa; Auriola, Seppo; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H; Ruponen, Marika

    2015-12-03

    The anticancer drug doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations are in clinical use, doxorubicin also during pregnancy. However, little is known about how doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations are taken up by placental cells and whether they can cross human placenta. We therefore investigated quantitative cellular uptake and toxicity of doxorubicin and its two liposomal formulations, pH-sensitive liposomal doxorubicin (L-DOX) and commercially available pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PL-DOX), in human placental choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells. PL-DOX showed significantly lower cellular uptake and toxicity compared with doxorubicin and L-DOX. In preliminary studies with human placental perfusion, PL-DOX did not cross the placenta at all in 4h, whereas doxorubicin and L-DOX crossed the placenta at low levels (max 12% of the dose). Furthermore, PL-DOX did not accumulate in placental tissue while doxorubicin did (up to 70% of the dose). Surface pegylation probably explains the low placental cell and tissue uptake of PL-DOX. Formulation of doxorubicin thus seems to enable a decrease of fetal exposure.

  2. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  3. A three-dimensional culture system recapitulates placental syncytiotrophoblast development and microbial resistance

    PubMed Central

    McConkey, Cameron A.; Delorme-Axford, Elizabeth; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kim, Kwang Sik; Sadovsky, Yoel; Boyle, Jon P.; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    In eutherians, the placenta acts as a barrier and conduit at the maternal-fetal interface. Syncytiotrophoblasts, the multinucleated cells that cover the placental villous tree surfaces of the human placenta, are directly bathed in maternal blood and are formed by the fusion of progenitor cytotrophoblasts that underlie them. Despite their crucial role in fetal protection, many of the events that govern trophoblast fusion and protection from microbial infection are unknown. We describe a three-dimensional (3D)–based culture model using human JEG-3 trophoblast cells that develop syncytiotrophoblast phenotypes when cocultured with human microvascular endothelial cells. JEG-3 cells cultured in this system exhibit enhanced fusogenic activity and morphological and secretory activities strikingly similar to those of primary human syncytiotrophoblasts. RNASeq analyses extend the observed functional similarities to the transcriptome, where we observed significant overlap between syncytiotrophoblast-specific genes and 3D JEG-3 cultures. Furthermore, JEG-3 cells cultured in 3D are resistant to infection by viruses and Toxoplasma gondii, which mimics the high resistance of syncytiotrophoblasts to microbial infections in vivo. Given that this system is genetically manipulatable, it provides a new platform to dissect the mechanisms involved in syncytiotrophoblast development and microbial resistance. PMID:26973875

  4. Human, Humanities, Humanitarian, Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.; Adams, Samuel H.

    1982-01-01

    Traces the development of secular humanism in education and calls for educators to present their students with a "real" picture of the world, including the values upon which the Unites States was founded. (FL)

  5. Long-term forskolin stimulation induces AMPK activation and thereby enhances tight junction formation in human placental trophoblast BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Egawa, M; Kamata, H; Kushiyama, A; Sakoda, H; Fujishiro, M; Horike, N; Yoneda, M; Nakatsu, Y; Ying, Guo; Jun, Zhang; Tsuchiya, Y; Takata, K; Kurihara, H; Asano, T

    2008-12-01

    BeWo cells, derived from human choriocarcinoma, have been known to respond to forskolin or cAMP analogues by differentiating into multinucleated cells- like syncytiotrophoblasts on the surfaces of chorionic villi of the human placenta. In this study, we demonstrated that long-term treatment with forskolin enhances the tight junction (TJ) formation in human placental BeWo cells. Interestingly, AMPK activation and phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a molecule downstream from AMPK, were induced by long-term incubation (>12h) with forskolin, despite not being induced by acute stimulation with forskolin. In addition, co-incubation with an AMPK inhibitor, compound C, as well as overexpression of an AMPK dominant negative mutant inhibited forskolin-induced TJ formation. Thus, although the molecular mechanism underlying AMPK activation via the forskolin stimulation is unclear, the TJ formation induced by forskolin is likely to be mediated by the AMPK pathway. Taking into consideration that TJs are present in the normal human placenta, this mechanism may be important for forming the placental barrier system between the fetal and maternal circulations.

  6. CpG methylation suppresses transcriptional activity of human syncytin-1 in non-placental tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Matouskova, Magda; Blazkova, Jana; Pajer, Petr; Pavlicek, Adam; Hejnar, Jiri . E-mail: hejnar@img.cas.cz

    2006-04-15

    Syncytin-1 is a captive envelope glycoprotein encoded by one of human endogenous retroviruses W. It is expressed exclusively in the placental trophoblast where it participates in cell-to-cell fusion during differentiation of syncytiotrophobast. In other tissues, however, syncytin-1 expression must be kept in check because inadvertent cell fusion might be dangerous for tissue organization and integrity. We describe here an inverse correlation between CpG methylation of syncytin-1 5' long terminal repeat and its expression. Hypomethylation of the syncytin-1 5' long terminal repeat in the placenta and in the choriocarcinoma-derived cell line BeWo was detected. However, other analyzed primary cells and cell lines non-expressing syncytin-1 contain proviruses heavily methylated in this sequence. CpG methylation of syncytin-1 is resistant to the effect of the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. The inhibitory role of CpG methylation is further confirmed by transient transfection of in-vitro-methylated syncytin-1 promoter-driven reporter construct. Altogether, we conclude that CpG methylation plays a principal role in the transcriptional suppression of syncytin-1 in non-placental tissues, and, in contrast, demethylation of the syncytin-1 promoter in trophoblast is a prerequisite for its expression and differentiation of multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast.

  7. Induced DNA demethylation can reshape chromatin topology at the IGF2-H19 locus

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoko; Nativio, Raffaella; Murrell, Adele

    2013-01-01

    Choriocarcinomas are embryonal tumours with loss of imprinting and hypermethylation at the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2)-H19 locus. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-Aza-2′deoxycytidine (5-AzaCdR) is an approved epigenetic cancer therapy. However, it is not known to what extent 5-AzaCdR influences other epigenetic marks. In this study, we set out to determine whether 5-AzaCdR treatment can reprogram the epigenomic organization of the IGF2-H19 locus in a choriocarcinoma cancer cell line (JEG3). We found that localized DNA demethylation at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) induced by 5-AzaCdR, reduced IGF2, increased H19 expression, increased CTCF and cohesin recruitment and changed histone modifications. Furthermore chromatin accessibility was increased locus-wide and chromatin looping topography was altered such that a CTCF site downstream of the H19 enhancers switched its association with the CTCF site upstream of the IGF2 promoters to associate with the ICR. We identified a stable chromatin looping domain, which forms independently of DNA methylation. This domain contains the IGF2 gene and is marked by a histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation block between CTCF site upstream of the IGF2 promoters and the Centrally Conserved Domain upstream of the ICR. Together, these data provide new insights into the responsiveness of chromatin topography to DNA methylation changes. PMID:23585276

  8. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin expression in recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumors of bone: a potential mimicker of germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Jour, George; Hoch, Benjamin L; Rendi, Mara H

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTs) are generally benign, locally aggressive neoplasms that rarely metastasize. The beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and several nongynecologic neoplasms but has not been described in GCT. At our institution, we observed cases of elevated beta-hCG in patients with GCT leading to diagnostic difficulty and in one case, concern for metastatic choriocarcinoma. This study aims to determine the frequency of beta-hCG expression in GCT and any relationship to clinical aggressiveness. We evaluated tissue expression of beta-hCG by immunohistochemistry with 58% of cases staining for beta-hCG. Additionally, 2 of 11 patients with available serum and/or urine beta-hCG measurements demonstrated elevated beta-hCG due to tumor. It is important to be aware of beta-hCG expression by GCT and the potential for elevated urine and serum beta-hCG levels in patients with GCT so as to avoid misdiagnosis of pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease.

  9. Cyclic AMP regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone. cap alpha. -subunit gene is mediated by an 18-base-pair element

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, B.J.; Bokar, J.A.; Virgin, J.B.; Vallen, E.A.; Milsted, A.; Nilson, J.H.

    1987-04-01

    cAMP regulates transcription of the gene encoding the ..cap alpha..-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the choriocarcinoma cells (BeWo). To define the sequences required for regulation by cAMP, the authors inserted fragments from the 5' flanking region of the ..cap alpha..-subunit gene into a test vector containing the simian virus 40 early promoter (devoid of its enhancer) linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Results from transient expression assays in BeWo cells indicated that a 1500-base-pair (bp) fragment conferred cAMP responsiveness on the CAT gene regardless of position or orientation of the insert relative to the viral promoter. A subfragment extending from position -169 to position -100 had the same effect on cAMP-induced expression. Furthermore, the entire stimulatory effect could be achieved with an 18-bp synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide corresponding to a direct repeat between position -146 and -111. In the absence of cAMP, the ..cap alpha..-subunit 5' flanking sequence also enhanced transcription from the simian virus 40 early promoter. They localized this enhancer activity to the same -169/-100 fragment containing the cAMP response element. The 18-bp element alone, however, had no effect on basal expression. Thus, this short DNA sequence serves as a cAMP response element and also functions independently of other promoter-regulatory elements located in the 5' flanking sequence of the ..cap alpha..-subunit gene.

  10. Downregulation of ASPP1 in gestational trophoblastic disease: correlation with hypermethylation, apoptotic activity and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Lee, Lee; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Lu, Xin; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Wong, Esther S Y; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2011-04-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease encompasses a spectrum of trophoblastic lesions including true neoplasms such as choriocarcinomas and the potentially malignant hydatidiform moles, which may develop persistent disease requiring chemotherapy. ASPP1, a member of apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPPs), is a proapoptotic protein that can stimulate apoptosis through its interaction with p53. We evaluated the promoter methylation and expression profiles of ASPP1 in different trophoblastic tissues and its in vitro functional effect on two choriocarcinoma cell lines, namely JEG-3 and JAR. Significant downregulation of ASPP1 mRNA and protein levels was demonstrated in hydatidiform moles and choriocarcinomas, when compared with normal placentas by quantitative-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The ASPP1 mRNA level was significantly correlated with its hypermethylation status, evaluated with methylation-specific PCR, in placenta and gestational trophoblastic disease samples (P=0.024). Moreover, lower ASPP1 immunoreactivity was shown in hydatidiform moles that progressed to persistent gestational trophoblastic neoplasms than in those that regressed (P=0.045). A significant correlation was also found between expression of ASPP1 and proliferative indices (assessed by Ki67 and MCM7), apoptotic activity (M30 CytoDeath antibody), p53 and caspase-8 immunoreactivities. An in vitro study showed that ectopic expression of ASPP1 could trigger apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways as indicated by an increase in cleaved caspase-9 and Fas ligand protein expression. The latter suggests a hitherto unreported novel link between ASPP1 and the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Our findings suggest that downregulation of ASPP1 by hypermethylation may be involved in the pathogenesis and progress of gestational trophoblastic disease, probably through its effect on apoptosis.

  11. What Is Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a tumor marker protein called alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), as well as human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Yolk ... of tumor almost always increases blood levels of AFP (alpha-fetoprotein). Choriocarcinoma: This is a very rare ...

  12. Human placental expression of SLIT/ROBO signaling cues: effects of preeclampsia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wu-Xiang; Laurent, Louise C; Agent, Sally; Hodges, Jennifer; Chen, Dong-Bao

    2012-04-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by dysfunctional endothelium and impaired angiogenesis. Recent studies suggest that the neuronal guidance SLIT/ROBO system regulates tumor angiogenesis. This study investigated if SLIT and ROBO are differentially expressed in healthy term and preeclamptic placentas and if hypoxia regulates SLIT and ROBO expression in placental trophoblast and endothelial cells. Total RNA and protein were extracted from placental tissues of healthy term (n = 5) and preeclamptic (n = 6) pregnancies and used for SLIT/ROBO expression analyses with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time quantitative-PCR, and immunoblotting. Paraffin-embedded tissues were processed to localize SLIT/ROBO proteins in placental villi by immunohistochemistry. BeWo choriocarcinoma cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with 2% or 10% oxygen or the hypoxia mimetic deferoxamine mesylate (100 μM) to test if hypoxia regulates SLIT/ROBO expression. SLIT2, SLIT3, ROBO1, and ROBO4 mRNA and proteins were detected in the placenta. SLIT2 and ROBO1 proteins localized in the syncytiotrophoblast, and SLIT3, ROBO1, and ROBO4 in capillary endothelium of the placental villi. Levels of ROBO1 and ROBO4 as well as sFLT1 (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1) proteins were significantly greater in preeclamptic placentas compared to normal controls. Hypoxia significantly increased both mRNA and protein levels of SLIT2 in BeWo cells and of SLIT3, ROBO1, and ROBB4 in HUVEC. Thus, trophoblast and endothelial coexpression of SLIT/ROBO suggests an autocrine/paracrine regulatory system for regulating placental function. Differential expression of SLITs and ROBOs in healthy term and preeclamptic placentas and hypoxia regulation of their expressions in placental cells implicate a potential pathophysiological role for this system in preeclampsia.

  13. [Histological features of tumor-bearing tissues formed by human fibroblasts after reprograming by Piwil2].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guangping; Wu, Xin; He, Dawei; Fu, Yiyao; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Deying; Lin, Tao; Wei, Guanghui

    2015-08-01

    To observe the histological features of tumor-bearing tissues formed by human fibroblasts after reprograming by spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal key regulating gene Piwil2 (Piwil2-iCSC). Piwil2-iCSC tumor spheroids-like colonies were selected for tumor formation assay in four nude mice. Pathological features of Piwil2-iCSC tumors were observed by histology. Stem cell markers and common triploblastic markers were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and immunohistochemistry. Germ cell tumor markers were detected by immunohistochemical examination. Two weeks after inoculation, subcutaneous tumors were formed in all the four nude mice with a tumor formation rate of 100%. In the Piwil2-iCSC tumor tissues, Piwil2-GFP(+) cells showed high-density nuclear expression and were widely observed in DAPI-stained sections. Numerous mitotic figure of the neoplastic cells were seen (>10 cells/field of vision under high magnification) in HE-stained sections. Enlarged abnormal cell nuclei were observed. RT-PCR assay showed that Piwil2-iCSC tumors still expressed Piwil2 and some self-renewal and pluripotent markers of stem cells and some markers of triploblastic differentiation. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumors expressed stem cell markers, triploblastic markers and germ cell tumor markers AFP and HCG. Piwil2-iCSC tumors are probably undifferentiated embryonic small cell carcinoma, most likely to be immature teratoma, mixed with yolk sac tumor and choriocarcinoma components. It can be used as a useful model for the research of origin or genesis mechanism of cancer stem cells and the treatment of relevant tumors.

  14. Epigenetic regulation on the 5'-proximal CpG island of human porcine endogenous retrovirus subgroup A receptor 2/GPR172B.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Yuki; Shojima, Takayuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) have been considered one of the major risks of xenotransplantation from pigs to humans. PERV-A efficiently utilizes human PERV-A receptor 2 (HuPAR-2)/GPR172B to infect human cells; however, there has been no study on the regulation mechanisms of HuPAR-2/GPR172B expression. In this study, we examined the expression of HuPAR-2/GPR172B from the standpoint of epigenetic regulation and discussed the risks of PERV-A infection in xenotransplantation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that HuPAR-2 mRNA was preferentially expressed in placental tissue, whereas it was highly suppressed in BeWo cells (a human choriocarcinoma cell line) and HEK293 cells. A CpG island containing the HuPAR-2 transcription starting site was identified by in silico analysis. The DNA methylation ratio (the relative quantity of methylcytosine to total cytosine) and histone modification (H3K9me3) levels in the CpG island measured by bisulfite genomic sequencing and ChIP assay, respectively, were inversely correlated with the mRNA levels. Both HuPAR-2 mRNA and HuPAR-2 protein were up-regulated in HEK293 cells by inhibiting DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. Additionally, promoter/enhancer activities within the CpG island were suppressed by in vitro DNA methylation. Our results demonstrated that epigenetic modification regulates HuPAR-2 expression.

