Science.gov

Sample records for jejunal crypt cells

  1. Kinetics of changes in the crypts of the jejunal mucosa of dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sunter, J. P.; Appleton, D. R.; Wright, N. A.; Watson, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    When symmetrical 1,2 dimethylhydrazine was administered to rats by weekly s.c. injection, 37% of the animals had developed small intestinal carcinomas after 21-27 weeks. These lesions were largely localized to duodenum and upper jejunum. At the same time there was a diffuse crypt hyperplasia in the jejunum which affected all the treated animals, not just those with neoplasms. This marked hyperplasia was preceded by a modest sustained crypt elongation which was seen soon after DMH injections began. In these hyperplastic jejunal crypts the absolute size of the proliferative compartment was increased, but the growth fraction calculated from labelling studies appeared to fall, probably by reduction in relative size of the proliferating population within the proliferative compartment. No convincing alteration in actual cell-cycle time was observed in the abnormal crypts. There was a slight (25%) increase in cell-production rate in the abnormal crypts. Images Fig. 1 PMID:656298

  2. Effects of spaceflight on the proliferation of jejunal mucosal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, Heywood R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  3. Opioid receptors on guinea-pig intestinal crypt epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, M E; Davison, J S; Bates, S L; Meddings, J B

    1996-01-01

    1. Opioid peptides promote net intestinal absorption via two mechanisms: stimulation of Na+ and Cl- absorption and inhibition of Cl- secretion. Although these transport changes are predominantly mediated by submucosal neurones, it is currently unclear whether opioid peptides can regulate enterocyte function directly. We therefore tested the hypothesis that enterocytes have specific opioid receptors. 2. Villus and crypt jejunal epithelial cells were isolated by the distended sac method from anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Flow cytometry was used to resolve enterocytes from other cell types and to determine whether binding of a fluorescently labelled opioid antagonist, naltrexone-FITC, could be prevented by unlabelled mu- and delta-opioid receptor agonists. A population of crypt enterocytes (approximately 21%) exhibited high-affinity naltrexone-FITC binding to both mu- and delta-type binding sites that was stereoselective and sodium dependent. Villus enterocytes did not exhibit any of these characteristics. 3. Basal cAMP production was elevated in both villus and crypt cells treated with IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine). Villus cells did not respond to 100 nM vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), nor were they affected by opioid peptides. In contrast, 100 nM VIP significantly increased cAMP production in crypt epithelial cells, which was significantly reduced by both morphiceptin and D-Ser2-Leu-Enk-Thr. This opioid-mediated effect was stereoselective and blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone. 4. These experiments suggest that enterocytes isolated from the crypt epithelium of guineapigs have both mu- and delta-types of opioid receptors. It is possible that these cells participate in opioid-mediated regulation of intestinal secretion. Images Figure 12 PMID:8951719

  4. Effects of epidermal growth factor and dimethylhydrazine on crypt size, cell proliferation, and crypt fission in the rat colon. Cell proliferation and crypt fission are controlled independently.

    PubMed Central

    Park, H. S.; Goodlad, R. A.; Ahnen, D. J.; Winnett, A.; Sasieni, P.; Lee, C. Y.; Wright, N. A.

    1997-01-01

    Crypt fission is now established as an important mechanism of intestinal growth and regeneration. It has been proposed that increased crypt size is the stimulus for crypt fission, because crypts preparing for fission are generally larger. Consequently, we investigated the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and dimethylhydrazine, which are both known to stimulate crypt cell proliferation, on crypt fission in the rat intestine. We also examined whether the effects of EGF on both proliferation and crypt fission are modified by the pretreatment with dimethylhydrazine for 16 weeks, dimethylhydrazine was then discontinued for 8 weeks, followed by intravenous infusion of EGF for 1 week. There were four groups: vehicle alone, EGF alone, dimethylhydrazine alone, and dimethylhydrazine followed by EGF infusion. The rats were killed at 25 weeks and rates of intestinal crypt cell production, crypt size, and crypt fission were determined. Intravenously infused EGF significantly increased crypt cell production rate, but the magnitude of the effect decreased from the proximal to the distal colon. EGF caused an increase in crypt area, possibly reflecting an increase in crypt size. Importantly dimethylhydrazine had no significant effect on crypt cell production rate nor on crypt area in the distal colon, but it did cause an increase in crypt area in the mid-colon. The crypt fission index was significantly decreased by EGF and increased by dimethylhydrazine. There was no qualitative interaction between EGF and dimethylhydrazine. These results demonstrate the marked proliferative effect of intravenously infused EGF in the colon of orally fed rats, with significant site effects (P = 0.0007); the effect was greatest in the proximal colon and disappeared in the distal colon. The observation that EGF reduced crypt fission indicates that increased cell proliferation, per se, is not a stimulus for crypt fission. This is further supported by the observation that dimethylhydrazine

  5. Experiment K-7-17: Effects of Spaceflight on the Proliferation of Jejunal Mucosal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  6. Crypt dysplasia in Barrett's oesophagus shows clonal identity between crypt and surface cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shabuddin; McDonald, Stuart A C; Wright, Nicholas A; Graham, Trevor A; Odze, Robert D; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Zeki, Sebastian

    2013-09-01

    Epithelial dysplasia is an important histological diagnosis signifying the presence of pre-invasive disease, usually needing intervention. However, the specific genetic changes responsible for the induction of this phenotypic change are unknown. Moreover, recent reports indicate that the dysplastic phenotype may not be immutable: in basal crypt dysplasia (CD), unequivocal dysplastic changes are seen in the crypts in Barrett's oesophagus and other pre-invasive lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, but the upper crypts and surface epithelium associated with these dysplastic crypts show the definitive morphology of a differentiated epithelium. The genotypic relationship between CD and the differentiated surface epithelium is presently unclear. We obtained 17 examples of CD: the lower and upper crypts and surface epithelium were differentially laser-microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections and mutations were sought in tumour suppressor genes frequently associated with progression in Barrett's oesophagus. We found two patients who both showed a c. C238T mutation in the CDKN2A (CDKN2AInk4A) gene and where the precise microanatomical relationships could be discerned: this mutation was present in both the CD at the crypt base and in the upper crypt and surface epithelium. We conclude that, in CD, the dysplastic basal crypt epithelium and the upper crypt and surface epithelium show clonal CDKN2A mutations, thus showing definitively that the surface epithelium is derived from the dysplastic crypt epithelium: the dysplastic phenotype is therefore not fixed and can be reversed. The mechanism of this change is unclear but may be related to the possibility that dysplastic cells can, probably early in their progression, respond to differentiation signals. However, it is also clear that a heavy mutational burden can be borne by crypts in the gastrointestinal tract without the development of phenotypic dysplasia. We are evidently some way from understanding

  7. Modelling the dynamics of stem cells in colonic crypts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirio, Orozco-Fuentes; Barrio, Rafael A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theoretical and computational framework to model the colonic crypt organisation in the human intestine. We construct a theoretical and computational framework to model the colonic crypt behaviour, using a Voronoi tessellation to represent each cell and elastic forces between them we addressed how their dynamical disfunction can lead to tumour masses and cancer. Our results indicate that for certain parameters the crypt is in a homeostatic state, but slight changes on their values can disrupt this behaviour.

  8. HLA-DR expression, natural killer cells and IgE containing cells in the jejunal mucosa of coeliac children.

    PubMed Central

    Arato, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M; Verkasalo, M; Klemola, T

    1987-01-01

    The expression of HLA-DR by surface and crypt epithelium and the numbers of cells of natural killer (NK) phenotype and of IgE containing cells were studied with monoclonal antisera using the peroxidase technique. We examined 48 jejunal biopsy specimens taken from 35 coeliac children before treatment (11), during gluten free diet (20) and after gluten challenge (17), and 13 control specimens. The luminal surface of the epithelial cells stained with HLA-DR antiserum in all specimens, but the cytoplasm of the surface epithelial cells took up the stain more frequently in the specimens from the controls (5/13) than those from the coeliacs (2/48) (p less than 0.01). In 21/28 specimens taken from coeliacs when on a gluten containing diet the crypt epithelium showed strong HLA-DR expression, while only 4/20 (p less than 0.01) specimens of coeliacs on a gluten free diet and 1/13 specimens of controls had similar staining. Among the intraepithelial lymphocytes no cells of NK phenotype were found in specimens from patients or controls. As compared with control specimens biopsy specimens from untreated coeliac patients showed smaller numbers of NK cells in the lamina propria. No difference was found in the numbers of IgE containing cells between the patients and controls. The strong expression of HLA-DR by the crypt epithelial cells in coeliac children on a normal diet suggest that these cells are involved in the presentation of the antigen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3311907

  9. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F

    2016-04-18

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal.

  10. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  11. Expression of apical Na(+)-L-glutamine co-transport activity, B(0)-system neutral amino acid co-transporter (B(0)AT1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 along the jejunal crypt-villus axis in young pigs fed a liquid formula.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengbo; Yang, Xiaojian; Lackeyram, Dale; Rideout, Todd C; Wang, Zirong; Stoll, Barbara; Yin, Yulong; Burrin, Douglas G; Fan, Ming Z

    2016-06-01

    Gut apical amino acid (AA) transport activity is high at birth and during suckling, thus being essential to maintain luminal nutrient-dependent mucosal growth through providing AA as essential metabolic fuel, substrates and nutrient stimuli for cellular growth. Because system-B(0) Na(+)-neutral AA co-transporter (B(0)AT1, encoded by the SLC6A19 gene) plays a dominant role for apical uptake of large neutral AA including L-Gln, we hypothesized that high apical Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity, and B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) in co-expression with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) were expressed along the entire small intestinal crypt-villus axis in young animals via unique control mechanisms. Kinetics of Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity in the apical membrane vesicles, prepared from epithelial cells sequentially isolated along the jejunal crypt-villus axis from liquid formula-fed young pigs, were measured with the membrane potential being clamped to zero using thiocyanate. Apical maximal Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity was much higher (p < 0.05) in the upper villus cells than in the middle villus (by 29 %) and the crypt (by 30 %) cells, whereas Na(+)-Gln co-transport affinity was lower (p < 0.05) in the upper villus cells than in the middle villus and the crypt cells. The B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) mRNA abundance was lower (p < 0.05) in the crypt (by 40-47 %) than in the villus cells. There were no significant differences in B(0)AT1 and ACE2 protein abundances on the apical membrane among the upper villus, the middle villus and the crypt cells. Our study suggests that piglet fast growth is associated with very high intestinal apical Na(+)-neutral AA uptake activities via abundantly co-expressing B(0)AT1 and ACE2 proteins in the apical membrane and by transcribing the B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) gene in the epithelia along the entire crypt-villus axis.

  12. Studies of intestinal lymphoid tissue. VII. The secondary nature of lymphoid cell "activation" in the jejunal lesion of tropical sprue.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, M. N.; Mathan, M.; Mathan, V. I.

    1983-01-01

    Morphometric techniques were used in the evaluation of lymphocyte morphology and activity in tropical sprue. jejunal biopsies from control subjects (8), patients with epidemic disease (7), patients with endemic disease (11), and subjects who had recovered from sprue (4) were analyzed blindly. In patients with sprue, lymphocytes were increased significantly within crypt (but not surface) epithelium. Immunoblasts (greater than 6 mu in diameter) were increased by 5% over control subjects. Group means for lymphocytic mitotic indexes were also significantly raised, while flux ratios only differed significantly between endemic sprue patients and control subjects. The lymphocytic infiltration was distributed focally in the upper crypt and crypt-villus interzones. Analysis of epidemic cases (presenting within 4-28 days) revealed detectable changes in lymphocyte behavior only after 3 weeks' illness, whereas mucosal lesions and malabsorption were already established during the first week. These data indicate that lymphocyte activation, suggestive of a local cell-mediated immune reaction, does occur in tropical sprue but is secondary to damage already inflicted on enterocytes and their function. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6614143

  13. Interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate in intestinal crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    von der Maase, H.

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CTX), or methotrexate (MTX) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. 5-FU given from 48 hr before to 24 hr after irradiation resulted in an almost constant, increased cell kill except at injection 6 hr after irradiation, which resulted in a more pronounced effect. CTX enhanced the radiation effect only when given simultaneously with or up to 3 hr after irradiation. The effect of MTX, extremely dependent on the sequence and interval between drug administration and irradiation, was most prominent when administered 1 hr before irradiation. At this drug-radiation interval, the D/sub 0/ surprisingly increased by a factor of 2.4, whereas MTX 15 min before irradiation displaced the survival curve to the left without changing the D/sub 0/. The influence of MTX on the radiation response disappeared when the drug was given either 96 hr before or 3 hr after irradiation.

  14. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2011-11-15

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine and colon has remained the subject of debate. Recent studies based on targeted lineage tracing strategies, combined with the development of an organotypic culture system, have identified the crypt base columnar cell as the intestinal stem cell, and have unveiled the strategy by which the balance between proliferation and differentiation is maintained. These results show that intestinal stem cells operate in a dynamic environment in which frequent and stochastic stem cell loss is compensated by the proliferation of neighboring stem cells. We review the basis of these experimental findings and the insights they offer into the mechanisms of homeostatic stem cell regulation.

  15. Effects of weaning on intestinal crypt epithelial cells in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Xiong, Xia; Wang, Xiaocheng; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells in the crypt proliferate in piglets in response to weaning. However, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. We examined 40 piglets from eight litters (five piglets per litter) that were weaned at the age of 14 d, and one piglet from each litter was randomly selected for closer investigation. Based on the distended intestinal sac method, we isolated crypt epithelial cells from the mid-jejunum on Days 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-weaning. Protein expression was analyzed using either isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification or western blotting. Proteins related to the cell cycle, organization of the cellular macromolecular complex subunit, localization of cellular macromolecules, Golgi vesicle transport, fatty acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and translational initiation were mainly down-regulated, while those involved in glycolysis, cell cycle arrest, protein catabolism, and cellular amino acid metabolism were up-regulated. The amount of proteins active in the mTOR signaling pathway was generally decreased over time. These results indicate that weaning influences energy metabolism, cellular macromolecule organization and localization, and protein metabolism, thereby affecting the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells in weaned piglets. Moreover, those cellular processes are possibly controlled by that signaling pathway. PMID:27830738

  16. Effect of diet and age on jejunal and circulating lymphocyte subsets in children with coeliac disease: persistence of CD4-8-intraepithelial T cells through treatment.

    PubMed

    Verkasalo, M A; Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M

    1990-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the relative numbers of T lymphocyte subsets in 61 jejunal biopsies and in peripheral blood of 35 children with coeliac disease, and of 13 healthy controls. The T cell numbers in the lamina propria were unaffected by a change from gluten-free to gluten containing diet in the patients. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (where the CD8 cells predominated) were significantly raised in patients taking gluten. Ten to 20% of the patients' intraepithelial CD3 (mature T) cells expressed neither CD8 nor CD4 surface antigens. This CD4 8 T cell population persisted through gluten elimination and challenge. The circulating lymphocyte subsets showed little variation with the diet although there was a marked increase in the proportion (14.9%) of CD4 8 T cells in patients during gluten elimination. In the histologically normal jejunal mucosa from control subjects, the age of the subject showed a positive correlation with villus intraepithelial CD3+ and CD8+ cells, and crypt intraepithelial CD4+ cells. No clear cut effect of age was observed on lamina propria lymphocyte counts of the controls, or on the lymphocyte counts in jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients. The observed CD3+4-8- lymphocytes may represent activated cells unable to present their surface antigens, or they may be gamma delta-receptor bearing T cells, which could have a significant role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  17. Fermentable dietary fiber potentiates the localization of immune cells in the rat large intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Seiji; Xu, Hong; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-10-01

    Intestinal crypts are composed of a well-defined hierarchy of epithelial cells, and proliferating epithelial cells reside close to the bottom of the crypts-even in the large intestine. We investigated whether CD8(+)and CD4(+)intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and CD161(+) natural killer (NK) cells localized in proliferating or differentiated epithelial region of cecum and colon. Both proliferating epithelial layer cells and the immune cells along the longitudinal crypt axis of the large intestine were measured histochemically. Dietary intervention revealed that the physiological localization of the immune cells in the longitudinal crypt axis depended on the immune cell type. CD8(+) IELs were preferentially located among differentiated epithelial cells. In contrast, CD161(+) NK cells were located adjacent to the epithelial cells at the bottom of crypt. Cecal crypts contained significantly larger numbers of CD8(+) IELs than did colonic crypts. However, there was only a minor population of CD4(+) IEL in the cecal and colonic epithelia. Some dietary fibers increased the densities of CD8(+) IELs and CD161(+) NK cells in the cecum, with the magnitude of response varying among the types of fiber. There was a significant relationship between SCFA and the localization of immune cells, especially CD8(+) IEL and CD161(+) NK cells, which are considered to be involved in the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis.

  18. Mensenchymal stem cells can delay radiation-induced crypt death: impact on intestinal CD44(+) fragments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yu; Jin, Xing; Jiang, Yi-Yao; Wang, Li-Xian; Liu, Yong-Jun; Wang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Intestinal stem cells are primitive cells found within the intestinal epithelium that play a central role in maintaining epithelial homeostasis through self-renewal and commitment into functional epithelial cells. Several markers are available to identify intestinal stem cells, such as Lgr5, CD24 and EphB2, which can be used to sort intestinal stem cells from mammalian gut. Here, we identify and isolate intestinal stem cells from C57BL/6 mice by using a cell surface antigen, CD44. In vitro, some CD44(+) crypt cells are capable of forming "villus-crypt"-like structures (organoids). A subset strongly positive for CD44 expresses high levels of intestinal stem-cell-related genes, including Lgr5, Bmi1, Hopx, Lrig1, Ascl2, Smoc2 and Rnf43. Cells from this subset are more capable of developing into organoids in vitro, compared with the subset weakly positive for CD44. However, the organoids are sensitive to ionizing irradiation. We investigate the specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in protecting organoids against radiation-induced crypt death. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, the crypt domains of irradiated organoids possess more proliferative cells and fewer apoptotic cells than those not co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Cd44v6 continues to be expressed in the crypt domains of irradiated organoids co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in delaying radiation-induced crypt death in vitro.

  19. A mathematical model of the colon crypt capturing compositional dynamic interactions between cell types

    PubMed Central

    Smallbone, Kieran; Corfe, Bernard M

    2014-01-01

    Models of the development and early progression of colorectal cancer are based upon understanding the cycle of stem cell turnover, proliferation, differentiation and death. Existing crypt compartmental models feature a linear pathway of cell types, with little regulatory mechanism. Previous work has shown that there are perturbations in the enteroendocrine cell population of macroscopically normal crypts, a compartment not included in existing models. We show that existing models do not adequately recapitulate the dynamics of cell fate pathways in the crypt. We report the progressive development, iterative testing and fitting of a developed compartmental model with additional cell types, and which includes feedback mechanisms and cross-regulatory mechanisms between cell types. The fitting of the model to existing data sets suggests a need to invoke cross-talk between cell types as a feature of colon crypt cycle models. PMID:24354351

  20. Colon Stem Cell and Crypt Dynamics Exposed by Cell Lineage Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Elbaz, Judith; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Segev, Elad; Shlush, Liran I.; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell dynamics in vivo are often being studied by lineage tracing methods. Our laboratory has previously developed a retrospective method for reconstructing cell lineage trees from somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites. This method was applied here to explore different aspects of stem cell dynamics in the mouse colon without the use of stem cell markers. We first demonstrated the reliability of our method for the study of stem cells by confirming previously established facts, and then we addressed open questions. Our findings confirmed that colon crypts are monoclonal and that, throughout adulthood, the process of monoclonal conversion plays a major role in the maintenance of crypts. The absence of immortal strand mechanism in crypts stem cells was validated by the age-dependent accumulation of microsatellite mutations. In addition, we confirmed the positive correlation between physical and lineage proximity of crypts, by showing that the colon is separated into small domains that share a common ancestor. We gained new data demonstrating that colon epithelium is clustered separately from hematopoietic and other cell types, indicating that the colon is constituted of few progenitors and ruling out significant renewal of colonic epithelium from hematopoietic cells during adulthood. Overall, our study demonstrates the reliability of cell lineage reconstruction for the study of stem cell dynamics, and it further addresses open questions in colon stem cells. In addition, this method can be applied to study stem cell dynamics in other systems. PMID:21829376

  1. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Nobukatsu; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Ryohei; Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  2. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    PubMed

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

  3. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A.; Byrne, Helen M.; Maini, Philip K.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Pin, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.—Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. PMID:27811059

  4. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae exploits cytokeratin 18-positive epithelial cells of porcine tonsillar crypts as an invasion gateway.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Eguchi, Masahiro; Shi, Fang; Sato, Masumi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2013-06-15

    Tonsils are important organs for mucosal immunity and are gateways for various pathogens, including bacteria and viruses. The purpose of the present study was to reveal how Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the causative agent of swine erysipelas, invades the mucosal epithelium of the tonsils of pigs. Two germ-free piglets were orally infected with E. rhusiopathiae Koganei 65-0.15, an attenuated vaccine strain in Japan, and their tonsils of the soft palate were histologically examined four weeks after infection. Bacterial organisms were observed in dilated crypt lumens and a few epithelial cells of the crypt. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that some epithelial cells of the crypt were positive for cytokeratin (CK) 18, a specific marker for M cells in the Peyer's patches of pigs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that bacterial antigens were present in the cytoplasm of CK 18-positive epithelial cells. Furthermore, an ultramicroscopic examination revealed that the bacteria-containing epithelial cells did not have microfolds or microvilli, both of which are characteristic of membranous epithelial cells (M cells), and that they were in close contact with intraepithelial phagocytes. Thus, the present observations suggest that the tonsillar crypt epithelium is a site of persistent infection for orally administered E. rhusiopathiae, and the bacteria exploit cytokeratin 18-positive epithelial cells of the crypts as portals of entry into the body.

  5. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging.

    PubMed

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Simons, Benjamin D; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-20

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5(+) cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5- Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5(+) cells in the upper part of the niche (termed 'border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed 'central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5(+) cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  6. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-01

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5+ cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5-Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5+ cells in the upper part of the niche (termed `border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed `central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5+ cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  7. The effect of hyperthermia on the radiation response of crypt cells in mouse jejunum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia and/or gamma-radiation on the survival of intestinal crypt cells was studied in BDF sub 1 mice using a microcolony assay. Hyperthermia treatments, which in themselves caused no detectable cell lethality, inhibited the capacity of crypt cells to repair sublethal radiation damage. In addition, heat applied either before or after single radiation exposures potentiated lethal damage to crypt cells; the degree of enhancement was dependent on the time interval between treatments. At the levels of heating employed, DNA synthesis in the intestinal epithelium was significantly reduced immediately following exposure, but returned rapidly to normal levels. No further disturbances in cellular kinetics were observed for up to 10 days after heating.

  8. Ballroom dancing with stem cells: placement and displacement in the intestinal crypt.

    PubMed

    Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2014-03-06

    Intestinal homeostasis is dependent upon stem cells that reside in the intestinal crypt, although the identity and dynamics of this population are unclear. Ritsma et al. (2014) recently reported temporal live imaging of mouse intestinal stem cells and their progeny, providing insights into spatial dynamics underlying stem cell behavior.

  9. Interplay between metabolic identities in the intestinal crypt supports stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colman, Maria J; Schewe, Matthias; Meerlo, Maaike; Stigter, Edwin; Gerrits, Johan; Pras-Raves, Mia; Sacchetti, Andrea; Hornsveld, Marten; Oost, Koen C; Snippert, Hugo J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda; Fodde, Riccardo; Burgering, Boudewijn M T

    2017-03-16

    The small intestinal epithelium self-renews every four or five days. Intestinal stem cells (Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar cells (CBCs)) sustain this renewal and reside between terminally differentiated Paneth cells at the bottom of the intestinal crypt. Whereas the signalling requirements for maintaining stem cell function and crypt homeostasis have been well studied, little is known about how metabolism contributes to epithelial homeostasis. Here we show that freshly isolated Lgr5(+) CBCs and Paneth cells from the mouse small intestine display different metabolic programs. Compared to Paneth cells, Lgr5(+) CBCs display high mitochondrial activity. Inhibition of mitochondrial activity in Lgr5(+) CBCs or inhibition of glycolysis in Paneth cells strongly affects stem cell function, as indicated by impaired organoid formation. In addition, Paneth cells support stem cell function by providing lactate to sustain the enhanced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the Lgr5(+) CBCs. Mechanistically, we show that oxidative phosphorylation stimulates p38 MAPK activation by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species signalling, thereby establishing the mature crypt phenotype. Together, our results reveal a critical role for the metabolic identity of Lgr5(+) CBCs and Paneth cells in supporting optimal stem cell function, and we identify mitochondria and reactive oxygen species signalling as a driving force of cellular differentiation.

  10. Bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in five painted storks.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martha A; Terrell, Scott P; Neiffer, Donald L; Miller, Michele A; Mangold, Barbara J

    2002-08-01

    Five painted storks were treated with fenbendazole for 5 days for internal parasitism. Four birds died following treatment. Profound heteropenia was a consistent finding in all samples evaluated; additionally, the 1 surviving bird had progressive anemia. Consistent necropsy findings in the 4 birds that died were small intestinal crypt cell necrosis and severe bone marrow depletion and necrosis. Fenbendazole has been associated with bone marrow hypoplasia and enteric damage in mammals and other species of birds. The dosages of fenbendazole used in birds are often substantially higher than those recommended for mammals, which may contribute to bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in birds.

  11. Reg4+ deep crypt secretory cells function as epithelial niche for Lgr5+ stem cells in colon

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Sachs, Norman; Wiebrands, Kay; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Fumagalli, Arianna; Lyubimova, Anna; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan H.; Karthaus, Wouter R.; Li, Vivian S. W.; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peters, Peter J.; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5+) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5+ stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt secretory (DCS) cells are intermingled with Lgr5+ stem cells at crypt bottoms. Here, we report regenerating islet-derived family member 4 (Reg4) as a marker of DCS cells. To investigate a niche function, we eliminated DCS cells by using the diphtheria-toxin receptor gene knocked into the murine Reg4 locus. Ablation of DCS cells results in loss of stem cells from colonic crypts and disrupts gut homeostasis and colon organoid growth. In agreement, sorted Reg4+ DCS cells promote organoid formation of single Lgr5+ colon stem cells. DCS cells can be massively produced from Lgr5+ colon stem cells in vitro by combined Notch inhibition and Wnt activation. We conclude that Reg4+ DCS cells serve as Paneth cell equivalents in the colon crypt niche. PMID:27573849

  12. Crypt stem cell survival in the mouse intestinal epithelium is regulated by prostaglandins synthesized through cyclooxygenase-1.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, S M; Schloemann, S; Tessner, T; Seibert, K; Stenson, W F

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are important mediators of epithelial integrity and function in the gastrointestinal tract. Relatively little is known, however, about the mechanism by which PGs affect stem cells in the intestine during normal epithelial turnover, or during wound repair. PGs are synthesized from arachidonate by either of two cyclooxygenases, cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1) or cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), which are present in a wide variety of mamalian cells. Cox-1 is thought to be a constitutively expressed enzyme, and the expression of Cox-2 is inducible by cytokines or other stimuli in a variety of cell types. We investigated the role of PGs in mouse intestinal stem cell survival and proliferation following radiation injury. The number of surviving crypt stem cells was determined 3.5 d after irradiation by the microcolony assay. Radiation injury induced a dose-dependent decrease in the number of surviving crypts. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of Cox-1 and Cox-2, further reduced the number of surviving crypts in irradiated mice. The indomethacin dose response for inhibition of PGE2 production and reduction of crypt survival were similar. DimethylPGE2 reversed the indomethacin-induced decrease in crypt survival. Selective Cox-2 inhibitors had no effect on crypt survival. PGE2, Cox-1 mRNA, and Cox-1 protein levels all increase in the 3 d after irradiation. Immunohistochemistry for Cox-1 demonstrated localization in epithelial cells of the crypt in the unirradiated mouse, and in the regenerating crypt epithelium in the irradiated mouse. We conclude that radiation injury results in increased Cox-1 levels in crypt stem cells and their progeny, and that PGE2 produced through Cox-1 promotes crypt stem cell survival and proliferation. PMID:9077547

  13. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureban, Sripathi M.; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis. PMID:26270561

  14. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury.

    PubMed

    Sureban, Sripathi M; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis.

  15. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  16. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Wright, Gus A.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2 transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5+ stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  17. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Wright, Gus A; Safe, Stephen; Chapkin, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5(+) stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism.

  18. Polyethylene glycol, unique among laxatives, suppresses aberrant crypt foci, by elimination of cells

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Sylviane; Parnaud, Géraldine; Van Beek, Erik; Corpet, Denis E.

    2006-01-01

    Background Polyethylene glycol (PEG), an osmotic laxative, is a very potent inhibitor of colon cancer in rats. In a search for mechanisms, we tested the hypothesis that fecal bulking and moisture decreases colon carcinogenesis. We also looked for PEG effects on crypt cells in vivo. Methods Fischer 344 rats (N=272) were given an injection of the colon carcinogen azoxymethane. They were then randomized to a standard AIN76 diet containing one of 19 laxative agents (5% w/w in most cases): PEG 8000 and other PEG-like compounds, carboxymethylcellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone, sodium polyacrylate, calcium polycarbophil, karaya gum, psyllium, mannitol, sorbitol, lactulose, propylene glycol, magnesium hydroxide, sodium phosphate, bisacodyl, docusate, and paraffin oil. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and fecal values were measured blindly after a 30-day treatment. Proliferation, apoptosis, and the removal of cells from crypts were studied in control and PEG-fed rats by various methods, including TUNEL and fluorescein dextran labeling. Results PEG 8000 reduced nine-fold the number of ACF in rats (p<0.001). The other PEGs and magnesium-hydroxide modestly suppressed ACF, but not the other laxatives. ACF number did not correlate with fecal weight or moisture. PEG doubled the apoptotic bodies per crypt (p<0.05), increased proliferation by 25–50% (p<0.05) and strikingly increased (>40-fold) a fecal marker of epitheliolysis in the gut (p<0.001). PEG normalized the percentage of fluorescein dextran labeled cells on the top of ACF (p<0.001). Conclusions Among laxatives, only PEG afforded potent chemoprevention. PEG protection was not due to increased fecal bulking, but likely to the elimination of cells from precancerous lesions. PMID:16716974

  19. Influence of dietary supplementation with flaxseed and lactobacilli on the mucosal morphology and proliferative cell rate in the jejunal mucosa of piglets after weaning

    PubMed Central

    Jonecova, Zuzana; Toth, Stefan; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Nemcova, Radomira

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of flaxseed and lactobacilli supplementation to the diet of piglets during the time period between 10 days before and 21 days after weaning. The morphometry of the jejunal mucosa and proliferative ratio of both epithelial and lamina propria cells were compared with those found in a group of piglets fed with the usual diet added with sunflower oil during the same time period. The addition of flaxseed oil to the diet significantly increased the crypt depth in comparison with both groups supplemented with sunflower (P < 0.05 and 0.001 respectively) on the weaning day. Moreover, the flaxseed addition caused a significant decrease in villus height (P < 0.01) and crypt depth (P < 0.01) 21 days postweaning in comparison with the sunflower group. The proliferative ratio of the epithelial cells in the sunflower group on the weaning day was significantly higher than in both flaxseed groups (P < 0.01). Paradoxically, significantly higher proliferative activity in the mucosal connective tissue in the group with flaxseed supplementation in comparison with the sunflower group was observed on the day of weaning, as well as 3 days later (P < 0.05 both). A combination of flaxseed with lactobacilli showed significantly lower proliferative activity in the connective tissue cells from weaning up to 7 days after weaning (P < 0.05 all) in comparison with the flaxseed group. PMID:25929724

  20. Influence of dietary supplementation with flaxseed and lactobacilli on the mucosal morphology and proliferative cell rate in the jejunal mucosa of piglets after weaning.

    PubMed

    Jonecova, Zuzana; Toth, Stefan; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Nemcova, Radomira

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of flaxseed and lactobacilli supplementation to the diet of piglets during the time period between 10 days before and 21 days after weaning. The morphometry of the jejunal mucosa and proliferative ratio of both epithelial and lamina propria cells were compared with those found in a group of piglets fed with the usual diet added with sunflower oil during the same time period. The addition of flaxseed oil to the diet significantly increased the crypt depth in comparison with both groups supplemented with sunflower (P < 0.05 and 0.001 respectively) on the weaning day. Moreover, the flaxseed addition caused a significant decrease in villus height (P < 0.01) and crypt depth (P < 0.01) 21 days postweaning in comparison with the sunflower group. The proliferative ratio of the epithelial cells in the sunflower group on the weaning day was significantly higher than in both flaxseed groups (P < 0.01). Paradoxically, significantly higher proliferative activity in the mucosal connective tissue in the group with flaxseed supplementation in comparison with the sunflower group was observed on the day of weaning, as well as 3 days later (P < 0.05 both). A combination of flaxseed with lactobacilli showed significantly lower proliferative activity in the connective tissue cells from weaning up to 7 days after weaning (P < 0.05 all) in comparison with the flaxseed group.

  1. Inhibition of Notch signaling reduces the number of surviving Dclk1+ reserve crypt epithelial stem cells following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dongfeng; May, Randal; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Li, Linheng; Barrett, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1) is a putative intestinal stem cell (ISC) marker. In this report, we evaluated the use of Dclk1 as a marker of surviving ISCs in response to treatment with high-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Both apoptotic and mitotic Dclk1+ cells were observed 24 h post-TBI associated with a corresponding loss of intestinal crypts observed at 84 h post-TBI. Although the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating proliferation and lineage commitment within the intestine, its role in ISC function in response to severe genotoxic injury is not yet fully understood. We employed the microcolony assay to functionally assess the effects of Notch inhibition with difluorophenacetyl-l-alanyl-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) on intestinal crypt stem cell survival following severe (>8 Gy) radiation injury. Following treatment with DAPT, we observed a nearly 50% reduction in the number of surviving Dclk1+ crypt epithelial cells at 24 h after TBI and similar reduction in the number of surviving small intestinal crypts at 84 h. These data indicate that inhibition of Notch signaling decreases ISC survival following radiation injury, suggesting that the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in ISC-mediated crypt regeneration. These results also suggest that crypt epithelial cell Dclk1 expression can be used as one potential marker to evaluate the early survival of ISCs following severe radiation injury. PMID:24368703

  2. De Novo Formation of Insulin-Producing “Neo-β Cell Islets” from Intestinal Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Weinblatt, Daniel; Emmett, Matthew J.; Tameire, Feven; Yousefi, Maryam; Yang, Chenghua; Maehr, Rene; Zhou, Qiao; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval; Li, Changhong; Spence, Jason R.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to interconvert terminally differentiated cells could serve as a powerful tool for cell-based treatment of degenerative diseases, including diabetes mellitus. To determine which, if any, adult tissues are competent to activate an islet β cell program, we performed an in vivo screen by expressing three β cell “reprogramming factors” in a wide spectrum of tissues. We report that transient intestinal expression of these factors—Pdx1, MafA, and Ngn3 (PMN)—promotes rapid conversion of intestinal crypt cells into endocrine cells, which coalesce into “neoislets” below the crypt base. Neoislet cells express insulin and show ultrastructural features of β cells. Importantly, intestinal neoislets are glucose-responsive and able to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Moreover, PMN expression in human intestinal “organoids” stimulates the conversion of intestinal epithelial cells into β-like cells. Our results thus demonstrate that the intestine is an accessible and abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells. PMID:24613355

  3. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  4. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M Agostina; Mah, Amanda T; Krebs, Adrienne E; Dehmer, Jeffrey J; McNaughton, Kirk K; Helmrath, Michael A; Magness, Scott T; Lund, P Kay

    2015-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has potent trophic effects on normal or injured intestinal epithelium, but specific effects on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are undefined. We used Sox9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter mice that permit analyses of both actively cycling ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(Low)) and reserve/facultative ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(High)) to study IGF1 action on ISCs in normal intestine or during crypt regeneration after high-dose radiation-induced injury. We hypothesized that IGF1 differentially regulates proliferation and gene expression in actively cycling and reserve/facultative ISCs. IGF1 was delivered for 5 days using subcutaneously implanted mini-pumps in uninjured mice or after 14 Gy abdominal radiation. ISC numbers, proliferation, and transcriptome were assessed. IGF1 increased epithelial growth in nonirradiated mice and enhanced crypt regeneration after radiation. In uninjured and regenerating intestines, IGF1 increased total numbers of Sox9-EGFP(Low) ISCs and percentage of these cells in M-phase. IGF1 increased percentages of Sox9-EGFP(High) ISCs in S-phase but did not expand this population. Microarray revealed that IGF1 activated distinct gene expression signatures in the 2 Sox9-EGFP ISC populations. In vitro IGF1 enhanced enteroid formation by Sox9-EGFP(High) facultative ISCs but not Sox9-EGFP(Low) actively cycling ISCs. Our data provide new evidence that IGF1 activates 2 ISC populations via distinct regulatory pathways to promote growth of normal intestinal epithelium and crypt regeneration after irradiation.

  5. Identification of a cKit+ Colonic Crypt Base Secretory Cell That Supports Lgr5+ Stem Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Michael E.; Nusse, Ysbrand; Kalisky, Tomer; Lee, John J.; Dalerba, Piero; Scheeren, Ferenc; Lobo, Neethan; Kulkarni, Subhash; Sim, Sopheak; Qian, Dalong; Beachy, Philip A.; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Quake, Stephen R.; Clarke, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Paneth cells contribute to the small intestinal niche of Lgr5+ stem cells. Although the colon also contains Lgr5+ stem cells, it does not contain Paneth cells. We investigated the existence of colonic Paneth-like cells that have a distinct transcriptional signature and support Lgr5+ stem cells. Methods We used multicolor fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate different subregions of colon crypts, based on known markers, from dissociated colonic epithelium of mice. We performed multiplexed single-cell gene expression analysis with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction followed by hierarchical clustering analysis to characterize distinct cell types. We used immunostaining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses with in vivo administration of a Notch inhibitor and in vitro organoid cultures to characterize different cell types. Results Multicolor fluorescence-activated cell sorting could isolate distinct regions of colonic crypts. Four major epithelial subtypes or transcriptional states were revealed by gene expression analysis of selected populations of single cells. One of these, the goblet cells, contained a distinct cKit/CD117+ crypt base subpopulation that expressed Dll1, Dll4, and epidermal growth factor, similar to Paneth cells, which were also marked by cKit. In the colon, cKit+ goblet cells were interdigitated with Lgr5+ stem cells. In vivo, this colonic cKit+ population was regulated by Notch signaling; administration of a γ-secretase inhibitor to mice increased the number of cKit+ cells. When isolated from mouse colon, cKit+ cells promoted formation of organoids from Lgr5+ stem cells, which expressed Kitl/stem cell factor, the ligand for cKit. When organoids were depleted of cKit+ cells using a toxin-conjugated antibody, organoid formation decreased. Conclusions cKit marks small intestinal Paneth cells and a subset of colonic goblet cells that are regulated by Notch signaling and support Lgr5+stem

  6. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  7. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling.

  8. Histological and electrophysiological properties of crypt cells from the olfactory epithelium of the marine teleost Trachurus symmetricus.

    PubMed

    Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2006-03-01

    Crypt cells from the olfactory epithelium of the Pacific jack mackerel Trachurus symmetricus were characterized by light and electron microscopy and analyzed in dissociation with the patch-clamp technique in its cell-attached, perforated patch and normal whole-cell mode. Isolated crypt cells remained united with their supporting cells, and both were electrically coupled through gap junctions. Under voltage-clamp, depolarizing voltage steps triggered a transient sodium current, a sustained calcium current, and two types of potassium currents with fast and slow inactivation kinetics. No calcium-dependent potassium current could be observed. The sodium current was blocked by saxitoxin, the calcium current by cobalt and furnidipine, and the potassium currents by tetraethylammonium chloride. In the cell-attached configuration, crypt cells displayed spontaneous spike activity and responded to amino acid solutions with dose-dependent excitation, followed by a period of spike inhibition. These first recordings of individual crypt cells provide the basis for future studies of their odorant specificity, transduction mechanism, and overall function in the fish olfactory epithelium.

  9. Fructo-oligosaccharides and iron bioavailability in anaemic rats: the effects on iron species distribution, ferroportin-1 expression, crypt bifurcation and crypt cell proliferation in the caecum.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Alexandre R; Gaievski, Eduardo H S; De Carli, Eduardo; Alvares, Eliana P; Colli, Célia

    2014-10-28

    The present study investigated the effects of fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) on the bioavailability of Fe from ferric pyrophosphate (FP), a water-insoluble compound, in Fe-deficient anaemic rats that were subjected to a Hb repletion assay. Male Wistar rats (n 64) were fed adequate or low (8 mg/kg) Fe diets for 15 d followed by 1 or 2 weeks of Fe repletion with diets providing 35 mg Fe/kg as ferrous sulphate (FS), FP or FP that was mixed with 7·5% FOS in the form of yacon flour or Raftilose P95 (RAF), a purified source of FOS. The effects of FOS were observed within the 1st week of the repletion period. Fe bioavailability was improved by FOS supplementation, as measured by Hb regeneration efficiency and hepatic Fe stores, which were more pronounced in the RAF group. Moreover, RAF supplementation resulted in a higher biological value relative to that of the FP group. FOS supplementation resulted in caecal enlargement, in addition to acidification and Fe species redistribution in the caecal contents relative to the control rats. These effects occurred concomitantly with decreased ferroportin (FPN)-1 expression in the caecal mucosa, which was similar in magnitude to that observed in the FS group. Caecum mucosal morphometry was influenced by FOS supplementation, whereas crypt fission and cell proliferation were highest in the caecum of the RAF group. These results reinforce the effects of FOS as Fe bioavailability enhancers in anaemic rats that are sustained by early changes in their caecal environment (decreased mucosal FPN-1 expression and increased Fe absorbability, crypt fission and cellularity).

  10. Paneth Cell-Rich Regions Separated by a Cluster of Lgr5+ Cells Initiate Crypt Fission in the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Langlands, Alistair J; Almet, Axel A; Appleton, Paul L; Newton, Ian P; Osborne, James M; Näthke, Inke S

    2016-06-01

    The crypts of the intestinal epithelium house the stem cells that ensure the continual renewal of the epithelial cells that line the intestinal tract. Crypt number increases by a process called crypt fission, the division of a single crypt into two daughter crypts. Fission drives normal tissue growth and maintenance. Correspondingly, it becomes less frequent in adulthood. Importantly, fission is reactivated to drive adenoma growth. The mechanisms governing fission are poorly understood. However, only by knowing how normal fission operates can cancer-associated changes be elucidated. We studied normal fission in tissue in three dimensions using high-resolution imaging and used intestinal organoids to identify underlying mechanisms. We discovered that both the number and relative position of Paneth cells and Lgr5+ cells are important for fission. Furthermore, the higher stiffness and increased adhesion of Paneth cells are involved in determining the site of fission. Formation of a cluster of Lgr5+ cells between at least two Paneth-cell-rich domains establishes the site for the upward invagination that initiates fission.

  11. Proliferation and mRNA expression of absorptive villous cell markers and mineral transporters in prolactin-exposed IEC-6 intestinal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Wongdee, Kannikar; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-06-01

    During pregnancy and lactation, prolactin (PRL) enhances intestinal absorption of calcium and other minerals for fetal development and milk production. Although an enhanced absorptive efficiency is believed to mainly result from the upregulation of mineral transporters in the absorptive villous cells, some other possibilities, such as PRL-enhanced crypt cell proliferation and differentiation to increase the absorptive area, have never been ruled out. Here, we investigated cell proliferation and mRNA expression of mineral absorption-related genes in the PRL-exposed IEC-6 crypt cells. As expected, the cell proliferation was not altered by PRL. Inasmuch as the mRNA expressions of villous cell markers, including dipeptidylpeptidase-4, lactase and glucose transporter-5, were not increased, PRL was not likely to enhance crypt cell differentiation into the absorptive villous cells. In contrast to the previous findings in villous cells, PRL was found to downregulate the expression of calbindin-D(9k), claudin-3 and occludin in IEC-6 crypt cells, while having no effect on transient receptor potential vanilloid family channels-5/6, plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA)-1b and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 expression. In conclusion, IEC-6 crypt cells did not respond to PRL by increasing proliferation or differentiation into villous cells. The present results thus supported the previous hypothesis that PRL enhanced mineral absorption predominantly by increasing transporter expression and activity in the absorptive villous cells.

  12. Paneth cell marker expression in intestinal villi and colon crypts characterizes dietary induced risk for mouse sporadic intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghai; Peregrina, Karina; Dhima, Elena; Lin, Elaine Y; Mariadason, John M; Augenlicht, Leonard H

    2011-06-21

    Nutritional and genetic risk factors for intestinal tumors are additive on mouse tumor phenotype, establishing that diet and genetic factors impact risk by distinct combinatorial mechanisms. In a mouse model of dietary-induced sporadic small and large intestinal cancer in WT mice in which tumor etiology, lag, incidence, and frequency reflect >90% of intestinal cancer in Western societies, dietary-induced risk altered gene expression profiles predominantly in villus cells of the histologically normal mucosa, in contrast to targeting of crypt cells by inheritance of an Apc(1638N) allele or homozygous inactivation of p21(Waf1/cip1), and profiles induced by each risk factor were distinct at the gene or functional group level. The dietary-induced changes in villus cells encompassed ectopic expression of Paneth cell markers (a lineage normally confined to the bottom of small intestinal crypts), elevated expression of the Wnt receptor Fzd5 and of EphB2 (genes necessary for Paneth cell differentiation and localization to the crypt bottom), and increased Wnt signaling in villus cells. Ectopic elevation of these markers was also present in the colon crypts, which are also sites of sporadic tumors in the nutritional model. Elevating dietary vitamin D(3) and calcium, which prevents tumor development, abrogated these changes in the villus and colon cells. Thus, common intestinal cancer driven by diet involves mechanisms of tumor development distinct from those mechanisms that cause tumors induced by the rare inheritance of a mutant adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) allele. This is fundamental for understanding how common sporadic tumors arise and in evaluating relative risk in the population.

  13. Mast cells in Canine parvovirus-2-associated enteritis with crypt abscess.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, M W; Saliki, J T; Blas-Machado, U; Whittington, L

    2013-11-01

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in allergic reactions and parasitic infections is well established. Their involvement in host immune response against bacterial and viral infections is reported. In this study, investigation is made to determine if MCs are associated with Canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2)-induced enteritis with crypt abscess (ECA). Mast cell count (MCC) was made on toluidine blue-stained intestinal sections from a total of 34 dogs. These included 16 dogs exhibiting ECA positive for CPV-2 and negative for Canine distemper virus and Canine coronavirus by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent antibody test, 12 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 6 non-ECA/non-IBD (control) dogs. The average total MCC per high-power field in ECA (40.8 ± 2.2) and IBD (24.7 ± 2.1) was significantly higher (P < .05) than in the control (3.4 ± 0.6). Although not significant (P > .05), MCC was also higher in ECA than in IBD. The present study for the first time has documented significantly increased MCs in CPV-2-associated ECA as was previously reported for IBD, showing that MCs may also play an important role in CPV-2-associated ECA. Further studies involving more CPV-infected dogs are recommended to substantiate the findings.

  14. Novel Regenerative Peptide TP508 Mitigates Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage By Activating Stem Cells and Preserving Crypt Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M.; Houchen, Courtney W.; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L.; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post-exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin®) 24h after lethal radiation exposure (9Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post-exposure prevents the disintegration of gastrointestinal crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also up-regulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24h post-exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment. PMID:26280221

  15. Novel regenerative peptide TP508 mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage by activating stem cells and preserving crypt integrity.

    PubMed

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M; Houchen, Courtney W; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis, and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin) 24 h after lethal radiation exposure (9 Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post exposure prevents the disintegration of GI crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also upregulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24 h post exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment.

  16. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5 Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Claudin-4 Undergoes Age-Dependent Change in Cellular Localization on Pig Jejunal Villous Epithelial Cells, Independent of Bacterial Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Van Kessel, Andrew G.; Wilson, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:25948883

  18. Claudin-4 undergoes age-dependent change in cellular localization on pig jejunal villous epithelial cells, independent of bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, J Alex; Kent-Dennis, Coral; Van Kessel, Andrew G; Wilson, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases.

  19. The crypt cycle. Crypt and villus production in the adult intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Totafurno, J; Bjerknes, M; Cheng, H

    1987-01-01

    We propose a model for the growth of individual crypts that is able to account for the observed changes in the number of cells in crypts under normal conditions, after irradiation, and after 30% resection. Parameter values for this model are estimated both for mouse and man, and detailed predictions of crypt growth rates are made. This model does not predict a steady-state crypt size; rather it suggests that crypts grow until they bifurcate. We therefore propose a crypt cycle (analogous to the cell cycle) and present evidence that most if not all crypts in the adult mouse are cycling asynchronously and independently. This evidence consists of four experiments that indicate that branching crypts are randomly distributed over the intestinal epithelium, that the plane of bifurcation of branching crypts is randomly oriented with respect to the villus base, and that the size distribution of crypts is consistent with an expanding crypt population. We also report for the first time evidence of villus production in the adult mouse intestinal epithelium. We conclude that the crypt and villus populations in the adult mouse are not in a steady state. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:3663832

  20. Lawsonia intracellularis exploits β-catenin/Wnt and Notch signalling pathways during infection of intestinal crypt to alter cell homeostasis and promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Yang W.; Bengtsson, Rebecca J.; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Finlayson, Heather; Smith, Sionagh H.; Archibald, Alan L.; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2017-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in pigs. L. intracellularis infection causes extensive intestinal crypt cell proliferation and inhibits secretory and absorptive cell differentiation. However, the affected host upstream cellular pathways leading to PE are still unknown. β-catenin/Wnt signalling is essential in maintaining intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and self-renewal capacity, while Notch signalling governs differentiation of secretory and absorptive lineage specification. Therefore, in this report we used immunofluorescence (IF) and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTqPCR) to examine β-catenin/Wnt and Notch-1 signalling levels in uninfected and L. intracellularis infected pig ileums at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post challenge (dpc). We found that while the significant increase in Ki67+ nuclei in crypts at the peak of L. intracellularis infection suggested enhanced cell proliferation, the expression of c-MYC and ASCL2, promoters of cell growth and ISC proliferation respectively, was down-regulated. Peak infection also coincided with enhanced cytosolic and membrane-associated β-catenin staining and induction of AXIN2 and SOX9 transcripts, both encoding negative regulators of β-catenin/Wnt signalling and suggesting a potential alteration to β-catenin/Wnt signalling levels, with differential regulation of the expression of its target genes. We found that induction of HES1 and OLFM4 and the down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels was consistent with the increased Notch-1 signalling in crypts at the peak of infection. Interestingly, the significant down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels coincided with the depletion of MUC2 expression at 14 dpc, consistent with the role of ATOH1 in promoting goblet cell maturation. The lack of significant change to LGR5 transcript levels at the peak of infection suggested that the crypt hyperplasia was not due to the expansion

  1. Protein kinase D1 mediates stimulation of DNA synthesis and proliferation in intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells and in mouse intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Sinnett-Smith, James; Rozengurt, Nora; Kui, Robert; Huang, Carlos; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2011-01-07

    We examined whether protein kinase D1 (PKD1), the founding member of a new protein kinase family, plays a critical role in intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate that PKD1 activation is sustained, whereas that of PKD2 is transient in intestinal epithelial IEC-18 stimulated with the G(q)-coupled receptor agonists angiotensin II or vasopressin. PKD1 gene silencing utilizing small interfering RNAs dramatically reduced DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in IEC-18 cells stimulated with G(q)-coupled receptor agonists. To clarify the role of PKD1 in intestinal epithelial cell proliferation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that express elevated PKD1 protein in the intestinal epithelium. Transgenic PKD1 exhibited constitutive catalytic activity and phosphorylation at the activation loop residues Ser(744) and Ser(748) and on the autophosphorylation site, Ser(916). To examine whether PKD1 expression stimulates intestinal cell proliferation, we determined the rate of crypt cell DNA synthesis by detection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporated into the nuclei of crypt cells of the ileum. Our results demonstrate a significant increase (p < 0.005) in DNA-synthesizing cells in the crypts of two independent lines of PKD1 transgenic mice as compared with non-transgenic littermates. Morphometric analysis showed a significant increase in the length and in the total number of cells per crypt in the transgenic PKD1 mice as compared with the non-transgenic littermates (p < 0.01). Thus, transgenic PKD1 signaling increases the number of cells per crypt by stimulating the rate of crypt cell proliferation. Collectively, our results indicate that PKD1 plays a role in promoting cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Structural and functional evolution of jejunal allograft rejection in rats and the ameliorating effects of cyclosporine therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Madara, J L; Kirkman, R L

    1985-01-01

    We assessed the structural and functional evolution of small intestinal transplant rejection in a rat model by use of 1-micron section, electron microscopic, and in vitro electrophysiologic techniques to study jejunal mucosa 3, 6, and 9 d posttransplantation. The earliest structural abnormalities detected in jejunal loops transplanted from Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrids into Lewis rats occurred within 3 d posttransplantation and consisted of focal endothelial cell injury of the microvasculature and focal injury of crypt epithelial cells. Both alterations were associated with adjacent infiltration of large lymphoid cells, and both markedly progressed and became rather diffuse over the following 6 d. In contrast, villus absorptive cells were not markedly altered in structure until the 9th postoperative day. As compared with host jejuna, allograft jejunal epithelium demonstrated multiple functional abnormalities. Transepithelial resistance declined progressively by days 6 and 9 (both P less than 0.05), although baseline transepithelial spontaneous potential difference was only affected at day 9 (P less than 0.01). Stimulated absorption by allograft jejuna, as assessed by measuring electrical response to mucosal glucose, was not significantly diminished until day 9 (P less than 0.05). In contrast, stimulated secretion assessed by measurement of electrical response to serosal theophylline was diminished by day 6 (P less than .01). These data suggest that the earliest epithelial injury during rejection, as judged both structurally and functionally, occurs in the crypt and is paralleled by endothelial injury at the level of the microvasculature. Thus, the primary targets for rejection are most likely endothelial cells and crypt epithelial cells. In contrast, structural and functional impairment of villus epithelium is detectable only at substantially later times during rejection and are most likely secondary processes related to either ischemia produced by microvascular

  3. Morphometric study of the jejunal mucosa in various childhood enteropathies with special reference to intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuitunen, P; Kosnai, I; Savilahti, E

    1982-01-01

    A morphometric study of intraepithelial (IE) lymphocytes per 100 epithelial cells, villous heights (VH), crypt depths (CrD), and epithelial cell heights (ECH) was made on jejunal specimens of 17 patients with cow's-milk allergy (CMA), 52 with celiac disease (CD), seven with congenital lactase deficiency (CLD), four with acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE), four with giardiasis, and four with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). The aim of this study was to investigate how the morphometric parameters correlate with each other. All cases with CMA, CD, and DH had villous atrophy with hyperplasia of the crypts, both signs being more severe in cases with CD and DH than with CMA. IE lymphocyte infiltration was more intense in specimens of patients with CD and DH (mean 76.0), than those with CMA (mean 62.5). The ECH were equally reduced in patients with CD and CMA. In a follow-up specimen at 1 year and 10 months for CD patients and 11 months for CMA patients the inflammation was reduced, and the VH were increased but still differed from the controls. In CLD cases the morphology of the villi and crypts of the jejunum was quite normal, with no IE lymphocyte infiltration; ECH were reduced. Minor morphological changes were seen in the specimens of patients with AE and giardiasis. In the whole study group there was a significant linear correlation, either positive or negative, between all variables measured (IE lymphocytes, VH, CrD, and ECH).

  4. Fluid absorption in isolated perfused colonic crypts.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S K; Binder, H J; Boron, W F; Geibel, J P

    1995-01-01

    A spatial segregation of ion transport processes between crypt and surface epithelial cells is well-accepted and integrated into physiological and pathophysiological paradigms of small and large intestinal function: Absorptive processes are believed to be located in surface (and villous) cells, whereas secretory processes are believed to be present in crypt cells. Validation of this model requires direct determination of fluid movement in intestinal crypts. This study describes the adaptation of techniques from renal tubule microperfusion to hand-dissect and perfuse single, isolated crypts from rat distal colon to measure directly fluid movement. Morphologic analyses of the isolated crypt preparation revealed no extraepithelial cellular elements derived from the lamina propria, including myofibroblasts. In the basal state, crypts exhibited net fluid absorption (mean net fluid movement = 0.34 +/- 0.01 nl.mm-1.min-1), which was Na+ and partially HCO3- dependent. Addition of 1 mM dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, 60 nM vasoactive intestinal peptide, or 0.1 mM acetylcholine to the bath (serosal) solution reversibly induced net fluid secretion (net fluid movement approximately -0.35 +/- 0.01 nl.mm-1.min-1). These observations permit speculation that absorption is a constitutive transport function in crypt cells and that secretion by crypt cells is regulated by one or more neurohumoral agonists that are released in situ from lamina propria cells. The functional, intact polarized crypt described here that both absorbs and secretes will permit future studies that dissect the mechanisms that govern fluid and electrolyte movement in the colonic crypt. Images PMID:7593625

  5. Identification of a developmental gene expression signature, including HOX genes, for the normal human colonic crypt stem cell niche: overexpression of the signature parallels stem cell overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bhatlekar, Seema; Addya, Sankar; Salunek, Moreh; Orr, Christopher R; Surrey, Saul; McKenzie, Steven; Fields, Jeremy Z; Boman, Bruce M

    2014-01-15

    Our goal was to identify a unique gene expression signature for human colonic stem cells (SCs). Accordingly, we determined the gene expression pattern for a known SC-enriched region--the crypt bottom. Colonic crypts and isolated crypt subsections (top, middle, and bottom) were purified from fresh, normal, human, surgical specimens. We then used an innovative strategy that used two-color microarrays (∼18,500 genes) to compare gene expression in the crypt bottom with expression in the other crypt subsections (middle or top). Array results were validated by PCR and immunostaining. About 25% of genes analyzed were expressed in crypts: 88 preferentially in the bottom, 68 in the middle, and 131 in the top. Among genes upregulated in the bottom, ∼30% were classified as growth and/or developmental genes including several in the PI3 kinase pathway, a six-transmembrane protein STAMP1, and two homeobox (HOXA4, HOXD10) genes. qPCR and immunostaining validated that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are selectively expressed in the normal crypt bottom and are overexpressed in colon carcinomas (CRCs). Immunostaining showed that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are co-expressed with the SC markers CD166 and ALDH1 in cells at the normal crypt bottom, and the number of these co-expressing cells is increased in CRCs. Thus, our findings show that these two HOX genes are selectively expressed in colonic SCs and that HOX overexpression in CRCs parallels the SC overpopulation that occurs during CRC development. Our study suggests that developmental genes play key roles in the maintenance of normal SCs and crypt renewal, and contribute to the SC overpopulation that drives colon tumorigenesis.

  6. Intestinal tuft cells regulate the ATM mediated DNA Damage response via Dclk1 dependent mechanism for crypt restitution following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Weygant, Nathaniel; Qu, Dongfeng; Berry, William L.; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Ali, Naushad; Rao, Chinthalapally; Huycke, Mark; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2016-01-01

    Crypt epithelial survival and regeneration after injury require highly coordinated complex interplay between resident stem cells and diverse cell types. The function of Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulating intestinal epithelial DNA damage response for cell survival/self-renewal after radiation-induced injury is unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were isolated and purified and utilized for experimental analysis. We found that small intestinal crypts of VillinCre;Dclk1f/f mice were hypoplastic and more apoptotic 24 h post-total body irradiation, a time when stem cell survival is p53-independent. Injury-induced ATM mediated DNA damage response, pro-survival genes, stem cell markers, and self-renewal ability for survival and restitution were reduced in the isolated intestinal epithelial cells. An even greater reduction in these signaling pathways was observed 3.5 days post-TBI, when peak crypt regeneration occurs. We found that interaction with Dclk1 is critical for ATM and COX2 activation in response to injury. We determined that Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulate the whole intestinal epithelial cells following injury through paracrine mechanism. These findings suggest that intestinal tuft cells play an important role in regulating the ATM mediated DNA damage response, for epithelial cell survival/self-renewal via a Dclk1 dependent mechanism, and these processes are indispensable for restitution and function after severe radiation-induced injury. PMID:27876863

  7. p21waf1/cip1 deficiency does not perturb the intestinal crypt stem cell population after massive small bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    Longshore, Shannon W.; Nair, Rajalakshmi; Perrone, Erin E.; Erwin, Christopher R.; Guo, Jun; Warner, Brad W.

    2009-01-01

    Background After small bowel resection (SBR), adaptation is initiated in intestinal crypts where stem cells reside. Prior studies revealed SBR induced enterocyte proliferation requires the expression of p21waf1/cip1. Since deficient expression of p21waf1/cip1 has been shown to result in reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells, we sought to test the hypothesis that p21waf1/cip1 deficiency similarly perturbs the intestinal stem cell population after SBR. Methods Control (n=21; C57Bl/6) and p21waf1/cip1-null mice (n=30) underwent 50% proximal SBR or sham operation. After 3 days, the ileum was harvested and the crypt stem cell population evaluated by counting crypt base columnar (CBC) cells on histological sections, determining the expression of Musashi-1 and Lgr5, and profiling the transcriptional expression of 84 known stem cell genes. Results There were no significant differences in CBC cells, expression of Musashi-1 or Lgr5, or in stem cell gene expression after SBR in control mice. Further, there were no differences in these markers between controls and p21waf1/cip1-null mice. Conclusion In contrast with bone marrow stem cells, the stem cell population of the gut is unaffected by deficient expression of p21waf1/cip1. Additional mechanisms for the role of p21waf1/cip1 in small bowel proliferation and adaptation following massive SBR must be considered. PMID:19524718

  8. Differential expression of proteins involved in energy production along the crypt-villus axis in early-weaning pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xia; Yang, Huansheng; Tan, Bie; Yang, Chengbo; Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Gang; Kim, Sung Woo; Li, Tiejun; Li, Lili; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-08-15

    Weaning of piglets reflects intestinal dysfunction and atrophy and affected the physiological state of enterocytes. However, few studies have defined physiological state of enterocytes along the crypt-villus axis in early-weaning piglets. A total of 16 piglets from 8 litters were used in the experiment. One group of piglets was nursed by sows until age 21 days, and another group was weaned at age 14 days and then fed creep feed instead of breast milk for 7 days. Piglets were killed at 21 days, and the jejunum segments were dissected. After sequential isolation of jejunum epithelial cells along the crypt-villus axis, their proteins were analyzed through the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification, and proteins involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and proliferating cell nuclear antigen abundances in jejunal epithelial cells of weaning or suckling group were determined by Western blotting. The differential proteins in three cell fractions were identified and analyzed. The results showed that proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation, and the glycolysis pathway were significantly downregulated in the upper and middle villus of the early-weaned group. However, proteins involved in glycolysis were significantly upregulated in crypt cells. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway-related proteins was decreased (P < 0.05) in the early-weaned group. The present results showed that early-weaning differentially affect the expression of proteins involved in energy production of enterocytes along the jejunal crypt-villus axis.

