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Sample records for jejunal crypt cells

  1. HIV enteropathy: HAART reduces HIV-induced stem cell hyperproliferation and crypt hypertrophy to normal in jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Batman, Philip A; Kapembwa, Moses S; Belmonte, Liliana; Tudor, Gregory; Kotler, Donald P; Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro; Griffin, George E

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the structural and kinetic response of small intestinal crypt epithelial cells including stem cells to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Crypt size and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were quantified using morphometric techniques. Crypt length was measured by counting the number of enterocytes along one side of a number of crypts in each biopsy specimen and the mean crypt length was calculated. Proliferating crypt cells were identified with MIB-1 monoclonal antibody, and the percentage of crypt cells in proliferation was calculated at each cell position along the length of the crypt (proliferation index). Data were obtained from 9 HIV-positive test patients co-infected with microsporidia, 34 HIV-positive patients receiving HAART and 13 control cases. Crypt length was significantly greater in test patients than in controls, but crypt length in patients receiving HAART was normal. The proliferation index was greater in test subjects than in controls in stem and transit cell compartments, and was decreased in patients treated with HAART only in the stem cell region of the crypt. Villous atrophy in HIV enteropathy is attributed to crypt hypertrophy and encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. HAART restores normal crypt structure by inhibition of HIV-driven stem cell hyperproliferation at the crypt bases.

  2. HIV enteropathy: crypt stem and transit cell hyperproliferation induces villous atrophy in HIV/Microsporidia-infected jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Batman, Philip A; Kotler, Donald P; Kapembwa, Moses S; Booth, Dawn; Potten, Christopher S; Orenstein, Jan M; Scally, Andrew J; Griffin, George E

    2007-02-19

    The study aim was to analyse the kinetics of stem and transit cells in the crypts of jejunal mucosa infected with HIV and Microsporidia. The size of villi, depth of crypts and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were measured using morphometric techniques. The surface area/volume ratio (S/V) of jejunal biopsies was estimated under light microscopy using a Weibel graticule. Crypt length was measured by counting enterocytes along the crypt side from the base to the villus junction, and the mean crypt length was calculated. The S/V and crypt lengths of the jejunal mucosa of 21 HIV and Microsporidia-infected test cases were compared with 14 control cases. The labelling index in relation to the crypt cell position of 10 of the test cases was analysed compared with 13 control cases. Differences were found in the S/V and crypt length, and there was a negative correlation between S/V and crypt length in test and control cases combined. Cell labelling indices fell into low and high proliferation groups. There were significant differences in labelling indices between low proliferation test cases and controls, between high proliferation test cases and controls, and between high and low proliferation test cases. Villous atrophy induced by HIV and Microsporidia is attributed to crypt cell hyperplasia and the encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. These infections induce crypt hypertrophy by stimulating cell mitosis predominantly in transit cells but also in stem cells. Increased stem cell proliferation occurs only in high proliferation cases.

  3. Kinetics of changes in the crypts of the jejunal mucosa of dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sunter, J. P.; Appleton, D. R.; Wright, N. A.; Watson, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    When symmetrical 1,2 dimethylhydrazine was administered to rats by weekly s.c. injection, 37% of the animals had developed small intestinal carcinomas after 21-27 weeks. These lesions were largely localized to duodenum and upper jejunum. At the same time there was a diffuse crypt hyperplasia in the jejunum which affected all the treated animals, not just those with neoplasms. This marked hyperplasia was preceded by a modest sustained crypt elongation which was seen soon after DMH injections began. In these hyperplastic jejunal crypts the absolute size of the proliferative compartment was increased, but the growth fraction calculated from labelling studies appeared to fall, probably by reduction in relative size of the proliferating population within the proliferative compartment. No convincing alteration in actual cell-cycle time was observed in the abnormal crypts. There was a slight (25%) increase in cell-production rate in the abnormal crypts. Images Fig. 1 PMID:656298

  4. Effects of spaceflight on the proliferation of jejunal mucosal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, Heywood R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  5. Opioid receptors on guinea-pig intestinal crypt epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, M E; Davison, J S; Bates, S L; Meddings, J B

    1996-01-01

    1. Opioid peptides promote net intestinal absorption via two mechanisms: stimulation of Na+ and Cl- absorption and inhibition of Cl- secretion. Although these transport changes are predominantly mediated by submucosal neurones, it is currently unclear whether opioid peptides can regulate enterocyte function directly. We therefore tested the hypothesis that enterocytes have specific opioid receptors. 2. Villus and crypt jejunal epithelial cells were isolated by the distended sac method from anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Flow cytometry was used to resolve enterocytes from other cell types and to determine whether binding of a fluorescently labelled opioid antagonist, naltrexone-FITC, could be prevented by unlabelled mu- and delta-opioid receptor agonists. A population of crypt enterocytes (approximately 21%) exhibited high-affinity naltrexone-FITC binding to both mu- and delta-type binding sites that was stereoselective and sodium dependent. Villus enterocytes did not exhibit any of these characteristics. 3. Basal cAMP production was elevated in both villus and crypt cells treated with IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine). Villus cells did not respond to 100 nM vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), nor were they affected by opioid peptides. In contrast, 100 nM VIP significantly increased cAMP production in crypt epithelial cells, which was significantly reduced by both morphiceptin and D-Ser2-Leu-Enk-Thr. This opioid-mediated effect was stereoselective and blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone. 4. These experiments suggest that enterocytes isolated from the crypt epithelium of guineapigs have both mu- and delta-types of opioid receptors. It is possible that these cells participate in opioid-mediated regulation of intestinal secretion. Images Figure 12 PMID:8951719

  6. Effects of epidermal growth factor and dimethylhydrazine on crypt size, cell proliferation, and crypt fission in the rat colon. Cell proliferation and crypt fission are controlled independently.

    PubMed Central

    Park, H. S.; Goodlad, R. A.; Ahnen, D. J.; Winnett, A.; Sasieni, P.; Lee, C. Y.; Wright, N. A.

    1997-01-01

    Crypt fission is now established as an important mechanism of intestinal growth and regeneration. It has been proposed that increased crypt size is the stimulus for crypt fission, because crypts preparing for fission are generally larger. Consequently, we investigated the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and dimethylhydrazine, which are both known to stimulate crypt cell proliferation, on crypt fission in the rat intestine. We also examined whether the effects of EGF on both proliferation and crypt fission are modified by the pretreatment with dimethylhydrazine for 16 weeks, dimethylhydrazine was then discontinued for 8 weeks, followed by intravenous infusion of EGF for 1 week. There were four groups: vehicle alone, EGF alone, dimethylhydrazine alone, and dimethylhydrazine followed by EGF infusion. The rats were killed at 25 weeks and rates of intestinal crypt cell production, crypt size, and crypt fission were determined. Intravenously infused EGF significantly increased crypt cell production rate, but the magnitude of the effect decreased from the proximal to the distal colon. EGF caused an increase in crypt area, possibly reflecting an increase in crypt size. Importantly dimethylhydrazine had no significant effect on crypt cell production rate nor on crypt area in the distal colon, but it did cause an increase in crypt area in the mid-colon. The crypt fission index was significantly decreased by EGF and increased by dimethylhydrazine. There was no qualitative interaction between EGF and dimethylhydrazine. These results demonstrate the marked proliferative effect of intravenously infused EGF in the colon of orally fed rats, with significant site effects (P = 0.0007); the effect was greatest in the proximal colon and disappeared in the distal colon. The observation that EGF reduced crypt fission indicates that increased cell proliferation, per se, is not a stimulus for crypt fission. This is further supported by the observation that dimethylhydrazine

  7. Crypt dysplasia in Barrett's oesophagus shows clonal identity between crypt and surface cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shabuddin; McDonald, Stuart A C; Wright, Nicholas A; Graham, Trevor A; Odze, Robert D; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Zeki, Sebastian

    2013-09-01

    Epithelial dysplasia is an important histological diagnosis signifying the presence of pre-invasive disease, usually needing intervention. However, the specific genetic changes responsible for the induction of this phenotypic change are unknown. Moreover, recent reports indicate that the dysplastic phenotype may not be immutable: in basal crypt dysplasia (CD), unequivocal dysplastic changes are seen in the crypts in Barrett's oesophagus and other pre-invasive lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, but the upper crypts and surface epithelium associated with these dysplastic crypts show the definitive morphology of a differentiated epithelium. The genotypic relationship between CD and the differentiated surface epithelium is presently unclear. We obtained 17 examples of CD: the lower and upper crypts and surface epithelium were differentially laser-microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections and mutations were sought in tumour suppressor genes frequently associated with progression in Barrett's oesophagus. We found two patients who both showed a c. C238T mutation in the CDKN2A (CDKN2AInk4A) gene and where the precise microanatomical relationships could be discerned: this mutation was present in both the CD at the crypt base and in the upper crypt and surface epithelium. We conclude that, in CD, the dysplastic basal crypt epithelium and the upper crypt and surface epithelium show clonal CDKN2A mutations, thus showing definitively that the surface epithelium is derived from the dysplastic crypt epithelium: the dysplastic phenotype is therefore not fixed and can be reversed. The mechanism of this change is unclear but may be related to the possibility that dysplastic cells can, probably early in their progression, respond to differentiation signals. However, it is also clear that a heavy mutational burden can be borne by crypts in the gastrointestinal tract without the development of phenotypic dysplasia. We are evidently some way from understanding

  8. Experiment K-7-17: Effects of Spaceflight on the Proliferation of Jejunal Mucosal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  9. Experiment K-7-17: Effects of Spaceflight on the Proliferation of Jejunal Mucosal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  10. Modelling the dynamics of stem cells in colonic crypts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirio, Orozco-Fuentes; Barrio, Rafael A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theoretical and computational framework to model the colonic crypt organisation in the human intestine. We construct a theoretical and computational framework to model the colonic crypt behaviour, using a Voronoi tessellation to represent each cell and elastic forces between them we addressed how their dynamical disfunction can lead to tumour masses and cancer. Our results indicate that for certain parameters the crypt is in a homeostatic state, but slight changes on their values can disrupt this behaviour.

  11. Stomatal crypts may facilitate diffusion of CO(2) to adaxial mesophyll cells in thick sclerophylls.

    PubMed

    Hassiotou, Foteini; Evans, John R; Ludwig, Martha; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2009-11-01

    In some plants, stomata are exclusively located in epidermal depressions called crypts. It has been argued that crypts function to reduce transpiration; however, the occurrence of crypts in species from both arid and wet environments suggests that crypts may play another role. The genus Banksia was chosen to examine quantitative relationships between crypt morphology and leaf structural and physiological traits to gain insight into the functional significance of crypts. Crypt resistance to water vapour and CO(2) diffusion was calculated by treating crypts as an additional boundary layer partially covering one leaf surface. Gas exchange measurements of polypropylene meshes confirmed the validity of this approach. Stomatal resistance was calculated as leaf resistance minus calculated crypt resistance. Stomata contributed significantly more than crypts to leaf resistance. Crypt depth increased and accounted for an increasing proportion of leaf resistance in species with greater leaf thickness and leaf dry mass per area. All Banksia species examined with leaves thicker than 0.6 mm had their stomata in deep crypts. We propose that crypts function to facilitate CO(2) diffusion from the abaxial surface to adaxial palisade cells in thick leaves. This and other possible functions of stomatal crypts, including a role in water use, are discussed.