  15. HTR8/SVneo Cells Display Trophoblast Progenitor Cell-Like Characteristics Indicative of Self-Renewal, Repopulation Activity, and Expression of “Stemness-” Associated Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Maja; Knoefler, Ilka; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Markert, Udo R.; Fitzgerald, Justine S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. JEG3 is a choriocarcinoma—and HTR8/SVneo a transformed extravillous trophoblast—cell line often used to model the physiologically invasive extravillous trophoblast. Past studies suggest that these cell lines possess some stem or progenitor cell characteristics. Aim was to study whether these cells fulfill minimum criteria used to identify stem-like (progenitor) cells. In summary, we found that the expression profile of HTR8/SVneo (CDX2+, NOTCH1+, SOX2+, NANOG+, and OCT-) is distinct from JEG3 (CDX2+ and NOTCH1+) as seen only in human-serum blocked immunocytochemistry. This correlates with HTR8/SVneo's self-renewal capacities, as made visible via spheroid formation and multi-passagability in hanging drops protocols paralleling those used to maintain embryoid bodies. JEG3 displayed only low propensity to form and reform spheroids. HTR8/SVneo spheroids migrated to cover and seemingly repopulate human chorionic villi during confrontation cultures with placental explants in hanging drops. We conclude that HTR8/SVneo spheroid cells possess progenitor cell traits that are probably attained through corruption of “stemness-” associated transcription factor networks. Furthermore, trophoblastic cells are highly prone to unspecific binding, which is resistant to conventional blocking methods, but which can be alleviated through blockage with human serum. PMID:23586024

  16. Adhesive and degradative properties of human placental cytotrophoblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fisher, S J; Cui, T Y; Zhang, L; Hartman, L; Grahl, K; Zhang, G Y; Tarpey, J; Damsky, C H

    1989-08-01

    Human fetal development depends on the embryo rapidly gaining access to the maternal circulation. The trophoblast cells that form the fetal portion of the human placenta have solved this problem by transiently exhibiting certain tumor-like properties. Thus, during early pregnancy fetal cytotrophoblast cells invade the uterus and its arterial network. This process peaks during the twelfth week of pregnancy and declines rapidly thereafter, suggesting that the highly specialized, invasive behavior of the cytotrophoblast cells is closely regulated. Since little is known about the actual mechanisms involved, we developed an isolation procedure for cytotrophoblasts from placentas of different gestational ages to study their adhesive and invasive properties in vitro. Cytotrophoblasts isolated from first, second, and third trimester human placentas were plated on the basement membrane-like extracellular matrix produced by the PF HR9 teratocarcinoma cell line. Cells from all trimesters expressed the calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecule cell-CAM 120/80 (E-cadherin) which, in the placenta, is specific for cytotrophoblasts. However, only the first trimester cytotrophoblast cells degraded the matrices on which they were cultured, leaving large gaps in the basement membrane substrates and releasing low molecular mass 3H-labeled matrix components into the medium. No similar degradative activity was observed when second or third trimester cytotrophoblast cells, first trimester human placental fibroblasts, or the human choriocarcinoma cell lines BeWo and JAR were cultured on radiolabeled matrices. To begin to understand the biochemical basis of this degradative behavior, the substrate gel technique was used to analyze the cell-associated and secreted proteinase activities expressed by early, mid, and late gestation cytotrophoblasts. Several gelatin-degrading proteinases were uniquely expressed by early gestation, invasive cytotrophoblasts, and all these activities could be

  17. Endothelin-1 induces endoplasmic reticulum stress by activating the PLC-IP(3) pathway: implications for placental pathophysiology in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arjun; Olovsson, Matts; Burton, Graham J; Yung, Hong-wa

    2012-06-01

    Recent evidence implicates placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the pathophysiological characteristics of preeclampsia. Herein, we investigate whether endothelin (ET)-1, which induces Ca(2+) release from the ER, can induce placental ER stress. Loss of ER Ca(2+) homeostasis impairs post-translational modification of proteins, triggering ER stress-response pathways. IHC confirmed the presence of both ET-1 and its receptors in the syncytiotrophoblast. Protein levels and immunoreactivity of ET-1 and the endothelin B receptor (ETBR) were increased in preeclamptic samples compared with normotensive controls. JEG-3 and BeWo choriocarcinoma cells treated with ET-1 displayed an increase in ER stress markers. ET-1 induced phospho-activation of the ETBR. Treating cells with BQ788, an ETBR antagonist, or small-interfering RNA knockdown of the receptor inhibited induction of ER stress. ET-1 also stimulated p-phospholipase C (PLC)γ1 levels. By using inhibitors of PLC activation, U73122, and the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) receptor, xestospongin-C, we demonstrated that ET-1 induces ER stress via the PLC-IP(3) pathway. Furthermore, ET-1 levels increased in the syncytiotrophoblast of explants from normal placentas after hypoxia-reoxygenation in vitro. Conditioned medium from hypoxia-reoxygenation explants also contained higher ET-1 levels, which induced ER stress in JEG-3 cells that was abolished by an ET-1-neutralizing antibody. Collectively, the data show that ET-1 induced ER stress in trophoblasts via the ETBR and initiation of signaling through the PLC-IP(3) pathway, with the potential for autocrine stimulation.

  18. 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 and Type 2: association between mRNA expression and activity in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Day, Joanna M; Tutill, Helena J; Newman, Simon P; Purohit, Atul; Lawrence, Harshani R; Vicker, Nigel; Potter, Barry V L; Reed, Michael J

    2006-03-27

    17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSDs) are a family of enzymes that regulate steroid availability within a tissue by catalysing the interconversion of active and inactive forms. Type 1 is up-regulated in many breast tumours, and is responsible for the reduction of oestrone to active oestradiol which stimulates cell proliferation within the tumour. Type 2 oxidises many active steroids to their inactive forms, including oestradiol to oestrone. In this study, we have compared the mRNA expression and enzyme activities of Type 1 and Type 2 in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T47D, JEG3 and 293-EBNA cell lines. Also studied were two cell lines stably expressing transfected Type 1 cDNA. RT-PCR indicated that little Type 1 mRNA is expressed in two of the breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and in 293-EBNA cells, but that expression is much higher in the T47D breast cancer cell line, and in the choriocarcinoma cell line, JEG3. However, a higher level of expression of Type 1 is seen in the transfected cell lines MCF-7.8H and 293-EBNA[His617beta-HSD1]. Activity assays show that there is high association between mRNA expression and enzyme activity. Assays indicate that, with the exception of MDA-MB-231 cells, Type 2 activity is low in these lines. The study of the basal activities of these enzymes will be used in future studies investigating the regulation of the enzymes by endogenous and exogenous factors. An understanding of their regulation in both healthy and malignant tissues may lead to future therapeutic intervention at the regulatory level.

  19. The expression of proprotein convertase PACE4 is highly regulated by Hash-2 in placenta: possible role of placenta-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, human achaete-scute homologue-2.

    PubMed

    Koide, Shizuyo; Yoshida, Ichiro; Tsuji, Akihiko; Matsuda, Yoshiko

    2003-09-01

    PACE4 is a member of the mammalian subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family, which contribute to the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF) beta family proteins. We previously reported that PACE4 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts of human placenta [Tsuji et al. (2003) BIOCHIM: Biophys. Acta 1645, 95-104]. In this study, the regulatory mechanism for PACE4 expression in placenta was analyzed using a human placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo cells. Promoter analysis indicated that an E-box cluster (E4-E9) in the 5'-flanking region of the PACE4 gene acts as a negative regulatory element. The binding of human achaete-scute homologue 2 (Hash-2) to the E-box cluster was shown by gel mobility-shift assay. The overexpression of Hash-2 caused a marked decrease in PACE4 gene expression. When BeWo cells were grown under low oxygen (2%) conditions, the expression of Hash-2 decreased, while that of PACE4 increased. In both cases, other SPCs, such as furin, PC5/6, and PC7/8, were not affected. Further, PACE4 expression was found to be developmentally regulated in rat placenta. By in situ hybridization, Mash-2 (mammalian achaete-scute homologue 2) mRNA was found to be expressed in the spongiotrophoblast layer where PACE4 was not expressed. In contrast, the PACE4 mRNA was expressed mainly in the labyrinthine layer where Mash-2 was not detected. These results suggest that PACE4 expression is down-regulated by Hash-2/Mash-2 in both human and rat placenta and that many bioactive proteins might be regulated by PACE4 activity.

  20. Expression and interdependencies of pluripotency factors LIN28, OCT3/4, NANOG and SOX2 in human testicular germ cells and tumours of the testis.

    PubMed

    Gillis, A J M; Stoop, H; Biermann, K; van Gurp, R J H L M; Swartzman, E; Cribbes, S; Ferlinz, A; Shannon, M; Oosterhuis, J W; Looijenga, L H J

    2011-08-01

    OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and, most recently, LIN28 have been identified as key regulators of pluripotency in mammalian embryonic and induced stem cells, and are proven to be crucial for generation of the mouse germ-cell lineage. These factors are a hallmark of certain histological types of germ-cell tumours (GCTs). Here, we report novel information on the temporal and spatial expression pattern of LIN28 during normal human male germ-cell development as well as various types of GCTs. To investigate LIN28 expression, immunohistochemical analyses and quantitative proximity ligation assay-based TaqMan protein assays were applied on snap-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples as well as representative cell lines. LIN28 was found in primordial germ cells, gonocytes and pre-spermatogonia, in contrast to OCT3/4 and NANOG, which were found only in the first two stages. LIN28 was also found in all precursor lesions (carcinoma in situ and gonadoblastoma) of type II GCTs, as well as the invasive components seminoma and the non-seminomatous elements embryonal carcinoma and yolk sac tumour. Choriocarcinoma showed a heterogeneous pattern, while teratomas and spermatocytic seminomas (type III GCTs) were negative. This expression pattern suggests that LIN28 is associated with malignant behaviour of type II GCTs. Cell line experiments involving siRNA knockdown of LIN28, OCT3/4 and SOX2 showed that LIN28 plays a role in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of both seminoma and embryonal carcinoma, closely linked to, and likely upstream of OCT3/4 and NANOG. In conclusion, LIN28 regulates the differentiation status of seminoma and embryonal carcinoma and is likely to play a related role in normal human germ-cell development. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  1. N-myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1) mediates pomegranate juice protection from apoptosis in hypoxic BeWo cells but not in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baosheng; Zaveri, Parul G.; Longtine, Mark S.; Nelson, D. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) expression is increased in placentas of human pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction and in hypoxic cultured primary trophoblasts. We previously showed that elevated NDRG1 decreases trophoblast apoptosis induced by hypoxia. Separately, we found that pomegranate juice (PJ) decreases cell death induced by hypoxia in trophoblasts. Here, we test the hypothesis that PJ protects trophoblasts from hypoxia-induced apoptosis by modulating NDRG1 expression. Methods Quantitative rtPCR was used to investigate the effects of PJ treatment on mRNA levels of 22 candidate genes involved in apoptosis, oxidative stress, and differentiation in trophoblasts. Western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to analyze NDRG1 protein levels. siRNA-mediated NDRG1 knockdown was used to investigate the role of NDRG1 in response to PJ in hypoxic BeWo choriocarcinoma cells and hypoxic cultured primary human trophoblasts. Results The mRNA levels of eight genes were altered, with NDRG1 showing the largest response to PJ and thus, we pursued the role of NDRG1 here. PJ significantly increased NDRG1 protein expression in primary trophoblasts and in BeWo cells. Knockdown of NDRG1 in hypoxic BeWo cells in the presence of PJ yielded increased apoptosis. In contrast, knockdown of NDRG1 in hypoxic primary trophoblasts in the presence of PJ did not increase apoptosis. Discussion We conclude that the PJ-mediated decrease in cell death in hypoxia is partially mediated by NDRG1 in BeWo cells but not in primary trophoblasts. The disparate effects of NDRG1 between BeWo cells and primary trophoblasts indicate caution is required when extrapolating from results obtained with cell lines to primary trophoblasts. PMID:26028238

  2. Azithromycin and spiramycin induce anti-inflammatory response in human trophoblastic (BeWo) cells infected by Toxoplasma gondii but are able to control infection.

    PubMed

    Franco, P S; Gomes, A O; Barbosa, B F; Angeloni, M B; Silva, N M; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Martins-Filho, O A; Silva, D A O; Mineo, J R; Ferro, E A V

    2011-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen which may cause fetal infection if primary infection. Our previous studies have used human choriocarcinoma trophoblastic cells (BeWo cell line) as experimental model of T. gondii infection involving placental microenvironment. This study aimed to examine the effects of azithromycin and spiramycin against T. gondii infection in BeWo cells. Cells were treated with different concentrations of the macrolide antibiotics and analyzed first for cell viability using thiazolyl blue tetrazole (MTT) assay. As cell viability was significantly decreased with drug concentrations higher than 400 μg/mL, the concentration range used in further experiments was from 50 to 400 μg/mL. The number of infected cells and intracellular replication of T. gondii decreased after treatment with each drug. The infection induced up-regulation of the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which was also enhanced in infected cells after treatment with azithromycin, but not with spiramycin. Analysis of the cytokine profile showed increase TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-4 production, but decreased IFN-γ levels, were detected in infected cells and treated with each drug. In conclusion, treatment of human trophoblastic BeWo cells with with azithromycin or spiramycin is able to control the infection and replication of T. gondii. In addition, treatment with these macrolides, especially with azityromycin induces an anti-inflammatory response and high MIF production, which can be important for the establishment and maintenance of a viable pregnancy during T. gondii infection.

  3. Cultured human melanoma cells biosynthesize a novel form of laminin that lacks the M/sub r/ = 400 kDa subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.P.; Kroll, T.G.; Ruddon, R.W.

    1987-05-01

    A human melanoma cell line (A375) was found to produce an unusual type of laminin composed exclusively of M/sub r/ = 200 kDa B subunits and lacking the M/sub r/ = 400 kDa A subunit. Detergent lysates of A375 cells pulsed with (/sup 35/S)methionine contained an immunoreactive form of laminin that migrated on nonreduced SDS-PAGE with an apparent M/sub r/ = 850 kDa. The 850 kDa laminin was clearly resolved from the typical M/sub r/ = 950 kDa laminin composed of A and B subunit types that is produced by a variety of cultured cells such as human choriocarcinoma (JAR) cells. Upon reduction of the intersubunit disulfide bonds of the A375 laminin, a pair of polypeptides co-migrated on SDS-PAGE with the M/sub r/ = 200 kDa B subunit doublet of JAR laminin. The A-deficient A375 laminin does not seem to be a result of the proteolysis of A subunit in cell lysates. No degradation of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled JAR laminin was observed upon incubation with nonradioactive A375 cell lysate supplemented in the usual manner with ten protease inhibitors. Furthermore, A subunit did not appear transiently in A375 cells at any chase time (0-4 hr) following a 10-min biosynthetic pulse with (/sup 35/S)methionine. The authors observations suggest that A375 cells biosynthesize principally the B subunits of laminin and assemble them to form a disulfide-linked macromolecule, possibly a B/sub 4/ tetramer.