  9. STUDIES ON SMALL INTESTINAL CRYPT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Jerry S.

    1963-01-01

    Small intestinal crypt epithelium obtained from normal fasting humans by peroral biopsy of the mucosa was studied with the electron microscope. Paneth cells were identified at the base of the crypts by their elaborate highly organized endoplasmic reticulum, large secretory granules, and small lysosome-like dense bodies within the cytoplasm. Undifferentiated cells were characterized by smaller cytoplasmic membrane-bounded granules which were presumed to be secretory in nature, a less elaborate endoplasmic reticulum, many unattached ribosomes and, in some cells, the presence of glycogen. Some undifferentiated cells at the base of the crypts contained lobulated nuclei and striking paranuclear accumulations of mitochondria. Membrane-bounded cytoplasmic fragments, probably originating from undifferentiated and Paneth cells, were frequently apparent within crypt lumina. Of the goblet cells, some were seen actively secreting mucus. In these, apical mucus appeared to exude into the crypt lumen between gaps in the microvilli. The membrane formerly surrounding the apical mucus appeared to fuse with and become part of the plasma membrane of the cell, suggesting a merocrine secretory mechanism. Enterochromaffin cells were identified by their location between the basal regions of other crypt cells and by their unique intracytoplasmic granules. PMID:14064112

  10. Raised number of jejunal IgG2-producing cells in untreated adult coeliac disease compared with food allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Rognum, T O; Kett, K; Fausa, O; Bengtsson, U; Kilander, A; Scott, H; Gaarder, P I; Brandtzaeg, P

    1989-01-01

    The subclass distribution of IgG-producing immunocytes was studied by two colour immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies in jejunal biopsy specimens from 10 adults with untreated coeliac disease, 11 coeliac disease patients on a gluten free diet, and seven patients with established food allergy. Paired immunofluorescence staining was performed with subclass specific murine monoclonal antibodies in combination with polyclonal rabbit antibody reagent to total IgG; the proportion of cells belonging to each subclass could thereby be determined. The ratio of IgG2 immunocytes was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in untreated coeliac disease patients (median, 35.2%; range, 26.7-65.2%) than in those on a gluten free diet (median, 7.3%; range, 0-31.9%) or those having food allergy (median, 12.5%; range, 0-36.5%). The disparity in the local IgG2 response between patients with untreated coeliac disease and those with food allergy might be due to differences in the nature of the antigenic stimuli, dissimilar genetic 'make-up' of the subjects, or both. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2599444

  11. Effect of genetically modified corn on the jejunal mucosa of adult male albino rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Marwa A A; Okasha, Ebtsam F

    2016-11-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants expressing insecticidal traits offer a new strategy for crop protection. GM-corn contains Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes producing delta endotoxins in the whole plant. Diet can influence the characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract altering its function and structure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GM-corn on the histological structure of jejunal mucosa of adult male albino rat using different histological, immunohistochemical and morphometrical methods. Twenty adult male albino rats were divided into two equal groups; control and GM-corn fed group administered with 30% GM-corn for 90days. Specimens from the jejunum were processed for light and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical study was carried out using antibody against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Different morphometrical parameters were assessed. Specimens from GM-corn fed group showed different forms of structural changes. Focal destruction and loss of the villi leaving denuded mucosal surface alternating with stratified areas were observed, while some crypts appeared totally disrupted. Congested blood capillaries and focal infiltration with mononuclear cells were detected. Significant upregulation of PCNA expression, increase in number of goblet cells and a significant increase in both villous height and crypt depth were detected. Marked ultrastructural changes of some enterocytes with focal loss of the microvillous border were observed. Some enterocytes had vacuolated cytoplasm, swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER). Some cells had dark irregular nuclei with abnormally clumped chromatin. It could be concluded that consumption of GM-corn profoundly alters the jejunal histological structure.

  12. Interactions between stromal cell--derived keratinocyte growth factor and epithelial transforming growth factor in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj-Elliott, M; Poulsom, R; Pender, S L; Wathen, N C; MacDonald, T T

    1998-01-01

    Immune reactions in the gut are associated with increased epithelial cell proliferation. Here we have studied the role of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF; FGF7) and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) in the epithelial cell hyperplasia seen in explants of fetal human small intestine after activation of lamina propria T cells with the superantigen Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB). After the addition of SEB to the explants there is a 10-fold increase in KGF mRNA by 72 h of culture. KGF transcripts were abundant in the lamina propria using in situ hybridization and the culture supernatants contained elevated amounts of KGF protein. SEB had no direct effect on KGF mRNA and protein production by cultured lamina propria mesenchymal cells, but both were upregulated by TNF-alpha. Accompanying the increase in KGF there was also an increase in TGF-alpha precursor proteins in the culture supernatants and the phosphorylated form of the EGFR receptor was also detected in the tissue. Increased TGF-alpha precursor proteins were also detected in the supernatants of control explants stimulated with KGF alone. The direct addition of KGF and TGF-alpha enhanced epithelial cell proliferation and antibodies against KGF and TGF-alpha partially inhibited SEB-induced crypt hyperplasia. These results suggest molecular cross-talk between the KGF/KGFR and the TGF-alpha/EGFR in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia. PMID:9788959

  13. Optimality in the Development of Intestinal Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Blat, Irene C.; Jacks, Tyler; Clevers, Hans; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Intestinal crypts in mammals are comprised of long-lived stem cells and shorter-lived progenies. These two populations are maintained in specific proportions during adult life. Here, we investigate the design principles governing the dynamics of these proportions during crypt morphogenesis. Using optimal control theory, we show that a proliferation strategy known as a “bang-bang” control minimizes the time to obtain a mature crypt. This strategy consists of a surge of symmetric stem cell divisions, establishing the entire stem cell pool first, followed by a sharp transition to strictly asymmetric stem cell divisions, producing nonstem cells with a delay. We validate these predictions using lineage tracing and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization of intestinal crypts in infant mice, uncovering small crypts that are entirely composed of Lgr5-labeled stem cells, which become a minority as crypts continue to grow. Our approach can be used to uncover similar design principles in other developmental systems. PMID:22304925

  14. K-ras mutations, rectal crypt cells proliferation, and meat consumption in patients with left-sided colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, H; Matthew, J A; Gee, J M; Watson, M; Rhodes, M; Speakman, C T; Stebbings, W S; Kennedy, H J; Johnson, I T

    2000-02-01

    It has been suggested that N-nitroso compounds derived from meat may increase the risk of K-ras mutations in the human colon. We sought evidence of associations between red meat consumption, frequency and type of K-ras mutations in resected tumours, and the rate of crypt cell proliferation (CCP) in the normal mucosa of patients with left-sided colorectal carcinoma. Meat consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and CCP was determined in rectal biopsies obtained prior to surgery. K-ras mutations in the resected tumours were determined using a PCR-based oligonucleotide hybridization assay. Fifteen K-ras mutations were detected in tumours from 43 patients; 13/15 in codon 12, 3/15 in codon 13, and 1/15 in both codons 12 and 13. All mutations were G-->A or G-->T transitions. There was no statistically significant difference between intakes of red meat in patients with a K-ras mutation (92.4 +/- 9.7 g/day) and those without (82.3 +/- 7.7 g/day). Rectal CCP was significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls, but there was no correlation with meat consumption or K-ras mutation. These data do not support the hypothesis that meat consumption is a risk factor for acquisition of K-ras mutations during colorectal carcinogenesis.

  15. The response of murine intestinal crypts to short-range promethium-147 beta irradiation: Deductions concerning clonogenic cell numbers and positions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.; Ghafoor, A.; Moore, J.V.; Roberts, S.A.; Williams, P.C.

    1989-05-01

    An exteriorized loop of mouse intestine was exposed to /sup 147/Pm low-energy electrons, where the dose rate decreased by a factor of 5 from the base of the crypt to the top of the proliferative zone. A crypt survival curve was obtained, expressed in terms of exposure time. The shape of the curve was interpreted in terms of survival parameters for colony-forming cells (clonogens) derived using /sup 137/Cs gamma rays and the depth-dose curve measured for /sup 147/Pm electrons. It is concluded that the shape of the crypt survival curve using /sup 147/Pm electrons is inconsistent with the notion of either the presence of a large number of clonogens or a small number near the top of the proliferative zone. A computer fitting procedure showed that the best agreement between predicted and observed curves was achieved with 2.7 +/- 0.5 clonogens at cell position 5.6 +/- 0.6, in the putative stem-cell zone.

  16. The response of murine intestinal crypts to short-range promethium-147 beta irradiation: deductions concerning clonogenic cell numbers and positions.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Potten, C S; Ghafoor, A; Moore, J V; Roberts, S A; Williams, P C

    1989-05-01

    An exteriorized loop of mouse intestine was exposed to 147Pm low-energy electrons, where the dose rate decreased by a factor of 5 from the base of the crypt to the top of the proliferative zone. A crypt survival curve was obtained, expressed in terms of exposure time. The shape of the curve was interpreted in terms of survival parameters for colony-forming cells (clonogens) derived using 137Cs gamma rays and the depth-dose curve measured for 147Pm electrons. It is concluded that the shape of the crypt survival curve using 147Pm electrons is inconsistent with the notion of either the presence of a large number of clonogens or a small number near the top of the proliferative zone. A computer fitting procedure showed that the best agreement between predicted and observed curves was achieved with 2.7 +/- 0.5 clonogens at cell position 5.6 +/- 0.6, in the putative stem-cell zone.

  17. Selection of multipotent stem cells during morphogenesis of small intestinal crypts of Lieberkuhn is perturbed by stimulation of Lef-1/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melissa H; Huelsken, Joerg; Birchmeier, Walter; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2002-05-03

    Studies of chimeric mice have disclosed that the stem cell hierarchy in the small intestinal epithelium is established during formation of its proliferative units (crypts of Lieberkühn). This process involves a selection among several multipotential progenitors so that ultimately only one survives to supply descendants to the fully formed crypt. In this report, we examine the hypothesis that the level of beta-catenin (beta-cat)-mediated signaling is an important factor regulating this stem cell selection. In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, beta-catenin can partner with Lef-1/Tcf high mobility group (HMG) box transcription factors to control gene expression. Both Lef-1 and Tcf-4 mRNAs are produced in the fetal mouse small intestine. Tcf-4 expression is sustained, whereas Lef-1 levels fall as crypt formation is completed during the first two postnatal weeks. A Tcf-4 gene knockout is known to block intestinal epithelial proliferation in late fetal life. Therefore, to test the hypothesis, we enhanced beta-catenin signaling in a chimeric mouse model in which the stem cell selection could be monitored. A fusion protein containing the HMG box domain of Lef-1 linked to the trans-activation domain of beta-catenin (Lef-1/beta-cat) was constructed to promote direct stimulation of signaling without being retained in the cytoplasm through interactions with E-cadherin and Apc/Axin. Lef-1/beta-cat was expressed in 129/Sv embryonic stem cell-derived small intestinal epithelial progenitors present in developing B6-ROSA26<-->129/Sv chimeras. Lef-1/beta-cat stimulated expression of a known beta-catenin target (E-cadherin), suppressed expression of Apc and Axin, and induced apoptosis in 129/Sv but not in neighboring B6-ROSA26 epithelial cells. This apoptotic response was not associated with any detectable changes in cell division within the Lef-1/beta-cat-expressing epithelium. By the time crypt development was completed, all 129/Sv epithelial cells were lost. These results

  18. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  19. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Anita; Stearns, Adam T.; Park, Peter J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Rhoads, David B.; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  20. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  1. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  2. The RBE-LET relationship for rodent intestinal crypt cell survival, testes weight loss, and multicellular spheroid cell survival after heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E. L.; Powers-Risius, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents data for survival of mouse intestinal crypt cells, mouse testes weight loss as an indicator of survival of spermatogonial stem cells, and survival of rat 9L spheroid cells after irradiation in the plateau region of unmodified particle beams ranging in mass from 4He to 139La. The LET values range from 1.6 to 953 keV/microns. These studies examine the RBE-LET relationship for two normal tissues and for an in vitro tissue model, multicellular spheroids. When the RBE values are plotted as a function of LET, the resulting curve is characterized by a region in which RBE increases with LET, a peak RBE at an LET value of 100 keV/microns, and a region of decreasing RBE at LETs greater than 100 keV/microns. Inactivation cross sections (sigma) for these three biological systems have been calculated from the exponential terminal slope of the dose-response relationship for each ion. For this determination the dose is expressed as particle fluence and the parameter sigma indicates effect per particle. A plot of sigma versus LET shows that the curve for testes weight loss is shifted to the left, indicating greater radiosensitivity at lower LETs than for crypt cell and spheroid cell survival. The curves for cross section versus LET for all three model systems show similar characteristics with a relatively linear portion below 100 keV/microns and a region of lessened slope in the LET range above 100 keV/microns for testes and spheroids. The data indicate that the effectiveness per particle increases as a function of LET and, to a limited extent, Z, at LET values greater than 100 keV/microns. Previously published results for spread Bragg peaks are also summarized, and they suggest that RBE is dependent on both the LET and the Z of the particle.

  3. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, P<0.001) and showed significant suppression of multi-crypt foci (~30-50%, P<0.05-0.001). Omeprazole produced significant dose-response effects on inhibition of multi-crypt foci (≥4). Omeprazole treatment in human colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  4. CD44 and TLR4 mediate hyaluronic acid regulation of Lgr5+ stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal growth in postnatal and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Terrence E; Santhanam, Srikanth; Foster, Lynne; Ciorba, Matthew; Stenson, William F

    2015-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid, a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix, binds to CD44 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We previously addressed the role of hyaluronic acid in small intestinal and colonic growth in mice. We addressed the role of exogenous hyaluronic acid by giving hyaluronic acid intraperitoneally and the role of endogenous hyaluronic acid by giving PEP-1, a peptide that blocks hyaluronic acid binding to its receptors. Exogenous hyaluronic acid increased epithelial proliferation but had no effect on intestinal length. PEP-1 resulted in a shortened small intestine and colon and diminished epithelial proliferation. In the current study, we sought to determine whether the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth were mediated by signaling through CD44 or TLR4 by giving exogenous hyaluronic acid or PEP-1 twice a week from 3-8 wk of age to wild-type, CD44(-/-), and TLR4(-/-) mice. These studies demonstrated that signaling through both CD44 and TLR4 were important in mediating the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth in the small intestine and colon. Extending our studies to early postnatal life, we assessed the effects of exogenous hyaluronic acid and PEP-1 on Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation and crypt fission. Administration of PEP-1 to Lgr5(+) reporter mice from postnatal day 7 to day 14 decreased Lgr5(+) cell proliferation and decreased crypt fission. These studies indicate that endogenous hyaluronic acid increases Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal lengthening and that these effects are dependent on signaling through CD44 and TLR4.

  5. Apoptosis induction in colon cancer cell lines and alteration of aberrant crypt foci in rat colon by purple rice (Oryza sativa L. var. glutinosa) extracts.

    PubMed

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Summart, Ratasak; Chewonarin, Teera

    2014-01-01

    Crude ethanol extracts (CEE) of purple rice was fractionated to obtain hexane soluble (HSF) and ethyl acetate soluble fractions (EASF). Total antioxidant capacity was higher in CEE than the HSF and EASF. However, HSF exhibited strong antiproliferation and apoptosis induction against colon cancer cell lines, both p53 wild-type (RKO) and mutant (SW620) strains. Then, the CEE was used to determine the effects on the progression of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a preneoplastic lesion seen in colon carcinogenesis in rats. Male Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected of 40 mg/kg body weight dimethylhydrazin (DMH) once weekly for 2 wk. After 2 wk, rats were orally administered ethanol extract at 100 and 1000 mg/kg body weight, for 4 wk. Rats fed with only the high dose of CEE had significantly decreased numbers of ACF per rat (45.56%) and crypt multiplicity (AC/focus) (16.67%) compared to rats that received DMH alone. The result also demonstrated that CEE induced apoptosis in colonic epithelium cells of rat received colon carcinogen as detected the increasing of caspase-3 activity. This finding could be concluded that purple rice extracts inhibited aberrant colonic epithelial cell progression via apoptosis induction.

  6. Saireito (TJ-114), a Japanese traditional herbal medicine, reduces 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice by inhibiting cytokine-mediated apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinichi; Hayashi, Shusaku; Kitahara, Yumeno; Nagasawa, Koyo; Aono, Hitomi; Shibata, Junichiro; Utsumi, Daichi; Amagase, Kikuko; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Clinical chemotherapy frequently causes intestinal mucositis as a side effect, which is accompanied by severe diarrhea. We recently showed that the cytokine-mediated apoptotic pathway might be important for the development of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Saireito, the traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo) medicine, is widely used to treat diarrhea and various inflammatory diseases in Japan. In the present study, we investigated the effect of saireito on 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice, especially in relation to apoptosis in the intestinal crypt. Male C57BL/6 mice were given 5-FU (50 mg/kg), i.p. once daily for 6 days. Intestinal mucositis was evaluated histochemically. Saireito (100-1000 mg/kg) was administered p.o. twice daily for 6 days. Repeated 5-FU treatment caused severe intestinal mucositis including morphological damage, which was accompanied by body weight loss and diarrhea. Daily administration of saireito reduced the severity of intestinal mucositis in a dose-dependent manner. Body weight loss and diarrhea during 5-FU treatment were also significantly attenuated by saireito administration. The number of apoptotic and caspase-3-activated cells in the intestinal crypt was increased, and was accompanied by up-regulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β mRNA within 24 h of the first 5-FU injection. However, all of these measures were significantly lower after saireito administration. These results suggest that saireito attenuates 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. This action may come from the reduction of apoptosis in the intestinal crypt via suppression of the up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, saireito may be clinically useful for the prevention of intestinal mucositis during cancer chemotherapy.

  7. Ex vivo culture of intestinal crypt organoids as a model system for assessing cell death induction in intestinal epithelial cells and enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, T; Luks, L; Kostadinova, F; Zimberlin, C; Medema, J P; Leist, M; Brunner, T

    2014-05-15

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) not only have a critical function in the absorption of nutrients, but also act as a physical barrier between our body and the outside world. Damage and death of the epithelial cells lead to the breakdown of this barrier function and inflammation due to access of the immune system to compounds of the intestinal flora. Intestinal epithelial damage is frequently associated with various inflammatory disorders, chemo- and radiotherapy as well as drug-mediated toxicity. Until recently, intestinal epithelial-damaging activities of drugs and treatments could be tested only in vivo in animal models because of the poor survival rate of primary IECs ex vivo. The three-dimensional culture and outgrowth of intestinal crypt stem cells into organoids have offered new possibilities to culture and study IECs ex vivo. Here we demonstrate that intestinal organoids are a useful and physiologically relevant model system to study cell death and survival in IECs. We further describe a number of microscopy-based as well as colorimetric methods to monitor and score survival and death of intestinal organoids. Finally, the comparison of organoids isolated from gene-deficient mice and wild-type mice allows investigating the role of specific genes in the regulation of IEC death. Owing to their comparable structure and behavior, intestinal organoids may serve as an interesting and physiologically relevant surrogate system for large- and mid-scale in vitro testing of intestinal epithelium-damaging drugs and toxins, and for the investigation of cell death pathways.

  8. Use of transgenic mice to map cis-acting elements in the intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene (Fabpi) that control its cell lineage- specific and regional patterns of expression along the duodenal-colonic and crypt-villus axes of the gut epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    to sustain high levels of hGH production after weaning. Nucleotides -277 to -185 contain part of a domain conserved between the three orthologous Fabpi genes (nucleotides -240 to -159), a 24-bp element (nucleotides -212 to -188) that binds nuclear factors present in colonic but not small intestinal epithelial cells, and a portion of a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein footprint (C/EBP alpha, nucleotides - 188 to -167). Removal of nucleotides -277 to -185 (yielding I-FABP-184 to +28/hGH+3) results in inappropriate expression of hGH in proliferating and nonproliferating epithelial cells located in the mid and upper portions of duodenal, jejunal, ileal, and colonic crypts without affecting the "shape" of the cephalocaudal gradient of transgene expression.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1527171

  9. Using crypts as iris minutiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Feng; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2013-05-01

    Iris recognition is one of the most reliable biometric technologies for identity recognition and verification, but it has not been used in a forensic context because the representation and matching of iris features are not straightforward for traditional iris recognition techniques. In this paper we concentrate on the iris crypt as a visible feature used to represent the characteristics of irises in a similar way to fingerprint minutiae. The matching of crypts is based on their appearances and locations. The number of matching crypt pairs found between two irises can be used for identity verification and the convenience of manual inspection makes iris crypts a potential candidate for forensic applications.

  10. Patterns of Proliferative Activity in the Colonic Crypt Determine Crypt Stability and Rates of Somatic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Michor, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cells in the colon are arranged in cylindrical structures called crypts in which cellular proliferation and migration are tightly regulated. We hypothesized that the proliferation patterns of cells may determine the stability of crypts as well as the rates of somatic evolution towards colorectal tumorigenesis. Here, we propose a linear process model of colonic epithelial cells that explicitly takes into account the proliferation kinetics of cells as a function of cell position within the crypt. Our results indicate that proliferation kinetics has significant influence on the speed of cell movement, kinetics of mutation propagation, and sensitivity of the system to selective effects of mutated cells. We found that, of all proliferation curves tested, those with mitotic activities concentrated near the stem cell, including the actual proliferation kinetics determined in in vivo labeling experiments, have a greater ability of delaying the rate of mutation accumulation in colonic stem cells compared to hypothetical proliferation curves with mitotic activities focused near the top of the crypt column. Our model can be used to investigate the dynamics of proliferation and mutation accumulation in spatially arranged tissues. PMID:23785264

  11. The drug monosodium luminol (GVT) preserves crypt-villus epithelial organization and allows survival of intestinal T cells in mice infected with the ts1 retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Virginia L; Yan, Mingshan; Kuang, Xianghong; Kim, Soo-Jin; Wong, Paul K Y

    2009-02-21

    Of the cytopathic retroviruses that affect mammals, including HIV-1, many selectively infect CD4+ T cells and cause immunosuppressive syndromes. These diseases destroy both the thymus and the small and large intestines, after infecting and killing T-lineage cells in both tissues. A mutant of the murine leukemia retrovirus MoMuLV-TB, called ts1, causes this syndrome in susceptible strains of mice. In FVB/N strain mice that are infected at birth, thymic atrophy, CD4+ T cell loss, intestinal collapse, body wasting, and death occur by approximately 30-40 days postinfection (dpi). Apoptosis of ts1-infected T-lineage cells, in the thymus, peripheral lymphoid system and intestines is caused by accumulation of the ts1 mutant viral envelope preprotein gPr80(env), which is inefficiently cleaved into the mature viral proteins gp70 and PrP15E. We show here that ts1 infection in the small intestine is followed by loss of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and cell cycling gradients (along the crypt-villus axes), accumulation of gPr80(env) in intestinal cells, apoptosis of developing T cells in the lamina propria (LP), and intestinal collapse by approximately 30 dpi. In infected mice treated with the antioxidant drug monosodium luminol (GVT), however, normal intestinal epithelial cell gradients are still in place at 30 dpi, and IECs covering both the crypts and villi contain large amounts of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2. In addition, no apoptotic cells are present, and accumulated gpr80(env) is absent from the tissue at this time. We conclude that GVT treatment can make ts1 a noncytopathic virus for intestinal lymphoid cells, as it does for thymocytes [25]. As in the thymus, GVT may protect the intestine by reducing oxidant stress in infected intestinal T cells, perhaps by prevention of gPr80(env) accumulation via Nrf2 upregulation in the IECs. These results identify GVT as a potential therapy for intestinal diseases or inflammatory

  12. Effects of chronic 137Cs ingestion on barrier properties of jejunal epithelium in rats.

    PubMed

    Dublineau, I; Grison, S; Grandcolas, L; Baudelin, C; Paquet, F; Voisin, P; Aigueperse, J; Gourmelon, P

    2007-05-15

    Environmental contamination by 137Cs is of particular public health interest because of the various sources of fallout originating from nuclear weapons, radiological source disruptions, and the Chernobyl disaster. This dispersion may lead to a chronic ecosystem contamination and subsequent ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. The aim of this study was to thus determine the impact of a chronic ingestion of low-dose 137Cs on small intestine functions in rats. The animals received 150 Bq per day in drinking water over 3 mo. At these environmental doses, 137Cs contamination did not modify the crypt and villus architecture. In addition, epithelial integrity was maintained following the chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as demonstrated by histological analyses (no breakdown of the surface mucosa) and electrical transepithelial parameters (no change in potential difference and tissue conductance). Furthermore, cesium contamination seemed to induce contradictory effects on the apoptosis pathway, with an increase in the gene expression of Fas/FasL and a decrease in the apoptotic cell number present in intestinal mucosa. No marked inflammation was observed following chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as indicated by neutrophil infiltration and gene expression of cytokines and chemokines. Results indicated no imbalance in the Th1/Th2 response induced by cesium at low doses. Finally, evaluation of the functionality of the jejunal epithelium in rats contaminated chronically with 137Cs did not demonstrate changes in the maximal response to carbachol, nor in the cholinergic sensitivity of rat jejunal epithelium. In conclusion, this study shows that chronic ingestion of 137Cs over 3 mo at postaccidental doses exerts few biological effects on the epithelium of rat jejunum with regard to morphology, inflammation status, apoptosis/proliferation processes, and secretory functions.

  13. Corrupted colonic crypt fission in carcinogen-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background The colonic crypts in rats reproduce themselves by symmetric fission at the base of the crypts, and proceeding upwards, generate two separate identical crypts. Recently we reported corrupted colonic crypt fission (CCCF) in rats with colonic carcinoma. Here we investigated whether CCCF also occurred in the colonic mucosa without carcinoma in carcinogen-treated rats. Methods Filed Swiss-roll sections from 35 male rats (25 treated with 1,2-dimethyhydrazine (DMH) suspended in EDTA solution, and 10 EDTA-treated) were reviewed. CCCF were regarded those with either asymmetric basal fission, asymmetric lateral sprouting/lateral fission, basal dilatations, or spatial aberrations of the normal (vertical) axis. Results 202 CCCF (38%) were recorded amongst 533 crypts with fission in DMH-treated rats, and only one CCCF (0.1%) was found amongst 571 crypts with fission in EDTA-treated rats (p<0.05). The basal aspect of four adenomas included in Swiss roll sections exhibited CCCF lined either with indigenous (non-dysplastic) epithelium or with dysplastic epithelium. Conclusion It was demonstrated that CCCF without dysplasia develop in carcinogen-treated SD rats. As judged by the figures presented, the possibility that the epithelium in those corrupted crypts was successively replaced by top-down growing dysplastic cells, could not be totally rejected. This is the first report showing that non-dysplastic CCCF may antedate the very early stages of colonic carcinogenesis in SD rats. PMID:28273142

  14. Critical role of microbiota within cecal crypts on the regenerative capacity of the intestinal epithelium following surgical stress.

    PubMed

    Zaborin, Alexander; Krezalek, Monika; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Defazio, Jennifer R; Setia, Namrata; Belogortseva, Natalia; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Guo, Qiti; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2017-02-01

    Cecal crypts represent a unique niche that are normally occupied by the commensal microbiota. Due to their density and close proximity to stem cells, microbiota within cecal crypts may modulate epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that surgical stress, a process that invariably involves a short period of starvation, antibiotic exposure, and tissue injury, results in cecal crypt evacuation of their microbiota. Crypts devoid of their microbiota display pathophysiological features characterized by abnormal stem cell activation as judged by leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) staining, expansion of the proliferative zone toward the tips of the crypts, and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, crypts devoid of their microbiota display loss of their regenerative capacity as assessed by their ability to form organoids ex vivo. When a four-member human pathogen community isolated from the stool of a critically ill patient is introduced into the cecum of mice with empty crypts, crypts become occupied by the pathogens and further disruption of crypt homeostasis is observed. Fecal microbiota transplantation restores the cecal crypts' microbiota, normalizes homeostasis within crypts, and reestablishes crypt regenerative capacity. Taken together, these findings define an emerging role for the microbiota within cecal crypts to maintain epithelial cell homeostasis in a manner that may enhance recovery in response to the physiological stress imposed by the process of surgery.

  15. Memory based active contour algorithm using pixel-level classified images for colon crypt segmentation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Assaf; Rivlin, Ehud; Shimshoni, Ilan; Sabo, Edmond

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method for detection and segmentation of crypts in colon biopsies. Most of the approaches proposed in the literature try to segment the crypts using only the biopsy image without understanding the meaning of each pixel. The proposed method differs in that we segment the crypts using an automatically generated pixel-level classification image of the original biopsy image and handle the artifacts due to the sectioning process and variance in color, shape and size of the crypts. The biopsy image pixels are classified to nuclei, immune system, lumen, cytoplasm, stroma and goblet cells. The crypts are then segmented using a novel active contour approach, where the external force is determined by the semantics of each pixel and the model of the crypt. The active contour is applied for every lumen candidate detected using the pixel-level classification. Finally, a false positive crypt elimination process is performed to remove segmentation errors. This is done by measuring their adherence to the crypt model using the pixel level classification results. The method was tested on 54 biopsy images containing 4944 healthy and 2236 cancerous crypts, resulting in 87% detection of the crypts with 9% of false positive segments (segments that do not represent a crypt). The segmentation accuracy of the true positive segments is 96%.

  16. Preferential Entry of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Hc Domain through Intestinal Crypt Cells and Targeting to Cholinergic Neurons of the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R.

    2012-01-01

    Botulism, characterized by flaccid paralysis, commonly results from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) absorption across the epithelial barrier from the digestive tract and then dissemination through the blood circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve terminals. The trafficking pathway of BoNT/A passage through the intestinal barrier is not yet fully understood. We report that intralumenal administration of purified BoNT/A into mouse ileum segment impaired spontaneous muscle contractions and abolished the smooth muscle contractions evoked by electric field stimulation. Entry of BoNT/A into the mouse upper small intestine was monitored with fluorescent HcA (half C-terminal domain of heavy chain) which interacts with cell surface receptor(s). We show that HcA preferentially recognizes a subset of neuroendocrine intestinal crypt cells, which probably represent the entry site of the toxin through the intestinal barrier, then targets specific neurons in the submucosa and later (90–120 min) in the musculosa. HcA mainly binds to certain cholinergic neurons of both submucosal and myenteric plexuses, but also recognizes, although to a lower extent, other neuronal cells including glutamatergic and serotoninergic neurons in the submucosa. Intestinal cholinergic neuron targeting by HcA could account for the inhibition of intestinal peristaltism and secretion observed in botulism, but the consequences of the targeting to non-cholinergic neurons remains to be determined. PMID:22438808

  17. Somatostatin peptides inhibit basolateral potassium channels in human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Warhurst, G; Butterfield, I; Higgs, N B; Lomax, R B

    1999-11-01

    Somatostatin is a powerful inhibitor of intestinal Cl(-) secretion. We used patch-clamp recording techniques to investigate the effects of somatostatin on low-conductance (23-pS) K(+) channels in the basolateral membrane of human colonic crypts, which are an important component of the Cl(-) secretory process. Somatostatin (2 microM) elicited a >80% decrease in "spontaneous" K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patches in nonstimulated crypts (50% inhibition = approximately 8 min), which was voltage-independent and was prevented by pretreating crypts for 18 h with pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml), implicating a G protein-dependent mechanism. In crypts stimulated with 100-200 microM dibutyryl cAMP, 2 microM somatostatin and its synthetic analog octreotide (2 microM) both produced similar degrees of K(+) channel inhibition to that seen in nonstimulated crypts, which was also present under low-Cl(-) (5 mM) conditions. In addition, 2 microM somatostatin abolished the increase in K(+) channel activity stimulated by 2 microM thapsigargin but had no effect on the thapsigargin-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca(2+). These results indicate that somatostatin peptides inhibit 23-pS basolateral K(+) channels in human colonic crypt cells via a G protein-dependent mechanism, which may result in loss of the channel's inherent Ca(2+) sensitivity.

  18. Individual and combined effects of Fusarium toxins on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in swine jejunal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lam-Yim Murphy; Woo, Chit-Shing Jackson; Turner, Paul C; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan; El-Nezami, Hani

    2013-07-18

    Fusarium toxins have been arousing public interest in recent years because of their potential health hazards for humans and agricultural livestock. It was hypothesized that selected pro-inflammatory cytokines might serve as sensitive biomarkers of the predicted adverse effects of Fusarium toxins on the basis of their potential ability to induce immune and intestinal alterations comparable to those in human chronic inflammatory infection. Consequently, the aim of this study was to elucidate individual and combined effects of four common Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), zearalenone (ZEA) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1α, IL1β, IL6, IL8, TNFα and MCP-1) using a porcine jejunal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. Based on a dose-response relationship between individual mycotoxins and cell viability (MTT assay) that was previously established, cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic concentrations were selected to investigate combinations of two, three and all four of the mycotoxins. In general, up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression occurred for both individual and mixtures of Fusarium toxins at cytotoxic concentrations, whereas significant up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA mostly obtained when the toxins existed in mixtures at non-cytotoxic concentrations and these mixtures were found to cause cytotoxicity from MTT assay determined previously. Therefore, it may be concluded that some of the changes in the mRNA expression of IL1α, IL1β, IL6, IL8, TNFα and MCP-1 could be cytotoxicity-related. It was also noted that additive effects were not always observed for the mixtures. These data suggest that individual or mixtures of Fusarium toxins could cause or exacerbate intestinal inflammation. These also provide a better understanding of the possible effects of Fusarium toxins, alone or in combinations on the immunological defense mechanisms of IECs, which would contribute to the

  19. Morphological study of the regeneration mechanism of acetic acid-injured colon crypts in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Araki, K; Furuya, Y; Matsuoka, T; Mashima, K; Kobayashi, M; Matsuura, K

    2000-01-01

    The regeneration mechanism of injured rat colonic mucosa with 1% acetic acid was certified in this study. The injured colons were studied periodically on experimental days 1, 3, 5, 7, 15, and 20 with light and scanning electron microscopy. Specimens were examined in paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin; crypts were isolated with the HCl digestion method; and three-dimensional stromal collagen tissue was prepared with the NaOH cell maceration method. Damage to the mucosal and submucosal layers peaked between the 1st and 3rd days with edema, regeneration, necrosis, and inflammation. The edema and inflammation subsided, and mucosal atrophy and crypt reduction remained at around 1 week. At 2 weeks the mucosa became thick, and crypts showed many branches in their lower two-thirds; and by 3 weeks the mucosa had recovered to almost normal. The ratio of number of crypts at the base and surface was almost 1.5 on the 15th day and 1.0 on the 20th day, suggesting that each branch progresses upward to create an independent crypt. We believe that the fission mechanism plays an important role in crypt repair after acetic acid injury of the colonic mucosa. As the proliferative zone of the colonic crypt is localized at the crypt base, fission of the crypt starting at the base and progressing up to the surface is the most reasonable and efficient mechanism for repair by increasing the number of crypts.

  20. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids (‘adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids’) are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29–84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n =3) and lung (n =1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed ‘other’ carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular (‘carcinoid pattern’) was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, ‘adenocarcinoma ex

  1. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-10-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids ('adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids') are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29-84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n=3) and lung (n=1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed 'other' carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular ('carcinoid pattern') was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, 'adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid' is

  2. Nanoselenium Supplementation of Heat-Stressed Broilers: Effects on Performance, Carcass Characteristics, Blood Metabolites, Immune Response, Antioxidant Status, and Jejunal Morphology.

    PubMed

    Safdari-Rostamabad, Morteza; Hosseini-Vashan, Seyyed Javad; Perai, Ali Hossein; Sarir, Hadi

    2016-11-22

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary nanoselenium supplementation at 0, 0.6 and 1.2 mg/kg of diet on growth performance, serum biochemical parameters, immune response, antioxidant capacity, and jejunal morphology of 29-d-old male broilers subjected to heat stress at 37 ± 1°C for 14 d. Broilers were fed for 42 d on the experimental diets. The results showed that nanoselenium supplementation had no effect on growth performance, but it supplementation at the rate of 1.2 mg/kg diet decreased the serum concentration of cholesterol prior to the heat exposure. Further, dietary nanoselenium supplementation linearly increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, while linearly decreased those of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and aspartate aminotransferase in the serum before applying heat stress. Compared with thermoneutral temperature, heat stress reduced body mass gain, feed intake, percentages of carcass, breast, leg, abdominal fat, bursa of Fabricius, thymus, antibody response against sheep red blood cells, serum concentration of protein, erythrocyte activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, jejunal villus height, and villus height to crypt depth ratio, while increased feed conversion ratio, percentages of liver, gizzard, pancreas, gallbladder, heart, and the concentrations of aspartate aminotransferase and malondialdehyde. Dietary supplementation of nanoselenium linearly reduced the abdominal fat and liver percentages, while linearly increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and villus height in heat-stressed broilers. Furthermore, the lower level of nanoselenium decreased the percentages of gizzard and heart in broilers under heat stress. The diet supplemented with 1.2 mg/kg nanoselenium improved feed conversion ratio and increased antibody response against sheep red blood cells, activity of superoxide dismutase, and villus height to crypt depth ratio, but decreased the serum

  3. Chemopreventive effect of Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) blume tuber against aberrant crypt foci and cell proliferation in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ansil, Puthuparampil Nazarudeen; Prabha, Santhibhavan Prabhakaran; Nitha, Anand; Latha, Mukalel Sankunni

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death, both in men and women. This study investigated the effects of Amorphophallus campanulatus tuber methanolic extract (ACME) on aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, colonic cell proliferation, lipid peroxidative damage and the antioxidant status in a long term preclinical model of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups, viz., group I rats served as controls; group II rats treated as drug controls receiving 250 mg/ kg body weight of ACME orally; group III rats received DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) subcutaneously once a week for the first 15 weeks; groups IV, V and VI rats received ACME along with DMH during the initiation, post- initiation stages and the entire period of the study, respectively. All the rats were sacrificed at the end of 30 weeks and the intestinal and colonic tissues from different groups were subjected to biochemical and histological studies. Administration of DMH resulted in significant (p ≤ 0.05) intestinal and colonic lipid peroxidation (MDA) and reduction of antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S- transferase and reduced glutathione. Whereas the supplementation of ACME significantly (p ≤ 0.05) improved the intestinal and colonic MDA and reduced glutathione levels and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in DMH intoxicated rats. ACME administration also significantly suppressed the formation and multiplicity of ACF. In addition, the DMH administered rats showed amplified expression of PCNA in the colon and decreased expression of this proliferative marker was clearly noted with initiation, post-initiation and entire period of ACME treatment regimens. These results indicate that ACME could exert a significant chemopreventive effect on colon carcinogenesis induced by DMH.

  4. Analysis of Wnt signalling dynamics during colon crypt development in 3D culture

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Wee; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Burgess, Antony W.

    2015-01-01

    Many systems biology studies lack context-relevant data and as a consequence the predictive capabilities can be limited in developing targeted cancer therapeutics. Production of colon crypt in vitro is ideal for studying colon systems biology. This report presents the first production of, to our knowledge, physiologically-shaped, functional colon crypts in vitro (i.e. single crypts with cells expressing Mucin 2 and Chromogranin A). Time-lapsed monitoring of crypt formation revealed an increased frequency of single-crypt formation in the absence of noggin. Using quantitative 3D immunofluorescence of β-catenin and E-cadherin, spatial-temporal dynamics of these proteins in normal colon crypt cells stimulated with Wnt3A or inhibited by cycloheximide has been measured. Colon adenoma cultures established from APCmin/+ mouse have developmental differences and β-catenin spatial localization compared to normal crypts. Quantitative data describing the effects of signalling pathways and proteins dynamics for both normal and adenomatous colon crypts is now within reach to inform a systems approach to colon crypt biology. PMID:26087250

  5. Delphinidin Reduces Glucose Uptake in Mice Jejunal Tissue and Human Intestinal Cells Lines through FFA1/GPR40.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Teuber, Stefanie; Morera, Francisco J; Ojeda, Camila; Flores, Carlos A; Hidalgo, María A; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos; Burgos, Rafael A

    2017-04-05

    Anthocyanins are pigments with antihyperglycemic properties, and they are potential candidates for developing functional foods for the therapy or prevention of Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The mechanism of these beneficial effects of anthocyanins are, however, hard to explain, given their very low bioavailability due to poor intestinal absorption. We propose that free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also named GPR40), is involved in an inhibitory effect of the anthocyanidin delphinidin over intestinal glucose absorption. We show the direct effects of delphinidin on the intestine using jejunum samples from RF/J mice, and the human intestinal cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, and NCM460. By the use of specific pharmacological antagonists, we determined that delphinidin inhibits glucose absorption in both mouse jejunum and a human enterocytic cell line in a FFA1-dependent manner. Delphinidin also affects the function of sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). Intracellular signaling after FFA1 activation involved cAMP increase and cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations originated from intracellular Ca(2+) stores and were followed by store-operated Ca(2+) entry. Taken together, our results suggest a new GPR-40 mediated local mechanism of action for delphinidin over intestinal cells that may in part explain its antidiabetic effect. These findings are promising for the search for new prevention and pharmacological treatment strategies for DM2 management.

  6. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    PubMed

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  7. Epithelial crypts: A complex and enigmatic olfactory organ in African and South American lungfish (Lepidosireniformes, Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Wittmer, Carolin; Nowack, Christine

    2017-03-23

    African lungfish (Protopterus) seem unique among osteognathostomes in possessing a potential vomeronasal organ homolog in form of accessory epithelial crypts within their nasal cavity. Many details regarding structural and functional properties of these crypts are still unexplored. In this study, we reinvestigate the issue and also present the first data on epithelial crypts in the South American lungfish Lepidosiren paradoxa. The nasal cavities of L. paradoxa and Protopterus annectens were studied using histology, scanning electron microscopy, and alcian blue and PAS staining. In both species, the epithelial crypts consist of a pseudostratified sensory epithelium and a monolayer of elongated glandular cells, in accordance with previously published data on Protopterus. In addition, we found a new second and anatomically distinct type of mucous cell within the duct leading into the crypt. These glandular duct cells are PAS positive, whereas the elongated glandular cells are stainable with alcian blue, suggesting distinct functions of their respective secretions. Furthermore, the two lungfish species show differently structured crypt sensory epithelia and external crypt morphology, with conspicuous bilaterally symmetrical stripes of ciliated cells in L. paradoxa. Taken together, our data suggest that stimulus transport into the crypts involves both ciliary movement and odorant binding mucus.

  8. Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 and fructo-oligosaccharide partially reduce jejunal inflammation in a model of intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cassie L; Geier, Mark S; Yazbeck, Roger; Torres, Diana M; Butler, Ross N; Howarth, Gordon S

    2008-01-01

    Although probiotics are beginning to enter mainstream medicine for disorders of the colon, their effects on the small bowel remain largely unexplored. We investigated the recently identified probiotic, Lactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum) BR11 (BR11) and the prebiotic, fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), both individually and in synbiotic combination, for their potential to alleviate intestinal mucositis. From Days 0-9, rats consumed skim milk (SM; saline + SM), low dose (LD-BR11; 1 x 10(6)cfu/ml), high dose (HD-BR11; 1 x 10(9)cfu/ml), LD-FOS (3%), HD-FOS (6%), or synbiotic (HD-BR11/FOS). On Day 7, rats were injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 150 mg/kg). All rats were sacrificed on Day 10. Intestinal tissues were collected for quantitative histology, sucrase, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) determinations. 5-FU decreased sucrase activity, villus height, crypt depth, and crypt cell proliferation compared to controls. Compared to 5-FU + SM, histological damage severity scores were increased for all treatments, although all were effective at reducing jejunal inflammation, indicated by reduced MPO activity (P < 0.05). The combination of BR11 and FOS did not provide additional protection. Moreover, HD-FOS and the synbiotic actually increased clinical mucositis severity (P < 0.05). We conclude that L. fermentum BR11 has the potential to reduce inflammation of the upper small intestine. However, its combination with FOS does not appear to confer any further therapeutic benefit for the alleviation of mucositis.

  9. Critical role of microbiota within cecal crypts on the regenerative capacity of the intestinal epithelium following surgical stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaborin, Alexander; Krezalek, Monika; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Defazio, Jennifer R.; Setia, Namrata; Belogortseva, Natalia; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Guo, Qiti; Zaborina, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Cecal crypts represent a unique niche that are normally occupied by the commensal microbiota. Due to their density and close proximity to stem cells, microbiota within cecal crypts may modulate epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that surgical stress, a process that invariably involves a short period of starvation, antibiotic exposure, and tissue injury, results in cecal crypt evacuation of their microbiota. Crypts devoid of their microbiota display pathophysiological features characterized by abnormal stem cell activation as judged by leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) staining, expansion of the proliferative zone toward the tips of the crypts, and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, crypts devoid of their microbiota display loss of their regenerative capacity as assessed by their ability to form organoids ex vivo. When a four-member human pathogen community isolated from the stool of a critically ill patient is introduced into the cecum of mice with empty crypts, crypts become occupied by the pathogens and further disruption of crypt homeostasis is observed. Fecal microbiota transplantation restores the cecal crypts’ microbiota, normalizes homeostasis within crypts, and reestablishes crypt regenerative capacity. Taken together, these findings define an emerging role for the microbiota within cecal crypts to maintain epithelial cell homeostasis in a manner that may enhance recovery in response to the physiological stress imposed by the process of surgery. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study provides novel insight into the process by which surgical injury places the intestinal epithelium at risk for colonization by pathogenic microbes and impairment of its regenerative capacity via loss of its microbiota. We show that fecal transplant restores crypt homeostasis in association with repopulation of the microbiota within cecal crypts. PMID:27979825

  10. Experiment K-6-17. Structural changes and cell turnover in the rats small intestine induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity associated with microgravity conditions of space flight as evidenced by negative nitrogen balance and muscle atrophy (Nicogossian and Parker, 1982; Oganov, 1981), as well as inhibited lymphocyte proliferation (Bechler and Cogoli, 1986), would be evident in cells characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. As a model, researchers chose to study the turnover of mucosal cells lining the jejunum of the small intestine, since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Under normal conditions, epithelial cells that line the small intestine are continually produced in the crypts of Lieberkuhn. These cells migrate out of the crypts onto intestinal villi, are progressively pushed up the villus as new crypt cells are formed, and ultimately reach the tip of villi where they are then descquamated. In rats, the entire process, from initial proliferation in crypts to desquamation, takes approximately 2 days (Cairnie et al., 1965; Lipkin, 1973). In this study, researchers determined the mitotic index for mucosal cells lining the proximal, middle, and distal regions of the jejunum in rats from three treatment groups (synchronous control, vivarium control and flight), and measured the depth of the crypts of Lieberkuhn and the length of villi present in each of the three jejunal regions sampled.

  11. Daily variations in colchicine-induced apoptosis in duodenal crypts.

    PubMed

    Norma, V González; Badrán, Amado F; Barbeito, Claudio G

    2005-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death can be induced by several agents, among them colchicine, a microtubule disrupting-drug that affects continuously renewing cell populations, such as the intestinal crypt enterocytes. The objectives of this investigation were (1) to confirm in vivo colchicines-inductive effect and (2) to determine the existence of 24 h variations in the crypt enterocytes apoptotic indices. The study was done on C3H/S male adult mice housed under standardized conditions. Starting at midnight until the end of a circadian period, subgroups of mice were sacrificed after having been injected with colchicine or saline i.p. 4h beforehand. Duodenal samples were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL technique. In order to score the number of apoptosis, the longitudinal sections of the crypts were divided into three regions comprised, respectively, of tiers 1-4, 5-12, and 13-20, proceeding from the bottom to the top of the crypt. Values of each lot were expressed as mean +/- SEM. A highly significant statistical difference in apoptotic indices was found for colchicine-treated animals. The 24 h curve for colchicine-induced apoptosis displayed qualitative and quantitative differences compared to other inducer agents. Highest apoptotic indices were found in the deepest crypt regions. Daily variations were observed in all the crypt sectors of the colchicine-treated animals and in tiers 5-12 of the saline controls. The present work demonstrates that the colchicine cytotoxicity due to its apoptotic-inducing effect depends on the dosing time during the 24 h in this mouse strain.

  12. Calcium transport by rat duodenal villus and crypt basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, J.R.F.; Weiser, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    Rat duodenal cells were isolated sequentially to give fractions enriched for villus and crypt cells. From each of these fractions, basolateral-enriched membrane vesicles were prepared and ATP-dependent calcium uptake was studied. Calcium uptake was sensitive to temperature, was inhibited by vanadate and by A23187, and was lower in vitamin D-deficient animals. In normal animals, (UVCa)-transport was approximately twofold greater in villus-tip than in crypt cell-fraction basolateral membranes though the affinity of the uptake for calcium was similar (K/sub m/ = 0.3 M). In vitamin D-deficient animals, the crypt-to-villus gradient was reduced, and in all fractions, calcium transport was similar to or lower than that in the crypts of normal animals. Six hours after vitamin D-deficient animals were repleted with 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, a significant increase in calcium transport by everted gut sacs was present; however, basolateral calcium transport was significantly increased in only the mid-villus fractions, and no change was seen in the villus-tip fractions. Thus vitamin D appears necessary for the development of increased basolateral membrane calcium pump activity in duodenal villus cells, but not all cells in vitamin D-deficient rats are able to respond to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

  13. Jejunal Epiphany: Diverticulae, Enteroliths and Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rehmani, Babar; Kumar, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple jejunal diverticulae represent a rare entity and are usually asymptomatic. This case report is about one such jejunal diverticulae along with multiple enteroliths and jejunal strictures. All these three different findings in a short segment of jejunum is a very rare finding with all three variants seen in a segment of jejunum. We herein present a case of a 45-year-old male, who presented with vague abdominal pain for one and half years associated with nausea and vomiting and altered bowel habits. Laparotomy revealed multiple large jejunal diverticulae compressing the bowel with multiple enteroliths and two strictures in a short segment of jejunum leading to intestinal obstruction. Patient underwent resection of the involved jejunal segment and then repair by anastomosis. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:28208925

  14. Effect of different levels of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli colonization and jejunal morphology in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Boka, J; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, R

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli count and morphology of jejunal epithelial cells in laying hens. A total of 100 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) of 49 weeks old were randomly distributed among five cage replicates of five birds each. Experimental diets consisted of different levels (0%, 1%, 2% and 3% of diet) of dietary black cumin inclusion. The experimental period lasted for a total of 10 weeks, and egg quality indexes and laying hens' performance were measured as two 35-day trial periods. At the final day, two hens per replicate were slaughtered to investigate the influence of dietary treatments on intestinal E. coli colonization and morphology of jejunal cells. Although dietary black cumin in all supplementation levels decreased (p < 0.05) the enumeration of ileal E. coli, the morphological and histological alterations in small intestine such as enhancement of villus height to crypt depth ratio, increased goblet cell numbers and proliferation of lamina propria lymphatic follicles were observed after dietary supplementation with at least 2% black cumin. Dietary treatments decreased (p < 0.05) the concentration of serum cholesterol and triglycerides and increased (p < 0.05) serum HDL concentration and relative weight of pancreas; however, the egg yolk cholesterol was not influenced by dietary treatments. In addition, dietary supplementation with black cumin improved (p < 0.05) eggshell quality and Haugh unit. The best feed conversion ratio was obtained when diets were supplemented with 2% black cumin. This improvement was due to the increase (p < 0.05) in egg mass and contemporaneous decrease (p < 0.01) in feed consumption. The present results indicated that regardless of supplementation level, dietary inclusion of black cumin decreased E. coli enumeration in ileal digesta and improved serum lipid profile and eggshell quality, whereas the

  15. Iron homeostasis: new tales from the crypt.

    PubMed

    Roy, C N; Enns, C A

    2000-12-15

    The enterocyte is a highly specialized cell of the duodenal epithelium that coordinates iron uptake and transport into the body. Until recently, the molecular mechanisms underlying iron absorption and iron homeostasis have remained a mystery. This review focuses on the proteins and regulatory mechanisms known to be present in the enterocyte precursor cell and in the mature enterocyte. The recent cloning of a basolateral iron transporter and investigations into its regulation provide new insights into possible mechanisms for iron transport and homeostasis. The roles of proteins such as iron regulatory proteins, the hereditary hemochromatosis protein (HFE)-transferrin receptor complex, and hephaestin in regulating this transporter and in regulating iron transport across the intestinal epithelium are discussed. A speculative, but testable, model for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which incorporates the changes in the iron-related proteins associated with the life cycle of the enterocyte as it journeys from the crypt to the tip of the villous is proposed.

  16. Effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed diets with different levels of crude protein.

    PubMed

    Bavarsadi, M; Mahdavi, A H; Ansari-Mahyari, S; Jahanian, E

    2016-06-08

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, serum biochemical parameters, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed on diets with different levels of crude protein (CP). A total of 180 laying hens were subjected into nine dietary treatments with four cages of five birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of CP (85.0, 92.5 and 100% of Hy-Line W36 manual recommendation) and three levels of sanguinarine (0.00, 3.75 and 7.50 mg/kg) as a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of laying hens which fed during a 70-day feeding trial. The in vitro study showed that sanguinarine exhibited sevenfold and threefold decreased antioxidant activities to inhibit 2-2-diphenyl-1-picric hydrazyl free radical as well as ferric ion reducing rather than butylated hydroxyl toluene. Although using the decremental levels of CP caused the increase in heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.01), dietary administration of sanguinarine could suppress the serum cholesterol and malondialdehyde concentrations as well as heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.05). Additionally, decreasing CP content resulted in the decreased percentage of albumin (p < 0.05); however, it had no negative effects on humoral immunity. Nonetheless, feeding of at least 3.75 mg/kg sanguinarine led to the remarkable increases in serum gamma globulin concentration (p < 0.01) and secondary (p < 0.05) antibody titres against sheep red blood cells. Moreover, a decline in dietary CP content led to higher villi height and crypt depth (p < 0.05; p < 0.001) and consequently decreased villi height-to-crypt depth ratio (p < 0.001) than the optimum level (100% CP). In spite of the effects of sanguinarine on the suppression of Escherichia coli and Salmonella counts (p < 0.05), it markedly enhanced villi height-to-crypt depth ratio as well as lamina propria lymphatic follicles extent

  17. Intestinal absorptive capacity, intestinal permeability and jejunal histology in HIV and their relation to diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, J; Bjarnason, I; Somasundaram, S; Macpherson, A; Francis, N; Price, A B; Sharpstone, D; Smithson, J; Menzies, I S; Gazzard, B G

    1995-01-01

    Intestinal function is poorly defined in patients with HIV infection. Absorptive capacity and intestinal permeability were assessed using 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose in 88 HIV infected patients and the findings were correlated with the degree of immunosuppression (CD4 counts), diarrhoea, wasting, intestinal pathogen status, and histomorphometric analysis of jejunal biopsy samples. Malabsorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and D-xylose was prevalent in all groups of patients with AIDS but not in asymptomatic, well patients with HIV. Malabsorption correlated significantly (r = 0.34-0.56, p < 0.005) with the degree of immune suppression and with body mass index. Increased intestinal permeability was found in all subgroups of patients. The changes in absorption-permeability were of comparable severity to those found in patients with untreated coeliac disease. Jejunal histology, however, showed only mild changes in the villus height/crypt depth ratio as compared with subtotal villus atrophy in coeliac disease. Malabsorption and increased intestinal permeability are common in AIDS patients. Malabsorption, which has nutritional implications, relates more to immune suppression than jejunal morphological changes. PMID:8549936

  18. Experimental studies of immunologically mediated enteropathy. Development of cell mediated immunity and intestinal pathology during a graft-versus-host reaction in irradiated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, A M; Felstein, M V; Borland, A; Parrott, D M

    1988-01-01

    The intestinal component of a graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR) provides a useful experimental model to elucidate the pathogenesis of clinical enteropathies which cause villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia and which are associated with a local immune response. One to three days after induction of GvHR in heavily irradiated (CBAxBALB/c)F1 mice, a proliferative form of enteropathy developed. Compared with controls, these mice had increased counts of jejunal intraepithelial lymphocytes and had a four-fold increase in crypt cell production rate as well as an increase in crypt length. These changes were accompanied by a marked enhancement of splenic natural killer cell activity. After day three, the crypt cell production rate fell to zero and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) which could lyse targets of host origin appeared. In parallel, mice with GvHR developed significant villus shortening and their clinical condition deteriorated. Further experiments showed that increased counts of intraepithelial lymphocytes, villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia also occurred in grafts of fetal CBA intestine implanted under the kidney capsule of (CBAxBALB/c)F1 mice with GvHR. As these grafts are syngeneic to the injected CBA spleen cells, they should not be attacked by anti-host cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We suggest that the proliferative and destructive components of enteropathy in GvHR are caused by lymphokines released by an anti-host delayed type hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:3294125

  19. An Atypical Presentation of Sporadic Jejunal Burkitt's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a very aggressive type of B-cell NHL with replication approaching 100%. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is rare. In our case, a 24-year-old male initially presented with symptomatic anemia. He was initially evaluated with colonoscopy and EGD, both of which were unremarkable. A capsule endoscopy was then performed to further evaluate his significant anemia which revealed friable inflamed ulcerated mass in the jejunum. A push enteroscopy was then performed to obtain tissue from the jejunal mass. Biopsy results and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with Burkitt's lymphoma. PET/CT scan revealed only jejunal involvement. Treatment consisted of bowel resection prior to chemotherapy due to concern for perforation with chemotherapy. Patient achieved complete remission after the treatment. PMID:27672459

  20. Modulatory effects of taurine on jejunal contractility.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q Y; Chen, D P; Ye, D M; Diao, Y P; Lin, Y

    2014-12-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is widely distributed in animal tissues and has diverse pharmacological effects. However, the role of taurine in modulating smooth muscle contractility is still controversial. We propose that taurine (5-80 mM) can exert bidirectional modulation on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments. Different low and high contractile states were induced in isolated jejunal segments of rats to observe the effects of taurine and the associated mechanisms. Taurine induced stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments at 3 different low contractile states, and inhibitory effects at 3 different high contractile states. Bidirectional modulation was not observed in the presence of verapamil or tetrodotoxin, suggesting that taurine-induced bidirectional modulation is Ca(2+) dependent and requires the presence of the enteric nervous system. The stimulatory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments was blocked by atropine but not by diphenhydramine or by cimetidine, suggesting that muscarinic-linked activation was involved in the stimulatory effects when isolated jejunal segments were in a low contractile state. The inhibitory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments were blocked by propranolol and L-NG-nitroarginine but not by phentolamine, suggesting that adrenergic β receptors and a nitric oxide relaxing mechanism were involved when isolated jejunal segments were in high contractile states. No bidirectional effects of taurine on myosin phosphorylation were observed. The contractile states of jejunal segments determine taurine-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects, which are associated with muscarinic receptors and adrenergic β receptors, and a nitric oxide associated relaxing mechanism.