  12. HLA-DR expression, natural killer cells and IgE containing cells in the jejunal mucosa of coeliac children.

    PubMed Central

    Arato, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M; Verkasalo, M; Klemola, T

    1987-01-01

    The expression of HLA-DR by surface and crypt epithelium and the numbers of cells of natural killer (NK) phenotype and of IgE containing cells were studied with monoclonal antisera using the peroxidase technique. We examined 48 jejunal biopsy specimens taken from 35 coeliac children before treatment (11), during gluten free diet (20) and after gluten challenge (17), and 13 control specimens. The luminal surface of the epithelial cells stained with HLA-DR antiserum in all specimens, but the cytoplasm of the surface epithelial cells took up the stain more frequently in the specimens from the controls (5/13) than those from the coeliacs (2/48) (p less than 0.01). In 21/28 specimens taken from coeliacs when on a gluten containing diet the crypt epithelium showed strong HLA-DR expression, while only 4/20 (p less than 0.01) specimens of coeliacs on a gluten free diet and 1/13 specimens of controls had similar staining. Among the intraepithelial lymphocytes no cells of NK phenotype were found in specimens from patients or controls. As compared with control specimens biopsy specimens from untreated coeliac patients showed smaller numbers of NK cells in the lamina propria. No difference was found in the numbers of IgE containing cells between the patients and controls. The strong expression of HLA-DR by the crypt epithelial cells in coeliac children on a normal diet suggest that these cells are involved in the presentation of the antigen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3311907

  13. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F

    2016-04-18

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal.

  14. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  15. Expression of apical Na(+)-L-glutamine co-transport activity, B(0)-system neutral amino acid co-transporter (B(0)AT1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 along the jejunal crypt-villus axis in young pigs fed a liquid formula.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengbo; Yang, Xiaojian; Lackeyram, Dale; Rideout, Todd C; Wang, Zirong; Stoll, Barbara; Yin, Yulong; Burrin, Douglas G; Fan, Ming Z

    2016-06-01

    Gut apical amino acid (AA) transport activity is high at birth and during suckling, thus being essential to maintain luminal nutrient-dependent mucosal growth through providing AA as essential metabolic fuel, substrates and nutrient stimuli for cellular growth. Because system-B(0) Na(+)-neutral AA co-transporter (B(0)AT1, encoded by the SLC6A19 gene) plays a dominant role for apical uptake of large neutral AA including L-Gln, we hypothesized that high apical Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity, and B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) in co-expression with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) were expressed along the entire small intestinal crypt-villus axis in young animals via unique control mechanisms. Kinetics of Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity in the apical membrane vesicles, prepared from epithelial cells sequentially isolated along the jejunal crypt-villus axis from liquid formula-fed young pigs, were measured with the membrane potential being clamped to zero using thiocyanate. Apical maximal Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity was much higher (p < 0.05) in the upper villus cells than in the middle villus (by 29 %) and the crypt (by 30 %) cells, whereas Na(+)-Gln co-transport affinity was lower (p < 0.05) in the upper villus cells than in the middle villus and the crypt cells. The B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) mRNA abundance was lower (p < 0.05) in the crypt (by 40-47 %) than in the villus cells. There were no significant differences in B(0)AT1 and ACE2 protein abundances on the apical membrane among the upper villus, the middle villus and the crypt cells. Our study suggests that piglet fast growth is associated with very high intestinal apical Na(+)-neutral AA uptake activities via abundantly co-expressing B(0)AT1 and ACE2 proteins in the apical membrane and by transcribing the B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) gene in the epithelia along the entire crypt-villus axis.

  16. Studies of intestinal lymphoid tissue. VII. The secondary nature of lymphoid cell "activation" in the jejunal lesion of tropical sprue.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, M. N.; Mathan, M.; Mathan, V. I.

    1983-01-01

    Morphometric techniques were used in the evaluation of lymphocyte morphology and activity in tropical sprue. jejunal biopsies from control subjects (8), patients with epidemic disease (7), patients with endemic disease (11), and subjects who had recovered from sprue (4) were analyzed blindly. In patients with sprue, lymphocytes were increased significantly within crypt (but not surface) epithelium. Immunoblasts (greater than 6 mu in diameter) were increased by 5% over control subjects. Group means for lymphocytic mitotic indexes were also significantly raised, while flux ratios only differed significantly between endemic sprue patients and control subjects. The lymphocytic infiltration was distributed focally in the upper crypt and crypt-villus interzones. Analysis of epidemic cases (presenting within 4-28 days) revealed detectable changes in lymphocyte behavior only after 3 weeks' illness, whereas mucosal lesions and malabsorption were already established during the first week. These data indicate that lymphocyte activation, suggestive of a local cell-mediated immune reaction, does occur in tropical sprue but is secondary to damage already inflicted on enterocytes and their function. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6614143

  17. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2011-11-15

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine and colon has remained the subject of debate. Recent studies based on targeted lineage tracing strategies, combined with the development of an organotypic culture system, have identified the crypt base columnar cell as the intestinal stem cell, and have unveiled the strategy by which the balance between proliferation and differentiation is maintained. These results show that intestinal stem cells operate in a dynamic environment in which frequent and stochastic stem cell loss is compensated by the proliferation of neighboring stem cells. We review the basis of these experimental findings and the insights they offer into the mechanisms of homeostatic stem cell regulation.

  18. Effects of weaning on intestinal crypt epithelial cells in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Xiong, Xia; Wang, Xiaocheng; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells in the crypt proliferate in piglets in response to weaning. However, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. We examined 40 piglets from eight litters (five piglets per litter) that were weaned at the age of 14 d, and one piglet from each litter was randomly selected for closer investigation. Based on the distended intestinal sac method, we isolated crypt epithelial cells from the mid-jejunum on Days 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-weaning. Protein expression was analyzed using either isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification or western blotting. Proteins related to the cell cycle, organization of the cellular macromolecular complex subunit, localization of cellular macromolecules, Golgi vesicle transport, fatty acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and translational initiation were mainly down-regulated, while those involved in glycolysis, cell cycle arrest, protein catabolism, and cellular amino acid metabolism were up-regulated. The amount of proteins active in the mTOR signaling pathway was generally decreased over time. These results indicate that weaning influences energy metabolism, cellular macromolecule organization and localization, and protein metabolism, thereby affecting the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells in weaned piglets. Moreover, those cellular processes are possibly controlled by that signaling pathway. PMID:27830738

  19. Interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate in intestinal crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    von der Maase, H.

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CTX), or methotrexate (MTX) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. 5-FU given from 48 hr before to 24 hr after irradiation resulted in an almost constant, increased cell kill except at injection 6 hr after irradiation, which resulted in a more pronounced effect. CTX enhanced the radiation effect only when given simultaneously with or up to 3 hr after irradiation. The effect of MTX, extremely dependent on the sequence and interval between drug administration and irradiation, was most prominent when administered 1 hr before irradiation. At this drug-radiation interval, the D/sub 0/ surprisingly increased by a factor of 2.4, whereas MTX 15 min before irradiation displaced the survival curve to the left without changing the D/sub 0/. The influence of MTX on the radiation response disappeared when the drug was given either 96 hr before or 3 hr after irradiation.

  20. Effect of diet and age on jejunal and circulating lymphocyte subsets in children with coeliac disease: persistence of CD4-8-intraepithelial T cells through treatment.

    PubMed

    Verkasalo, M A; Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M

    1990-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the relative numbers of T lymphocyte subsets in 61 jejunal biopsies and in peripheral blood of 35 children with coeliac disease, and of 13 healthy controls. The T cell numbers in the lamina propria were unaffected by a change from gluten-free to gluten containing diet in the patients. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (where the CD8 cells predominated) were significantly raised in patients taking gluten. Ten to 20% of the patients' intraepithelial CD3 (mature T) cells expressed neither CD8 nor CD4 surface antigens. This CD4 8 T cell population persisted through gluten elimination and challenge. The circulating lymphocyte subsets showed little variation with the diet although there was a marked increase in the proportion (14.9%) of CD4 8 T cells in patients during gluten elimination. In the histologically normal jejunal mucosa from control subjects, the age of the subject showed a positive correlation with villus intraepithelial CD3+ and CD8+ cells, and crypt intraepithelial CD4+ cells. No clear cut effect of age was observed on lamina propria lymphocyte counts of the controls, or on the lymphocyte counts in jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients. The observed CD3+4-8- lymphocytes may represent activated cells unable to present their surface antigens, or they may be gamma delta-receptor bearing T cells, which could have a significant role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  1. Fermentable dietary fiber potentiates the localization of immune cells in the rat large intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Seiji; Xu, Hong; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-10-01

    Intestinal crypts are composed of a well-defined hierarchy of epithelial cells, and proliferating epithelial cells reside close to the bottom of the crypts-even in the large intestine. We investigated whether CD8(+)and CD4(+)intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and CD161(+) natural killer (NK) cells localized in proliferating or differentiated epithelial region of cecum and colon. Both proliferating epithelial layer cells and the immune cells along the longitudinal crypt axis of the large intestine were measured histochemically. Dietary intervention revealed that the physiological localization of the immune cells in the longitudinal crypt axis depended on the immune cell type. CD8(+) IELs were preferentially located among differentiated epithelial cells. In contrast, CD161(+) NK cells were located adjacent to the epithelial cells at the bottom of crypt. Cecal crypts contained significantly larger numbers of CD8(+) IELs than did colonic crypts. However, there was only a minor population of CD4(+) IEL in the cecal and colonic epithelia. Some dietary fibers increased the densities of CD8(+) IELs and CD161(+) NK cells in the cecum, with the magnitude of response varying among the types of fiber. There was a significant relationship between SCFA and the localization of immune cells, especially CD8(+) IEL and CD161(+) NK cells, which are considered to be involved in the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis.

  2. Goblet cell depletion in small intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of conventional nursing and weaned pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Saif, Linda J

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal goblet cells secret mucins to form mucus layers critical for maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes watery diarrhea and high mortality of suckling pigs. PEDV mainly infects villous epithelial cells of the small intestine, and infected cells undergo acute, massive necrosis, followed by severe villous atrophy. Conventional 9-day-old nursing pigs [PEDV-inoculated (n=9); Mock (n=11)] and 26-day-old weaned [PEDV-inoculated (n=11); Mock (n=9)] were inoculated orally [8.9 log10 genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV strain PC21A or mock. We used alcian blue or Periodic-Acid-Schiff staining for the detection of acidic or neutral mucin-secreting goblet cells in the small intestine. We demonstrated that PEDV infection of the nursing pigs at post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5 and weaned pigs at PIDs 3-5 led to depletion or significant reduction in the number of goblet cells (and also the number of villous goblet cells normalized by jejunal villous crypt height to crypt depth ratios) in the villi or crypts. These findings coincided with the development of intestinal villous atrophy. By immunohistochemistry, a few PEDV antigen-positive goblet cells were identified in the jejunal or ileal villous epithelium of the infected nursing or weaned pigs. During the early stages of PEDV infection, goblet cell mucins in the small intestine may be decreased, possibly leading to an impaired mucus layer and increased susceptibility to secondary enteric bacterial infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Identification and classification of lysozyme-expressing cells in the mouse small intestinal crypt and their correlation with the morphology of secretory granules and labeling density of immunogold].

    PubMed

    Satot, Toru; Kawamoto, Eiichi; Yamada, Jinzo

    2009-09-01

    lysozyme in the small intestine varied at different sites. The labeling density in the Paneth and intermediate cells of the ileal crypt was lower than those of the duodeal and jejunal crypts. (5) In the lysozyme-expressing cells in small intestinal crypt of 2- and 24-month old mouse, the ultrastructure and labeling density did not change.