  4. Hypericum caprifoliatum and Hypericum connatum affect human trophoblast-like cells differentiation and Ca2+ influx

    PubMed Central

    da Conceição, Aline O.; von Poser, Gilsane Lino; Barbeau, Benoit; Lafond, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of crude methanol and n-hexane extracts of Hypericum connatum (H. connatum) and Hypericum caprifoliatum on trophoblast-like cells. Methods BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast-like cells were submitted to different extract concentrations (1, 5, 10 and 15 µg/mL) and evaluated in relation to cell viability and in vitro trophoblast differentiation and function. Cell viability was evaluated using WST-1 reagent. Differentiation was measured by luciferase production, hCG production/release, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway activation. The function of the trophoblast-like cells was measured by 45Ca2+ influx evaluation. Results The results showed a decrease in cell viability/proliferation. Both plants and different extracts induced a significant decrease in hCG production/release and luciferase production. H. connatum did not cause mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway disturbance; however, Hypericum caprifoliatum n-hexane extract at 15 µg/mL inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The significant increase in Ca2+ influx by JEG-3 cells was seen after short and long incubation times with H. connatum methanolic extract at 15 µg/mL. Conclusions The results indicated that these two Hypericum species extracts can interfere on trophoblast differentiation and Ca2+ influx, according to their molecular diversity. Although in vivo experiments are necessary to establish their action on placental formation and function, this study suggests that attention must be paid to the potential toxic effect of these plants. PMID:25182721

  5. Human chorionic gonadotropin: Different glycoforms and biological activity depending on its source of production.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Thierry

    2016-06-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is the first hormonal message from the placenta to the mother. It is detectable in maternal blood two days after implantation and behaves like a super LH agonist stimulating progesterone secretion by the corpus luteum. In addition to maintaining the production of progesterone until the placenta itself produces it, hCG also has a role in myometrial quiescence and local immune tolerance. Specific to humans, hCG is a complex glycoprotein composed of two highly glycosylated subunits. The α-subunit is identical to the pituitary gonadotropin hormones (LH, FSH, TSH), contains two N-glycosylation sites, and is encoded by a single gene (CGA). By contrast, the β-subunits are distinct for each hormones and confer both receptor and biological specificity, although LH and hCG bind to the same receptor (LH/CG-R). The hCG ß-subunit is encoded by a cluster of genes (CGB) and contains two sites of N-glycosylation and four sites of O-glycosylation. The hCG glycosylation state varies with the stage of pregnancy, its source of production and in the pathology. It is well established that hCG is mainly secreted into maternal blood, where it peaks at 8-10weeks of gestation (WG), by the syncytiotrophoblast (ST), which represents the endocrine tissue of the human placenta. The invasive extravillous trophoblast (iEVT) also secretes hCG, and in particular hyperglycosylated forms of hCG (hCG-H) also produced by choriocarcinoma cells. In maternal blood, hCG-H is elevated during early first trimester corresponding to the trophoblastic cell invasion process and then decreases. In addition to its endocrine role, hCG has autocrine and paracrine roles. It promotes formation of the ST and angiogenesis through LH/CG-R but has no effect on trophoblast invasion in vitro. By contrast, hCG-H stimulates trophoblast invasion and angiogenesis by interacting with the TGFß receptor in a LH/CG-R independent signalling pathway. hCG is largely used in antenatal screening

  6. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  7. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  8. A Unique Co-culture Model for Fundamental and Applied Studies of Human Fetoplacental Steroidogenesis and Interference by Environmental Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Thibeault, Andrée-Anne Hudon; Deroy, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Experimental tools for studying the complex steroidogenic interactions that occur between placenta and fetus during human pregnancy are extremely limited. Objectives: We aimed to develop a co-culture model to study steroidogenesis by the human fetoplacental unit and its disruption by exposure to environmental contaminants. Methods: We cultured BeWo human choriocarcinoma cells, representing the villous cytotrophoblast, and H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells, representing the fetal unit, in a carefully adapted co-culture medium. We placed H295R cells in 24-well plates and BeWo cells on transwell inserts with or without pesticide treatment (atrazine or prochloraz) and assessed CYP19 activity and hormonal production after 24 hr of co-culture. Results: The co-culture exhibited the steroidogenic profile of the fetoplacental unit, allowing a synergistic production of estradiol and estriol (but not of estrone) of 133.3 ± 11.3 pg/mL and 440.8 ± 44.0 pg/mL, respectively. Atrazine and prochloraz had cell-type specific effects on CYP19 activity and estrogen production in co-culture. Atrazine induced CYP19 activity and estrogen production in H295R cells only, but did not affect overall estrogen production in co-culture, whereas prochloraz inhibited CYP19 activity exclusively in BeWo cells and reduced estrogen production in co-culture by almost 90%. In contrast, prochloraz did not affect estradiol or estrone production in BeWo cells in monoculture. These differential effects underline the relevance of our co-culture approach to model fetoplacental steroidogenesis. Conclusions: The co-culture of H295R and BeWo cells creates a unique in vitro model to reproduce the steroidogenic cooperation between fetus and placenta during pregnancy and can be used to study the endocrine-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals. Citation: Hudon Thibeault AA, Deroy K, Vaillancourt C, Sanderson JT. 2014. A unique co-culture model for fundamental and applied studies of

  9. Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiment Records, 1944 - 1994, Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    because of the occurrence of arteriovenous fistulas in a patient with histologically proven choriocarcinoma. The fistulas were demonstrated...Cu-67 biological half-time of 28 days and faecal excretion of 22% in 5 days, and suggested a decreased biliary excretion of copper in both homozygous...but rather to decreased biliary excretion of copper. Documents: Authors: G.T. Strickland, W. M. Beckner and Mei-Ling Leu. Title: Absorption of Copper

  10. More Human than Human.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  11. New discoveries on the biology and detection of human chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Laurence A

    2009-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone comprising 2 subunits, alpha and beta joined non covalently. While similar in structure to luteinizing hormone (LH), hCG exists in multiple hormonal and non-endocrine agents, rather than as a single molecule like LH and the other glycoprotein hormones. These are regular hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG and the free beta-subunit of hyperglycosylated hCG. For 88 years regular hCG has been known as a promoter of corpus luteal progesterone production, even though this function only explains 3 weeks of a full gestations production of regular hCG. Research in recent years has explained the full gestational production by demonstration of critical functions in trophoblast differentiation and in fetal nutrition through myometrial spiral artery angiogenesis. While regular hCG is made by fused villous syncytiotrophoblast cells, extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells make the variant hyperglycosylated hCG. This variant is an autocrine factor, acting on extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells to initiate and control invasion as occurs at implantation of pregnancy and the establishment of hemochorial placentation, and malignancy as occurs in invasive hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma. Hyperglycosylated hCG inhibits apoptosis in extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells promoting cell invasion, growth and malignancy. Other non-trophoblastic malignancies retro-differentiate and produce a hyperglycosylated free beta-subunit of hCG (hCG free beta). This has been shown to be an autocrine factor antagonizing apoptosis furthering cancer cell growth and malignancy. New applications have been demonstrated for total hCG measurements and detection of the 3 hCG variants in pregnancy detection, monitoring pregnancy outcome, determining risk for Down syndrome fetus, predicting preeclampsia, detecting pituitary hCG, detecting and managing gestational trophoblastic diseases, diagnosing quiescent gestational trophoblastic

  12. New discoveries on the biology and detection of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Cole, Laurence A

    2009-01-26

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone comprising 2 subunits, alpha and beta joined non covalently. While similar in structure to luteinizing hormone (LH), hCG exists in multiple hormonal and non-endocrine agents, rather than as a single molecule like LH and the other glycoprotein hormones. These are regular hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG and the free beta-subunit of hyperglycosylated hCG. For 88 years regular hCG has been known as a promoter of corpus luteal progesterone production, even though this function only explains 3 weeks of a full gestations production of regular hCG. Research in recent years has explained the full gestational production by demonstration of critical functions in trophoblast differentiation and in fetal nutrition through myometrial spiral artery angiogenesis. While regular hCG is made by fused villous syncytiotrophoblast cells, extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells make the variant hyperglycosylated hCG. This variant is an autocrine factor, acting on extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells to initiate and control invasion as occurs at implantation of pregnancy and the establishment of hemochorial placentation, and malignancy as occurs in invasive hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma. Hyperglycosylated hCG inhibits apoptosis in extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells promoting cell invasion, growth and malignancy. Other non-trophoblastic malignancies retro-differentiate and produce a hyperglycosylated free beta-subunit of hCG (hCG free beta). This has been shown to be an autocrine factor antagonizing apoptosis furthering cancer cell growth and malignancy. New applications have been demonstrated for total hCG measurements and detection of the 3 hCG variants in pregnancy detection, monitoring pregnancy outcome, determining risk for Down syndrome fetus, predicting preeclampsia, detecting pituitary hCG, detecting and managing gestational trophoblastic diseases, diagnosing quiescent gestational trophoblastic

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of human UDP-d-Xylose:proteoglycan core protein beta-d-xylosyltransferase and its first isoform XT-II.

    PubMed

    Götting, C; Kuhn, J; Zahn, R; Brinkmann, T; Kleesiek, K

    2000-12-08

    Human UDP-d-xylose:proteoglycan core protein beta-d-xylosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.26, XT-I) initiates the biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan chains in proteoglycans by transferring xylose from UDP-xylose to specific serine residues of the core protein. Based on the partial amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme from human JAR choriocarcinoma cell culture supernatant we isolated a cDNA encoding XT-I using the degenerate reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method. This enzyme, which is involved in chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, heparin and dermatan sulfate biosynthesis, belongs to a novel family of glycosyltransferases with no homology to proteins known so far. 5' and 3'-RACE were performed to isolate a novel cDNA fragment of 3726 bp with a single open reading frame encoding at least 827 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 91 kDa. The human XT-I gene was located on chromosome 16p13.1 using radiation hybrid mapping, and extracts from CHO-K1 cells transfected with the XT-I cDNA in an expression vector exhibited marked XT activity. A new 3608 bp cDNA fragment encoding a protein of 865 amino acid residues was also isolated by PCR using degenerate primers based on the amino acid sequence of human XT-I. The amino acid sequence of this XT-II isoform displayed 55% identity to the human XT-I. The XT-II gene was located on chromosome 17q21.3-17q22, and the exon/intron structure of the 15 kb gene was determined. RT-PCR analyses of XT-I and XT-II mRNA from various tissues confirmed that both XT-I and XT-II transcripts are ubiquitously expressed in the human tissues, although with different levels of transcription. Furthermore, the cDNAs encoding XT-I and XT-II from rat were cloned. The deduced amino acid sequences of rat xylosyltransferases displayed 94% identity to the corresponding human enzyme.

  14. Transcriptional expression of genes involved in cell invasion and migration by normal and tumoral trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Janneau, Jean-Louis; Maldonado-Estrada, Juan; Tachdjian, Gérard; Miran, Isabelle; Motté, Nelly; Saulnier, Patrick; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Coté, Jean-François; Simon, Bénédicte; Frydman, René; Chaouat, Gérard; Bellet, Dominique

    2002-11-01

    Once initiated, invasion of trophoblast cells must be tightly regulated, particularly in early pregnancy. The mechanisms necessary for the invasion and migration of trophoblast cells are thought to be related to those involved in the invasive and metastatic properties of cancer cells. Quantitative PCR was used to measure, in trophoblast cells, the transcriptional expression profiles of four genes, INSL4, BRMS1, KiSS-1 and KiSS-1R, reported to be implicated in tumor invasion and metastasis. Laser capture microdissection and purification of trophoblast cells demonstrate that, as already known for INSL4, BRMS1, KiSS-1 and KiSS-1R are expressed by the trophoblast subset of placental tissues. Expression profiles of these genes studied in early placentas (7-9 weeks, n=55) and term placentas (n=11) showed that expression levels of BRMS1 are higher in term than in early placentas, while expression levels of KiSS-1R are higher in early than in term placentas. Low levels of expression of BRMS1 were observed in normal pregnancies, in molar pregnancies and in choriocarcinoma cell lines BeWo, JAR and JEG3 while, in striking contrast, the expression levels of INSL4, KiSS-1 and Kiss-1R were increased in both early placentas and molar pregnancies and were reduced in choriocarcinoma cells. These transcriptional expression profiles are in favor of a predominant role of INSL4, KiSS-1 and KiSS-1R in the control of the invasive and migratory properties of trophoblast cells.

  15. Laminin alpha1-chain shows a restricted distribution in epithelial basement membranes of fetal and adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, I; Gullberg, D; Rissanen, J; Kivilaakso, E; Kiviluoto, T; Laitinen, L A; Lehto, V P; Ekblom, P

    2000-06-15

    Two novel monoclonal antibodies were raised and used to study the expression of laminin (Ln) alpha1-chain in developing and adult human tissues. In both fetal and adult kidney, a distinct immunoreactivity was seen in basement membranes (BM) of most proximal tubules but not in the distal tubular or glomerular BM or in the basal laminae of blood vessels. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled cultured human renal proximal tubular cells showed an abundant production and deposition of Ln alpha1-chain to the extracellular matrix, suggestive of an epithelial origin of kidney Ln-1. Quantitative cell adhesion experiments with JAR choriocarcinoma cells showed that purified human Ln-1 is a good substrate for cell adhesion that it is differently recognized by integrin receptors when compared to mouse Ln-1. In fetal and adult testes immunoreactivity was solely confined to BM of the seminiferous epithelium. In the airways BM-confined reaction was only seen in fetal budding bronchial tubules (16-19 weeks) at the pseudoglandular stage of development. In the skin a distinct immunoreactivity was confined to BM of developing hair buds but not in epithelial BMs of adult epidermis or of epidermal appendages. In other adult tissues, immunoreactivity was found in BMs of thyroid, salivary, and mammary glands as well as in BMs of endometrium and endocervix, but not of ectocervix or vagina. No immunoreactivity was found in BMs of most of the digestive tract, including the liver and pancreas, except for BMs of esophageal submucosal glands and duodenal Brunner's glands. In fetal specimens, BMs of the bottoms of the intestinal and gastric glands were positive. Basal laminae of blood vessels were generally negative for Ln alpha1 chain with the exception of specimens of both fetal and adult central nervous system in which immunoreactivity for Ln alpha1 chain was prominently confined to capillary walls. The results suggest that outside the central nervous system, Ln alpha1 chain shows a

  16. The Diagnosis of Choriocarcinoma in Molar Pregnancies: A Revised Approach in Clinical Testing

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Lisa; Zhang, Liangtao; Sheath, Karen; Love, Donald R.; George, Alice M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hydatidiform moles occur in approximately 1 in 1,500 pregnancies; however, early miscarriages or spontaneous abortions may not be correctly identified as molar pregnancies due to poor differentiation of chorionic villi. Methods The current clinical testing algorithm used for the detection of hydatidiform moles uses a combination of morphological analysis and p57 immunostaining followed by ploidy testing to establish a diagnosis of either a complete or partial molar pregnancy. We review here 198 referrals for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ploidy testing, where the initial diagnosis based on morphology is compared to the final diagnosis based on a combination of morphology, FISH and p57 immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Results Approximately 40% of cases were determined to be genetically abnormal, but only 28.8% of cases were diagnosed as molar pregnancies. The underestimation of complete molar pregnancies and those with androgenetic inheritance was also found to be likely using conventional diagnostic methods, as atypical p57 staining was observed in approximately 10% of cases. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a revised approach to testing products of conception is necessary, with cases screened according to their clinical history in order to distinguish molar pregnancy referrals from hydropic pregnancies. PMID:26566410

  17. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  18. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  19. Humanizing the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dennis

    1983-01-01

    Reviews some of the steps taken at Shoreline Community College to develop cooperative programs involving vocational and academic faculty, including the creation of a Humanities Advisory Council. Briefly describes some of the cooperative programs, e.g., symposia on critical issues in higher education, guest lectures, and high school outreach. (AYC)

  20. Humanity and human DNA.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Genetics has marked the second half of the 20th century by addressing such formidable problems as the identification of our genes and their role, their interaction with the environment, and even their therapeutic uses. The identification of genes raises questions about differences between humans and non-humans, as well as about the evolution towards trans-humanism and post-humanism. In practise, however, the main question concerns the limits of prenatal genetic diagnosis, not only on account of the seriousness of the affections involved but also because of the choice to be made between following-up the medical indication and engaging in a systematic public health strategy aimed at eliminating children with certain handicaps. History reminds us that genetic science has already been misused by political forces influenced by the ideas of eugenics, particularly in the Nazi period. We may wonder whether it is reasonable to formulate a judgement on the life of a child yet to be born, merely on the basis of a DNA analysis. My experience as a practising geneticist and my involvement in French politics forces me to stress the dangers of a new eugenics hiding behind a medical mask. As demonstrated by epigenetics, human beings cannot be reduced to their DNA alone. In our society, one of the problems concerns individuals whose lives may be considered by some as simply not worth living. Another problem is the place and the social significance of the handicapped amongst us. Fortunately, recent progresses in gene therapy, biotherapy, and even pharmacology, appear to be opening up promising therapeutic perspectives. We should bear in mind that the chief vocation of medical genetics, which fully belongs to the art of medicine, is to heal and to cure. This is precisely where genetics should concentrate its efforts software.

  1. In vitro transport mechanism of psoralen in a human placental cell line (BeWo cells).

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Song, Dianrong; Han, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Yuhua; Du, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which psoralen is transported across the placenta was investigated in the BeWo human placental cell line derived from choriocarcinoma in a transwell assay system using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry detection. Psoralen uptake by BeWo cells increased linearly over the concentration range of 0.01 µM to 100 µM (r (2) = 0.997) and was not saturable. Psoralen uptake by BeWo cells was not affected by temperature (4 °C, room temperature, and 37 °C; p > 0.05). Psoralen transport increased linearly over 180 min (r (2) = 0.988) with 3.08 ± 0.26 %, 5.47 ± 0.21 %, 7.54 ± 0.06 %, 9.40 ± 0.37 %, 11.49 ± 0.31 %, and 12.46 ± 0.61 % transferred from the apical chamber to the basolateral chamber in the transwell assays at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 min, respectively. The rate of transport showed the same tendency, increasing linearly from 0.13 ± 0.01 pmol/s to 0.58 ± 0.03 pmol/s over the concentration range of 25 µM to 100 µM (r (2) = 0.989). The apparent permeability coefficient for psoralen (100 µM) was 5.62 ± 0.24 × 10(-6) cm/s and 5.53 ± 0.47 × 10(-6) cm/s before and after treatment with verapamil (100 µM), respectively (p > 0.05). The efflux value for psoralen was approximately 1. These data show that psoralen is well absorbed and crosses the placental barrier via passive diffusion in the BeWo cell line.