  1. Investigating the Relation between Stochastic Differentiation, Homeostasis and Clonal Expansion in Intestinal Crypts via Multiscale Modeling

    PubMed Central

    De Matteis, Giovanni; Antoniotti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal tumors originate and develop within intestinal crypts. Even though some of the essential phenomena that characterize crypt structure and dynamics have been effectively described in the past, the relation between the differentiation process and the overall crypt homeostasis is still only partially understood. We here investigate this relation and other important biological phenomena by introducing a novel multiscale model that combines a morphological description of the crypt with a gene regulation model: the emergent dynamical behavior of the underlying gene regulatory network drives cell growth and differentiation processes, linking the two distinct spatio-temporal levels. The model relies on a few a priori assumptions, yet accounting for several key processes related to crypt functioning, such as: dynamic gene activation patterns, stochastic differentiation, signaling pathways ruling cell adhesion properties, cell displacement, cell growth, mitosis, apoptosis and the presence of biological noise. We show that this modeling approach captures the major dynamical phenomena that characterize the regular physiology of crypts, such as cell sorting, coordinate migration, dynamic turnover, stem cell niche correct positioning and clonal expansion. All in all, the model suggests that the process of stochastic differentiation might be sufficient to drive the crypt to homeostasis, under certain crypt configurations. Besides, our approach allows to make precise quantitative inferences that, when possible, were matched to the current biological knowledge and it permits to investigate the role of gene-level perturbations, with reference to cancer development. We also remark the theoretical framework is general and may be applied to different tissues, organs or organisms. PMID:24869488

  2. The Viral Mimetic Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid Alters the Growth Characteristics of Small Intestinal and Colonic Crypt Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julie M.; Santaolalla, Rebeca; von Furstenberg, Richard J.; Henning, Susan J.; Abreu, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The intestinal epithelium is the first line of defense against enteric pathogens. We investigated the response of small intestinal and colonic crypt cultures to a panel of toll-like receptor ligands to assess the impact of microbial pattern recognition on epithelial growth. Methods Primary murine jejunal enteroids and colonoids were cultured with lipopeptide Pam3CSK4, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) for 4 to 6 days. Surface area, budding and survival were assessed. Proliferation and numbers of lysozyme positive cells were quantified by flow cytometry. Gene expression was assessed by Nanostring and qRT-PCR. Results Exposure to Pam3CSK4 and LPS had minimal impact on either enteroids or colonoids. In contrast, Poly I:C increased the surface area of enteroids, while colonoids demonstrated decreased budding. Survival was decreased by Poly I:C in enteroids but not in colonoids. Both enteroids and colonoids exhibited upregulated gene expression of chemokines, but these were increased in magnitude in enteroids. Decreases in gene expression associated with epithelial differentiation and lysozyme positive cells were more apparent in enteroids than in colonoids. Baseline gene expression between enteroids and colonoids differed markedly in levels of stem cell and inflammatory markers. The changes in morphology induced by Poly I:C were mediated by the toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 1 (Ticam1) in enteroids but not in colonoids. Conclusions Poly I:C alters the molecular program of epithelial cells and shifts from absorption and digestion towards defense and inflammation. Diversity of responses to microbial patterns in enteroids and colonoids may underlie differences in susceptibility to infection along the intestinal tract. PMID:26414184

  3. Separate effects of irradiation and of graft-versus-host reaction on rat mucosal mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, A G; Munro, G H; Huntley, J F; Miller, H R; Ferguson, A

    1989-01-01

    T cell mediated immune responses in the gut can produce enteropathy and malabsorption. We have investigated the relevance of mucosal mast cells (MMC) to the mechanisms of this enteropathy by using graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR) in the rat as a model of mucosal delayed type hypersensitivity. Measurements of mucosal architecture, intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) and MMC counts were performed in control and experimental rats, and release of rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII) into the bloodstream was used as an index of MMC activation. In unirradiated rats, jejunal MMC count was increased on day 14 of the GvHR (mean 272/mm2 v 182 in controls, p less than 0.01), as was serum RMCPII (p less than 0.01). Irradiated rats (4.5 Gy, reconstituted with isogeneic spleen cells) had low counts of IEL and crypt hyperplasia seven to 14 days after irradiation. Irradiated rats with GvHR (induced by ip injection of parental strain spleen cells) and studied on days 7, 10 and 14, had significant enteropathy with longer crypts and higher CCPR than matched irradiated animals (p less than 0.05 on day 14 when compared with irradiation alone). Intraepithelial lymphocytes counts, however, reflected only the effect of radiation. Irradiation, with or without GvHR, led to the virtual disappearance of jejunal MMC, undetectable jejunal RMCPII and very low levels of RMCPII in serum (all p less than 0.01 when compared with unirradiated controls). These experiments show that there is a modest expansion in jejunal MMC in unirradiated rats with semiallogeneic GvHR, whereas irradiation, alone or associated with GvHR, profoundly depletes MMC for at least two weeks. The enteropathy of GvHR can evolve in the virtual absence of MMC. PMID:2707634

  4. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    PubMed Central

    Rayyan, Esa; Polito, Sarah; Leung, Lana; Bhakta, Ashesh; Kang, Jonathan; Willey, Justin; Mansour, Wasim; Drumm, Mitchell L; Al-Nakkash, Layla

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride channel. The third most common CFTR mutation seen clinically is R117H. Genistein, a naturally occurring phytoestrogen, is known to stimulate CFTR function in vitro. We aimed to determine whether route of administration of genistein could mediate differential effects in R117H male and female CF mice. Mice were fed (4 weeks) or injected subcutaneously (1 week) with the following: genistein 600 mg/kg diet (600Gd); genistein-free diet (0Gd); genistein injection 600 mg/kg body weight (600Gi); dimethyl sulfoxide control (0Gi). In male R117H mice fed 600Gd, basal short circuit current (Isc) was unchanged. In 600Gd-fed female mice, there was a subgroup that demonstrated a significant increase in basal Isc (53.14±7.92 μA/cm2, n=6, P<0.05) and a subgroup of nonresponders (12.05±6.59 μA/cm2, n=4), compared to 0Gd controls (29.3±6.5 μA/cm2, n=7). In R117H mice injected with 600Gi, basal Isc was unchanged in both male and female mice compared to 0Gi controls. Isc was measured in response to the following: the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μM, bilateral), bumetanide (100 μM, basolateral) to indicate the Cl− secretory component, and acetazolamide (100 μM, bilateral) to indicate the HCO3− secretory component; however, there was no effect of genistein (diet or injection) on any of these parameters. Jejunal morphology (ie, villi length, number of goblet cells per villus, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells per crypt) in R117H mice suggested no genistein-mediated difference among the groups. Serum levels of genistein were significantly elevated, compared to respective controls, by either 600Gd (equally elevated in males and females) or 600Gi (elevated more in females versus males). These data suggest a sex-dependent increase in basal Isc of R117H mice and that the increase is also specific for route of

  5. Actinomyces denticolens colonisation identified in equine tonsillar crypts

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, S.; Otaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Higuchi, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Torii, Y.; Yokoyama, E.; Azuma, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, submandibular abscesses associated with Actinomyces denticolens have been reported in horses. The actinomycotic clumps have been observed in the tonsillar crypts. The aim of this study was to demonstrate colonisation of A denticolens in equine tonsils. Twelve equine tonsils obtained from a slaughterhouse were divided into two parts for histopathological examination and for isolation of A denticolens. When actinomycotic clumps were found in these tonsillar crypts, immunohistochemistry using hyperimmune serum against A denticolens (DMS 20671) was performed on the serial sections. To determine whether Actinomyces-like bacteria isolated using immunoantigenic separation technique were A denticolens, the isolates were analysed for the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Actinomycotic clumps were found in the tonsillar crypts of 11 (91.7 per cent) horses. The clumps were of the saprophytic type accompanied with the feedstuffs, but a few clumps were surrounded by inflammatory cells. A denticolens antigens were immunodetected not only in the clumps of 11 (100 per cent) tonsils, but also in the tonsillar parenchyma. Six isolates obtained from four tonsils showed 99.7–99.9 per cent similarity to A denticolens in the 16S rRNA gene sequence. In horses, the colonisation sites of A denticolens are the tonsils, thus the authors suggest that the tonsils provide the intrinsic infection site for A denticolens. PMID:27651913

  6. Perforation of jejunal diverticulum with ectopic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shintani, Yukako; Murono, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Perforation of jejunal diverticulum is a rare complication. Here, we report a case of jejunal diverticulum penetration with surrounding ectopic pancreas. An 83-year-old female patient was admitted to our department with acute onset of severe abdominal pain lasting for half a day. Abdominal computed tomography showed outpouching of the small intestine that contained air/fluid, with multiple surrounding air bubbles in the mesentery of the small intestine. She was diagnosed with penetration of the small intestine, and an emergency laparotomy was indicated. The penetrated jejunal diverticulum was identified ~20-cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed, and her postoperative course was uneventful. The pathological findings confirmed diverticulum penetration into the mesentery and severe inflammation at the site, with surrounding ectopic pancreas. Furthermore, the pancreatic ducts were opened through the penetrated diverticulum. This rare case shows that the ectopic pancreas might have caused penetration of jejunal diverticulum owing to the pancreatic duct opening through the diverticulum.

  7. Primarily Proximal Jejunal Stone Causing Enterolith Ileus in a Patient without Evidence of Cholecystoenteric Fistula or Jejunal Diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Mneimneh, Mostapha; Hammoud, Mazen M.; Zaaroura, Ahmed; Papas, Yasmina S.

    2016-01-01

    Stone formation within the intestinal lumen is called enterolith. This stone can encroach into the lumen causing obstruction and surgical emergency. Jejunal obstruction by an enterolith is a very rare entity and often missed preoperatively. To our knowledge, most cases of jejunal obstruction, secondary to stone, were associated with biliary disease (cholecystoenteric fistula), bezoar, jejunal diverticulosis, or foreign body. Hereby we present a rare case report of small bowel obstruction in an elderly man who was diagnosed lately to have primary proximal jejunal obstruction by an enterolith without evidence of a cholecystoenteric fistula or jejunal diverticulosis. This patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with stone extraction, and subsequent primary repair of the bowel. PMID:27803836

  8. Primarily Proximal Jejunal Stone Causing Enterolith Ileus in a Patient without Evidence of Cholecystoenteric Fistula or Jejunal Diverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Abtar, Houssam Khodor; Mneimneh, Mostapha; Hammoud, Mazen M; Zaaroura, Ahmed; Papas, Yasmina S

    2016-01-01

    Stone formation within the intestinal lumen is called enterolith. This stone can encroach into the lumen causing obstruction and surgical emergency. Jejunal obstruction by an enterolith is a very rare entity and often missed preoperatively. To our knowledge, most cases of jejunal obstruction, secondary to stone, were associated with biliary disease (cholecystoenteric fistula), bezoar, jejunal diverticulosis, or foreign body. Hereby we present a rare case report of small bowel obstruction in an elderly man who was diagnosed lately to have primary proximal jejunal obstruction by an enterolith without evidence of a cholecystoenteric fistula or jejunal diverticulosis. This patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with stone extraction, and subsequent primary repair of the bowel.

  9. Probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum modulates the formation of aberrant crypt foci, mucin-depleted foci, and cell proliferation on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Kansal, Vinod K; Kruzliak, Peter; Kumari, Archana

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) are pre-neoplastic lesions identified in the colon of carcinogen-treated rodents and in humans at high risk for colon cancer. The present study was carried out to divulge the protective potential of the probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LaVK2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BbVK3 alone or in combination with piroxicam (PXC) on the development of early biomarkers of colorectal carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats administered 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). DMH was injected subcutaneously at the rate of 40 mg/kg body weight per animal twice a week for 2 weeks. A total of 120 male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to five groups, each group having 24 animals. The rats were fed with buffalo milk or probiotic supplement (20 grams) alone or as an adjunct with PXC in addition to a basal diet ad libitum for 32 weeks. Group I was offered buffalo milk (BM) and served as the control group. Group II was administered DMH along with BM and served as the DMH-control group; group III was administered BM-DMH-PXC, in which besides administering BM-DMH, PXC was also offered. Group IV was offered probiotic LaBb Dahi and DMH, and group V was offered both probiotic LaBb Dahi and PXC along with DMH. The rats were euthanized at the 8(th), 16(th), and 32(nd) week of the experiment and examined for development of ACF, aberrant crypts per ACF (AC/ACF), mucin-depleted foci (MDF), large MDF, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling index. Administration of DMH in rats induced pre-neoplastic lesions (ACF and MDF) and increased the PCNA index in colorectal tissue. A significant (p<0.05) reduction in the number of ACF, AC/ACF, MDF, large MDF, and PCNA labeling index were observed in the probiotic LaBb Dahi group compared with the DMH control group. Feeding rats with LaBb Dahi or treatment with PXC diminished the initiation and progression of DMH-induced pre-neoplastic lesions and the PCNA index, and treatment with

  10. Instabilities of Monolayered Epithelia: Shape and Structure of Villi and Crypts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannezo, E.; Prost, J.; Joanny, J.-F.

    2011-08-01

    We study theoretically the shapes of a dividing epithelial monolayer of cells lying on top of an elastic stroma. The negative tension created by cell division provokes a buckling instability at a finite wave vector leading to the formation of periodic arrays of villi and crypts. The instability is similar to the buckling of a metallic plate under compression. We use the results to rationalize the various structures of the intestinal lining observed in vivo. Taking into account the coupling between cell division and local curvature, we obtain different patterns of villi and crypts, which could explain the different morphologies of the small intestine and the colon.

  11. Differences in transcriptomic profile and IgA repertoire between jejunal and ileal Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Levast, Benoît; De Monte, Michèle; Melo, Sandrine; Chevaleyre, Claire; Berri, Mustapha; Salmon, Henri; Meurens, François

    2010-02-01

    In many species such as sheep and pig, there are two types of Peyer's patches (PP): several discrete patches in the jejunum and a long and continuous patch in the ileum. Most of the immunoglobulin A in the gut is generated by B-cells in the PP germinal centers. Moreover, swine like ovine ileal PP might be important for antigen independent B-cell repertoire diversification. We examined, by quantitative real-time PCR, the expression of 36 transcripts of antimicrobial peptides, chemokines, interleukines, Toll-like receptors and transcription factors from both PP and we highlighted the differences by a principal component analysis. Ileal PP was characterized by a higher mRNA expression of CCL28, IL5, IL10, TLR2 and TLR4 while jejunal PP showed higher mRNA expression of antimicrobial peptides, CCL25, FOXP3, IL4, T-Bet, TSLP and SOCS2. Then, we analyzed some VDJ rearrangements to assess immunoglobulin repertoire diversity in jejunal and ileal PP from weaned piglets. The IgA and IgM repertoires were more diverse in ileal than in jejunal piglet PP. All these results could be related to the rarefaction of interfollicular T-cell zone and the presence in ileal versus jejunal lumen of a more diversified microflora. These findings shed a light on the functional differences between both PP.

  12. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  13. Rapid tissue engineering of biomimetic human corneal limbal crypts with 3D niche architecture.

    PubMed

    Levis, Hannah J; Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc A; Kaasi, Andreas; Daniels, Julie T

    2013-11-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of the human corneal epithelium and these cells reside in a specialised stem cell niche. They are located at the base of limbal crypts, in a physically protected microenvironment in close proximity to a variety of neighbouring niche cells. Design and recreation of elements of various stem cell niches have allowed researchers to simplify aspects of these complex microenvironments for further study in vitro. We have developed a method to rapidly and reproducibly create bioengineered limbal crypts (BLCs) in a collagen construct using a simple one-step method. Liquid is removed from collagen hydrogels using hydrophilic porous absorbers (HPAs) that have custom moulded micro-ridges on the base. The resulting topography on the surface of the thin collagen constructs resembles the dimensions of the stromal crypts of the human limbus. Human limbal epithelial cells seeded onto the surface of the constructs populate these BLCs and form numerous layers with a high proportion of the cells lining the crypts expressing putative stem cell marker, p63α. The HPAs are produced using a moulding process that is flexible and can be adapted depending on the requirements of the end user. Creation of defined topographical features using this process could be applicable to numerous tissue-engineering applications where varied 3-dimensional niche architectures are required.

  14. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  15. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine.

  16. The chemopotential effect of Annona muricata leaves against azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats and the apoptotic effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 cells: a bioassay-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  17. The Chemopotential Effect of Annona muricata Leaves against Azoxymethane-Induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci in Rats and the Apoptotic Effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 Cells: A Bioassay-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  18. Diosgenin, a steroid saponin of Trigonella foenum graecum (Fenugreek), inhibits azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci formation in F344 rats and induces apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raju, Jayadev; Patlolla, Jagan M R; Swamy, Malisetty V; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2004-08-01

    Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek) is traditionally used to treat disorders such as diabetes, high cholesterol, wounds, inflammation, and gastrointestinal ailments. Recent studies suggest that fenugreek and its active constituents may possess anticarcinogenic potential. We evaluated the preventive efficacy of dietary fenugreek seed and its major steroidal saponin constituent, diosgenin, on azoxymethane-induced rat colon carcinogenesis during initiation and promotion stages. Preneoplastic colonic lesions or aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were chosen as end points. In addition, we assessed the mechanism of tumor growth inhibition of diosgenin in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. To evaluate the effect of the test agent during the initiation and postinitiation stages, 7-week-old male F344 rats were fed experimental diets containing 0% or 1% fenugreek seed powder (FSP) or 0.05% or 0.1% diosgenin for 1 week and were injected with azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight). Effects during the promotional stage were studied by feeding 1% FSP or 0.1% diosgenin 4 weeks after the azoxymethane injections. Rats were sacrificed 8 weeks after azoxymethane injection, and their colons were evaluated for ACF. We found that, by comparison with control, continuous feeding of 1% FSP and 0.05% and 0.1% diosgenin suppressed total colonic ACF up to 32%, 24%, and 42%, respectively (P < or = 0.001 to 0.0001). Dietary FSP at 1% and diosgenin at 0.1% fed only during the promotional stage also inhibited total ACF up to 33% (P < or = 0.001) and 39% (P < or = 0.0001), respectively. Importantly, continuous feeding of 1% FSP or 0.05% or 0.1% diosgenin reduced the number of multicrypt foci by 38%, 20%, and 36% by comparison with the control assay (P < or = 0.001). In addition, 1% FSP or 0.1% diosgenin fed during the promotional stage caused a significant reduction (P < or = 0.001) of multicrypt foci compared with control. Dietary diosgenin at 0.1% and 0.05% inhibited total colonic ACF and multicrypt foci

  19. Apoptosis of ileal crypt epithelia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Andreas; Russo, Alexandra; Lux, Steffi; Waiz, Lioudmila; Seidmann, Larissa; Faber, Jörg; Kirkpatrick, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Intestinal crypt cell apoptosis may occur after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without clinically overt graft-versus-host disease. We describe this phenomenon in a case of a 12-year-old girl who had segments of the ileum resected because of a relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnostic difficulties are discussed. PMID:25984309

  20. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M A; Mancini Filho, J; Lajolo, F M

    1984-02-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed.

  1. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Mancini Filho, J.; Lajolo, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6696828

  2. Investigation of computer-aided colonic crypt pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xin; Pan, Yinsheng; Sivak, Michael V., Jr.; Olowe, Kayode; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Approximately 50% of these deaths could be prevented by earlier detection through screening. Magnification chromoendoscopy is a technique which utilizes tissue stains applied to the gastrointestinal mucosa and high-magnification endoscopy to better visualize and characterize lesions. Prior studies have shown that shapes of colonic crypts change with disease and show characteristic patterns. Current methods for assessing colonic crypt patterns are somewhat subjective and not standardized. Computerized algorithms could be used to standardize colonic crypt pattern assessment. We have imaged resected colonic mucosa in vitro (N = 70) using methylene blue dye and a surgical microscope to approximately simulate in vivo imaging with magnification chromoendoscopy. We have developed a method of computerized processing to analyze the crypt patterns in the images. The quantitative image analysis consists of three steps. First, the crypts within the region of interest of colonic tissue are semi-automatically segmented using watershed morphological processing. Second, crypt size and shape parameters are extracted from the segmented crypts. Third, each sample is assigned to a category according to the Kudo criteria. The computerized classification is validated by comparison with human classification using the Kudo classification criteria. The computerized colonic crypt pattern analysis algorithm will enable a study of in vivo magnification chromoendoscopy of colonic crypt pattern correlated with risk of colorectal cancer. This study will assess the feasibility of screening and surveillance of the colon using magnification chromoendoscopy.

  3. Foci of aberrant crypts in the colons of mice and rats exposed to carcinogens associated with foods

    SciTech Connect

    Tudek, B.; Bird, R.P.; Bruce, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci can be identified in the colons of rodents treated 3 wk earlier with azoxymethane, a known colon carcinogen. These crypts can easily be visualized in the unsectioned methylene blue-stained colons under light microscopy, where they are distinguished by their increased size, more prominent epithelial cells, and pericryptal space. They occur as single aberrant crypts or as two, three, or four aberrant crypts in a cluster. We compared the reported ability of carcinogens associated with the human diet to induce colon cancer with the measured rate of induction of aberrant crypts in female CF1 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. The carcinogens used were 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, methyl nitrosourea, N-nitrosodimethylamine, benzo(a)pyrene, aflatoxin B1, 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido(1,2-alpha:3',2'-d)imidazole, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-P)quinoline, 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-P)quinoline, and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-b)indole. Graded doses of these compounds were given to the animals by gavage twice with a 4-day interval, and the animals were terminated 3 wk later. All colon carcinogens induced aberrant crypts in a dose-related fashion. N-Nitrosodimethylamine and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-b)indole, carcinogenic compounds that do not induce colon cancer, did not induce them. The ability of the studied compounds to induce aberrant crypts was species specific; e.g., aflatoxin B1 and 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-P)quinoline induce about 20 times more in rats than mice. This relationship was consistent with their reported ability to induce colon cancer in these species. Results of the present study support the use of the aberrant crypt assays to screen colon-specific carcinogens and to study the process of colon carcinogenesis.

  4. Direct inhibitory effect of nicardipine on basolateral K+ channels in human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Butterfield, I; Higgs, N B; Warhurst, G

    1999-03-01

    The most abundant basolateral K+ channels in human colonic crypt cells have a low conductance (23 pS), respond to increases in intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP, and have been implicated in intestinal electrogenic Cl- secretion. The effect of nicardipine on the activity of these K+ channels was examined by patch-clamp recording in the cell-attached and excised inside-out configurations from the basolateral membrane of single crypts isolated from biopsied samples of human distal colon. During cell-attached recordings, addition of 2 micromol/l nicardipine to crypts pretreated with 200 micromol/l dibutyryl cAMP decreased single-channel open probability by 87%, but in parallel studies nicardipine had no effect on the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Using inside-out patches from crypts pretreated with dibutyryl cAMP (bathed in 1.2 mmol/l Ca2+), the addition of increasing concentrations of nicardipine (200 nmol/l, 2 micromol/l and 20 micromol/l) decreased single-channel open probability in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 0.47 micromol/l). In additional experiments using stripped rat distal colonic mucosa mounted in conventional Ussing chambers, serosal addition of nicardipine at increasing concentrations (ranging from 200 nmol/l to 20 micromol/l) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of dibutyryl-cAMP-stimulated electrogenic Cl- secretion (IC50 2 micromol/l). Taken together, these results indicate that nicardipine has a direct inhibitory action on 23-pS basolateral K+ channels in human intestinal crypt cells, which is likely to decrease cAMP-stimulated electrogenic Cl- secretion. These basolateral K+ channels may provide a focal point for the development of new strategies in the treatment of secretory diarrhoeal diseases.

  5. Delayed jejunal perforation after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Ikennah L.; Dixon, Elijah

    2016-01-01

    Bowel perforation is a rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which if left undiagnosed can have fatal consequences. In addition, isolated small bowel perforation is extremely rare and should be considered in patients presenting with sudden onset abdominal pain in the postoperative period. A 57-year-old male with symptomatic gallstones underwent urgent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and was discharged home on postoperative day (POD) 1 without complications. He presented to the emergency department on POD 11 complaining of sudden onset abdominal pain. A CT scan did not confirm a diagnosis and he was admitted for observation. On post admission day 2, he became significantly peritonitic and laparotomy revealed jejunal perforation. Bowel resection with hand-sewn anastomosis was completed and he was discharged on POD 10. Follow-up at 6 weeks revealed no further issues. We review the literature on small bowel perforation post laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:26908534

  6. One-hit effects in cancer: Altered proteome of morphologically normal colon crypts in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Anthony T.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Li, Xin-Ming; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Coudry, Renata A.; Cooper, Harry S.; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Boman, Bruce M.; Zhang, Tao; Litwin, Samuel; Ross, Eric A.; Conrad, Peggy; Crowell, James A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Knudson, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    We studied patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), because they are virtually certain to develop colon cancer, and because much is known about the causative APC gene. We hypothesized that the inherited heterozygous mutation itself leads to changes in the proteome of morphologically normal crypts and the proteins that changed may represent targets for preventive and therapeutic agents. We determined the differential protein expression of morphologically normal colon crypts of FAP patients versus those of individuals without the mutation, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and validation by 2D gel Western blotting. Approximately 13% of 1,695 identified proteins were abnormally expressed in the morphologically normal crypts of APC mutation carriers, indicating that a colon crypt cell under the one-hit state is already abnormal. Many of the expression changes affect pathways consistent with the function of the APC protein, including apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell motility, cytoskeletal organization and biogenesis, mitosis, transcription and oxidative stress response. Thus, heterozygosity for a mutant APC tumor suppressor gene alters the proteome of normal-appearing crypt cells in a gene-specific manner, consistent with a detectable one-hit event. These changes may represent the earliest biomarkers of colorectal cancer development, potentially leading to the identification of molecular targets for cancer prevention. PMID:18794146

  7. A Crypt-Specific Core Microbiota Resides in the Mouse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Pédron, Thierry; Mulet, Céline; Dauga, Catherine; Frangeul, Lionel; Chervaux, Christian; Grompone, Gianfranco; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to explore the microbial content of functionally critical niches of the mouse gastrointestinal tract, we targeted molecular microbial diagnostics of the crypts that contain the intestinal stem cells, which account for epithelial regeneration. As current evidence indicates, the gut microbiota affects epithelial regeneration; bacteria that are likely to primarily participate in this essential step of the gut, microbiota cross talk, have been identified. We show in this article that only the cecal and colonic crypts harbor resident microbiota in the mouse and that regardless of the line and breeding origin of these mice, this bacterial population is unexpectedly dominated by aerobic genera. Interestingly, this microbiota resembles the restricted microbiota found in the midgut of invertebrates; thus, the presence of our so-called “crypt-specific core microbiota” (CSCM) in the mouse colon potentially reflects a coevolutionary process under selective conditions that can now be addressed. We suggest that CSCM could play both a protective and a homeostatic role within the colon. This article is setting the bases for such studies, particularly by providing a bona fide—and essentially cultivable—crypt microbiota of reference. PMID:22617141

  8. Free jejunal flaps can be monitored by use of microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Hanne Birke

    2008-08-01

    When new combinations of preoperative treatments of carcinoma of the esophagus are implemented, surgical morbidity and mortality become even more important risk factors. This study investigated whether the risk of postoperative complications caused by ischemia in the reconstructed esophagus can be reduced using microdialysis as monitoring method. This is a retrospective study of 14 patients undergoing resection of carcinoma in the upper part of the esophagus and reconstruction with a free jejunal flap. The metabolism in all 14 jejunal transfers was monitored by use of microdialysis. The data were analyzed looking for reliable parameters detecting critical ischemia. Critical ischemia was suspected in two cases. Both of these cases were surgically revised, ischemia in the jejunal flap was verified, and the jejunal flaps were revascularized. All 14 jejunal flaps survived. Using the concentration of glucose in the microdialysate, it was possible to detect the two cases of critical ischemia. Yet, the most reliable parameter seemed to be the retrospectively calculated lactate:glucose ratio; in both the ischemic flaps, the lactate:glucose ratio exceeded more than 1000% the maximum values found in all the nonischemic flaps. Microdialysis is a promising monitoring method for surveillance of free jejunal flaps.

  9. The molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Heng; Jiang, Min; Peng, Xi; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; He, Min; Zuo, Zhicai; Ouyang, Ping; Fan, Junde; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has potent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and other adverse effects in human and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum of broilers. Broilers, as experimental animals, were fed 0.6 mg/kg AFB1 diet for 3 weeks. Our results showed that AFB1 reduced the jejunal villus height, villus height/crypt ratio and caused G2/M cell cycle arrest. The G2/M cell cycle was accompanied by the increase of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Chk2, p21 protein and mRNA expression, and the decrease of Mdm2, cdc25C, cdc2, cyclin B and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and mRNA expression. In conclusion, AFB1 blocked G2/M cell cycle by ATM pathway in the jejunum of broilers. PMID:27232757

  10. Perforated jejunal diverticulum: a rare case of acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Cheung, Cherry X.; Hills, Tristram; Waris, Aqueel; Healy, Donagh; Khan, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Jejunal pseudo-diverticulosis is a rare acquired herniation of the mucosa and submucosa through weakened areas of the muscularis mucosa of the mesenteric aspect of the bowel. They are asymptomatic in the majority of cases; however, they can present with a wide spectrum of non-specific symptoms such as chronic abdominal discomfort, postprandial flatulence, diarrhoea, malabsorption and steattorhoea. In up to 15% of cases, more serious acute complications may arise such as the development of intestinal obstruction, haemorrhage or as in our case, localized peritonitis secondary to perforation. Perforation carries an overall mortality rate of up to 40% and exploratory laparotomy followed by copious lavage with segmental resection and primary anastomosis remains the mainstay of managing such sequalae of jejunal pseudo-diverticulosis. Our case report highlights the importance of maintaining a high clinical suspicion of a perforated jejunal diverticulum in an elderly patient presenting with an acute abdomen. PMID:27765806

  11. Symbolic dynamics of jejunal motility in the irritable bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wackerbauer, Renate; Schmidt, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Different studies of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by conventional analysis of jejunal motility report conflicting results. Therefore, our aim is to quantify the jejunal contraction activity by symbolic dynamics in order to discriminate between IBS and control subjects. Contraction amplitudes during fasting motility (phase II) are analyzed for 30 IBS and 30 healthy subjects. On the basis of a particular scale-independent discretization of the contraction amplitudes with respect to the median, IBS patients are characterized by increased block entropy as well as increased mean contraction amplitude. In a further more elementary level of analysis these differences can be reduced to specific contraction patterns within the time series, namely the fact that successive large contraction amplitudes are less ordered in IBS than in controls. These significant differences in jejunal motility may point to an altered control of the gut in IBS, although further studies on a representative number of patients have to be done for a validation of these findings.

  12. Application of three-dimensional imaging to the intestinal crypt organoids and biopsied intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Tsai, Ya-Hui; Liu, Yuan-An; Lee, Shih-Hua; Tseng, Sheng-Hong; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) histopathology is the standard analytical method for intestinal biopsied tissues; however, the role of 3-dimensional (3D) imaging system in the analysis of the intestinal tissues is unclear. The 3D structure of the crypt organoids from the intestinal stem cell culture and intestinal tissues from the donors and recipients after intestinal transplantation was observed using a 3D imaging system and compared with 2D histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The crypt organoids and intestinal tissues showed well-defined 3D structures. The 3D images of the intestinal tissues with acute rejection revealed absence of villi and few crypts, which were consistent with the histopathological features. In the intestinal transplant for megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, the donor's intestinal tissues had well-developed nerve networks and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the muscle layer, while the recipient's intestinal tissues had distorted nerve network and the ICCs were few and sparsely distributed, relative to those of the donor. The 3D images showed a clear spatial relationship between the microstructures of the small bowel and the features of graft rejection. In conclusion, integration of the 3D imaging and 2D histopathology provided a global view of the intestinal tissues from the transplant patients.

  13. Combined changes in Wnt signaling response and contact inhibition induce altered proliferation in radiation-treated intestinal crypts

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, S.-J.; Osborne, J. M.; Appleton, P. L.; Näthke, I.

    2016-01-01

    Curative intervention is possible if colorectal cancer is identified early, underscoring the need to detect the earliest stages of malignant transformation. A candidate biomarker is the expanded proliferative zone observed in crypts before adenoma formation, also found in irradiated crypts. However, the underlying driving mechanism for this is not known. Wnt signaling is a key regulator of proliferation, and elevated Wnt signaling is implicated in cancer. Nonetheless, how cells differentiate Wnt signals of varying strengths is not understood. We use computational modeling to compare alternative hypotheses about how Wnt signaling and contact inhibition affect proliferation. Direct comparison of simulations with published experimental data revealed that the model that best reproduces proliferation patterns in normal crypts stipulates that proliferative fate and cell cycle duration are set by the Wnt stimulus experienced at birth. The model also showed that the broadened proliferation zone induced by tumorigenic radiation can be attributed to cells responding to lower Wnt concentrations and dividing at smaller volumes. Application of the model to data from irradiated crypts after an extended recovery period permitted deductions about the extent of the initial insult. Application of computational modeling to experimental data revealed how mechanisms that control cell dynamics are altered at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:27053661

  14. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal UR Rehman

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia. PMID:26500958

  15. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanjeev B; Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal Ur Rehman

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia.

  16. In vitro model of intestinal crypt abscess. A novel neutrophil-derived secretagogue activity.

    PubMed Central

    Nash, S; Parkos, C; Nusrat, A; Delp, C; Madara, J L

    1991-01-01

    In order to model crypt abscesses, a histological finding which correlates with disease activity in intestinal inflammation, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were layered onto monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84, a crypt-like epithelium which is capable of Cl- secretion. Such PMN-epithelial interaction had no substantial effect on monolayer integrity or function. However, when PMN were stimulated by conditions including those present naturally in the human colonic lumen, monolayers responded with a bumetanide-sensitive short circuit current (Isc) indicative of Cl- secretion, the basis of secretory diarrhea. This Isc response was induced by a neutrophil-derived secretagogue (NDS), which was only active when applied to the luminal surface of monolayers and did not require PMN-epithelial contact. NDS activity is resistant to boiling, acid, and trypsin and passes a 500 nominal mol wt cutoff filter. NDS activity is not secondary to the respiratory burst products O2- or H2O2 and does not appear to be a myeloperoxidase product. We speculate NDS elicited Cl- secretion may contribute to the secretory diarrhea seen in patients with intestinal inflammation and crypt abscesses. PMID:2010557

  17. Aberrant crypt foci in human colons: distribution and histomorphologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shpitz, B; Bomstein, Y; Mekori, Y; Cohen, R; Kaufman, Z; Neufeld, D; Galkin, M; Bernheim, J

    1998-05-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are one of the earliest putative preneoplastic, and in some cases, neoplastic lesions in human colons. These microscopic lesions, identified on methylene blue-stained mucosa with a low-power-magnification microscope, are thought to be closely related to the earliest steps in multistage colonic tumorigenesis. We investigated the distribution pattern and histomorphological features of ACF in 74 patients with sporadic colorectal cancer. The distribution pattern shows a slightly higher prevalence with older age. The prevalence of the ACF in sigmoid colon was significantly higher in patients with colorectal cancer as compared with patients with benign colonic diseases. Also, significantly more ACF were detected in distal parts of the large bowel (descending, sigmoid colon, and rectum) than in proximal parts. Of 42 microdissected lesions, 12 were dysplastic and 30 were hyperplastic foci. The average size of dysplastic lesions was significantly larger than hyperplastic foci. More apoptotic bodies were found in dysplastic lesions. These lesions also showed an upward expansion of proliferative compartment and higher proliferation indices expressed as proliferating cell nuclear antigen-labeling index. Lymphoid follicles were frequently observed in the base of both hyperplastic and dysplastic foci (40% and 66.6%, respectively). The coincidence of lymphoid follicles was 2.5 to 8 times higher than expected. These features may be related to further progression of selected ACF during colorectal tumorigenesis.

  18. Duodenal crypt health following exposure to Cr(VI): Micronucleus scoring, γ-H2AX immunostaining, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Chad M.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Elbekai, Reem H.; Paranjpe, Madhav G.; Seiter, Jennifer M.; Chappell, Mark A.; Tappero, Ryan V.; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M.; Bichteler, Anne; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.

    2015-08-01

    Lifetime exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal damage and an increase in duodenal tumors in B6C3F1 mice. To assess whether these tumors could be the result of a direct mutagenic or genotoxic mode of action, we conducted a GLP-compliant 7-day drinking water study to assess crypt health along the entire length of the duodenum. Mice were exposed to water (vehicle control), 1.4, 21, or 180 ppm Cr(VI) via drinking water for 7 consecutive days. Crypt enterocytes in Swiss roll sections were scored as normal, mitotic, apoptotic, karyorrhectic, or as having micronuclei. A single oral gavage of 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide served as a positive control for micronucleus induction. Exposure to 21 and 180 ppm Cr(VI) significantly increased the number of crypt enterocytes. Micronuclei and γ-H2AX immunostaining were not elevated in the crypts of Cr(VI)-treated mice. In contrast, treatment with cyclophosphamide significantly increased numbers of crypt micronuclei and qualitatively increased γ-H2AX immunostaining. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy revealed the presence of strong Cr fluorescence in duodenal villi, but negligible Cr fluorescence in the crypt compartment. Together, these data indicate that Cr(VI) does not adversely effect the crypt compartment where intestinal stem cells reside, and provide additional evidence that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal cancer in B6C3F1 mice involves chronic villous wounding resulting in compensatory crypt enterocyte hyperplasia.

  19. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacy L.; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic. PMID:24489394

  20. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacy L; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-02-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic.

  1. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Koshimune, Seijiro; Onoda, Tomoo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    Free jejunal transfer using microsurgery after oesophageal or pharyngeal cancer resection is a useful operative approach. However, the disadvantage of free tissue transfer is the risk of necrosis of the transferred tissue due to impaired blood supply. In addition, jejunal flaps are more prone to blood-flow disorders such as ischaemia and congestion compared with other types of flaps. The causes of local blood supply disorders after microsurgery are divided broadly into two classes: one is thrombosis of an artery and/or vein in the anastomotic region and the other consists of local physical factors such as compressive pressure derived from haematoma formation and the effect of infection of the vascular pedicle. In this report, two rare cases of blood-flow disorder of the transferred free jejunum are described. In both cases, no signs of significant infection or occlusion of the vascular pedicles were present and late necrosis progressed gradually. The patients showed remarkable weight loss and a poor nutritional state due to inadequate preoperative nutritional intake. The necrosis was considered to be a result of non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap, and the factors contributing to free jejunal necrosis were reviewed.

  2. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  3. Aberrant crypt foci in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Roncucci, L.; Modica, S.; Pedroni, M.; Tamassia, M. G.; Ghidoni, M.; Losi, L.; Fante, R.; Di Gregorio, C.; Manenti, A.; Gafa, L.; Ponz de Leon, M.

    1998-01-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are clusters of abnormally large colonic crypts identified on the mucosal surface of the human colon. They are thought to be preneoplastic lesions. The aim of the present study was to compare density (number of ACF per square cm of mucosal surface), crypt multiplicity (number of crypts per ACF) and histology of ACF in colonic resections of colorectal cancer patients resident in two Italian provinces with a twofold difference in colorectal cancer incidence rates. Thirty-two and 26 colonic resections were collected after operation in Ragusa (Southern Italy) and Modena (Northern Italy), respectively, and fixed in 10% formalin. Mucosal layers were observed under a light microscope at 25x after staining with methylene blue. Density of ACF was significantly higher in Modena (median 0.101 ACF cm(-2)) than in Ragusa (0.049, P = 0.001), whereas there was no difference in crypt multiplicity. ACF were classified into three groups according to histological features: ACF with mild alterations (hypertrophic ACF, 73%), ACF with hyperplasia (hyperplastic ACF, 17%) and ACF with dysplasia (microadenomas, 10%). The proportions of ACF in the three groups were similar in the two provinces. Density of ACF was higher and crypt multiplicity lower proceeding from proximal to distal large bowel. Microadenomas were observed only in the colon, whereas hyperplastic ACF were more frequent in the rectum. In conclusion, density of ACF correlates with colorectal cancer rates in two Italian provinces, and shows a positive gradient from proximal to distal large bowel. Histology of ACF suggests that they may be precursors of both hyperplastic and adenomatous polyps. These data provide further evidence of the role of ACF in human colorectal carcinogenesis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9649156

  4. [A case of jejunal perforation in gallstone ileus].

    PubMed

    Taira, Akiko; Yamada, Masami; Takehira, Yasunori; Kageyama, Fujito; Yoshii, Shigeto; Murohisa, Gou; Yoshida, Kenichi; Iwaoka, Yasushi; Terai, Tomohiro; Uotani, Takahiro; Watanabe, Shinya; Noritake, Hidenao; Ikematu, Yoshito; Kanai, Toshikazu

    2008-04-01

    Gallstone ileus is a rare but important cause of small bowel obstruction in the geriatric population. A 65-year-old man with a twenty year history of cholecystolithiasis was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain and vomiting. Physical exams showed abdominal defence and rebound tenderness. A plain abdominal X-ray suggested a small bowel obstruction and pneumobilia. CT scan revealed a 2.5-cm gallstone at the jejunum and air in the biliary tree. The patient underwent a emergency laparotomy based on a diagnosis of panperitonitis with a perforation associated with gallstone ileus. Operative findings revealed a jejunal perforation and a impacted stone on the anal side of perforation. Enterolithotomy and jejunal resection were performed with cholecystectomy and repairment of the cholecystoduodenal fistula.

  5. A new tube for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal alimentation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R; Nyhus, L M

    1985-04-01

    A new tube has been devised for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal enteral alimentation. The tube is inserted by the nasogastric route intraoperatively. What differentiates this from earlier tubes is the addition of two inflatable balloons that facilitate passage of the tip of the tube through the retroperitoneal duodenum and into the proximal jejunum. Such a device is needed because the advantages of enteral alimentation in the postoperative patient include safety, low cost and significant metabolic benefits.

  6. Replaceable Jejunal Feeding Tubes in Severely Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tabea; Holland-Cunz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Long-term enteral nutrition in chronically ill, malnourished children represents a clinical challenge if adequate feeding via nasogastric or gastrostomy tubes fails. We evaluated the usefulness and complications of a new type of surgical jejunostomy that allows for easier positioning and replacement of the jejunal feeding tube in children. We surgically inserted replaceable jejunal feeding tubes (RJFT) connected to a guide thread which exited through a separate tiny opening of the abdominal wall. In a retrospective case series, we assessed the effectiveness and complications of this technique in severely ill children suffering from malnutrition and complex disorders. Three surgical complications occurred, and these were addressed by reoperation. Four children died from their severe chronic disorders within the study period. The RJFT permitted continuous enteral feeding and facilitated easy replacement of the tube. After the postoperative period, jejunal feeding by RJFT resulted in adequate weight gain. This feeding access represents an option for children in whom sufficient enteral nutrition by nasogastric tubes or gastrostomy proved impossible. Further studies are required to investigate the safety and effectiveness of this surgical technique in a larger case series. PMID:28232847

  7. GASTRIC AND JEJUNAL HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Rosemary Simões Nomelini; ALMEIDA, Élia Cláudia de Souza; CAMILO, Silvia Maria Perrone; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Júverson Alves; GUIMARÃES, Lucinda Calheiros; DUQUE, Ana Cristina da Rocha; ETCHEBEHERE, Renata Margarida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that increasingly is being treated by surgery. Aim: To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. Methods: This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. Results: In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative). The postoperative group had a significant reduction in H. pylori infection (p=0.0001). A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. Conclusion: There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients. PMID:27683773

  8. Complicated Jejunal Diverticulosis: Small Bowel Volvulus with Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohi, Rommel Singh; Moudgil, Ashish; Bhatia, Suresh Kumar; Seth, Kaushal; Kaur, Tajinder

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the diverticulum of the small bowel varies from 0.2-1.3% in autopsy studies to 2.3% when assessed on enteroclysis. It occurs mostly in patients in the 6th decade of their life. Of all the small bowel diverticuli, jejunal diverticulum is the most common type. This rare entity is usually asymptomatic. However, they may cause chronic non-specific symptoms for a long period of time like dyspepsia, chronic postprandial pain, nausea, vomiting, borborgymi, alternating diarrhoea and constipation, weight loss, anaemia, steatorrhea or rarely lead to complications like haemorrhage, obstruction, perforation. Obstruction can be due to enterolith, adhesions, intussusception, and volvulus. The condition is difficult to diagnose because patients are generally presented with symptoms that mimic other diseases. It is important for clinicians to have awareness of this entity. Here, we present a case of multiple jejunal diverticuli with a history of repeated attacks of diverticulitis over past 20 years, which were misdiagnosed and now presented with intestinal obstruction due to volvulus of the involved segment along with mesentery around its axis. Resection of the diverticuli segment of jejunum was done with end-to-end jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. The patient is asymptomatic since 10 months of follow-up. PMID:27853337

  9. Pharyngoesophageal stricture and fistula. Treatment by free jejunal graft.

    PubMed Central

    Hester, T R; McConnel, F; Nahai, F; Cunningham, S J; Jurkiewicz, M J

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with disorders of the pharynx or cervical esophagus requiring extensive ablative therapy were reconstructed by heterotopic autotransplantation of a segment of jejunum. Of these 55 patients, the overwhelming majority were treated for squamous cell carcinoma or the complications of combined radiation and operative therapy. There were six graft failures in the entire group of 55 patients for a transfer reliability of 90%. Three patients died in the perioperative period (5%). The purpose of this paper is to report on the treatment of a subset of these patients in whom fixed cicatricial stenosis of the gullet was the problem or in whom a radionecrotic cutaneous fistula existed. Fourteen such patients were treated, ten with stricture and four with fistula. Both patch grafts of on-lay segments and more routine circumferentially intact tubed segments of jejunum were used depending upon the nature of the defect. The youngest patient in this group was a 3-year-old juvenile diabetic with caustic stricture and the oldest was a 75-year-old man with fixed stricture following operation and radiation for cancer. Nine of ten and four of four anatomic reconstructions were successful in the stricture and fistula patients, respectively. All of these 13 patients with a neo- gullet of jejunum were able to handle secretions and liquids satisfactorily. Eleven patients were on a regular diet and had no discernible physiological impairment in alimentation. One patient had mild dysphagia and used a blenderized diet. One patient was able to swallow liquids only. In this patient the resection for tumor was so high and so extensive that the physiologic act of deglutition itself was impaired. There were no perioperative deaths, although one patient has succumbed to recurrent and metastatic carcinoma. When conventional treatment for stricture or fistula in the cervical alimentary tract has failed, reconstruction can be accomplished safely by free revascularized jejunal graft

  10. [Surgical Removal of Migrated Coil after Embolization of Jejunal Variceal Bleeding: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Lee, Danbi; Oh, Kyunghwan; Lee, Mingee; So, Seol; Yang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Chan Wook; Gwon, Dong Il; Chung, Young Hwa

    2017-01-25

    Jejunal variceal bleeding is less common compared with esophagogastric varices in patients with portal hypertension. However, jejunal variceal bleeding can be fatal without treatment. Treatments include surgery, transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS), endoscopic sclerotherapy, percutaneous coil embolization, and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO). Percutaneous coil embolization can be considered as an alternative treatment option for those where endoscopic sclerotherapy, surgery, TIPS or BRTO are not possible. Complications of percutaneous coil embolization have been reported, including coil migration. Herein, we report a case of migration of the coil into the jejunal lumen after percutaneous coil embolization for jejunal variceal bleeding. The migrated coil was successfully removed using surgery.

  11. Radiation induced cytochrome c release causes loss of rat colonic fluid absorption by damage to crypts and pericryptal myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, J; Gourmelon, P; Griffiths, N; Lebrun, F; Naftalin, R; Pedley, K

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Therapeutic or accidental exposure to radiation commonly causes gastrointestinal disturbances, including diarrhoea. Rats subjected to whole body ionising radiation at a dose of 8 Gy lose their capacity to absorb fluid via the descending colon after four days. After seven days, fluid absorption recovers to control levels.
AIMS—To investigate the effect of ionising radiation on colonic permeability together with its effect on mitochondria dependent apoptotic signals and intercellular adhesion molecules.
METHODS—Rats were irradiated with doses of 0-12 Gy. Colonic permeability was measured by accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dextran in crypt lumens. Changes in levels of cytochrome c, caspase 3, E and OB cadherin, β-catenin smooth muscle actin, and collagen IV were assessed using immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy.
RESULTS—Cytosolic cytochrome c increased after 8 Gy (t1/2 1.4 (0.6) hours) and peaked at approximately six hours. Caspase 3 increased more slowly, particularly in crypt epithelial cells (t1/2 57 (14.5) hours). Pericryptal myofibroblasts disintegrated within 24 hours as was evident from loss of OB cadherin and smooth muscle actin. This coincided with increased crypt permeability to dextran. Intercellular adhesion between crypt luminal cells was not lost until day 4 when both β-catenin and E-cadherin were minimal. The half maximal dose-response for these effects was in the range 2-4 Gy. Recovery of colonic transport was concurrent with recovery of pericryptal smooth muscle actin and OB cadherin. The pan caspase inhibitor Z-Val-Ala-Asp.fluoromethylketone (1 mg/kg per day) had a small effect in conserving the pericryptal sheath myofibroblasts and sheath permeability but had no systemic therapeutic effects.
CONCLUSIONS—These data suggest that radiation damage to the colon may be initiated by mitochondrial events. Loss of crypt fluid absorption and increased permeability coincided with decreased

  12. A 116-kDa phytoglycoprotein inhibits aberrant crypt foci formation through modulation of manganese superoxide dismutase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-kappa B, activator protein-1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine/dextran sodium sulfate-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2008-11-01

    The 116-kDa Ulmus davidiana Nakai (UDN) glycoprotein is a naturally occurring phytoglycoprotein found in the stem of UDN. In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive effect of UDN glycoprotein on inflammation-mediated colorectal carcinogenesis induced by 10 mg/kg 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and 2% dextran sodium sulfate in ICR mice. Consumption of UDN glycoprotein (0.01 and 0.02%) significantly reduced the frequency of colonic aberrant crypt foci, the expression of colonic proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the release of plasma lactate dehydrogenase without any cytotoxic activity at the initiation stage of colorectal carcinogenesis in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine/dextran sodium sulfate-treated mice. In addition, UDN glycoprotein has antioxidative effects on the formation of plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and on the production of plasma inducible nitric oxide, accompanying the normalizing effects on the activity of colonic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) in the mice. UDN glycoprotein intake also remarkably attenuated the expression of inflammation-related factors (inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) and the DNA-binding activity of redox-sensitive transcription factors (nuclear factor-kappa B and activator protein-1) in the mice. Collectively, the results suggest that UDN glycoprotein has chemopreventive potential at the initiation stage of colorectal cancer by reducing the factors responsible for oxidative stress, inflammation, and carcinogenesis.

  13. Epithelial cell differentiation in normal and transgenic mouse intestinal isografts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transgenes consisting of segments of the rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene's 5' non-transcribed domain linked to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (minus its regulatory elements) have provided useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms that regulate cellular and spatial differentiation of the continuously renewing gut epithelium. We have removed the jejunum from normal and transgenic fetal mice before or coincident with, cytodifferentiation of its epithelium. These segments were implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of young adult CBY/B6 nude mouse hosts to determine whether the bipolar, migration- dependent differentiation pathways of gut epithelial cells can be established and maintained in the absence of its normal luminal environment. Immunocytochemical analysis of isografts harvested 4-6 wk after implantation revealed that activation of the intact endogenous mouse L-FABP gene (fabpl) in differentiating enterocytes is perfectly recapitulated as these cells are translocated along the crypt-to-villus axis. Similarly, Paneth and goblet cells appear to appropriately differentiate as they migrate to the crypt base and villus tip, respectively. The enteroendocrine cell subpopulations present in intact 4-6-wk-old jejunum are represented in these isografts. Their precise spatial distribution along the crypt-to-villus axis mimics that seen in the intact gut. A number of complex interrelationships between enteroendocrine subpopulations are also recapitulated. In both "intact" and isografted jejunum, nucleotides -596 to +21 of the rat L-FABP gene were sufficient to direct efficient expression of the hGH reporter to enterocytes although precocious expression of the transgene occurred in cells located in the upper crypt, before their translocation to the villus base. Inappropriate expression of hGH occurred in a high percentage (greater than 80%) of secretin, gastrin, cholecystokinin, and gastric inhibitory peptide producing enteroendocrine cells present

  14. Apc Restoration Promotes Cellular Differentiation and Reestablishes Crypt Homeostasis in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dow, Lukas E; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Simon, Janelle; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-06-18

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated in the vast majority of human colorectal cancers (CRC) and leads to deregulated Wnt signaling. To determine whether Apc disruption is required for tumor maintenance, we developed a mouse model of CRC whereby Apc can be conditionally suppressed using a doxycycline-regulated shRNA. Apc suppression produces adenomas in both the small intestine and colon that, in the presence of Kras and p53 mutations, can progress to invasive carcinoma. In established tumors, Apc restoration drives rapid and widespread tumor-cell differentiation and sustained regression without relapse. Tumor regression is accompanied by the re-establishment of normal crypt-villus homeostasis, such that once aberrantly proliferating cells reacquire self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capability. Our study reveals that CRC cells can revert to functioning normal cells given appropriate signals and provide compelling in vivo validation of the Wnt pathway as a therapeutic target for treatment of CRC.

  15. Histomorphology of aberrant crypt foci in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Norlida, A Ojep; Phang, Koon Seng

    2010-12-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex multistep process that includes changes in histomorphological appearance of the colonic mucosa and changes at molecular level. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was first described by Bird in 1987 on examination of methylene-blue-stained colonic mucosa of azoxymethane-treated mice under light microscopy. Since then ACF was considered as the earliest preneoplastic change that can be seen in the colonic mucosa. The aim of this study was to look at the histomorphology and distribution of ACF in colorectal carcinoma. 50 formalin-fixed archival colectomy specimens for colorectal carcinoma were examined under light microscopy after staining with 0.2% methylene blue. ACF was identified by larger and darker crypts with thickened epithelium, and often elevated from adjacent normal mucosa. ACF was found in 41 of 50 colectomy specimens examined. There were 328 ACF consisting of 36 (11.0%) ACF without hyperplasia or dysplasia, 263 (80.2%) ACF with hyperplasia and 29 (8.8%) ACF with dysplasia. Of these 29 ACF with dysplasia, 25 showed low grade dysplasia and four high grade dysplasia. The density of ACF was higher in the left colon, those older than 65 years of age and among males but these findings were statistically not significant. The crypt multiplicity of hyperplastic ACF (30.149, SD 28.395) was larger than dysplastic ACF (20.613, SD 40.128). The spectrum of histological changes observed probably represent the evolution of ACF in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  16. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent.

  17. 5-HT induces cAMP production in crypt colonocytes at a 5-HT4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, F C; Smith, E H; Kellum, J M

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that both 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) induce chloride efflux from crypt colonocytes in the rat distal colon; antagonist studies suggest that the 5-HT response is mediated primarily by the 5-HT4 receptor. Since this receptor is known to be positively coupled to adenylate cyclase, we postulated that 5-HT should induce generation of cAMP, which should be inhibited by 5-HT4 antagonists. Method. Mucosal cells from rat distal colon were taken by a sequential calcium chelation technique for enrichment of crypt cells. Cytokeratin stains demonstrated that >99% of cells were colonocytes. [3H]Thymidine uptake studies demonstrate a fivefold increased incorporation in this cell preparation compared to earlier fractions. 3-Isobutyl-l-methylxanthine (IBMX, 100 microM) was added to all cell suspensions in order to prevent cAMP metabolism. Cell suspensions were incubated for 2 min at 37 degreesC with different concentrations of 5-HT (n = 7). cAMP was measured by enzyme immunoassay. In another series of experiments, 5-HT (0.3 microM) stimulation of cAMP was similarly measured in the presence and absence of 5-HT receptor antagonists: 10 microM 5-HTP-DP (5-HT1P; n = 4), 0.1 microM ketanserin (5-HT2A; n = 4), 0.3 microM ondansetron (5-HT3; n = 4), 3 microM tropisetron (5-HT3 and 5-HT4; n = 4), and 10 nM GR-113808 (5-HT4; n = 5). Results. 5-HT produced a dose-dependent increase in cAMP. The increase was significant at concentrations >/=0.3 microM when compared to cells incubated with IBMX alone. In the second series of experiment, 5-HT-induced generation of cAMP at a dose of 0.3 microM was significantly inhibited in the presence of GR-113808 and tropisetron. Conclusion. 5-HT acts at a 5-HT4 receptor to induce production of cAMP in rat distal crypt colonocytes.

  18. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly.

    PubMed

    Davis, Heather A; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction.

  19. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Heather A.; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction. PMID:22753967

  20. Chagas' achalasia treated by a jejunal interposed segment.

    PubMed

    Dantas, A N; Carvalho, J L; Coelho, F K; Teixeira, A M; Lyra, L G; Rebouças, G; Didier, F V

    1975-01-01

    Resection of the achalasic area and replacement by a segment of jejunal loop, associated with vagotomy and pyloroplasty, has been performed in 21 patients. The majority of these patients had Chagas' disease, with a dilated esophagus wider than 7 cm. This surgical procedure offered symptomatic relief in 20 of our 21 cases. One patient died, but the death was not necessarily related to the operation. Although disphagia and regurgitation did not disappear entirely in all cases the decrease in severity of these symptoms was such to allow the few symptomatic patients to lead an entirely normal life after the operation.

  1. Jejunal and ileal absorption of oxprenolol in man: influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability.

    PubMed Central

    Godbillon, J; Vidon, N; Palma, R; Pfeiffer, A; Franchisseur, C; Bovet, M; Gosset, G; Bernier, J J; Hirtz, J

    1987-01-01

    1 Study I evaluated the absorption of oxprenolol in the ileum, compared to jejunum, in healthy volunteers by an intestinal perfusion technique. Around 80 mg of drug were delivered as a saline solution directly in the small bowel. 2 Samples taken 30 cm distally to the site of perfusion showed that 63% of perfused oxprenolol was absorbed in the jejunum and 48% in the ileum; the differences were significant. 3 The plasma concentration-time profiles were similar for the two perfusions. The AUC and Cmax values of free and conjugated oxprenolol for the jejunal perfusion were significantly lower than those of ileum. They showed large but consistent intersubject variations in the two treatments. 4 Study II investigated, using the same technique, the influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability of this drug. A saline (in treatments A and B) or a nutrient (in treatment C) solution containing oxprenolol was perfused into the jejunum below a balloon either inflated (A) or deflated (B and C). 5 The disappearance rate of oxprenolol from the jejunum was unaffected by endogenous secretions. The mean amount of drug absorbed along a 30-cm jejunal segment accounted for 52 (A) and 57% (B) of the total amount perfused. The intestinal absorption rate was markedly increased in the presence of nutrients (mean amount absorbed 96% for C). 6 The change in the rate of disappearance from the intestine had no effect on the systemic availability of oxprenolol (mean AUC values 8740, 8250 and 8020 nmol l-1 h for A, B and C, respectively) or its elimination from plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3663450

  2. PepT1 Expression Helps Maintain Intestinal Homeostasis by Mediating the Differential Expression of miRNAs along the Crypt-Villus Axis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Mingzhen; Xiao, Bo; Han, Moon Kwon; Walter, Lewins; Garg, Pallavi; Merlin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In the jejunum, PepT1 is particularly enriched in the well-differentiated absorptive epithelial cells in the villi. Studies of expression and function of PepT1 along the crypt-villus axis demonstrated that this protein is crucial to the process of di/tripeptide absorption. We recently exhibited that PepT1 plays an important role in multiple biological functions, including the ability to regulate the expression/secretion of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and the expression levels of multiple proteins. In this study, we observed that PepT1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited reduced body weight and shorten intestinal microvilli. We then examined the expression levels of various miRNAs and their target proteins along the crypt-villi axis in the jejunum of PepT1 KO mice. We found that PepT1 KO altered the distribution of miRNAs along the crypt-villus axis and changed the miRNA profiles of both villi and crypts. Using miRNA-target prediction and 2D-DIGE/mass spectrometry on villi and crypts samples, we found that ablation of PepT1 further directly or indirectly altered expression levels of certain protein targets. Collectively, our results suggest that PepT1 contributes to maintain balance of homeostasis and proper functions in the small intestine, and dysregulated miRNAs and proteins along the crypt-villus axis are highly related to this process. PMID:27250880

  3. A kinetic model to study the regulation of [Formula: see text]-catenin, APC, and Axin in the human colonic crypt.

    PubMed

    Emerick, Brooks; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Boman, Bruce M

    2017-03-07

    The Wnt/[Formula: see text]-catenin pathway plays a crucial role in stem cell renewal and differentiation in the normal human colonic crypt. The balance between [Formula: see text]-catenin and APC along the crypt axis determines its normal functionality. The mechanism that deregulates this balance may give insight into the initiation of colorectal cancer. This is significant because the spatial dysregulation of [Formula: see text]-catenin by the mutated tumor suppressor gene/protein APC in human colonic crypts is responsible for the initiation and growth of colorectal cancer. We consider a regulatory function that promotes APC synthesis within the cell and its effect on the accumulation of the Wnt target protein, [Formula: see text]-catenin. It is evident that an APC gradient exists along the crypt axis; however, the mechanism by which APC expression is regulated within the cell is not well known. We investigate the dynamics of an APC regulatory mechanism with an increased level of Axin at the subcellular level. Model output shows an increase of APC for a diminished Wnt signal, which explains the APC gradient along the crypt. We find that the dynamic interplay between [Formula: see text]-catenin, APC, and Axin produces oscillatory behavior, which is controlled by the Wnt stimulus. In the presence of reduced functional APC, the oscillations are amplified, which suggests that the cell remains in a more proliferative state for longer periods of time. Increased Axin levels (typical of mammalian cells) reduce oscillatory behavior and minimize the levels of [Formula: see text]-catenin within the cell while raising the levels of APC.

  4. Calcium mediation of the pig jejunal secretory response.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Wong, P H; Maenz, D D

    1985-01-01

    The involvement of Ca++ ions as secretory mediators in pig jejunal epithelia has been investigated with an in vitro system. Omission of Ca++ from the Ringer-HCO3 bathing media on both sides of the tissue had minor effects on the basal electrical activity of pig jejunal mucosa. There were only slight decreases in transepithelial potential difference and increases in conductance with Ca++ free media. Low EGTA concentrations which reversibly blocked potential difference responses to secretory agents also had minimal effects on basal electrical activity. The in vitro secretory responses to A23187, to theophylline, and to Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin were all eliminated by Ca++ depletion and restored by replacing normal Ca++ concentrations in the bathing media. Dantrolene prevented the secretory response but not the potential difference increases caused by heat-stable enterotoxin and A23187, suggesting that intracellular Ca++ stores may be reservoirs of secretory signal agent. Verapamil only blocked the secretory response to heat-stable enterotoxin. Chlorpromazine had negligible effects on basal conditions, but totally blocked both the secretory response and the Ca++-dependent effects of A23187 and heat-stable enterotoxin on potential difference. The response to theophylline was only partially inhibited by chlorpromazine, implying some involvement of both cAMP and Ca++ as secretory signals for theophylline. Cytoplasmic Ca++ concentrations appear to be at least as important as cyclic nucleotides in regulating the secretory effects of pig jejunum. PMID:2410089

  5. Jejunal access loop cholangiogram and intervention using image guided access.

    PubMed

    Amitha Vikrama, K S; Keshava, S N; Surendrababu, N R S; Moses, V; Joseph, P; Vyas, F; Sitaram, V

    2010-02-01

    Jejunal access loop is fashioned in patients who undergo Roux en Y hepaticojejunostomy and biliary intervention is anticipated on follow up. Post-operative study of the biliary tree through the access loop is usually done under fluoroscopic guidance. We present a series of 20 access loop cholangiograms performed in our institution between August 2004 and November 2008. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the procedure and to highlight the role of CT guidance in procuring access. Access loop was accessed using CT (n = 13), ultrasound (n = 3) or fluoroscopic guidance (n = 4). Fluoroscopy was used for performing cholangiograms and interventions. Twelve studies had balloon plasty of the stricture at anastomotic site or high up in the hepatic ducts. Seven studies showed normal cholangiogram. Plasty was unsuccessful in one study. Technical success in accessing the jejunal access loop was 100%; in cannulation of anastomotic site and balloon plasty it was 95%. One case required two attempts. Procedure-related complications were not seen. All patients who underwent balloon plasty of the stricture were doing well for variable lengths of time. Access loop cholangiogram and interventions are safe and effective. CT guidance in locating/procuring the access loop is a good technique.