  4. Cell Organisation in the Colonic Crypt: A Theoretical Comparison of the Pedigree and Niche Concepts

    PubMed Central

    van der Wath, Richard C.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Burgess, Antony W.; Smith, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a monolayer of rapidly self-renewing epithelial cells which is not only responsible for absorption of water and nutrients into the bloodstream but also acts as a protective barrier against harmful microbes entering the body. New functional epithelial cells are produced from stem cells, and their proliferating progeny. These stem cells are found within millions of crypts (tubular pits) spaced along the intestinal tract. The entire intestinal epithelium is replaced every 2–3 days in mice (3–5 days in humans) and hence cell production, differentiation, migration and turnover need to be tightly regulated. Malfunctions in this regulation are strongly linked to inflammatory bowel diseases and to the formation of adenomas and ultimately cancerous tumours. Despite a great deal of biological experimentation and observation, precisely how colonic crypts are regulated to produce mature colonocytes remains unclear. To assist in understanding how cell organisation in crypts is achieved, two very different conceptual models of cell behaviour are developed here, referred to as the ‘pedigree’ and the ‘niche’ models. The pedigree model proposes that crypt cells are largely preprogrammed and receive minimal prompting from the environment as they move through a routine of cell differentiation and proliferation to become mature colonocytes. The niche model proposes that crypt cells are primarily influenced by the local microenvironments along the crypt, and that predetermined cell behaviour plays a negligible role in their development. In this paper we present a computational model of colonic crypts in the mouse, which enables a comparison of the quality and controllability of mature coloncyte production by crypts operating under these two contrasting conceptual models of crypt regulation. PMID:24069177

  5. Mensenchymal stem cells can delay radiation-induced crypt death: impact on intestinal CD44(+) fragments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yu; Jin, Xing; Jiang, Yi-Yao; Wang, Li-Xian; Liu, Yong-Jun; Wang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Intestinal stem cells are primitive cells found within the intestinal epithelium that play a central role in maintaining epithelial homeostasis through self-renewal and commitment into functional epithelial cells. Several markers are available to identify intestinal stem cells, such as Lgr5, CD24 and EphB2, which can be used to sort intestinal stem cells from mammalian gut. Here, we identify and isolate intestinal stem cells from C57BL/6 mice by using a cell surface antigen, CD44. In vitro, some CD44(+) crypt cells are capable of forming "villus-crypt"-like structures (organoids). A subset strongly positive for CD44 expresses high levels of intestinal stem-cell-related genes, including Lgr5, Bmi1, Hopx, Lrig1, Ascl2, Smoc2 and Rnf43. Cells from this subset are more capable of developing into organoids in vitro, compared with the subset weakly positive for CD44. However, the organoids are sensitive to ionizing irradiation. We investigate the specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in protecting organoids against radiation-induced crypt death. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, the crypt domains of irradiated organoids possess more proliferative cells and fewer apoptotic cells than those not co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Cd44v6 continues to be expressed in the crypt domains of irradiated organoids co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in delaying radiation-induced crypt death in vitro.

  6. A mathematical model of the colon crypt capturing compositional dynamic interactions between cell types

    PubMed Central

    Smallbone, Kieran; Corfe, Bernard M

    2014-01-01

    Models of the development and early progression of colorectal cancer are based upon understanding the cycle of stem cell turnover, proliferation, differentiation and death. Existing crypt compartmental models feature a linear pathway of cell types, with little regulatory mechanism. Previous work has shown that there are perturbations in the enteroendocrine cell population of macroscopically normal crypts, a compartment not included in existing models. We show that existing models do not adequately recapitulate the dynamics of cell fate pathways in the crypt. We report the progressive development, iterative testing and fitting of a developed compartmental model with additional cell types, and which includes feedback mechanisms and cross-regulatory mechanisms between cell types. The fitting of the model to existing data sets suggests a need to invoke cross-talk between cell types as a feature of colon crypt cycle models. PMID:24354351

  7. Computational Models Reveal a Passive Mechanism for Cell Migration in the Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sara-Jane; Näthke, Inke S.; Osborne, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration in the intestinal crypt is essential for the regular renewal of the epithelium, and the continued upward movement of cells is a key characteristic of healthy crypt dynamics. However, the driving force behind this migration is unknown. Possibilities include mitotic pressure, active movement driven by motility cues, or negative pressure arising from cell loss at the crypt collar. It is possible that a combination of factors together coordinate migration. Here, three different computational models are used to provide insight into the mechanisms that underpin cell movement in the crypt, by examining the consequence of eliminating cell division on cell movement. Computational simulations agree with existing experimental results, confirming that migration can continue in the absence of mitosis. Importantly, however, simulations allow us to infer mechanisms that are sufficient to generate cell movement, which is not possible through experimental observation alone. The results produced by the three models agree and suggest that cell loss due to apoptosis and extrusion at the crypt collar relieves cell compression below, allowing cells to expand and move upwards. This finding suggests that future experiments should focus on the role of apoptosis and cell extrusion in controlling cell migration in the crypt. PMID:24260407

  8. Colon Stem Cell and Crypt Dynamics Exposed by Cell Lineage Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Elbaz, Judith; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Segev, Elad; Shlush, Liran I.; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell dynamics in vivo are often being studied by lineage tracing methods. Our laboratory has previously developed a retrospective method for reconstructing cell lineage trees from somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites. This method was applied here to explore different aspects of stem cell dynamics in the mouse colon without the use of stem cell markers. We first demonstrated the reliability of our method for the study of stem cells by confirming previously established facts, and then we addressed open questions. Our findings confirmed that colon crypts are monoclonal and that, throughout adulthood, the process of monoclonal conversion plays a major role in the maintenance of crypts. The absence of immortal strand mechanism in crypts stem cells was validated by the age-dependent accumulation of microsatellite mutations. In addition, we confirmed the positive correlation between physical and lineage proximity of crypts, by showing that the colon is separated into small domains that share a common ancestor. We gained new data demonstrating that colon epithelium is clustered separately from hematopoietic and other cell types, indicating that the colon is constituted of few progenitors and ruling out significant renewal of colonic epithelium from hematopoietic cells during adulthood. Overall, our study demonstrates the reliability of cell lineage reconstruction for the study of stem cell dynamics, and it further addresses open questions in colon stem cells. In addition, this method can be applied to study stem cell dynamics in other systems. PMID:21829376

  9. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Nobukatsu; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Ryohei; Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  10. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A.; Byrne, Helen M.; Maini, Philip K.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Pin, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.—Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. PMID:27811059

  11. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    PubMed

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

  12. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae exploits cytokeratin 18-positive epithelial cells of porcine tonsillar crypts as an invasion gateway.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Eguchi, Masahiro; Shi, Fang; Sato, Masumi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2013-06-15

    Tonsils are important organs for mucosal immunity and are gateways for various pathogens, including bacteria and viruses. The purpose of the present study was to reveal how Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the causative agent of swine erysipelas, invades the mucosal epithelium of the tonsils of pigs. Two germ-free piglets were orally infected with E. rhusiopathiae Koganei 65-0.15, an attenuated vaccine strain in Japan, and their tonsils of the soft palate were histologically examined four weeks after infection. Bacterial organisms were observed in dilated crypt lumens and a few epithelial cells of the crypt. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that some epithelial cells of the crypt were positive for cytokeratin (CK) 18, a specific marker for M cells in the Peyer's patches of pigs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that bacterial antigens were present in the cytoplasm of CK 18-positive epithelial cells. Furthermore, an ultramicroscopic examination revealed that the bacteria-containing epithelial cells did not have microfolds or microvilli, both of which are characteristic of membranous epithelial cells (M cells), and that they were in close contact with intraepithelial phagocytes. Thus, the present observations suggest that the tonsillar crypt epithelium is a site of persistent infection for orally administered E. rhusiopathiae, and the bacteria exploit cytokeratin 18-positive epithelial cells of the crypts as portals of entry into the body.

  13. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-01

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5+ cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5-Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5+ cells in the upper part of the niche (termed `border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed `central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5+ cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  14. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging.

    PubMed

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Simons, Benjamin D; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-20

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5(+) cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5- Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5(+) cells in the upper part of the niche (termed 'border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed 'central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5(+) cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  15. The effect of hyperthermia on the radiation response of crypt cells in mouse jejunum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia and/or gamma-radiation on the survival of intestinal crypt cells was studied in BDF sub 1 mice using a microcolony assay. Hyperthermia treatments, which in themselves caused no detectable cell lethality, inhibited the capacity of crypt cells to repair sublethal radiation damage. In addition, heat applied either before or after single radiation exposures potentiated lethal damage to crypt cells; the degree of enhancement was dependent on the time interval between treatments. At the levels of heating employed, DNA synthesis in the intestinal epithelium was significantly reduced immediately following exposure, but returned rapidly to normal levels. No further disturbances in cellular kinetics were observed for up to 10 days after heating.

  16. Modelling the spatio-temporal cell dynamics reveals novel insights on cell differentiation and proliferation in the small intestinal crypt.

    PubMed

    Pin, Carmen; Watson, Alastair J M; Carding, Simon R

    2012-01-01

    We developed a slow structural relaxation model to describe cellular dynamics in the crypt of the mouse small intestine. Cells are arranged in a three dimensional spiral the size of which dynamically changes according to cell production demands of adjacent villi. Cell differentiation and proliferation is regulated through Wnt and Notch signals, the strength of which depends on the local cell composition. The highest level of Wnt activity is associated with maintaining equipotent stem cells (SC), Paneth cells and common goblet-Paneth cell progenitors (CGPCPs) intermingling at the crypt bottom. Low levels of Wnt signalling area are associated with stem cells giving rise to secretory cells (CGPCPs, enteroendocrine or Tuft cells) and proliferative absorptive progenitors. Deciding between these two fates, secretory and stem/absorptive cells, depends on Notch signalling. Our model predicts that Notch signalling inhibits secretory fate if more than 50% of cells they are in contact with belong to the secretory lineage. CGPCPs under high Wnt signalling will differentiate into Paneth cells while those migrating out from the crypt bottom differentiate into goblet cells. We have assumed that mature Paneth cells migrating upwards undergo anoikis. Structural relaxation explains the localisation of Paneth cells to the crypt bottom in the absence of active forces. The predicted crypt generation time from one SC is 4-5 days with 10-12 days needed to reach a structural steady state. Our predictions are consistent with experimental observations made under altered Wnt and Notch signalling. Mutations affecting stem cells located at the crypt floor have a 50% chance of being propagated throughout the crypt while mutations in cells above are rarely propagated. The predicted recovery time of an injured crypt losing half of its cells is approximately 2 days.

  17. Modelling the Spatio-Temporal Cell Dynamics Reveals Novel Insights on Cell Differentiation and Proliferation in the Small Intestinal Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Carmen; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Carding, Simon R.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a slow structural relaxation model to describe cellular dynamics in the crypt of the mouse small intestine. Cells are arranged in a three dimensional spiral the size of which dynamically changes according to cell production demands of adjacent villi. Cell differentiation and proliferation is regulated through Wnt and Notch signals, the strength of which depends on the local cell composition. The highest level of Wnt activity is associated with maintaining equipotent stem cells (SC), Paneth cells and common goblet-Paneth cell progenitors (CGPCPs) intermingling at the crypt bottom. Low levels of Wnt signalling area are associated with stem cells giving rise to secretory cells (CGPCPs, enteroendocrine or Tuft cells) and proliferative absorptive progenitors. Deciding between these two fates, secretory and stem/absorptive cells, depends on Notch signalling. Our model predicts that Notch signalling inhibits secretory fate if more than 50% of cells they are in contact with belong to the secretory lineage. CGPCPs under high Wnt signalling will differentiate into Paneth cells while those migrating out from the crypt bottom differentiate into goblet cells. We have assumed that mature Paneth cells migrating upwards undergo anoikis. Structural relaxation explains the localisation of Paneth cells to the crypt bottom in the absence of active forces. The predicted crypt generation time from one SC is 4–5 days with 10–12 days needed to reach a structural steady state. Our predictions are consistent with experimental observations made under altered Wnt and Notch signalling. Mutations affecting stem cells located at the crypt floor have a 50% chance of being propagated throughout the crypt while mutations in cells above are rarely propagated. The predicted recovery time of an injured crypt losing half of its cells is approximately 2 days. PMID:22623982

  18. Interplay between metabolic identities in the intestinal crypt supports stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colman, Maria J; Schewe, Matthias; Meerlo, Maaike; Stigter, Edwin; Gerrits, Johan; Pras-Raves, Mia; Sacchetti, Andrea; Hornsveld, Marten; Oost, Koen C; Snippert, Hugo J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda; Fodde, Riccardo; Burgering, Boudewijn M T

    2017-03-16

    The small intestinal epithelium self-renews every four or five days. Intestinal stem cells (Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar cells (CBCs)) sustain this renewal and reside between terminally differentiated Paneth cells at the bottom of the intestinal crypt. Whereas the signalling requirements for maintaining stem cell function and crypt homeostasis have been well studied, little is known about how metabolism contributes to epithelial homeostasis. Here we show that freshly isolated Lgr5(+) CBCs and Paneth cells from the mouse small intestine display different metabolic programs. Compared to Paneth cells, Lgr5(+) CBCs display high mitochondrial activity. Inhibition of mitochondrial activity in Lgr5(+) CBCs or inhibition of glycolysis in Paneth cells strongly affects stem cell function, as indicated by impaired organoid formation. In addition, Paneth cells support stem cell function by providing lactate to sustain the enhanced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the Lgr5(+) CBCs. Mechanistically, we show that oxidative phosphorylation stimulates p38 MAPK activation by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species signalling, thereby establishing the mature crypt phenotype. Together, our results reveal a critical role for the metabolic identity of Lgr5(+) CBCs and Paneth cells in supporting optimal stem cell function, and we identify mitochondria and reactive oxygen species signalling as a driving force of cellular differentiation.