  2. Human Augmentics: augmenting human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Robert V; Leigh, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans. One can think of Human Augmentics as the driving force in the non-biological evolution of humans. HA devices will provide technology to compensate for human biological limitations either natural or acquired. The strengths of HA lie in its applicability to all humans. Its interoperability enables the formation of ecosystems whereby augmented humans can draw from other realms such as "the Cloud" and other augmented humans for strength. The exponential growth in new technologies portends such a system but must be designed for interaction through the use of open-standards and open-APIs for system development. We discuss the conditions needed for HA to flourish with an emphasis on devices that provide non-biological rehabilitation.

  3. Human Parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianming; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S

    2017-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) and human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), members of the large Parvoviridae family, are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases. For B19V in particular, host features determine disease manifestations. These viruses are prevalent worldwide and are culturable in vitro, and serological and molecular assays are available but require careful interpretation of results. Additional human parvoviruses, including HBoV2 to -4, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), and human bufavirus (BuV) are also reviewed. The full spectrum of parvovirus disease in humans has yet to be established. Candidate recombinant B19V vaccines have been developed but may not be commercially feasible. We review relevant features of the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses, and the human immune response that they elicit, which have allowed a deep understanding of pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  5. Group B Streptococcus Induces Trophoblast Death

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Amber; Chung, Kathy; Kocak, Hande; Bertolotto, Cristina; Uh, Andy; Hobel, Calvin J; Simmons, Charles F; Doran, Kelly; Liu, George; Equils, Ozlem

    2008-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is one of the leading causes of neonatal infection; however the molecular mechanisms involved are not clearly known. Here we used high and low hemolytic GBS isolates and mutant GBS that lacks β-hemolysin expression and showed that GBS infection or exposure to GBS-hemolysin extract induces primary human trophoblast, placental fibroblast and JEG3 trophoblast cell line death, and that GBS-induced trophoblast death was β-hemolysin dependent. The fibroblasts and trophoblasts provide an innate immune barrier between fetal and maternal circulation in the placenta. These data suggest that GBS may disrupt this barrier to invade fetal circulation. PMID:18599257

  6. DNA methylation mediated up-regulation of TERRA non-coding RNA is coincident with elongated telomeres in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Boris; Napier, Christine E; Vryer, Regan; Dimitriadis, Eva; Manuelpillai, Ursula; Sharkey, Andrew; Craig, Jeffrey M; Reddel, Roger R; Saffery, Richard

    2016-11-01

    What factors regulate elongated telomere length in the human placenta? Hypomethylation of TERRA promoters in the human placenta is associated with high TERRA expression, however, no clear mechanistic link between these phenomena and elongated telomere length in the human placenta was found. Human placenta tissue and trophoblasts show longer telomere lengths compared to gestational age-matched somatic cells. However, telomerase (hTERT) expression and activity in the placenta is low, suggesting a role for an alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). While ALT is observed in 10-15% of human cancers and in some mouse stem cells, ALT has never been reported in non-cancerous human tissues. Human term placental tissue and matched cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) were collected as part of the Peri/Postnatal Epigenetic Twins study (PETS). In addition, first trimester placental villi, purified cytotrophoblasts, choriocarcinoma cell lines and a panel of ALT-positive cancer cell lines were tested. Telomere length was determined using the Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) assay and a relative quantitative PCR method. DNA methylation levels at several CpG rich subtelomeric TERRA promoters were determined using bisulfite conversion and the SEQUENOM EpiTYPER platform. Expression of TERRA and hTERT was determined using quantitative RT-PCR. ALT was assessed using the C-circle assay (CCA). The human placenta tissue and purified first trimester trophoblasts showed low subtelomeric (TERRA) DNA methylation compared to matched CBMCs and other somatic cells. Interestingly placental TERRA methylation was lower than ALT-cancer cell lines, previously reported to be hypomethylated at these loci. Low TERRA methylation was associated with higher expression of TERRA RNA in placenta compared to matched CBMCs. Detectable levels of C-circles were observed in first trimester placental villi, but not term placenta, suggesting that the ALT mechanism may be active in specific placental cells in

  7. Teaching humanism.

    PubMed

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  8. Toxicities of trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin, abortifacient proteins from Chinese medicinal plants, on cultured tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tsao, S W; Ng, T B; Yeung, H W

    1990-01-01

    Trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin are abortifacient proteins extracted from Chinese medicinal herbs. Study of their in vitro cytotoxicities showed that the two proteins selectively injured choriocarcinoma and melanoma cells. Hepatoma cells represented the most resistant cell line among the various cell lines investigated. Cytotoxicity profiles of trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin differed from those of anti-cancer drugs which interfere with DNA metabolism such as cisplatin, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. Radioactive precursor incorporation studies suggested that the two abortifacient proteins inhibited cellular protein synthesis. The marked decrease in secretion of human chorionic gonadotrophin and progesterone by choriocarcinoma cells after treatment with the proteins could be attributed mainly to loss of cells.

  9. Human cloning and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Birnbacher, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    Judging from the official documents dealing with the moral and legal aspects of human reproductive cloning there seems to be a nearly worldwide consensus that reproductive cloning is incompatible with human dignity. The certainty of this judgement is, however, not matched by corresponding arguments. Is the incompatibility of reproductive with human dignity an ultimate moral intuition closed to further argument? The paper considers several ways by which the intuition might be connected with more familiar applications of the concept of human dignity, and argues that there is no such connection. It concludes that the central objections to human reproductive cloning are not objections relating to dignity but objections relating to risk, especially the risks imposed on children born in the course of testing the method's safety.

  10. Human rights

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J Enoch

    1977-01-01

    What are human rights? In this article Enoch Powell, MP (a former Conservative Minister of Health), approaches this question through a critical discussion of Article 25 (I) of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Professor R S Downie in his accompanying commentary analyses Mr Powell's statements and takes up in particular Mr Powell's argument that claiming rights for one person entails compulsion on another person. In Professor Downie's view there is nothing in Article 25 (I) that cannot embody acceptable moral rights, the commonly accepted interpretation of that Article of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights which many people think is wholly acceptable. PMID:604483

  11. Overcoming Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiliano, Louis; Davis, Robert Leonard

    1979-01-01

    Humanism cheats students because it gives them false ideas about their abilities and encourages them to aspire to unrealistic levels of achievement. It also reduces the level of performance that should be expected of teachers and paraprofessionals. (Author/IRT)

  12. Human expunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  13. Human otoacariasis.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, K S Gangadhara; Rajeshwari, A

    2007-09-01

    Accidental entry of foreign bodies into the ear canal is very common. Animate foreign bodies constitute upto 14% of cases, majority being the cockroaches. Not many cases of ticks entering into human ears are found in the scientific literature. Even the available reports are from South Africa, Nepal, Malaysia, Chile and Srilanka. This Indian study discusses the occurence, clinical features, the methods adopted in the removal and the complications of tick infestation of human ear. A total of 144 cases of ticks entering the human ears were studied over a period of two years from Jan 2004 to Dec 2005. This report represents one of the largest recorded series of human otoacariasis available in the Indian literature.

  14. Human babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Rożej-Bielicka, Wioletta; Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Gołąb, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging parasitic, anthropo-zoonotic tick-borne disease, seldom diagnosed in humans. Caused by Protozoa, Babesia (also called Piroplasma) intraerytrocytic piriform microorganism. Infection of vertebrates is transmitted by ticks. Out of more than 100 Babesia species/genotypes described so far, only some were diagnosed in infected humans, mostly B. microti, B. divergens and B. venatorum (Babesia sp. EU1). Infection in humans is often asymptomatic or mild but is of a particular risk for asplenic individuals, those with congenital or acquired immunodeficiencies, and elderly. Infections transmitted with blood and blood products raise concerns in hemotherapy. Epidemiological situation of babesiosis varies around the world. In Europe, no increase in the number of cases was reported, but in the USA its prevalence is increasing and extension of endemic areas is observed. The aim of this publication is to describe the problems connected with the current epidemiological situation, diagnosis and treatment of human babesiosis with regard to clinical status of patients.

  15. Human Cloning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-20

    not believe that noncoital, asexual reproduction , such as cloning, would be considered a fundamental right by the Supreme Court. A ban on human...society by “crossing the boundary from sexual to asexual reproduction , thus approving in principle the genetic manipulation and control of nascent human... reproductive cloning and, by a vote of 10 to 7, a four-year moratorium on cloning for medical research purposes. The ethical issues surrounding reproductive

  16. Human Endomucin

    PubMed Central

    Samulowitz, Ulrike; Kuhn, Annegret; Brachtendorf, Gertrud; Nawroth, Roman; Braun, Attila; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Böcker, Werner; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2002-01-01

    Endomucin is a typical sialomucin that we recently identified on the surface of mouse endothelial cells and on putative hematopoetic clusters of the dorsal aorta in the embryo. We have generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the extracellular part of human endomucin and polyclonal antibodies against the cytoplasmic part. Using immunohistochemistry endomucin was specifically detected on endothelial cells of blood and lymphatic vessels of all analyzed human tissues. In addition, the polyclonal antibodies stained the epithelium of the epidermis as well as epithelial and myoepithelial cells of the eccrine and apocrine glands in the skin. This nonendothelial staining could only be seen with a subset of mAbs if the staining procedure was amplified. Although high endothelial venules (HEVs) were not significantly stained with mAbs against endomucin, the polyclonal antibodies clearly detected endomucin on HEVs in lymphatic organs of the mouse and human, suggesting HEV-specific glycosylation affecting recognition by the mAbs. Indeed, endomucin isolated from human and mouse lymphoid organs carried the MECA-79 epitope that defines a set of L-selectin ligands on HEVs called peripheral node addressins. We conclude that human and mouse endomucin are endothelial sialomucins with the potential to function as L-selectin ligands. PMID:12000719

  17. Human monkeypox.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Andrea M; Damon, Inger K

    2014-01-01

    Human monkeypox is a zoonotic Orthopoxvirus with a presentation similar to smallpox. Clinical differentiation of the disease from smallpox and varicella is difficult. Laboratory diagnostics are principal components to identification and surveillance of disease, and new tests are needed for a more precise and rapid diagnosis. The majority of human infections occur in Central Africa, where surveillance in rural areas with poor infrastructure is difficult but can be accomplished with evidence-guided tools and educational materials to inform public health workers of important principles. Contemporary epidemiological studies are needed now that populations do not receive routine smallpox vaccination. New therapeutics and vaccines offer hope for the treatment and prevention of monkeypox; however, more research must be done before they are ready to be deployed in an endemic setting. There is a need for more research in the epidemiology, ecology, and biology of the virus in endemic areas to better understand and prevent human infections.

  18. [Humanized childbirth].

    PubMed

    Kuo, Su-Chen

    2005-06-01

    Childbirth is a major event in a family. The expectant parent's perception of the childbirth experience influences his or her development as a parent. Making childbirth a positive and satisfying experience for women is the responsibility of health care providers. Women want to have physical and emotional privacy during labor and delivery, and to experience both in a friendly, comfortable environment. For women expected to undergo normal deliveries, humanized childbirth is one accessible approach. This article explores the definition and evolution of humanized childbirth and the care practice that it involves. It also explores birth plans and birth experiences, and the improvements necessary to routine labor practices to enable women to participate in decision making about their childbirth experiences. The author emphasizes that when health-care providers recognize the value of humanized childbirth and make changes accordingly, the dignity of women's childbirth experiences will be enhanced.

  19. Human Interface to Netcentricity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    to human communication involves communications initiated by applications or devices for human consumption. Examples include intelligent agents...AKO) are all examples of human to machine communication. • Human to Human: Human to human communication in a net-centric environment can be...the discussion will center on providing options for improving human to human communication . It is our position that an emphasis on human to human

  20. Heterogeneity of human chorionic gonadotropin in various biological fluids as revealed by chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Huang, S C; Hsieh, C Y; Ouyang, P C; Chen, H C

    1989-01-01

    This study demonstrates that chromatofocusing is powerful in analyzing multiple forms of hCG from biological fluids. For analyzing hCG from biological fluids, it is necessary to perform chromatofocusing, in the range of pH 6.2-3.0 and pH 9.0-6.0. By chromatofocusing, highly purified hCG (CR121) was found to be acidic, in the range of pI 4.22-3.8, and hCG beta was more acidic, in the range of pI 4.0-3.2. Moreover, hCG from the first trimester pregnancy, hydatidiform mole or choriocarcinoma was also mainly acidic. Therefore, chromatofocusing in the range of 6.2-3.0 was suitable for analyzing purified hCG, hCG beta, and urinary hCG from the first trimester pregnancy, hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma. On the other hand, because hCG in the third trimester pregnancy and the toxemia of pregnancy were mainly alkaline, the chromatofocusing system in the range of pH 9.0-6.0 was suitable for analyzing hCG from the third trimester pregnancy and the toxemia of pregnancy.

  1. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  2. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  3. Classical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donn; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot course in humanities team-taught by three teachers, two from a senior high-school and one from a junior high-school, in Brookfield, Wisconsin. The specific subject matter is Greek and Roman culture. The curriculum is outlined and the basic reading list is included. (CLK)

  4. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  5. Humanizing Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Abraham

    The task of humanizing Shakespeare for high school seniors is not simple but may be done in a variety of ways, all intended to arouse student interest, curiosity, respect, and fondness for the Bard. Gimmicks such as bulletin board signs, pictures, maps, charts, and writings attract attention, as do letters to local newspapers reporting informally…

  6. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  7. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  8. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  9. Placental autophagy regulation by the BOK-MCL1 rheostat.

    PubMed

    Kalkat, Manpreet; Garcia, Julia; Ebrahimi, Jessica; Melland-Smith, Megan; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2013-12-01

    Autophagy is the catabolic degradation of cellular cytoplasmic constituents via the lysosomal pathway that physiologically elicits a primarily cytoprotective function, but can rapidly be upregulated in response to stressors thereby inducing cell death. We have reported that the balance between the BCL2 family proteins BOK and MCL1 regulates human trophoblast cell fate and its alteration toward cell death typifies preeclampsia. Here we demonstrate that BOK is a potent inducer of autophagy as shown by increased LC3B-II production, autophagosomal formation and lysosomal activation in HEK 293. In contrast, using JEG3 cells we showed that prosurvival MCL1 acts as a repressor of autophagy via an interaction with BECN1, which is abrogated by BOK. We found that MCL1-cleaved products, specifically MCL1c157, trigger autophagy while the splicing variant MCL1S has no effect. Treatment of JEG3 cells with nitric oxide donor SNP resulted in BOK-MCL1 rheostat dysregulation, favoring BOK accumulation, thereby inducing autophagy. Overexpression of MCL1 rescued oxidative stress-induced autophagy. Of clinical relevance, we report aberrant autophagy levels in the preeclamptic placenta due to impaired recruitment of BECN1 to MCL1. Our data provided the first evidence for a key role of the BOK-MCL1 system in regulating autophagy in the human placenta, whereby an adverse environment as seen in preeclampsia tilts the BOK-MCL1 balance toward the build-up of isoforms that triggers placental autophagy.

  10. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  11. Human Mind in Human Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furth, Hans G.

    1996-01-01

    Claims that mind and mental objects form a societal mental structure enabling children to assimilate the society and become co-constructing members. Cites evidence that competence to create mental objects, symbols, and meanings separated from action is the evolutionary evolved human capacity for society and culture. Vygotsky's "natural"…

  12. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  13. Humane reproduction.