  6. Leucine stimulates ASCT2 amino acid transporter expression in porcine jejunal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Ren, Man; Zeng, Xiangfang; He, Pingli; Ma, Xi; Qiao, Shiyan

    2014-12-01

    Leucine has been shown to influence intestinal protein metabolism, cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, our previous study demonstrated that branched-chain amino acids could modulate the intestinal amino acid and peptide transporters in vivo. As the possible mechanisms are still largely unknown, in the present work, we studied the transcriptional and translational regulation of leucine on amino acid transporter production in IPEC-J2 cells and the signaling pathways involved. Treatment of IPEC-J2 cells with 7.5 mM leucine enhanced the mRNA expression of the Na(+)-neutral AA exchanger 2 (ASCT2) and 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc) and caused an increase in ASCT2 protein expression. Leucine also activated phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and eIF4E through the phosphorylation of mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling pathways in IPEC-J2 cells. Pre-treatment of IPEC-J2 cells with inhibitors of mTOR and Akt (rapamycin and wortmannin) or an inhibitor of ERK (PD098059) for 30 min before leucine treatment attenuated the positive effect of leucine in enhancing the protein abundance of ASCT2. These results demonstrate that leucine could up-regulate the expression of the amino acid transporters (ASCT2) through transcriptional and translational regulation by ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR activation.

  7. Preventive effects of chrysin on the development of azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Kohno, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Rikako; Sugie, Shigeyuki; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Tanaka, Takuji

    2006-05-01

    The modifying effects of dietary feeding with chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were investigated in male F344 rats. We also assessed the effect of chrysin on mitosis and apoptosis in 'normal appearing' crypts. To induce ACF, rats were given two weekly subcutaneous injections of AOM (20 mg/kg body weight). They also received an experimental diet containing chrysin (0.001 or 0.01%) for 4 weeks, starting 1 week before the first dose of AOM. AOM exposure produced a substantial number of ACF (73+/-13/rat) at the end of the study (week 4). Dietary administration of chrysin caused significant reduction in the frequency of ACF: 0.001% chrysin, 37+/-17/rat (49% reduction, P<0.001); and 0.01% chrysin, 40+/-10/rat (45% reduction, P<0.001). In addition, chrysin administration significantly reduced the mitotic index and significantly increased the apoptotic index in 'normal appearing' crypts. These findings might suggest a possible chemopreventive activity of chrysin in the early step of colon tumorigenesis through modulation of cryptal cell proliferation activity and apoptosis.

  8. The effects of progressive anemia on jejunal mucosal and serosal tissue oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Haisjackl, M; Luz, G; Sparr, H; Germann, R; Salak, N; Friesenecker, B; Deusch, E; Meusburger, S; Hasibeder, W

    1997-03-01

    Anemia may promote intestinal hypoxia. We studied the effects of progressive isovolemic hemodilution on jejunal mucosal (Po2muc), and serosal tissue oxygen tension (Po2ser, Clark-type surface electrodes), mucosal microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hbo2muc), and hematocrit (Hctmuc; tissue reflectance spectophotometry) in a jejunal segment. Twelve domestic pigs were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Laparatomy was performed, arterial supply of a jejunal segment isolated, and constant pressure pump perfused. Seven animals were progressively hemodiluted to systemic hematocrits (Hctsys) of 20%, 15%, 10%, and 6%. Baseline for Po2muc, Po2ser and Hbo2muc was 23.5 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, 57.5 +/- 4 mm Hg, and 47.0% +/- 6.4% which were not different from the five controls. Despite a significant increase in jejunal blood flow, jejunal oxygen delivery decreased and oxygen extraction ratio increased significantly at Hctsys 10% and 6%. Po2ser decreased significantly below or at Hctsys of 15%, whereas Po2muc and Hbo2muc were maintained to Hctsys of 10%, but less than 10% Hbo2muc and mesenteric venous pH decreased significantly, implying that physiological limits of jejunal microvascular adaptation to severe anemia were reached. Decrease of Hctmuc was less pronounced than Hctsys. In conclusion, redistribution of jejunal blood flow and an increase in the ratio of mucosal to systemic hematocrit are the main mechanisms maintaining mucosal oxygen supply during progressive anemia.

  9. Reconstruction of esophageal defects with microsurgically revascularized jejunal segments: a report of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, T S; Hwang, O L; Wang-Wei

    1980-12-01

    Experimental free transfer of a jejunal segment to a recipient bed in the neck was successfully performed in 5 mongrel dogs. This was followed by clinical application of 2 different microvascular procedures in 13 patients for repair of esophageal defects. In 7 of these patients a free jejunal transfer was used; in 6 of these patients a pedicled jejunal graft with revascularization of its distal end by microvascular anastomosis was used. The esophageal defects were located in the cervical portion in 7 cases, the cervicothoracic portion in 5 cases, and the thoracic portion in 1 case. Ten (77%) of the 13 procedures were successful.

  10. Late metastatic colon cancer masquerading as primary jejunal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, A-WN; Joudeh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the small bowel from a previously resected colorectal cancer is rare and may erroneously be diagnosed as a primary small bowel carcinoma. It usually occurs several years after the primary resection. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone left hemicolectomy for colon cancer 3 years earlier and returned with subacute small bowel obstruction. This was initially thought, based on preoperative radiological findings and normal colonoscopic examination, to be due a primary jejunal cancer. Even at surgery, the lesion convincingly appeared as an obstructing primary small bowel carcinoma. However, the histology of the resected small bowel revealed metastatic colon cancer. This rare and an unusual metastatic occurrence some years after the primary resection is described and reviewed. PMID:26890851

  11. Duodeno-Jejunal Varicosities Following Extrahepatic Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Varsamidakis, Nick; Hobbs, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A 31 year old man, under investigation for melena, was found at endoscopy to have varicosities at the site of a duodeno-jejunostomy which had been performed for duodenal atresia when he was three days old. Angiography revealed an occluded portal vein with an extensive collateral circulation. At laparotomy some of the collateral vessels were found to pass through the anastomotic site and directly into the left lobe of the liver. The portal pressure was found to be minimally elevated. Resection of the anastomotic segment was performed with reconstruction using a Roux en Y jejunal loop. Bleeding from collateral vessels passing through an anastomosis site in a patient with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis has not previously been reported. PMID:1610726

  12. Effects of inulin and enzyme complex, individually or in combination, on growth performance, intestinal microflora, cecal fermentation characteristics, and jejunal histomorphology in broiler chickens fed a wheat- and barley-based diet.

    PubMed

    Rebolé, A; Ortiz, L T; Rodríguez, M L; Alzueta, C; Treviño, J; Velasco, S

    2010-02-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the effects of inulin, alone or in combination with enzyme complex (primarily xylanase and beta-glucanase), on growth performance, ileal and cecal microflora, cecal short-chain fatty acids, and d-lactic acid and jejunal histomorphology of broiler chickens fed a wheat- and barley-based diet from 7 to 35 d of age. A total of 240 seven-day-old male Cobb broilers were allocated to 1 of 6 treatments, with 8 replicate pens per treatment and 5 birds per pen. The experiment consisted of a 3x2 factorial arrangement of the treatments with 3 concentrations of inulin (0, 10, or 20 g/kg of diet) and 2 concentrations of enzyme complex (0 or 100 mg/kg of diet). At the end of the experiment, 8 birds per treatment (one from each pen) were randomly chosen and slaughtered. Birds fed inulin-containing diets exhibited significantly (P=0.043) improved final BW gain. Dietary inulin had a positive and significant (P<0.002 to 0.009) effect on bifidobacteria and lactobacilli counts in both ileal and cecal contents and, to an extent, also altered the fermentation patterns in the ceca, increasing the concentration of n-butyric and d-lactic acids and the n-butyric acid:acetic acid ratio. Inulin inclusion had no effect on villus height and crypt depth or microvillus length, width, and density in the jejunum. Enzyme supplementation of the control diet and inulin-containing diets had no effect on many of the variables studied and only resulted in a decrease in crypt depth and an increase in villus height:crypt depth ratio in the jejunum.

  13. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  14. Preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and high jejunal atresia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baglaj, Maciej; Gerus, Sylwester

    2012-01-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare congenital anomaly. In most patients, it is associated with other congenital defects including situs inversus, malrotation, and biliary atresia or occurs as part of the heterotaxia syndrome or polysplenia syndrome. We describe a newborn affected by high jejunal atresia, malrotation, and a complex cardiac anomaly, in whom PDPV was diagnosed at early relaparotomy because of stenosis of the jejunal anastomosis. Occurrence of PDPV with intestinal atresia has not been previously reported in the literature.

  15. The visceromotor responses to colorectal distension and skin pinch are inhibited by simultaneous jejunal distension.

    PubMed

    Shafton, Anthony D; Furness, John B; Ferens, Dorota; Bogeski, Goce; Koh, Shir Lin; Lean, Nicholas P; Kitchener, Peter D

    2006-07-01

    Noxious stimuli that are applied to different somatic sites interact; often one stimulus diminishes the sensation elicited from another site. By contrast, inhibitory interactions between visceral stimuli are not well documented. We investigated the interaction between the effects of noxious distension of the colorectum and noxious stimuli applied to the jejunum, in the rat. Colorectal distension elicited a visceromotor reflex, which was quantified using electromyographic (EMG) recordings from the external oblique muscle of the upper abdomen. The same motor units were activated when a strong pinch was applied to the flank skin. Distension of the jejunum did not provoke an EMG response at this site, but when it was applied during colorectal distension it blocked the EMG response. Jejunal distension also inhibited the response to noxious skin pinch. The inhibition of the visceromotor response to colorectal distension was prevented by local application of tetrodotoxin to the jejunum, and was markedly reduced when nicardipine was infused into the local jejunal circulation. Chronic sub-diaphragmatic vagotomy had no effect on the colorectal distension-induced EMG activity or its inhibition by jejunal distension. The nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium suppressed phasic contractile activity in the jejunum, had only a small effect on the inhibition of visceromotor response by jejunal distension. It is concluded that signals that arise from skin pinch and colorectal distension converge in the central nervous system with pathways that are activated by jejunal spinal afferents; the jejunal signals strongly inhibit the abdominal motor activity evoked by noxious stimuli.

  16. Ratiometric Imaging of Tissue by Two-Photon Microscopy: Observation of a High Level of Formaldehyde around Mouse Intestinal Crypts.

    PubMed

    Singha, Subhankar; Jun, Yong Woong; Bae, Juryang; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2017-03-21

    Ratiometric imaging by two-photon microscopy can offer a viable tool for the relative quantification of biological analytes inside tissue with minimal influence from environmental factors that affect fluorescence signal. We demonstrate the ratiometric imaging of formaldehyde at the suborgan level using a two-photon fluorescent probe, which involves pixel-to-pixel ratiometric data transformation. This study reveals for the first time a high level of formaldehyde around the crypts of mouse small intestine, implicating its possible protective role along with the released antimicrobials from the Paneth cells.

  17. [CELLULAR COMPOSITION OF THE LAMINA PROPRIA OF JEJUNAL MUCOUS MEMBRANE IN C57BL/6 MICE DURING THE RECOVERY PERIOD AFTER PROLONGED SPACE FLIGHT].

    PubMed

    Aminova, G G

    2015-01-01

    The jejunum of C57 BL/6 mice (n = 5) was examined 7 days after a 30-day-long space flight and in vivarium control animals (n = 6). The cellular composition of the lamina propria of the mucous membranes of the villi and crypt region was studied using histological and morphometric methods. It was found that on Day 7 the recovery of normal cellular composition of the lamina propria was incomplete. In the villi, the number of medium and small lymphocytes, as well as of the plasma cells was reduced. In the crypt region, the changes were less pronounced. In the lamina propria in experimental animals the number of large lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, disintegrating cells and stromal cells was increased. The number of eosinophils was reduced.

  18. Protective effect of lactofermented beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation and genotoxicity of fecal water in rats.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Cukrowska, Bożena; Błasiak, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 50 mg/kg on the 23rd and 26th day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco 2 cell line, evaluated by MTT/NRU tests and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and DAPI staining. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and MNU treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and MNU treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in MNU-treated rats (from 55±18 to 21±6). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 45±21 to 7±4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with an MNU-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco 2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. The presence of FBJ in the diet significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus, adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with lactofermented beetroot juice may provide protection against precancerous aberrant crypt formation and reduce the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of fecal water.

  19. Dietary Zinc Oxide Modulates Antioxidant Capacity, Small Intestine Development, and Jejunal Gene Expression in Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui; Lv, Hang; Chen, Zhuang; Wang, Li; Wu, Xiuju; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Liang, Rui; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-02-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) on the antioxidant capacity, small intestine development, and jejunal gene expression in weaned piglets. Ninety-six 21-day-old piglets were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments. Each treatment had eight replicates with four piglets per replicate. The piglets were fed either control diet (control) or control diet supplemented with in-feed antibiotics (300 mg/kg chlortetracycline and 60 mg/kg colistin sulfate) or pharmacological doses of ZnO (3000 mg/kg). The experiment lasted 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected at days 14 and 28, while intestinal samples were harvested at day 28 of the experiment. Dietary high doses of ZnO supplementation significantly increased the body weight (BW) at day 14 and average daily gain (ADG) of days 1 to 14 in weaned piglets, when compared to control group (P < 0.05). The incidence of diarrhea of piglets fed ZnO-supplemented diets, at either days 1 to 14, days 14 to 28, or the overall experimental period, was significantly decreased in comparison with those in other groups (P < 0.05). Supplementation with ZnO increased the villus height of the duodenum and ileum in weaned piglets and decreased the crypt depth of the duodenum, when compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Dietary ZnO supplementation decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration at either day 14 or day 28, but increased total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) at day 14, when compared to that in the control (P < 0.05). ZnO supplementation upregulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin in the jejunum mucosa of weaned piglets, compared to those in the control (P < 0.05). The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) mRNA expression in the jejunum mucosa was downregulated in the ZnO-supplemented group, compared with the control (P < 0.05). Both in-feed antibiotics and ZnO supplementation decreased the m

  20. Prostaglandin-induced radioprotection of murine intestinal crypts and villi by a PGE diene analog (SC-44932) and a PGI analog (Iloprost)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Wayne R.; Collins, Paul W.

    The aminothiols exemplified by WR-2721 are effective radioprotectors; however, their toxicity associated with hypotension, nausea, and emesis has limited their development for applications in medicine or in hazardous radiation environments. There is a need for new radioprotectors that have fewer toxic side effects when given alone or combined with reduced amounts of thiols. A variety of prostaglandins (PGs) have been shown to be radioprotective agents and some appear to have fewer toxic side effects than the aminothiols. Iloprost, a stable PGI, analog protects the clonogenic epithelial cells of intestinal crypts but does not protect epithelial cells of the villi. In contrast, an E-series omega chain diene analog designated SC-44932 protects epithelial cells of both crypts and villi. When the two are combined, protection of the crypts is additive and the villi are protected to the same degree as when SC-44932 is given alone. Since radioprotection for some PGs has been shown to be dependent upon receptors, we suggest that the pattern of radioprotection seen with these two analogs depend on the location of the respective receptors or on the ability of differentiated villus cells to respond to PGs. By studying different analogs, we hope to identify mechanisms associated with PG-induced radioprotection and to identify the most protective PG analogs for applications of radioprotection.

  1. Chemopreventive Efficacy of Andrographis paniculata on Azoxymethane-Induced Aberrant Colon Crypt Foci In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Henhena, Nawal; Ying, Rozaida Poh Yuen; Ismail, Salmah; Najm, Wala; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; El-Seedi, Hesham; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a grass-shaped medicinal herb, traditionally used in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoprotective effects of A. paniculata on colorectal cancer. A. paniculata ethanol extract was tested on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in vivo and in vitro. A. paniculata treated groups showed a significant reduction in the number of ACF of the treated rats. Microscopically, ACF showed remarkably elongated and stratified cells, and depletion of the submucosal glands of AOM group compared to the treated groups. Histologically, staining showed slightly elevated masses above the surrounding mucosa with oval or slit-like orifices. Immunohistochemically, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and β-catenin protein were down-regulated in the A. paniculata treated groups compared to the AOM group. When colon tissue was homogenized, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly decreased, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was increased in the treated groups compared to the AOM group. A. paniculata ethanol extract showed antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity, as elucidated by the measure of oxidative stress markers. Further, the active fractions were assessed against cell lines of CCD841 and HT29 colon cancer cells. PMID:25390042

  2. Chemopreventive efficacy of Andrographis paniculata on azoxymethane-induced aberrant colon crypt foci in vivo.

    PubMed

    Al-Henhena, Nawal; Ying, Rozaida Poh Yuen; Ismail, Salmah; Najm, Walaa; Najm, Wala; Khalifa, Shaden A M; El-Seedi, Hesham; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a grass-shaped medicinal herb, traditionally used in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoprotective effects of A. paniculata on colorectal cancer. A. paniculata ethanol extract was tested on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in vivo and in vitro. A. paniculata treated groups showed a significant reduction in the number of ACF of the treated rats. Microscopically, ACF showed remarkably elongated and stratified cells, and depletion of the submucosal glands of AOM group compared to the treated groups. Histologically, staining showed slightly elevated masses above the surrounding mucosa with oval or slit-like orifices. Immunohistochemically, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and β-catenin protein were down-regulated in the A. paniculata treated groups compared to the AOM group. When colon tissue was homogenized, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly decreased, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was increased in the treated groups compared to the AOM group. A. paniculata ethanol extract showed antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity, as elucidated by the measure of oxidative stress markers. Further, the active fractions were assessed against cell lines of CCD841 and HT29 colon cancer cells.

  3. Structural and mechanical architecture of the intestinal villi and crypts in the rat intestine: integrative reevaluation from ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Yasue; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2005-08-01

    The ultrastructure of the rat intestinal interstitium was analyzed from the viewpoint of mechanical dynamics to stabilize the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal folds. In the rat, the small intestine lacks circular folds, but the large intestine possesses spiral folds. The intestinal villi, the largest in the duodenum, decreased in size in the jejunum and ileum successively, and were absent in the large intestine. The intestinal interstitium consisted of lamina propria mucosae (LPM) and tela submucosa (TSM) separated by muscularis mucosae (MM), the LPM was subdivided into an upper part within the villi and a lower part among the crypts in the small intestine. The light microscopic density of interstitium in the intestinal wall was lowest in the upper LPM, moderately dense in the lower LPM and highest in the TSM, and that among the intestinal region was highest in the duodenum and decreased successively in the jejunum and ileum. In the large intestine, the TSM bulged to form spiral folds with very low density. The intestinal epithelium in the villi possessed wide intercellular spaces and that in the crypts had closed intercellular spaces. At electron microscopic level, the upper and lower LPM contained subepithelial supportive meshwork that consisted of collagen fibrils and myofibroblast processes. The lower LPM and TSM contained conspicuous bundles of collagen fibrils and, in addition, TSM contained minor populations of scattered collagen fibrils near the smooth muscle layer (SML). The diameter of collagen fibrils was the largest in the bundles of TSM, and decreased from the duodenum through the jejunum and ileum to the large intestine. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intestinal villi are mechanically stabilized by the balance between the expansive interstitial pressure and inward pull by the subepithelial supportive meshwork. This hypothesis explains the hitherto neglected fact that the intestinal epithelium possesses wide

  4. Phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Phytobezoars are concretions of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibers found in the alimentary tract. Previous gastric resection, gastrojejunostomy, or pyloroplasty predispose people to bezoar formation. Small-bowel bezoars normally come from the stomach, and primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare. They are seen only in patients with underlying small-bowel diseases such as diverticula, strictures, or tumors. Primary small-bowel bezoars almost always present as intestinal obstructions, although it is a very rare cause, being responsible for less than 3% of all small-bowel obstructions in one series. Jejunal diverticula are rare, with an incidence of less than 0.5%. They are usually asymptomatic pseudodiverticula of pulsion type, and complications are reported in 10% to 30% of patients. A phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum is an extremely rare presentation. Case presentation A 78-year-old Pakistani man presented to our clinic with small-bowel obstruction. Upon exploration, we found a primary small-bowel bezoar originating in a jejunal diverticulum and causing jejunal obstruction. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment harboring the diverticulum was performed, and our patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare but must be kept in mind as a possible cause of small-bowel obstruction. PMID:21951579

  5. Spontaneous Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of Jejunal Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-yan; Wei, Jiang-peng; Zhao, Xiu-yuan; Wang, Yue; Wu, Huan-huan; Shi, Tao; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rupture of jejunal artery aneurysm is a very rare event resulting in life-threatening hemorrhage in Behcet disease (BD). We report a case of ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm in a 35-year-old patient with BD. The patient had a 1-year history of intermittent abdominal pain caused by superior mesenteric artery aneurysm with thrombosis. Anticoagulation treatment showed a good response. Past surgical history included stenting for aortic pseudoaneurysm. On admission, the patient underwent an urgent operation due to sudden hemorrhagic shock. Resection was performed for jejunal artery aneurysm and partial ischemia of intestine. The patient was diagnosed with BD, based on a history of recurrent oral and skin lesions over the past 6 years. Treatment with anti-inflammatory medications showed a good response during the 8-month follow-up. An increased awareness of BD and its vascular complications is essential. Aneurysms in BD involving jejunal artery are rare, neglected and require proper management to prevent rupture and death. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of jejunal artery aneurysm caused by BD. PMID:26559278

  6. Tales from the crypt: a parasitoid manipulates the behaviour of its parasite host.

    PubMed

    Weinersmith, Kelly L; Liu, Sean M; Forbes, Andrew A; Egan, Scott P

    2017-01-25

    There are many examples of apparent manipulation of host phenotype by parasites, yet few examples of hypermanipulation-where a phenotype-manipulating parasite is itself manipulated by a parasite. Moreover, few studies confirm manipulation is occurring by quantifying whether the host's changed phenotype increases parasite fitness. Here we describe a novel case of hypermanipulation, in which the crypt gall wasp Bassettia pallida (a phenotypic manipulator of its tree host) is manipulated by the parasitoid crypt-keeper wasp Euderus set, and show that the host's changed behaviour increases parasitoid fitness. Bassettia pallida parasitizes sand live oaks and induces the formation of a 'crypt' within developing stems. When parasitized by E. set, B. pallida adults excavate an emergence hole in the crypt wall, plug the hole with their head and die. We show experimentally that this phenomenon benefits E. set, as E. set that need to excavate an emergence hole themselves are about three times more likely to die trapped in the crypt. In addition, we discuss museum and field data to explore the distribution of the crypt-keeping phenomena.

  7. Is laparoscopic resection the appropriate management of a jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)? Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, Michail; Zezos, Petros; Courcoutsakis, Nikos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Kouklakis, Georgios; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2010-10-01

    A 51-year-old female patient presented with iron deficiency anemia. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy were unremarkable. Computed tomography enteroclysis showed an ovoid 3×4-cm jejunal tumor with intraluminal protrusion and exophytic growth pattern, without lymphadenopathy or metastatic disease. Laparoscopic resection of the tumor was successfully carried out. Histologically, a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with an interlacing bundle pattern and high-mitotic activity greater than 10 mitoses/50 high-power fields were observed. The immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was KIT (CD117)-, vimentin-, smooth muscle actin-, and S-100-positive, whereas it was CD34-negative. These findings were consistent with the features of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and after 10 months of follow-up, she is well without any evidence of tumor recurrence.

  8. Effects of dark chocolate on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Nulton, Emily; Shelechi, Mahshid; Hernández, Lisa M; Nemoseck, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports that diets rich in polyphenols promote health and may delay the onset of colon cancer. Cocoa and chocolate products have some of the highest polyphenolic concentrations compared to other polyphenolic food sources. This study tested the hypothesis that a diet including dark chocolate can protect against colon cancer by inhibiting aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, downregulating gene expression of inflammatory mediators, and favorably altering cell kinetics. We also investigated whether bloomed dark chocolate retains the antioxidant capacity and protects against colon cancer. Forty-eight rats received either a diet containing control (no chocolate), regular dark chocolate, or bloomed dark chocolate and were injected subcutaneously with saline or azoxymethane. Relative to control, both regular and bloomed dark chocolate diets lowered the total number of ACF (P = 0.022). Chocolate diet-fed animals downregulated transcription levels of COX-2 (P = 0.035) and RelA (P = 0.045). Both chocolate diets lowered the proliferation index (P = 0.001). These results suggest that a diet including dark chocolate can reduce cell proliferation and some gene expression involving inflammation, which may explain the lower number of early preneoplastic lesions. These results provide new insight on polyphenol-rich chocolate foods and colon cancer prevention.

  9. Lack of chemoprevention of dietary Agaricus blazei against rat colonic aberrant crypt foci.

    PubMed

    Ziliotto, L; Barbisan, L F; Rodrigues, M A M

    2008-06-01

    The mushroom Agaricus blazei (Ab) has been widely used in folk medicine to treat various diseases including cancer. No information is available on its possible protective effects on the development of colon cancer. The potential blocking effect of Ab intake on the initiation stage of colon carcinogenesis was investigated in a short-term (4-week) bioassay using aberrant crypt foci (ACF) as biomarker. Male Wistar rats were given four subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 40 mg/kg bw, twice a week), during 2 weeks to induce ACF. The diet containing Ab at 5% was given 2 weeks before and during carcinogen treatment to investigate the potential beneficial effects of this edible mushroom on DMH-induced ACF. All groups were killed at the end of the fourth week. The colons were analyzed for ACF formation in 1% methylene blue whole-mount preparations and for cell proliferation in histological sections immunohistochemically stained for the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). All DMH-treated rats developed ACF mainly in the middle and distal colon. Agaricus blazei intake at 5% did not alter the number of ACF induced by DMH or the PCNA indices in the colonic mucosa. Thus, the results of the present study did not confirm a chemopreventive activity of Ab on the initiation stage of rat colon carcinogenesis.

  10. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  11. Food deprivation increases alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of jejunal epithelial transport in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Teixeira, V; Vieira-Coelho, M A; Serrão, M P; Soares-da-Silva, P

    2000-10-01

    This study examined the effect of food deprivation on the jejunal response to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor activation in young (20-d-old) and adult (60-d-old) rats, using short-circuit (I(sc)) measurements in the absence or presence of furosemide (1 mmol/L). The effect of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation by 5-bromo-N:-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK 14,304; 0.3-3000 nmol/L) was a concentration-dependent decrease in I(sc) with similar half-maximal effective concentration (EC(50); 12.3 +/- 1.1 vs. 9.6 +/- 1.1 nmol/L) and maximal effect (E(max); 70.6 +/- 6.9 vs. 80.6 +/- 4.5% of reduction) values in adult food-deprived and fed rats. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in fed and food-deprived rats was markedly (P: < 0.05) attenuated by furosemide (1 mmol/L). E(max) values for UK 14,304 in 20-d-old food-deprived rats were higher (P: < 0.05) than those observed in fed rats (93.3 +/- 3.3 vs. 67.0 +/- 11.3% of reduction), without differences in EC(50) values. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in 20-d-old fed rats was completely abolished by furosemide (1 mmol/L). In food-deprived young rats, the effect of UK 14,304 was also markedly (P: < 0.05) antagonized by furosemide, but not completely abolished. Specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding in membranes from jejunal epithelial cells revealed the presence of a single class of binding sites, with an apparent K:(D) in the low nmol/L range. In 20-d-old food-deprived rats, specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding was markedly increased, and this was reversed by refeeding. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in isolated jejunal epithelial cells from 60-d-old fed rats was twice that in 20-d-old fed rats [117 +/- 14 vs. 52 +/- 5 nmol free inorganic phosphorus/(mg protein.min)]. Food deprivation in adult rats, but not in 20-d-old rats, was accompanied by a significant decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In both young and adult rats (fed and food-deprived), UK 14,304 did not affect Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In conclusion, food

  12. Effects of Salmonella on spatial-temporal processes of jejunal development in chickens.

    PubMed

    Schokker, Dirkjan; Smits, Mari A; Hoekman, Arjan J W; Parmentier, Henk K; Rebel, Johanna M J

    2010-10-01

    To study effects of Salmonella enteritidis on morphological and functional changes in chicken jejunal development, we analysed gene expression profiles at seven points post-infection in 1-21 day-old broiler chickens. Nine clusters with different gene expression patterns were identified, and the genes in each cluster were further analyzed by a functional annotation clustering method (DAVID). Functional and morphological developmental processes dominated in all the nine clusters. Salmonella infection caused delays in several intestinal-morphological processes, whereas functional metabolic processes occurred in a similar spatial-temporal frame compared to normal jejunum development. A clear difference between normal developing- and Salmonella disturbed jejunum was the higher expression of genes involved in cell turn-over at early stages in the infected jejunum. Surprisingly, we found no clustered immune related processes in the infected birds. To compare the immunological processes between control and Salmonella infected chickens, the gene expression data was superimposed on known immunological KEGG pathways. Furthermore an in-depth analysis on the immune gene level was performed. As expected, we did find immunological processes in the Salmonella infected jejunum. Several of these processes could be verified by immunohistochemistry measurements of different immunological cell types. However, the well-ordered spatial-temporal development of the immune system, as observed in control non-infected animals, was completely abolished in the infected animals. Several immunological processes started much earlier in time, whereas other processes are disorganised. These data indicate that normal morphological and immunological development of jejunum is changed dramatically by a disturbance due to Salmonella infection. Due to the disturbance, the well-organized spatial-temporal development of morphological processes are delayed, those of the immunological development are

  13. Tales from the crypt: a parasitoid manipulates the behaviour of its parasite host

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sean M.; Forbes, Andrew A.; Egan, Scott P.

    2017-01-01

    There are many examples of apparent manipulation of host phenotype by parasites, yet few examples of hypermanipulation—where a phenotype-manipulating parasite is itself manipulated by a parasite. Moreover, few studies confirm manipulation is occurring by quantifying whether the host's changed phenotype increases parasite fitness. Here we describe a novel case of hypermanipulation, in which the crypt gall wasp Bassettia pallida (a phenotypic manipulator of its tree host) is manipulated by the parasitoid crypt-keeper wasp Euderus set, and show that the host's changed behaviour increases parasitoid fitness. Bassettia pallida parasitizes sand live oaks and induces the formation of a ‘crypt’ within developing stems. When parasitized by E. set, B. pallida adults excavate an emergence hole in the crypt wall, plug the hole with their head and die. We show experimentally that this phenomenon benefits E. set, as E. set that need to excavate an emergence hole themselves are about three times more likely to die trapped in the crypt. In addition, we discuss museum and field data to explore the distribution of the crypt-keeping phenomena. PMID:28123089

  14. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  15. Colonic GLP-2 is not Sufficient to Promote Jejunal Adaptation in a PN-Dependent Rat Model of Human Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthew C.; Liu, Xiaowen; Boehler, Christopher J.; Murali, Sangita G.; Holst, Jens J.; Ney, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bowel resection may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS), which often requires parenteral nutrition (PN) due to inadequate intestinal adaptation. The objective of this study was to determine the time course of adaptation and proglucagon system responses after bowel resection in a PN-dependent rat model of SBS. Methods Rats underwent jugular catheter placement and a 60% jejunoileal resection + cecectomy with jejunoileal anastomosis or transection control surgery. Rats were maintained exclusively with PN and killed at 4 hours to 12 days. A nonsurgical group served as baseline. Bowel growth and digestive capacity were assessed by mucosal mass, protein, DNA, histology, and sucrase activity. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and bioactive glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results Jejunum cellularity changed significantly over time with resection but not transection, peaking at days 3–4 and declining by day 12. Jejunum sucrase-specific activity decreased significantly with time after resection and transection. Colon crypt depth increased over time with resection but not transection, peaking at days 7–12. Plasma bioactive GLP-2 and colon proglucagon levels peaked from days 4–7 after resection and then approached baseline. Plasma IGF-I increased with resection through day 12. Jejunum and colon GLP-2 receptor RNAs peaked by day 1 and then declined below baseline. Conclusions After bowel resection resulting in SBS in the rat, peak proglucagon, plasma GLP-2, and GLP-2 receptor levels are insufficient to promote jejunal adaptation. The colon adapts with resection, expresses proglucagon, and should be preserved when possible in massive intestinal resection. PMID:19644131

  16. Jejunal Perforation: A Rare Presentation of Burkitt's Lymphoma—Successful Management

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Samir Ranjan; Rao, Ganni Bhaskara; Yerraguntla, Subramanya Sarma; Bodepudi, Sisir

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the small bowel presenting as acute abdomen are a rare occurrence. Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as a surgical emergency needing emergency laparotomy is an uncommon presentation of this tumor. We present an interesting case of jejunal perforation as a first manifestation of Burkitt's lymphoma which was successfully managed with surgical resection, high dose chemotherapy, and good supportive care. PMID:24995139

  17. One of the Rare Causes of Acute Abdomen Leading to Subileus: Jejunal Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Elçin; Yerli, Hasan; Avcı, Tevfik; Yılmaz, Tuğbahan; Gülay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Jejunal diverticulitis is one of the rare causes of acute abdomen generally seen in the elderly. Jejunal diverticulosis was defined as the herniation of the mucosa and the submucosa from the inside of the muscular layer of the bowel wall on the mesenteric side of the intestine. Case Report: We presented the intraoperative and pathological findings of a 69-year-old male patient who had presented with complaints about abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting and been operated upon due to subileus and peritonitis induced by large-sized jejunal diverticulitis, along with his computed tomography (CT) findings. Conclusion: Jejunal diverticulitis is uncommon and may be a disease which might be difficult to diagnose when it develops on the basis of the large-sized diverticula resembling intestinal ansae. To the best of our knowledge, the computed tomography and intraoperative findings of a case in which partial resection is applied to the jejunum due to subileus have not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:27308082

  18. Effect of jejunal infusion of nutrients on gastrointestinal transit and hormonal response in man.

    PubMed

    Vidon, N; Pfeiffer, A; Chayvialle, J A; Merite, F; Maurel, M; Franchisseur, C; Huchet, B; Bernier, J J

    1989-12-01

    The effects of jejunal infusion of nutrients on gastric emptying and secretion, intestinal transit and hormone release were studied in human volunteers. Two caloric loads, 1.3 and 3.3 kcal/min, of a nutrient solution consisting of 18 percent protein, 27 percent lipids, and 55 percent carbohydrates were tested. These were first used in random order in 6 subjects to assess the effects on intestinal transit. For the study of gastric emptying, jejunal infusion was started 1 h after intragastric instillation of a 490 kcal, 400 ml, homogenized meal. Intestinal transit time and gastric emptying half-time increased with the rate of nutrient infusion into the jejunum. Postprandial gastric secretion was reduced. The two caloric loads induced significant rises of plasma cholecystokinin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide concentrations. Plasma motilin decreased in relation to the jejunal caloric load. The other peptides were essentially not affected by jejunal nutrient infusion in fasting subjects. We conclude that in man, gastric emptying rate, gastric secretion, and intestinal transit are regulated by the presence of nutrients in the jejunum.

  19. The TRPA1 Activator Allyl Isothiocyanate (AITC) Contracts Human Jejunal Muscle: Pharmacological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Zsolt; Dekany, Andras; Kelemen, Dezsö; Bencsik, Timea; Papp, Robert; Bartho, Lorand

    2016-09-01

    The contractile effect of AITC (300 μM) on human jejunal longitudinal strips was inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonist HC 030031 and atropine or scopolamine, but was insensitive to tetrodotoxin, purinoceptor antagonists or capsaicin desensitization. It is concluded that TRPA1 activation stimulates a cholinergic mechanism in a tetrodotoxin-resistant manner.

  20. Electrophysiological response of chicken's jejunal epithelium to increasing levels of T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Kröger, Susan; Tichy, Alexander; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2013-02-01

    The present investigations were conducted to test the effects of T-2 toxin on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of chicken. Jejunal segments of broilers were monitored in Ussing chambers in the presence of T-2 toxin at the levels of 0 (negative control), 0 (methanol/vehicle control), 0.1, 1, 5, and 10 μg/ml of buffer. T-2 toxin did not affect basal values of short circuit current (I(sc)), transmural potential difference, or tissue conductivity in the jejunal epithelium. T-2 toxin also did not statistically affect glucose-induced electrophysiological variables during the first 3 min of glucose induction. Compared to the vehicle control, the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) was negatively affected (P = 0.008) only under 5 μg of T-2 toxin/ml. Increasing levels of T-2 toxin negatively affected the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) in a cubic (P = 0.007) fashion. These data indicate that acute exposure to moderate levels of T-2 toxin may progressively impair the cation gradient across the jejunal epithelium.

  1. Jejunal water and electrolyte secretion induced by L-arginine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, J E; Fairclough, P D; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1981-01-01

    In this study a perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal secretion in response to the dibasic amino acid L-arginine. L-arginine at 5, 15, and 40 mmol/l in isotonic saline solutions induced net intestinal secretion of water and Na+. The structurally similar dibasic amino acid L-lysine caused net absorption at 5 and 15 mmol/l, and only modest net secretion of water and Na+ at 40 mmol/l, although absorption rates of the two amino acids were similar. D-arginine (15 mmol/l) was without effect on net water and Na+ absorption. L-arginine 15 mmol/l inhibited glucose-stimulated water and Na+ absorption when perfused in the same intestinal segment, but was without effect when perfused in separate jejunal or ileal segments. Parenteral chlorpromazine inhibited L-arginine induced jejunal water and Na+ secretion. Jejunal secretion induced by L-arginine thus appears not to be due to passive osmotic water flow, nor to release of circulating secretagogues. Stimulation of a mucosal secretory process is most likely to be the mechanism. PMID:6783480

  2. Electroacupuncture at ST37 Enhances Jejunal Motility via Excitation of the Parasympathetic System in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Mengqian; Li, Yuqin; Wang, Yidan; Zhang, Na; Hu, XuanMing; Yin, Yin; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. The roles of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems in mediating the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at ST37 on jejunal motility have yet to be demonstrated. Aim. We used rats and mice to investigate the effect and mechanism of action of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility. Methods. Jejunal motility was recorded by a balloon placed in the jejunum and connected to a biological signal collection system through a transducer. The effects of EA (3 mA) at ST37 were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats without drugs and with the administration of clenbuterol, propranolol, acetylcholine, and atropine. Further, the efficacy of EA at different intensities (1/2/4/6/8 mA) was measured in wild-type mice and β1β2−/− mice and M2M3−/− mice. Results. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the excitatory effect of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility disappeared in the presence of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. EA at ST37 was less effective in M2M3−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Furthermore, to a certain extent, there existed “intensity-response” relationship between jejunal motility and EA. Conclusions. EA at ST37 can enhance jejunal motility in rats and mice mainly via excitation of the parasympathetic pathway. There is an “intensity-response” relationship between EA and effect on jejunal motility. PMID:27818700

  3. Disruption of the jejunal migrating motor complex by gastric distension and feeding in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, J S; Grundy, D; Scratcherd, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The jejunal motor response to gastric distension has been quantified in the conscious dog and compared with that of feeding in order to determine the role of the physical bulk of a meal in the conversion from fasted to fed motor activity. 2. In six dogs gastric distension abolished the cyclical migrating motor complex (m.m.c.) and evoked a pattern of continuous irregular jejunal motility similar to that seen postprandially, but only after a latency of 21.5 +/- 2.7 min compared to that of 7.1 +/- 1.2 min for the response to feeding. Computer analysis of distension and fed jejunal motility revealed similar distributions of intervals between contractions and contraction amplitudes with comparable mean values for both. 3. In two dogs with antrum and corpus surgically divided distension of the corpus had a similar effect on jejunal motility although the latency to both distension and feeding were considerably less. 4. By varying the period of distension it has been possible to control accurately the duration of the jejunal motor response and so assess its effectiveness in disrupting the timing of the m.m.c. The return to m.m.c. cycling following deflation was independent of preceding complexes. The occurrence of the post-distension activity front was closely related to the act of deflation itself (R = 0.94) following a latency of 26.2 +/- 2.1 min (n = 39). 5. It is concluded that the bulk of a meal contributes significantly to the early part of postprandial motility and is capable of disrupting the timing of subsequent migrating motor complexes. PMID:3443971

  4. Oncological outcome after free jejunal flap reconstruction for carcinoma of the hypopharynx.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jimmy Yu Wai; Chow, Velda Ling Yu; Chan, Richie Chiu Lung; Lau, Gregory Ian Siu Kee

    2012-07-01

    It has been a common practice among the oncologist to reduce the dosage of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients after free jejunal flap reconstruction. The current aims to study potential risk of radiation to the visceral flap and the subsequent oncological outcome. Between 1996 and 2010, consecutive patients with carcinoma of the hypopharynx requiring laryngectomy, circumferential pharyngectomy and post-operative irradiation were recruited. Ninety-six patients were recruited. TNM tumor staging at presentation was: stage II (40.6%), stage III (34.4%) and stage IV (25.0%). Median follow-up period after surgery was 68 months. After tumor ablation, reconstruction was performed using free jejunal flap (60.4%), pectoralis major myocutaneous (PM) flap (31.3%) and free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap (8.3%). All patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy within 6.4 weeks after surgery. The mean total dose of radiation given to those receiving cutaneous and jejunal flap reconstruction was 62.2 Gy and 54.8 Gy, respectively. There was no secondary ischaemia or necrosis of the flaps after radiotherapy. The 5-year actuarial loco-regional tumor control for the cutaneous flap and jejunal flap group was: stage II (61 vs. 69%, p = 0.9), stage III (36 vs. 46%, p = 0.2) and stage IV (32 vs. 14%, p = 0.04), respectively. Reduction of radiation dosage in free jejunal group adversely affects the oncological control in stage IV hypopharyngeal carcinoma. In such circumstances, tubed cutaneous flaps are the preferred reconstructive option, so that full-dose radiotherapy can be given.

  5. The ileal brake--inhibition of jejunal motility after ileal fat perfusion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R C; Trotman, I F; Higgins, B E; Ghatei, M A; Grimble, G K; Lee, Y C; Bloom, S R; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1984-01-01

    The possibility that malabsorbed fat passing through the human ileum exerts an inhibitory feedback control on jejunal motility has been investigated in 24 normal subjects by perfusing the ileum with a fat containing solution designed to produce ileal luminal fat concentrations similar to those in steatorrhoea (30-40 mg/ml). Mean transit times through a 30 cm saline perfused jejunal segment were measured by a dye dilution technique. Thirty minutes after ileal fat perfusion, mean transit times rose markedly to 18.9 +/- 2.5 minutes from a control value of 7.5 +/- 0.9 minutes (n = 5; p less than 0.05). This was associated with an increase in volume of the perfused segment which rose to 175.1 +/- 22.9 ml (control 97.6 +/- 10.3 ml, n = 5; p less than 0.05). Transit times and segmental volumes had returned towards basal values 90 minutes after completing the fat perfusion. Further studies showed that ileal fat perfusion produced a pronounced inhibition of jejunal pressure wave activity, percentage duration of activity falling from a control level of 40.3 +/- 5.0% to 14.9 +/- 2.8% in the hour after ileal perfusion (p less than 0.01). Ileal fat perfusion was associated with marked rises in plasma enteroglucagon and neurotensin, the peak values (218 +/- 37 and 68 +/- 13.1 pmol/l) being comparable with those observed postprandially in coeliac disease. These observations show the existence in man of an inhibitory intestinal control mechanism, whereby ileal fat perfusion inhibits jejunal motility and delays caudal transit of jejunal contents. PMID:6706215

  6. Supplementation with L-glutamine prevents tumor growth and cancer-induced cachexia as well as restores cell proliferation of intestinal mucosa of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Heber Amilcar; Sehaber, Camila Caviquioli; Hermes-Uliana, Catchia; Mariani, Fernando Augusto; Guarnier, Flavia Alessandra; Vicentini, Geraldo Emílio; Bossolani, Gleison Daion Piovezana; Jussani, Laraine Almeida; Lima, Mariana Machado; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the intestinal mucosa of the duodenum and jejunum of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats supplemented with L-glutamine. Thirty-two male 50-day-old Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were randomly divided into four groups: control (C), control supplemented with 2 % L-glutamine (GC), Walker-256 tumor (WT), and Walker-256 tumor supplemented with 2 % L-glutamine (TWG). Walker-256 tumor was induced by inoculation viable tumor cells in the right rear flank. After 10 days, celiotomy was performed and duodenal and jejunal tissues were removed and processed. We evaluated the cachexia index, proliferation index, villus height, crypt depth, total height of the intestinal wall, and number of goblet cells by the technique of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Induction of Walker-256 tumor promoted a reduction of metaphase index in the TW group animals, which was accompanied by a reduction in the villous height and crypt depths, resulting in atrophy of the intestinal wall as well as increased PAS-positive goblet cells. Supplementation with L-glutamine reduced the tumor growth and inhibited the development of the cachectic syndrome in animals of the TWG group. Furthermore, amino acid supplementation promoted beneficial effects on the intestinal mucosa in the TWG animals through restoration of the number of PAS-positive goblet cells. Therefore, supplementation with 2 % L-glutamine exhibited a promising role in the prevention of tumor growth and cancer-associated cachexia as well as restoring the intestinal mucosa in the duodenum and jejunum of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

  7. Dietary-feeding of Grape Seed Extract Prevents Azoxymethane-induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci Formation in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Balaiya; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2010-01-01

    Chemoprevention by dietary agents/supplements has emerged as a novel approach to control various malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). This study assessed dietary grape seed extract (GSE) effectiveness in preventing azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and associated mechanisms in Fischer 344 rats. Six-week old rats were injected with AOM, and fed control diet or the one supplemented with 0.25% or 0.5% (w/w) GSE in pre- and post-AOM or only post-AOM experimental protocols. At 16 weeks of age, rats were sacrificed and colons were evaluated for ACF formation followed by cell proliferation, apoptosis and molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry. GSE-feeding caused strong chemopreventive efficacy against AOM-induced ACF formation in terms of upto 60% (P<0.001) reduction in number of ACF and 66% (P<0.001) reduction in crypt multiplicity. Mechanistic studies showed that GSE-feeding inhibited AOM-induced cell proliferation but enhanced apoptosis in colon including ACF, together with a strong decrease in cyclin D1, COX-2, iNOS and survivin levels. Additional studies showed that GSE-feeding also decreased AOM-caused increase in β-catenin and NF-κB levels in colon tissues. Compared to control animals, GSE alone treatment did not show any considerable change in these biological and molecular events in colon, and was non-toxic. Together, these findings show the chemopreventive efficacy of GSE against the early steps of colon carcinogenesis in rats via likely targeting of β-catenin and NF-κB signaling, and suggest its potential usefulness for the prevention of human CRC. PMID:20564341

  8. Toxoplasma gondii causes death and plastic alteration in the jejunal myenteric plexus

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Eduardo José de Almeida; Zaniolo, Larissa Marchi; Vicentino, Suellen Laís; Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; Sant’Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of ME-49 Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) strain infection on the myenteric plexus and external muscle of the jejunum in rats. METHODS: Thirty rats were distributed into two groups: the control group (CG) (n = 15) received 1 mL of saline solution orally, and the infected group (IG) (n = 15) inoculated with 1 mL of saline solution containing 500 oocysts of M-49 T. gondii strain orally. After 36 d of infection, the rats were euthanized. Infection with T. gondii was confirmed by blood samples collected from all rats at the beginning and end of the experiment. The jejunum of five animals was removed and submitted to routine histological processing (paraffin) for analysis of external muscle thickness. The remaining jejunum from the others animals was used to analyze the general population and the NADH-diaphorase, VIPergic and nitrergic subpopulations of myenteric neurons; and the enteric glial cells (S100-IR). RESULTS: Serological analysis showed that animals from the IG were infected with the parasite. Hypertrophy affecting jejunal muscle thickness was observed in the IG rats (77.02 ± 42.71) in relation to the CG (51.40 ± 12.34), P < 0.05. In addition, 31.2% of the total number of myenteric neurons died (CG: 39839.3 ± 5362.3; IG: 26766.6 ± 2177.6; P < 0.05); hyperplasia of nitrergic myenteric neurons was observed (CG: 7959.0 ± 1290.4; IG: 10893.0 ± 1156.3; P < 0.05); general hypertrophy of the cell body in the remaining myenteric neurons was noted [CG: 232.5 (187.2-286.0); IG: 248.2 (204.4-293.0); P < 0.05]; hypertrophy of the smallest varicosities containing VIP neurotransmitter was seen (CG: 0.46 ± 0.10; IG: 0.80 ± 0.16; P < 0.05) and a reduction of 25.3% in enteric glia cells (CG: 12.64 ± 1.27; IG: 10.09 ± 2.10; P < 0.05) was observed in the infected rats. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that infection with oocysts of ME-49 T. gondii strain caused quantitative and plastic alterations in the myenteric plexus of the jejunum in rats. PMID

  9. Dietary milk fat globule membrane reduces the incidence of aberrant crypt foci in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Snow, Dallin R; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Ward, Robert E; Cambell, Jesse; Young, Michael J; Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry J

    2010-02-24

    Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is a biopolymer composed primarily of membrane proteins and lipids that surround the fat globules in milk. Although it is considered to have potential as a bioactive ingredient, few feeding studies have been conducted to measure its potential benefits. The aim of this investigation was to determine if dietary MFGM confers protection against colon carcinogenesis compared to diets containing corn oil (CO) or anhydrous milk fat (AMF). Male, weanling Fischer-344 rats were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments that differed only in the fat source: (1) AIN-76A diet, corn oil; (2) AIN-76A diet, AMF; and (3) AIN-76A diet, 50% MFGM, 50% AMF. Each diet contained 50 g/kg diet of fat. With the exception of the fat source, diets were formulated to be identical in macro and micro nutrient content. Animals were injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine once per week at weeks 3 and 4, and fed experimental diets for a total of 13 weeks. Over the course of the study dietary treatment did not affect food consumption, weight gain or body composition. After 13 weeks animals were sacrificed, colons were removed and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were counted by microscopy. Rats fed the MFGM diet (n = 16) had significantly fewer ACF (20.9 +/- 5.7) compared to rats fed corn oil (n = 17) or AMF (n = 16) diets (31.3 +/- 9.5 and 29.8 +/- 11.4 respectively; P < 0.05). Gene expression analysis of colonic mucosa did not reveal differential expression of candidate colon cancer genes, and the sphingolipid profile of the colonic mucosa was not affected by diet. While there were notable and significant differences in plasma and red blood cell lipids, there was no relationship to the cancer protection. These results support previous findings that dietary sphingolipids are protective against colon carcinogenesis yet extend this finding to MFGM, a milk fat fraction available as a food ingredient.

  10. Free jejunal flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction in head and neck cancer patients: An evaluation of donor site complications

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, Shantanu N.; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Matros, Evan; Paty, Philip B.; Cordeiro, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Free jejunal transfer for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction has often been criticized for its associated donor site morbidity. Conversely, the same argument has been invoked to support use of fasciocutaneous flaps, given their low incidence of donor site complications. The purpose of the current study was to document donor site complication rate with free jejunal flaps for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction, in the hands of an experienced surgeon. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of consecutive patients who underwent free jejunal transfer between 1992 and 2012 by the senior author. Demographic data, abdominal complications, surgical characteristics of small bowel anastomoses and postoperative bowel function were specifically noted. Results Ninety-two jejunal flap reconstructions were performed in 90 patients. Mean follow up time was 29 months. Twelve (13%) patients had prior abdominal surgery. Donor site complications included ileus (n=2), wound cellulitis (n=1), wound dehiscence (n=1) and small bowel obstruction (n=1). Mean time to initiation of tube feeds after reconstruction was 5 days. Seventy-seven (86.5%) patients were discharged on an oral diet. The perioperative mortality rate of 2% was not associated with any donor site complication. Conclusion Free jejunal transfer is associated with minimal and acceptable donor site complication rates. The choice of flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction should be determined by the type of defect, potential recipient site complications and the surgeon’s familiarity with the flap. Potential donor site complications should not be a deterrent for free jejunal flaps given the low rate described in this study. PMID:26220434

  11. Jejunal Diverticulitis Ascending to the Duodenum as a Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Fresow, Robert; Kamusella, Peter; Talanow, Roland; Andresen, Reimer

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 73 year-old Caucasian male with acute abdominal pain, peritonism and vomiting. Due to the severity of symptoms a CT examination of the abdomen was performed. The scans revealed multiple jejunal diverticula, wall thickening of the duodenum and jejunum, and free peritoneal fluid. No clear signs of mesenteric infarction, free abdominal air or abscess formation were seen. An additional exploratory laparotomy was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out the need for resection of small bowel. Since the results were matching, conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Jejunal diverticulitis is a rare cause of acute abdomen, however has to be considered as a differential diagnosis to more common entities. It usually stays localized, while in our case the inflammation ascended to the duodenum. CT is the modality of choice to diagnose and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:25302248

  12. The Combination of Gastroschisis, Jejunal Atresia, and Colonic Atresia in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Zachary; Nanagas, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a rare case of gastroschisis associated with jejunal atresia and colonic atresia. In our case, the jejunal atresia was not discovered for 27 days after the initial abdominal wall closure. The colonic atresia was not discovered for 48 days after initial repair of the gastroschisis secondary to the rarity of the disorder. Both types of atresia were repaired with primary hand-sewn anastomoses. Other than the prolonged parenteral nutrition and hyperbilirubinemia, our patient did very well throughout his hospital course. Based on our case presentation, small bowel atresia and colonic atresia must be considered in patients who undergo abdominal wall closure for gastroschisis with prolonged symptoms suggestive of bowel obstruction. Our case report also demonstrates primary enteric anastomosis as a safe, well-tolerated surgical option for patients with types of intestinal atresia. PMID:26180651

  13. Jejunal intussusception caused by a huge Vanek's tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Neishaboori, Hassan; Emadian, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp (known also as Vanek's tumor) is a type of localized, non-neoplastic inflammatory pseudotumor or inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor that occurs most commonly in the stomach but also in the small and large bowel. It is a documented cause of intussusception in adults. We report a case of a 40-year-old woman who presented with severe, postprandial abdominal pain followed by projectile vomiting over a period of three days. Ultrasonography demonstrated a solid and echogenic mass surrounded by the typical mural layers of an invaginated jejunum. She underwent urgent laparotomy and resection of an 18 cm tumor from the distal jejunum. The immuno-histopathological diagnosis after segmental jejunal resection was a jejunal inflammatory fibroid polyp. Although inflammatory fibroid polyps are seen very rarely in adults, they are among the probable diagnoses that should be considered in obstructive tumors of the small bowel causing intussusceptions. PMID:24834274

  14. Lanreotide inhibits human jejunal secretion induced by prostaglandin E1 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, I; René, E; Ramdani, A; Bayod, F; Sabbagh, L C; Thomas, F; Mignon, M

    1996-02-01

    1. Somatostatin inhibits hormonal secretions in the gastrointestinal tract. Somatostatin analogues are used in the treatment of VIPome-related watery diarrhoea. In addition, more than 10% of patients with AIDS suffer from diarrhoea likely due to the increased intestinal secretion of water and ions. However, the direct effect of somatostatin on the flux of water and ions in the intestine has not been, so far, analyzed in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of lanreotide, a somatostatin analogue, on the movements of water and ions in the jejunum in man. 2. Accordingly, 10 healthy volunteers (age 18-35 years, mean 27) and two patients with AIDS (26 and 33 years) suffering from water diarrhoea (> 800 ml day-1) underwent intestinal perfusion using a four lumen tube with proximal occluding balloon. The segment tested was 25 cm long. The jejunum was infused by an isotonic control saline solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as nonabsorbable marker. Basal jejunal secretions were measured in all subjects. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) was administered intraluminally to stimulate jejunal secretion in healthy volunteers. The effect of intravenous lanreotide on the jejunal PGE1-induced secretions of water and electrolytes was analysed in healthy subjects and on the basal secretions in AIDS patients. Each period was analyzed on the basis of three (10 min) successive intestinal juice collections after 20-30 min equilibration time. The antisecretory effect of lanreotide was evaluated in each subject as the difference between fluxes compared to the control period. 3. In healthy volunteers, PGE1 induced secretion of H2O, Na+, K+ and Cl- in the jejunum and lanreotide reduced significantly PGE1-induced response. In both AIDS patients basal fluxes of water and ions were reduced by lanreotide in a dose-dependent manner. 4. Somatostatin can reduce stimulated-jejunal secretion of ions and water in normal subjects and may improve water diarrhoea in AIDS

  15. Portal vein stent placement with or without varix embolization of jejunal variceal bleeding after hepatopancreatobiliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Shim, Dong Jae; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Yook; Han, Kichang; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Background Extrahepatic portal hypertension after surgery involving the duodenum or jejunum might result in massive ectopic variceal bleeding. Purpose To report the results of portal vein stent placement with the addition of variceal embolization. Material and Methods Between January 2000 and June 2015, portal vein stent placement was attempted in 477 patients. Of these, 22 patients (age, 63 ± 10 years) with jejunal variceal bleeding caused by portal vein obstruction after surgery were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) findings before and after treatment and the rates of technical and clinical success, complications, and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results Stent placement was successful in 19 of 22 patients. Additional variceal embolization was performed in five cases. Clinical success, defined as the cessation of bleeding without recurrence within 1 month, was achieved in 18 of 19 patients with technical success. One patient developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after stent placement and was successfully treated with additional variceal embolization. There were no procedure-related complications. A regression of the jejunal varices was noted in 14 of 19 patients on follow-up CT scans. During the follow-up period (258 days; range, 7-1196 days), stent occlusion and recurrent bleeding occurred in six and four patients, respectively, of the 19 patients who achieved technical success. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences regarding stent patency between benign and malignant strictures. Conclusion Percutaneous, transhepatic, portal vein stent placement with or without jejunal variceal embolization appears to be a safe and effective treatment for jejunal variceal bleeding after surgery.

  16. Chloride ion transport into pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Gabriel, S E

    1988-01-01

    1. This study was carried out to determine the types and activities of carrier proteins which transport the chloride ion in pig jejunal brush-border membranes, with an emphasis on studying the properties of chloride conductance activity in vesicles prepared from these membranes. 2. Sodium-chloride co-transport activity was not detected in this tissue. A sodium-proton antiport with typical amiloride sensitivity was present. An anion exchanger linking chloride to hydroxyl or bicarbonate ions was also found in the pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles. 3. Chloride conductance activity in this system was specifically dependent on the buffering agents used for vesicle preparation. Conductance activity could not be demonstrated in vesicles prepared in imidazolium acetate or in HEPES-Tris buffers. HEPES-tetramethylammonium buffering of vesicles in the chloride uptake system produced a significant conductance response to a potassium gradient plus valinomycin. 4. Chloride conductance showed saturable kinetics with respect to substrate concentration, with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of approximately 116 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 132 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. 5. Preliminary screening of potential inhibitors of chloride conductance showed only minimal inhibitor effects of SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-sulphonic acid), anthracene-9-carboxylate, N-phenylanthranilate and piretanide. 6. The conductance activity in pig jejunal vesicles appears to have stringent buffer requirements, and to be relatively insensitive to the effects of reported conductance inhibitors. PMID:2466986

  17. Effect of ethanol on jejunal regional blood flow in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Buell, M G; Beck, I T

    1983-01-01

    The effects of intraluminal ethanol perfusion (3.0% and 6.0% vt/vol) on mucosal morphology, water transport, and regional blood flow were examined in in vivo jejunal segments of pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits. Compared with control segments, ethanol-perfused segments exhibited morphological alterations of the mucosa consisting of subepithelial fluid accumulation (bleb formation), exfoliation of enterocytes, and vascular congestion. The prevalence of epithelial damage was significantly increased in the segments perfused with 6% ethanol. Net water transport was significant (p less than 0.025) depressed in segments perfused with 3.0% and 6.0% wt/vol ethanol. In animals in which the control segment was absorbing water, ethanol led to a depression in net water absorption or to the reversal of absorption to net secretion. In animals in which the control segment exhibited secretion, ethanol led to an enhanced net secretion. Blood flow through the total jejunal wall and through the luminal layer (consisting of mucosa plus submucosa) was significantly (p less than 0.05) increased by the presence of 3.0% and 6.0% wt/vol ethanol in the intestinal lumen. Blood flow in the external layer of the jejunum (consisting of muscularis plus serosa) did not change significantly. It therefore appears that the ethanol-induced alterations in jejunal mucosal morphology and water transport are accompanied by a localized mucosal or submucosal hyperemia, or both. However, a direct cause and effect relationship between these remains to be established.