  19. Ballroom dancing with stem cells: placement and displacement in the intestinal crypt.

    PubMed

    Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2014-03-06

    Intestinal homeostasis is dependent upon stem cells that reside in the intestinal crypt, although the identity and dynamics of this population are unclear. Ritsma et al. (2014) recently reported temporal live imaging of mouse intestinal stem cells and their progeny, providing insights into spatial dynamics underlying stem cell behavior.

  20. Crypt cell production rate in the small intestine of the zinc-supplemented mouse.

    PubMed

    Duff, Michael; Ettarh, Rajunor R

    2002-01-01

    Zinc is a trace element which is necessary in the body and the daily requirement is usually provided mainly through food intake. The effects of zinc deficiency are multisystemic and in the gastrointestinal tract include ulceration and inflammation. Many of these effects in the mammalian small intestine are reversible by zinc replenishment in a manner that is thought to be linked to the effect of this element on intestinal mucosal cell kinetics. However, the effects of continued replenishment (supplementation) have not been closely examined. This study examined the effects of zinc supplementation on gut crypt cell production in zinc-replete animals. Fifteen CD-1 mice were given zinc sulphate (0.3 mmol/l) in tap water while a second (control) group of 15 mice received only tap water. After 14 days, the small intestine was removed, measured and divided into four equal lengths and then sampled at the midpoint of each of the resulting four segments. Whole crypt numbers and crypt cell production rate were determined for each intestinal site for both groups of mice. While crypt dimensions and crypt numbers in zinc-fed mice showed no significant change from control levels, the crypt cell production in zinc-fed mice was significantly increased and duration of mitosis reduced in the third (distal) intestinal segment when compared to values from control mice. These findings show that the addition of subtoxic quantities of zinc to diet in zinc-replete animals enhances cell production and indicate that the reversal of zinc deficiency-induced gut damage following dietary zinc replenishment may be due to a direct effect on cell kinetics. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in five painted storks.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martha A; Terrell, Scott P; Neiffer, Donald L; Miller, Michele A; Mangold, Barbara J

    2002-08-01

    Five painted storks were treated with fenbendazole for 5 days for internal parasitism. Four birds died following treatment. Profound heteropenia was a consistent finding in all samples evaluated; additionally, the 1 surviving bird had progressive anemia. Consistent necropsy findings in the 4 birds that died were small intestinal crypt cell necrosis and severe bone marrow depletion and necrosis. Fenbendazole has been associated with bone marrow hypoplasia and enteric damage in mammals and other species of birds. The dosages of fenbendazole used in birds are often substantially higher than those recommended for mammals, which may contribute to bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in birds.

  2. No evidence for cell-to-cell coupling in rat colonic crypts: studies with Lucifer Yellow and with photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, C; Leipziger, J; Nitschke, R; Ricken, S; Greger, R

    1998-06-01

    Epithelial cells of exocrine glands (pancreas, lacrimal glands, salivary glands, sweat glands and gastric glands) are intimately linked together by gap junctions. Due to this close junctional coupling exocrine secretion occurs as the well concerted effort of a cell population. Colonic crypts have, on the one hand, anatomical and functional properties resembling those of exocrine glands (mostly crypt base cells) and, on the other hand, properties of absorbing cells (mostly surface cells). In the mid-crypt, depending on the functional status, absorption and secretion can occur. The present study was aimed at examining whether rat distal colonic crypt cells co-ordinate their functional status by cell-to-cell coupling. Two types of measurements were performed: as an independent assessment of cell viability the membrane voltage (Vm) was measured with the fast whole-cell patch-clamp technique; to investigate cellular coupling simultaneously Lucifer Yellow (LY) (mol. wt. 443) distribution was visualized using digital video imaging. LY (500 micromol/l) was included into the patch pipette filling solution. The recorded Vm was -73.4+/-2.3 mV in crypt base cells (n=15), -63.7+/-2.1 mV in mid-crypt cells (n=17) and -52.3+/-2. 9 mV in crypt surface cells. All cells tested reversibly responded to carbachol (100 micromol/l) with a persistent hyperpolarization, as previously shown. Activation of Cl- secretion by elevation of the cAMP concentration with forskolin (5 micromol/l) led to a reversible depolarization. Throughout the duration of each individual experiment [mean experimental time in basal cells: 18.3+/-2.5 min (n=15), in mid-crypt cells: 19.6+/-3.4 min (n=17) and in crypt surface cells: 11.7+/-3.4 min (n=13)] LY dye distribution was solely confined to the patched cell. In addition bleaching of calcein fluorescence in laser scan microscopy was not followed by dye back diffusion, whereas this was clearly the case in pancreatic acini (n=5). These data indicate that colonic

  3. Reg4+ deep crypt secretory cells function as epithelial niche for Lgr5+ stem cells in colon

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Sachs, Norman; Wiebrands, Kay; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Fumagalli, Arianna; Lyubimova, Anna; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan H.; Karthaus, Wouter R.; Li, Vivian S. W.; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peters, Peter J.; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5+) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5+ stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt secretory (DCS) cells are intermingled with Lgr5+ stem cells at crypt bottoms. Here, we report regenerating islet-derived family member 4 (Reg4) as a marker of DCS cells. To investigate a niche function, we eliminated DCS cells by using the diphtheria-toxin receptor gene knocked into the murine Reg4 locus. Ablation of DCS cells results in loss of stem cells from colonic crypts and disrupts gut homeostasis and colon organoid growth. In agreement, sorted Reg4+ DCS cells promote organoid formation of single Lgr5+ colon stem cells. DCS cells can be massively produced from Lgr5+ colon stem cells in vitro by combined Notch inhibition and Wnt activation. We conclude that Reg4+ DCS cells serve as Paneth cell equivalents in the colon crypt niche. PMID:27573849

  4. Crypt stem cell survival in the mouse intestinal epithelium is regulated by prostaglandins synthesized through cyclooxygenase-1.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, S M; Schloemann, S; Tessner, T; Seibert, K; Stenson, W F

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are important mediators of epithelial integrity and function in the gastrointestinal tract. Relatively little is known, however, about the mechanism by which PGs affect stem cells in the intestine during normal epithelial turnover, or during wound repair. PGs are synthesized from arachidonate by either of two cyclooxygenases, cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1) or cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), which are present in a wide variety of mamalian cells. Cox-1 is thought to be a constitutively expressed enzyme, and the expression of Cox-2 is inducible by cytokines or other stimuli in a variety of cell types. We investigated the role of PGs in mouse intestinal stem cell survival and proliferation following radiation injury. The number of surviving crypt stem cells was determined 3.5 d after irradiation by the microcolony assay. Radiation injury induced a dose-dependent decrease in the number of surviving crypts. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of Cox-1 and Cox-2, further reduced the number of surviving crypts in irradiated mice. The indomethacin dose response for inhibition of PGE2 production and reduction of crypt survival were similar. DimethylPGE2 reversed the indomethacin-induced decrease in crypt survival. Selective Cox-2 inhibitors had no effect on crypt survival. PGE2, Cox-1 mRNA, and Cox-1 protein levels all increase in the 3 d after irradiation. Immunohistochemistry for Cox-1 demonstrated localization in epithelial cells of the crypt in the unirradiated mouse, and in the regenerating crypt epithelium in the irradiated mouse. We conclude that radiation injury results in increased Cox-1 levels in crypt stem cells and their progeny, and that PGE2 produced through Cox-1 promotes crypt stem cell survival and proliferation. PMID:9077547

  5. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureban, Sripathi M.; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis. PMID:26270561

  6. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Beaulieu@USherbrooke.ca

    2006-03-31

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells.

  7. Organization of the crypt-villus axis and evolution of its stem cell hierarchy during intestinal development.

    PubMed

    Hermiston, M L; Gordon, J I

    1995-05-01

    The small intestinal crypt of the adult mouse represents a model system for studying cell renewal. One or more functionally equivalent stem cells located within the crypt fuel a continuous regeneration of the gut's four principal epithelial cell lineages. These lineages differentiate during a geographically well-organized migration along the crypt-villus axis. This axis does not complete its morphogenetic program until the third postnatal week. We examined the organization of the crypt-villus axis and its stem cell hierarchy in postnatal day 1 (P1) to P28 transgenic mice. These mice contained transcriptional regulatory elements from the liver fatty acid binding protein gene linked to a human growth hormone (hGH) reporter. Adult male and female animals exhibit a striped pattern of hGH accumulation in their villus-associated epithelial cells: vertical coherent bands of wholly hGH-positive epithelial cells derived from a monoclonal crypt and vertical coherent stripes of wholly hGH-negative epithelial cells derived from an adjacent crypt extend to the apical extrusion zone of their common villus. Villus striping develops in a proximal-to-distal wave that extends from the duodenum to the jejunum by P7 and to the ileum by P14. Striping occurs as a result of a loss in the ability to support transgene expression. The decision appears to affect all cells within a stripe, irrespective of their position along the basilar-to-apical axis of a villus, suggesting that it is programmed by the nascent crypt's multipotent stem cell(s). Suppression of transgene expression traverses the crypt-villus axis more rapidly than the rate of epithelial cell migration. The boundary between stripes is very sharp and does not contain cells with transitional levels of the hGH reporter, indicating that the epithelial components of the crypt-villus axis have a higher degree of organization at this stage of development than appreciated previously.

  8. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  9. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Wright, Gus A.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2 transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5+ stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  10. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Wright, Gus A; Safe, Stephen; Chapkin, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5(+) stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Polyethylene glycol, unique among laxatives, suppresses aberrant crypt foci, by elimination of cells

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Sylviane; Parnaud, Géraldine; Van Beek, Erik; Corpet, Denis E.