    PubMed

    1974-03-01

    Discusses social, economic, and humane considerations in population control. Mental health aspects of controlled fertility are considered in relation to the family's psychosocial and material resources, the effects of reproduction on the individual the family, and community, and the advantages and disadvantages of controlled reproduction. A distinction between family planning and population control is outlined. It is suggested that there is hardly a single more effective tool for preventing psychological disorders than the prevention of unwanted pregnancies. Analyses of educational and medical services and methods of birth control are presented. A comprehensive neighborhood health station, which would consolidate these services, is suggested. It is concluded that humane programs of reproduction would lead to a reconciliation of biological drives with a responsible concern for the quality of life.

  14. Human Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Inman, Verne T.

    1966-01-01

    The development of bipedal plantigrade progression is a purely human, and apparently learned, accomplishment. Experimental findings confirm the hypothesis that the human body will integrate the motion of various segments of the body and control the activity of muscles to minimize energy expenditure. Movements which are integrated for this purpose include vertical displacement of the body, horizontal rotation of the pelvis, mediolateral pelvic tilt, flexion of the knee, plantar flexion of the ankle and foot, lateral displacement of the torso and rotation of the shoulder girdle. Raising and lowering the body results in gains and losses of potential energy, and acceleration and deceleration result in gains and losses of kinetic energy. The motions are so co-ordinated that a transfer of energy back and forth from kinetic to potential occurs during walking, which tends to minimize total energy expenditure as well as muscle work. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5942660

  15. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  16. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa.

  17. Human suffering.

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    10 measures of quality of life are used to rank 141 countries in the International Human Suffering Index (HSI). The Index differentiates between extreme, high, moderate, and minimal levels of human suffering. Social welfare is the sum of 10 measures: life expectancy, daily caloric intake, clean drinking water, infant immunization, secondary school enrollment, gross national product per capita, the rate of inflation, communication technology (i.e., telephones), political freedom, and civil rights. Each measure is ranked between 0 and 10. The highest score indicates the greatest country stress, with the worst possible score being 100. About 1 billion people live in desperate poverty. Living conditions are the worst in Mozambique (93), followed by Somalia, Afghanistan, Haiti, and Sudan. Most of these countries also have high population growth. The most comfortable countries are Denmark (1), the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, and Canada, which have low population growth. Total scores of 75 or greater (extreme human suffering) occur in 27 countries (20 in Africa, 16 in Asia, and Haiti) with 8% of the world's population (432 million people). High human suffering scores range between 50 and 74 and include 56 countries (24 in Africa, 16 in Asia, 15 in the Western Hemisphere, and 1 in Oceania) with 3.5 billion people. The number of countries in this grouping increased from 44 countries with 58% of world population in 1987. Moderate suffering scores range from 25-49. Countries with moderate suffering number 34 countries (9 in Europe, 13 in Asia, 8 in the Western Hemisphere, and 2 in Oceania and 2 in Africa) with 11.8% of world population (636 million). Over the preceding 5-year period the number of countries increased from 29 countries with 10% of world population. Minimal human suffering occurs in 24 countries (17 in Europe, Israel and Japan in Asia; Canada, the US, and Barbados in the Western Hemisphere; and Australia and New Zealand in Oceania) with 14.8% of world

  18. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  19. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  20. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  1. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  2. Hypoxia prevents induction of aromatase expression in human trophoblast cells in culture: potential inhibitory role of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor Mash-2 (mammalian achaete-scute homologous protein-2).

    PubMed

    Jiang, B; Kamat, A; Mendelson, C R

    2000-10-01

    125, 201, 246, or 501 bp of DNA flanking the 5'-end of the placenta-specific exon (exon I.1) of the human CYP19 gene linked to the human GH (hGH) structural gene, as reporter. In studies using BeWo, a human choriocarcinoma cell line, overexpression of Mash-2 also inhibited expression of cotransfected CYP19I.1:hGH fusion gene constructs. The findings that Mash-2 had no effect on the expression of a CYP19I.1(-42):hGH fusion gene in primary cultures of human trophoblast and BeWo cells suggest that Mash-2 exerts its inhibitory effects directly or indirectly though CYP19I.1 5'-flanking sequences that lie between -42 and -125 bp. By contrast, neither Id1 nor Id2 had an effect on CYP19I. 1 promoter activity in the transfected BeWo cells. These findings suggest that Mash-2 may serve as a hypoxia-induced transcription factor that prevents differentiation to syncytiotrophoblast and aromatase induction in human trophoblast cultured under low O2 conditions.

  3. Human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  4. Human schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2014-06-28

    Human schistosomiasis--or bilharzia--is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination.

  5. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  6. Triethylenetetramine modulates polyamine and energy metabolism and inhibits cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, Mervi T; Ucal, Sebahat; Pasanen, Markku; Peräniemi, Sirpa; Weisell, Janne; Khomutov, Maxim; Khomutov, Alex R; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Keinänen, Tuomo A

    2016-05-15

    Polyamine metabolism is an attractive anticancer drug target, since polyamines are absolutely required for cellular proliferation, and increased levels of polyamines and their biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are associated with cancer. Triethylenetetramine (TETA) is a charge-deficient isosteric analogue of the polyamine spermidine (Spd) and a Cu(II)-chelating compound used for the treatment of Wilson's disease, and it has been implicated as a potential anticancer therapeutic drug. In the present study, we studied the effects of TETA in comparison with two other Cu(II)-chelators, D-penicillamine (PA) and tetrathiomolybdate (TTM), on polyamine metabolism in DU145 prostate carcinoma, MCF-7 breast carcinoma and JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. TETA induced antizyme, down-regulated ODC and inhibited [(14)C] Spd uptake. Moreover, it completely prevented α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)-induced increase in [(14)C] Spd uptake, and inhibited [(14)C] putrescine (Put) uptake and ODC activity in vivo Seven-day treatment of DU145 cells with TETA caused growth cessation by reducing intracellular polyamine levels and suppressing the formation of hypusinated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). TETA or its N-acetylated metabolites also inhibited spermine (Spm), diamine and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidases and decreased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Moreover, TETA inhibited the utilization of Put as energy source via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, as indicated by decreased production of (14)CO2 from [(14)C] Put. These results indicate that TETA attacks multiple proven anticancer drug targets not attributed to copper chelation, which warrants further studies to reveal its potential in cancer chemoprevention and cure. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Tissue Specific and Hormonal Regulation of Gene Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    labor . In choriocarcinoma cell lines, which are models for placental trophoblasts, activation of cAMP dependent pathways increases human (h)CRH...placenta (7,8). Recent studies indicate that placental CRH may serve as a key component in timing the onset of human labor (9). Placental CRH is...consistent with a role for CRH in fetal gestation and labor , especially in humans (28). The expression of CRH in human placenta begins around the seventh week

  8. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  9. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  10. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  11. Building artificial humans to understand humans.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Nishio, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    If we could build an android as a very humanlike robot, how would we humans distinguish a real human from an android? The answer to this question is not so easy. In human-android interaction, we cannot see the internal mechanism of the android, and thus we may simply believe that it is a human. This means that a human can be defined from two perspectives: one by organic mechanism and the other by appearance. Further, the current rapid progress in artificial organs makes this distinction confusing. The approach discussed in this article is to create artificial humans with humanlike appearances. The developed artificial humans, an android and a geminoid, can be used to improve understanding of humans through psychological and cognitive tests conducted using the artificial humans. We call this new approach to understanding humans android science.

  12. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  13. [Human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes.

  14. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  15. Humane Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Eileen S.; Westerlund, Stuart R.

    This booklet traces the historical development of human education as it has been instilled into the young people of America from colonial times to the present and provides a future prognosis of humaneness in the schools. Humane education promotes humane behavior and is an important part of the humane movement in the United States, although until…

  16. Human Research Risk Management

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) investigates and mitigates the highest risks to human health and per...

  17. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  18. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  19. The multidrug-resistance transporter ABCB5 is expressed in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Volpicelli, Elgida R; Lezcano, Cecilia; Zhan, Qian; Girouard, Sasha D; Kindelberger, David W; Frank, Markus H; Frank, Natasha Y; Crum, Christopher P; Murphy, George F

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in placenta protectively transport drugs and xenobiotics. ABCB5 [subfamily B (MDR/TAP)] is a novel ABC multidrug-resistance transporter that also mediates cell fusion, stem cell function, and vasculogenic plasticity. Immunohistochemistry and double-labeling immunofluorescence staining for ABCB5 and ABCB5/CD200, respectively, was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded placental tissue from 5 first trimester, 5 second trimester, and 5 term pregnancies as well as 5 partial moles, and 5 complete moles. In addition, tumor cells from 5 choriocarcinoma and 5 placental site trophoblastic tumor cases were examined. ABCB5 staining was observed in villous trophoblasts in 100% (5/5) of first trimester placentas (with progressive decrease in term placentas); 100% of partial moles (5/5); and 100% of complete moles (5/5). Notably, reactivity was discretely restricted to the inner trophoblast layer, with no staining of overlying syncytiotrophoblast. Antibody specificity and localization was confirmed further by in situ hybridization. ABCB5 expression was retained in 20% of choriocarcinomas (1/5) and 40% of placental site trophoblastic tumors (2/5). Prior studies have localized expression of multidrug-resistance-1, also known as ABCB1, within the syncytiotrophoblast of early placentas, where it serves a protective function as an efflux transporter. Our results show that ABCB5 is preferentially expressed in the cytotrophoblast layer of placental villi. The expression of this novel biomarker at the maternal-fetal interface raises questions on its role in placental structure and function as well as on its potential contribution to the protective efflux provided by other P-glycoprotein transporters.

  20. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  1. Special Section: Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  2. Cooperation in human teaching.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Ann Cale

    2015-01-01

    Kline's evolutionary analysis of teaching provides welcome reframing for cross-species comparisons. However, theory based on competition cannot explain the transmission of human cultural elements that were collectively created. Humans evolved in a cultural niche and teaching-learning coevolved to transmit culture. To study human cultural variation in teaching, we need a more articulated theory of this distinctively human engagement.

  3. The Humanities: Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on a wide range of interdisciplinary themes and ideas for humanities instruction, the 17 articles in this journal issue discuss the following topics: (1) literature, humanities, and the adult learner; (2) the role of the humanities in educating for a democracy; (3) humanities in the marketplace; (4) literature versus "great books" in high…

  4. What Are the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Francis

    A working definition of the humanities and characteristics of a liberally educated person are specified. The humanities embrace areas of human knowledge that possess these elements: central concern for human beings rather than for the processes of nature or the structures of society; primary focus on the individual rather than on the group;…

  5. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  6. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  7. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  8. Preference for human eyes in human infants.

    PubMed

    Dupierrix, Eve; de Boisferon, Anne Hillairet; Méary, David; Lee, Kang; Quinn, Paul C; Di Giorgio, Elisa; Simion, Francesca; Tomonaga, Masaki; Pascalis, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Despite evidence supporting an early attraction to human faces, the nature of the face representation in neonates and its development during the first year after birth remain poorly understood. One suggestion is that an early preference for human faces reflects an attraction toward human eyes because human eyes are distinctive compared with other animals. In accord with this proposal, prior empirical studies have demonstrated the importance of the eye region in face processing in adults and infants. However, an attraction for the human eye has never been shown directly in infants. The current study aimed to investigate whether an attraction for human eyes would be present in newborns and older infants. With the use of a preferential looking time paradigm, newborns and 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-olds were simultaneously presented with a pair of nonhuman primate faces (chimpanzees and Barbary macaques) that differed only by the eyes, thereby pairing a face with original nonhuman primate eyes with the same face in which the eyes were replaced by human eyes. Our results revealed that no preference was observed in newborns, but a preference for nonhuman primate faces with human eyes emerged from 3months of age and remained stable thereafter. The findings are discussed in terms of how a preference for human eyes may emerge during the first few months after birth.

  9. Training Humans for the Human Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    TRAINING HUMANS FOR THE HUMAN DOMAIN Dr. Steve Tatham Mr. Keir Giles U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE ~~~ ~O.L STRATEGIC STUDIES INSTITUTE Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Training Humans for the Human Domain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  10. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  11. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  12. Human dignity, bioethics, and human rights.

    PubMed

    Häyry, Matti; Takala, Tuija

    2005-09-01

    The authors analyse and assess the Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights published by UNESCO. They argue that the Draft has two main weaknesses. It unnecessarily confines the scope of bioethics to life sciences and their practical applications. And it fails to spell out the intended role of human dignity in international ethical regulation.

  13. Values for Human-to-Human Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Defines "values" and lists the eight values (stewardship, service, intellectual freedom, rationalism, literacy and learning, equity of access, privacy, democracy) derived by the author in an earlier work. Gives a brief history of the evolution of human-to-human reference service and discusses its future. Relates each of the author's eight values…

  14. Promoter elements and transcription factors involved in differentiation-dependent human chorionic gonadotrophin-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid expression of term villous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Knöfler, M; Saleh, L; Bauer, S; Vasicek, R; Griesinger, G; Strohmer, H; Helmer, H; Husslein, P

    2000-10-01

    Differentiation of primary villous cytotrophoblasts into syncytia is associated with increasing production of alpha and beta human CG subunits, which is predominantly governed at the level of messenger RNA expression. Here, we present a detailed study on the mechanisms involved in the differentiation-dependent regulation of the trophoblast-specific CGalpha gene promoter. Site-directed mutations in each of the five DNA-elements of the composite enhancer were performed to investigate the contribution of the individual regulatory sequences to the overall transcriptional activity of the promoter at two different stages of trophoblast in vitro differentiation. We show that deletion of one cyclic AMP response element (CRE) did not affect CGalpha promoter activity in cytotrophoblasts; however, it reduced transcription by 33% in differentiating cultures. Removal of both CREs almost abolished transcription at early and later stages of in vitro differentiation. Upon mutation the enhancer elements alphaACT, JRE, and CCAAT significantly decreased luciferase reporter transcription; however their contribution to the total promoter activity did not change during in vitro differentiation. Contrary to that, mutated TSE diminished promoter activity by 19% during 12 and 48 h of cultivation but reduced luciferase expression by 78% between 48 and 84 h of differentiation. In electrophoretic mobility shift assay, the TSE interacted with activating protein (AP)-2alpha in both primary trophoblasts and choriocarcinoma cells. While CRE-interacting proteins were detectable 12 h after isolation, the TSE-binding complex did not appear before 36 h of in vitro differentiation. During syncytium formation increasing protein expression of activating transcription factor (ATF)-1, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-1, and AP-2alpha was observed on Western blots. Moreover, phosphorylated CREB-1 and ATF-1 accumulated between 24 and 78 h of trophoblast cultivation. By fluorescence

  15. Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Carboplatin, Etoposide, or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients With Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-02

    Adult Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Embryonal Carcinoma; Grade 2 Immature Ovarian Teratoma; Grade 3 Immature Ovarian Teratoma; Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Teratoma; Stage I Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Stage I Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Stage I Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Stage II Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Stage II Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage III Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Stage III Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Stage III Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Mixed Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Mixed Choriocarcinoma and Teratoma; Testicular Mixed Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor

  16. Indicators: Human Disturbance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human disturbance is a measure of the vulnerability of aquatic resources to a variety of harmful human activities such as tree removal, road building, construction near shorelines/streambanks, and artificial hardening of lakeshores with retaining walls.

  17. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  18. The Growing Human Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  19. Human assisted robotic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Files, B. T.; Canady, J.; Warnell, G.; Stump, E.; Nothwang, W. D.; Marathe, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In support of achieving better performance on autonomous mapping and exploration tasks by incorporating human input, we seek here to first characterize humans' ability to recognize locations from limited visual information. Such a characterization is critical to the design of a human-in-the-loop system faced with deciding whether and when human input is useful. In this work, we develop a novel and practical place-recognition task that presents humans with video clips captured by a navigating ground robot. Using this task, we find experimentally that human performance does not seem to depend on factors such as clip length or familiarity with the scene and also that there is significant variability across subjects. Moreover, we find that humans significantly outperform a state-of-the-art computational solution to this problem, suggesting the utility of incorporating human input in autonomous mapping and exploration techniques.

  20. Human genomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Disotell, Todd R

    2000-01-01

    The recent completion and assembly of the first draft of the human genome, which combines samples from several ethnically diverse males and females, provides preliminary data on the extent of human genetic variation. PMID:11178257

  1. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  3. Human Melioidosis, Malawi, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Katangwe, Thembi; Purcell, Janet; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Denis, Brigitte; Montgomery, Jacqui; Alaerts, Maaike; Heyderman, Robert Simon; Dance, David A.B.; Kennedy, Neil; Feasey, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A case of human melioidosis caused by a novel sequence type of Burkholderia pseudomallei occurred in a child in Malawi, southern Africa. A literature review showed that human cases reported from the continent have been increasing. PMID:23735189

  4. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  5. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  6. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... outside of the body. To Learn More About HPV Human Papillomavirus Vaccine More in For Women Medication ...