  18. Jejunal Diverticulosis Presented with Acute Abdomen and Diverticulitis Complication: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Nurdan; Mermi, Esra Ummuhan; Acay, Mehtap Beker; Murat, Muammer; Zobaci, Ethem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare, usually asymptomatic disease. Its incidence increases with age. If symptomatic, diverticulosis may cause life-threatening acute complications such as diverticulitis, perforation, intestinal hemorrhage and obstruction. In this report, we aimed to present a 67-year-old male patient with jejunal diverticulitis accompanying with abdominal pain and vomiting. Case Report A 67-year-old male patient complaining of epigastric pain for a week and nausea and fever for a day presented to our emergency department. Ultrasonographic examination in our clinic revealed diverticulum-like images with thickened walls adjacent to the small intestine loops, and increase in the echogenicity of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography showed multiple diverticula, thickened walls with showing contrast enhancement and adjacent jejunum in the left middle quadrant, increased density of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue, and mesenteric lymph nodes. The patient was hospitalized by general surgery department with the diagnosis of jejunal diverticulitis. Conservative intravenous fluid administration and antibiotic therapy were initiated. Clinical symptoms regressed and the patient was discharged from hospital after 2 weeks. Conclusions In cases of diverticulitis it should be kept in mind that in patients with advanced age and pain in the left quadrant of the abdomen, diverticular disease causing mortality and morbidity does not always originate from the colon but might also originate from the jejunum. PMID:26715947

  19. Jejunal bypass stimulation of pancreatic growth and cholecystokinin secretion in rats: importance of luminal nutrients.

    PubMed Central

    Levan, V H; Liddle, R A; Green, G M

    1987-01-01

    The effect of jejunal bypass on pancreatic growth and plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) was investigated in rats. Rats underwent bypass of jejunum or sham operation. Rats with jejunal bypass were further divided into three groups; one group received a continuous infusion of a partially hydrolysed liquid diet (Vital) into the bypassed jejunum; a second group received the nutrient solution mixed with trypsin and infused into the bypassed jejunum; the third bypass group did not receive infusion of nutrient or trypsin into the jejunum. Jejunal bypass alone did not significantly stimulate pancreatic growth or DNA content at one or two weeks postoperative. Infusion of nutrient solution into the bypassed jejunum stimulated pancreatic growth and DNA content, with maximal increases of 185% and 181% for pancreatic weight and DNA content, respectively, at two weeks. This coincided with significant increases in postabsorptive plasma CCK concentrations. Infusion of pancreatic proteases into the bypassed jejunum partially reversed the effects of nutrient infusion. These results suggest that exclusion of bile-pancreatic juice or pancreatic proteases from the jejunum does not lead to maximal release of CCK unless the jejunum receives luminal nutrients. It is proposed that CCK release from rat jejunum occurs spontaneously in the absence of pancreatic proteases, and that luminal nutrients in bypassed jejunum increase plasma CCK and stimulate pancreatic growth by maintaining synthesis of CCK. PMID:3692314

  20. Microvascular Reconstruction of Free Jejunal Graft in Larynx-preserving Esophagectomy for Cervical Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Natori, Yuhei; Komoto, Masakazu; Matsumura, Takashi; Horiguchi, Masatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahioko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Losing the ability to speak severely affects the quality of life, and patients who have undergone laryngectomy tend to become depressed, which may lead to social withdrawal. Recently, with advancements in chemoradiotherapy and with alternative perspectives on postoperative quality of life, larynx preservation has been pursued; however, the selection of candidates and the optimal reconstructive procedure remain controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed our experience with free jejunal graft for larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (LPCE), focusing on microvascular reconstruction. Methods: Seven patients underwent LPCE for cervical esophageal carcinoma, and defects were reconstructed by free jejunal transfer subsequently. We collected preoperative and postoperative data of the patients and assessed the importance of the procedure. Results: We mostly used the transverse cervical artery as the recipient, and a longer operative time was required, particularly for the regrowth cases. The operative field for microvascular anastomosis was more limited and deeper than those in the laryngectomy cases. Two graft necrosis cases were confirmed at postoperative day 9 or 15, and vessels contralateral from the graft were chosen as recipients in both patients. Conclusions: Microvascular reconstruction for free jejunal graft in LPCE differed in several ways from the procedure combined with laryngectomy. Compression from the tracheal cartilage to the pedicle was suspected as the reason of the necrosis clinically and pathologically. Therefore, we should select recipient vessels from the ipsilateral side of the graft, and careful and extended monitoring of the flap should be considered to make this procedure successful. PMID:27257562

  1. Abnormal leukotriene C4 released by unaffected jejunal mucosa in patients with inactive Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Guarner, F; Antolín, M; Rodríguez, R; Salas, A; Malagelada, J R

    1994-01-01

    The mucosal release of inflammatory mediators is enhanced in active inflammatory bowel disease. This study examines whether leukotriene C4 production occurs in apparently unaffected segments of the gut. The intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 was determined by jejunal perfusion in seven healthy controls, in nine patients with chronic ulcerative colitis, and in 13 patients with Crohn's disease (six with ileal disease, and seven with only colonic). All patients were in clinical remission and none of them had evidence of jejunal involvement. Mild intraluminal irritation with a 2.5 mmol/l deoxycholic acid solution was induced to stimulate local inflammatory mechanisms. The release of DNA (a marker of mucosal desquamation) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was simultaneously measured. Jejunal release of DNA was higher in Crohn's disease patients than in ulcerative colitis or healthy controls. Basal release of PGE2 was similar in the three groups of patients. Basal release of leukotriene C4 was considerably enhanced, however, in Crohn's disease patients compared with healthy controls. In ulcerative colitis patients, basal leukotriene C4 release was non-significantly different from controls. Bile acid perfusion stimulated PGE2, leukotriene C4, and DNA release in all groups studied, but leukotriene C4 release was significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients. It is concluded that in inactive Crohn's disease there is an enhanced intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 in apparently unaffected segments of proximal small bowel, which may reflect fundamental changes in the function of the gut mucosal barrier. PMID:8174991

  2. Effects of different sulphur amino acids and dietary electrolyte balance levels on performance, jejunal morphology, and immunocompetence of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, V; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, E

    2016-02-01

    As alterations of dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) can influence amino acid metabolism via changes the ions incur in their configurations, performance and immunological responses of broiler chicks might be affected. So, the current study was carried out to investigate the effects of different levels of sulphur amino acids (SAA) and DEB on performance, jejunal morphology and immunocompetence of broiler chicks. A total of 360 1-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to nine experimental treatments with four replicates of 10 birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of SAA (100, 110, and 120% of NRC recommendation, provided by methionine supplementation in diets with the same cysteine level) and three levels of DEB (150, 250, and 350 mEq/kg) that were fed during the entire of trial in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement. Results showed that the relative weights of intestine and abdominal fat were decreased markedly (p < 0.001) with increasing levels of SAA and DEB respectively. Antibody titre against sheep red blood cell was neither individually nor in combination influenced by supplementation of SAA or DEB. Nevertheless, a decrease in DEB level led to a suppression in heterophile (p < 0.05) and an increase in lymphocyte counts (p = 0.06); consequently, heterophile to lymphocyte ratio was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by decremental levels of DEB. Albumin to globulin ratio was increased after inclusion of at least 10% SAA (p < 0.001) and 150 mEq DEB/kg in the diet (p = 0.11). Although feeding high-DEB level led to a remarkable decrease in villus height (p < 0.01) and goblet cell numbers (p < 0.001), supplementing the highest level of SAA improved the height of jejunal villus. During the entire trial period, average daily feed intake (ADFI) was increased by incremental SAA levels (p < 0.05). However, inclusion of 150 mEq/kg led to not only a remarkable increase (p < 0.0001) in both ADFI and average daily weight gain (ADWG) but

  3. Bivariate flow cytometric analysis of murine intestinal epithelial cells for cytokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Ng, C.R.; Gray, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the small intestine and the lack of methods to obtain pure crypt populations has, in the past, limited the application of standard flow cytometric analysis for cytokinetic studies of the proliferating crypts. The authors describe a flow cytometric technique to discriminate crypt and villus cells in an epithelial cell suspension on the basis of cell length, and to measure the DNA content of the discriminated subpopulations. These data indicate that bivariate analysis of a mixed epithelial cell suspension can be used to distinguish mature villus cells, G/sub 1/ crypt cells, and S-phase crypt cells. In addition, continuous labeling studies suggest that the position of a cell on the cell length axis reflects epithelial cell maturity. The authors applied this flow cytometric technique to determine the cytokinetic nature of epithelial cells obtained by sequential digestion of the small intestine. 22 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  4. D-Glucose Acts via SGLTI to Increase NHE3 in Mouse Jejunal Brush Border by a NHERF2-Dependent Process

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rong; Murtazina, Rakhilya; Cha, Boyoung; Chakraborty, Molee; Sarker, Rafiquel; Chen, Tian-e; Lin, Zhihong; Hogema, Boris M.; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Seidler, Ursula; Turner, Jerrold R.; Li, Xuhang; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Oral rehydration solutions (ORS) reduce diarrhea-associated mortality by unclear mechanisms. Sodium absorption is mediated by the Na+/H+ hydrogen exchanger NHE3 and is increased by Na+-glucose co-transport in vitro, but the mechanisms of this process are only partially understood and its in vivo relevance has not been determined. Methods Intracellular pH was measured in jejunal enterocytes of wild-type mice and mice with disrupted Na+/H+ exchange regulatory co-factor 2 (NHERF2−/− mice) by multi-photon microscopy. Diarrhea was induced by cholera toxin. Caco-2BBe cells that express NHE3 and the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT)1 were studied by fluorometery, before and after siRNA-mediated knockdown of NHERF1 or NHERF2. NHE3 distribution was assessed by cell-surface biotinylation and confocal microscopy. Brush border mobility was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and confocal microscopy. Results The non-metabolized SGLT1 substrate α-methyl-D-Glu (α-MD-G) activated jejunal NHE3; this process required Akt and NHERF2. α-MD-G normalized NHE3 activity after cholera toxin-induced diarrhea. α-MD-G–stimulated jejunal NHE3 activity was: defective in NHERF2−/− mice and cells with NHERF2 knockdown, but occurred normally with NHERF1 knockdown; associated with increased NHE3 surface expression in Caco-2 cells, which was also NHERF2-dependent; associated with dissociation of NHE3 from NHERF2 and an increase in the NHE3 mobile fraction from the brush border; and accompanied by a NHERF2 ezrin-radixin-moesin–binding domain-dependent increase in co-precipitation of ezrin with NHE3. Conclusions SGLT1-mediated Na-glucose co-transport stimulates NHE3 activity in vivo by an Akt- and NHERF2-dependent signaling pathway. It is associated with increased brush border NHE3 and association between ezrin and NHE3. Activation of NHE3 corrects cholera toxin-induced defects in Na absorption and might mediate efficacy of ORS. PMID:20977906

  5. The expression of genes involved in jejunal lipogenesis and lipoprotein synthesis is altered in morbidly obese subjects with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Garcia-Arnes, Juan; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalo, Montserrat; Soriguer, Federico; Moreno-Ruiz, Francisco J; Rodriguez-Cañete, Alberto; Gallego-Perales, Jose L; Alcain-Martinez, Guillermo; Vazquez-Pedreño, Luis; Lopez-Enriquez, Soledad; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, until now little attention has been paid to the role that the intestine might have. The aim of this research was to determine the relation between insulin resistance and intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis in morbidly obese subjects and to study the effect of insulin on these processes. Jejunal mRNA expression of the different genes involved in the intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis was analyzed in three groups of morbidly obese subjects: Group 1 with low insulin resistance (MO-low-IR), group 2 with high insulin resistance (MO-high-IR), and group 3 with T2DM and treatment with metformin (MO-metf-T2DM). In addition, intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from MO-low-IR were incubated with different doses of insulin/glucose. In Group 2 (MO-high-IR), the jejunal mRNA expression levels of apo A-IV, ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), pyruvate dehydrogenase (lipoamide) beta (PDHB), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were significantly higher and acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACC1) and fatty-acid synthase lower than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). In Group 3 (MO-metf-T2DM), only the ACLY and PDHB mRNA expressions were significantly higher than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). The mRNA expression of most of the genes studied was significantly linked to insulin and glucose levels. The incubation of IEC with different doses of insulin and glucose produced a higher expression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apo A-IV, SREBP-1c, and ACC1 when both, glucose and insulin, were at a high concentration. However, with only high insulin levels, there were higher apo A-IV, PDHB and SREBP-1c expressions, and a lower ACLY expression. In conclusion, the jejunum of MO-high-IR has a decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in de novo fatty-acid synthesis and an

  6. Rhythms of cell division of different periodicity in small intestinal cryptic epithelium and their contribution to circadian rhythm formation.

    PubMed

    Antokhin, A I; Zharkova, N A; Zakharchenko, A V; Romanov, Yu A

    2012-02-01

    We used an improved method of chronobiological information processing enabling not only to detect oscillations with different frequencies, but also to determine the significance of each harmonic. This has made it possible to identify significant high-power harmonics present in the majority of cell positions in the crypt. These harmonics make the major contribution to the formation of diurnal rhythm of cell division in the crypt and hence determine spatial and temporal organization of the proliferative system in the crypt.

  7. Duodenal-jejunal bypass normalizes pancreatic islet proliferation rate and function but not hepatic steatosis in hypothalamic obese rats.

    PubMed

    Cantelli, K R; Soares, G M; Ribeiro, R A; Balbo, S L; Lubaczeuski, C; Boschero, A C; Araújo, A C F; Bonfleur, M L

    2017-03-30

    Modifications in life-style and/or pharmacotherapies contribute to weight loss and ameliorate the metabolic profile of diet-induced obese humans and rodents. Since these strategies fail to treat hypothalamic obesity, we have assessed the possible mechanisms by which duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) surgery regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and the morphophysiology of pancreatic islets, in hypothalamic obese (HyO) rats. During the first 5 days of life, male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of monosodium glutamate (4 g/kg body weight, HyO group), or saline (CTL). At 90 days of age, HyO rats were randomly subjected to DJB (HyO DJB group) or sham surgery (HyO Sham group). HyO Sham rats were morbidly obese, insulin resistant, hypertriglyceridemic and displayed higher serum concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and hepatic triglyceride (TG). These effects were associated with higher expressions of the lipogenic genes and fatty acid synthase (FASN) protein content in the liver. Furthermore, hepatic genes involved in β-oxidation and TG export were down-regulated in HyO rats. In addition, these rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, β-cell hypersecretion, a higher percentage of islets and β-cell area/pancreas section, and enhanced nuclear content of Ki67 protein in islet-cells. At 2 months after DJB surgery, serum concentrations of TG and NEFA, but not hepatic TG accumulation and gene and protein expressions, were normalized in HyO rats. Insulin release and Ki67 positive cells were also normalized in HyO DJB islets. In conclusion, DJB decreased islet-cell proliferation, normalized insulinemia, and ameliorated insulin sensitivity and plasma lipid profile, independently of changes in hepatic metabolism.

  8. Jejunal wall triglyceride concentration of morbidly obese persons is lower in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Soriguer, F; García-Serrano, S; Garrido-Sánchez, L; Gutierrez-Repiso, C; Rojo-Martínez, G; Garcia-Escobar, E; García-Arnés, J; Gallego-Perales, J L; Delgado, V; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The overproduction of intestinal lipoproteins may contribute to the dyslipidemia found in diabetes. We studied the influence of diabetes on the fasting jejunal lipid content and its association with plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in the synthesis and secretion of these lipoproteins. The study was undertaken in 27 morbidly obese persons, 12 of whom had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The morbidly obese persons with diabetes had higher levels of chylomicron (CM) triglycerides (P < 0.001) and apolipoprotein (apo)B48 (P = 0.012). The jejunum samples obtained from the subjects with diabetes had a lower jejunal triglyceride content (P = 0.012) and angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) mRNA expression (P = 0.043). However, the apoA-IV mRNA expression was significantly greater (P = 0.036). The jejunal triglyceride content correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression (r = -0.587, P = 0.027). The variables that explained the jejunal triglyceride content in a multiple linear regression model were the insulin resistance state and the apoA-IV mRNA expression. Our results show that the morbidly obese subjects with diabetes had lower jejunal lipid content and that this correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression. These findings show that the jejunum appears to play an active role in lipid homeostasis in the fasting state.

  9. Fractionated low doses of abdominal irradiation alters jejunal uptake of nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, A.B.; Keelan, M.; Cheeseman, C.I.; Walker, K.

    1986-06-01

    Abdominal radiation is associated with changes in intestinal uptake of nutrients that begins within three days and persist for over 33 weeks. Clinically, fractionated doses of radiation (FDR) are used in an attempt to minimize the complications of this therapy, but the effects of fractionated doses of radiation on intestinal transport have not been defined. An in vitro technique was used to assess the jejunal and ileal uptake of varying concentrations of glucose and leucine, as well as the uptake of single concentrations of fatty acids and decanol in rats exposed 3, 7, and 14 days previously to a course of 200 cGy given on each of five consecutive days. FDR was associated with an increase in the uptake of decanol, and therefore a decrease in the effective resistance of the unstirred water layer. FDR had a variable effect on the uptake of glucose and leucine, with a decline in the value of the Michaelis constant (Km) and the passive permeability coefficient for glucose (Pd), whereas the Km for leucine was unchanged and the Pd for leucine was variably affected by FDR. The maximal transport rate (Jdm) for leucine progressively rose following FDR, whereas the Jdm for glucose initially rose, then fell. The uptake of galactose and medium chain-length fatty acids was unchanged by FDR, whereas the jejunal uptake of myristic acid rose, and the uptake of cholic acid declined, then returned to normal. FDR was associated with greater body weight gain and jejunal and ileal weight. The changes in nutrient uptake following FDR differed from the absorption changes occurring after a single dose of radiation. Thus, fractionated doses of abdominal radiation produce complex changes in the intestinal uptake of actively and passively transported nutrients, and these variable changes are influenced by the time following radiation exposure and by the solute studied.

  10. Cystic jejunal duplication with Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas, incidentally discovered in a patient with pancreatic tail neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Bara Jr, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a case of enteric duplication cyst and criteria for a proper differential diagnosis. A 51-year-old male was hospitalized for pancreatic tail neoplasm and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. During surgery, a jejunal cystic lesion was incidentally detected and jejunectomy was performed. Microscopically, the cyst was observed to be covered by Keratin 7/Keratin 20 positive intestinal type epithelium and the muscularis layer was shared by the cyst and adjacent jejunum, without a cleavage plane between the cyst wall and jejunal muscularis propria. In the deep muscularis propria, a Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas was also noted. In the pancreatic tail, a low grade intraepithelial lesion (panIN-1a) was diagnosed. This case highlights the necessity for a correct differential diagnosis of such rare lesions. Roughly 30 cases of jejunal duplication cysts have been reported to date in the PubMed database. PMID:27672644

  11. Multiple jejunal cancers resulting from combination of germline APC and MLH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lindor, Noralane M; Smyrk, Tom C; Buehler, Sheila; Gunawardena, Shanaka R; Thomas, Brittany C; Limburg, Paul; Kirmani, Salman; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2012-12-01

    Double heterozygotes for mutations in APC and a DNA mismatch repair gene are extremely rare. We report on an individual who had truncating mutations in APC and MLH1 whose clinical presentation initially resembled Familial Adenomatous Polyposis but then emerged as a novel phenotype with multiple jejunal carcinomas. We have reviewed the relevant literature on double heterozygotes and based on what has been reported to date, this phenotype was not anticipated. It may be useful for clinicians to be aware of this observation as clinical screening guidelines are proposed for such individuals.

  12. Beef tallow increases apoptosis and decreases aberrant crypt foci formation relative to soybean oil in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Khil, Jinmo; Gallaher, Daniel D

    2004-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies have implicated red meat as increasing colon cancer risk, animal studies have generally not been supportive of such an effect. This study examined red meat components, such as beef protein and tallow, on markers of colon cancer risk. Rats administered dimethylhydrazine were fed either casein or beef protein as the protein source and soybean oil or tallow as the fat source in a 2 2 factorial design for 9 wk. There were fewer preneoplastic lesions [aberrant crypt foci (ACF)] and a greater apoptotic labeling index (P < 0.05) in the distal colonic mucosa of rats fed tallow compared with soybean oil. Fecal bile acid concentrations were significantly lower in rats fed tallow compared with soybean oil. There were no significant differences in mucosal cell proliferation. No significant effects were found due to protein source or to interactions between fat and protein sources for ACF, cell proliferation labeling indexes, or bile acid concentrations. However, there was a significant protein by fat source interaction for the apoptotic labeling index. The decreased number of ACF, decreased fecal bile acid concentration, and increased mucosal apoptosis with tallow consumption are not consistent with a role for this fat in increasing risk of colon cancer.

  13. Cloudy apple juice decreases DNA damage, hyperproliferation and aberrant crypt foci development in the distal colon of DMH-initiated rats.

    PubMed

    Barth, S W; Fähndrich, C; Bub, A; Dietrich, H; Watzl, B; Will, F; Briviba, K; Rechkemmer, G

    2005-08-01

    Clear (CleA) and cloudy (CloA) apple juices containing different amounts of analyzed procyanidins and pectin were investigated for preventive effects of colon cancer and underlying molecular mechanisms in F344 rats given intraperitoneal injections of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH; 20 mg/kg body wt) once a week for 4 weeks. Rats received either water (Cont), CleA or CloA (ad libitum) for 7 weeks starting 1 week before the first DMH injection. CloA inhibited DMH induced genotoxic damage in mucosa cells of the distal colon compared with Cont as investigated by single-cell microgel electrophoresis assay. The mean tail intensity in mucosa cells of DMH-treated controls (Cont/DMH: 6.1+/-0.9%) was significantly reduced by CloA (2.4+/-0.8%; P<0.01) but not by CleA intervention (4.1+/-1.2%; P>0.05). The crypt cell proliferation index induced by DMH (Cont/NaCl: 10.0+/-0.7%; Cont/DMH: 19.9+/-1.0%; P<0.001) was significantly decreased by CleA (15.7+/-0.7%; P<0.001) and CloA intervention (11.9+/-0.4%; P<0.001). CloA but not CleA significantly reduced the number of large aberrant crypt foci (ACF) consisting of more than four aberrant crypts (AC) (Cont/DMH: 37.4+/-5.4; CleA/DMH: 32.8+/-4.4, P>0.05; CloA/DMH: 18.8+/-2.5 ACF; P<0.05) and the overall mean ACF size in the distal colon (Cont/DMH: 2.31+/-0.09; CleA/DMH: 2.27+/-0.05; CloA/DMH: 2.04+/-0.03 AC/ACF; P<0.05). After treatment with DMH and/or apple juices there were no changes in transcript levels of colonic cyclooxygenase isoforms (COX-1, COX-2) or glutathione-associated enzymes (GST-M2, gamma-GCS, GST-P), the splenocyte natural killer cell activity and plasma antioxidant status. However, CloA but not CleA prevented the DMH-induced reduction of splenocyte CD4/CD8 (T-helper cells to cytotoxic lymphocytes) ratio. Since both formulations contained comparable concentrations and types of monomeric polyphenols, complex polyphenols or non-polyphenolic compounds, such as pectin might be responsible for the stronger cancer

  14. Dual effect of chronic nicotine administration: augmentation of jejunitis and amelioration of colitis induced by iodoacetamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Cohen, P; Heyman, S N; Rachmilewitz, D

    2001-02-01

    Smoking has a dichotomous effect on inflammatory bowel disease, ameliorating disease activity in ulcerative colitis but having a deleterious effect on Crohn's disease. This effect is thought to be due to nicotine. We investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on the small and large bowel in iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis and colitis. Jejunitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intrajejunal administration of 0.1 ml 2% iodoacetamide and colitis by intrarectal administration of 0.1 ml 3% iodoacetamide. Nicotine was dissolved in drinking water (12.5 or 250 micrograms/ml), rats drinking ad libitum. Nicotine administration started 10 days prior to damage induction and throughout the experiment and had no effect on weight gain or daily food intake of rats. Rats were killed 5 days after iodoacetamide-induced colitis and 7 days after induction of jejunitis. The jejunum and colon were resected, rinsed, weighed, damage assessed macroscopically and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation. Effects of nicotine on gut microcirculation were also assessed. Nicotine by itself caused no damage to the colon. Nicotine had a dichotomous effect on jejunitis and colitis. At a dose of 12.5 micrograms/ml nicotine improved the macroscopic damage of colitis from 252 +/- 66 to 70 +/- 31 mm2, and segmental weight also declined significantly in the colon (from 1.7 +/- 0.2 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 g/10 cm). In contrast, the same dose of nicotine had a deleterious effect on iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis, increasing the macroscopic damage from 368 +/- 38 to 460 +/- 97 mm2 in rats treated with injury escalating to 970 +/- 147 in rats treated with 250 micrograms/ml nicotine. Nicotine treatment also significantly increased jejunal segmental weight. By itself nicotine did not change NOS activity or PGE2 generation compared to control rats, but it enhanced microcirculation in the colon

  15. Antibodies as crypts of antiinfective and antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Cunha, R L O R; Travassos, L R; Polonelli, L

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs), often associated with antimicrobial and antitumor agents, have emerged as an important class of novel drugs for antigen-driven therapeutic purposes in diverse clinical settings, including oncology and infectious diseases. Abs commonly give rise in the treated host to anti-Ab responses, which may induce adverse reactions and limit their therapeutic efficacy. Their modular domain architecture has been exploited to generate alternative reduced formats (Fabs, scFvs, dAbs, minibodies, multibodies), essentially devoid of the Fc region. The presence of complementarity determining regions (CDRs) ensures the maintenance of selective binding to antigens and supports their use for biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Paradigmatic Abs mimicking the wide-spectrum antimicrobial activity of a yeast killer toxin (killer Abs) have revealed the existence of a family of Abs exerting a direct in vitro and/or in vivo microbicidal activity. Based on the variable sequence of an antiidiotypic recombinant killer Ab, CDR-related peptides have been synthesized, engineered by alanine-scanning and selected according to antimicrobial, antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. Irrespective of the native Ab specificity, synthetic CDRs from unrelated murine and human monoclonal Abs, have shown to display differential in vitro, in vivo and/or ex vivo antifungal (Candida albicans), antiviral (HIV-1) and antitumor (melanoma cells) activities. Alanine substitution of single residues of synthetic CDR peptides resulted in further differential increased/unaltered/decreased biological activity. The intriguing potential of Abs as source of antiinfective and antitumor therapeutics will be discussed, in light of recent advances in peptide design, stability and delivery.

  16. A case of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis diagnosed by double-balloon enteroscopy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ignacio; Latorre, Rafael; Soria, Federico; Carballo, Fernando; Lopez-Albors, Octavio; Buendia, Antonio J; Perez-Cuadrado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    A 3 yr old male English setter dog was presented for evaluation of a 6-wk history of intermittent diarrhea. After standard gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy showed normal mucosa, double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) was used via both oral and anal approaches. Gross changes consistent with inflammation in the jejunum were seen, and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histologic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis. Clinical remission of the disease occurred after 3 mo of therapy with prednisone, metronidazole, and a novel protein diet. Use of DBE has not been previously reported in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease, and isolated lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis has not been described. The described cases of intestinal inflammatory disease diagnosed by conventional endoscopy were related to pathologic changes in the duodenum, ileum or colon, but not the jejunum. The main advantage of the DBE technique allowed examination of portions of the small intestine (jejunum) that were not commonly accessible by standard endoscopic techniques, and permitted a minimally invasive collection of biopsy samples compared with surgical biopsy. This case highlights the need to consider using DBE in animals with gastrointestinal disorders, whose symptoms are not readily explained by routine tests, conventional endoscopy, and dietary or therapeutic trials.

  17. Life-threating upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to a primary aorto-jejunal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Fernández de Sevilla, Elena; Echeverri, Juan Andrés; Boqué, Miriam; Valverde, Silvia; Ortega, Nuria; Gené, Anna; Rodríguez, Nivardo; Balibrea, José María; Armengol, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary aorto-enteric fistula (AEF) is an uncommon life-threating condition. Only 4% of them involve the jejunum or ileum and its mortality ranges from 33 to 85%. Presentation of case A 54-year-old female was admitted to the Emergency Department with syncope and hematemesis. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy found a pulsatile vessel in the second portion of the duodenum. A computed tomography scan showed an AEF with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and iliac artery thrombosis. During surgery, an infrarenal aortic aneurysm complicated with an aorto-jejunal fistula was found. An axilo-bifemoral bypass, open repair of the aneurysm and segmental small bowel resection with primary suture of the jejunal defect were performed. Discussion Depending on previous aortic grafting, AEF can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary AEF is usually caused by an untreated abdominal aortic aneurysm, commonly presenting an infectious etiology. The main clinical sign is a “herald” hemorrhage. The EGD is considered as the first step in diagnosing AEF. The treatment of choice for AEF is emergent surgery. Use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is mandatory in the postoperative period to avoid fistula recurrence. Conclusion AEF is a rare entity with a high mortality. High clinical suspicion is essential to make a correct diagnosis, which is crucial for the prognosis of these patients, such is the case of our patient. If hemodynamic stability is achieved, it allows to employ surgical strategies in which extra-abdominal bypass is performed before fistula is treated. PMID:25616071

  18. Vagal influences on the jejunal 'minute rhythm' in the anaesthetized ferret.

    PubMed Central

    Collman, P I; Grundy, D; Scratcherd, T

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous jejunal motility in the urethane-anaesthetized ferret shows a cyclical pattern of contraction bursts alternating with quiescent periods described as 'minute rhythm' in conscious animals. Cooling the cervical vagi to below 4 degrees C or acute vagotomy abolished this pattern of motility. On re-warming the vagi there was a return to cyclical motility after a latency which depended upon the contractile state at the time vagal conduction was restored. Electrical vagal stimulation produced bursts of contractions at the same frequency as the spontaneous motility. Longer periods of stimulation gave rise to bursts of contractions interrupted by periods of relative quiescence, mimicking the spontaneous motility, despite the continuous stimulation. Following atropinization all spontaneous motility was abolished, but electrical stimulation of the vagi revealed a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic response whose characteristics differed from that of the cholinergic response. It is concluded that the vagus plays a permissive role in regulating the jejunal 'minute rhythm' via a cholinergic pathway and that there is a second excitatory vagal pathway which innervates non-cholinergic post-ganglionic neurones whose functional significance and transmitter mechanism is unknown. PMID:6663513

  19. An unusual presentation of a malignant jejunal tumor and a different management strategy.

    PubMed

    Samaiya, Atul; Deo, Sv Suryanarayana; Thulkar, Sanjay; Hazarika, Sidhartha; Kumar, Sunil; Parida, Dillip K; Shukla, Nootan K

    2005-01-09

    BACKGROUND: Malignant small bowel tumors are very rare and leiomyosarcoma accounts for less than 15% of the cases. Management of these tumors is challenging in view of nonspecific symptoms, unusual presentation and high incidence of metastasis. In this case report, an unusual presentation of jejunal sarcoma and management of liver metastasis with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is discussed. CASE PRESENTATION: A 45-year-old male presented with anemia and features of small bowel obstruction. Operative findings revealed a mass lesion in jejunum with intussusception of proximal loop. Resection of bowel mass was performed. Histopathological findings were suggestive of leiomyosarcoma. After 3-years of follow-up, the patient developed recurrence in infracolic omentum and a liver metastasis. The omental mass was resected and liver lesion was managed with radiofrequency ablation. CONCLUSION: Jejunal leiomyosarcoma is a rare variety of malignant small bowel tumor and a clinical presentation with intussusception is unusual. We suggest that an aggressive management approach using a combination of surgery and a newer technique like RFA can be attempted in patients with limited metastatic spread to liver to prolong the long-term survival in a subset of patients.

  20. Evidence of amiloride-sensitive fluid absorption in rat descending colonic crypts from fluorescence recovery of FITC-labelled dextran after photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Pedley, Kevin C; Naftalin, Richard J

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled 10 and 250 kDa dextran (FITC dextran) in isolated rat descending colonic crypts was measured at 35 °C using laser scanning confocal microscopy. FRAP of either 10 or 250 kDa FITC dextran in crypt lumens was almost complete within 2–3 min. In the presence of amiloride (0.1 mm), or in the absence of Na+, the rate of FITC dextran uptake into the crypt lumens was reduced by 70–80 %. The rate of fluid uptake into the crypt lumen, as estimated from the rate of total FITC dextran uptake into the crypt lumen and its adjacent pericryptal region after FRAP, was between 1.3 × 10−3 and 1.7 × 10−3 cm s−1. Convective flow during FRAP was also determined from the initial rate of FITC dextran advance along the crypt lumen. This effect was almost completely blocked by amiloride (0.1 mm). The permeability of 10 kDa FITC dextran across the descending colonic crypt wall was found to be higher than that of 250 kDa FITC dextran (3.7 (± 0.6) × 10−5 and 1.8 (± 0.3) × 10−6 cm s−1, respectively; n = 3 for both, P < 0.01). The permeability of the caecal crypt wall to 10 kDa dextran was higher than that of the descending crypt wall (2.03 (± 0.21) × 10−5 cm s−1; n = 3, P < 0.025). Simulation of the flow of Na+, water and FITC dextran into the crypt lumen and across the crypt wall and pericryptal sheath corroborates the observed parameters of water and Na+ flows. PMID:11600688

  1. Chromoendoscopy with a Standard-Resolution Colonoscope for Evaluation of Rectal Aberrant Crypt Foci

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Marcin; Zinkiewicz, Krzysztof; Kurpiewski, Waldemar; Kowalczyk, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death worldwide. According to the theory by Vogelstein, colorectal carcinogenesis involves a series of successive changes in the normal colonic mucosa, starting with excessive proliferation and focal disorders of intestinal crypts, followed by adenoma and its subsequent malignant transformation. The first identifiable changes in CRC carcinogenesis are aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ACF are invisible during routine colonoscopy yet are well identifiable in chromoendoscopy using methylene blue or indigo carmine. High-resolution colonoscopes are used for assessment of ACF. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of standard-resolution colonoscopy for identification of rectal ACF. The following parameters were evaluated: duration of chromoendoscopy of a given rectal segment, type of ACF, sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy combined with histopathological evaluation. The mean duration of colonoscopy and chromoendoscopy was 26.8 min. In the study population, typical ACF were found in 73 patients (p = 0.489), hyperplastic ACF in 49 (p = 0.328), and dysplastic ACF in 16 patients (p = 0.107). Mixed ACF were observed in 11 individuals (p = 0.073). The sensitivity of the method was found to be 0.96 whereas its specificity 0.99. Identification of rectal ACF using standard-resolution colonoscopy combined with rectal mucosa staining with 0.25% methylene blue is characterised by high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26886097

  2. Fluorescence-based SMC and OCT endoscope to study aberrant crypt foci in the mouse colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Molly; Leung, Sarah; Rice, Faith; Wall, R. Andrew; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2013-03-01

    The accepted model of colorectal cancer assumes the paradigm that aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are the earliest events in tumorigenesis and develop into adenoma, which further develop into adenocarcinoma. Under this assumption, basic research and drug studies have been performed using ACF as substitute markers for fully developed carcinoma. While studies have shown a correlation between the number of ACF present and the presence of adenoma/adenocarcinoma, a causal relationship has yet to be determined. The mouse has shown to be an excellent model for colorectal cancer; however, the outcomes of such experiments require sacrifice and histologic examination of ex vivo tissue. To better utilize the mouse model to study ACF and adenoma development, an endoscope was constructed for non-destructive in vivo surface visualization, molecular imaging and cross-sectional imaging of the colon. Our system combines surface magnifying chromoendoscopy (SMC) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image colon microstructure. Sixteen mice, treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane, were imaged at 2 week intervals, to visualize carcinogenesis events. With this dual-modality system we are able to visualize crypt structure alteration over time as well as adenoma development over time.

  3. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  4. Intussusception and volvulus secondary to jejunal adenocarcinoma in an adult Nigerian male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okolo, C A; Afolabi, A O; Sahabi, S M

    2010-12-01

    A 31 year-old Nigerian man with jejuno-jejunal intussusception with the lead point being an adenocarcinoma complicated by small intestinal volvulus is presented. The subtle clinical features of an underlying small bowel malignancy were masked by the overwhelming clinical and radiological features of intussusception. rare case is reported to remind clinicians to have an increased index of suspicion of malignancy in patients who present with the usual features of chronic anemia, weight loss and loss of appetite with an intra-abdominal mass. The presentation of acute intestinal obstruction, with mesenteric vein thrombosis probably due to intussusception or volvulus should not however lower the suspicion. Histological evaluation of surgical biopsies is of immense importance.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE GASTRO-JEJUNO-DUODENAL TRANSIT AFTER JEJUNAL POUCH INTERPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; GOMES, Célio Geraldo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background : The jejunal pouch interposition between the gastric body and the duodenum after the gastrectomy, although not frequent in the surgical practice today, has been successfully employed for the prevention and treatment of the postgastrectomy syndromes. In the latter, it is included the dumping syndrome, which affects 13-58% of the patients who undergo gastrectomy. Aim : Retrospective assessment of the results of this procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome. Methods : Fourty patients were selected and treatetd surgically for peptic ulcer, between 1965 and 1970. Of these, 29 underwent vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunalduodenostomy at the lesser curvature level, and the 11 remaining were submitted to vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunal-duodenostomy at the greater curvature level. The gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit was assessed in the immediate or late postoperative with the contrasted study of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The clinical evolution was assessed according to the Visick grade. Results : Of the 40 patients, 28 were followed with the contrast evaluation in the late postoperative. Among those who were followed until the first month (n=22), 20 (90%) had slow gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit and in two (10%) the transit was normal. Among those who were followed after the first month (n=16), three (19%) and 13 (81%) had slow and normal gastric emptying, respectively. None had the contrasted exam compatible with the dumping syndrome. Among the 40 patients, 22 underwent postoperative clinical evaluation. Of these, 19 (86,5%) had excellent and good results (Visick 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusions : The jejunal pouch interposition showed to be a very effective surgical procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome in gastrectomized patients. PMID:26734789

  6. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  7. The suppression of aberrant crypt multiplicity in colonic tissue of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated C57BL/6J mice by dietary flavone is associated with an increased expression of Krebs cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Isabel; Diehl, Daniela; Oesterle, Doris; Daniel, Hannelore; Wenzel, Uwe

    2007-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with diet playing a prominent role in disease initiation and progression. Flavonoids are secondary plant compounds that are suggested as protective ingredients of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. We here tested whether flavone, a flavonoid that proved to be an effective apoptosis inducer in colon cancer cells in culture, can affect the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs) in C57BL/6J mice in vivo when preneoplastic lesions were induced by the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Flavone applied at either a low dose (15 mg/kg body wt per day) or a high dose (400 mg/kg body wt per day) reduced the numbers of ACFs significantly, independent of whether it was supplied simultaneously with the carcinogen (blocking group) or subsequent to the tumor induction phase (suppressing group). Proteome analysis performed in colonic tissue samples revealed that flavone treatment increased the expression of a number of Krebs cycle enzymes in the suppressing group and this was associated with reduced crypt multiplicity. It suggests that mitochondrial substrate oxidation is increased by flavone in colonic cells in vivo as already observed in HT-29 cells in vitro as the prime mechanism underlying tumor cell apoptosis induction by flavone. In conclusion, flavone reduces the number of ACFs in DMH-treated mice at doses that can be achieved for flavonoids by a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Moreover, reduction in crypt multiplicity by flavone is most probably due to the preservation of a normal oxidative metabolism.

  8. Basic fibroblast growth factor suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis and TP53 pathway in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Sekine, Ichiro

    2010-07-01

    The effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was studied in radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were administered 4 mg/kg bFGF intraperitoneally 25 h before receiving 8 Gy whole-body X rays. The jejunum was removed for analysis from time 0 to 120 h after irradiation. Villus length in control rats declined steadily until 72 h, while in bFGF-treated rats the villi were longer than in the controls until 48 h. Crypt lengths were similar to villi. bFGF treatment increased Ki-67-positive cells in the jejunal crypt at 0, 24 and 48 h. The treatment with bFGF reduced the number of apoptotic cells per jejunal crypt to 23% and 10% of the control values at 3 and 6 h, respectively, and increased numbers of mitotic cells significantly at 48 and 72 h. bFGF decreased the levels of TP53, CDKN1A, Puma and Cleaved caspase 3 at 3 h as detected by Western blot analyses. Our results suggest that bFGF protected against acute radiation-induced injury by suppressing the crypt apoptotic cells including the stem cells and promoted crypt cell proliferation. The inhibition of apoptosis thus might be related to suppression of the TP53 pathway.

  9. Dietary cardamom inhibits the formation of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in mice and reduces COX-2 and iNOS expression in the colon.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Archana; Ghosh, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Shamee

    2005-01-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been focused on identifying naturally occurring chemopreventive compounds capable of inhibiting, retarding, or reversing the multi-step carcinogenesis. The primary aim of the present study was to identify the effects of a commonly consumed spice, viz., cardamom against azoxymethane (AOM) induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in Swiss Albino mice. The secondary aim, was to explore the ability of cardamom to modulate the status of proliferation and apoptosis, and to understand its role in altering cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Male Swiss albino mice were injected with AOM (dose: 5mg/Kg body weight) or saline (Group 1) weekly once for two weeks. The AOM-injected mice were randomly assigned to two groups (Groups 2 and 3). While all the groups were on standard lab chow, Group 3 received oral doses of 0.5% cardamom, in aqueous suspension, daily for 8 weeks. Following treatment, significant reduction in the incidences of aberrant crypt foci (p<0.05) was observed. This reduction in ACF was accompanied by suppression of cell proliferation (mean Brdu LI in carcinogen control =13.91+/-3.31, and 0.5% cardamom =2.723+/-0.830) and induction of apoptosis (mean AI in carcinogen control=1.547+/-0.42 and 0.5% cardamom = 6.61+/-0.55). Moreover, reduction of both COX-2 and iNOS expression was also observed. These results suggest that aqueous suspensions of cardamom have protective effects on experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis. Cardamom as a whole and its active components require further attention if the use of this spice is to be recommended for cancer prevention.

  10. Effective suppression of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci formation in mice with citrus peel flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Liu, Cheng Bin; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-03-01

    Citrus peel or its extract has been reported to exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activity. Herein, we report the first investigation of inhibitory effects of a formulated product from citrus peel extract, gold lotion (GL), on azoxymethane-induced colonic tumorigenesis. We have demonstrated that oral feeding of GL decreased the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), particularly large size of ACF in colonic tissues of mice. Both gene and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were suppressed by GL treatment. The in vivo data have revealed for the first time that the citrus peel extract-GL-is an effective antitumor agent mechanistically downregulating the protein levels of iNOS, COX-2, ornithine decarboxylase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 in colonic tissues of mice, suggesting that GL is a novel functional natural product capable of preventing inflammation-associated colon tumorigenesis.

  11. Evaluation of blueberry juice in mouse azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypts and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-González, Isela; Garcia-Melo, Fernando; Vásquez-Garzón, Verónica R; Villa-Treviño, Saúl; Madrigal-Santillán, E Osiris; Morales-González, José A; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Blueberry is a plant with a number of nutritional and biomedical capabilities. In the present study we initially evaluated the capacity of its juice (BJ) to inhibit the number of aberrant crypts (AC) induced with azoxymethane (AOM) in mouse. BJ was administered daily by the oral route to three groups of animals during four weeks (1.6, 4.1, and 15.0 μL/g), respectively, while AOM (10 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to the mentioned groups, twice a week, in weeks two and three of the assay. We also included two control groups of mice, one administered distilled water and the other the high dose of BJ. A significant increase of AC was observed in the AOM treated animals, and a mean protection of 75.6% was determined with the two low doses of BJ tested; however, the high dose of the juice administered together with AOM increased the number of crypts more than four times the value observed in animals administered only AOM. Furthermore, we determined the antioxidant potential of BJ with an ex vivo DPPH assay and found a dose-dependent decrease with a mean of 19.5%. We also determined the DNA oxidation/antioxidation by identifying 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine adducts and found a mean decrease of 44.3% with the BJ administration with respect to the level induced by AOM. Our results show a complex differential effect of BJ related to the tested doses, opening the need to further evaluate a number of factors so as to determine the possibility of a cocarcinogenic potential.

  12. Evaluation of Blueberry Juice in Mouse Azoxymethane-Induced Aberrant Crypts and Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Isela; Garcia-Melo, Fernando; Vásquez-Garzón, Verónica R.; Villa-Treviño, Saúl; Madrigal-Santillán, E. Osiris; Morales-González, José A.; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A.; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Blueberry is a plant with a number of nutritional and biomedical capabilities. In the present study we initially evaluated the capacity of its juice (BJ) to inhibit the number of aberrant crypts (AC) induced with azoxymethane (AOM) in mouse. BJ was administered daily by the oral route to three groups of animals during four weeks (1.6, 4.1, and 15.0 μL/g), respectively, while AOM (10 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to the mentioned groups, twice a week, in weeks two and three of the assay. We also included two control groups of mice, one administered distilled water and the other the high dose of BJ. A significant increase of AC was observed in the AOM treated animals, and a mean protection of 75.6% was determined with the two low doses of BJ tested; however, the high dose of the juice administered together with AOM increased the number of crypts more than four times the value observed in animals administered only AOM. Furthermore, we determined the antioxidant potential of BJ with an ex vivo DPPH assay and found a dose-dependent decrease with a mean of 19.5%. We also determined the DNA oxidation/antioxidation by identifying 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine adducts and found a mean decrease of 44.3% with the BJ administration with respect to the level induced by AOM. Our results show a complex differential effect of BJ related to the tested doses, opening the need to further evaluate a number of factors so as to determine the possibility of a cocarcinogenic potential. PMID:25258642

  13. Isolation of Cokeromyces recurvatus, initially misidentified as Coccidioides immitis, from peritoneal fluid in a cat with jejunal perforation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Cheri; Sutton, Deanna A; Matise, Ilze; Kirchhof, Nicole; Libal, Melissa C

    2005-07-01

    Cokeromyces recurvatus, a zygomycete, was isolated by fungal culture from the peritoneal fluid of a cat with jejunal perforation secondary to intestinal lymphosarcoma. This organism has not been recovered previously from a veterinary patient. The tissue form of C. recurvatus is morphologically similar to those of Coccidioides immitis and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and may be misdiagnosed as 1 of these organisms on the basis of cytologic or histopathologic specimens, particularly in geographic regions where these organisms are not endemic.

  14. The complex arrangement of an "aorto-jejunal paraduodenal" fossa, as revealed by dissection of human posterior parietal peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Barberini, Fabrizio; Zani, Augusto; Ripani, Maurizio; Di Nitto, Valentina; Brunone, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    Peritoneal fossae derive from normal or anomalous coalescence of the peritoneum during fetal development, or from the course of retroperitoneal vessels. Clinically, internal abdominal hernias may be housed inside these fossae. In this report from an autopsy, a singular peritoneal fossa was delimited superiorly by an arcuate serous fold, raised up by the inferior mesenteric vein, and infero-posteriorly by two (right and left) avascular folds, extending from the abdominal aorta to the jejunum. The right fold reached the duodeno-jejunal flexure, which was located on the right side of the aorta. The left fold subdivided into two, anterior and posterior, secondary folds. The anterior fold reached the superior edge of the first jejunal loop, and the posterior fold turned medially to connect with the inferior edge of the proximal limb of the same loop. This fossa consisted of three recesses: superior, Located behind the subserous vascular arch, antero-inferior and postero-inferior, separated by interposition of the left posterior secondary fold, between the jejunum and aorta. The complex arrangement of this fossa suggests that it might have originated from a coalescence arising beyond the duodeno-jejunal flexure and including the first jejunal loop, and from the subserous course of the inferior mesenteric vein. Because of displacement to the right of the flexure, processes of coalescence in a location normally occupied by the ascending duodenum might have occurred in a similar pattern for the jejunum, involving the mesoduodenum and the proximal part of the mesentery. Labyrinthine fossae like this might cause strangulation of internal abdominal hernias and hinder intraoperative maneuvers.

  15. Enhanced jejunal production of antibodies to Klebsiella and other Enterobacteria in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Maki-Ikola, O.; Hallgren, R.; Kanerud, L.; Feltelius, N.; Knutsson, L.; Granfors, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To measure gut immunity directly in jejunal fluid in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Antibodies against three different Enterobacterias were measured in jejunal perfusion fluids (collected by a double balloon perfusion device) of 19 patients with AS, 14 patients with RA, and 22 healthy controls using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.
RESULTS—The AS patients had significantly increased jejunal fluid concentrations of IgM, IgG, and IgA class antibodies against Klebsiella pneumoniae, and IgM and IgA class antibodies against Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis compared with healthy controls. When compared with the patients with RA, the AS patients had higher concentrations of IgA and IgG class antibodies only against K pneumoniae. The RA patients had higher IgM class antibody concentrations against all three studied Enterobacterias, when compared with the healthy controls, suggesting an enhanced mucosal immune response in these patients. A three month treatment with sulphasalazine did not decrease enterobacterial antibody concentrations in the 10 patients with AS.
CONCLUSION—There is strong direct evidence for an abnormal mucosal humoral immune response particularly to K pneumoniae in patients with AS.

 PMID:9486004

  16. Effect of dietary fiber on absorption of B-6 vitamers in a rat jejunal perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L B; Gregory, J F; Cerda, J J

    1983-09-01

    Previous research has indicated that dietary fiber may affect the absorption and utilization of certain nutrients. To determine the effect of certain fiber materials on the absorption of B-6 vitamers, jejunal segments from young male adult rats were perfused in situ with a control solution containing 0.02 mM pyridoxine (PN), 0.02 mM pyridoxal (PL), and 0.02 mM pyridoxamine (PM), followed by a test solution containing the same vitamin B-6 mixture and one of five fiber-rich test materials (cellulose, pectin, lignin, homogenized fresh carrot, or carrot homogenized after 10 min boiling) added at a concentration of 1-3%. The mean absorption rates of PL, PN, and PM from the control solution were, respectively, 3.66 +/- 0.23, 2.06 +/- 0.23, and 1.74 +/- 0.37 nmole/min/20 cm jejunal segment. There were no significant differences between the absorption rates of B-6 vitamers from control and test solutions containing cellulose, pectin, and lignin. The absorption rates of PM and PL were significantly depressed (P less than 0.05 and P less than 0.01, respectively) by the presence of fresh or cooked carrot. The absorption rate of PN in presence of cooked carrot was also decreased relative to the control value but the difference was only marginally significant (P less than 0.10). When the concentration of fresh carrot in the test solution was increased to 10% by weight and the perfusion rate was decreased from 1.91 to 0.49 ml/min in a second perfusion experiment, there was a significant increase in variability and the differences between absorption rates of the B-6 vitamers in control and test solutions were not statistically significant. The limited evidence of adverse effect of carrot on absorption of vitamin B-6 suggested the need for further clarification of the influence of dietary fiber in an unrefined state on the bioavailability of vitamin B-6.

  17. Grape Seed Extract Dose-Responsively Decreases Disease Severity in a Rat Model of Mucositis; Concomitantly Enhancing Chemotherapeutic Effectiveness in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Ker Yeaw; Howarth, Gordon Stanley; Bastian, Susan Elaine Putnam

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mucositis is a serious disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that results from cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the effects of increasing grape seed extract doses on the severity of chemotherapy in a rat model and its coincident impact on chemotherapeutic effectiveness in colon cancer cells. Design Female Dark Agouti rats were gavaged with grape seed extract (400–1000 mg/kg) or water (day 3–11) and were injected intraperitoneally with 5-Fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) or saline (control) on day 9 to induce mucositis. Daily metabolic data were collected and rats were sacrificed on day 12. Intestinal tissues were collected for histological and myeloperoxidase analyses. Caco-2 cell viability was examined in response to grape seed extract in combination with 5-Fluorouracil by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay. Results Compared with 5-Fluorouracil controls, grape seed extract (400–1000 mg/kg) significantly decreased the histological damage score (P<0.05) in the jejunum. Grape seed extract (1000 mg/kg) increased jejunal crypt depth by 25% (P<0.05) in 5-Fluorouracil treated rats compared to 5-Fluorouracil controls, and attenuated the 5-Fluorouracil -induced reduction of mucosal thickness (25%, P<0.05). Grape seed extract (600 mg/kg) decreased myeloperoxidase activity by 55% (P<0.01) compared to 5-Fluorouracil controls. Grape seed extract was more effective at ameliorating 5-Fluorouracil induced intestinal injury, with effects most pronounced in the proximal jejunum. Grape seed extract (10–25 ug/mL) significantly enhanced the growth-inhibitory effects of 5-Fluorouracil by 26% (P<0.05) in Caco-2 cells and was more potent than 5-Fluorouracil at 50–100 µg/mL. Conclusion Grape seed extract may represent a new therapeutic option to decrease the symptoms of intestinal mucositis while concurrently impacting on the viability of colon cancer cells. PMID:24465501

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus control and atherosclerosis prevention in a non-obese rat model using duodenal-jejunal bypass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Huang, Zhen; Ran, Wenhua; Liao, Gang; Zha, Lang; Wang, Ziwei

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent disease worldwide and during its conventional treatment, vascular complications remain unavoidable. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) is able to induce the remission of T2DM. However, studies of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), a modified procedure of GBP, are being carried out to investigate its ability to induce the remission of T2DM and protect the aorta from atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of DJB on the rate of T2DM remission and the prevention of atherosclerosis in the aorta in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes without obesity, and to explore the mechanism of DJB in protecting the aorta from atherosclerosis. A T2DM rat model was established with a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. Surgery was performed to analyze its effects on glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, inflammation and pathological changes. Furthermore, changes in c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKKβ) genes in the aorta following DJB surgery were examined. Levels of blood glucose, lipids, insulin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were significantly elevated in the T2DM diabetic model compared with the non-diabetic control. A gradual recovery was observed in the DJB group following surgery. Foam cells and atherosclerotic plaques appeared in the ascending aortic tissue in the sham-surgery and T2DM groups, whereas only slight lesions were observed in the DJB group. The expression levels of JNK1 and IKKβ genes in the aorta were significantly increased in the sham-operated and T2DM groups compared with those in the DJB and normal control groups. The present study demonstrated that DJB caused remission of T2DM without weight loss in non-obese rats. Thus, DJB may delay or prevent the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis in the aorta and this may occur through the JNK1 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways.

  19. Formation of independently revascularized bowel segments using the rectus abdominis muscle flap: a rat model for jejunal prefabrication.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Chen, Hung-Chi; Wei, Fu-Chan; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Lan, Chyn-Tair; See, Lai-Chu; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2002-02-01

    Reconstruction of the pharyngoesophagus with free jejunal transfer is a major challenge when recipient neck vessels are absent because of previous surgery or irradiation. In such instances, jejunal transfer using a muscle flap as a "vascular carrier" may be a problem-solving alternative. Pretransfer vascularization of the jejunum is achieved by wrapping the muscle flap around the small bowel segment. After a short staging period, the mesenteric pedicle is divided and the bowel segment is transferred up to the neck based on its new blood supply. The objectives of this study were to develop an animal model for prefabricating independently revascularized jejunal segments using the rectus abdominis muscle flap and to determine the minimal time required for independent bowel survival. Twenty-four mature (500-g to 700-g) rats were divided into six experimental groups of four animals each. In each animal, a 1.5-cm segment of proximal jejunum was isolated on two jejunal arteries and wrapped with a superior pedicled rectus abdominis muscle flap. To determine the time of neovascular takeover, the mesenteric pedicles were ligated on postoperative day 2 (group I), day 3 (group II), day 4 (group III), day 5 (group IV), day 6 (group V), and day 7 (group VI). At the time of pedicle ligation, the composite flap was transposed to a new subcutaneous position. Viability of bowel was assessed according to gross appearance and histologic examination 48 hours after transfer. Complete survival of revascularized jejunum in 11 of 12 animals was obtained after pedicle ligation on postoperative day 5 and beyond (p < 0.0001, Fisher's exact test). These bowel segments demonstrated luminal patency, intact pink mucosa, mucus production, and visible peristalsis. Histologic examination showed healthy intestinal epithelium and tissue integration along the serosa-muscle interphase. In contrast, pedicle ligation on day 4 and earlier resulted in varying degrees of bowel necrosis characterized by

  20. Stress and strain analysis of contractions during ramp distension in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian; Gregersen, Hans

    2011-07-28

    Previous studies have demonstrated morphological and biomechanical remodeling in the intestine proximal to an obstruction. The present study aimed to obtain stress and strain thresholds to initiate contraction and the maximal contraction stress and strain in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments. Partial obstruction and sham operations were surgically created in mid-jejunum of male guinea pigs. The animals survived 2, 4, 7 and 14 days. Animals not being operated on served as normal controls. The segments were used for no-load state, zero-stress state and distension analyses. The segment was inflated to 10 cmH(2)O pressure in an organ bath containing 37°C Krebs solution and the outer diameter change was monitored. The stress and strain at the contraction threshold and at maximum contraction were computed from the diameter, pressure and the zero-stress state data. Young's modulus was determined at the contraction threshold. The muscle layer thickness in obstructed intestinal segments increased up to 300%. Compared with sham-obstructed and normal groups, the contraction stress threshold, the maximum contraction stress and the Young's modulus at the contraction threshold increased whereas the strain threshold and maximum contraction strain decreased after 7 days obstruction (P<0.05 and 0.01). In conclusion, in the partially obstructed intestinal segments, a larger distension force was needed to evoke contraction likely due to tissue remodeling. Higher contraction stresses were produced and the contraction deformation (strain) became smaller.

  1. Stress and strain analysis of contractions during ramp distension in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian; Gregersen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated morphological and biomechanical remodeling in the intestine proximal to an obstruction. The present study aimed to obtain stress and strain thresholds to initiate contraction and the maximal contraction stress and strain in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments. Partial obstruction and sham operations were surgically created in mid-jejunum of male guinea pigs. The animals survived 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. Animals not being operated on served as normal controls. The segments were used for no-load state, zero-stress state and distension analyses. The segment was inflated to 10 cmH2O pressure in an organ bath containing 37°C Krebs solution and the outer diameter change was monitored. The stress and strain at the contraction threshold and at maximum contraction were computed from the diameter, pressure and the zero-stress state data. Young’s modulus was determined at the contraction threshold. The muscle layer thickness in obstructed intestinal segments increased up to 300%. Compared with sham-obstructed and normal groups, the contraction stress threshold, the maximum contraction stress and the Young’s modulus at the contraction threshold increased whereas the strain threshold and maximum contraction strain decreased after 7 days obstruction (P<0.05 and 0.01). In conclusion, in the partially obstructed intestinal segments, a larger distension force was needed to evoke contraction likely due to tissue remodeling. Higher contraction stresses were produced and the contraction deformation (strain) became smaller. PMID:21632056

  2. Nicotinic acid inhibits enterotoxin-induced jejunal secretion in the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Kapitany, R A; Scoot, A

    1981-01-01

    The use of nicotinic acid for preventing intestinal secretion caused by cholera toxin and by the heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli has been investigated in the weanling pig. Secretory effects were measured in ligated jejunal loops of halothane-anesthetized pigs by dilution of a nonabsorbable marker added to the loop fluid. Different routes of administration and different initial pH values for nicotinate solutions were studied to determine optimal conditions for secretory inhibition. The neutral sodium salt of nicotinic acid had no significant antisecretory activity under any conditions used in these trials. Inhibition of secretion was most effective with partly neutralized nicotinic acid at pH 4.5 added directly to loops containing enterotoxin. Net fluid secretion induced by cholera toxin or heat-stable enterotoxin of E. coli was prevented by this treatment. Reversal of secretion was not accompanied by any measurable changes in cyclic nucleotide concentration in intestinal mucosa. Nicotinic acid antagonism of a secretory step common to cholera toxin and heat-stable enterotoxin of E. coli but subsequent to cyclic nucleotide involvement is indicated by these data. PMID:7020893

  3. Anemia and jejunal intussusception: An unusual presentation for a metastatic phyllodes breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    Schechet, Sidney A.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Dhamne, Sagar; Scott, Bradford G.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare cause of breast cancer, accounting for less than 0.5% of breast cancers. These tumors are classified as benign, borderline, or malignant, with malignant tumors compromising nearly 25% of cases. Metastases occur in 20% of malignant tumors, lungs, bones, liver and brain being the frequent sites of metastases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a metastatic phyllodes tumor to the small bowel causing jejunal intussusception, symptomatic anemia, and small bowel obstruction. DISCUSSION Patients with phyllodes tumor of the breast can develop disease recurrence even years after initial treatment. Phyllodes tumor metastasizing to the small bowel is extremely rare, with only three known previously described case reports in the literature. CONCLUSION High risk patients, with a past medical history of phyllodes breast cancer, should be monitored closely. Even years after breast cancer treatment, these patients may present with gastrointestinal complaints such as obstruction or bleeding, and therefore metastatic disease to the small bowel should be considered on the differential with subsequent abdominal imaging obtained. PMID:22288047

  4. Food-grade TiO2 impairs intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis, initiates preneoplastic lesions and promotes aberrant crypt development in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Sarah; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Cartier, Christel; Coméra, Christine; Gaultier, Eric; Dupuy, Jacques; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Grysan, Patrick; Reguer, Solenn; Thieriet, Nathalie; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Thiaudière, Dominique; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Carrière, Marie; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Pierre, Fabrice H; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Houdeau, Eric

    2017-01-20

    Food-grade titanium dioxide (TiO2) containing a nanoscale particle fraction (TiO2-NPs) is approved as a white pigment (E171 in Europe) in common foodstuffs, including confectionary. There are growing concerns that daily oral TiO2-NP intake is associated with an increased risk of chronic intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. In rats orally exposed for one week to E171 at human relevant levels, titanium was detected in the immune cells of Peyer's patches (PP) as observed with the TiO2-NP model NM-105. Dendritic cell frequency increased in PP regardless of the TiO2 treatment, while regulatory T cells involved in dampening inflammatory responses decreased with E171 only, an effect still observed after 100 days of treatment. In all TiO2-treated rats, stimulation of immune cells isolated from PP showed a decrease in Thelper (Th)-1 IFN-γ secretion, while splenic Th1/Th17 inflammatory responses sharply increased. E171 or NM-105 for one week did not initiate intestinal inflammation, while a 100-day E171 treatment promoted colon microinflammation and initiated preneoplastic lesions while also fostering the growth of aberrant crypt foci in a chemically induced carcinogenesis model. These data should be considered for risk assessments of the susceptibility to Th17-driven autoimmune diseases and to colorectal cancer in humans exposed to TiO2 from dietary sources.