    2006-01-01

    Background Polyethylene glycol (PEG), an osmotic laxative, is a very potent inhibitor of colon cancer in rats. In a search for mechanisms, we tested the hypothesis that fecal bulking and moisture decreases colon carcinogenesis. We also looked for PEG effects on crypt cells in vivo. Methods Fischer 344 rats (N=272) were given an injection of the colon carcinogen azoxymethane. They were then randomized to a standard AIN76 diet containing one of 19 laxative agents (5% w/w in most cases): PEG 8000 and other PEG-like compounds, carboxymethylcellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone, sodium polyacrylate, calcium polycarbophil, karaya gum, psyllium, mannitol, sorbitol, lactulose, propylene glycol, magnesium hydroxide, sodium phosphate, bisacodyl, docusate, and paraffin oil. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and fecal values were measured blindly after a 30-day treatment. Proliferation, apoptosis, and the removal of cells from crypts were studied in control and PEG-fed rats by various methods, including TUNEL and fluorescein dextran labeling. Results PEG 8000 reduced nine-fold the number of ACF in rats (p<0.001). The other PEGs and magnesium-hydroxide modestly suppressed ACF, but not the other laxatives. ACF number did not correlate with fecal weight or moisture. PEG doubled the apoptotic bodies per crypt (p<0.05), increased proliferation by 25–50% (p<0.05) and strikingly increased (>40-fold) a fecal marker of epitheliolysis in the gut (p<0.001). PEG normalized the percentage of fluorescein dextran labeled cells on the top of ACF (p<0.001). Conclusions Among laxatives, only PEG afforded potent chemoprevention. PEG protection was not due to increased fecal bulking, but likely to the elimination of cells from precancerous lesions. PMID:16716974

  12. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M. Agostina; Mah, Amanda T.; Krebs, Adrienne E.; Dehmer, Jeffrey J.; McNaughton, Kirk K.; Helmrath, Michael A.; Magness, Scott T.; Lund, P. Kay

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has potent trophic effects on normal or injured intestinal epithelium, but specific effects on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are undefined. We used Sox9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter mice that permit analyses of both actively cycling ISCs (Sox9-EGFPLow) and reserve/facultative ISCs (Sox9-EGFPHigh) to study IGF1 action on ISCs in normal intestine or during crypt regeneration after high-dose radiation-induced injury. We hypothesized that IGF1 differentially regulates proliferation and gene expression in actively cycling and reserve/facultative ISCs. IGF1 was delivered for 5 days using subcutaneously implanted mini-pumps in uninjured mice or after 14 Gy abdominal radiation. ISC numbers, proliferation, and transcriptome were assessed. IGF1 increased epithelial growth in nonirradiated mice and enhanced crypt regeneration after radiation. In uninjured and regenerating intestines, IGF1 increased total numbers of Sox9-EGFPLow ISCs and percentage of these cells in M-phase. IGF1 increased percentages of Sox9-EGFPHigh ISCs in S-phase but did not expand this population. Microarray revealed that IGF1 activated distinct gene expression signatures in the 2 Sox9-EGFP ISC populations. In vitro IGF1 enhanced enteroid formation by Sox9-EGFPHigh facultative ISCs but not Sox9-EGFPLow actively cycling ISCs. Our data provide new evidence that IGF1 activates 2 ISC populations via distinct regulatory pathways to promote growth of normal intestinal epithelium and crypt regeneration after irradiation.—Van Landeghem, L., Santoro, M. A., Mah, A. T., Krebs, A. E., Dehmer, J. J., McNaughton, K. K., Helmrath, M. A., Magness, S. T., Lund, P. K. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations. PMID:25837582

  13. Jejunal enteropathy associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: quantitative histology.

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P A; Miller, A R; Forster, S M; Harris, J R; Pinching, A J; Griffin, G E

    1989-01-01

    Jejunal biopsy specimens from 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive male homosexual patients were analysed and compared with those of a control group to determine whether the abnormalities were caused by the virus or by opportunistic infection. The degree of villous atrophy was estimated with a Weibel eyepiece graticule, and this correlated strongly with the degree of crypt hyperplasia, which was assessed by deriving the mean number of enterocytes in the crypts. The density of villous intraepithelial lymphocytes fell largely within the normal range, either when expressed in relation to the number of villous enterocytes or in relation to the length of muscularis mucosae. Villous enterocytes showed mild non-specific abnormalities. Pathogens were sought in biopsy sections and in faeces. Crypt hyperplastic villous atrophy occurred at all clinical stages of HIV disease and in the absence of detectable enteropathogens. An analogy was drawn between HIV enteropathy and the small bowel changes seen in experimental graft-versus-host disease. It is suggested that the pathogenesis of villous atrophy is similar in the two states, the damage to the jejunal mucosa in HIV enteropathy being inflicted by an immune reaction mounted in the lamina propria against cells infected with HIV. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2703544

  14. Smad3 contributes to positioning of proliferating cells in colonic crypts by inducing EphB receptor protein expression

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Sato, Toru; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Noguchi, Yoshiko; Tokumasa, Atsuko; Yokote, Kotaro; Yokosuka, Osamu; Saito, Yasushi

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Smad3{sup -/-} mice showed an increased number of proliferating epithelial cells in colonic crypts. {yields} Proliferating epithelial cells showed activated Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. {yields} Smad3{sup -/-} mice also showed intermingling of proliferating cells with differentiated cells. {yields} Loss of EphB receptor expression was observed in the colonic crypts of Smad3{sup -/-} mice. {yields} Loss of EphB receptor expression is likely responsible for cell intermingling. -- Abstract: Deficiency of Smad3, an intracellular mediator of TGF-{beta}, was shown to significantly accelerate re-epithelialization of the colonic mucosa. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which Smad3 controls colonic epithelial cell proliferation and crypt formation. Smad3{sup ex8/ex8} C57BL/6 mice were used in this study and wild-type littermates served as controls. The number of proliferating cells in the isolated colonic epithelium of Smad3{sup -/-} mice was significantly increased compared to that in wild-type littermates. Protein levels of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27 were significantly decreased, while that of c-Myc was increased in the isolated colonic epithelium from Smad3{sup -/-} mice. In the colonic tissue of wild-type mice, cell proliferation was restricted to the bottom of the crypts in accordance with nuclear {beta}-catenin staining, whereas proliferating cells were located throughout the crypts in Smad3{sup -/-} mice in accordance with nuclear {beta}-catenin staining, suggesting that Smad3 is essential for locating proliferating cells at the bottom of the colonic crypts. Notably, in Smad3{sup -/-} mice, there was loss of EphB2 and EphB3 receptor protein expression, critical regulators of proliferating cell positioning, while EphB receptor protein expression was confirmed at the bottom of the colonic crypts in wild-type mice. These observations indicated that disturbance of the EphB/ephrin B system brings

  15. Inhibition of Notch signaling reduces the number of surviving Dclk1+ reserve crypt epithelial stem cells following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dongfeng; May, Randal; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Li, Linheng; Barrett, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1) is a putative intestinal stem cell (ISC) marker. In this report, we evaluated the use of Dclk1 as a marker of surviving ISCs in response to treatment with high-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Both apoptotic and mitotic Dclk1+ cells were observed 24 h post-TBI associated with a corresponding loss of intestinal crypts observed at 84 h post-TBI. Although the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating proliferation and lineage commitment within the intestine, its role in ISC function in response to severe genotoxic injury is not yet fully understood. We employed the microcolony assay to functionally assess the effects of Notch inhibition with difluorophenacetyl-l-alanyl-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) on intestinal crypt stem cell survival following severe (>8 Gy) radiation injury. Following treatment with DAPT, we observed a nearly 50% reduction in the number of surviving Dclk1+ crypt epithelial cells at 24 h after TBI and similar reduction in the number of surviving small intestinal crypts at 84 h. These data indicate that inhibition of Notch signaling decreases ISC survival following radiation injury, suggesting that the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in ISC-mediated crypt regeneration. These results also suggest that crypt epithelial cell Dclk1 expression can be used as one potential marker to evaluate the early survival of ISCs following severe radiation injury. PMID:24368703

  16. Caco-2 cells - expression, regulation and function of drug transporters compared with human jejunal tissue.

    PubMed

    Brück, S; Strohmeier, J; Busch, D; Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2017-03-01

    Induction or inhibition of drug transporting proteins by concomitantly administered drugs can cause serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, in vitro assays currently available are mostly for studying the inhibitory potential of drugs on intestinal transporter proteins, rather than induction. Therefore, this study investigated the suitability of the frequently used intestinal Caco-2 cell line to predict transporter-mediated DDIs as caused by induction via activation of nuclear receptors. TaqMan® low density arrays and LC-MS/MS based targeted proteomics were used to evaluate transporter expression in Caco-2 cells in comparison with jejunal tissue, in culture-time dependence studies and after incubation with different known inducers of drug metabolism and transport. Additionally, studies on ABCB1 function were performed using Transwell® assays with [(3) H]-digoxin and [(3) H]-talinolol as substrates after incubation with the prototypical inducers rifampicin, St John's wort, carbamazepine and efavirenz. The gene and protein expression pattern of drug transporters in Caco-2 cells and jejunal tissue differed considerably. For some transporters culture-time dependent differences in mRNA expression and/or protein abundance could be determined. Finally, none of the studied prototypical inducers showed an effect either on mRNA expression and protein abundance or on the function of ABCB1. Differences in transporter expression in Caco-2 cells compared with jejunal tissue, as well as expression dependence on culture time must be considered in in vitro studies to avoid under- or overestimation of certain transporters. The Caco-2 cell model is not suitable for the evaluation of DDIs caused by transporter induction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. De Novo Formation of Insulin-Producing “Neo-β Cell Islets” from Intestinal Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Weinblatt, Daniel; Emmett, Matthew J.; Tameire, Feven; Yousefi, Maryam; Yang, Chenghua; Maehr, Rene; Zhou, Qiao; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval; Li, Changhong; Spence, Jason R.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to interconvert terminally differentiated cells could serve as a powerful tool for cell-based treatment of degenerative diseases, including diabetes mellitus. To determine which, if any, adult tissues are competent to activate an islet β cell program, we performed an in vivo screen by expressing three β cell “reprogramming factors” in a wide spectrum of tissues. We report that transient intestinal expression of these factors—Pdx1, MafA, and Ngn3 (PMN)—promotes rapid conversion of intestinal crypt cells into endocrine cells, which coalesce into “neoislets” below the crypt base. Neoislet cells express insulin and show ultrastructural features of β cells. Importantly, intestinal neoislets are glucose-responsive and able to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Moreover, PMN expression in human intestinal “organoids” stimulates the conversion of intestinal epithelial cells into β-like cells. Our results thus demonstrate that the intestine is an accessible and abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells. PMID:24613355

  18. Quantitative analysis of crypt cell population during postnatal development of the olfactory organ of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata (Teleostei, Poecilidae), from birth to sexual maturity.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Simone; Lazzari, Maurizio; Franceschini, Valeria

    2012-08-01

    Crypt cells are one of three types of olfactory sensory neuron, differing from ciliated and microvillar cells in shape, localization and number, and found only in fish. Although crypt cells are morphologically well characterized, their function remains unclear. They were hypothesized to be involved in reproductive behaviours by detecting sex pheromones, but electrophysiological investigations revealed sensitivity to only amino acids. However, the number of crypt cells in adult guppies is not the same in the two sexes. In this study, we compared the size of the crypt cell population in juvenile guppies during the first 90 days after birth. The purpose of our study was to clarify whether a correlation exists between sex and the number of these olfactory neurons. The data show that guppies reach adult crypt cell density when they become sexually mature. Despite a constant increment in volume during development of the olfactory organ, the minimum density of crypt neurons occurs at ~45 days. Moreover, in the early weeks, the density of crypt neurons is greater in males than in females because in females the total number of cells decreases significantly after just 7 days. In adults, however, crypt neurons are found in higher density in females than in males. These findings suggest that the number of crypt cells is sex specific, with independent developmental dynamics between males and females. A role in pheromone detection could explain such a difference, but the early appearance of crypt cells in the first days of life is suggestive of other, not sexually related, functions.

  19. Influence of dietary supplementation with flaxseed and lactobacilli on the mucosal morphology and proliferative cell rate in the jejunal mucosa of piglets after weaning.

    PubMed

    Jonecova, Zuzana; Toth, Stefan; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Nemcova, Radomira

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of flaxseed and lactobacilli supplementation to the diet of piglets during the time period between 10 days before and 21 days after weaning. The morphometry of the jejunal mucosa and proliferative ratio of both epithelial and lamina propria cells were compared with those found in a group of piglets fed with the usual diet added with sunflower oil during the same time period. The addition of flaxseed oil to the diet significantly increased the crypt depth in comparison with both groups supplemented with sunflower (P < 0.05 and 0.001 respectively) on the weaning day. Moreover, the flaxseed addition caused a significant decrease in villus height (P < 0.01) and crypt depth (P < 0.01) 21 days postweaning in comparison with the sunflower group. The proliferative ratio of the epithelial cells in the sunflower group on the weaning day was significantly higher than in both flaxseed groups (P < 0.01). Paradoxically, significantly higher proliferative activity in the mucosal connective tissue in the group with flaxseed supplementation in comparison with the sunflower group was observed on the day of weaning, as well as 3 days later (P < 0.05 both). A combination of flaxseed with lactobacilli showed significantly lower proliferative activity in the connective tissue cells from weaning up to 7 days after weaning (P < 0.05 all) in comparison with the flaxseed group.