  7. The Growing Human Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  8. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  9. Human productivity program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of human productivity on the space station within the existing resources and operational constraints is the aim of the Human Productivity Program. The conceptual objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to identify long lead technology; (2) to identify responsibility for work elements; (3) to coordinate the development of crew facilities and activities; and (4) to lay the foundation for a cost effective approach to improving human productivity. Human productivity work elements are also described and examples are presented.

  10. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Humanities in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendler, Helen

    1982-01-01

    In order that the humanities survive in America and that they find a place in the American community, learning should begin with arts. It is by the natural reciprocity between the arts and the humanities that the humanities can be made most accessible in the community. (MLW)

  12. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  13. Humanities in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendler, Helen

    1982-01-01

    In order that the humanities survive in America and that they find a place in the American community, learning should begin with arts. It is by the natural reciprocity between the arts and the humanities that the humanities can be made most accessible in the community. (MLW)

  14. Monogenic human obesity.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2008-01-01

    We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptinmelanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterisation of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  15. Expanding Human Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyean, Beverly-Colleene

    1983-01-01

    The human brain is capable of mastering skills far beyond those it is now used for. Three questions about the further evolution of human intelligence are raised: What will be the next step in human intelligence? How is the next step manifesting itself? How can we prepare for those changes? (IS)

  16. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  17. [Eugenics and human cloning].

    PubMed

    Boloz, W

    2001-01-01

    Because of legislative bans there are still no reports of human cloning. However eager public debate is currently running, concerning medical, legal, social and ethical aspects of human cloning. Arguments for and against human cloning are presented. An important argument against cloning is the danger of eugenic tendencies connected with cloning, which could lead to genetic discrimination.

  18. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…

  19. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  20. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  1. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…

  2. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  3. Robotics of human movements.

    PubMed

    van der Smagt, Patrick; Grebenstein, Markus; Urbanek, Holger; Fligge, Nadine; Strohmayr, Michael; Stillfried, Georg; Parrish, Jonathon; Gustus, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    The construction of robotic systems that can move the way humans do, with respect to agility, stability and precision, is a necessary prerequisite for the successful integration of robotic systems in human environments. We explain human-centered views on robotics, based on the three basic ingredients (1) actuation; (2) sensing; and (3) control, and formulate detailed examples thereof.

  4. Esprit: A Humanities Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Donald G.; Capella, Barry John

    In March 1984, the first issue of "Esprit," a semi-annual humanities magazine for the 56 two-year colleges in New York State, was published. The magazine seeks to confront the apparent decline of student interest in the humanities, community doubts about the relevance of the humanities, and the seeming indifference to the special truths…

  5. Human Rights Resource Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrano, Elias, Comp.

    This document provides information about 25 programs/brochures which focus on human rights topics. Specific topics include: (1) counselor preparation; (2) multicultural awareness; (3) abuse and neglect; (4) Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; (5) self-awareness; (6) human rights awareness and human rights of students; (7) cultural diversity; (8)…

  6. The Virtual Physiological Human

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Peter V.; Diaz, Vanessa; Hunter, Peter; Kohl, Peter; Viceconti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human is synonymous with a programme in computational biomedicine that aims to develop a framework of methods and technologies to investigate the human body as a whole. It is predicated on the transformational character of information technology, brought to bear on that most crucial of human concerns, our own health and well-being.

  7. Human Systems Roadmap Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-09

    Performance Human Aspects of Operations in Military Environments Dr. Ray Perez (Navy) Dr. Todd Nelson (AF) Dr. Mike LaFiandra (Army) Dr. Liz Bowman...Interfaces and Cognitive Processes Human Aspects of Operations in Military Environments Protection, Sustainment, and Warfighter Performance Right Person...mission command and tactical intelligence human - agent teaming  Personalized, integrated assessments and training to improve performance

  8. Carcinoma of the breast with choriocarcinomatous features.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Amir; Rosa, Marilin

    2011-09-01

    Choriocarcinomatous differentiation has been described in tumors arising from many organs including lung, rectum, colon, stomach, bladder, and rarely breast. Mammary carcinoma with choriocarcinomatous features is a rare variant of breast metaplastic carcinoma characterized by malignant cells morphologically resembling choriocarcinoma cells in which reactivity with human placental lactogen and human chorionic gonadotropin can be demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The characteristic syncytiotrophoblast-like giant cells seen in these neoplasms are more commonly associated with moderately to poorly differentiated carcinomas with or without a clear-cut mesenchymal component. Most of the reported cases have behaved very aggressively. The reason for this poor prognosis remains unclear. Because of the small number of cases, special treatment protocols have not been developed and these patients are treated surgically and with the standard chemotherapeutic agents available for other types of carcinoma of the breast. Pathologically, these tumors must be distinguished from metastatic choriocarcinoma to the breast.

  9. Rethinking medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Chiapperino, Luca; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: (i) a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; (ii) the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; (iii) the methodological requirements that could render Medical Humanities an effective framework for medical decision-making.

  10. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  11. Humanism in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, S

    1993-09-01

    Emergency medicine has not yet appropriated "humanism" as a term of its own. Medical humanism needs to be interpreted in a way that is consistent with the practical goals of emergency medicine. In this essay, humanism in emergency medicine is defined by identifying the dehumanizing aspects of sudden illness and exploring of ways for sustaining the humanity of emergency department patients. Excerpts from Dr Oliver Sacks' autobiographical work A Leg to Stand On give voice to the human needs created by sudden illness and its treatment.

  12. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  13. Human rights and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  14. Human Milk Banking.

    PubMed

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula.

  15. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly.

  16. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  17. N,N-Dimethylacetamide Significantly Attenuates LPS- and TNFα-Induced Proinflammatory Responses Via Inhibition of the Nuclear Factor Kappa B Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pekson, Ryan; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Gorasiya, Samir; Sundaram, Sruthi; Ashby, Charles R; Vancurova, Ivana; Reznik, Sandra E

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) prevents inflammation-induced preterm birth in a murine model, inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increases in placental proinflammatory cytokines and upregulates the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). However, DMA’s mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigate how DMA produces its antiinflammatory effect. Using in vitro and ex vivo models, we show that DMA suppresses secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 cells, TNFα-challenged JEG-3 cells and LPS-stimulated human placental explants. DMA significantly attenuated secretion of TNFα, IL-6, IL-10 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells; IL-6 secretion from TNFα-stimulated JEG-3 cells; and TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) from LPS-stimulated human placental explants. We further investigated whether DMA’s effect on cytokine expression involves the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. DMA (10 mM) significantly inhibited degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cell inhibitor α (IκBα) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, but there was no significant change in the expression of phosphorylated or native forms of downstream proteins in the MAPK pathway. In addition, DMA significantly attenuated luciferase activity in cells co-transfected with NF-κB-Luc reporter plasmid, but not with AP-1-Luc or CEBP-Luc reporters. Overall, our findings suggest that the antiinflammatory activity of DMA is mediated by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway via decreased IκBα degradation. PMID:27782292

  18. [The embryo, the human and the humanized].

    PubMed

    Roa, A

    1992-03-01

    Since the moment of fecundation the human embryo is endowed with the properties of unity and uniqueness and its existence is therefore inviolable. Disputing arguments against this thesis are analyzed. Recent views of some biologists negate the human character to the embryo since the essence of a human being would be its cultural nature and ability to communicate. However, the embryo contains all the genetic information that will allow him to develop the ability to communicate. Any attempt to separate the 3 moments of time, past present and future is a definitive violation of ethics. A basic foundation of ethics is that present and future are implicit in the past and vice-versa. Finally, the idea that the unwanted child is not a cultural being should be discarded.

  19. Chimeras and human dignity.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2008-12-01

    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I first introduce some of the arguments that have been offered supporting the claim that the creation of certain sorts of chimeras threatens or violates human dignity. I next present opponents' assessments of such arguments. Finally I critically analyze both the critics' and the supporters' claims about whether chimera research threatens human dignity.

  20. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  1. Human Systems Integration Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION OFFICE HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION REQUIREMENTS POCKET GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2009 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2009 2. REPORT TYPE Pocket Guide 3. DATES...COVERED 00-09-2009 to 00-12-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human Systems Integration Requirements Pocket Guide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  2. Human hemoglobin genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  3. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  4. The psychology of humanness.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures.

  5. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  6. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  7. [Human physiology: kidney].

    PubMed

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  8. Competent human research personnel.

    PubMed

    Arford, Patricia H; Knowles, Marilyn B; Sneed, Nancee V

    2008-12-01

    The process of conducting human research is highly regulated, rigorous, detailed oriented, potentially harmful, and, hopefully, beneficial. Health professionals learn how to critique, design, analyze, and apply human research but have minimal education in how to conduct human research. Successful completion of a 24-hour course was mandated for research support personnel to enhance the protection of human subjects, improve the integrity of data collected, and ensure cost-effective results. Routine audits demonstrated that the course substantially improved the documentation of the informed consent process, source documentation, protocol adherence, and regulatory compliance.

  9. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  10. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  11. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  12. [Human science and medicine].

    PubMed

    Caporale, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Objective of Human Science teaching is to develop Knowledge and ability for rational analysis of bio-medical problems. The relationship between doctor and patient must be founded on dialogue, cooperation, understanding, on respect of human rights: life, health, physical integrity, privacy, autonomy, freedom and liability to guide ethical choices in clinical experience and rediscover anthropological significance of Medicine.

  13. Portraits of Human Greatness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Anselm's Coll., Manchester, NH.

    Examined is the Humanities Program at St. Anselm College, a two-year program of readings and lectures ordered chronologically from ancient to contemporary times--from the age of Classical Greek thought and the Old Testament to the twentieth century. The first year of the Humanities Program is organized in eight units on general modes of…

  14. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics: news.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-10-01

    Infant rotavirus vaccination provides for herd immunity Nonreplicating sporozoite vaccine protects humans against malaria Personalized brain cancer vaccine enters phase 2 trial Novel implantable therapeutic cancer vaccine to be tested in humans Clostridium difficile vaccine candidate successful in phase 1 CDC reports strong uptake of HPV vaccine in boys Whooping cough outbreak in Texas.

  15. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  16. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  17. Human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J S; Keating, A; Hozumi, N

    1997-01-01

    Human gene therapy and its application for the treatment of human genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, cancer, and other diseases, are discussed. Gene therapy is a technique in which a functioning gene is inserted into a human cell to correct a genetic error or to introduce a new function to the cell. Many methods, including retroviral vectors and non-viral vectors, have been developed for both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer into cells. Vectors need to be developed that efficiently transfer genes to target cells, and promoter systems are required that regulate gene expression according to physiologic needs of the host cell. There are several safety and ethical issues related to manipulating the human genome that need to be resolved. Current gene therapy efforts focus on gene insertion into somatic cells only. Gene therapy has potential for the effective treatment of genetic disorders, and gene transfer techniques are being used for basic research, for example, in cancer, to examine the underlying mechanism of disease. There are still many technical obstacles to be overcome before human gene therapy can become a routine procedure. The current human genome project provides the sequences of a vast number of human genes, leading to the identification, characterization, and understanding of genes that are responsible for many human diseases.

  18. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients-Candida, Pneumocystis, and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  19. The great human expansion.

    PubMed

    Henn, Brenna M; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Feldman, Marcus W

    2012-10-30

    Genetic and paleoanthropological evidence is in accord that today's human population is the result of a great demic (demographic and geographic) expansion that began approximately 45,000 to 60,000 y ago in Africa and rapidly resulted in human occupation of almost all of the Earth's habitable regions. Genomic data from contemporary humans suggest that this expansion was accompanied by a continuous loss of genetic diversity, a result of what is called the "serial founder effect." In addition to genomic data, the serial founder effect model is now supported by the genetics of human parasites, morphology, and linguistics. This particular population history gave rise to the two defining features of genetic variation in humans: genomes from the substructured populations of Africa retain an exceptional number of unique variants, and there is a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity within populations living outside of Africa. These two patterns are relevant for medical genetic studies mapping genotypes to phenotypes and for inferring the power of natural selection in human history. It should be appreciated that the initial expansion and subsequent serial founder effect were determined by demographic and sociocultural factors associated with hunter-gatherer populations. How do we reconcile this major demic expansion with the population stability that followed for thousands years until the inventions of agriculture? We review advances in understanding the genetic diversity within Africa and the great human expansion out of Africa and offer hypotheses that can help to establish a more synthetic view of modern human evolution.

  20. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  1. Investigating the Human Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducote, Richard L.; Peterson, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    A project entitled "Investigating the Human Experience," which was funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, enables the College of DuPage to conduct a series of free films in various off-campus facilities. Documentaries and recent TV specials are shown, followed by a group discussion moderated by an instructor from the…

  2. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  3. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed…

  4. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  5. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  6. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  7. Being Human in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dorothy J.; Fahey, Brian W.

    The structure of humanness as the unique and essential being of the individual, constantly emerging through experience and the actualization of human potential within the sports environment, is the central theme of this book. Sport is defined broadly to include all forms of physical activity experiences. Each chapter represents an inquiry unique…

  8. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  9. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  10. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  11. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  12. Quantifying Human Performance Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askren, William B.; Regulinski, Thaddeus L.

    Human performance reliability for tasks in the time-space continuous domain is defined and a general mathematical model presented. The human performance measurement terms time-to-error and time-to-error-correction are defined. The model and measurement terms are tested using laboratory vigilance and manual control tasks. Error and error-correction…

  13. Annotated Humanities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Richard R.; Applebee, Arthur

    The humanities programs offered in 1968 by 227 United States secondary schools are listed alphabetically by state, including almost 100 new programs not annotated in the 1967 listing (see TE 000 224). Each annotation presents a brief description of the approach to study used in the particular humanities course (e.g., American Studies, Culture…

  14. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  15. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  16. Human Dignity Through History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlie, Arthur L.

    A major educational need, as assessed by a committee of teachers, students, and community members, is to recognize acceptance of human dignity as the ultimate value in decision making. This concept provides a basis for the elementary and secondary social studies program. Although the concept of human dignity was promoted with the signing of the…

  17. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  18. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  19. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed…

  20. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  1. Human-System Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-10

    Computing, this multidisciplinary field exploits advances in cognitive research together with those in computer science and related areas to optimize the...deep understanding of human cognition, perception, and/or locomotion; the relevant areas of computer science ; and the nature of the human activity to be

  2. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  3. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  4. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  5. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  6. Vaccination against human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Claudia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus infection is common and causes different manifestations. This infection is a public health concern because it has been associated with genital tract malignant diseases among men and women. Currently two vaccines are available to prevent the human papillomavirus infection and its associated diseases. PMID:24488402

  7. Portraits of Human Greatness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Anselm's Coll., Manchester, NH.

    Examined is the Humanities Program at St. Anselm College, a two-year program of readings and lectures ordered chronologically from ancient to contemporary times--from the age of Classical Greek thought and the Old Testament to the twentieth century. The first year of the Humanities Program is organized in eight units on general modes of…

  8. Incorporating Human Interindividual Biotransformation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The protection of sensitive individuals within a population dictates that measures other than central tendencies be employed to estimate risk. The refinement of human health risk assessments for chemicals metabolized by the liver to reflect data on human variability can be accomplished through (1) the characterization of enzyme expression in large banks of human liver samples, (2) the employment of appropriate techniques for the quantification and extrapolation of metabolic rates derived in vitro, and (3) the judicious application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. While in vitro measurements of specific biochemical reactions from multiple human samples can yield qualitatively valuable data on human variance, such measures must be put into the perspective of the intact human to yield the most valuable predictions of metabolic differences among humans. For quantitative metabolism data to be the most valuable in risk assessment, they must be tied to human anatomy and physiology, and the impact of their variance evaluated under real exposure scenarios. For chemicals metabolized in the liver, the concentration of parent chemical in the liver represents the substrate concentration in the MichaelisMenten description of metabolism. Metabolic constants derived in vitro may be extrapolated to the intact liver, when appropriate conditions are met. Metabolic capacity Vmax; the maximal rate of the reaction) can be scaled directly to the concentration

  9. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  10. Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances

    2004-01-01

    The first human space flight, in the early 1960s, was aimed primarily at determining whether humans could indeed survive and function in micro-gravity. Would eating and sleeping be possible? What mental and physical tasks could be performed? Subsequent programs increased the complexity of the tasks the crew performed. Table 1 summarizes the history of U.S. space flight, showing the projects, their dates, crew sizes, and mission durations. With over forty years of experience with human space flight, the emphasis now is on how to design space vehicles, habitats, and missions to produce the greatest returns to human knowledge. What are the roles of the humans in space flight in low earth orbit, on the moon, and in exploring Mars?