  5. Food-grade TiO2 impairs intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis, initiates preneoplastic lesions and promotes aberrant crypt development in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Bettini, Sarah; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Cartier, Christel; Coméra, Christine; Gaultier, Eric; Dupuy, Jacques; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Grysan, Patrick; Reguer, Solenn; Thieriet, Nathalie; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Thiaudière, Dominique; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Carrière, Marie; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Pierre, Fabrice H.; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Houdeau, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Food-grade titanium dioxide (TiO2) containing a nanoscale particle fraction (TiO2-NPs) is approved as a white pigment (E171 in Europe) in common foodstuffs, including confectionary. There are growing concerns that daily oral TiO2-NP intake is associated with an increased risk of chronic intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. In rats orally exposed for one week to E171 at human relevant levels, titanium was detected in the immune cells of Peyer’s patches (PP) as observed with the TiO2-NP model NM-105. Dendritic cell frequency increased in PP regardless of the TiO2 treatment, while regulatory T cells involved in dampening inflammatory responses decreased with E171 only, an effect still observed after 100 days of treatment. In all TiO2-treated rats, stimulation of immune cells isolated from PP showed a decrease in Thelper (Th)-1 IFN-γ secretion, while splenic Th1/Th17 inflammatory responses sharply increased. E171 or NM-105 for one week did not initiate intestinal inflammation, while a 100-day E171 treatment promoted colon microinflammation and initiated preneoplastic lesions while also fostering the growth of aberrant crypt foci in a chemically induced carcinogenesis model. These data should be considered for risk assessments of the susceptibility to Th17-driven autoimmune diseases and to colorectal cancer in humans exposed to TiO2 from dietary sources. PMID:28106049

  6. Ground-penetrating radar investigation of St. Leonard's Crypt under the Wawel Cathedral (Cracow, Poland) - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Andrea; Pajewski, Lara; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Avlonitou, Pepi; Konstantakis, Yannis; Musiela, Małgorzata; Mitka, Bartosz; Lambot, Sébastien; Żakowska, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The Wawel ensemble, including the Royal Castle, the Wawel Cathedral and other monuments, is perched on top of the Wawel hill immediately south of the Cracow Old Town, and is by far the most important collection of buildings in Poland. St. Leonard's Crypt is located under the Wawel Cathedral of St Stanislaus BM and St Wenceslaus M. It was built in the years 1090-1117 and was the western crypt of the pre-existing Romanesque Wawel Cathedral, so-called Hermanowska. Pope John Paul II said his first Mass on the altar of St. Leonard's Crypt on November 2, 1946, one day after his priestly ordination. The interior of the crypt is divided by eight columns into three naves with vaulted ceiling and ended with one apse. The tomb of Bishop Maurus, who died in 1118, is in the middle of the crypt under the floor; an inscription "+ MAVRVS EPC MCXVIII +" indicates the burial place and was made in 1938 after the completion of archaeological works which resulted in the discovery of this tomb. Moreover, the crypt hosts the tombs of six Polish kings and heroes: Michał Korybut Wiśniowiecki (King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth), Jan III Sobieski (King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Commander at the Battle of Vienna), Maria Kazimiera (Queen of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and consort to Jan III Sobieski), Józef Poniatowski (Prince of Poland and Marshal of France), Tadeusz Kościuszko (Polish general, revolutionary and a Brigadier General in the American Revolutionary War) and Władysław Sikorski (Prime Minister of the Polish Government in Exile and Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Armed Forces). The adjacent six crypts and corridors host the tombs of the other Polish kings, from Sigismund the Old to Augustus II the Strong, their families and several Polish heroes. In May 2015, the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" organised and offered a Training School (TS) on the

  7. Evaluation of Chemopreventive Effects of Acanthus ilicifolius against Azoxymethane-Induced Aberrant Crypt Foci in the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Almagrami, Amel A.; Alshawsh, Mohammed A.; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Shwter, Abdrabuh; Salem, Sameer D.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acanthus ilicifolius, a mangrove medicinal plant, is traditionally used to treat a variety of diseases. The aim of this research is to assess the chemoprotective outcomes of A. ilicifolius ethanolic extract against azoxymethane (AOM) induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings In our study, rats were arranged in to five groups. Rats in the normal control group were given subcutaneous injections of normal saline once weekly for 2 weeks. The AOM control, reference and treatment groups were given subcutaneous injection of AOM, 15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 2 weeks each. The reference group was treated with 35 mg/kg 5-Fluorouracil via intraperitoneal injection once weekly for 8 weeks, and the treatment groups were administered by gavage with 250 and 500 mg/kg A. ilicifolius extract daily for 8 weeks. Both normal and AOM control groups received the vehicle; 10% Tween-20 only. Rats treated with 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of A. ilicifolius extracts showed a decrease in the mean number of ACF by 65% and 53%, respectively. Those fed with A. ilicifolius showed significantly decreased multiplicity of ACF formations when compared with the results from the AOM control group. The 250 mg/kg A. ilicifolius treatment group showed significant decreases in lipid peroxidation MDA levels when compared with the AOM control group. In immunohistochemistry staining, the proliferating nuclear cell antigen (PCNA)-positive cells were significantly higher in the AOM control group than in the A. ilicifolius-treated groups. RT-PCR showed that A. ilicifolius caused a change in the regulation of apoptosis-related genes expression. Conclusion/Significance The results of the current study show that AOM-treated rats receiving oral exposure to A. ilicifolius demonstrated a significant decrease in the number of ACF in the colon when compared to AOM-treated rats receiving vehicle only. A ilicifolius may be an effective herbal approach for the

  8. {beta}-Catenin stabilization imparts crypt progenitor phenotype to hyperproliferating colonic epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, Joseph H.; Wang Yu; Singh, Pomila; Umar, Shahid

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the Citrobacter rodentium (CR)-induced transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia (TMCH) model, we provide mechanistic basis of changes in {beta}-catenin/APC/CKI{epsilon} leading to progression and/or regression of hyperplasia in vivo. In response to CR-induced TMCH, crypt lengths increased significantly between days 6-27 post-infection, followed by a steep decline by day 34. {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/total {beta}-catenin were elevated on day 1 post-infection, preceding changes in crypt length, and persisted for 27 days before declining by day 34. Importantly, cellular CKI{epsilon} and {beta}-catenin co-immunoprecipitated and exhibited remarkable parallel changes in kinetics during hyperplasia/regression phases. {beta}-catenin, phosphorylated at Ser33,37 and Thr41 ({beta}-cat{sup 33,37/41}), was low till day 12, followed by gradual increase until day 27 before declining by day 34. GSK-3{beta} exhibited significant Ser{sup 9}-phosphorylation/inactivation at days 6-12 with partial recovery at days 27-34. Wild type (wt) APC (p312) levels increased at day 6 with transient proteolysis/truncation to p130 form between days 12 and 15; p312 reappeared by day 19 and returned to baseline by day 34. The kinetics of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin nuclear accumulation and acetylation (Ac-{beta}-Cat{sup Lys49}) from days 6 to 27, followed by loss of phosphorylation/acetylation by day 34 was almost identical; Tcf-4 co-immunoprecipitated with {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin and localized immunohistochemically to {beta}-Cat{sup 41/45}-positive regions leading to elevated cyclin D1 expression, during the hyperproliferative, but not regression phases of TMCH. CKI{epsilon} mediated phosphorylation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}, resulting in stabilization/nuclear translocation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45} may be critical for maintaining proliferation at days 6-27. Reversal of GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation and APC changes may be equally critical during the regression phase from days 27 to 34.

  9. A Rare Case of Jejunal Arterio-Venous Fistula: Treatment with Superselective Catheter Embolization with a Tracker-18 Catheter and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Martin J. Anderson, Suzanne E.; Lourens, Steven; Triller, Juergen

    2004-11-15

    Arterio-venous fistulas may develop spontaneously, following trauma or infection, or be iatrogenic in nature. We present a rare case of a jejunal arterio- venous fistula in a 35-year-old man with a history of pancreatic head resection that had been performed two years previously because of chronic pancreatitis. The patient was admitted with acute upper abdominal pain, vomiting and an abdominal machinery-type bruit. The diagnosis of a jejunal arterio-venous fistula was established by MR imaging. Transfemoral angiography was performed to assess the possibility of catheter embolization. The angiographic study revealed a small aneurysm of the third jejunal artery, abnormal early filling of dilated jejunal veins and marked filling of the slightly dilated portal vein (13-14 mm). We considered the presence of segmental portal hypertension. The patient was treated with coil embolization in the same angiographic session. This case report demonstrates the importance of auscultation of the abdomen in the initial clinical examination. MR imaging and color Doppler ultrasound are excellent noninvasive tools in establishing the diagnosis. The role of interventional radiological techniques in the treatment of early portal hypertension secondary to jejunal arterio-venous fistula is discussed at a time when this condition is still asymptomatic. A review of the current literature is included.

  10. Non-ionic diffusion and carrier-mediated transport drive extracellullar pH regulation of mouse colonic crypts.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Montrose, M H

    1996-01-01

    1. Extracellular pH (pHo) regulation within mouse colonic crypt lumens is stimulated by transepithelial gradients of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Current work assesses underlying mechanisms contributing to pHo regulation. 2. Crypt luminal alkalinization was saturable by apical SCFA (substrate concentration activating half-maximal transport (KT) of isobutyrate = 45 mM). However, saturation was consistent with either carrier-mediated SCFA flux or non-ionic diffusion, because the non-ionized form was titrated by luminal alkalinization. Direct acidification of apical perfusates increased the magnitude of SCFA-induced luminal alkalinization, roughly in the same proportion to the increased concentration of non-ionized SCFA in the crypt lumen. 3. Transepithelial gradients of an alternative weak acid (CO2) produce pHo changes similar to SCFA. In contrast, a weak base (NH3) changes pHo with reverse dependence on the orientation of the transepithelial gradient compared with SCFA. Results implicate non-ionic diffusion in pHo regulation, and suggest that pHo changes may underly SCFA-stimulated bicarbonate secretion and ammonium absorption. 4. SCFA metabolism plays a minor role in extracellular pH regulation. An avidly metabolized SCFA (N-butyrate) augments crypt luminal alkalinization only slightly (0.08 pH units) versus a poorly metabolized SCFA (isobutyrate). 5. Apical addition of 1 mM 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) partially inhibits luminal alkalinization caused by apical SCFA. DIDS has no effect on luminal alkalinization caused by transepithelial CO2 gradients. Probenecid (1 mM), alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4 mM) or basolateral DIDS (1 mM) do not affect pHo regulation. Results suggest that DIDS-sensitive, SCFA-dependent transport in the colonocyte apical membrane contributes to pHo regulation. Images Figure 7 PMID:8865074

  11. Induction of colonic aberrant crypts in mice by feeding apparent N-nitroso compounds derived from hot dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael E; Lisowyj, Michal P; Zhou, Lin; Wisecarver, James L; Gulizia, James M; Shostrom, Valerie K; Naud, Nathalie; Corpet, Denis E; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-preserved meats (e.g., hot dogs) may help cause colon cancer because they contain N-nitroso compounds. We tested whether purified hot-dog-derived total apparent N-nitroso compounds (ANC) could induce colonic aberrant crypts, which are putative precursors of colon cancer. We purified ANC precursors in hot dogs and nitrosated them to produce ANC. In preliminary tests, CF1 mice received 1 or 3 i.p. injections of 5mg azoxymethane (AOM)/kg. In Experiments 1 and 2, female A/J mice received ANC in diet. In Experiment 1, ANC dose initially dropped sharply because the ANC precursors had mostly decomposed but, later in Experiment 1 and throughout Experiment 2, ANC remained at 85 nmol/g diet. Mice were killed after 8 (AOM tests) or 17–34 (ANC tests) wk. Median numbers of aberrant crypts in the distal 2 cm of the colon for 1 and 3 AOM injections, CF1 controls, ANC (Experiment 1), ANC (Experiment 2),and untreated A/J mice were 31, 74, 12, 20, 12, and 5–6, with P < 0.01 for both ANC tests. Experiment 2 showed somewhat increased numbers of colonic mucin-depleted foci in the ANC-treated group. We conclude that hot-dog-derived ANC induced significant numbers of aberrant crypts in the mouse colon. PMID:22293095

  12. Induction of colonic aberrant crypts in mice by feeding apparent N-nitroso compounds derived from hot dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael E; Lisowyj, Michal P; Zhou, Lin; Wisecarver, James L; Gulizia, James M; Shostrom, Valerie K; Naud, Nathalie; Corpet, Denis E; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-preserved meats (e.g., hot dogs) may help cause colon cancer because they contain N-nitroso compounds. We tested whether purified hot-dog-derived total apparent N-nitroso compounds (ANC) could induce colonic aberrant crypts, which are putative precursors of colon cancer. We purified ANC precursors in hot dogs and nitrosated them to produce ANC. In preliminary tests, CF1 mice received 1 or 3 i.p. injections of 5 mg azoxymethane (AOM)/kg. In Experiments 1 and 2, female A/J mice received ANC in diet. In Experiment 1, ANC dose initially dropped sharply because the ANC precursors had mostly decomposed but, later in Experiment 1 and throughout Experiment 2, ANC remained at 85 nmol/g diet. Mice were killed after 8 (AOM tests) or 17-34 (ANC tests) wk. Median numbers of aberrant crypts in the distal 2 cm of the colon for 1 and 3 AOM injections, CF1 controls, ANC (Experiment 1), ANC (Experiment 2),and untreated A/J mice were 31, 74, 12, 20, 12, and 5-6, with P < 0.01 for both ANC tests. Experiment 2 showed somewhat increased numbers of colonic mucin-depleted foci in the ANC-treated group. We conclude that hot-dog-derived ANC induced significant numbers of aberrant crypts in the mouse colon.

  13. Risk factors for colorectal cancer in man induce aberrant crypt foci in rats: Preliminary findings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Fard, Sara; Furrer, Rudolf; Archer, Michael C.; Bruce, W. Robert; Lip, HoYin; Mehta, Rhea; O'Brien, Peter J.; Giacca, Adria; Ward, Wendy E.; Femia, A. Pietro; Caderni, Giovanna; Medline, Alan; Banks, Kate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiological studies have demonstrated clear associations between specific dietary and environmental risk factors and incidence of colorectal cancer, but the mechanisms responsible for these associations are not known. An animal model could facilitate such an understanding. Both genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens induce aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colons of F344 rats. F344 rats were provided with diets that contained putative risk factors for CRC: low calcium and low vitamin D, high iron, high fructose, and decreased light (UV) exposure or a control diet for 14 wk. The rats were then assessed with biochemical measures and by topological examination for evidence of colon abnormalities. Circulating ionized calcium was decreased from 2.85 to 1.69 mmol/L, and ACF were increased from 0.7 to 13.6 lesions/colon (both P < 0.001). Rats exposed to the multiple environmental conditions associated with colon cancer, developed ACF similar to the heterogeneous or ill-defined ACF in the human colon. Heterogeneous ACF are the most frequently seen in humans and are also seen in rats shortly after exposure to the non-genotoxic colon carcinogen, dextransulfate sodium. The rodent model could be used to assess the pathways from diet and environment to colon cancer and to provide guidance for clinical studies. PMID:26709971

  14. Double labeling autoradiography. Cell kinetic studies with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, B.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of the multiple applicability of the double labeling method with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR are demonstrated. Double labeling with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR makes it possible to determine the cycle and its phases with high precision by modifying the usual percent labeled mitoses method with a single injection of /sup 3/H-TdR. In addition, data is provided on the variances of the transit times through the cycle phases. For example, in the case of the jejunal crypt cells of the mouse, the transit times through successive cycle phases are uncorrelated. In the case of glial cells the double labeling method provides cell kinetic parameters despite the paucity of proliferating glial cells. In the adult untreated animal, glial cell mitoses are so rare that the percent labeled mitoses method can not be utilized. However, the S-phase duration can be measured by double labeling and the cycle time can be determined by the so-called method of labeled S phases. With the latter method the passage through the S phase of the /sup 3/H-TdR-labeled S phase cells can be registered by injecting /sup 14/C-TdR at different time intervals following /sup 3/H-TdR application. In this way an S-phase duration of about 10 hr and a cycle time of about 20 hr was found for glial cells in the adult untreated mouse. An exchange of glial cells between the growth fraction and the nongrowth fraction has also been shown by double labeling. A quite different application of the double labeling method with 3H- and /sup 14/C-TdR is the in vivo study of the cell cycle phase-specific effect of drugs used in chemotherapy of tumors. The effect of vincristine on these cells has been studied. Vincristine affects cells in S and G2 in such a manner that they are arrested during the next metaphase and subsequently become necrotic. It has no effect on G1 cells.

  15. Indomethacin decreases jejunal fluid secretion in addition to luminal release of prostaglandin E2 in patients with acute cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Van Loon, F P; Rabbani, G H; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Human cholera is associated with an increased luminal release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), but whether inhibition of increased PGE2 synthesis will reduce or control intestinal secretion is uncertain. 'Steady state' perfusions (10 ml/minute) in 12 patients with acute cholera, and repeat perfusions in nine of these patients during the convalescent phase were therefore performed using the triple lumen technique. The proximal jejunum was perfused with isotonic saline containing sodium-sulphobromophthalein as a non-absorbable marker. After intravenous administration of indomethacin (1.0 mg/kg) the jejunal net transfer of fluid and the jejunal flow rate of PGE2 were determined in 30 minute periods for 120 minutes after a 120 minute control period. Indomethacin decreased net fluid secretion (2.1 (0.3-4.2) v 4.5 (2.5-8.4) ml/hour x cm; medians, Q50 ranges, p less than 0.01) and the jejunal flow rate of PGE2 (1.5 (1.2-2.7) v 2.2 (1.4-4.9) ng/minute, p less than 0.05). The results of similar perfusion studies in 22 patients with acute cholera, used to establish the spontaneous time related change in fluid secretion, showed no significant change in net fluid transfer (3.5 (2.2-6.2) to 3.5 (2.6-11.6) ml/hour x cm, p greater than 0.25) over 240 minutes. These data provide further evidence in favour of the hypothesis that prostaglandins have a role in the cholera toxin induced intestinal fluid secretion in man. PMID:1612480

  16. Jejunal free flap for reconstruction of pharyngeal defects in patients with head and neck cancer-the Birmingham experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel J; Parmar, Satyesh; Praveen, Prav; Martin, Tim; Pracy, Paul; Jennings, Chris; Simms, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively audited operative complications, success of flaps, and speech and swallowing outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer who had reconstruction with jejunal free tissue transfer to the pharynx. A total of 104 patients had jejunal free flaps between 1987 and 2009 at University Hospital, Birmingham. Management was by a multidisciplinary team, and the same vascular surgeon did all the anastomoses. We investigated the relations between patients, operative factors, and postoperative complications, and noted the ischaemic time of the flaps and coexisting conditions of the patients. Outcomes measured included initial and final survival rates of flaps, donor and recipient site complications, and speech and swallowing outcomes on discharge and up to 2 years postoperatively. Of the 104 patients, 14 (13%) had initial flap complications but overall flap survival was 97%. A total of 11 (11%) patients developed a fistula at a mean of 15 days postoperatively and 11 (11%) had minor donor site complications. A total of 95 (91%) were able to resume oral diet on discharge. Of the 44 who were followed up on discharge, 32 (73%) were able to maintain oral intake at 2 years and 31 (70%) could use their voice in everyday situations. The jejunal free flap enables the tumour to be removed, and reconstruction and restoration of function to be done in a single operation using tissue that is versatile. The operation is associated with low morbidity at the donor and recipient sites, and results in good speech and swallowing outcomes. The flap can also be used to reconstruct pharyngolaryngeal defects.

  17. Transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, MIHAELA; JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; MOALE, MIHAI; CHIRA, ROMEO

    2017-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is one of the most common conditions encountered in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is extensive and identifying the underlying etiology can be challenging. We report a case of acute transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection in a patient with no cardiovascular risk factors or autoimmune diseases. Symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain usually treated in the surgical department. The patient had criteria for conservative treatment and rapidly recovered. We highlight a rare condition which should be taken into account for the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. PMID:28246505

  18. Suppressive effect of pioglitazone, a PPAR gamma ligand, on azoxymethane-induced colon aberrant crypt foci in KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Toshiya; Teraoka, Naoya; Takasu, Shinji; Nakano, Katsuya; Takahashi, Mami; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Fujii, Gen; Komiya, Masami; Yanaka, Akinori; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer. Pioglitazone is a peroxisome proliferator- activated receptor γ(PPARγ) agonist that induces differentiation in adipocytes and induces growth arrest and/or apoptosis in vitro in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we investigated the effect of pioglitazone on the development of azoxymethane-induced colon aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in KK-Ay obesity and diabetes model mice, and tried to clarify mechanisms by which the PPARγ ligand inhibits ACF development. Administration of 800 ppm pioglitazone reduced the number of colon ACF / mouse to 30% of those in untreated mice and improved hypertrophic changes of adipocytes in KK-Ay mice with significant reduction of serum triglyceride and insulin levels. Moreover, mRNA levels of adipocytokines, such as leptin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, in the visceral fat were decreased. PCNA immunohistochemistry revealed that pioglitazone treatment suppressed cell proliferation in the colorectal epithelium with elevation of p27 and p53 gene expression. These results suggest that pioglitazone prevented obesity-associated colon carcinogenesis through improvement of dysregulated adipocytokine levels and high serum levels of triglyceride and insulin, and increase of p27 and p53 mRNA levels in the colorectal mucosa. These data indicate that pioglitazone warrants attention as a potential chemopreventive agent against obesity-associated colorectal cancer.

  19. Determination using synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy of putative stem cells in human adenocarcinoma of the intestine: corresponding benign tissue as a template.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzai, Abdullah A; Patel, Imran I; Veronesi, Giulia; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Llabjani, Valon; Cotte, Marine; Stringfellow, Helen F; Martin, Francis L

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial-cell layer lining the two morphologically and functionally distinct segments of the mammalian intestinal tract, small intestine, and colon is constantly being renewed. This renewal is necessitated by a harsh lumen environment and is hypothesized to be driven by a small population of stem cells (SCs) that are believed to reside at the base of intestinal crypts. A lack of specific markers has hampered previous attempts to identify their exact location. We obtained tissue sections containing small intestine and colon crypts derived from normal (benign) or adenocarcinoma (AC) human intestine. The samples were floated onto BaF2 windows and analyzed using synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy via an aperture size of 10 × 10 μm. Derived infrared (IR) spectral data was then analyzed using principal component analysis and/or linear discriminant analysis. Hypothesized cell types (as a function of aperture location along the length of individual crypts) within benign crypts were classed based on exploratory unsupervised IR spectral point clustering. Scores plots derived from individual small intestine crypts consistently generated one or two distinct spectra that clustered away from the remaining cell categories; these were retrospectively classed as "distinct base region" spectra. In these plots, a clear progression of locations along crypt lengths designated as from putative stem cells (SCs) to transit-amplifying (TA) cells to terminally differentiated (TD) cells was observed in benign small intestine and colon crypts. This progression of spectral points was crypt specific, pointing away from a unifying cell lineage model in human intestinal crypts. On comparison of AC-derived spectra versus corresponding benign, a subpopulation of AC-derived spectra suggested a putative SC-like spectral fingerprint; remaining IR spectra were classed as exhibiting TA cell-like or TD cell-like spectral characteristics. These observations

  20. Ovine offspring growth and diet digestibility are influenced by maternal Se supplementation and nutritional intake level during pregnancy despite a common postnatal diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to evaluate effects of maternal dietary restriction and Se supply on angiogenic factor mRNA expression in intestinal and mammary tissues, and jejunal crypt cell proliferation and vascularity in late term fetal intestines. In Exp. 1, pregnant ewe lambs (n = 32; initial BW = 45.6 +/- 2...

  1. Radiobiological intercomparison of two clinical neutron beams using the regeneration of mouse intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Böhm, L; Gueulette, J; Jones, D T; Beauduin, M; Vynckier, S; de Roubaix, S; Yudelev, M; Slabbert, J P; Wambersie, A

    1990-03-01

    Determination of dose modification factor greatly facilitates the introduction of clinically proven neutron therapy schedules at new installations. We have compared the biological performance of the p(66)+Be neutron facility at Faure, South Africa, with the established p(65)+Be installation at Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. Filtration, D gamma/DT, dose rate and HVT 5/15 for the Louvain and Faure beam are: 2 cm, 2.5 cm polyethylene; 3%, 5%; 0.2 Gy/min, 0.4 Gy/min; and 20 cm and 19 cm respectively. Dosimetry was done in A-150 plastic. Irradiation of BALB/C mice was carried on according to the dose accumulation method in a perspex phantom at 5 cm depth and at an SSD of 150 cm at a field size of 28 X 28 cm2. Sections of the jejunum were prepared at each centre and analyzed by both. The RBE of the Faure beam determined at a survival level of 50 crypts ranged from 1.64 to 1.69. The dose modification factor RBE of the Louvain beam given by Beauduin et al. was 1.61 +/- 0.14. The dose modification factor of the Faure beam relative to the Louvain beam is thus 1.03 +/- 0.13 which could be expected from the similarity of the physical characteristics. Independent RBE measurements in a variety of systems also suggest similar biological properties. The depth variation of the RBE was found to be 4% (mouse gut) using 3 cm polyethylene filter over the depth range of 2.5 to 13.5 cm. This is in agreement with microdosimetry measurements using polyethylene filters of various thicknesses and with V79 measurements reported by Slabbert et al.

  2. The inside mystery of jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dhull, A K; Kaushal, V; Dhankhar, R; Atri, R; Singh, H; Marwah, N

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are malignant and rare form of soft tissue sarcoma of the digestive tract. The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors is very low Kramer et al. 2005 Jejunal GISTs are extremely rare. Here we present a rare case of jejunal GIST with unusually large size at presentation. The patient presented with severe abdomen pain, exophytic growth, and dimorphic anemia. Surgical resection of the tumor was carried out, and operative findings revealed a 15 × 10 cm growth, arising from serosal surface of jejunum, at the antimesenteric surface. Diagnosis in this case was made by subjecting the resected specimen to immunohistochemical analysis. In view of large size of the resected tumor, and high-risk histopathological features, imatinib mesylate 400 mg once daily was given as adjuvant chemotherapy. Patient is asymptomatic without any evidence of tumor recurrence after six months of postoperative followup. Imatinib as such is recommended in metastatic, residual or recurrent cases of GISTs or which are surgically not removable; however, recent recommendations suggests the use of imatinib mesylate after radical surgery in high-risk cases, because it has shown a significant decrease in the recurrence rate, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also approved the use of imatinib as adjuvant therapy after complete resection of localized, primary GIST.

  3. Dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose uptake in jejunal epithelium of broilers after acute exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Awad, Wageha A; Kröger, Susan; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of ethanol on gastrointestinal tract of chicken. In this study, we investigated the effects of low levels of ethanol on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of commercial broilers. Jejunal tissues from 35- to 39-day-old broilers were exposed to either 0 or 0.1% ethanol in Ussing chambers, and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 40 min. After 40 and 60 min of incubation, glucose (20 mM) and carbamoylcholine (200 μM), respectively, were introduced into the chambers. The absolute and percent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (Vt) induced by glucose were increased significantly with 0.1% ethanol. There was no significant effect of 0.1% ethanol on carbamoylcholine-induced electrophysiological variables. To investigate if higher levels of ethanol have similar effects, we tested the effects of 0, 0.33, and 0.66% ethanol under similar experimental conditions until the glucose-addition step. Contrary to 0.1% ethanol, both the 0.33 and 0.66% ethanol levels significantly decreased the basal and glucose-induced Isc and Vt. Tissue conductivity remained unaffected in all cases. These results indicate that intestinal epithelia of chicken may be more sensitive to the effects of ethanol as compared with other species. This is the first report indicating dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose absorption in intestinal epithelia in the presence of ethanol.

  4. [Usefulness of endoscopically guided nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube placement in a case of aspiration pneumonia due to postgastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kosei; Totsuka, Osamu; Tamura, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    A 79-year-old man with a history of gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction 27 years previously was admitted to our hospital due to recurrent pneumonia. Because he had dysphagia and had frequently developed pneumonia over the course of a year, enteral nutrition via nasogastric tube was initiated approximately six months before admission. The clinical and computed tomography findings showed that the cause of pneumonia was aspiration of tube feeding nutrients due to gastroesophageal reflux. To prevent gastroesophageal reflux, he was continuously kept in a 30-degree or greater reclining position. However, gastroesophageal reflux was seen at an injection rate of 50 ml/h or greater. After we inserted a nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube guided by endoscopy, gastroesophageal reflux, dumping syndrome and diarrhea were not seen up to an injection rate of 300 ml/h. Endoscopically guided nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube placement is a simple method and may be useful for patients with aspiration pneumonia due to postgastrectomy. Moreover, long-term postgastrectomy patients appear to tolerate the postopyloric injection of enteral nutrition. Because the number of elderly patients who have dysphagia with postgastrectomy is increasing, these findings provide a basis for treatment in elderly medical settings.

  5. The effects of age on mucosal morphology and epithelial cell production in rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R M

    1977-01-01

    Six groups of male Wistar rats were used, with mean weights of 29, 63, 97, 161, 249 and 399 g. Pieces of small intestine from three sites were examined after staining in bulk with the Feulgen reaction. Crypt/villus ratio (the number of crypts per villus) rose with age at all three sites, Villus height and crypt depth were measured on microdissected specimens. Villi in the proximal intestine were always taller than those distally. Proximal villi increased in height in successively older rats, except in the oldest group. Villi at the two distal sites tended to be tall in the youngest group of rats, but suffered a temporary reduction in height in the next two age groups. Crypt depth increased markedly within the first three age groups, and more slowly thereafter. Colchicine-metaphase accumulation rate was estimated from counts on microdissected intact crypts. The rate was low in the youngest group (8 cells/crypt/hour) but about 30 cells/crypt/hour in all other groups. After the changes during the early phase of rapid growth, no marked changes were seen during later life. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:885792

  6. Comparing the effects of COX and non-COX-inhibiting NSAIDs on enhancement of apoptosis and inhibition of aberrant crypt foci formation in a rat colorectal cancer model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jonathan E; Young, Graeme P; LE Leu, Richard K; Hu, Ying

    2013-09-01

    The protection against colorectal cancer (CRC) by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is in part dependent on inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX). We compared the efficacy of the non-COX-inhibiting R-flurbiprofen (R-FB) with COX-inhibiting sulindac and racemic flurbiprofen (Rac-FB), and determined their effects on apoptosis, in an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rat CRC model. In experiment 1, groups of rats were given a daily drug gavage (R-FB 30 mg/kg, Rac-FB 10 mg/kg and Sulindac 20 mg/kg) for one week, followed by AOM treatment and were sacrificed eight hours later, colons were examined for apoptosis and cell proliferation. In experiment 2, groups of rats were given two AOM treatments, followed by a daily drug gavage until they were sacrificed ten weeks later, and colons were examined for aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and prostaglandin E2 production. All drugs significantly enhanced apoptosis and inhibited ACF, irrespective of their COX-inhibiting potency (p<0.01), but sulindac was more potent in inhibition of large ACF, p<0.05. COX-inhibiting sulindac achieved the greatest protective effect. The greater safety profile of Rac-FB should provide an advantage for chemoprevention.

  7. Effect of dietary caraway (Carum carvi L.) on aberrant crypt foci development, fecal steroids, and intestinal alkaline phosphatase activities in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamaleeswari, Muthaiyan; Deeptha, Kumaraswami; Sengottuvelan, Murugan; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2006-08-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common malignancies in many regions of the world and is thought to arise from the accumulation of mutations in a single epithelial cell of the colon and rectum. Caraway (Carum carvi L. Umbelliferae) is a shrub with a long history as a medicinal plant since ancient times. The effect of different doses of caraway (CC) on the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and the levels of fecal bile acids, neutral sterols, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were studied in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer in rats. Animals were randomized into 6 groups. Group 1 served as control, and group 2 received 90 mg/kg body weight caraway orally everyday. Groups 3-6 rats were given subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) once a week for the first 4 weeks to induce ACF. Rats in groups 4-6, in addition to DMH injections, received caraway at 30, 60, and 90 mg/kg body weight respectively p.o. everyday until the end of whole experimental period of 15 weeks. Caraway supplementation significantly reduced ACF development and also decreased the levels of fecal bile acids, neutral sterols, and tissue ALP activities. The histological alterations induced by DMH were also significantly improved. Overall, our results showed that all 3 doses of caraway inhibited tumorigenesis though the effect of the intermediary dose of 60 mg/kg body weight was more pronounced.

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Spirulina maxima on the Azoxymethane-induced Aberrant Colon Crypts and Oxidative Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Isela; Islas-Islas, Víctor; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Barrios, Juan Pablo; Paniagua, Norma; Vásquez-Garzón, Verónica R.; Villa-Treviño, Saúl; Osiris-Madrigal-Santillán; Morales-González, José Antonio; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spirulina maxima (Sm) is a cyanobacterium well known because of its high nutritive value, as well as its anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperlipidemic, antioxidant, and anti-genotoxic activities. Objective: To determine the capacity of Sm to inhibit the induction of aberrant colon crypts (AC), as well as the level of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidative damage in mice treated with azoxymethane (AOM). Materials and Methods: Sm (100, 400, and 800 mg/kg) was daily administered to animals by the oral route during 4 weeks, while AOM (10 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to mice twice in weeks 2 and 3 of the assay. We also included a control group of mice orally administered with distilled water along the assay, as well as other group orally administered with the high dose of Sm. Results: A significant decrease in the number of AC with the three tested doses of Sm, with a mean protection of 51.6% respect to the damage induced by AOM. Also, with the three doses of the alga, we found a reduction in the level of lipoperoxidation, as well as in regard to the percentage of the DNA adduct 8-hydroxy-2’- deoxyguanosine. Conclusion: Sm possesses anti-precarcinogenic potential in vivo, as well as capacity to reduce the oxidative damage induced by AOM. SUMMARY Azoxymethane (AOM) induced a high number of colon aberrant crypts in mouse. It also increased the level of peroxidation and of DNA oxidation in the same organ.Spirulina maxima significantly reduced the number of AOM-induced colon aberrant crypts in mouse. It also reduced the AOM-induced lipid and DNA oxidation in mouse.The results suggest a chemopreventive potential for the tested algae. PMID:27013804

  9. Only fibres promoting a stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem decrease the rate of aberrant crypt foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P; Pierre, F; Patry, Y; Champ, M; Berreur, M; Pradal, G; Bornet, F; Meflah, K; Menanteau, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibres have been proposed as protective agents against colon cancer but results of both epidemiological and experimental studies are inconclusive.
AIMS—Hypothesising that protection against colon cancer may be restricted to butyrate producing fibres, we investigated the factors needed for long term stable butyrate production and its relation to susceptibility to colon cancer.
METHODS—A two part randomised blinded study in rats, mimicking a prospective study in humans, was performed using a low fibre control diet (CD) and three high fibre diets: starch free wheat bran (WB), type III resistant starch (RS), and short chain fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Using a randomised block design, 96 inbred rats were fed for two, 16, 30, or 44 days to determine the period of adaptation to the diets, fermentation profiles, and effects on the colon, including mucosal proliferation on day 44. Subsequently, 36 rats fed the same diets for 44 days were injected with azoxymethane and checked for aberrant crypt foci 30 days later.
RESULTS—After fermentation had stabilised (44 days), only RS and FOS produced large amounts of butyrate, with a trophic effect in the large intestine. No difference in mucosal proliferation between the diets was noted at this time. In the subsequent experiment one month later, fewer aberrant crypt foci were present in rats fed high butyrate producing diets (RS, p=0.022; FOS, p=0.043).
CONCLUSION—A stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem related to selected fibres appears to be less conducive to colon carcinogenesis.


Keywords: fibre; fermentation; butyrate; colon carcinogenesis; aberrant crypt foci; rat PMID:11115823

  10. Changes in α-glucosidase activities along the jejunal-ileal axis of normal rats by the α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazuki; Hanai, Emiko; Suruga, Kazuhito; Kuranuki, Sachi; Goda, Toshinao

    2010-10-01

    Miglitol, an α-glucosidase inhibitor that inhibits postprandial hyperglycemia by delaying carbohydrate digestion and absorption along the jejunal-ileal axis, has recently been approved for use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Miglitol treatment may lead to increased α-glucosidase activities toward the ileum because carbohydrate flow toward the ileum increases. However, it is not yet known if miglitol treatment alters the α-glucosidase activities along the jejunal-ileal axis. In this study, we examined the effects of miglitol supplementation for 3 or 7 days on α-glucosidase activities along the jejunal-ileal axis of Wistar rats. Supplementation with miglitol for 3 or 7 days in rats increased tissue weights of the lower jejunum and ileum, but did not alter tissue weights of the upper jejunum and cecum or the contents of the cecum. Furthermore, supplementation with miglitol for 7 days reduced the activities of isomaltase and maltase in the upper jejunum and increased the activities of sucrase, isomaltase, and maltase in the lower jejunum and ileum. These results suggest that the delay in carbohydrate digestion and absorption along the jejunal-ileal axis by miglitol supplementation in rats is associated with increased α-glucosidase activities toward the ileum.

  11. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  12. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  13. Suggestive evidence for the induction of colonic aberrant crypts in mice fed sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Zahid, Muhammad; Anwar, Muhammad M; Pennington, Karen L; Cohen, Samuel M; Wisecarver, James L; Shostrom, Valerie; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2016-01-01

    A reported linkage between processed (nitrite-treated) meat products and the incidence of colon cancer could be due to sodium nitrite (NaNO2) itself or to N-nitroso compounds produced from the nitrite. Exposure to nitrite occurs due to residual nitrite in processed meat and to salivary nitrite arising by reduction of nitrate in vegetables and drinking water. Here we tested whether NaNO2 could induce colonic aberrant crypts (ABC) or ABC foci (ACF), which are putative precursors of colon cancer. We fed NaNO2 in drinking water for 20-25 wk to groups of 8-20 adult female mice. After sacrifice, ABC and ACF were counted in 2-cm distal colonic segments. In Experiment 1, no significant differences in ABC/ACF induction were seen between groups of 13-14 A/J mice fed 0, 0.5, or 1.0 g NaNO2/l drinking water. NaNO2 also did not affect fasting blood glucose levels. In Experiment 2, we fed 0, 1.0, 1.25, or 1.5 g NaNO2/l water to groups of 15 CF-1 mice. Five of the mice fed 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed ABC, whereas all other groups showed only 0-2 ABC/group, including 0 ABC for the group fed 1.25 g NaNO2/l. Overall statistical analysis indicated a dose-response p trends of 0.04. Pairwise comparison of ABC between groups fed 1.25 and 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed p 0.02 for both ABC and ACF, but a similar comparison between the untreated and 1.5 g/l groups showed no significant effects. In Experiment 3, hot dogs (18% of diet), which were fed to CF-1 mice previously treated with azoxymethane, inhibited ABC and ACF induction, but this effect was not significant (P = 0.10-0.12). In conclusion, these results support the view that NaNO2 may be a risk factor for colon carcinogenesis.

  14. Protective effect of lactofermented red beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation, genotoxicity of fecal water and oxidative stress induced by 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine in rats model.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 10 μg/day, every day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco-2 cell line, evaluated by MTT test and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Oxidative stress in rats was expressed by measuring serum antioxidant status and the level of malondialdehyde in the kidneys and liver. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and PhIP treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and PhIP treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in PhIP-treated rats (from 59 ± 18 to 26 ± 4). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 52 ± 18 to 18 ± 4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with a PhIP-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco-2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. In groups fed dietary PhP and FBJ the latter was found to increase the antioxidant status of serum from 40% to 66% depending on the fraction. Reduced concentration of malondialdehyde was found only in the kidneys of rats fed with PhIP and FBJ. FBJ present in the diet of rats causes a reduction of MDA in the kidneys from 118.7 nmol/g tissue to 100 nmol/g tissue. The presence of FBJ in the diet of rats significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus and Bacteroides-Prevotella group adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion

  15. The herbal extract, Iberogast, improves jejunal integrity in rats with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tessa H; Yazbeck, Roger; Lymn, Kerry A; Whitford, Eleanor J; Cheah, Ker Y; Butler, Ross N; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Pilichiewicz, Amelia N; Mashtoub, Suzanne; Howarth, Gordon S

    2009-05-01

    There is an acute need for the development of effective therapies for mucositis, a debilitating side effect of cancer chemotherapy. Iberogast is a herbal extract reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated Iberogast for its potential to reduce the severity of 5-Fluorouracil (FU)-induced mucositis in rats. Rats were allocated to three treatment groups (n = 8) and gavaged daily with a 10% solution of Iberogast or water from day 0 to day 8. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) or saline on day 6, and killed after 72 h. In vivo and in vitro sucrase activity was assessed by (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) and sucrase assay respectively. Intestinal disease severity was determined by histological assessment of villus height and crypt depth. Significant increases in villus height (277 +/- 9 microm) and crypt depth (67 +/- 3 microm) were observed in 5-FU + Iberogast-treated rats compared with 5-FU + Water (224 +/- 13 microm and 48 +/- 2 microm respectively; p < 0.05). Sucrase activity was significantly reduced in all 5-FU groups compared to control. Significant reductions in SBT and sucrase activity were observed in all 5-FU groups compared with Saline + Water controls (p < 0.05). We conclude that although Iberogast partially improved the histopathological features of 5-FU induced mucositis, it conferred no significant protection as indicated by the assessed endpoints.

  16. Oral 5-fluorouracil colon-specific delivery through in vivo pellet coating for colon cancer and aberrant crypt foci treatment.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Elyagoby, A; Wong, T W

    2014-07-01

    In situ coating of 5-fluorouracil pellets by ethylcellulose and pectin powder mixture (8:3 weight ratio) in capsule at simulated gastrointestinal media provides colon-specific drug release in vitro. This study probes into pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of intra-capsular pellets coated in vivo in rats with reference to their site-specific drug release outcomes. The pellets were prepared by extrusion-spheronization technique. In vitro drug content, drug release, in vivo pharmacokinetics, local colonic drug content, tumor, aberrant crypt foci, systemic hematology and clinical chemistry profiles of coated and uncoated pellets were examined against unprocessed drug. In vivo pellet coating led to reduced drug bioavailability and enhanced drug accumulation at colon (179.13 μg 5-FU/g rat colon content vs 4.66 μg/g of conventional in vitro film-coated pellets at 15 mg/kg dose). The in vivo coated pellets reduced tumor number and size, through reforming tubular epithelium with basement membrane and restricting expression of cancer from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Unlike uncoated pellets and unprocessed drug, the coated pellets eliminated aberrant crypt foci which represented a putative preneoplastic lesion in colon cancer. They did not inflict additional systemic toxicity. In vivo pellet coating to orally target 5-fluorouracil delivery at cancerous colon is a feasible therapeutic treatment approach.

  17. Growth Performance, Plasma Fatty Acids, Villous Height and Crypt Depth of Preweaning Piglets Fed with Medium Chain Triacylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Chwen, Loh Teck; Foo, Hooi Ling; Thanh, Nguyen Tien; Choe, D. W.

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding medium chain triacylglycerol (MCT) on growth performance, plasma fatty acids, villus height and crypt depth in preweaning piglets. A total of 150 new born piglets were randomly assigned into one of three treatments: i) Control (no MCT); ii) MCT with milk (MCT+milk); iii) MCT without milk (MCT+fasting). Body weight, plasma fatty acid profiles, villus height and crypt depth were measured. Final BW for the Control and MCT+fasting was lower (p<0.05) than MCT+milk. The piglets fed with MCT regardless of milk provision or fasting had greater medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) than the Control. In contrast, the Control had greater long chain fatty acid (LCFA) and unsaturated fatty acid (USFA) than the MCT piglets. The piglets fed with MCT regardless of milk provision or fasting had higher villus height for the duodenum and jejunum after 6 h of feeding. Similar observations were found in piglets fed with MCT after 6 and 8 days of treatment. This study showed that feeding MCT to the piglets before weaning improved growth performance, with a greater concentration of MCT in blood plasma as energy source and a greater height of villus in duodenum, jejunum and ileum. PMID:25049841

  18. THE EFFECTS OF A HIGH ANIMAL FAT DIET ON THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANES IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of a High Animal Fat Diet on the Induction of Aberrant Crypt Foci in the Colons of Male F344/N Rats Exposed to Trihalomethanes in the Drinking Water

    Abstract

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF), identified as the putative precursor lesion in the development of co...

  19. Effect of etoricoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor on aberrant crypt formation and apoptosis in 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis in rat model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Kaur, J; Sanyal, S N

    2010-01-01

    Etoricoxib, a second generation selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor had been studied for the chemopreventive response at its therapeutic anti-inflammatory dose in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in rat model. Eight to ten weeks old male rats of Sprague-Dawley strain were divided into four groups. While group 1 served as control and received the vehicle of the drugs, group 2 and 3 were administered freshly prepared DMH in 1mM EDTA-saline (pH 7.0) (30 mg/kg body wt/week, subcutaneously). Group 3 was also given a daily treatment of etoricoxib (0.6 mg/kg body wt orally) while the group 4 received the same amount of etoricoxib only, prepared in 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose. Animals were sacrificed at the end of 6 weeks, body weight recorded and the colons were subjected to macroscopic and histopathological studies. The maximum number of raised mucosal lesions called the multiple plaque lesions (MPL) were found in the DMH group which significantly reverted back in the DMH + etoricoxib group, while very few MPLs were recorded in the control and etoricoxib only group. Similarly, the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), the point of future carcinogenic growth, was recorded more in the DMH group and significantly less in the DMH + etoricoxib group. The histopathological analysis showed the presence of severe hyperplasia, occasional dysplasia and aggregates of lymphoid cells in the localized regions. Etoricoxib group showed near normal histological features with the crypt architecture and the surrounding stromal tissue remaining intact. To ascertain the molecular mechanism of such anti-carcinogenic features the colonocytes were isolated and studied in primary culture for the evidence of apoptosis by fluorescent staining and genotoxic changes by single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) which shows that the DMH treated animals produced much less apoptotic nuclei but more comet producing cell, while these features were reverted back

  20. Dynamics of pavement cell-chloride cell interactions during abrupt salinity change in Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Daborn, K; Cozzi, R R; Marshall, W S

    2001-06-01

    Freshwater-adapted killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) opercular epithelia were dissected and subjected to blood-side hypertonic bathing solution in Ussing-style chambers to simulate the increase in blood osmolality during migration to sea water. Conversely, seawater-acclimated killifish opercular epithelia were subjected to hypotonic bathing solutions to simulate the initial stages of migration to fresh water. Freshwater-acclimation (hypertonic stress) induced a rapid (approximately 30 min) increase in membrane conductance (G(t)) from 3.10+/-0.56 to 7.52+/-1.15 mS x cm(-2) (P<0.01, N=27), whereas seawater-acclimation (hypotonic stress) induced a rapid decrease in G(t) from 8.22+/-1.15 to 4.41+/-1.00 mS x cm(-2) (P<0.01, N=27; means +/- S.E.M.). Control seawater-acclimated membranes had a density of apical crypts (where chloride cells are exposed to the environment; detected by scanning electron microscopy) of 1133+/-96.4 crypts x mm(-2) (N=12), whereas the hypotonically shocked specimens had a lower crypt density of 870+/-36.7 crypts x mm(-2) (P<0.01 N=10; means +/- S.E.M.). Hypertonic shock of freshwater membranes increased crypt density from 383.3+/-73.9 (N=12) to 630+/-102. 9 crypts x mm(-2) (P<0.05; N=11; means +/- S.E.M.). There was no change in density of chloride cells, as detected by fluorescence microscopy; hence, osmotic stress changes the degree of exposure, not the number of chloride cells. Cytochalasin D (5.0 micromol x l(-1)) completely blocked the conductance response to hypotonic shock and the reduction in apical crypt density measured by scanning electron microscopy, while phalloidin (33 micromol x l(-1)), colchicine (3x10(-4)mol x l(-1)) and griseofulvin (1.0 micromol x l(-1)) were ineffective. Actin imaging by phalloidin staining and confocal microscopy revealed extensive actin cords in pavement cell microridges and a ring of actin at the apex of chloride cells. We conclude that the actin cytoskeleton of chloride cells is required to maintain

  1. TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    David R. Geter', Tanya M. Moore', Michael H. George', Steve R. Kilburn', Gloria Huggins-Clark', James W. Allen', and Anthony B. DeAngelo' 'National H...

  2. THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N RATS EXPOSED TO THIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory


    THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N
    RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES IN THE DRINKING WATER

    The trihalomethanes (THM), bromoform (TBM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM), administered by corn oil gavage were found to increase large...

  3. VEHICLE AND MODE OF ADMINISTRATION EFFECTS ON THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N RATS EXPOSED TO BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle and Mode of Administration Effects on the Induction of Aberrant Crypt Foci in the Colons of Male F344/N Rats Exposed to Bromodichloromethane.

    David R. Geter, Michael H. George, Tanya M. Moore, Steve Kilburn, Gloria Huggins-Clark, and Anthony B. DeAngelo. Submited ...

  4. Luminal Microbes Promote Monocyte–Stem Cell Interactions Across a Healthy Colonic Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Skoczek, Dagmara A.; Walczysko, Petr; Horn, Nikki; Parris, Alyson; Clare, Simon; Williams, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a vital barrier between luminal microbes and the underlying mucosal immune system. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by continuous renewal of the epithelium and is pivotal for gut homeostasis. Breaching of the barrier causes mobilization of immune cells to promote epithelial restitution. However, it is not known whether microbes at the luminal surface of a healthy epithelial barrier influence immune cell mobilization to modulate tissue homeostasis. Using a mouse colonic mucosal explant model, we demonstrate that close proximity of luminal microbes to a healthy, intact epithelium results in rapid mucus secretion and movement of Ly6C+7/4+ monocytes closer to epithelial stem cells. These early events are driven by the epithelial MyD88-signaling pathway and result in increased crypt cell proliferation and intestinal stem cell number. Over time, stem cell number and monocyte–crypt stem cell juxtapositioning return to homeostatic levels observed in vivo. We also demonstrate that reduced numbers of tissue Ly6C+ monocytes can suppress Lgr5EGFP+ stem cell expression in vivo and abrogate the response to luminal microbes ex vivo. The functional link between monocyte recruitment and increased crypt cell proliferation was further confirmed using a crypt–monocyte coculture model. This work demonstrates that the healthy gut epithelium mediates communication between luminal bacteria and monocytes, and monocytes can modulate crypt stem cell number and promote crypt cell proliferation to help maintain gut homeostasis. PMID:24907348

  5. Dietary aloe vera gel powder and extract inhibit azoxymethane- induced colorectal aberrant crypt foci in mice fed a high- fat diet.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Takeshi; Shimpo, Kan; Kaneko, Takaaki; Beppu, Hidehiko; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Sonoda, Shigeru; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yamada, Muneo; Abe, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    Aloe vera gel exhibits protective effects against insulin resistance as well as lipid-lowering and anti-diabetic effects. The anti-diabetic compounds in this gel were identified as Aloe-sterols. Aloe vera gel extract (AVGE) containing Aloe-sterols has recently been produced using a new procedure. We previously reported that AVGE reduced large-sized intestinal polyps in Apc-deficient Min mice fed a high fat diet (HFD), suggesting that Aloe vera gel may protect against colorectal cancer. In the present study, we examined the effects of Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP) and AVGE on azoxymethane-induced colorectal preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in mice fed a HFD. Male C57BL/6J mice were given a normal diet (ND), HFD, HFD containing 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose solution, which was used as a solvent for AVGE (HFDC), HFD containing 3% or 1% AVGP, and HFDC containing 0.0125% (H-) or 0.00375% (L-) AVGE. The number of ACF was significantly lower in mice given 3% AVGP and H-AVGE than in those given HFD or HFDC alone. Moreover, 3% AVGP, H-AVGE and L-AVGE significantly decreased the mean Ki-67 labeling index, assessed as a measure of cell proliferation in the colonic mucosa. In addition, hepatic phase II enzyme glutathione S-transferase mRNA levels were higher in the H-AVGE group than in the HFDC group. These results suggest that both AVGP and AVGE may have chemopreventive effects on colorectal carcinogenesis under the HFD condition. Furthermore, the concentration of Aloe-sterols was similar between 3% AVGP and H-AVGE, suggesting that Aloe-sterols were the main active ingredients in this experiment.

  6. Differential staining of dysplastic aberrant crypt foci in the colon facilitates prediction of carcinogenic potentials of chemicals in rats.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Masako; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Masako; Taguchi, Ayako; Sugimura, Takashi; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2005-03-18

    We developed a novel and simple method to identify dysplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) induced in rats by colon carcinogens more efficiently and selectively without conducting laborious histological examination, which usually requires enough time to get final diagnosis. By adding a simple decolorization process with 70% methanol after conventional 0.2% methylene blue staining, dysplastic ACF could be differentially contrasted. To examine the validity of this novel method, which we refer to as differential staining, we analyzed colonic lesions induced by three heterocyclic amines, including 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, and found that the number of dysplastic ACF detected more precisely reflected their carcinogenic potential than the total numbers of ACF.

  7. Serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Romy M; Parnell, Nolie K; Grützner, Niels; Mansell, Joanne; Berghoff, Nora; Schellenberg, Stefan; Reusch, Claudia E; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) protein loss, due to lymphangiectasia or chronic inflammation, can be challenging to diagnose. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor (cα1PI) concentrations to detect crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs. Serum and fecal cα1PI concentrations were measured in 120 dogs undergoing GI tissue biopsies, and were compared between dogs with and without crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. Serial serum cα1PI concentrations were also evaluated in 12 healthy corticosteroid-treated dogs. Serum cα1PI and albumin concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation than in those without (both P <0.001), and more severe lesions were associated with lower serum cα1PI concentrations, higher 3 days-mean fecal cα1PI concentrations, and lower serum/fecal cα1PI ratios. Serum and fecal cα1PI, and their ratios, distinguished dogs with moderate or severe GI crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation from dogs with only mild or none such lesions with moderate sensitivity (56-92%) and specificity (67-81%). Serum cα1PI concentrations increased during corticosteroid administration. We conclude that serum and fecal α1PI concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation in dogs. Due to its specificity for the GI tract, measurement of fecal cα1PI appears to be superior to serum cα1PI for diagnosing GI protein loss in dogs. In addition, the serum/fecal cα1PI ratio has an improved accuracy in hypoalbuminemic dogs, but serum cα1PI concentrations should be carefully interpreted in corticosteroid-treated dogs.

  8. Number of spermatozoa in the crypts of the sperm reservoir at about 24 h after a low-dose intrauterine and deep intrauterine insemination in sows.

    PubMed

    Tummaruk, P; Tienthai, P

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the number of spermatozoa in the crypts of the utero-tubal junction (UTJ) and the oviduct of sows approximately 24 h after intrauterine insemination (IUI) and deep intrauterine insemination (DIUI) and compared with that of conventional artificial insemination (AI). Fifteen crossbred Landrace x Yorkshire (LY) multiparous sows were used in the experiment. Transrectal ultrasonography was performed every 4 h to examine the time of ovulation in relation to oestrous behaviour. The sows were inseminated with a single dose of diluted fresh semen by the AI (n = 5), IUI (n = 5) and DIUI (n = 5) at approximately 6-8 h prior to the expected time of ovulation, during the second oestrus after weaning. The sperm dose contained 3000 x 10(6) spermatozoa in 100 ml for AI, 1,000 x 10(6) spermatozoa in 50 ml for IUI and 150 x 10(6) spermatozoa in 5 ml for DIUI. The sows were anaesthetized and ovario-hysterectomized approximately 24 h after insemination. The oviducts and the proximal part of the uterine horns (1 cm) on each side of the reproductive tracts were collected. The section was divided into four parts, i.e. UTJ, caudal isthmus, cranial isthmus and ampulla. The spermatozoa in the lumen in each part were flushed several times with phosphate buffer solution. After flushing, the UTJ and all parts of the oviducts were immersed in a 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The UTJ and each part of the oviducts were cut into four equal parts and embedded in a paraffin block. The tissue sections were transversely sectioned to a thickness of 5 mum. Every fifth serial section was mounted and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The total number of spermatozoa from 32 sections in each parts of the tissue (16 sections from the left side and 16 sections from the right side) was determined under light microscope. The results reveal that most of the spermatozoa in the histological section were located in groups in the epithelial crypts. The means of

  9. Regional Differences in Stem and Transit Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in the Terminal Ileum and Colon of Mice After 12 Gy

    SciTech Connect

    Gandara, Ricardo M.C.; Mahida, Yashwant R.; Potten, Christopher S.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of cell turnover, which is regulated by stem cells located near the base of crypts. We aimed to investigate stem cell-dependent characteristics of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and crypt size in terminal ileum and different regions of the colon. Methods and Materials: Mice were studied under steady-state conditions and after radiation-induced stem cell apoptosis. Percentage of proliferating or apoptotic cells at a particular cell position (cp) along the crypt axis was expressed as labeling or apoptotic index. Results: Under steady-state conditions: crypt size was smallest in the ascending colon. In contrast to other regions of the colon, the distribution profile of proliferating cells in ascending colon showed some similarity to that in the terminal ileum. Postirradiation: apoptotic cells were prominent at the bottom of the crypt of mid- and descending colon but in the ascending colon, they were seen with similar frequency from cp 1 to 4. During regeneration, a constant proliferative capacity was seen above Paneth cells in the terminal ileum. In the ascending (but not mid- or descending) colon, the profile of proliferating cells over the first 4 days after irradiation showed a similarity to that in the terminal ileum. Conclusions: Profiles of proliferating epithelial cells (under steady-state conditions and postirradiation) and apoptotic cells (postirradiation) suggest similarities in the location of stem cells in the ascending colon and terminal ileum.

  10. Absence of Role of Dietary Protein Sensing in the Metabolic Benefits of Duodenal-Jejunal Bypass in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Barataud, Aude; Goncalves, Daisy; Vinera, Jennifer; Zitoun, Carine; Duchampt, Adeline; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Mithieux, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) induces remission or substantial improvement of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) but underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The beneficial effects of dietary proteins on energy and glucose homeostasis are mediated by the antagonist effects of peptides toward mu-opioid receptors (MORs), which are highly expressed in the distal gut. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of RYGB could depend at least in part on the interaction of peptides from food with intestinal MORs. Duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) was performed in obese and lean wild-type (WT) or MOR deficient (MOR−/−) mice. Food intake and body weight was monitored daily during 3 weeks. Glucose homeostasis was assessed from glucose and insulin tolerance tests. In obese WT and MOR−/− mice, DJB induced a rapid and sustained weight loss partly independent of food intake, and a rapid improvement in glycaemic parameters. Weight loss was a major determinant of the improvements observed. In lean WT and MOR−/− mice, DJB had no effect on weight loss but significantly enhanced glucose tolerance. We found that MORs are not essential in the metabolic beneficial effects of DJB, suggesting that protein sensing in the distal gut is not a link in the metabolic benefits of gastric surgery. PMID:28332577

  11. Marked Differences in Mucosal Immune Responses Induced in Ileal versus Jejunal Peyer’s Patches to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Secreted Proteins following Targeted Enteric Infection in Young Calves

    PubMed Central

    Facciuolo, Antonio; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    In cattle, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection is primarily mediated through M cells overlying Peyer’s patches (PP) in the ileum. The capacity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to invade ileal PP (IPP) versus discrete PP in the jejunum (JPP) and subsequent differences in mucosal immune responses were investigated. Intestinal segments were surgically prepared in both mid-jejunum, containing two JPPs, and in terminal small intestine containing continuous IPP. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (109 CFU) was injected into the lumen of half of each intestinal segment when calves were 10–14 days-old and infection confirmed 1–2 months later by PCR and immunohistochemistry. Thirteen recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins, previously identified as immunogenic, were used to analyze pathogen-specific B- and T-cell responses in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes. IgA plasma cell responses to 9 of 13 recombinant proteins were detected in JPP but not in IPP. Secretory IgA reacting in ELISA with 9 of the 13 recombinant proteins was detected in luminal contents from both jejunal and ileal segments. These observations support the conclusion that pathogen-specific IgA B cells were induced in JPP but not IPP early after a primary infection. The presence of secretory IgA in intestinal contents is consistent with dissemination of IgA plasma cells from the identified mucosa-associated immune induction sites. This is the first direct evidence for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis uptake by bovine JPP and for local induction of pathogen-specific IgA plasma cell responses after enteric infection. We also provide evidence that bacterial invasion of IPP, a primary B lymphoid tissue, provides a novel strategy to evade induction of mucosal immune responses. Over 60% of PPs in the newborn calf small intestine is primary lymphoid tissue, which has significant implications when designing oral vaccines or diagnostic tests to detect early M. avium subsp

  12. Modification of the effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation by concurrent chemotherapy infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, K.K.; Rayner, P.A.; Lam, K.N.

    1984-08-01

    The combined effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) and concurrent infusion of bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, cis-platinum, 5-fluorouracil, actinomycin D, and mitomycin C were studied in the SCC VII/SF tumor, a squamous cell carcinoma and the jejunal crypt cells in the mouse. For the SCC VII/SF tumor, enhanced cell killing was seen with each of the six drugs when infused concurrently with CLDRI; the greatest enhancement was seen with mitomycin C and cis-platinum. For the jejunal crypt cells, enhanced cell killing was seen primarily with bleomycin. The authors results suggest a therapeutic gain with concurrent CLDRI and chemotherapy infusion for five of the six chemotherapeutic drugs studied with the exception of bleomycin.