  20. Influence of dietary supplementation with flaxseed and lactobacilli on the mucosal morphology and proliferative cell rate in the jejunal mucosa of piglets after weaning

    PubMed Central

    Jonecova, Zuzana; Toth, Stefan; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Nemcova, Radomira

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of flaxseed and lactobacilli supplementation to the diet of piglets during the time period between 10 days before and 21 days after weaning. The morphometry of the jejunal mucosa and proliferative ratio of both epithelial and lamina propria cells were compared with those found in a group of piglets fed with the usual diet added with sunflower oil during the same time period. The addition of flaxseed oil to the diet significantly increased the crypt depth in comparison with both groups supplemented with sunflower (P < 0.05 and 0.001 respectively) on the weaning day. Moreover, the flaxseed addition caused a significant decrease in villus height (P < 0.01) and crypt depth (P < 0.01) 21 days postweaning in comparison with the sunflower group. The proliferative ratio of the epithelial cells in the sunflower group on the weaning day was significantly higher than in both flaxseed groups (P < 0.01). Paradoxically, significantly higher proliferative activity in the mucosal connective tissue in the group with flaxseed supplementation in comparison with the sunflower group was observed on the day of weaning, as well as 3 days later (P < 0.05 both). A combination of flaxseed with lactobacilli showed significantly lower proliferative activity in the connective tissue cells from weaning up to 7 days after weaning (P < 0.05 all) in comparison with the flaxseed group. PMID:25929724

  1. Signaling and epigenetic mechanisms of intestinal stem cells and progenitors: insight into crypt homeostasis, plasticity, and niches.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan J; Rao-Bhatia, Abilasha; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2017-09-01

    The rapid turnover of intestinal epithelial cells is maintained by a small number of stem cells located in pocket-like gland structures called crypts. While our understanding of the identity and function of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) has rapidly progressed, epigenetic and transcriptional regulation in crypt stem cell and progenitor pools remains an active field of investigation. Surrounded by various types of cells in the stroma, crypt progenitors display high levels of plasticity, harboring the ability to interconvert in the face of epithelial damage. Recent studies analyzing epigenetic patterns of intestinal epithelial cells have provided evidence that plasticity is maintained by a broadly permissive epigenomic state, wherein cell-lineage specification is directed through activation of signaling pathways and transcription factor (TF) expression. New studies also have shown that the ISC niche, which is comprised of surrounding epithelial and mesenchymal tissues, plays a crucial role in supporting the maintenance and differentiation of stem cells by providing contextual information in the form of signaling cascades, such as Wnt, Notch, and Hippo. These cascades ultimately govern TF expression to promote early cell-lineage decisions in both crypt stem cells and progenitors. Highlighting recent studies investigating signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms of intestinal epithelial cells, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying crypt homeostasis, plasticity, and niches. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e281. doi: 10.1002/wdev.281 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Unraveling intestinal stem cell behavior with models of crypt dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Alexis J.; Samuelson, Linda C.; Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The definition, regulation and function of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) has been hotly debated. Recent discoveries have started to clarify the nature of ISCs, but many questions remain. This review discusses the current advances and controversies of ISC biology as well as theoretical compartmental models that have been coupled with in vivo experimentation to investigate the mechanisms of ISC dynamics during homeostasis, tumorigenesis, repair and development. We conclude our review by discussing the key lingering questions in the field and proposing how many of these questions can be addressed using both compartmental models and experimental techniques. PMID:24480852

  3. HIV enteropathy: comparative morphometry of the jejunal mucosa of HIV infected patients resident in the United Kingdom and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P; Kapembwa, M; Miller, A; Sedgwick, P; Lucas, S; Sewankambo, N; Serwadda, D; Pudney, J; Moody, A; Harris, J; Griffin, G

    1998-01-01

    Aims—To compare jejunal mucosal morphometry in HIV infected patients resident in London and Uganda. 
Patients—Twenty HIV positive patients from London and 16 from Uganda were studied, and compared with HIV negative control subjects from both sites. 
Methods—Stools and biopsy specimens were examined for enteropathogens. Surface area to volume (S:V) ratio was estimated morphometrically, mean crypt length of jejunal biopsy specimens was measured, and HIV infected cells detected immunohistochemically were quantified. 
Results—Enteric pathogens were detected in none of the London patients, and in three Ugandan patients. S:V ratio was lower, and mean crypt length higher, in the specimens of London patients than in normal subjects, but there was no difference in S:V ratio or mean crypt length between Ugandan patients and controls. A negative correlation was present between S:V ratio and mean crypt length in all biopsy specimens analysed. HIV infected cells were detected only in lamina propria. 
Conclusion—Infection of cells in the lamina propria of the jejunum with HIV stimulates crypt cell proliferation, and a fall in villous surface area. The mucosal response to HIV is masked by other pathogens in the African environment. 

 Keywords: HIV; jejunum; AIDS; enteropathy PMID:9863480

  4. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M Agostina; Mah, Amanda T; Krebs, Adrienne E; Dehmer, Jeffrey J; McNaughton, Kirk K; Helmrath, Michael A; Magness, Scott T; Lund, P Kay

    2015-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has potent trophic effects on normal or injured intestinal epithelium, but specific effects on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are undefined. We used Sox9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter mice that permit analyses of both actively cycling ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(Low)) and reserve/facultative ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(High)) to study IGF1 action on ISCs in normal intestine or during crypt regeneration after high-dose radiation-induced injury. We hypothesized that IGF1 differentially regulates proliferation and gene expression in actively cycling and reserve/facultative ISCs. IGF1 was delivered for 5 days using subcutaneously implanted mini-pumps in uninjured mice or after 14 Gy abdominal radiation. ISC numbers, proliferation, and transcriptome were assessed. IGF1 increased epithelial growth in nonirradiated mice and enhanced crypt regeneration after radiation. In uninjured and regenerating intestines, IGF1 increased total numbers of Sox9-EGFP(Low) ISCs and percentage of these cells in M-phase. IGF1 increased percentages of Sox9-EGFP(High) ISCs in S-phase but did not expand this population. Microarray revealed that IGF1 activated distinct gene expression signatures in the 2 Sox9-EGFP ISC populations. In vitro IGF1 enhanced enteroid formation by Sox9-EGFP(High) facultative ISCs but not Sox9-EGFP(Low) actively cycling ISCs. Our data provide new evidence that IGF1 activates 2 ISC populations via distinct regulatory pathways to promote growth of normal intestinal epithelium and crypt regeneration after irradiation.

  5. EP receptor expression in human intestinal epithelium and localization relative to the stem cell zone of the crypts.

    PubMed

    Olsen Hult, Lene Th; Kleiveland, Charlotte R; Fosnes, Kjetil; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence for PGE2 affecting intestinal epithelial proliferation. PGE2 is also reported to be involved in the regulation of growth and differentiation in adult stem cells, both effects mediated by binding to EP-receptors. We have used the Lgr5 as a marker to scrutinize EP-receptor and COX expression in human intestinal epithelial cells with focus on the stem cell area of the crypts. Normal tissue from ileum and colon, but also duodenal biopsies from patients with untreated celiac disease, were investigated by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The combination of fresh flash-frozen tissue and laser microdissection made it possible to isolate RNA from the epithelial cell layer, only. In the small intestine, Lgr5 labels cells are in the +4 position, while in the colon, Lgr5 positive cells are localized to the crypt bottoms. Epithelial crypt cells of normal small intestine expressed neither EP-receptor mRNA nor COX1/2. However, crypt cells in tissue from patients with untreated celiac disease expressed EP2/4 receptor and COX1 mRNA. In the colon, the situation was different. Epithelial crypt cells from normal colon were found to express EP2/4 receptor and COX1/2 transcripts. Thus, there are distinct differences between normal human small intestine and colon with regard to expression of EP2/4 receptors and COX1/2. In normal colon tissue, PGE2-mediated signaling through EP-receptors 2/4 could be involved in regulation of growth and differentiation of the epithelium, while the lack of EP-receptor expression in the small intestinal tissue exclude the possibility of a direct effect of PGE2 on the crypt epithelial cells.

  6. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  7. Identification of a cKit+ Colonic Crypt Base Secretory Cell That Supports Lgr5+ Stem Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Michael E.; Nusse, Ysbrand; Kalisky, Tomer; Lee, John J.; Dalerba, Piero; Scheeren, Ferenc; Lobo, Neethan; Kulkarni, Subhash; Sim, Sopheak; Qian, Dalong; Beachy, Philip A.; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Quake, Stephen R.; Clarke, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Paneth cells contribute to the small intestinal niche of Lgr5+ stem cells. Although the colon also contains Lgr5+ stem cells, it does not contain Paneth cells. We investigated the existence of colonic Paneth-like cells that have a distinct transcriptional signature and support Lgr5+ stem cells. Methods We used multicolor fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate different subregions of colon crypts, based on known markers, from dissociated colonic epithelium of mice. We performed multiplexed single-cell gene expression analysis with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction followed by hierarchical clustering analysis to characterize distinct cell types. We used immunostaining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses with in vivo administration of a Notch inhibitor and in vitro organoid cultures to characterize different cell types. Results Multicolor fluorescence-activated cell sorting could isolate distinct regions of colonic crypts. Four major epithelial subtypes or transcriptional states were revealed by gene expression analysis of selected populations of single cells. One of these, the goblet cells, contained a distinct cKit/CD117+ crypt base subpopulation that expressed Dll1, Dll4, and epidermal growth factor, similar to Paneth cells, which were also marked by cKit. In the colon, cKit+ goblet cells were interdigitated with Lgr5+ stem cells. In vivo, this colonic cKit+ population was regulated by Notch signaling; administration of a γ-secretase inhibitor to mice increased the number of cKit+ cells. When isolated from mouse colon, cKit+ cells promoted formation of organoids from Lgr5+ stem cells, which expressed Kitl/stem cell factor, the ligand for cKit. When organoids were depleted of cKit+ cells using a toxin-conjugated antibody, organoid formation decreased. Conclusions cKit marks small intestinal Paneth cells and a subset of colonic goblet cells that are regulated by Notch signaling and support Lgr5+stem

  8. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  9. Notch receptor regulation of intestinal stem cell homeostasis and crypt regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Alexis J.; Keeley, Theresa M.; Demitrack, Elise S.; Chung, Jooho; Maillard, Ivan; Samuelson, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway regulates intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, including stem cell maintenance, progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Notch1 and Notch2 receptors are expressed in the epithelium, but individual contributions to these functions are unclear. We used genetic deletion to define receptor roles on stem cell function, cell proliferation/differentiation, and repair after injury. Loss of Notch1 induced a transient secretory cell hyperplasia that spontaneously resolved over time. In contrast, deletion of Notch2 had no secretory cell effect. Compound deletions of Notch1 and Notch2 resulted in a more severe secretory cell hyperplasia than deletion of Notch1 alone. Furthermore, only double deletion of Notch1 and Notch2 decreased cell proliferation, suggesting a low threshold for maintenance of proliferation compared to differentiation. Stem cells were affected by deletion of Notch1, with reduced expression of Olfm4 and fewer LGR5+ stem cells. Deletion of Notch2 had no apparent affect on stem cell homeostasis. However, we observed impaired crypt regeneration after radiation in both Notch1- and Notch2-deleted intestine, suggesting that higher Notch activity is required post-injury. These findings suggest that Notch1 is the primary receptor regulating intestinal stem cell function and that Notch1 and Notch2 together regulate epithelial cell proliferation, cell fate determination, and post-injury regeneration. PMID:25835502

  10. Histological and electrophysiological properties of crypt cells from the olfactory epithelium of the marine teleost Trachurus symmetricus.

    PubMed

    Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2006-03-01

    Crypt cells from the olfactory epithelium of the Pacific jack mackerel Trachurus symmetricus were characterized by light and electron microscopy and analyzed in dissociation with the patch-clamp technique in its cell-attached, perforated patch and normal whole-cell mode. Isolated crypt cells remained united with their supporting cells, and both were electrically coupled through gap junctions. Under voltage-clamp, depolarizing voltage steps triggered a transient sodium current, a sustained calcium current, and two types of potassium currents with fast and slow inactivation kinetics. No calcium-dependent potassium current could be observed. The sodium current was blocked by saxitoxin, the calcium current by cobalt and furnidipine, and the potassium currents by tetraethylammonium chloride. In the cell-attached configuration, crypt cells displayed spontaneous spike activity and responded to amino acid solutions with dose-dependent excitation, followed by a period of spike inhibition. These first recordings of individual crypt cells provide the basis for future studies of their odorant specificity, transduction mechanism, and overall function in the fish olfactory epithelium.