  11. Implications for human health.

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, L

    1979-01-01

    To analyze the implications for human health, the toxicologist requires four sets of data: the results of toxicity and other studies in animals; quantitative data on actual or potential human exposure; whatever information is available on effects of exposure in man; and the statistical extrapolations from the dose-response relationships in animals to the (usually) much lower levels of human exposure. Professional expertise in toxicology is essential to assess the nature and severity of the toxic effects observed in animals, including such characteristics as potential for progression, irreversibility and production of incapacity. Given sufficient data, an estimate can be arrived at of the likelihood that such effects will be elicited in human populations of differing susceptibilities. The criteria by which the overall implications for human health can be judged comprise both the direct effects on man, as well as the indirect consequences stemming from environmental impacts. PMID:540600

  12. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  13. Dogs catch human yawns.

    PubMed

    Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M; Senju, Atsushi; Shepherd, Alex J

    2008-10-23

    This study is the first to demonstrate that human yawns are possibly contagious to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Twenty-nine dogs observed a human yawning or making control mouth movements. Twenty-one dogs yawned when they observed a human yawning, but control mouth movements did not elicit yawning from any of them. The presence of contagious yawning in dogs suggests that this phenomenon is not specific to primate species and may indicate that dogs possess the capacity for a rudimentary form of empathy. Since yawning is known to modulate the levels of arousal, yawn contagion may help coordinate dog-human interaction and communication. Understanding the mechanism as well as the function of contagious yawning between humans and dogs requires more detailed investigation.

  14. IL-10 Produced by Trophoblast Cells Inhibits Phagosome Maturation Leading to Profound Intracellular Proliferation of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tina; Robinson, Nirmal; Allison, Sarah E.; Coombes, Brian K; Sad, Subash; Krishnan, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (ST) is a phagosomal pathogen that can infect placental trophoblast cells leading to abortion and severe maternal illness. It is unclear how the trophoblast cells promote profound bacterial proliferation. Methods The mechanism of internalization, intracellular growth and phagosomal biogenesis in ST-infected human epithelial (HeLa), macrophage (THP-1) and trophoblast-derived cell lines (JEG-3, BeWo and HTR-8) was studied. Specific inhibitors were used to block bacterial internalization. Phagosomal maturation was determined by confocal microscopy, western-blotting and release of lysosomal β-galactosidase by infected cells. Bacterial colony forming units were determined by plating infected cell lysates on agar plates. Results ST proliferated minimally in macrophages but replicated profoundly within trophoblast cells. The ST-∆invA (a mutant of Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 gene effector proteins) was unable to infect epithelial.cells, but was internalized by scavenger receptors on trophoblasts and macrophages. However, ST was contrastingly localized in early (Rab5+) or late (LAMP1+) phagosomes within trophoblast cells and macrophages respectively. Furthermore trophoblast cells (unlike macrophages) did not exhibit phagoso-lysosomal fusion. ST-infected macrophages produced IL-6 whereas trophoblast cells produced IL-10. Neutralizing IL-10 in JEG-3 cells accelerated phagolysomal fusion and reduced proliferation of ST. Placental bacterial burden was curtailed in vivo in anti-IL-10 antibody treated and IL-10-deficient mice. Discussion Macrophages phagocytose but curtail intracellular replication of ST in late phagosomes. In contrast, phagocytosis by trophoblast cells results in an inappropriate cytokine response and proliferation of ST in early phagosomes. Conclusion IL-10 production by trophoblast cells that delays phagosomal maturation may facilitate proliferation of pathogens in placental cells. PMID:23834952

  15. Early Onset of Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Disease after Full-Term Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ghaemmaghami, Fatemeh; Zarchi, Mojgan Karimi

    2008-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a curable malignancy that occurred approximately 50% after term pregnancies, and prognosis in this form of gestational trophoblastic Disease (GTD) is Poor. The earliest onset choriocarcinoma after term pregnancy in one study was reported 3 weeks after delivery, but in current study, choriocarcinoma was diagnosed 2 weeks after delivery. 28 years-old women gravidity 2, parity 2 delivered a healthy infant at term. Frequent episodes of vaginal bleeding occurred after 10 days of delivery. On admission to hospital, she had lesions in the lungs. The pretreatment human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) level was 84,000 mIU/ml and her FIGO risk factor score was 8 (high risk group). The EMA/CO regimen was administered as first line chemotherapy and the patient achieved complete remission after 7 courses. Although early onset postpartum hemorrhage is due to complication of delivery, but gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) may be occurred and assessment of human chorionic gonadotropin could be help to early diagnose of GTD. PMID:23675070

  16. Archaea on human skin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Auerbach, Anna K; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  17. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  18. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  19. Archaea on Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J.; Auerbach, Anna K.; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  20. Propelling medical humanities in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    Advances in the study of the medical humanities and medical humanities education have been made over the past few decades. Many influential journals have published articles examining the role of medical humanities and medical humanities education, the development and evaluation of medical humanities, and the design of a curriculum for medical humanities education in Western countries. However, most articles related to medical humanities in China were published in Chinese, moreover, researchers have worked in relative isolation and published in disparate journals, so their work has not been systematically presented to and evaluated by international readers. The six companion articles featured in this issue describe the current status and challenge of medical humanities and medical humanities education in China in the hope of providing international readers with a novel and meaningful glimpse into medical humanities in China. This Journal is calling for greater publication of research on medical humanities and medical humanities education to propel medical humanities in China.

  1. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  2. Genetics of human hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael A.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2006-01-01

    Human hydrocephalus is a common medical condition that is characterized by abnormalities in the flow or resorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), resulting in ventricular dilatation. Human hydrocephalus can be classified into two clinical forms, congenital and acquired. Hydrocephalus is one of the complex and multifactorial neurological disorders. A growing body of evidence indicates that genetic factors play a major role in the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. An understanding of the genetic components and mechanism of this complex disorder may offer us significant insights into the molecular etiology of impaired brain development and an accumulation of the cerebrospinal fluid in cerebral compartments during the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. Genetic studies in animal models have started to open the way for understanding the underlying pathology of hydrocephalus. At least 43 mutants/loci linked to hereditary hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models and humans. Up to date, 9 genes associated with hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models. In contrast, only one such gene has been identified in humans. Most of known hydrocephalus gene products are the important cytokines, growth factors or related molecules in the cellular signal pathways during early brain development. The current molecular genetic evidence from animal models indicate that in the early development stage, impaired and abnormal brain development caused by abnormal cellular signaling and functioning, all these cellular and developmental events would eventually lead to the congenital hydrocephalus. Owing to our very primitive knowledge of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of human hydrocephalus, it is difficult to evaluate whether data gained from animal models can be extrapolated to humans. Initiation of a large population genetics study in humans will certainly provide invaluable information about the molecular and cellular etiology and the developmental mechanisms of human

  3. Human Resource Accounting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    I AD-RI54 787 HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 1/2 F MONTEREY CR J C MARTINS DEC 84 1UNCLASSIFIED /G 5/9 NL -~~ .. 2. . L...Monterey, California JUN1im THESISG HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING by Joaquim C. Martins LLJ.. December 1984 Thesis Advisor: R.A. McGonigal Approved for...REPORT & PECRI00 COVERED Master’s Thesis; Human Resource Accounting Dcme 94- ’ 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTOR(*) . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER

  4. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  5. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  6. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Human Use Index (Future)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values indicate little disturbance of natural land cover. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  8. Introduction to human factors.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This paper provides an introduction to "human factors engineering," an applied science that seeks to optimize usability and safety of systems. Human factors engineering pursues this goal by aligning system design with the perceptual, cognitive, and physical capabilities of users. Human factors issues loom large in the diabetes management domain because patients and health care professionals interact with a complex variety of systems, including medical device hardware and software, which are themselves embedded within larger systems of institutions, people, and processes. Usability considerations must be addressed in these systems and devices to ensure safe and effective diabetes management.

  9. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  10. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  11. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    McBride, Alison A

    2017-10-19

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893940

  13. Sulfatases and human disease.

    PubMed

    Diez-Roux, Graciana; Ballabio, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Sulfatases are a highly conserved family of proteins that cleave sulfate esters from a wide range of substrates. The importance of sulfatases in human metabolism is underscored by the presence of at least eight human monogenic diseases caused by the deficiency of individual sulfatases. Sulfatase activity requires a unique posttranslational modification, which is impaired in patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) due to a mutation of the sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). Here we review current knowledge and future perspectives on the evolution of the sulfatase gene family, on the role of these enzymes in human metabolism, and on new developments in the therapy of sulfatase deficiencies.

  14. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  15. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  16. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  17. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... of Cancer, 1975-2009, featuring the burden and trends in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers and HPV ...

  18. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  19. Retroviruses and human pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Stehelin, D.; Varnier, O.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains four sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Retroviruses and the Murine Model System;Retroviruses and the Vertebrate Model System;Retroviruses and Human Pathology;and Retroviruses and Oncogenes.

  20. Finland and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromm, Hans

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the status of the humanities in Finland, beginning with the post World War II era. Comments on state-supported programs and the successes achieved in such areas as linguistics, philology, literature, and historical research. (JDH)

  1. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  2. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Rodenticides Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose ...

  3. Human Biomass Consumption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Humans are using an increasing amount of Earth’s annual production of plants. Research shows that, from 1995 to 2005, consumption rose from 20 to 25 percent of the planet's annual production. Wha...

  4. Spaceflight Versus Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2013-09-01

    Spaceflight is challenging. Human spaceflight is far more challenging,.Those familiar with spaceflight recognize that human spaceflight is more than tacking an environmental control system on an existing spacecraft, that there are a number of serious technical challenges involved in sending people out into space and bringing them back home safely.The return trip, bringing the crew back to the surface of the earth safely, is more than just an additional task, it's the new imperative. Differences between manned and unmanned spaceflight are more than technical. The human element forces a change in philosophy, a mindset that will likely touch every aspect of flight from launch through mission and return. Seasoned space professionals used to the paradigms and priorities of unmanned flight need to be cognizant of these differences and some of the implications, perhaps most especially because mission success and human safety priorities are sometimes contradictory.

  5. Will Technology Humanize Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    The author considers the question of whether technology will cause humanization or dehumanization in the schools. He concludes that we can not stop tecchnology; we can only give it direction and purpose. (Author/MS)

  6. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  7. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  8. Human Computers 1947

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Langley's human computers at work in 1947. The female presence at Langley, who performed mathematical computations for male staff. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 48), by James Schultz.

  9. Uniquely human social cognition.

    PubMed

    Saxe, Rebecca

    2006-04-01

    Recent data identify distinct components of social cognition associated with five brain regions. In posterior temporal cortex, the extrastriate body area is associated with perceiving the form of other human bodies. A nearby region in the posterior superior temporal sulcus is involved in interpreting the motions of a human body in terms of goals. A distinct region at the temporo-parietal junction supports the uniquely human ability to reason about the contents of mental states. Medial prefrontal cortex is divided into at least two subregions. Ventral medial prefrontal cortex is implicated in emotional empathy, whereas dorsal medial prefrontal cortex is implicated in the uniquely human representation of triadic relations between two minds and an object, supporting shared attention and collaborative goals.

  10. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Reitred astronaut Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Dr. Joseph R. Fragola, Vice President, Valador, Inc., testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager at NASA, testifies before a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Bretton Alexander, President of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation, testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Constellation Program Manager Jeff Hanley testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  16. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  17. Human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 21, describes in detail the human X chromosome. X chromatin (or Barr body) formation, inactivation and reactivation of the X chromosome, X;Y translocations, and sex reversal are discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  19. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  20. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  1. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  2. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  3. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  4. Science and Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassin, Rene

    1972-01-01

    Practices and products of scientific research have been threatening human privacy. Strong guidelines should be enforced by world organizations to prevent this. Practicing professionals should also resist temptations for infringing upon other's rights. (PS)

  5. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  6. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  7. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  8. Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-22

    The scientific knowledge and technologies needed to make human exploration of Mars happen are within our reach. NASA 360 joins Dr. Jim Green, Director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division, as he discusses how NASA is preparing for human exploration of the Red Planet. This video was created from a live recording at the Viking 40th Anniversary Symposium in July 2016. To watch the original talk please visit: http://bit.ly/2bk1PGk

  9. The Human Relations School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert S.; Lippitt, Ronald

    As an expansion of ED 026 320, the model for a Human Relations School sketched in this document is an attempt to answer these questions: What would it be like if a school were to see itself as a laboratory for living and learning in which the test that is known about human interaction were utilized? How would it be organized? What would be its…

  10. The great human expansion

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic and paleoanthropological evidence is in accord that today’s human population is the result of a great demic (demographic and geographic) expansion that began approximately 45,000 to 60,000 y ago in Africa and rapidly resulted in human occupation of almost all of the Earth’s habitable regions. Genomic data from contemporary humans suggest that this expansion was accompanied by a continuous loss of genetic diversity, a result of what is called the “serial founder effect.” In addition to genomic data, the serial founder effect model is now supported by the genetics of human parasites, morphology, and linguistics. This particular population history gave rise to the two defining features of genetic variation in humans: genomes from the substructured populations of Africa retain an exceptional number of unique variants, and there is a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity within populations living outside of Africa. These two patterns are relevant for medical genetic studies mapping genotypes to phenotypes and for inferring the power of natural selection in human history. It should be appreciated that the initial expansion and subsequent serial founder effect were determined by demographic and sociocultural factors associated with hunter-gatherer populations. How do we reconcile this major demic expansion with the population stability that followed for thousands years until the inventions of agriculture? We review advances in understanding the genetic diversity within Africa and the great human expansion out of Africa and offer hypotheses that can help to establish a more synthetic view of modern human evolution. PMID:23077256

  11. Human Germline Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Kelly E; Mortlock, Douglas P; Scholes, Derek T; Bombard, Yvonne; Brody, Lawrence C; Faucett, W Andrew; Garrison, Nanibaa' A; Hercher, Laura; Isasi, Rosario; Middleton, Anna; Musunuru, Kiran; Shriner, Daniel; Virani, Alice; Young, Caroline E

    2017-08-03

    With CRISPR/Cas9 and other genome-editing technologies, successful somatic and germline genome editing are becoming feasible. To respond, an American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) workgroup developed this position statement, which was approved by the ASHG Board in March 2017. The workgroup included representatives from the UK Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors, Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and US National Society of Genetic Counselors. These groups, as well as the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Asia Pacific Society of Human Genetics, British Society for Genetic Medicine, Human Genetics Society of Australasia, Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia, and Southern African Society for Human Genetics, endorsed the final statement. The statement includes the following positions. (1) At this time, given the nature and number of unanswered scientific, ethical, and policy questions, it is inappropriate to perform germline gene editing that culminates in human pregnancy. (2) Currently, there is no reason to prohibit in vitro germline genome editing on human embryos and gametes, with appropriate oversight and consent from donors, to facilitate research on the possible future clinical applications of gene editing. There should be no prohibition on making public funds available to support this research. (3) Future clinical application of human germline genome editing should not proceed unless, at a minimum, there is (a) a compelling medical rationale, (b) an evidence base that supports its clinical use, (c) an ethical justification, and (d) a transparent public process to solicit and incorporate stakeholder input. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  12. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  13. [Synthesizing a human genome?

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    The recently proposed « HGP-write » project aims to synthetize a full human genome and to introduce it into cells. This ambitious endeavour is fraught with financial and technical uncertainties and, if successful, would make « synthetic humans » a definite possibility even though this is not part of its announced goals. Accordingly, it has not been received with enthusiasm. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  14. Alcohol in human history.

    PubMed

    Vallee, B L

    1994-01-01

    The role of ethanol in the history of human development is here summarized under seven topics: I. Alcohol: the substitute for water as the major human beverage; II. Alcohol as a component of the diet and source of calories; III. Alcohol, concentration by distillation; IV. The Reformation, Temperance and Prohibition; V. Potable nonalcoholic beverages: Boiled water (coffee, tea); VI. Purification and sanitation of water; VII. The present and future.