  13. In naming the dead: Autosomal and Y-chromosomal STR typing on human skeletal remains from an 18th/19th century aristocratic crypt in Gallspach, Upper Austria.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Reinhard; Renhart, Silvia; Gruber, Heinz; Kli Mesch, Wolfgang; Neuhuber, Franz; Cemper-Kiesslich, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA analyses have shown to be a powerful tool in the joint transdisciplinary assessment of archaeological records involving human remains. In this study we set out to identify single inhumations by synoptically evaluating the historical, archaeological, anthropological and molecular records on human remains from the crypt of the aristocratic family of Hoheneck (or: Hohenegg) dating to the 18(th) and 19(th) century AD. A total of 11 individuals were under investigation, yielding complete autosomal and Y-chromosomal STR profiles for 5 persons clearly showing a family group. DNA results, anthropological data and archaeological records taken together resulted in (almost) unambiguous correlation to historical records on the persons entombed in the crypt.

  14. Effect of hesperetin, a citrus flavonoid, on bacterial enzymes and carcinogen-induced aberrant crypt foci in colon cancer rats: a dose-dependent study.

    PubMed

    Aranganathan, Selvaraj; Selvam, Jayabal Panneer; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2008-10-01

    Hesperetin, an important bioactive compound in Chinese traditional medicine, has antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Hesperetin is found in abundance in orange and grape juices (200-590 mg L(-1)) consumed in the daily diet. We have investigated the effect of different doses of hesperetin on faecal and colonic mucosal bacterial enzymes and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into six groups and were fed a modified pellet diet for 16 weeks. Group 1 served as control and group 2 received the modified pellet diet along with hesperetin (30 mg kg(-1)). The rats in groups 3-6 rats were given a weekly subcutaneous injection of DMH (20 mg kg(-1)) for the first four weeks. Hesperetin was supplemented orally at different doses (10, 20 or 30 mg kg(-1)) for a total of 16 weeks. At the end of the experimental period all rats were killed. In DMH-treated rats, the activity of faecal and colonic mucosal bacterial enzymes, such as beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase, nitroreductase, sulfatase and mucinase, were significantly elevated, but in rats supplemented hesperetin along with DMH the activity was significantly lowered (P < 0.05). The total number of aberrant crypts was significantly increased in unsupplemented DMH-treated rats, while hesperetin supplementation to DMH-treated rats significantly reduced the total number of crypts. The results demonstrated that hesperetin supplementation at a dose of 20 mg kg(-1) played a potent role in suppressing the formation of aberrant crypt foci and reducing the activity of bacterial enzymes in colon cancer.

  15. Chemopreventive effects of Strobilanthes crispus leaf extract on azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Al-Henhena, Nawal; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; Ying, Rozaida Poh Yuen; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Rouhollahi, Elham; Al-Wajeeh, Nahla Saeed; Ali, Habibah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; El-Seedi, Hesham R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, microscopic and histological studies suggest that Strobilanthes crispus ethanol extract reduce azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. S. crispus is considered a traditional medicine and used as an antioxidant. Its leaf contains a large amount of phenolic compounds to which its radical scavenging role is attributed and enhance its ability to eradicate oxidative stress reactions. The study was designed to determine the chemopreventive effect of S. crispus ethanol extract in vivo and in vitro by elucidating the effect of the extract on intermediate biomarkers which can be used as effective predictors of colon cancer. S. crispus was analyzed for DPPH free radical scavenging, nitric oxide (NO) and ferric acid reduction. The results indicated that S. crispus oral administration significantly inhibited colorectal carcinogenesis induced by AOM as revealed by the reduction in the number of ACF. S. crispus down-regulated the expression of PCNA, Bcl2 and β-catenin. Additionally, it exerted a pronounced inhibitory effect on MDA and NO levels and stimulatory effect on CAT and GPx activities. These results demonstrate that S. crispus is a chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer through the suppression of early and intermediate carcinogenic phases that may be related to its flavonoid content. PMID:26307342

  16. Inhibitory effect of various breads on DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci and colorectal tumours in rats.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangying; Zeng, Sien; Takashima, Tiri; Nozoe, Koichiro; Shobayashi, Megumi; Kakugawa, Koji; Murakami, Kaori; Jikihara, Hiroshi; Zhou, Lihua; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Bread is rich in dietary fibre and many phytochemical compounds, which may influence chemoprevention of colon cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of three kinds of bread on DMH-induced colorectal tumours in F344 rats. F344 rats were divided into four groups (Steinmetz Three-Grain bread, Steinmetz Country bread, White bread, and MF). All groups were injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 20 mg/kg body weight) once a week for 8 consecutive weeks from 5 weeks of age. To investigate the antioxidant effect of bread, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging rate of bread and the serum levels of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in rats were examined. The number of colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and the incidence of colorectal tumours were studied after 34 weeks of DMH treatment. The Steinmetz Three-Grain and Steinmetz Country bread groups had higher scavenging rates of the DPPH free radical and lower serum levels of 8-OHdG and incidence of ACF, adenomas, and adenocarcinomas of colon than the White bread and MF group. Steinmetz Three-Grain bread and Steinmetz Country bread have various ingredient combinations that may inhibit colorectal cancer progression.

  17. Antitumor activity of the β-glucan paramylon from Euglena against preneoplastic colonic aberrant crypt foci in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Shimada, Ryoko; Matsuyama, Ai; Yuasa, Masahiro; Sawamura, Hiromi; Yoshida, Eriko; Suzuki, Kengo

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the effects of β-glucans isolated from Euglena on the formation of preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon were examined in mice. Mice were fed a semi-purified AIN-93M diet containing cellulose or the same diet but with the cellulose replaced with β-glucans in the form of Euglena, paramylon, or amorphous paramylon, for 11 weeks. After consuming these dietary supplements for 8 days, half of the mice were intraperitoneally administered 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) at a dose of 20 mg kg(-1) body weight every week for 6 weeks. Among the DMH-treated groups, the paramylon- and amorphous paramylon-fed mice displayed a significantly lower number of ACF than the control group. Also, the liver weight of the paramylon group was markedly decreased compared with those of the control and Euglena groups, whereas the cecal content weight and fecal volume of the paramylon group were significantly increased. As for the levels of organic acids in the cecal contents, the paramylon group displayed significantly increased lactic acid levels compared with the control and Euglena groups. From these findings, although the mechanism of the ACF-inhibiting effects of paramylon remains unclear, it is considered that β-glucans, such as paramylon and its isomer amorphous paramylon, have preventive effects against colon cancer and are more effective against the condition than Euglena.

  18. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming-Wei; Liu, Shao-Zhuang; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats. METHODS Diabetic rats, which were induced by high-fat diet (HFD), nicotinamide and low-dose streptozotocin, underwent sham operations, SG, SG with jejuno-ileal loop (SG-JI) and SG with jejuno-jejunal loop (SG-JJ) followed by postoperative HFD. Then, at the time points of baseline and 2, 12 and 24 wk postoperatively, we determined and compared several variables, including the area under the curve for the results of oral glucose tolerance test (AUCOGTT), serum levels of triglyceride, cholesterol and ghrelin in fasting state, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), body weight, calorie intake, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin secretions after glucose gavage at dose of 1 g/kg. RESULTS At 2 wk postoperatively, rats that underwent SG, SG-JJ and SG-JI, compared with sham-operated (SHAM) rats, demonstrated lower body weight, calorie intake and ghrelin (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), enhanced secretion of insulin and GLP-1 after glucose gavage (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), improved AUCOGTT, HOMA-IR, fasting serum triglyceride and cholesterol (AUCOGTT: 1616.9 ± 83.2, 837.4 ± 83.7, 874.9 ± 97.2 and 812.6 ± 81.9, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; HOMA-IR: 4.31 ± 0.54, 2.94 ± 0.22, 3.17 ± 0.37 and 3.41 ± 0.22, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Triglyceride: 2.35 ± 0.17, 1.87 ± 0.23, 1.98 ± 0.30 and 2.04 ± 0.21 mmol/L, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Cholesterol: 1.84 ± 0.21, 1.53 ± 0.20, 1.52 ± 0.20 and 1.46 ± 0.23 mmol/L). At 12 wk postoperatively, rats receiving SG-JJ and SG-JI had lower body weight, reduced levels of triglyceride and cholesterol and elevated level of GLP-1 compared to those receiving SG (P < 0.05 vs SG). At 24 wk after surgery, compared with SG, the advantage of SG-JJ and SG-JI for glucolipid metabolism was still evident (P < 0.05 vs SG). SG-JI had a better performance in lipid metabolism and GLP-1 secretion of rats than did SG-JJ. CONCLUSION

  19. Effect of dietary fatty acids on jejunal and ileal oleic acid uptake by rat brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Prieto, R M; Stremmel, W; Sales, C; Tur, J A

    1996-04-18

    To test the effect of dietary fatty acids on fatty acid uptake, the influx kinetics of a representative long-chain fatty acid, 3H-oleic acid, in both the jejunum and ileum of rats has been studied using brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Animals were fed with semipurified diets containing 5 g fat/100 g diet, as corn oil (control group), safflower oil (unsaturated group) and coconut oil hydrogenated (saturated group). With increasing unbound oleate concentration in the medium, the three dietary groups showed saturable kinetics in both jejunal and ileal BBMV (controls: Vmax = 0.15 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 136 +/- 29.1 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 0.23 +/- 0.03 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 196 +/- 50.3 nmol for ileum; unsaturated: Vmax = 0.28 +/- 0.05 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 242.7 +/- 91.8 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 1.29 +/- 0.06 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 509.8 +/- 97.5 nmol for ileum; saturated: Vmax = 0.03 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 124.5 +/- 72.6 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 0.04 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein -1.5 min-1 and Km = 205.6 +/- 85.3 nmol for ileum). These results support the theory that feeding an isocaloric diet containing only unsaturated fatty acids enhanced oleic acid uptake, and feeding an isocaloric diet containing only saturated fatty acids decreased oleic acid uptake. The results obtained in the present work also show the adaptative ability of jejunum and ileum to the type of dietary fat.

  20. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation.

  1. Indigestible material attenuated changes in apoptosis in the fasted rat jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Takashi; Fujise, Takehiro; Shiraishi, Ryosuke; Kuroki, Tsukasa; Park, Jae Myung; Ootani, Akifumi; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Tsunada, Seiji; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2008-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that fasting induced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation in the rat intestinal mucosa. The aim was to investigate the effect of expanded polystyrene as indigestible material on apoptosis and cell proliferation in rat small intestinal mucosa during fasting. Male SD rats were divided into 3 groups. The first group was fed with chow and water ad libitum. The second group fasted for 72 hrs. The third group was fasted for 24 hrs and was fed expanded polystyrene. Intestinal apoptosis was evaluated by percent fragmented DNA assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUDP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, and caspase-3 assay. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (5-BrdU) uptake. Truncal vagotomy was performed to evaluate a role of the central nervous system. In the 72-hr fasted rat, mucosal height of the rat jejunum was decreased to 73% of that in rats fed ad libitum, and this decrease was partly restored to 90% in rats fed expanded polystyrene. The fragmented DNA was increased in fasted rats (28.0%) when compared with that in rats fed ad libitum (2.6%). The increase in fragmented DNA in fasted rats was recovered by feeding them expanded polystyrene (8.3%). TUNEL staining confirmed this result. The effect of polystyrene on apoptosis was decreased by truncal vagotomy. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in fasted rats, which was then decreased by feeding of expanded polystyrene. In contrast to apoptosis, feeding of expanded polystyrene had no reconstructive effect on 5-BrdU uptake in the intestinal epithelium, which was decreased by fasting to 60% of that in rats fed ad libitum. In conclusion, feeding of indigestible material partly restored the decrease in intestinal mucosal length in the fasted rats through the apoptotic pathway without any influence on BrdU uptake. Further exploration focused on the mechanism of this effect of indigestible material is required.

  2. Improving access to intestinal stem cells as a step toward intestinal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, J W; Lau, C; Jacomino, M; Finegold, M; Henning, S J

    1994-03-01

    In previous studies exploring the intestinal epithelium as a potential site for somatic gene therapy, we concluded that the mucus lining the intestine constitutes a significant barrier to any attempts at gene transfer via the lumenal route. The mucus problem is aggravated by the fact that the epithelial stem cells, which are the logical target for gene transfer, are located deep in the intestinal crypts. The goals of the current study were to develop procedures that would improve accessibility to the intestinal stem cells and which would effect in vivo mucus removal without damaging the underlying epithelium. Initial experiments involved evaluation of the use of distension to improve accessibility to the intestinal crypts and the use of the mucolytic agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) versus a control solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for mucus removal. Catheters were inserted in each end of 3-cm terminal ileal segments in anesthetized rats. Two milliliters of agent was instilled into the clamped segment for 2 min, removed, and repeated. Lumenal distension resulted in shortened villi with wider intervillus spacing, thereby improving crypt access. Both NAC and DTT washes removed significant mucus between the villi but failed to reach the crypt lumen. To enhance mucus release from the crypt lumen, pilocarpine was selected due to its cholinergic properties and preferential binding to muscarinic receptors on crypt goblet cells. Pilocarpine given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the mucolytic or PBS wash resulted in significant eradication of mucus down into the crypt lumen. This effect was still evident 3-4 hr later provided the intestine remained undisturbed.

  3. Efficacy of combined jejunal and colonic fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sudhir K; Girotra, Mohit; Garg, Shashank; Dutta, Anand; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Maddox, Cynthia; Song, Yang; Bartlett, John G; Vinayek, Rakesh; Fricke, W Florian

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI) is increasing; fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective therapy. However, there have been no studies of the efficacy of a single session of combined enteral and colonic FMT or characterizations of changes in the microbiota between donors and recipients. We performed a study of 27 patients with RCDI who were given a fixed volume of processed fecal filtrate via enteroscopy and colonoscopy in a single session. Patients were closely monitored, and fecal samples were collected from 2 patient-donor pairs for 16S rRNA analysis. All patients had reduced stool frequency, abdominal pain, white blood cell counts, and elimination of fecal C difficile toxin (P < .05). FMT increased microbial diversity, increasing proportions of Lachnospiraceae (phylum Firmicutes) and reducing proportions of Enterobacteriaceae. FMT was associated with marked changes in the composition of fecal microbiota in 2 patients with RCDI.

  4. Radiation-induced inhibition of thymidine incorporation in vivo as a measure of the initial slope and RBEn/gamma.

    PubMed

    Dubravsky, N B; Maor, M H; Withers, H R

    1985-08-01

    Radiation damage can be measured by decreased incorporation of 3H-TdR. The early effect of total body irradiation of mice, with doses up to 300-400 rad, of gamma rays of neutrons, on thymidine-3H incorporation into the DNA of murine proliferating normal and tumor cells are described. Total body irradiation with single doses up to 300 rad resulted in a steep dose-dependent depression of 3H-TdR incorporation into the DNA of the jejunal crypt, testis, spleen, fibrosarcoma (FSa), and FSa metastasis cells. The dose required to depress 3H-TdR incorporation values to 37% of control level (D37/thymidine) after gamma-irradiation was calculated to be 405, 443, 72, 303, and 531 rad, for jejunal crypt, testis, spleen, FSa metastasis, and FSa tumor cells, respectively. The depression progressed during the first 3 hours after irradiation. After neutron irradiation, the D37/thymidine was calculated to be 81, 140, 35, and 155 rad for jejunal crypt, testis, spleen, and FSa metastasis cells, respectively. The RBEn/gamma derived from these results were 5.00, 3.16, 2.06, and 1.95 for jejunal crypt, testis, spleen, and FSa metastasis cells, respectively. These results of D37/thymidine after gamma-irradiation and the RBEn/gamma correlate well with the 1Do for the initial slope of the survival curve and RBEn/gamma published in the literature for C3H/Kam mice using the same gamma and neutron beams. These findings show that cell survival after small doses of irradiation correlate with the effect of irradiation on the actively proliferating cells at the time of irradiation.

  5. Hematological and serum biochemical parameters of blood in adolescent rats and histomorphological changes in the jejunal epithelium and liver after chronic exposure to cadmium and lead in the case of supplementation with green tea vs black, red or white tea.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Dobrowolski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Rats were used to check whether regular consumption of black, red, or white tea would have a protective effect similar to the action of green tea on the intestine and liver in the case of exposure to Cd and Pb within the limits of human environmental exposure to these elements. Rats at the age of 6 weeks were divided into the control and four groups supplemented with green (GT), black (BT), red (RT), or white (WT) tea extracts. Their diet (except the control) was mixed with 7 mg Cd/kg and 50mg Pb/kg. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. The effects of administration of tea in Cd- and Pb-poisoned rats on plasma biochemical parameters and the jejunal epithelium and liver were determined. The highest body mass was found in the GT group. The highest hemoglobin and Fe concentrations were in the control and GT groups. The highest activity of AST was in groups poisoned with Cd and Pb independently on supplementation. The highest ALT activity was in BT and RT groups with lower content of polifenoles. Pb and Cd disturbed the liver leading to necrosis and fatty degenerative changes, and a loss of normal architecture of the hepatocytes. Rats from the GT group had the highest cell proliferation rate in intestinal glands and the largest absorptive surface. Black, red, and white tea exerted a varied impact on the histological structure and innervation of the small intestine wall as well as on the absorptive function of small intestine mucosa in rats poisoned with Pb and Cd than green tea. On the other hand, taking into account the number of apoptotic cells, the effect of the teas was the same. Moreover, it is clear that long term exposure to Cd and Pb contamination causes toxic effect in the liver.

  6. Chemoprevention of Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci by Novel Schiff Based Dichlorido(4-Methoxy-2-{[2-(Piperazin-4-Ium-1-Yl)Ethyl]Iminomethyl}Phenolate)Cd Complex in Azoxymethane-Induced Colorectal Cancer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hajrezaie, Maryam; Shams, Keivan; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Karimian, Hamed; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Emtyazjoo, Mozhgan; Zahedifard, Maryam; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2015-01-01

    Schiff-based complexes as a source of cancer chemotherapeutic compounds have been subjected to the variety of anticancer studies. The in-vitro analysis confirmed the CdCl2(C14H21N3O2) complex possess cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction properties in colon cancer cells, so lead to investigate the inhibitory efficiency of the compound on colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF). Five groups of adult male rats were used in this study: Vehicle, cancer control, positive control groups and the groups treated with 25 and 50 mg/kg of complex for 10 weeks. The rats in vehicle group were injected subcutaneously with 15 mg/kg of sterile normal saline once a week for 2 weeks and orally administered with 5% Tween-20 (5 ml/kg) for 10 weeks, other groups were injected subcutaneously with 15 mg/kg azoxymethane once a week for 2 weeks. The rats in positive groups were injected intra-peritoneally with 35 mg/kg 5-Flourouracil four times in a month. Administration of the complex suppressed total colonic ACF formation up to 73.4% (P < 0.05). The results also showed that treatment with the complex significantly reduced the level of malondialdehyde while increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Furthermore, the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl2 and the up-regulation of Bax was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. PMID:26201720

  7. Chemoprevention of Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci by Novel Schiff Based Dichlorido(4-Methoxy-2-{[2-(Piperazin-4-Ium-1-Yl)Ethyl]Iminomethyl}Phenolate)Cd Complex in Azoxymethane-Induced Colorectal Cancer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hajrezaie, Maryam; Shams, Keivan; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Karimian, Hamed; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Emtyazjoo, Mozhgan; Zahedifard, Maryam; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2015-07-23

    Schiff-based complexes as a source of cancer chemotherapeutic compounds have been subjected to the variety of anticancer studies. The in-vitro analysis confirmed the CdCl2(C14H21N3O2) complex possess cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction properties in colon cancer cells, so lead to investigate the inhibitory efficiency of the compound on colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF). Five groups of adult male rats were used in this study: Vehicle, cancer control, positive control groups and the groups treated with 25 and 50 mg/kg of complex for 10 weeks. The rats in vehicle group were injected subcutaneously with 15 mg/kg of sterile normal saline once a week for 2 weeks and orally administered with 5% Tween-20 (5 ml/kg) for 10 weeks, other groups were injected subcutaneously with 15 mg/kg azoxymethane once a week for 2 weeks. The rats in positive groups were injected intra-peritoneally with 35 mg/kg 5-Flourouracil four times in a month. Administration of the complex suppressed total colonic ACF formation up to 73.4% (P < 0.05). The results also showed that treatment with the complex significantly reduced the level of malondialdehyde while increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Furthermore, the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl2 and the up-regulation of Bax was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining.

  8. Dclk1 Deletion in Tuft Cells Results in Impaired Epithelial Repair After Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stanley A.; Li, Linheng; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Dclk1+ tuft cells in the replacement of intestinal epithelia and reestablishing the epithelial barrier after severe genotoxic insult is completely unknown. Successful restoration requires precise coordination between the cells within each crypt subunit. While the mechanisms that control this response remain largely uncertain, the radiation model remains an exceptional surrogate for stem cell-associated crypt loss. Following the creation of Dclk1-intestinal-epithelial-deficient Villin-Cre;Dclk1flox/flox mice, widespread gene expression changes were detected in isolated intestinal epithelia during homeostasis. While the number of surviving crypts were unaffected, Villin-Cre;Dclk1flox/flox mice failed to maintain tight junctions and died at ~5d, where Dclk1flox/flox mice lived until day 10 following radiation injury. These findings suggest that Dclk1 plays a functional role critical in the epithelial restorative response. PMID:24123696

  9. Proximal enterectomy provides a stronger systemic stimulus to intestinal adaptation than distal enterectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, G V; Bristol, J B; Williamson, R C

    1987-01-01

    Enteroglucagon has been implicated as a tropic hormone in the control of intestinal adaptation. Because cells producing enteroglucagon are located mainly in the distal small bowel (and colon), ileal resection might be expected to produce less adaptive change than a jejunal resection of equivalent length. This hypothesis was tested in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) weighing 184.0 +/- 7.3 g and receiving a Thiry-Vella fistula (TVF) of the mid-60% of the small intestine. One group had concomitant resection of the jejunum proximal to the TVF (n = 12), another had resection of the ileum distal to the TVF (n = 13), while controls had a TVF alone (n = 15). When killed 10 days postoperatively rats with ileal resection weighed only 81% of controls (p less than 0.001) and 85% of those with jejunal resection (p less than 0.01). Jejunal resection produced an 81% increase in crypt cell production rate (measured by a stathmokinetic technique) over control values (28.5 +/- 4.2 v 15.8 +/- 2.3 cells/crypt/h: p = 0.025), whereas ileal resection had no demonstrable effect (17.5 +/- 2.3 cells/crypt/h). Adaptive hyperplasia in isolated small bowel is modulated by factors localised to the distal small intestine, enteroglucagon being a plausible candidate. PMID:3692304

  10. Description of a new species of Euderus Haliday from the southeastern United States (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Eulophidae): the crypt-keeper wasp

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Scott P.; Weinersmith, Kelly L.; Liu, Sean; Ridenbaugh, Ryan D.; Zhang, Y. Miles; Forbes, Andrew A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Euderus Haliday, Euderus set sp. n., is described and illustrated from the southeastern United States, where it parasitizes the crypt gall wasp, Bassettia pallida Ashmead, 1896, on live oaks in the genus Quercus (subsection Virentes). This is the 1st species of the genus reported from the southeastern United States to parasitize cynipid gall wasps and the 3rd species of the genus reported to attack cynipids in North America. Modified sections of the identification keys to subgenera and species of Euderus (Yoshimoto, 1971) are included to integrate the new species. PMID:28228666

  11. Description of a new species of Euderus Haliday from the southeastern United States (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Eulophidae): the crypt-keeper wasp.

    PubMed

    Egan, Scott P; Weinersmith, Kelly L; Liu, Sean; Ridenbaugh, Ryan D; Zhang, Y Miles; Forbes, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    A new species of the genus Euderus Haliday, Euderus setsp. n., is described and illustrated from the southeastern United States, where it parasitizes the crypt gall wasp, Bassettia pallida Ashmead, 1896, on live oaks in the genus Quercus (subsection Virentes). This is the 1(st) species of the genus reported from the southeastern United States to parasitize cynipid gall wasps and the 3(rd) species of the genus reported to attack cynipids in North America. Modified sections of the identification keys to subgenera and species of Euderus (Yoshimoto, 1971) are included to integrate the new species.

  12. Expression of apical Na(+)-L-glutamine co-transport activity, B(0)-system neutral amino acid co-transporter (B(0)AT1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 along the jejunal crypt-villus axis in young pigs fed a liquid formula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut apical amino acid (AA) transport activity is high at birth and during suckling, thus being essential to maintain luminal nutrient-dependent mucosal growth through providing AA as essential metabolic fuel, substrates and nutrient stimuli for cellular growth. Because system-B(0) Na(+)-neutral AA c...

  13. Oral Morphine Pharmacokinetic in Obesity: The Role of P-Glycoprotein, MRP2, MRP3, UGT2B7, and CYP3A4 Jejunal Contents and Obesity-Associated Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lloret-Linares, Célia; Miyauchi, Eisuke; Luo, Huilong; Labat, Laurence; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Poitou, Christine; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Mouly, Stéphane; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Bergmann, Jean-François; Declèves, Xavier

    2016-03-07

    The objective of our work was to study the association between the jejunal expression levels of P-gp, MRP2, MRP3, UGT2B7, CYP3A4, the ABCB1 c.3435C > T polymorphism, and several obesity-associated biomarkers, as well as oral morphine and glucuronides pharmacokinetics in a population of morbidly obese subjects. The pharmacokinetics of oral morphine (30 mg) and its glucuronides was performed in obese patients candidate to bariatric surgery. A fragment of jejunal mucosa was preserved during surgery. Subjects were genotyped for the ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.3435C > T. The subjects were 6 males and 23 females, with a mean body mass index of 44.8 (35.4-61.9) kg/m(2). The metabolic ratios AUC0-inf M3G/morphine and AUC0-inf M6G/morphine were highly correlated (rs = 0.8, p < 0.0001) and were 73.2 ± 24.6 (34.7-137.7) and 10.9 ± 4.1 (3.8-20.6). The pharmacokinetic parameters of morphine and its glucuronides were not associated with the jejunal contents of P-gp, CYP3A4, MRP2, and MRP3. The jejunal content of UGT2B7 was positively associated with morphine AUC0-inf (rs = 0.4, p = 0.03). Adiponectin was inversely correlated with morphine Cmax (rs = -0.44, p = 0.03). None of the factors studied was associated with morphine metabolic ratios. The interindividual variability in the jejunal content of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes, the ABCB1 gene polymorphism, and the low-grade inflammation did not explain the variability in morphine and glucuronide exposure. High morphine metabolic ratio argued for an increased morphine glucuronidation in morbidly obese patients.

  14. Effect of age on epithelial cell migration in small intestine of chickens.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; Skartvedt, S M

    1975-02-01

    Villous length, crypt depth, epithelial cell migration rate, and replacement time were studied by autoradiography of histologic sections of small intestine from normal chickens exposed to tritiated thymidine (3-H-TdR). The results indicated that villi and crypts elongate, and epithelial cell migration accelerates between 1 day and 6 months of age. Epithelial replacement time seemed to increase with age of the chickens. Replacement was nearly complete in the 1-day-old group of chickens 5 days after thymidine exposure. In contrast, at this same time, replacement was only approximately 75 and 50% complete in the 3-week-old and 6-month-old groups of chickens, respectively.

  15. Effects of dose rates on radiation-induced replenishment of intestinal stem cells determined by Lgr5 lineage tracing.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu

    2015-07-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of intestinal Lgr5(+) stem cells is important for elucidating the mechanism of colonic cancer development. We previously established a method for evaluating Lgr5(+) stem cells by tamoxifen-dependent Lgr5-lineage tracing and showed that high-dose-rate radiation stimulated replenishment of colonic stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on stem cell maintenance. Tamoxifen (4OHT)-injected Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-Cre(ERT2) × ROSA-LSL-LacZ mice were used, LacZ-labeled colonic crypts were enumerated, and the loss of LacZ(+) crypts under low-dose-rate radiation was estimated. After 4OHT treatment, the number of LacZ-labeled Lgr5(+) stem cells was higher in the colon of infant mice than in adult mice. The percentage of LacZ-labeled crypts in infant mice rapidly decreased after 4OHT treatment. However, the percentage of labeled crypts plateaued at ∼2% at 4 weeks post-treatment and remained unchanged for up to 7 months. Thus, it will be advantageous to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose-rate radiation. Next, we determined the percentages of LacZ-labeled crypts irradiated with 1 Gy administered at different dose rates. As reported in our previous study, mice exposed to high-dose-rate radiation (30 Gy/h) showed a marked replenishment (P = 0.04). However, mice exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (0.003 Gy/h) did not exhibit accelerated stem-cell replenishment (P = 0.47). These findings suggest the percentage of labeled crypts can serve as a useful indicator of the effects of dose rate on the stem cell pool.

  16. Limbal melanocytes support limbal epithelial stem cells in 2D and 3D microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Dziasko, Marc A; Tuft, Stephen J; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-09-01

    Human limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are essential for the maintenance of the corneal epithelium of the ocular surface. LESCs are located within limbal crypts between the palisades of Vogt in the limbus; the interface between the peripheral cornea and conjunctiva. The limbal crypts have been proposed as a LESC niche owing to their support of epithelial cells, which can form holoclone colonies in vitro. Closely associated with the limbal crypts is a concentrated population of melanocytes. The anatomical location and close proximity to putative LESC suggests that melanocytes might play a role in maintenance of these stem cells in the niche. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of human limbal melanocytes (hLM) to support the expansion of human limbal epithelial cells (LECs) in vitro as an indicator of functional cell-cell interaction. After observing that hLM co-localize with clusters of compact epithelial cells in the native limbal crypts, hLM were isolated from crypt-rich cadaveric limbal biopsies and used as feeders for the culture of LECs. Interestingly, LECs grown on mitotically active hLM were able to generate large epithelial colonies that contained small and compact cells with morphological stem cell characteristics. Immunocytochemistry revealed that LECs expanded on hLM were positive for the expression of the putative stem cell markers CK15, Bmi-1 and p63α and negative for the marker of terminal cell differentiation CK3. LECs and hLM were finally co-cultured on RAFT (real architecture for 3D tissue) collagen tissue equivalents. In 3D co-cultures, hLM promoted multi-layering of the epithelial sheet in which basal cells were maintained in an undifferentiated state. Taken together, these observations suggest melanocytes could play an important role in the maintenance of LESCs in the native human limbal stem cell niche.

  17. Jejunal microvilli atrophy and reduced nutrient transport in rats with advanced liver cirrhosis: improvement by Insulin-like Growth Factor I

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Cortázar, Inma; Pascual, María; Urdaneta, Elena; Pardo, Javier; Puche, Juan Enrique; Vivas, Bárbara; Díaz-Casares, Amelia; García, María; Díaz-Sánchez, Matías; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Castilla, Alberto; González-Barón, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    Background Previous results have shown that in rats with non-ascitic cirrhosis there is an altered transport of sugars and amino acids associated with elongated microvilli. These alterations returned to normal with the administration of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I). The aims of this study were to explore the evolution of these alterations and analyse the effect of IGF-I in rats with advanced cirrhosis and ascites. Thus, jejunal structure and nutrient transport (D-galactose, L-leucine, L-proline, L-glutamic acid and L-cystine) were studied in rats with ascitic cirrhosis. Methods Advanced cirrhosis was induced by CCl4 inhalation and Phenobarbital administration for 30 weeks. Cirrhotic animals were divided into two groups which received IGF-I or saline during two weeks. Control group was studied in parallel. Jejunal microvilli were studied by electron microscopy. Nutrient transport was assessed in brush border membrane vesicles using 14C or 35S-labelled subtracts in the three experimental groups. Results Intestinal active Na+-dependent transport was significantly reduced in untreated cirrhotic rats. Kinetic studies showed a decreased Vmax and a reduced affinity for sugar and four amino acids transporters (expressed as an increased Kt) in the brush border membrane vesicles from untreated cirrhotic rats as compared with controls. Both parameters were normalised in the IGF-I-treated cirrhotic group. Electron microscopy showed elongation and fusion of microvilli with degenerative membrane lesions and/or notable atrophy. Conclusions The initial microvilli elongation reported in non ascitic cirrhosis develops into atrophy in rats with advanced cirrhosis and nutrient transports (monosaccharides and amino acids) are progressively reduced. Both morphological and functional alterations improved significantly with low doses of IGF-I. PMID:15196310

  18. Analysis of Cell Death Induction in Intestinal Organoids In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, Thomas; Delgado, Eugenia; Brunner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has an important function in the absorption of nutrients contained in the food. Furthermore, it also has an important barrier function, preventing luminal pathogens from entering the bloodstream. This single cell layer epithelium is quite sensitive to various cell death-promoting triggers, including drugs, irradiation, and TNF family members, leading to loss of barrier integrity, epithelial erosion, inflammation, malabsorption, and diarrhea. In order to assess the intestinal epithelium-damaging potential of treatments and substances specific test systems are required. As intestinal tumor cell lines are a poor substitute for primary intestinal epithelial cells, and in vivo experiments in mice are costly and often unethical, the use of intestinal organoids cultured from intestinal crypts provide an ideal tool to study cell death induction and mechanisms in primary intestinal epithelial cells. This protocol describes the isolation and culture of intestinal organoids from murine small intestinal crypts, and the quantitative assessment of cell death induction in these organoids.

  19. The radioprotective effects of bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang: a prescription of traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Song-Eun; Oh, Heon; Kim, Se-Ra; Yee, Sung-Tae; Yu, Young-Beob; Byun, Myung-Woo; Jo, Sung-Kee

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang, a prescription of traditional Oriental medicine, and its major ingredients on protection of the intestine and hematopoietic organs against radiation damage in this study. The jejunal crypt survival, endogenous spleen colony formation, and apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells were investigated in mice irradiated with high and low doses of gamma-rays. bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang administration before irradiation protected the jejunal crypts (p < 0.0001), increased the formation of the endogenous spleen colony (p < 0.05) and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05). In experiments on the effects of the individual ingredient of bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang, Rensan (Radix Ginseng), Danggui (Radix Angelicae gigantis), Shengma (Rhizoma Cimicifugae) and Chaihu (Radix Bupleuri) might have major radioprotective effects, and each might have different degrees of effect on these three endpoints. These results indicated that bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang might be a better agent than any one of its ingredients to satisfy all three endpoints. Although the mechanisms of this inhibitory effect remain to be elucidated, these results indicated that bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang might be a useful radioprotector, especially since it is a relatively non-toxic natural product. Further studies are needed to better characterize the protective nature of bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang extract and its ingredients.

  20. The environmental monitoring of Cultural Heritage through Low Cost strategies: The frescoes of the crypt of St. Francesco d'Assisi's, Irsina (Basilicata, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sileo, Maria; Gizzi, Fabrizio; Masini, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    One of the main tools of assessment and diagnosis used to define appropriate strategies for the preservation of cultural heritage is the environmental monitoring. To achieve an environmental monitoring are needed high costs of purchase and maintenance, high costs of instrumental and for the management of the plants and processing of results. These costs imply that the technologies for environmental monitoring are not as common but their use is limited to the study very famous monuments or sites. To extend the use and dissemination of such technologies to a greater number of monuments, through the project Pro_Cult (Advanced methodological approaches and technologies for Protection and Security of Cultural Heritage) a research aimed at testing low cost technologies has been performed. The aim of the research is to develop low cost monitoring systems, assessing their effectiveness in a comparative way with commercial high cost ones. To this aim an environmental monitoring system using the Arduino system was designed and developed. It is an electronics prototyping platform based on open-source hardware and software flexible and user friendly. This system is connected to sensors for the detection of environmental parameters of non high purchase cost but with respect to the medium potential detection sensors accurately. This low cost system was tested in the framework of a microclimate monitoring project of the crypt of St. Francis of Assisi in Irsina (Southern Italy) enriched by a precious cycle of medieval frescoes. The aim of this research was to compare two monitoring systems, the first, at low cost, using Arduino system, and the second, a standard commercial product for a full yearly cycle and assess the reliability and the results obtained by the two systems. This paper shows the results of the comparative analysis of an entire monitoring yearly cycle in relation to the problems of degradation affecting the paintings of medieval crypt [1]. The obtained results

  1. Lgr4 is required for Paneth cell differentiation and maintenance of intestinal stem cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Mustata, Roxana C; Van Loy, Tom; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frédérick; Strollo, Sandra; Vassart, Gilbert; Garcia, Marie-Isabelle

    2011-06-01

    Gene inactivation of the orphan G protein-coupled receptor LGR4, a paralogue of the epithelial-stem-cell marker LGR5, results in a 50% decrease in epithelial cell proliferation and an 80% reduction in terminal differentiation of Paneth cells in postnatal mouse intestinal crypts. When cultured ex vivo, LGR4-deficient crypts or progenitors, but not LGR5-deficient progenitors, die rapidly with marked downregulation of stem-cell markers and Wnt target genes, including Lgr5. Partial rescue of this phenotype is achieved by addition of LiCl to the culture medium, but not Wnt agonists. Our results identify LGR4 as a permissive factor in the Wnt pathway in the intestine and, as such, as a potential target for intestinal cancer therapy.

  2. The effects of dietary phosphorus deficiency on surface pH and membrane composition of the mucosa epithelium in caprine jejunum.

    PubMed

    Busche, R; Schröder, B; Huber, K; Sallmann, H P; Breves, G

    2007-01-01

    In ruminants, the uptake of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) across the intestinal mucosa epithelium by Na-dependent and Na-independent mechanisms is a main regulatory factor in P homeostasis. The aim of the study was to elucidate to which extent Na-independent mechanisms, including pH effects or composition of mucosal brush-border membranes, could be involved in positive stimulation of P(i) absorptive processes seen under the P deficient condition. Therefore, luminal, surface and intracellular pH of the jejunal epithelial cells in control and P depleted goats were compared and biochemical analyses of membrane phospholipids in the apical membrane of the jejunal epithelium were performed. Dietary P depletion resulted in decreased plasma P(i) levels. While pH in jejunal ingesta was not significantly changed, P depletion resulted in a significantly lower surface pH in the crypt region compared to control animals (7.62 +/- 0.02 vs. 7.77 +/- 0.04, n = 4, P < 0.01). Inhibition of apical Na(+)/H(+)-exchange resulted in an increase of the jejunal surface pH in P depleted animals by 0.07 +/- 0.01 (n = 6, P < 0.01) and 0.05 +/- 0.01 (n = 6, P < 0.01) for the villus and the crypt region, respectively. This increase were inversely correlated with the initial surface pH prior to inhibition. In contrast to surface pH, intracellular pH of the jejunal epithelium and the phospholipid composition of the apical jejunal membrane were not affected by P depletion. Although the data suggest the existence of a Na(+)/H(+)-exchange mechanism at the luminal surface of goat jejunum they do not support the hypothesis that adaptational processes of active P(i) absorption from goat jejunum in response to low dietary P could be based on "non P(i) transporter events".

  3. Pretreatment with transforming growth factor beta-3 protects small intestinal stem cells against radiation damage in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Potten, C. S.; Booth, D.; Haley, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, with its rapid cell replacement, is sensitive to cytotoxic damage and can be a site of dose-limiting toxicity in cancer therapy. Here, we have investigated the use of one growth modulator to manipulate the cell cycle status of gastrointestinal stem cells before cytotoxic exposure to minimize damage to this normal tissue. Transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGF-beta3), a known inhibitor of cell cycle progression through G1, was used to alter intestinal crypt stem cell sensitivity before 12-16 Gy of gamma irradiation, which was used as a model cytotoxic agent. Using a crypt microcolony assay as a measure of functional competence of gastrointestinal stem cells, it was shown that the administration of TGF-beta3 over a 24-h period before irradiation increased the number of surviving crypts by four- to six-fold. To test whether changes in crypt survival are reflected in the well-being of the animal, survival time analyses were performed. After 14.5 Gy of radiation, only 35% of the animals survived within a period of about 12 days, while prior treatment with TGF-beta3 provided significant protection against this early gastrointestinal animal death, with 95% of the treated animals surviving for greater than 30 days. PMID:9166937

  4. Teduglutide ([Gly2]GLP-2) protects small intestinal stem cells from radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Booth, D; Williamson, S; Demchyshyn, L L; Potten, C S

    2004-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 and its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP-IV) resistant analogue teduglutide are trophic for the gastrointestinal epithelium. Exposure increases villus height and crypt size and results in increased overall intestinal weight. As these effects may be mediated through stimulation of the stem cell compartment, they may promote intestinal healing and act as potential anti-mucositis agents in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A study was initiated to investigate the protective effects of teduglutide on the murine small intestinal epithelium following gamma-irradiation using the crypt microcolony assay as a measure of stem cell survival and functional competence. Teduglutide demonstrated intestinotrophic effects in both CD1 and BDF1 mouse strains. In BDF1 mice, subcutaneous injection of GLP-2 or teduglutide (0.2 mg/kg/day, b.i.d.) for 14 days increased intestinal weight by 28% and resulted in comparable increases in crypt size, villus height and area. Teduglutide given daily for 6 or 14 days prior to whole body, gamma-irradiation significantly increased crypt stem cell survival when compared with vehicle-treated controls. The mean levels of protection over a range of doses provided protection factors from 1.3 to 1.5. A protective effect was only observed when teduglutide was given before irradiation. These results suggest that teduglutide has the ability to modulate clonogenic stem cell survival in the small intestine and this may have a useful clinical application in the prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis.

  5. eNOS signaling is essential in GLP-2-mediated stimulation of blood flow, but not cell proliferation in the mouse gut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through a G protein-coupled receptor, glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) stimulates intestinal crypt cell proliferation and mucosal blood flow. GLP-2 receptor is localized to enteric neurons, endocrine cells, and myofibroblasts, but not enterocytes. However, it is largely unknown how GLP-2 receptor-act...

  6. The role of the Hes1 crosstalk hub in Notch-Wnt interactions of the intestinal crypt.

    PubMed

    Kay, Sophie K; Harrington, Heather A; Shepherd, Sarah; Brennan, Keith; Dale, Trevor; Osborne, James M; Gavaghan, David J; Byrne, Helen M

    2017-02-28

    The Notch pathway plays a vital role in determining whether cells in the intestinal epithelium adopt a secretory or an absorptive phenotype. Cell fate specification is coordinated via Notch's interaction with the canonical Wnt pathway. Here, we propose a new mathematical model of the Notch and Wnt pathways, in which the Hes1 promoter acts as a hub for pathway crosstalk. Computational simulations of the model can assist in understanding how healthy intestinal tissue is maintained, and predict the likely consequences of biochemical knockouts upon cell fate selection processes. Chemical reaction network theory (CRNT) is a powerful, generalised framework which assesses the capacity of our model for monostability or multistability, by analysing properties of the underlying network structure without recourse to specific parameter values or functional forms for reaction rates. CRNT highlights the role of β-catenin in stabilising the Notch pathway and damping oscillations, demonstrating that Wnt-mediated actions on the Hes1 promoter can induce dynamic transitions in the Notch system, from multistability to monostability. Time-dependent model simulations of cell pairs reveal the stabilising influence of Wnt upon the Notch pathway, in which β-catenin- and Dsh-mediated action on the Hes1 promoter are key in shaping the subcellular dynamics. Where Notch-mediated transcription of Hes1 dominates, there is Notch oscillation and maintenance of fate flexibility; Wnt-mediated transcription of Hes1 favours bistability akin to cell fate selection. Cells could therefore regulate the proportion of Wnt- and Notch-mediated control of the Hes1 promoter to coordinate the timing of cell fate selection as they migrate through the intestinal epithelium and are subject to reduced Wnt stimuli. Furthermore, mutant cells characterised by hyperstimulation of the Wnt pathway may, through coupling with Notch, invert cell fate in neighbouring healthy cells, enabling an aberrant cell to maintain its

  7. The role of the Hes1 crosstalk hub in Notch-Wnt interactions of the intestinal crypt

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Heather A.; Dale, Trevor; Gavaghan, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The Notch pathway plays a vital role in determining whether cells in the intestinal epithelium adopt a secretory or an absorptive phenotype. Cell fate specification is coordinated via Notch’s interaction with the canonical Wnt pathway. Here, we propose a new mathematical model of the Notch and Wnt pathways, in which the Hes1 promoter acts as a hub for pathway crosstalk. Computational simulations of the model can assist in understanding how healthy intestinal tissue is maintained, and predict the likely consequences of biochemical knockouts upon cell fate selection processes. Chemical reaction network theory (CRNT) is a powerful, generalised framework which assesses the capacity of our model for monostability or multistability, by analysing properties of the underlying network structure without recourse to specific parameter values or functional forms for reaction rates. CRNT highlights the role of β-catenin in stabilising the Notch pathway and damping oscillations, demonstrating that Wnt-mediated actions on the Hes1 promoter can induce dynamic transitions in the Notch system, from multistability to monostability. Time-dependent model simulations of cell pairs reveal the stabilising influence of Wnt upon the Notch pathway, in which β-catenin- and Dsh-mediated action on the Hes1 promoter are key in shaping the subcellular dynamics. Where Notch-mediated transcription of Hes1 dominates, there is Notch oscillation and maintenance of fate flexibility; Wnt-mediated transcription of Hes1 favours bistability akin to cell fate selection. Cells could therefore regulate the proportion of Wnt- and Notch-mediated control of the Hes1 promoter to coordinate the timing of cell fate selection as they migrate through the intestinal epithelium and are subject to reduced Wnt stimuli. Furthermore, mutant cells characterised by hyperstimulation of the Wnt pathway may, through coupling with Notch, invert cell fate in neighbouring healthy cells, enabling an aberrant cell to maintain

  8. The lack of protective effects of tea supplementation on liver and jejunal epithelium in adult rats exposed to cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Dobrowolski, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Adult rats at the age of 12 weeks were divided into the control group and groups supplemented with green (GT), black (BT), red (RT), or white (WT) tea extracts. The diet (except that for the control) was mixed with 7 mg Cd/kg and 50 mg Pb/kg. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. Basal haematology and plasma biochemical parameters as well as the histomorphometrical parameters of jejunal epithelium and liver were determined. The lowest body mass was found in the RT and WT groups. Some functional (increased plasma ALT and AST, and the de Ritis coefficient) and structural changes in the liver (slight fatty degenerative changes, an increase in the intercellular space) were evident irrespective of the type of tea in the Cd and Pb poisoned rats. This toxic effect was visible especially in rats drinking black or red tea. However, the rats had no elevated LDH and ALT activities. The highest content of Cd and Pb in the liver and blood plasma was found in rats drinking red tea. Based on the results obtained, it is clear that long-term exposure of adult rats with a mature intestinal barrier to Cd and Pb contamination, under higher exposure conditions than the current estimates of weekly exposure of the general population to Cd and Pb through diet, causes a toxic effect, especially in the liver, and can change the structure of intestinal mucosa, irrespective of tea administration.

  9. Management of a Septic Open Abdomen Patient with Spontaneous Jejunal Perforation after Emergent C/S with Confounding Factor of Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Özer, Mehmet; Yaylak, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the management of a septic Open Abdomen (OA) patient by the help of negative pressure therapy (NPT) and abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system in pregnant woman with spontaneous jejunal perforation after emergent cesarean section (C/S) with confounding factor of mild acute pancreatitis (AP). Presentation of Case. A 29-year-old and 34-week pregnant woman with AP underwent C/S. She was arrested after anesthesia induction and responded to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There were only ash-colored serosanguinous fluid within abdomen during C/S. After C/S, she was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) with vasopressor support. On postoperative 1st day, she underwent reoperation due to fecal fluid coming near the drainage. Leakage point could not be identified exactly and operation had to be deliberately abbreviated due to hemodynamic instability. NPT was applied. Two days later source control was provided by conversion of enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) to jejunostomy. ABRA was added and OA was closed. No hernia developed at 10-month follow-up period. Conclusion. NPT application in septic OA patient may gain time to patient until adequate source control could be achieved. Using ABRA in conjunction with NPT increases the fascial closure rate in infected OA patient. PMID:27006853

  10. The CSF-1 receptor fashions the intestinal stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Akcora, Dilara; Huynh, Duy; Lightowler, Sally; Germann, Markus; Robine, Sylvie; de May, Jan R; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Stanley, E Richard; Malaterre, Jordane; Ramsay, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) homeostasis requires the action of multiple pathways. There is some controversy regarding whether small intestine (SI) Paneth cells (PCs) play a central role in orchestrating crypt architecture and their relationship with Lgr5+ve stem cells. Nevertheless, we previously showed that germline CSF-1 receptor (Csf1r) knock out (KO) or Csf1 mutation is associated with an absence of mature PC, reduced crypt proliferation and lowered stem cell gene, Lgr5 expression. Here we show the additional loss of CD24, Bmi1 and Olfm4 expression in the KO crypts and a high resolution 3D localization of CSF-1R mainly to PC. The induction of GI-specific Csf1r deletion in young adult mice also led to PC loss over a period of weeks, in accord with the anticipated long life span of PC, changed distribution of proliferating cells and this was with a commensurate loss of Lgr5 and other stem cell marker gene expression. By culturing SI organoids, we further show that the Csf1r(-/-) defect in PC production is intrinsic to epithelial cells as well as definitively affecting stem cell activity. These results show that CSF-1R directly supports PC maturation and that in turn PCs fashion the intestinal stem cell niche.

  11. Meat and cancer: haemoglobin and haemin in a low-calcium diet promote colorectal carcinogenesis at the aberrant crypt stage in rats.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Fabrice; Taché, Sylviane; Petit, Claude R; Van der Meer, Roelof; Corpet, Denis E

    2003-10-01

    High intake of red meat, but not of white meat, is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. However, red meat does not promote cancer in rodents. Haemin, added to low-calcium diets, increases colonic proliferation, and haemoglobin, added to high-fat diets, increases the colon tumour incidence in rats, an effect possibly due to peroxyl radicals. We thus speculated that haem might be the promoting agent in meat, and that prevention strategies could use calcium and antioxidants. These hypotheses were tested in rats at the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) stage at 100 days. F344 rats (n = 124) were given an injection of azoxymethane and were then randomized to 11 groups fed with low-calcium (20 micro mol/g) AIN76-based diets, containing 5% safflower oil. Haemin (0.25, 0.5 and 1.5 micro mol/g) or haemoglobin (1.5 and 3 micro mol haem/g) was added to five experimental diets, compared with a control diet without haem. Three other high-haemin diets (1.5 micro mol/g) were supplemented with calcium (250 micro mol/g), antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole and rutin (0.05% each), and olive oil, which replaced safflower oil. Faecal water was assayed for lipid peroxidation by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) test, and for cytolytic activity. Haemin strikingly increased the ACF size, dose-dependently, from 2.6 to 11.4 crypts/ACF (all P < 0.001). The high-haemin diet also increased the number of ACF per colon (P < 0.001). Promotion was associated with increased faecal water TBARs and cytotoxicity. Calcium, olive oil and antioxidants each inhibited the haemin-induced ACF promotion, and normalized the faecal TBARs and cytotoxicity. The haemoglobin diets increased the number of ACF and faecal TBARs, but not the ACF size or the faecal cytotoxicity. In conclusion, dietary haemin is the most potent known ACF promoter. Haemoglobin is also a potent promoter of colorectal carcinogenesis. The results suggest that myoglobin in red meat could promote colon cancer. Diets high

  12. Chemopreventive effect of raw and cooked lentils (Lens culinaris L) and soybeans (Glycine max) against azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci.

    PubMed

    Faris, Mo'ez Al-Islam E; Takruri, Hamed R; Shomaf, Maha S; Bustanji, Yasser K

    2009-05-01

    Although lentils (Lens culinaris L) contain several bioactive compounds that have been linked to the prevention of cancer, the in vivo chemopreventive ability of lentils against chemically induced colorectal cancer has not been examined. Our present study examined the hypothesis that lentils could suppress the early carcinogenesis in vivo by virtue of their bioactive micro- and macroconstituents and that culinary thermal treatment could affect their chemopreventive potential. To accomplish this goal, we used raw whole lentils (RWL), raw split lentils (RSL), cooked whole lentils (CWL), and cooked split lentils (CSL). Raw soybeans (RSB; Glycine max) were used for the purpose of comparison with a well-studied chemopreventive agent. Sixty weanling Fischer 344 male rats, 4 to 5 weeks of age, were randomly assigned to 6 groups (10 rats/group): the control group (C) received AIN-93G diet, and treatment leguminous groups of RWL, CWL, RSL, CSL, and RSB received the treatment diets containing AIN-93G+5% of the above-mentioned legumes. After acclimatization for 1 week (at 5th to 6th week of age), all animals were put on the control and treatment diets separately for 5 weeks (from 6th to 11th week of age). At the end of the 5th week of feeding (end of 11th week of age), all rats received 2 subcutaneous injections of azoxymethane carcinogen at 15 mg/kg rat body weight per dose once a week for 2 consecutive weeks. After 17 weeks of the last azoxymethane injection (from 12th to 29th week of age), all rats were euthanized. Chemopreventive ability was assessed using colonic aberrant crypt foci and activity of hepatic glutathione-S-transferases. Significant reductions (P < .05) were found in total aberrant crypt foci number (mean +/- SEM) for RSB (27.33 +/- 4.32), CWL (33.44 +/- 4.56), and RSL (37.00 +/- 6.02) in comparison with the C group (58.33 +/- 8.46). Hepatic glutathione-S-transferases activities increased significantly (P < .05) in rats fed all treatment diets (from 51

  13. Generation of L cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina; Farin, Henner F; Ringnalda, Femke C; Vries, Robert G J; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; Gribble, Fiona M; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2014-02-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate functional L cells from three-dimensional cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids selectively increase the number of L cells, resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by the upregulation of transcription factors associated with the endocrine lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Regeneration of intestinal stem/progenitor cells following doxorubicin treatment of mice

    PubMed Central

    Dekaney, Christopher M.; Gulati, Ajay S.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Helmrath, Michael A.; Henning, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is in a constant state of renewal. The rapid turnover of cells is fed by a hierarchy of transit amplifying and stem/progenitor cells destined to give rise to the four differentiated epithelial lineages of the small intestine. Doxorubicin (Dox) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent that preferentially induces apoptosis in the intestinal stem cell zone (SCZ). We hypothesized that Dox treatment would initially decrease “+4” intestinal stem cell numbers with a subsequent expansion during mucosal repair. Temporal assessment following Dox treatment demonstrated rapid induction of apoptosis in the SCZ leading to a decrease in the number of intestinal stem/progenitor cells as determined by flow cytometry for CD45(−) SP cells, and immunohistochemistry of cells positive for putative +4 stem cell markers β-catSer552 and DCAMKL1. Between 96 and 168 h postinjection, overall proliferation in the crypts increased concomitant with increases in both absolute and relative numbers of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. This regeneration phase was also associated with increases of CD45(−) SP cells, β-catSer552-positive cells, crypt fission, and crypt number. We used Lgr5-lacZ mice to assess behavior of Lgr5-positive stem cells following Dox and found no change in this cell population. Lgr5 mRNA level was also measured and showed no change immediately after Dox but decreased during the regeneration phase. Together these data suggest that, following Dox-induced injury, expansion of intestinal stem cells occurs during mucosal repair. On the basis of available markers this expansion appears to be predominantly the +4 stem cell population rather than those of the crypt base. PMID:19589945

  15. Influence of diet or intrarectal bile acid injections on colon epithelial cell proliferation in rats previously injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Glauert, H.P.; Bennink, M.R.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of varying colon bile acid concentrations on rat colon epithelial cell proliferation were studied. Bile acid concentrations were altered by intrarectally injecting either deoxycholic or lithocholic acid for 4 weeks or by increasing the dietary fat or fiber (wheat bran, agar, or carrageenan) intake for 4 weeks. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH) was s.c. injected into half of the rats 1 week before treatments began. Colon epithelial cell proliferation was measured by (/sup 3/H)thymidine autoradiography of colon crypts. Rats injected with DMH had more DNA-synthesizing cells per crypt. Neither bile acid injection nor any of the diets altered the number of DNA-synthesizing cells per crypt. DMH injections, deoxycholic and lithocholic acid intrarectal injections, and dietary agar and wheat bran all increased the total number of cells per crypt. High fat diets and dietary carrageenan did not affect cell number. All diets containing fiber lowered total fecal bile acid concentrations, but increasing the fat content of the diet did not affect them. These results indicate that the bile acid injections and dietary agar and wheat bran induce a slight hyperplasia in the colon.

  16. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells in the Bovine Colonic Mucosa Differ in Their Responsiveness to Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cells in the depth of the crypts in the bovine colon express CD77 molecules that potentially act as receptors for Shiga toxins (Stx). The implication of this finding for the intestinal colonization 25 of cattle with human pathogenic Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) remains undefined. We used f...

  17. THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI (ACF) IN MALE AND FEMALE F344/N RATS BY BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID (BCA) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Induction of Aberrant Crypt Foci (ACF) in Male and Female F344/N Rats by Bromochloroacetic Acid (BCA) Administered in the Drinking Water.

    M.H. George1, D. Delker1, D.R. Geter1, C.Herbert2, J. Roycroft3, R. Melnick3, D.W.
    Rosenberg4, and A.B. DeAngelo1. 1USEPA, Resea...

  18. Novel Combination of Prebiotics Galacto-Oligosaccharides and Inulin-Inhibited Aberrant Crypt Foci Formation and Biomarkers of Colon Cancer in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Tahir Rasool; Syed, Fatima; Nasir, Muhammad; Rehman, Habib; Zahid, Muhammad Nauman; Liu, Rui Hai; Iqbal, Sanaullah

    2016-08-01

    The selectivity and beneficial effects of prebiotics are mainly dependent on composition and glycosidic linkage among monosaccharide units. This is the first study to use prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) that contains β-1,6 and β-1,3 glycosidic linkages and the novel combination of GOS and inulin in cancer prevention. The objective of the present study is to explore the role of novel GOS and inulin against various biomarkers of colorectal cancer (CRC) and the incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in a 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced rodent model. Prebiotic treatments of combined GOS and inulin (57 mg each), as well as individual doses (GOS: 76-151 mg; inulin 114 mg), were given to DMH-treated animals for 16 weeks. Our data reveal the significant preventive effect of the GOS and inulin combination against the development of CRC. It was observed that inhibition of ACF formation (55.8%) was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher using the GOS and inulin combination than GOS (41.4%) and inulin (51.2%) treatments alone. This combination also rendered better results on short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and bacterial enzymatic activities. Dose-dependent effects of prebiotic treatments were also observed on cecum and fecal bacterial enzymes and on SCFA. Thus, this study demonstrated that novel combination of GOS and inulin exhibited stronger preventive activity than their individual treatments alone, and can be a promising strategy for CRC chemoprevention.

  19. Effects of high-fat diet on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced aberrant crypt foci and colorectal tumours in rats

    PubMed Central

    QI, GUANGYING; TANG, BO; ZHOU, LIHUA; JIKIHARA, HIROSHI; KIWATA, ATSUMI; SAKAMOTO, YUKI; TANG, FANG; XIAO, SHENGJUN; WANG, ZHENRAN; WU, QIUHUI; LU, HUILING; WU, ZHEN; ZENG, SIEN; SHIMAMOTO, FUMIO

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of numerous types of cancer. The present study investigated the impact of a high-fat diet on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal cancer (CRC) in F344 rats. A total of 16 male F344 rats aged 4 weeks were randomly divided into two groups (8 rats/group). Rats in group A were fed a basal diet with a moderate fat (MF) content, while rats in group B were fed a high-fat diet. Upon reaching 5 weeks of age, the rats were injected subcutaneously with DMH (20 mg/kg body weight). DMH was administered once a week for 8 consecutive weeks. All the rats were sacrificed 34 weeks after the first DMH injection and dissected to obtain samples of colorectal tissues. The tissues were examined under a microscope for the presence of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs) and subjected to histopathological analysis. The results showed that at the end of the 34-week experiment, body weights and visceral fat levels were significantly higher in the high-fat diet group compared to the basal diet group. In addition, the incidences of colorectal ACF, adenoma and adenocarcinoma were markedly elevated in the high-fat diet group compared to the basal diet group. These results indicate that the consumption of a high-fat diet promotes the development and progression of CRC and the control of fat intake may prevent CRC. PMID:26137224

  20. Novel Combination of Prebiotics Galacto-Oligosaccharides and Inulin-Inhibited Aberrant Crypt Foci Formation and Biomarkers of Colon Cancer in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Tahir Rasool; Syed, Fatima; Nasir, Muhammad; Rehman, Habib; Zahid, Muhammad Nauman; Liu, Rui Hai; Iqbal, Sanaullah

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity and beneficial effects of prebiotics are mainly dependent on composition and glycosidic linkage among monosaccharide units. This is the first study to use prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) that contains β-1,6 and β-1,3 glycosidic linkages and the novel combination of GOS and inulin in cancer prevention. The objective of the present study is to explore the role of novel GOS and inulin against various biomarkers of colorectal cancer (CRC) and the incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in a 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced rodent model. Prebiotic treatments of combined GOS and inulin (57 mg each), as well as individual doses (GOS: 76–151 mg; inulin 114 mg), were given to DMH-treated animals for 16 weeks. Our data reveal the significant preventive effect of the GOS and inulin combination against the development of CRC. It was observed that inhibition of ACF formation (55.8%) was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher using the GOS and inulin combination than GOS (41.4%) and inulin (51.2%) treatments alone. This combination also rendered better results on short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and bacterial enzymatic activities. Dose-dependent effects of prebiotic treatments were also observed on cecum and fecal bacterial enzymes and on SCFA. Thus, this study demonstrated that novel combination of GOS and inulin exhibited stronger preventive activity than their individual treatments alone, and can be a promising strategy for CRC chemoprevention. PMID:27490566

  1. Beneficial Metabolic Effects of Duodenal Jejunal Bypass Liner for the Treatment of Adipose Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Analysis of Responders and Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, B; Krepak, Y; Schiffer, E; Jarick, I; Hauber, M; Lee-Barkey, Y H; Fischer, M; Tschoepe, D

    2016-09-01

    Implantation of a duodenal-jejunal endoluminal bypass liner (DJBL) has shown to induce weight loss and to improve metabolic parameters. DJBL is a reversible endoduodenal sleeve mimicking duodenal bypass while lacking risks and limitations of bariatric surgery.Effects on metabolic control, body mass parameters, appetite regulation, glucose tolerance, organ health, and lipid profile were determined in 16 morbidly overweight patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, relevant hormones (leptin, ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide, glucagon-like peptide, and insulin) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) at 0, 1, 32, and 52 weeks post-implant following a mixed meal tolerance test. Lipoprotein subclasses were analysed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectrometry. DJBL provoked weight loss, a decrease in fat mass, and an improvement in insulin resistance and hepatic function in most but not all of the patients, but in the long term did not increase gut hormone fasting levels pointing to a combined effect of more than gut parameters alone. Lipidome analysis was done in 10 patients, allowing classification to responders and non-responders by reduction of sLDL-p subfraction; and to further analyse the atherogenic profile. Responders showed an overall more pronounced effect regarding improvement of HbA1c, BMI, and HOMA index.Implantation of a DJBL in obese type 2 diabetes patients does not per se lead to an improvement of the metabolic situation. Further analyses including larger cohorts have to be performed to identify responding patients, to better treat non-responders and to analyse the key effectors.