  11. Crypt cell markers in the olfactory organ of Poecilia reticulata: analysis and comparison with the fish model Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Simone; Milani, Liliana; Lazzari, Maurizio; Maurizii, Maria Gabriella; Franceschini, Valeria

    2017-03-09

    Olfactory crypt neurons have been observed in several bony fishes and chondrichtyans. Although their morphology is uniform in all fish, very few is known about their antigenic properties, usually studied in zebrafish, but quite overlooked in other species. We tested in Poecilia reticulata (guppy) the two antibodies recognized to mark zebrafish crypt cells: while anti-S100 showed an immunohistochemical pattern comparable to what reported in zebrafish, anti-TrkA gave no signal. Western blot analysis revealed that S100-antiserum bound an antigen of expected weight, probably belonging to the S100 family. On the contrary, anti-TrkA detected more bands, but the protein/s might be too much diffused and/or diluted in the tissue to be detected with immunohistochemistry. Because of the high level of conservation in the Trk family proteins of the kinase domain, on which anti-TrkA was produced, we also tested anti-TrkB to exclude cross reactivity. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot confirmed that anti-TrkB displayed high specificity to its target and a different staining pattern compared to anti-TrkA, but, as anti-TrkA, it did not label crypt neurons. Finally, we documented that calretinin, a known marker of zebrafish ciliated and microvillous olfactory cells, in the guppy is expressed also by a subpopulation of S100-positive crypt neurons. These results reveal differences in antigen expression between zebrafish and guppy crypt cells. Together with the already known species-specific projections to the olfactory bulb and a heterogeneous panel of odorants, our findings support the possibility that crypt cells are functionally less uniform as supposed.

  12. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  13. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling.

  14. Interactive 3D computer model of the human corneolimbal region: crypts, projections and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Molvaer, Rikke K; Andreasen, Arne; Heegaard, Steffen; Thomsen, Jesper S; Hjortdal, Jesper; Urbak, Steen F; Nielsen, Kim

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to clarify the existence of and to map the localization of different proposed stem cell niches in the corneal limbal region. One human eye was cut into 2200 consecutive sections. Every other section was stained with haematoxylin and eosin, digitized at low and high magnification, aligned, 3D reconstructed and visualized using interactive 3D visualization software. The visualization software has interactive tools that make free rotations in all directions possible and makes it possible to create virtual sections independent of the original cutting plan. In all, one low-magnification and 24 high-magnification interactive 3D models were created. Immunohistochemistry against stem cell markers p63 and ΔNp63α was performed as a supplement to the 3D models. Using the interactive 3D models, we identified three types of stem cell niches in the limbal region: limbal epithelial crypts (LECs), limbal crypts (LCs) and focal stromal projections (FSPs). In all, eight LECs, 25 LCs and 105 FSPs were identified in the limbal region. The LECs, LCs and FSPs were predominantly located in the superior limbal region with seven LECs, 19 LCs and 93 FSPs in the superior limbal region and one LEC, six LCs and 12 FSPs in the inferior limbal region. Only few LECs, LCs and FSPs were localized nasally and temporally. Interactive 3D models are a powerful tool that may help to shed more light on the existence and spatial localization of the different stem cell niches (LECs, LCs and FSPs) in the corneal limbal region. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  15. Fructo-oligosaccharides and iron bioavailability in anaemic rats: the effects on iron species distribution, ferroportin-1 expression, crypt bifurcation and crypt cell proliferation in the caecum.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Alexandre R; Gaievski, Eduardo H S; De Carli, Eduardo; Alvares, Eliana P; Colli, Célia

    2014-10-28

    The present study investigated the effects of fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) on the bioavailability of Fe from ferric pyrophosphate (FP), a water-insoluble compound, in Fe-deficient anaemic rats that were subjected to a Hb repletion assay. Male Wistar rats (n 64) were fed adequate or low (8 mg/kg) Fe diets for 15 d followed by 1 or 2 weeks of Fe repletion with diets providing 35 mg Fe/kg as ferrous sulphate (FS), FP or FP that was mixed with 7·5% FOS in the form of yacon flour or Raftilose P95 (RAF), a purified source of FOS. The effects of FOS were observed within the 1st week of the repletion period. Fe bioavailability was improved by FOS supplementation, as measured by Hb regeneration efficiency and hepatic Fe stores, which were more pronounced in the RAF group. Moreover, RAF supplementation resulted in a higher biological value relative to that of the FP group. FOS supplementation resulted in caecal enlargement, in addition to acidification and Fe species redistribution in the caecal contents relative to the control rats. These effects occurred concomitantly with decreased ferroportin (FPN)-1 expression in the caecal mucosa, which was similar in magnitude to that observed in the FS group. Caecum mucosal morphometry was influenced by FOS supplementation, whereas crypt fission and cell proliferation were highest in the caecum of the RAF group. These results reinforce the effects of FOS as Fe bioavailability enhancers in anaemic rats that are sustained by early changes in their caecal environment (decreased mucosal FPN-1 expression and increased Fe absorbability, crypt fission and cellularity).

  16. Paneth Cell-Rich Regions Separated by a Cluster of Lgr5+ Cells Initiate Crypt Fission in the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Langlands, Alistair J.; Almet, Axel A.; Appleton, Paul L.; Newton, Ian P.; Osborne, James M.; Näthke, Inke S.

    2016-01-01

    The crypts of the intestinal epithelium house the stem cells that ensure the continual renewal of the epithelial cells that line the intestinal tract. Crypt number increases by a process called crypt fission, the division of a single crypt into two daughter crypts. Fission drives normal tissue growth and maintenance. Correspondingly, it becomes less frequent in adulthood. Importantly, fission is reactivated to drive adenoma growth. The mechanisms governing fission are poorly understood. However, only by knowing how normal fission operates can cancer-associated changes be elucidated. We studied normal fission in tissue in three dimensions using high-resolution imaging and used intestinal organoids to identify underlying mechanisms. We discovered that both the number and relative position of Paneth cells and Lgr5+ cells are important for fission. Furthermore, the higher stiffness and increased adhesion of Paneth cells are involved in determining the site of fission. Formation of a cluster of Lgr5+ cells between at least two Paneth-cell-rich domains establishes the site for the upward invagination that initiates fission. PMID:27348469

  17. Paneth Cell-Rich Regions Separated by a Cluster of Lgr5+ Cells Initiate Crypt Fission in the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Langlands, Alistair J; Almet, Axel A; Appleton, Paul L; Newton, Ian P; Osborne, James M; Näthke, Inke S

    2016-06-01

    The crypts of the intestinal epithelium house the stem cells that ensure the continual renewal of the epithelial cells that line the intestinal tract. Crypt number increases by a process called crypt fission, the division of a single crypt into two daughter crypts. Fission drives normal tissue growth and maintenance. Correspondingly, it becomes less frequent in adulthood. Importantly, fission is reactivated to drive adenoma growth. The mechanisms governing fission are poorly understood. However, only by knowing how normal fission operates can cancer-associated changes be elucidated. We studied normal fission in tissue in three dimensions using high-resolution imaging and used intestinal organoids to identify underlying mechanisms. We discovered that both the number and relative position of Paneth cells and Lgr5+ cells are important for fission. Furthermore, the higher stiffness and increased adhesion of Paneth cells are involved in determining the site of fission. Formation of a cluster of Lgr5+ cells between at least two Paneth-cell-rich domains establishes the site for the upward invagination that initiates fission.

  18. Comparative transcriptional profiling of the limbal epithelial crypt demonstrates its putative stem cell niche characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Limbal epithelial crypt (LEC) is a solid cord of cells, approximately 120 microns long. It arises from the undersurface of interpalisade rete ridges of the limbal palisades of Vogt and extends deeper into the limbal stroma parallel or perpendicular to the palisade. There are up to 6 or 7 such LEC, variably distributed along the limbus in each human eye. Morphological and immunohistochemical studies on the limbal epithelial crypt (LEC) have demonstrated the presence of limbal stem cells in this region. The purpose of this microarray study was to characterise the transcriptional profile of the LEC and compare with other ocular surface epithelial regions to support our hypothesis that LEC preferentially harbours stem cells (SC). Results LEC was found to be enriched for SC related Gene Ontology (GO) terms including those identified in quiescent adult SC, however similar to cornea, limbus had significant GO terms related to proliferating SC, transient amplifying cells (TAC) and differentiated cells (DC). LEC and limbus were metabolically dormant with low protein synthesis and downregulated cell cycling. Cornea had upregulated genes for cell cycling and self renewal such as FZD7, BTG1, CCNG, and STAT3 which were identified from other SC populations. Upregulated gene expression for growth factors, cytokines, WNT, Notch, TGF-Beta pathways involved in cell proliferation and differentiation were noted in cornea. LEC had highest number of expressed sequence tags (ESTs), downregulated and unknown genes, compared to other regions. Genes expressed in LEC such as CDH1, SERPINF1, LEF1, FRZB1, KRT19, SOD2, EGR1 are known to be involved in SC maintenance. Genes of interest, in LEC belonging to the category of cell adhesion molecules, WNT and Notch signalling pathway were validated with real-time PCR and immunofluorescence. Conclusions Our transcriptional profiling study identifies the LEC as a preferential site for limbal SC with some characteristics suggesting that

  19. Further studies on the response of intestinal crypt cells of different hierarchical status to eighteen different cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Ijiri, K.; Potten, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Adult male mice were treated with one or two different doses of each of 18 different cytotoxic agents. They were sampled at various times (3-12h) thereafter, and the spatial distributions of cell death in the small intestinal crypts were studied. Dead or dying cells or cells carrying dead cell fragments were examined histologically, and all of these were recorded (for convenience as apoptotic fragments), relative to the cell position in the crypt. Thus, distributions of apoptotic fragments against cell position were determined. A regression analysis of the data obtained at different times after administration of each agent was undertaken and the position of the median of the spatial distribution of presumptive target cells was deduced for each cytotoxic agent. The accuracy of this median value was determined to be +/- 0.5 cell positions. From these median values, the different cytotoxic agents could be divided roughly into three groups: [3H]thymidine, isopropyl-methane-sulphonate, gamma-rays, bleomycin and adriamycin all have their median values (susceptible cells) at cell positions 4 to 6; bischlorethylnitrosourea, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide and cycloheximide at cell positions 6-8; mechlorethamine, triethylenethiophosphoramide, vincristine, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea and methotrexate at cell positions 8-11. The position of these medians was considered in relation to the killing of clonogenic cells. Preliminary studies on the distributions of dead cells after myleran, cis-platinum and heat (hyperthermia) were also reported. There is a general tendency for antibiotics and radiation to attack the lower cell positions in the crypt. Alkylating agents on the other hand have a somewhat broad spectrum of action. Antimetabolites and a microtubule dissociating agent act on higher cell positions. No difference could be detected between two different forms (sources) of actinomycin D. The changes in the yields of apoptotic and mitotic cells with time and the migration

  20. Jejunal T Cell Inflammation in Human Obesity Correlates with Decreased Enterocyte Insulin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Sepulveda, Milena; Touch, Sothea; Mendes-Sá, Carla; André, Sébastien; Poitou, Christine; Allatif, Omran; Cotillard, Aurélie; Fohrer-Ting, Hélène; Hubert, Edwige-Ludiwyne; Remark, Romain; Genser, Laurent; Tordjman, Joan; Garbin, Kevin; Osinski, Céline; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Leturque, Armelle; Clément, Karine; Brot-Laroche, Edith