  15. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  16. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  17. Humans in space.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Averner, M

    2001-02-22

    Many successful space missions over the past 40 years have highlighted the advantages and necessity of humans in the exploration of space. But as space travel becomes ever more feasible in the twenty-first century, the health and safety of future space explorers will be paramount. In particular, understanding the risks posed by exposure to radiation and extended weightlessness will be crucial if humans are to travel far from Earth.

  18. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  20. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  1. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes.

  2. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  3. Human Exposure Database System (HEDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) provides public access to data sets, documents, and metadata from EPA on human exposure. It is primarily intended for scientists involved in human exposure studies or work requiring such data.

  4. Proteomics of human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Palmfeldt, Johan; Bross, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Proteomics have passed through a tremendous development in the recent years by the development of ever more sensitive, fast and precise mass spectrometry methods. The dramatically increased research in the biology of mitochondria and their prominent involvement in all kinds of diseases and ageing has benefitted from mitochondrial proteomics. We here review substantial findings and progress of proteomic analyses of human cells and tissues in the recent past. One challenge for investigations of human samples is the ethically and medically founded limited access to human material. The increased sensitivity of mass spectrometry technology aids in lowering this hurdle and new approaches like generation of induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells allow to produce patient-specific cellular disease models with great potential. We describe which human sample types are accessible, review the status of the catalog of human mitochondrial proteins and discuss proteins with dual localization in mitochondria and other cellular compartments. We describe the status and developments of pertinent mass spectrometric strategies, and the use of databases and bioinformatics. Using selected illustrative examples, we draw a picture of the role of proteomic analyses for the many disease contexts from inherited disorders caused by mutation in mitochondrial proteins to complex diseases like cancer, type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we speculate on the future role of proteomics in research on human mitochondria and pinpoint fields where the evolving technologies will be exploited. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Glycobiology of human milk.

    PubMed

    Newburg, D S

    2013-07-01

    Glycans are characteristic components of milk, and each species has unique patterns of specific carbohydrates. Human milk is unusually rich in glycans, with the major components being lactose and oligosaccharides, representing approximately 6.8 and 1% of the milk, respectively. Other sources of glycans in human milk include monosaccharides, mucins, glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins, glycopeptides, and glycolipids. In human milk, the presence and patterns of these glycans vary depending upon the stage of lactation and the maternal genes and their genetic polymorphisms that control glycosyl transferases. The synthesis of milk glycans utilizes a significant portion of the metabolic energy that the mother expends when producing her milk, but other than lactose, these glycans contribute little to the nutritional needs of the infant. The data herein support several functions. 1) Many human milk glycans inhibit pathogens from binding to the intestinal mucosa. 2) Human milk glycans attenuate inflammation. 3) Glycans also directly stimulate the growth of beneficial (mutualist) bacteria of the microbiota (formerly considered commensal microflora of the intestine); these mutualists and their fermentation products can, in turn, (a) inhibit pathogens, (b) modulate signaling and inflammation, and (c) the fermentation products can be absorbed and utilized as a source of dietary calories. These functions can help direct and support intestinal postnatal growth, development, and ontogeny of colonization. The many functions of the milk glycans may synergistically protect infants from disease. Hence, human milk glycans and their homologs may serve as novel prophylactic or therapeutic agents for a diverse range of deleterious conditions.

  6. Human immunoglobulin allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty recombinant monoclonal antibodies are approved as therapeutics. Almost all of these are based on the whole IgG isotype format, but vary in the origin of the variable regions between mouse (chimeric), humanized mouse and fully human sequences; all of those with whole IgG format employ human constant region sequences. Currently, the opposing merits of the four IgG subclasses are considered with respect to the in vivo biological activities considered to be appropriate to the disease indication being treated. Human heavy chain genes also exhibit extensive structural polymorphism(s) and, being closely linked, are inherited as a haplotype. Polymorphisms (allotypes) within the IgG isotype were originally discovered and described using serological reagents derived from humans; demonstrating that allotypic variants can be immunogenic and provoke antibody responses as a result of allo-immunization. The serologically defined allotypes differ widely within and between population groups; therefore, a mAb of a given allotype will, inevitably, be delivered to a cohort of patients homozygous for the alternative allotype. This publication reviews the serologically defined human IgG allotypes and considers the potential for allotype differences to contribute to or potentiate immunogenicity. PMID:20073133

  7. Potentiality and human embryos.

    PubMed

    Lizza, John P

    2007-09-01

    Consideration of the potentiality of human embryos to develop characteristics of personhood, such as intellect and will, has figured prominently in arguments against abortion and the use of human embryos for research. In particular, such consideration was the basis for the call of the US President's Council on Bioethics for a moratorium on stem cell research on human embryos. In this paper, I critique the concept of potentiality invoked by the Council and offer an alternative account. In contrast to the Council's view that an embryo's potentiality is determined by definition and is not affected by external conditions that may prevent certain possibilities from ever being realized, I propose an empirically grounded account of potentiality that involves an assessment of the physical and decisional conditions that may restrict an embryo's possibilities. In my view, some human embryos lack the potentiality to become a person that other human embryos have. Assuming for the sake of argument that the potential to become a person gives a being special moral status, it follows that some human embryos lack this status. This argument is then used to support Gene Outka's suggestion that it is morally permissible to experiment on 'spare' frozen embryos that are destined to be destroyed.

  8. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  9. MicroRNA-34a suppresses invasion through downregulation of Notch1 and Jagged1 in cervical carcinoma and choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ronald T K; Leung, Carmen O N; Ye, Tian-Min; Liu, Weimin; Chiu, Philip C N; Lam, Kevin K W; Lee, Kai-Fai; Yeung, William S B

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of other genes by transcriptional inhibition or translational repression. miR-34a is a known tumor suppressor gene and inhibits abnormal cell growth. However, its role in other tumorigenic processes is not fully known. This study aimed to investigate the action of miR-34a on cell invasion. We found that miR-34a is expressed at various levels in cervical cancer (HeLa, SiHa, C4I, C33a and CaSki) and trophoblast (BeWo and JAR) cell lines. Transient forced expression of miR-34a did not affect the proliferation of these cell lines. Computational miRNA target prediction suggested that Notch1 and Jagged1 were targets of miR-34a. By using functional assays, miR-34a was demonstrated to bind to the 3' untranslated regions of Notch1 and Jagged1. Forced expression of miR-34a altered the expression of Notch1 and Jagged1 protein as well as Notch signaling as shown by the response of Hairy Enhancer of Split-1 protein to these treatments using western blot analysis. Forced expression of miR-34a suppressed the invasiveness of HeLa and JAR cells. By using gamma-secretase inhibitor (N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester) that interfered Notch signaling and RNA interference that knockdown Notch1 expression, we confirmed that downregulation of Notch1 reduced the invasiveness of the cells. Transfection of intracellular domain of Notch nullifies the effect of miR-34a on the invasiveness of the cells. Besides, we identified that miR-34a affected cell invasion by regulating expression of urokinase plasminogen activator through Notch. Our results provide evidence that miR-34a inhibits invasiveness through regulation of the Notch pathway and its downstream matrix degrading enzyme.

  10. Effect of ATP depletion and temperature on the transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron by BeWo choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    van der Ende, A; du Maine, A; Schwartz, A L; Strous, G J

    1989-01-01

    We have recently described the transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron by BeWo cells [van der Ende, du Maine, Simmons, Schwartz & Strous (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8910-8916]. We now extend our studies of the mechanisms responsible for uptake and release of iron by these cells. Following preloading, 59Fe release was maximal (about 12%) after about 4 h. Replacement of the extracellular medium with an equal volume of fresh medium either prior to or following the time at which equilibrium was reached further stimulated 59Fe release. Both the rate and maximum amount of iron release decreased if longer loading times were used. Preincubation of BeWo cells for 15 min with 10 mM-sodium cyanide and 50 mM-2-deoxyglucose prior to the determination of 59Fe release did not alter the amount released into medium (which did not contain a high-affinity iron chelator). However, under these conditions, the uptake of 59Fe was dramatically inhibited as a result of prolongation of the transferrin-transferrin-receptor complex recycling time. These results demonstrate that the release of iron from BeWo cells is independent of cellular ATP levels, whereas iron uptake is ATP-dependent. Rates of both 59Fe release and 59Fe uptake were temperature-dependent. Analysis of these data via an Arrhenius plot suggests a single rate-limiting step for the release and uptake processes between 0 and 37 degrees C. The apparent energies of activation of these processes are very similar (approx. 59.0 kJ/mol for iron release and 50.6 kJ/mol for iron uptake), which raises the possibility that the release and uptake of iron share a common thermodynamically rate-limiting step. Possible mechanisms involved in iron release out of the cell and out of the endosome are discussed. PMID:2730581

  11. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  12. Microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Ugajin, Tomohisa; Murakami, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Okamura, Kunihiro

    2009-04-01

    In human fertilization, the sperm centrosome plays a crucial role as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC). We studied microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis, which occurs when a human egg undergoes cleavage without a sperm centrosome. Multiple cytoplasmic asters were organized in the human oocyte after parthenogenetic activation, indicating that multiple MTOC are present in the human oocyte cytoplasm and function like a human sperm centrosome during parthenogenesis.

  13. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a

  14. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population.

  15. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  16. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  17. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  18. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  19. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  20. Why Geo-Humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  1. Inhaled human insulin.

    PubMed

    Strack, Thomas R

    2006-04-01

    The benefit of subcutaneous insulin therapy in patients with diabetes is frequently limited due to difficulty in convincing patients of the importance of multiple daily insulin injections to cope effectively with meal-associated glycemic changes. Thus, the aim of achieving tight glycemic control, which is critical for reducing the risk of long-term diabetes-related complications, frequently remains elusive. The successful development of an inhalable insulin as a noninvasive alternative promises to change the management of diabetes. The first product to become available to patients is inhaled human insulin, a dry-powder formulation packaged into discrete blisters containing 1 or 3 mg of dry-powder human insulin and administered via a unique pulmonary inhaler device. It has recently been approved in both the United States and the European Union for the control of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The pharmacokinetic profile of inhaled human insulin closely mimics the natural pattern of insulin secretion, and resembles that of rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs. Similarly to rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs, inhaled human insulin has a more rapid onset of glucose-lowering activity compared to subcutaneous regular insulin, allowing it to be administered shortly before meals. It has a duration of glucose-lowering activity comparable to subcutaneous regular insulin and longer than rapid-acting insulin analogs. Inhaled human insulin effectively controls postprandial glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia, and even improves fasting glucose levels compared to subcutaneous insulin. Inhaled human insulin has an overall favorable safety profile. There are small reductions in lung function (1-1.5% of total lung forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] capacity) after onset of treatment that are reversible in most patients if treatment is discontinued. Inhaled human

  2. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies.

  3. Human hybrid hybridoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

  4. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  5. Healthy human gut phageome

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20–50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  6. Human milk banking guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bharadva, Ketan; Tiwari, Satish; Mishra, Sudhir; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Yadav, Balraj; Agarwal, R K; Kumar, Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    WHO and UNICEF state that the use of human milk from other sources should be the first alternative when it is not possible for the mother to breastfeed. Human milk banks should be made available in appropriate situations. The IYCF Chapter is actively concerned about the compelling use of formula feeds in the infants because of the non availability of human breast milk banks. A National Consultative Meet for framing guidelines was summoned by the IYCF Chapter and the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India on 30th June, 2013, with representations from various stakeholders. The guidelines were drafted after an extensive literature review and discussions. Though these guidelines are based on the experiences and guidelines from other countries, changes have been made to suit the Indian setup, culture and needs, without compromising scientific evidence. To ensure quality of donated breast milk as a safe end product. Human Milk Banking Association should be constituted, and human milk banks should be established across the country. National coordination mechanism should be developed with a secretariat and technical support to follow-up on action in States. Budgetary provisions should be made available for the activities.

  7. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient.

  8. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  9. The Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    Early in 1986, Charles DeLisi, then head of the Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to organize a workshop charged with inquiring whether the state of technology and potential payoffs in biological knowledge and medical practice were such as to justify an organized program to map and sequence the human genome. The DOE's interest arose from its mission to assess the effects of radiation and other products of energy generation on human health in general and genetic material in particular. The workshop concluded that the technology was ripe, the benefits would be great, and a national program should be promptly initiated. Later committees, reporting to DOE, to the NIH, to the Office of Technology Assessment of the US Congress, and to the National Academy of Science have reviewed these issues more deliberately and come to the same conclusion. As a consequence, there has been established in the United States, a Human Genome Program, with funding largely from the NIH and the DOE, as indicated in Table 1. Moreover, the Program has attracted international interest, and Great Britain, France, Italy, and the Soviet Union, among other countries, have been reported to be starting human genome initiatives. Coordination of these programs, clearly in the interests of each, remains to be worked out, although an international Human Genome Organization (HUGO) is considering such coordination. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  11. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  12. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  13. Human-human reliance in the context of automation.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph B; Stokes, Charlene K

    2012-02-01

    The current study examined human-human reliance during a computer-based scenario where participants interacted with a human aid and an automated tool simultaneously. Reliance on others is complex, and few studies have examined human-human reliance in the context of automation. Past research found that humans are biased in their perceived utility of automated tools such that they view them as more accurate than humans. Prior reviews have postulated differences in human-human versus human-machine reliance, yet few studies have examined such reliance when individuals are presented with divergent information from different sources. Participants (N = 40) engaged in the Convoy Leader experiment.They selected a convoy route based on explicit guidance from a human aid and information from an automated map. Subjective and behavioral human-human reliance indices were assessed. Perceptions of risk were manipulated by creating three scenarios (low, moderate, and high) that varied in the amount of vulnerability (i.e., potential for attack) associated with the convoy routes. Results indicated that participants reduced their behavioral reliance on the human aid when faced with higher risk decisions (suggesting increased reliance on the automation); however, there were no reported differences in intentions to rely on the human aid relative to the automation. The current study demonstrated that when individuals are provided information from both a human aid and automation,their reliance on the human aid decreased during high-risk decisions. This study adds to a growing understanding of the biases and preferences that exist during complex human-human and human-machine interactions.

  14. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  15. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  16. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  17. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  18. Whither medical humanities?

    PubMed

    Singh, Navjeevan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the medical humanities (MH) and their role in medical education is in its infancy in India. Students are initiated into professional (medical) education too early in life, usually at the expense of a basic grounding in the humanities, resulting in warped intellectual growth. The author, arguing against the wholesale import of foreign systems, advocates free inquiry by medical educators to evolve a humanities programme for medical students derived from our own cultural context. This essay describes the early experiences of efforts to make a beginning at the University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. The author reviews the various strategies used and the challenges of introducing the subject to the current generation of medical students.

  19. Medical humanities ... almost.

    PubMed

    Dangayach, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Brought up in the traditional education system in a large teaching hospital in Mumbai, India, I moved on to do specialisation in neurology in the United States of America. The Indian system of pre-medical education mandates early choices between the humanities and the sciences and thus precludes a more well-rounded development of a student. Though medical humanities is not taught as a subject as part of the medical curriculum in India, listening to inspiring and learned teachers and the daily interaction with scores of patients who are willing to submit themselves to examination "in the cause of medical education" is a humbling experience to a sensitive student. I see similar willingness in patients in the United States. However, a formal course in the medical humanities, including arts, literature, and philosophy will surely enrich the experience of a larger number of undergraduates and postgraduates learning the core subjects and help in moulding a more rounded physician.

  20. Highlights of human toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Lawrence T.; Dorchies, Philippe; Morassin, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is a helminthozoonosis due to the migration of Toxocara species larvae through human organism. Humans become infected by ingesting either embryonated eggs from soil (geophagia, pica), dirty hands or raw vegetables, or larvae from undercooked giblets. The diagnosis relies upon sensitive immunological methods (ELISA or western-blot) which use Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens. Seroprevalence is high in developed countries, especially in rural areas, and also in some tropical islands. The clinical spectrum of the disease comprises four syndromes, namely visceral larva migrans, ocular larva migrans, and the more recently recognized "common" (in adults) and "covert" (in children) pictures. Therapy of ocular toxocariasis is primarily based upon corticosteroids use, when visceral larva migrans and few cases of common or covert toxocariasis can be treated by anthelmintics whose the most efficient appeared to be diethylcarbamazine. When diagnosed, all of these syndromes require thorough prevention of recontamination (especially by deworming pets) and sanitary education. PMID:11301585