  2. Effects and mechanism of duodenal-jejunal bypass and sleeve gastrectomy on GLUT2 and glucokinase in diabetic Goto–Kakizaki rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The study investigated the effects and mechanism of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on the expression of liver GLUT2 and glucokinase (GCK) in diabetic rats. Methods Animal models of Goto–Kakizaki (GK) rats were established for the investigation of DJB and SG. Results of weight, food intake, fasting plasma glucose level, oral glucose tolerance test and insulin were compared. Liver tissues were harvested 8 weeks postoperatively. Reverse transcription-PCR and western blot were used to detect liver GLUT2 and GCK mRNA and protein expression after operation. Results Fasting plasma glucose levels of DJB group and SG group in GK rats were markedly declined at 3 days and l, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively (P <0.01), whereas the levels of the sham-operated group only dropped at 3 days and 1 week postoperatively, and there were no significant differences 2 weeks postoperatively (P >0.05). In the liver of GK rats, GLUT2 mRNA level and protein expression after DJB were higher than those in sham-operated group and control group. GLUT2 mRNA level and protein expression after SG were significantly lower than those in control group (P <0.01). GCK mRNA and protein experienced similar expression change. Conclusions Both DJB and SG can decrease the plasma glucose levels of GK rats, whereas they have different effects on the expression of liver GLUT2 and GCK. PMID:22686706

  3. Toxin-associated and other genes in Clostridium perfringens type A isolates from bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS).

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Benjamin J; Nowell, Victoria J; Parreira, Valeria R; Soltes, Glenn; Prescott, John F

    2012-10-01

    This study examined known or possible virulence-associated genes in type A Clostridium perfringens from cases of both bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS) and compared these to isolates from calves that were healthy or had undifferentiated diarrheal illness. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to genotype the 218 C. perfringens isolates. Isolates were sourced from healthy and diarrheic young and mature cattle (n = 191), from calves with confirmed or suspected BCA (n = 22), and from mature cattle with JHS (n = 5). Of 216 isolates (96%), 208 were positive for the cpa gene and 13% (29/218) were positive for atypical cpb2. Three of 8 (37.5%) confirmed BCA isolates, 2 of 13 (15.4%) suspected BCA isolates, and no JHS isolates tested positive for atypical cpb2. As all isolates were negative for cpb, cpb2, cpe, etx, netB, and tpeL, the results of the present study do not support a role for these genes in BCA or JHS. A subset of unique genes identified in 1 bovine clostridial abomasitis isolate (F262), for which a genome sequence is available, was searched for in 8 BCA isolates by PCR. None of the 10 genes was consistently present in all or even in a majority of BCA isolates. Many of these genes were also variably and inconsistently present in type A isolates from calves that did not have BCA. Although a virulence signature to aid in the diagnosis of BCA caused by C. perfringens type A was not identified, further work may discover a gene or group of genes that would constitute such a signature.

  4. Update on small intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-08-07

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration.

  5. Fish oil blocks azoxymethane-induced rat colon tumorigenesis by increasing cell differentiation and apoptosis rather than decreasing cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chang, W L; Chapkin, R S; Lupton, J R

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the protective effect of fish oil against colon carcinogenesis is due to decreased proliferation, increased differentiation and/or increased apoptosis. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 260) were fed one of two oils (corn or fish) and two fibers (pectin or cellulose), plus or minus the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Rats were killed at wk 18 (n = 80) or 36 (n = 180) for cytokinetic measurements. In vivo cell proliferation was measured by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into DNA, differentiation by binding of Dolichos biflorus agglutinin and apoptosis by immunoperoxidase detection of digoxigenin labeled genomic DNA. Fish oil resulted in a lower adenocarcinoma incidence (56.1 vs. 70.3%) compared with corn oil. There was no effect of fat or fiber on number of proliferative cells/crypt column in either the proximal or distal colon. In contrast, fish oil resulted in a greater degree of differentiation compared with corn oil in both colonic sites. In addition, fish oil resulted in a higher number of apoptotic cells/crypt column in both the proximal and distal colon as compared with corn oil. AOM treatment increased the ratio of proliferative cells/crypt column to apoptotic cells/crypt column in both the proximal and distal colon compared with saline controls. Fish oil, however, resulted in a lower ratio in both sites in the colon as compared with corn oil. These results suggest that an increase in apoptosis and differentiation, rather than a decrease in proliferation, accounts for the protective effect of fish oil against experimentally induced colon tumorigenesis.

  6. Malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells by a colon-derived long noncoding RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Rankin, Carl R.; Levy, Shawn; Snoddy, Jay R.; Zhang, Bing; Washington, Mary Kay; Thomson, J. Michael; Whitehead, Robert H.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Non-coding RNAs are found in the colonic crypt progenitor compartment. •Colonocytes transformed by ncNRFR are highly invasive and metastatic. •ncNRFR has a region similar to the miRNA, let-7 family. •ncNRFR expression alters let-7 activity as measured by reporter construct. •ncNRFR expression upregulates let-7b targets. -- Abstract: Recent progress has been made in the identification of protein-coding genes and miRNAs that are expressed in and alter the behavior of colonic epithelia. However, the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in colonic homeostasis is just beginning to be explored. By gene expression profiling of post-mitotic, differentiated tops and proliferative, progenitor-compartment bottoms of microdissected adult mouse colonic crypts, we identified several lncRNAs more highly expressed in crypt bottoms. One identified lncRNA, designated non-coding Nras functional RNA (ncNRFR), resides within the Nras locus but appears to be independent of the Nras coding transcript. Stable overexpression of ncNRFR in non-transformed, conditionally immortalized mouse colonocytes results in malignant transformation, as determined by growth in soft agar and formation of highly invasive tumors in nude mice. Moreover, ncNRFR appears to inhibit the function of the tumor suppressor let-7. These results suggest precise regulation of ncNRFR is necessary for proper cell growth in the colonic crypt, and its misregulation results in neoplastic transformation.

  7. Concerted actions of ameliorated colitis, aberrant crypt foci inhibition and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase induction by sonic hedgehog inhibitor led to prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-03-15

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been known to contribute to carcinogenesis in organ, where hedgehog exerted organogenesis and in cancers, which are developed based on mutagenic inflammation. Therefore, colitis-associated cancer (CAC) can be a good model to prove whether Shh inhibitors can be applied to prevent, as the efforts to discover potent anti-inflammatory agent are active to prevent CAC. Here, under the hypothesis that Shh inhibitors can prevent CAC, mouse model was generated to develop CAC by azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted carcinogenesis. Shh inhibitors, cerulenin and itraconazole were treated by oral gavage and the mice were sacrificed at early phase of 3 weeks and late phase of 16 weeks. Compared to control group, the number of aberrant crypt foci at 3 weeks and tumor incidence at 16 weeks were all significantly decreased with Shh inhibitor. Significant attenuations of macrophage infiltration accompanied with significant decreases of IL-6, COX-2, STAT3 and NF-κB as well as significant ameliorations of β-catenin nuclear translocation, cyclin D1 and CDK4 were imposed with Shh inhibitors. Especially, CAC was accompanied with significant cancellation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), but their levels were significantly preserved with Shh inhibitors. Among inflammatory mediators, significantly decreased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, regulated with repressed NF-κb and STAT3, were prominent with Shh inhibitor, whereas significant inductions of apoptosis were noted with Shh inhibitors. In conclusion, Shh inhibitors significantly prevented CAC covering either ameliorating oncogenic inflammation or suppressing tumor proliferation, especially supported with significant inhibition of IL-6 and STAT3 signaling, 15-PGDH preservation and apoptosis induction.

  8. A diet containing alpha-cellulose and fish oil reduces aberrant crypt foci formation and modulates other possible markers for colon cancer risk in azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leana J; Landström, Eva K; Royle, Peter J; Bird, Anthony R; McIntosh, Graeme H

    2002-08-01

    There is a need for better understanding of the roles of dietary fats and fibers in colon cancer risk. We examined the effect of different dietary fiber and fat sources on an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer in rats. In a 2 x 3 factorial design, rats were fed a semipurified diet containing soy-derived fiber (Fibrim), alpha-cellulose (Solkafloc) or resistant starch (RS; Hi-maize) at 10 g dietary fiber/100 g diet, combined with fish oil (FO) or sunflower seed oil (SSO) at 10 g/100 g diet, and lard added to all diets at 10 g/100 g, to provide a total of 20 g mixed fat/100 g diet. Sprague-Dawley rats (28 d of age) consumed diets for 4 wk and then two doses of AOM (15 mg/kg body) were administered 1 wk apart by subcutaneous injection. Rats were killed after 13 wk of consuming experimental diets. Colons were fixed in formalin and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were quantified after staining. ACF counts were higher (+66%, P < 0.01) in rats fed SSO and RS, than in those fed alpha-cellulose and FO. Rats fed FO had 19% fewer ACF than those fed SSO (P < 0.05). alpha-Cellulose was associated with the highest cecal butyrate concentration (P < 0.001), the highest beta-glucuronidase specific activity (P < 0.001) and the lowest cecal water cytotoxicity (P < 0.001) relative to soy fiber- and RS-fed rats. There were inverse correlations between the number of ACF and cecal butyrate concentration (r = -0.33, P < 0.05) and between cecal water cytotoxicity and beta-glucuronidase activity (r = -0.70, P < 0.001). The greatest protection was associated with alpha-cellulose as the fiber source and FO as the fat source as measured by colon ACF numbers in rats.

  9. Chemopreventive Effects of Germinated Rough Rice Crude Extract in Inhibiting Azoxymethane-Induced Aberrant Crypt Foci Formation in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Saki, Elnaz; Saiful Yazan, Latifah; Mohd Ali, Razana; Ahmad, Zalinah

    2017-01-01

    Chemoprevention has become an important area in cancer research due to low success rate of current therapeutic modalities. Diet plays a vital role in the etiology of cancer. This research was carried out to study the chemopreventive properties of germinated rough rice (GRR) crude extract in Sprague-Dawley rats induced with azoxymethane. Germination of rough rice causes significant changes in several chemical compositions of presently bioactive compounds. These compounds may prevent or postpone the inception of cancer. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups which were (G1) induced with azoxymethane (AOM) and not given GRR (positive control), (G2) induced with AOM and given 2000 mg/kg GRR, (G3) induced with AOM and given 1000 mg/kg GRR, (G4) induced with AOM and given 500 mg/kg GRR, and (G5) not induced with AOM and not given GRR crude extract (negative control). To induce colon cancer, rats received two IP injections of AOM in saline (15 mg/kg) for two subsequent weeks. Organs were removed and weighed. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were evaluated histopathologically. β-Catenin expressions were determined by Western blot. Treatment with 2000 mg/kg GRR crude extract not only resulted in the greatest reduction in the size and number of ACF but also displayed the highest percentage of nondysplastic ACF. Treatment with 2000 mg/kg GRR also gave the lowest level of expression in β-catenin. Thus, GRR could be a promising dietary supplement for prevention of CRC.

  10. Chemopreventive Effects of Germinated Rough Rice Crude Extract in Inhibiting Azoxymethane-Induced Aberrant Crypt Foci Formation in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Ali, Razana

    2017-01-01

    Chemoprevention has become an important area in cancer research due to low success rate of current therapeutic modalities. Diet plays a vital role in the etiology of cancer. This research was carried out to study the chemopreventive properties of germinated rough rice (GRR) crude extract in Sprague-Dawley rats induced with azoxymethane. Germination of rough rice causes significant changes in several chemical compositions of presently bioactive compounds. These compounds may prevent or postpone the inception of cancer. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups which were (G1) induced with azoxymethane (AOM) and not given GRR (positive control), (G2) induced with AOM and given 2000 mg/kg GRR, (G3) induced with AOM and given 1000 mg/kg GRR, (G4) induced with AOM and given 500 mg/kg GRR, and (G5) not induced with AOM and not given GRR crude extract (negative control). To induce colon cancer, rats received two IP injections of AOM in saline (15 mg/kg) for two subsequent weeks. Organs were removed and weighed. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were evaluated histopathologically. β-Catenin expressions were determined by Western blot. Treatment with 2000 mg/kg GRR crude extract not only resulted in the greatest reduction in the size and number of ACF but also displayed the highest percentage of nondysplastic ACF. Treatment with 2000 mg/kg GRR also gave the lowest level of expression in β-catenin. Thus, GRR could be a promising dietary supplement for prevention of CRC. PMID:28116312

  11. Most effective colon cancer chemopreventive agents in rats: a systematic review of aberrant crypt foci and tumor data, ranked by potency

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, Denis E.; Taché, Sylviane

    2002-01-01

    Potential chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer are assessed in rodents. We speculated that the magnitude of the effect is meaningful, and ranked all published agents according to their potency. Data were gathered systematically from 137 articles with the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) endpoint, and 146 articles with the tumor endpoint. A table was built containing potency of each agent to reduce the number of ACF. Another table was built with potency of each agent to reduce the tumor incidence. Both tables are shown in the present paper, and on a website with sorting abilities (http://www.inra.fr/reseau-nacre/sci-memb/corpet/indexan.html). Potency was estimated by the ratio of value in control rats divided by value in treated rats. From each article, only the most potent agent was kept, except from articles reporting the effect of more than 7 agents. Among the 186 agents in the ACF table, the median agent halved the number of ACF. The most potent agents to reduce azoxymethane-induced ACF were pluronic, polyethylene glycol, perilla oil with beta-carotene, and sulindac sulfide. Among the 160 agents in the tumor table, the median agent halved the tumor incidence in rats. The most potent agents to reduce the incidence of azoxymethane-induced tumors were celecoxib, a protease inhibitor from soy, difluoromethylornithine with piroxicam, polyethylene glycol, and a thiosulfonate. For the 57 agents present in both tables, a significant correlation was found between the potencies against ACF and tumors (r=0.45, p<0.001). Without celecoxib, a major outlying point in the correlation, it reached r=0.68 (p<0.001, N=56). In conclusion, this review gathers almost all known chemopreventive agents, ranks the most promising ones against colon carcinogenesis in rats or mice, and further supports the use of ACF as surrogate endpoint for tumors in rats. PMID:12467130

  12. Dose dependent inhibitory effect of dietary caraway on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colonic aberrant crypt foci and bacterial enzyme activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Deeptha, Kumaraswami; Kamaleeswari, Muthaiyan; Sengottuvelan, Murugan; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2006-11-01

    Colon cancer has become one of the major causes of cancer mortality. We determined the effect of caraway (Carum carvi L.) on the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and modulation of fecal bacterial enzyme activities in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups and all the animals were fed 15.8% peanut oil making a total of 20% fat in the diet. Group 1 served as control and group 2 animals received 90 mg/kg body weight caraway p.o. daily for 15 weeks. To induce ACF, DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) was injected subcutaneously once a week for the first four weeks (groups 3-6). In addition caraway was administered at the dose of 30, 60 and 90 mg/kg body weight everyday orally for the entire period of 15 weeks (groups 4-6). First, we analyzed ACF number (incidence), multiplicity and its distribution along the colon in all experimental groups at the end of 15 weeks. Subsequently, we also assayed the fecal bacterial enzyme activities. ACF formation and the fecal bacterial enzyme activities were found to be significantly high in DMH-alone treated group as compared to control group. Caraway supplementation at three different doses significantly suppressed ACF development, bacterial enzyme activities and modulated oxidative stress significantly as compared to the unsupplemented DMH-treated group. Results of our present study indicate that dietary caraway markedly inhibited DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis and the optimal dose of 60 mg/kg body weight was more effective than the other two doses.

  13. Tales from the crypt and coral reef: the successes and challenges of identifying new herpesviruses using metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Breuer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are ubiquitous double-stranded DNA viruses infecting many animals, with the capacity to cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Different herpesviruses have different cell tropisms, and have been detected in a diverse range of tissues and sample types. Metagenomics—encompassing viromics—analyses the nucleic acid of a tissue or other sample in an unbiased manner, making few or no prior assumptions about which viruses may be present in a sample. This approach has successfully discovered a number of novel herpesviruses. Furthermore, metagenomic analysis can identify herpesviruses with high degrees of sequence divergence from known herpesviruses and does not rely upon culturing large quantities of viral material. Metagenomics has had success in two areas of herpesvirus sequencing: firstly, the discovery of novel exogenous and endogenous herpesviruses in primates, bats and cnidarians; and secondly, in characterizing large areas of the genomes of herpesviruses previously only known from small fragments, revealing unexpected diversity. This review will discuss the successes and challenges of using metagenomics to identify novel herpesviruses, and future directions within the field. PMID:25821447

  14. [Structural changes in mitochondrion-rich cells in the gills of artificial selected Trachinotus ovatus offspring under different salinities].

    PubMed

    Ou, You-Jun; Liu, Ru-Jian; Li, Jia-Er; Cao, Shou-Hua

    2013-08-01

    Distribution and ultrastructural changes in the mitochondrion-rich cells in gills of artificial selected Trachinotus ovatus under different salinities (5, 20, and 30) were examined by light and transmission electron micrograph. Results indicated that the mitochondrion-rich cells were mainly present on the base of the gill filaments and branchial leaflets, and the volume and quantity of mitochondrion-rich cells increased with salinity. All three salinity groups had apical crypts, which were constituted by the mitochondrion-rich cells, pavement cells and accessory cells. Mitochondrion-rich cells in the salinity 5 group had large apical membranes with developed microridges and shallow apical crypts. Apical crypts in the salinity 20 and 30 groups had small apical membranes and undeveloped microridges, and were embolic obviously. Cytoplasm of mitochondrion-rich cells in the salinity 5 and 30 groups developed tubular systems and abundant cristae mitochondria. The tubular system of the salinity 20 group was non-spatially constant and had loose structure. Part of the tubular system contracted into a pearl bubble structure and shared rough endoplasmic reticulum. Mitochondrion-rich cells in Trachinotus ovatus under salinities 5 and 20 appeared both seawater-type's and freshwater-type's features, and those in salinity 30 had typical characteristics as seawater-type MR cells. Structural changes of mitochondrion-rich cells were suited to different osmotic pressure.

  15. Ultrastructural demonstration of the absorption and transportation of minute chylomicrons by subepithelial blood capillaries in rat jejunal villi.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Ei-Ichirou; Mantani, Youhei; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Qi, Wang-Mei; Tanida, Takashi; Takeuchi, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-30

    Chylomicrons from villous columnar epithelial cells are generally known to be transported only by central lymph vessels (CLV), whereas antigenic particulates derived from the intestinal lumen can also be transported by subepithelial blood capillaries (sBCs) in rat intestinal villi. The possibility of chylomicron absorption by sBCs was histoplanimetrically studied in the rat jejunum under a transmission electron microscope. The chylomicrons more abundantly presented in villous venules than in arterioles. The most frequent size (MFS) of chylomicrons was 75 to 90 nm in diameter in the areas near sBCs, while it was 45 to 60 nm in the epithelial intercellular spaces just above sBCs or the intermediate areas between sBCs. The MFS of chylomicrons was 45 to 60 nm in the intermediate areas between sBCs and in the epithelial intercellular spaces just above these areas. The MFS of chylomicrons in CLV was intermediate between that in the area adjacent to sBCs and that in the intermediate areas between sBCs. Chylomicrons were found in small vesicles in the endothelial cytoplasms of sBCs. No chylomicrons larger than 600 nm were observed in the lamina propria. These findings suggest that some of the chylomicrons smaller than 75 nm, which are probable intestinal very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), are directly transported to the liver by hepatic portal blood in addition to CLV and that epithelial fat droplets larger than 600 nm are not discharged into lamina propria in rat jejunum under physiological conditions.

  16. Both the anti- and pro-apoptotic functions of villin regulate cell turnover and intestinal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaohong; George, Sudeep P.; Roy, Swati; Pham, Eric; Esmaeilniakooshkghazi, Amin; Khurana, Seema

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine, epithelial cells are derived from stem cells in the crypts, migrate up the villus as they differentiate and are ultimately shed from the villus tips. This process of proliferation and shedding is tightly regulated to maintain the intestinal architecture and tissue homeostasis. Apoptosis regulates both the number of stem cells in the crypts as well as the sloughing of cells from the villus tips. Previously, we have shown that villin, an epithelial cell-specific actin-binding protein functions as an anti-apoptotic protein in the gastrointestinal epithelium. The expression of villin is highest in the apoptosis-resistant villus cells and lowest in the apoptosis-sensitive crypts. In this study we report that villin is cleaved in the intestinal mucosa to generate a pro-apoptotic fragment that is spatially restricted to the villus tips. This cleaved villin fragment severs actin in an unregulated fashion to initiate the extrusion and subsequent apoptosis of effete cells from the villus tips. Using villin knockout mice, we validate the physiological role of villin in apoptosis and cell extrusion from the gastrointestinal epithelium. Our study also highlights the potential role of villin’s pro-apoptotic function in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia-reperfusion injury, enteroinvasive bacterial and parasitic infections. PMID:27765954

  17. The deconjugation ability of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the blind loop syndrome with high sup 14 CO sub 2 excretion. Using the breath analysis technique and thin-layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Mizuno, T.; Shionoiri, H.; Sugiyama, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Five patients with blind loop syndrome (Billroth II) were examined by measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity of expired breath samples taken at intervals after a meal containing glycine-1-{sup 14}C cholate. The 5 patients tested showed a marked increase of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity. Furthermore, the ability of deconjugation of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the efferent loop of these patients was tested by thin-layer chromatography. The bacterial species identified from the samples were as follows: enterococcus, Lactobacillus buchneri, L. bifidus, L. brevis, Eubacterium lentum, Bacteroides vulgaricus, B. filamentosum, Corynebacterium granulosum, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Aerobacter aerogenes. These species of bacteria, except E. coli and A. aerogenes, showed the deconjugation ability by which conjugated bile acids in ox gall was hydrolyzed. Administration of chloramphenicol to the 5 patients reduced {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity significantly. On the other hand, 9 healthy men who were tested showed a flat curve, and 8 of the 9 had no growth of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids. The remaining healthy man showed an over growth of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the species did not have the ability of deconjugation.

  18. SOLiD SAGE sequencing shows differential gene expression in jejunal lymph node samples of resistant and susceptible red deer (Cervus elaphus) challenged with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, C G; Griffin, J F T; Scott, I C; O'Brien, R; Stanton, J L; MacLean, P; Brauning, R

    2016-01-01

    and higher MAP numbers in lymph nodes of S animals. By week 50 the number of upregulated genes declined in both groups. A number of genes upregulated in R animals appear to be associated with host resistance and regulation of adaptive immunity, especially CEACAM8. Genes upregulated in S animals involve antigen presentation (ENDOD1) and gut associated immune pathology (HSH2D). In conclusion, gene expression in jejunal lymph nodes of resistant and susceptible deer infer that the resistant phenotype is associated with pathways of adaptive immunity, while susceptibility is linked with upregulated non-protective pro-inflammatory responses, following experimental MAP infection.

  19. The Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Syndrome: Evidence of Long-Term Functional Changes in the Clonogenic Cells of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Booth, Catherine; Tudor, Gregory L; Katz, Barry P; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Long term or residual damage post-irradiation has been described for many tissues. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), this is only revealed when the HSC are stressed and required to regenerate and repopulate a myeloablated host. Such an assay cannot be used to assess the recovery potential of previously irradiated intestinal stem cells (ISC) due to their incompatibility with transplantation. The best approximation to the HSC assay is the crypt microcolony assay, also based on clonogen survival. In the current study, the regenerative capacity of intestinal clonogenic cells in mice that had survived 13 Gy irradiation (with 5% bone marrow shielding to allow survival through the hematopoietic syndrome) and were then aged for 200 d was compared to previously unirradiated age-matched controls. Interestingly, at 200 d following 13 Gy, there remained a statistically significant reduction in crypts present in the various small intestinal regions (illustrating that the gastrointestinal epithelium had not fully recovered despite the 200-d interval). However, upon re-irradiation on day 196, those mice previously irradiated had improved crypt survival and regeneration compared to the age-matched controls. This was evident in all regions of the small intestine following 11-13 Gy re-exposure. Thus, there were either more clonogens per crypt within those previously irradiated and/or those that were present were more radioresistant (possibly because a subpopulation was more quiescent). This is contrary to the popular belief that previously irradiated animals may have an impaired/delayed regenerative response and be more radiosensitive.

  20. Inflammatory cues acting on the adult intestinal stem cells and the early onset of cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE LERMA BARBARO, A.; PERLETTI, G.; BONAPACE, I.M.; MONTI, E.

    2014-01-01

    The observation that cancer often arises at sites of chronic inflammation has prompted the idea that carcinogenesis and inflammation are deeply interwoven. In fact, the current literature highlights a role for chronic inflammation in virtually all the steps of carcinogenesis, including tumor initiation, promotion and progression. The aim of the present article is to review the current literature on the involvement of chronic inflammation in the initiation step and in the very early phases of tumorigenesis, in a type of cancer where adult stem cells are assumed to be the cells of origin of neoplasia. Since the gastrointestinal tract is regarded as the best-established model system to address the liaison between chronic inflammation and neoplasia, the focus of this article will be on intestinal cancer. In fact, the anatomy of the intestinal epithelial lining is uniquely suited to study adult stem cells in their niche, and the bowel crypt is an ideal developmental biology system, as proliferation, differentiation and cell migration are all distributed linearly along the long axis of the crypt. Moreover, crypt stem cells are regarded today as the most likely targets of neoplastic transformation in bowel cancer. More specifically, the present review addresses the molecular mechanisms whereby a state of chronic inflammation could trigger the neoplastic process in the intestine, focusing on the generation of inflammatory cues evoking enhanced proliferation in cells not initiated but at risk of neoplastic transformation because of their stemness. Novel experimental approaches, based on triggering an inflammatory stimulus in the neighbourhood of adult intestinal stem cells, are warranted to address some as yet unanswered questions. A possible approach, the targeted transgenesis of Paneth cells, may be aimed at ‘hijacking’ the crypt stem cell niche from a status characterized by the maintenance of homeostasis to local chronic inflammation, with the prospect of initiating

  1. Migration and turnover of entero-endocrine and caveolated cells in the epithelium of the descending colon, as shown by radioautography after continuous infusion of 3H-thymidine into mice.

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, S; Leblond, C P

    1979-12-01

    Adult male mice were given a continuous infusion of about 0.5 muCi of 3H-thymidine per gram body weight per day for periods varying from 1 to 60 days. Semithin sections of descending colon were cut from/plastic-embedded blocks and stained by a method combining silver impregnation and iron hematoxylin, by which argentaffin entero-endocrine cells and caveolated cells could be identified. From radioautographs, the labeling index of these cells was determined. One to three days after the beginning of 3H-thymidine infusion, label is observed in some of the stained entero-endocrine cells in the bottom of the crypts; the apices of these cells reach the crypt lumen and are joined to neighboring cells by terminal bars (junctional complexes). After five to seven days, labeled entero-endocrine cells are seen on the sides of the crypts, where their base stretches along the basement membrane and their apex has lost its terminal bar connections to neighboring cells. Finally, by 13 and 24 days, labeled cells are observed within the epithelium at the mucosal surface. The turnover time, which is taken to be equal to the mean time required for migration from site of origin to site of loss on the mucosal surface, has been estimated at 23.3 days. This is much longer than the 4.6 days required by the two main cell types of the epithelium -- vacuolated-columnar and mucous cells -- to travel the same route. It is likely that, after entero-endocrine cells lose their terminal bar attachment to other epithelial cells, they migrate independently and very slowly. Labeled caveolated cells are first seen in the crypt bottom one day after the beginning of 3H-thymidine infusion. By three to five days, they are on the sides of the crypts; their base is stretched along the basement membrane, but their apex retains its attachment to neighboring cells by terminal bars. By seven days, labeled caveolated cells are on the mucosal surface. Their turnover time has been assessed at 8.2 days. This is, again

  2. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J.; Abud, Helen E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts. PMID:26367378

  3. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts.

  4. Hydrolysed inulin alleviates the azoxymethane-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci by altering selected intestinal microbiota in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Pattananandecha, Thanawat; Sirilun, Sasithorn; Duangjitcharoen, Yodsawee; Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Suwannalert, Prasit; Peerajan, Sartjin; Chaiyasut, Chaiyavat

    2016-09-01

    Context Inulin, a non-digestible carbohydrate isolated from Helianthus tuberosus L. (Asteraceae), has been shown to alter the gut beneficial bacteria including Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria. Inulin also influences the activities of intestinal microbiota that could prevent the colon cancer development. Objective This study determines the effect of hydrolysed inulin with different degrees of polymerisation on alteration of intestinal microbiota and their activities on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Materials and methods Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups (three control and three AOM-treated groups) and the animal were fed with either a normal diet or diet containing 10% of long-chain inulin (InuL) or short-chain inulin (InuS), respectively, for 17 weeks. Colon cancer was induced in rats by injecting AOM subcutaneously at the 8th and 9th week of the study period. At the end of the experiment, cecal contents of rats were examined for selected microbiota, organic acids, putrefactive compounds and microbial enzymes. ACF formation was microscopically examined. Results The inulin diets significantly increased the weight and decreased the pH of the caecal content. The rats fed with InuL-supplemented diet showed approximately 2.9- and 6.8-fold increases in the biomass of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria, respectively. Naive and AOM-treated rats fed with inulin-supplemented diet showed ∼1.3- and ∼2.2-fold decreases in the biomass of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, respectively. Inulins significantly decreased the colonic concentration of phenol, p-cresol and indole. Reduction in the activity of microbial enzymes such as β-glucuronidase, azoreductase and nitroreductase were observed in inulin-treated animals. Reduction in the ACF formation has been observed in inulin-treated groups. Discussion and conclusion The present study demonstrates that dietary

  5. B-RAF mutation and accumulated gene methylation in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P) and cancer in SSA/P

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, A; Okamoto, K; Fujino, Y; Nakagawa, T; Muguruma, N; Sannomiya, K; Mitsui, Y; Takaoka, T; Kitamura, S; Miyamoto, H; Okahisa, T; Fujimori, T; Imoto, I; Takayama, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) are a putative precursor of colon cancer with microsatellite instability (MSI). However, the developmental mechanism of SSA/P remains unknown. We performed genetic analysis and genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), SSA/P, and cancer in SSA/P specimens to show a close association between ACF and the SSA/P-cancer sequence. We also evaluated the prevalence and number of ACF in SSA/P patients. Methods: ACF in the right-side colon were observed in 36 patients with SSA/Ps alone, 2 with cancers in SSA/P, and 20 normal subjects and biopsied under magnifying endoscopy. B-RAF mutation and MSI were analysed by PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR–SSCP, respectively, in 15 ACF, 20 SSA/P, and 2 cancer specimens. DNA methylation array analysis of seven ACF, seven SSA/P, and two cancer in SSA/P specimens was performed using the microarray-based integrated analysis of methylation by isochizomers (MIAMI) method. Results: B-RAF mutations were frequently detected in ACF, SSA/P, and cancer in SSA/P tissues. The number of methylated genes increased significantly in the order of ACF

  6. Wnt Signaling Inhibition Deprives Small Intestinal Stem Cells of Clonogenic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Janeckova, Lucie; Fafilek, Bohumil; Krausova, Michaela; Horazna, Monika; Vojtechova, Martina; Alberich‐Jorda, Meritxell; Sloncova, Eva; Galuskova, Katerina; Sedlacek, Radislav; Anderova, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Wnt pathway plays a crucial role in self‐renewal and differentiation of cells in the adult gut. In the present study, we revealed the functional consequences of inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling in the intestinal epithelium. The study was based on generation of a novel transgenic mouse strain enabling inducible expression of an N‐terminally truncated variant of nuclear Wnt effector T cell factor 4 (TCF4). The TCF4 variant acting as a dominant negative (dn) version of wild‐type (wt) TCF4 protein decreased transcription of β‐catenin‐TCF4‐responsive genes. Interestingly, suppression of Wnt/β‐catenin signaling affected asymmetric division of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) rather than proliferation. ISCs expressing the transgene underwent several rounds of division but lost their clonogenic potential and migrated out of the crypt. Expression profiling of crypt cells revealed that besides ISC‐specific markers, the dnTCF4 production downregulated expression levels of epithelial genes produced in other crypt cells including markers of Paneth cells. Additionally, in Apc conditional knockout mice, dnTCF activation efficiently suppressed growth of Apc‐deficient tumors. In summary, the generated mouse strain represents a convenient tool to study cell‐autonomous inhibition of β‐catenin‐Tcf‐mediated transcription. genesis 54:101–114, 2016. © 2016 The Authors genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864984

  7. Mechanism of rapid mucus secretion in goblet cells stimulated by acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The parasympathetic control of goblet cell secretion and the membrane events accompanying accelerated mucus release were studied in large intestinal mucosal biopsies maintained in an organ culture system. The secretory response of individual goblet cells to 10(-6) M acetylcholine chloride with 3 x 10(-3) M eserine sulfate (a cholinesterase inhibitor) was assessed by light microscopy and autoradiography, by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and by freeze-fracture. Goblet cells on the mucosal surface are unaffected by acetylcholine. In crypt goblet cells acetylcholine-eserine induces rapid fusion of apical mucous granule membranes with the luminal plasma membrane (detectable by 2 min), followed by sequential, tandem fission of the pentalaminar, fused areas of adjacent mucous granule membranes. These events first involve the most central apical mucous granules, are then propagated to include peripheral granules, and finally spread toward the most basal granules. By 60 min, most crypt cells are nearly depleted. The apical membrane, although greatly amplified by these events, remains intact, and intracellular mucous granules do not coalesce with each other. During rapid secretion membrane-limited tags of cytoplasm are observed attached to the cavitated apical cell surface. These long, thin extensions of redundant apical membrane are rapidly lost, apparently by being shed into the crypt lumen. PMID:7391135

  8. Pharmacologically blocking p53-dependent apoptosis protects intestinal stem cells and mice from radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinwei; Wei, Liang; Cramer, Julie M.; Leibowitz, Brian J.; Judge, Colleen; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Linheng; Stelzner, Matthias G.; Dunn, James C. Y.; Martin, Martin G.; Lagasse, Eric; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation (IR) leads to debilitating and dose-limiting gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Using three-dimensional mouse crypt culture, we demonstrated that p53 target PUMA mediates radiation-induced apoptosis via a cell-intrinsic mechanism, and identified the GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR99021 as a potent radioprotector. CHIR99021 treatment improved Lgr5+ cell survival and crypt regeneration after radiation in culture and mice. CHIR99021 treatment specifically blocked apoptosis and PUMA induction and K120 acetylation of p53 mediated by acetyl-transferase Tip60, while it had no effect on p53 stabilization, phosphorylation or p21 induction. CHIR99021 also protected human intestinal cultures from radiation by PUMA but not p21 suppression. These results demonstrate that p53 posttranslational modifications play a key role in the pathological and apoptotic response of the intestinal stem cells to radiation and can be targeted pharmacologically. PMID:25858503

  9. Distribution of neuroendocrine cells in the small and large intestines of the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Ali, M Al Haj; Nyberg, Fred; Chandranath, S I; Dhanasekaran, S; Tariq, Saeed; Petroianu, G; Hasan, M Y; Adeghate, Ernest A; Adem, A

    2007-10-01

    The distribution and relative frequency of neuroendocrine cells in the small and large intestines of one-humped camel were studied using antisera against 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), somatostatin (SOM), peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A (NKA). Among these cell types, CCK-8 immunoreactive (IR) cells were uniformly distributed in the mucosa, while others showed varied distribution in the villi or crypts of the small intestine. Immunoreactive cells like 5HT, CCK-8, and SOM showed peak density in the villi and crypts of the small intestine and in the colonic glands of the large intestine, while cells containing SP were discerned predominately in the crypts. 5-HT, CCK-8 and SOM cells were mainly flask-shaped and of the open-variety, while PYY and SP immunoreactive cells were mainly rounded or basket-shaped and of the closed variety. Basically the distribution pattern of the endocrine cells in the duodenum, jejunum and colon of the one-humped camel is similar to that of other mammals. Finally, the distribution of these bioactive agents may give clues as to how these agents aid in the function of the intestinal tract of this desert animal.

  10. Colonic and colorectal cancer stem cells: progress in the search for putative biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Naomi D; Przyborski, Stefan A; Hutchison, Christopher J; Wilson, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of healthy colonic crypts is dependent on the integrity of the adult epithelial stem cells located within them. Perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the first step towards colorectal tumorigenesis. Experimental manipulation of intestinal stem cells has greatly increased our understanding of them, but further progress has been slowed due to the absence of a reliable stem cell biomarker. In this review we discuss the candidate colonic stem cell biomarkers which have been proposed. Furthermore, we investigate the putative biomarkers for so-called colorectal cancer stem cells, a highly aggressive subpopulation of cells considered to drive tumour development. PMID:18638071

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells stimulate intestinal stem cells to repair radiation-induced intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei; Guo, Mengzheng; Han, Zhibo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ping; Xu, Chang; Wang, Qin; Du, Liqing; Li, Qian; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Feiyue; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The loss of stem cells residing in the base of the intestinal crypt has a key role in radiation-induced intestinal injury. In particular, Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are indispensable for intestinal regeneration following exposure to radiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have previously been shown to improve intestinal epithelial repair in a mouse model of radiation injury, and, therefore, it was hypothesized that this protective effect is related to Lgr5+ ISCs. In this study, it was found that, following exposure to radiation, transplantation of MSCs improved the survival of the mice, ameliorated intestinal injury and increased the number of regenerating crypts. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in Lgr5+ ISCs and their daughter cells, including Ki67+ transient amplifying cells, Vil1+ enterocytes and lysozyme+ Paneth cells, in response to treatment with MSCs. Crypts isolated from mice treated with MSCs formed a higher number of and larger enteroids than those from the PBS group. MSC transplantation also reduced the number of apoptotic cells within the small intestine at 6 h post-radiation. Interestingly, Wnt3a and active β-catenin protein levels were increased in the small intestines of MSC-treated mice. In addition, intravenous delivery of recombinant mouse Wnt3a after radiation reduced damage in the small intestine and was radioprotective, although not to the same degree as MSC treatment. Our results show that MSCs support the growth of endogenous Lgr5+ ISCs, thus promoting repair of the small intestine following exposure to radiation. The molecular mechanism of action mediating this was found to be related to increased activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27685631

  12. Maternal nutritional plane and selenium supply during gestation impact visceral organ mass and intestinal growth and vascularity of neonatal lamb offspring.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A M; Neville, T L; Reed, J J; Taylor, J B; Reynolds, L P; Redmer, D A; Hammer, C J; Vonnahme, K A; Caton, J S

    2013-06-01

    To investigate effects of nutritional plane and Se supply during gestation on neonatal offspring visceral organ mass and intestinal growth and vascularity, 84 nulliparous Rambouillet ewes (age = 240 ± 17 d, BW = 52.1 ± 6.2 kg) were allocated to a 2 × 3 factorial design. Ewes were fed 1 of 2 Se diets [adequate Se (ASe, 11.5 µg/kg BW) or high Se (HSe, 77.0 µg/kg BW)], initiated at breeding, and 1 of 3 nutritional planes [60% (restricted; RES), 100% (control; CON), or 140% (high; HIH) of NRC requirements], initiated at d 40 of gestation. Ewes were fed individually and remained on treatments through parturition. All lambs were removed from their dams at birth and fed milk replacer. At 20.6 ± 0.9 d of age, lambs were necropsied, visceral organs dissected, and jejunal samples collected. Lambs born to ewes fed CON and HIH had greater (P < 0.05) BW, gastrointestinal tract, stomach complex, and liver masses at necropsy than RES. Large intestinal and pancreatic masses, as well as stomach complex, large intestinal, and liver proportional masses, demonstrated (P ≤ 0.08) a nutritional plane × Se supply interaction. Proportional pancreatic mass was greater (P = 0.03) for lambs born to RES ewes than HIH. Although small intestinal mass was not affected (P ≥ 0.18) by gestational treatments, lambs born to HIH-fed ewes had greater (P ≤ 0.09) jejunal DNA concentration than RES and CON, and greater (P = 0.01) total DNA than RES. Nutritional plane and Se supply interacted to affect (P ≤ 0.003) jejunal percent proliferation and total proliferating small intestinal cells, although jejunal crypt depth and villus length were not affected by gestational treatment (P ≥ 0.17). Jejunal glucagon-like peptide-2 mRNA expression was greater (P ≤ 0.07) in lambs born to ewes fed RES compared with CON and HIH. Jejunal capillary size was affected (P = 0.09) by the interaction of nutritional plane × Se supply. Lambs from CON ewes had greater (P ≤ 0.04) jejunal capillary surface

  13. Epithelial stem cell repertoire in the gut: clues to the origin of cell lineages, proliferative units and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nicholas A

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stem cells are shown to be pluripotential and to give rise to all cell lineages in the epithelium. After damage, gut stem cells produce reparative cell lineages that produce a wide range of peptides with important actions on cell proliferation and migration, and promote regeneration and healing. Increase in stem cell number is considered to induce crypt fission, and lead to increases in the number of crypts, even in the adult; it is also the mode of spread of mutated clones in the colorectal mucosa. Stem cell repertoire is defined by both intrinsic programming of the stem cell itself, but signalling from the mesenchyme is also vitally important for defining both stem cell progeny and proliferation. Carcinogenesis in the colon occurs through sequential mutations, possibly occurring in a single cell. A case is made for this being the stem cell, but recent studies indicate that several stem cells may need to be so involved, since early lesions appear to be polyclonal in derivation. PMID:10762441

  14. Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko; Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru; Akashi, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

  15. Epigenetics in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Roostaee, Alireza; Benoit, Yannick D.; Boudjadi, Salah

    2016-01-01

    A controlled balance between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to maintain normal intestinal tissue renewal and physiology. Such regulation is powered by several intracellular pathways that are translated into the establishment of specific transcription programs, which influence intestinal cell fate along the crypt‐villus axis. One important check‐point in this process occurs in the transit amplifying zone of the intestinal crypts where different signaling pathways and transcription factors cooperate to manage cellular proliferation and differentiation, before secretory or absorptive cell lineage terminal differentiation. However, the importance of epigenetic modifications such as histone methylation and acetylation in the regulation of these processes is still incompletely understood. There have been recent advances in identifying the impact of histone modifications and chromatin remodelers on the proliferation and differentiation of normal intestinal crypt cells. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the role of the cellular epigenome in intestinal cell fate, development, and tissue renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2361–2367, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061836

  16. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  17. Intestinal stem cell injury and protection during cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Radiation and chemotherapy remain the most effective and widely used cancer treatments. These treatments cause DNA damage and selectively target rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells, as well as inevitably cause damage to normal tissues, particularly those undergoing rapid self renewal. The side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapy are most pronounced in the hematopoietic (HP) system and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These tissues are fast renewing and have a well-defined stem cell compartment that plays an essential role in homeostasis, and in treatment-induced acute injury that is dose limiting. Using recently defined intestinal stem cell markers and mouse models, a great deal of insight has been gained in the biology of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), which will undoubtedly help further mechanistic understanding of their injury. This review will cover historic discoveries and recent advances in the identification and characterization of intestinal stem cells, their responses to genotoxic stress, and a new crypt and intestinal stem cell culture system. The discussion will include key pathways regulating intestinal crypt and stem cell injury and regeneration caused by cancer treatments, and strategies for their protection. The focus will be on the acute phase of cell killing in mouse radiation models, where our understanding of the mechanisms in relation to intestinal stem cells is most advanced and interventions appear most effective. PMID:24683536

  18. Rab8a vesicles regulate Wnt ligand delivery and Paneth cell maturation at the intestinal stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Vedula, Pavan; Feng, Qiang; Flores, Juan; Hoffman, Andrew; Fu, Jiang; Stypulkowski, Ewa; Rodriguez, Alexis; Dobrowolski, Radek; Harada, Akihiro; Hsu, Wei; Bonder, Edward M.; Verzi, Michael P.; Gao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Communication between stem and niche supporting cells maintains the homeostasis of adult tissues. Wnt signaling is a crucial regulator of the stem cell niche, but the mechanism that governs Wnt ligand delivery in this compartment has not been fully investigated. We identified that Wnt secretion is partly dependent on Rab8a-mediated anterograde transport of Gpr177 (wntless), a Wnt-specific transmembrane transporter. Gpr177 binds to Rab8a, depletion of which compromises Gpr177 traffic, thereby weakening the secretion of multiple Wnts. Analyses of generic Wnt/β-catenin targets in Rab8a knockout mouse intestinal crypts indicate reduced signaling activities; maturation of Paneth cells – a Wnt-dependent cell type – is severely affected. Rab8a knockout crypts show an expansion of Lgr5+ and Hopx+ cells in vivo. However, in vitro, the knockout enteroids exhibit significantly weakened growth that can be partly restored by exogenous Wnts or Gsk3β inhibitors. Immunogold labeling and surface protein isolation identified decreased plasma membrane localization of Gpr177 in Rab8a knockout Paneth cells and fibroblasts. Upon stimulation by exogenous Wnts, Rab8a-deficient cells show ligand-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation and transcriptional reporter activation. Rab8a thus controls Wnt delivery in producing cells and is crucial for Paneth cell maturation. Our data highlight the profound tissue plasticity that occurs in response to stress induced by depletion of a stem cell niche signal. PMID:26015543

  19. Rab8a vesicles regulate Wnt ligand delivery and Paneth cell maturation at the intestinal stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Vedula, Pavan; Feng, Qiang; Flores, Juan; Hoffman, Andrew; Fu, Jiang; Stypulkowski, Ewa; Rodriguez, Alexis; Dobrowolski, Radek; Harada, Akihiro; Hsu, Wei; Bonder, Edward M; Verzi, Michael P; Gao, Nan

    2015-06-15

    Communication between stem and niche supporting cells maintains the homeostasis of adult tissues. Wnt signaling is a crucial regulator of the stem cell niche, but the mechanism that governs Wnt ligand delivery in this compartment has not been fully investigated. We identified that Wnt secretion is partly dependent on Rab8a-mediated anterograde transport of Gpr177 (wntless), a Wnt-specific transmembrane transporter. Gpr177 binds to Rab8a, depletion of which compromises Gpr177 traffic, thereby weakening the secretion of multiple Wnts. Analyses of generic Wnt/β-catenin targets in Rab8a knockout mouse intestinal crypts indicate reduced signaling activities; maturation of Paneth cells - a Wnt-dependent cell type - is severely affected. Rab8a knockout crypts show an expansion of Lgr5(+) and Hopx(+) cells in vivo. However, in vitro, the knockout enteroids exhibit significantly weakened growth that can be partly restored by exogenous Wnts or Gsk3β inhibitors. Immunogold labeling and surface protein isolation identified decreased plasma membrane localization of Gpr177 in Rab8a knockout Paneth cells and fibroblasts. Upon stimulation by exogenous Wnts, Rab8a-deficient cells show ligand-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation and transcriptional reporter activation. Rab8a thus controls Wnt delivery in producing cells and is crucial for Paneth cell maturation. Our data highlight the profound tissue plasticity that occurs in response to stress induced by depletion of a stem cell niche signal.

  20. Three-Dimensional Gastrointestinal Organoid Culture in Combination with Nerves or Fibroblasts: A Method to Characterize the Gastrointestinal Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Pastuła, Agnieszka; Middelhoff, Moritz; Brandtner, Anna; Tobiasch, Moritz; Höhl, Bettina; Nuber, Andreas H.; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Neupert, Steffi; Kollmann, Patrick; Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma; Quante, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium is characterized by a high turnover of cells and intestinal stem cells predominantly reside at the bottom of crypts and their progeny serve to maintain normal intestinal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates the pivotal role of a niche surrounding intestinal stem cells in crypts, which consists of cellular and soluble components and creates an environment constantly influencing the fate of stem cells. Here we describe different 3D culture systems to culture gastrointestinal epithelium that should enable us to study the stem cell niche in vitro in the future: organoid culture and multilayered systems such as organotypic cell culture and culture of intestinal tissue fragments ex vivo. These methods mimic the in vivo situation in vitro by creating 3D culture conditions that reflect the physiological situation of intestinal crypts. Modifications of the composition of the culture media as well as coculturing epithelial organoids with previously described cellular components such as myofibroblasts, collagen, and neurons show the impact of the methods applied to investigate niche interactions in vitro. We further present a novel method to isolate labeled nerves from the enteric nervous system using Dclk1-CreGFP mice. PMID:26697073

  1. Effect of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin on cell volume and intracellular inorganic ions of rat intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gilles-Baillien, M; Gerday, C; Kaeckenbeeck, A; Flamee, P A; Duchesne, P Y

    1987-11-01

    1.--Electron micrographs of rat jejunum mucosa incubated for 1 h in the presence of Escheria coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in the lumen shows alterations of villous cells as well as of crypt cells. The brush border of mature enterocytes is partially desintegrated and covered with a thick mucus. Crypts are occupied on half of their height by cells very similar to Paneth cells, loaded with numerous large dark inclusions. 2.--Cell volume and intracellular inorganic ion concentrations have been estimated in mucosal scrapings of jejunum sacs, incubated in vitro for 1 or 3 h. The quick action (1 h of incubation) of STa is a swelling of the intestinal calls accompanied by an increase in Na+, Cl- and Ca2+ intracellular concentrations and a decrease in the K+ and Mg2+ ones. The delayed action (3 h of incubation) is an increase of extracellular space and a decrease in cell volume; and at the same time the intracellular concentration of Na+, Cl-, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ is augmented. 3.--After 3 h of incubation intestinal cells from the other levels of intestine (duodenum, ileum and colon) show the same variations in cell volume and intracellular inorganic ion concentrations under the influence of STa, as those recorded in the jejunum. 4.--The present work favours the hypothesis that all intestinal cells, villous or cryptic, are involved in the alteration of fluid ion transport ending in diarrhea.

  2. Enteral peptide formulas inhibit radiation induced enteritis and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and suppress the expression and function of Alzheimer's and cell division control gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, F.O. ); Issinger, O.G. ); McArdle, A.H. ); Shapiro, J.; Tomei, L.D. )

    1991-03-15

    Studies have shown that patients receiving enteral peptide formulas prior to irradiation have a significantly reduced incidence of enteritis and express a profound increase in intestinal cellularity. Two conceptual approaches were taken to describe this response. First was the evaluation in changes in programmed intestinal cell death and secondly the evaluation of a gene product controlling cell division cycling. This study provided a relationship between the ratio of cell death to cell formulations. The results indicate that in the canine and murine models, irradiation induces expression of the Alzheimer's gene in intestinal crypt cells, while the incidence of apoptosis in apical cells is significantly increased. The use of peptide enteral formulations suppresses the expression of the Alzheimer's gene in crypt cells, while apoptosis is eliminated in the apical cells of the intestine. Concomitantly, enteral peptide formulations suppress the function of the CK-II gene product in the basal and baso-lateral cells of the intestine. These data indicate that although the mitotic index is significantly reduced in enterocytes, this phenomenon alone is not sufficient to account for the peptide-induced radio-resistance of the intestine. The data also indicate a significant reduction of normal apoptosis in the upper lateral and apical cells of the intestinal villi. Thus, the ratio of cell death to cell replacement is significantly decreased resulting in an increase in villus height and hypertrophy of the apical villus cells. Thus, peptide solutions should be considered as an adjunct treatment both in radio- and chemotherapy.

  3. Oral Carcinoma Cuniculatum: A New Entity in the Clinicopathological Spectrum of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Alka; Mane, Deepa

    2017-01-01

    Carcinoma cuniculatum is principally recognized as a variant of carcinoma involving foot. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes Oral Carcinoma Cuniculatum (OCC) as a distinct and rare clinicopathological variant of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). OCC is confused clinically and histologically with Verrucous Carcinoma (VC) and is often misdiagnosed as either VC or OSCC. To best of our knowledge, till date, only 50 cases of this tumour have been reported in oral cavity (including the present case) and only limited number of cases have been reported from Indian subcontinent. Pathognomonic feature of OCC is proliferation of stratified squamous epithelium and its infiltration into underlying stroma forming a complex pattern of keratin cores and keratin filled crypts. These complex crypts give it a likeness of rabbit burrow hence, the name cuniculatum (cuniculatus=‘rabbit warren’). The report aims to present a case of OCC of mandibular gingiva, discuss its diagnostic features and highlight its differences from VC and OSCC. PMID:28274074

  4. Depletion of enteric bacteria diminishes leukocyte infiltration following doxorubicin-induced small intestinal damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jacquelyn S.; King, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims While enteric bacteria have been shown to play a critical role in other forms of intestinal damage, their role in mediating the response to the chemotherapeutic drug Doxorubicin (Doxo) is unclear. In this study, we used a mouse model of intestinal bacterial depletion to evaluate the role enteric bacteria play in mediating Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and, more specifically, in mediating chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration following Doxo treatment. An understanding of this pathway may allow for development of intervention strategies to reduce chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. Methods Mice were treated with (Abx) or without (NoAbx) oral antibiotics in drinking water for four weeks and then with Doxo. Jejunal tissues were collected at various time points following Doxo treatment and stained and analyzed for apoptosis, crypt damage and restitution, and macrophage and neutrophil number. In addition, RNA expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL1-β, IL-10) and cytokines (CCL2, CC7, KC) was assessed by qRT-PCR. Results In NoAbx mice Doxo-induced damage was associated with rapid induction of apoptosis in jejunal crypt epithelium and an increase weight loss and crypt loss. In addition, we observed an increase in immune-modulating chemokines CCL2, CCL7 and KC and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils. In contrast, while still positive for induction of apoptosis following Doxo treatment, Abx mice showed neither the overall weight loss nor crypt loss seen in NoAbx mice nor the increased chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration. Conclusion Enteric bacteria play a critical role in Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and are associated with an increase in immune-modulating chemokines and cells. Manipulation of enteric bacteria or the damage pathway may allow for prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. PMID:28257503

  5. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Domingo, Patricia; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Karrich, Julien J; Cornelissen, Ferry; Papazian, Natalie; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky J; Butler, James A; Boon, Louis; Coles, Mark C; Samsom, Janneke N; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-10-19

    Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence of this high mitotic activity, mucosal surfaces are frequently targeted by anticancer therapies, leading to dose-limiting side effects. The cellular mechanisms that control tissue protection and mucosal healing in response to intestinal damage remain poorly understood. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) are regulators of homeostasis and tissue responses to infection at mucosal surfaces. We now demonstrate that ILC3s are required for epithelial activation and proliferation in response to small intestinal tissue damage induced by the chemotherapeutic agent methotrexate. Multiple subsets of ILC3s are activated after intestinal tissue damage, and in the absence of ILC3s, epithelial activation is lost, correlating with increased pathology and severe damage to the intestinal crypts. Using ILC3-deficient Lgr5 reporter mice, we show that maintenance of intestinal stem cells after damage is severely impaired in the absence of ILC3s or the ILC3 signature cytokine IL-22. These data unveil a novel function of ILC3s in limiting tissue damage by preserving tissue-specific stem cells.

  6. Mutual reinforcement between telomere capping and canonical Wnt signalling in the intestinal stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting-Lin B.; Chen, Qijun; Deng, Jennifer T.; Jagannathan, Geetha; Tobias, John W.; Schultz, David C.; Wang, Shan; Lengner, Christopher J.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Lynch, John P.; Johnson, F. Brad

    2017-01-01

    Critical telomere shortening (for example, secondary to partial telomerase deficiency in the rare disease dyskeratosis congenita) causes tissue pathology, but underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Mice lacking telomerase (for example, mTR−/− telomerase RNA template mutants) provide a model for investigating pathogenesis. In such mice, after several generations of telomerase deficiency telomeres shorten to the point of uncapping, causing defects most pronounced in high-turnover tissues including intestinal epithelium. Here we show that late-generation mTR−/− mutants experience marked downregulation of Wnt pathway genes in intestinal crypt epithelia, including crypt base columnar stem cells and Paneth cells, and in underlying stroma. The importance of these changes was revealed by rescue of crypt apoptosis and Wnt pathway gene expression upon treatment with Wnt pathway agonists. Rescue was associated with reduced telomere-dysfunction-induced foci and anaphase bridges, indicating improved telomere capping. Thus a mutually reinforcing feedback loop exists between telomere capping and Wnt signalling, and telomere capping can be impacted by extracellular cues in a fashion independent of telomerase. PMID:28303901

  7. Clonal Evolution of Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Fink, Juergen; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    The field of gastrointestinal epithelial stem cells is a rapidly developing area of adult stem cell research. The discovery of Lgr5(+) intestinal stem cells has enabled us to study many hidden aspects of the biology of gastrointestinal adult stem cells. Marked by Lgr5 and Troy, several novel endodermal stem cells have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract. A precise working model of stem cell propagation, dynamics, and plasticity has been revealed by a genetic labeling method, termed lineage tracing. This chapter introduces the reidentification of crypt base columnar cells as Lgr5(+) stem cells in the intestine. Subsequently, it will discuss dynamic clonal evolution and cellular plasticity in the intestinal stem cell zone, as well as in stem cell zones of stomach glands.

  8. SAM pointed domain ETS factor (SPDEF) regulates terminal differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, Taeko K.; Kazanjian, Avedis; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Shroyer, Noah F.

    2010-02-01

    Background and Aims: SPDEF (also termed PDEF or PSE) is an ETS family transcription factor that regulates gene expression in the prostate and goblet cell hyperplasia in the lung. Spdef has been reported to be expressed in the intestine. In this paper, we identify an important role for Spdef in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and differentiation. Methods: SPDEF expression was inhibited in colon cancer cells to determine its ability to control goblet cell gene activation. The effects of transgenic expression of Spdef on intestinal differentiation and homeostasis were determined. Results: In LS174T colon cancer cells treated with Notch/{gamma}-secretase inhibitor to activate goblet cell gene expression, shRNAs that inhibited SPDEF also repressed expression of goblet cell genes AGR2, MUC2, RETLNB, and SPINK4. Transgenic expression of Spdef caused the expansion of intestinal goblet cells and corresponding reduction in Paneth, enteroendocrine, and absorptive enterocytes. Spdef inhibited proliferation of intestinal crypt cells without induction of apoptosis. Prolonged expression of the Spdef transgene caused a progressive reduction in the number of crypts that expressed Spdef, consistent with its inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Conclusions: Spdef was sufficient to inhibit proliferation of intestinal progenitors and induce differentiation into goblet cells; SPDEF was required for activation of goblet cell associated genes in vitro. These data support a model in which Spdef promotes terminal differentiation into goblet cells of a common goblet/Paneth progenitor.

  9. Influence of high-calorie (cafeteria) diets on the population of Paneth cells in the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Adriana; Castillo-Robles, Guadalupe; González-Hernández, Margarita; Villanueva, Iván

    2005-01-01

    A high-calorie (cafeteria) diet is known to cause changes in the intestinal morphology and functioning that seem to be related to calorie overfeeding. Among the cell lineages found in the small intestine epithelium, the Paneth cell (PC) population is known to be influenced by factors related mainly to the intestinal microbiota. The role of PCs in the intestinal cell concert remains unclear, because experimental evidence suggests PC involvement in local processes other than protection against pathogens. Participation of PC in digestive mechanisms has been proposed on this basis. We have analyzed the effect of high-carbohydrate (HC) and high-fat (HF) cafeteria diets on the PC population in the small intestine of the adult rat. For 8 weeks, both HC and HF diets caused a gain in body weight, but whereas the HC-fed rats showed reduced counts of intestinal crypts per 5-mum section, the HF-fed group showed the opposite. In control rats, the number of crypts per section showed a slight tendency to decrease along the duodenum - ileum axis, whereas the number of PCs per crypt was increased towards the ileum. As a result, the number of PCs per section (calculated from these data) remained constant along the three segments of the intestine. The hypercaloric diets did not modify the general tendencies seen in the crypt and PC counts, but reduced the number of PCs per section in the duodenum by 50%. HC-fed, but not HF-fed, rats showed a similar reduction in jejunum also. These changes do not correlate particularly with any of the predictable effects of diet composition, so that a multifactorial control of PC density is proposed.

  10. mTOR disruption causes intestinal epithelial cell defects and intestinal atrophy postinjury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Leesa L.; Davis, Ashley K.; Grogg, Matthew W.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) drive small intestinal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates stem and progenitor cell metabolism and is frequently dysregulated in human disease, but its physiologic functions in the mammalian small intestinal epithelium remain poorly defined. We disrupted the genes mTOR, Rptor, Rictor, or both Rptor and Rictor in mouse ISCs, progenitors, and differentiated intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) using Villin-Cre. Mutant tissues and wild-type or heterozygous littermate controls were analyzed by histologic immunostaining, immunoblots, and proliferation assays. A total of 10 Gy irradiation was used to injure the intestinal epithelium and induce subsequent crypt regeneration. We report that mTOR supports absorptive enterocytes and secretory Paneth and goblet cell function while negatively regulating chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cell number. Through additional Rptor, Rictor, and Rptor/Rictor mutant mouse models, we identify mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 as the major