    2015-07-07

    In obesity, insulin resistance is linked to inflammation in several tissues. Although the gut is a very large lymphoid tissue, inflammation in the absorptive small intestine, the jejunum, where insulin regulates lipid and sugar absorption is unknown. We analyzed jejunal samples of 185 obese subjects stratified in three metabolic groups: without comorbidity, suffering from obesity-related comorbidity, and diabetic, versus 33 lean controls. Obesity increased both mucosa surface due to lower cell apoptosis and innate and adaptive immune cell populations. The preferential CD8αβ T cell location in epithelium over lamina propria appears a hallmark of obesity. Cytokine secretion by T cells from obese, but not lean, subjects blunted insulin signaling in enterocytes relevant to apical GLUT2 mislocation. Statistical links between T cell densities and BMI, NAFLD, or lipid metabolism suggest tissue crosstalk. Obesity triggers T-cell-mediated inflammation and enterocyte insulin resistance in the jejunum with potential broader systemic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Determining the control networks regulating stem cell lineages in colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jienian; Axelrod, David E; Komarova, Natalia L

    2017-09-21

    The question of stem cell control is at the center of our understanding of tissue functioning, both in healthy and cancerous conditions. It is well accepted that cellular fate decisions (such as divisions, differentiation, apoptosis) are orchestrated by a network of regulatory signals emitted by different cell populations in the lineage and the surrounding tissue. The exact regulatory network that governs stem cell lineages in a given tissue is usually unknown. Here we propose an algorithm to identify a set of candidate control networks that are compatible with (a) measured means and variances of cell populations in different compartments, (b) qualitative information on cell population dynamics, such as the existence of local controls and oscillatory reaction of the system to population size perturbations, and (c) statistics of correlations between cell numbers in different compartments. Using the example of human colon crypts, where lineages are comprised of stem cells, transit amplifying cells, and differentiated cells, we start with a theoretically known set of 32 smallest control networks compatible with tissue stability. Utilizing near-equilibrium stochastic calculus of stem cells developed earlier, we apply a series of tests, where we compare the networks' expected behavior with the observations. This allows us to exclude most of the networks, until only three, very similar, candidate networks remain, which are most compatible with the measurements. This work demonstrates how theoretical analysis of control networks combined with only static biological data can shed light onto the inner workings of stem cell lineages, in the absence of direct experimental assessment of regulatory signaling mechanisms. The resulting candidate networks are dominated by negative control loops and possess the following properties: (1) stem cell division decisions are negatively controlled by the stem cell population, (2) stem cell differentiation decisions are negatively

  2. Proliferation and mRNA expression of absorptive villous cell markers and mineral transporters in prolactin-exposed IEC-6 intestinal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Wongdee, Kannikar; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-06-01

    During pregnancy and lactation, prolactin (PRL) enhances intestinal absorption of calcium and other minerals for fetal development and milk production. Although an enhanced absorptive efficiency is believed to mainly result from the upregulation of mineral transporters in the absorptive villous cells, some other possibilities, such as PRL-enhanced crypt cell proliferation and differentiation to increase the absorptive area, have never been ruled out. Here, we investigated cell proliferation and mRNA expression of mineral absorption-related genes in the PRL-exposed IEC-6 crypt cells. As expected, the cell proliferation was not altered by PRL. Inasmuch as the mRNA expressions of villous cell markers, including dipeptidylpeptidase-4, lactase and glucose transporter-5, were not increased, PRL was not likely to enhance crypt cell differentiation into the absorptive villous cells. In contrast to the previous findings in villous cells, PRL was found to downregulate the expression of calbindin-D(9k), claudin-3 and occludin in IEC-6 crypt cells, while having no effect on transient receptor potential vanilloid family channels-5/6, plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA)-1b and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 expression. In conclusion, IEC-6 crypt cells did not respond to PRL by increasing proliferation or differentiation into villous cells. The present results thus supported the previous hypothesis that PRL enhanced mineral absorption predominantly by increasing transporter expression and activity in the absorptive villous cells. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Role of CD8+ and CD4+ T Lymphocytes in Jejunal Mucosal Injury during Murine Giardiasis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kevin G.-E.; Yu, Linda C. H.; Buret, André G.

    2004-01-01

    T-cell-mediated pathogenesis has been documented in various idiopathic and microbially induced intestinal disorders. Diffuse microvillous shortening seen in giardiasis is responsible for disaccharidase insufficiencies and malabsorption of electrolytes, nutrients, and water. Other mucosal changes include crypt hyperplasia and increased numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). A recent report using an athymic mouse model of infection showed that these epithelial injuries were dependent on T cells. The aim of the present study was to identify which subset of superior mesenteric lymph node (SMLN) T cells were responsible for mucosal alterations in giardiasis. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, as well as whole lymphocyte populations, were isolated from SMLN of Giardia muris-infected mice for adoptive transfer. Jejunal segments of recipient mice were assessed for brush border ultrastructure, sucrase activity, crypt/villus ratio, and IEL numbers. Mice that received enriched CD8+ and whole SMLN lymphocytes, but not CD4+ T cells, from infected donors showed diffuse shortening of microvilli, loss of brush border surface area, impaired sucrase activity, and increased crypt/villus ratios compared to respective controls. Transfer of whole SMLN lymphocytes, as well as enriched CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, from infected donors led to increased IEL numbers in the recipient jejunum. The findings indicate that loss of intestinal brush border surface area, reduced disaccharidase activities, and increased crypt/villus ratios in giardiasis are mediated by CD8+ T cells, whereas both CD8+ and CD4+ SMLN T cells regulate the influx of IEL. PMID:15155662

  4. Selective irradiation of the vascular endothelium has no effect on the survival of murine intestinal crypt stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Bradley W.; Binns, Peter J.; Riley, Kent J.; Ma, Ling; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Coderre, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    The possible role of vascular endothelial cell damage in the loss of intestinal crypt stem cells and the subsequent development of the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome is addressed. Mice received whole-body epithermal neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 0.57 ± 0.04 Gy·min−1. An additional dose was selectively targeted to endothelial cells from the short-ranged (5–9 μm) particles released from neutron capture reactions in 10B confined to the blood by incorporation into liposomes 70–90 nm in diameter. Different liposome formulations produced 45 ± 7 or 118 ± 12 μg/g 10B in the blood at the time of neutron irradiation, which resulted in total absorbed dose rates in the endothelial cells of 1.08 ± 0.09 or 1.90 ± 0.16 Gy·min−1, respectively. At 3.5 d after irradiation, the intestinal crypt microcolony assay showed that the 2- to 3-fold increased doses to the microvasculature, relative to the nonspecific whole-body neutron beam doses, caused no additional crypt stem cell loss beyond that produced by the neutron beam alone. The threshold dose for death from the GI syndrome after neutron-beam-only irradiation was 9.0 ± 0.6 Gy. There were no deaths from the GI syndrome, despite calculated absorbed doses to endothelial cells as high as 27.7 Gy, in the groups that received neutron beam doses of <9.0 Gy with boronated liposomes in the blood. These data indicate that endothelial cell damage is not causative in the loss of intestinal crypt stem cells and the eventual development of the GI syndrome. PMID:16505359

  5. Paneth cell marker expression in intestinal villi and colon crypts characterizes dietary induced risk for mouse sporadic intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghai; Peregrina, Karina; Dhima, Elena; Lin, Elaine Y; Mariadason, John M; Augenlicht, Leonard H

    2011-06-21

    Nutritional and genetic risk factors for intestinal tumors are additive on mouse tumor phenotype, establishing that diet and genetic factors impact risk by distinct combinatorial mechanisms. In a mouse model of dietary-induced sporadic small and large intestinal cancer in WT mice in which tumor etiology, lag, incidence, and frequency reflect >90% of intestinal cancer in Western societies, dietary-induced risk altered gene expression profiles predominantly in villus cells of the histologically normal mucosa, in contrast to targeting of crypt cells by inheritance of an Apc(1638N) allele or homozygous inactivation of p21(Waf1/cip1), and profiles induced by each risk factor were distinct at the gene or functional group level. The dietary-induced changes in villus cells encompassed ectopic expression of Paneth cell markers (a lineage normally confined to the bottom of small intestinal crypts), elevated expression of the Wnt receptor Fzd5 and of EphB2 (genes necessary for Paneth cell differentiation and localization to the crypt bottom), and increased Wnt signaling in villus cells. Ectopic elevation of these markers was also present in the colon crypts, which are also sites of sporadic tumors in the nutritional model. Elevating dietary vitamin D(3) and calcium, which prevents tumor development, abrogated these changes in the villus and colon cells. Thus, common intestinal cancer driven by diet involves mechanisms of tumor development distinct from those mechanisms that cause tumors induced by the rare inheritance of a mutant adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) allele. This is fundamental for understanding how common sporadic tumors arise and in evaluating relative risk in the population.

  6. Mast cells in Canine parvovirus-2-associated enteritis with crypt abscess.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, M W; Saliki, J T; Blas-Machado, U; Whittington, L

    2013-11-01

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in allergic reactions and parasitic infections is well established. Their involvement in host immune response against bacterial and viral infections is reported. In this study, investigation is made to determine if MCs are associated with Canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2)-induced enteritis with crypt abscess (ECA). Mast cell count (MCC) was made on toluidine blue-stained intestinal sections from a total of 34 dogs. These included 16 dogs exhibiting ECA positive for CPV-2 and negative for Canine distemper virus and Canine coronavirus by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent antibody test, 12 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 6 non-ECA/non-IBD (control) dogs. The average total MCC per high-power field in ECA (40.8 ± 2.2) and IBD (24.7 ± 2.1) was significantly higher (P < .05) than in the control (3.4 ± 0.6). Although not significant (P > .05), MCC was also higher in ECA than in IBD. The present study for the first time has documented significantly increased MCs in CPV-2-associated ECA as was previously reported for IBD, showing that MCs may also play an important role in CPV-2-associated ECA. Further studies involving more CPV-infected dogs are recommended to substantiate the findings.

  7. Dose-dependent roles for canonical Wnt signalling in de novo crypt formation and cell cycle properties of the colonic epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiro; Utikal, Jochen; Yamashita, Satoshi; Aoki, Hitomi; Watanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Takuya; Okano, Hideyuki; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kunisada, Takahiro; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Hara, Akira; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    There is a gradient of β-catenin expression along the colonic crypt axis with the highest levels at the crypt bottom. In addition, colorectal cancers show a heterogeneous subcellular pattern of β-catenin accumulation. However, it remains unclear whether different levels of Wnt signalling exert distinct roles in the colonic epithelium. Here, we investigated the dose-dependent effect of canonical Wnt activation on colonic epithelial differentiation by controlling the expression levels of stabilised β-catenin using a doxycycline-inducible transgenic system in mice. We show that elevated levels of Wnt signalling induce the amplification of Lgr5+ cells, which is accompanied by crypt fission and a reduction in cell proliferation among progenitor cells. By contrast, lower levels of β-catenin induction enhance cell proliferation rates of epithelial progenitors without affecting crypt fission rates. Notably, slow-cycling cells produced by β-catenin activation exhibit activation of Notch signalling. Consistent with the interpretation that the combination of Notch and Wnt signalling maintains crypt cells in a low proliferative state, the treatment of β-catenin-expressing mice with a Notch inhibitor turned such slow-cycling cells into actively proliferating cells. Our results indicate that the activation of the canonical Wnt signalling pathway is sufficient for de novo crypt formation, and suggest that different levels of canonical Wnt activations, in cooperation with Notch signalling, establish a hierarchy of slower-cycling stem cells and faster-cycling progenitor cells characteristic for the colonic epithelium. PMID:23222438

  8. A nonlinear mathematical model of cell turnover, differentiation and tumorigenesis in the intestinal crypt.

    PubMed

    d'Onofrio, Alberto; Tomlinson, Ian P M

    2007-02-07

    We present a development of a model [Tomlinson, I.P.M., Bodmer, W.F., 1995. Failure of programmed cell death and differentiation as causes of tumors: Some simple mathematical models. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 11130-11134.] of the relationship between cells in three compartments of the intestinal crypt: stem cells, semi-differentiated cells and fully differentiated cells. Stem and semi-differentiated cells may divide to self-renew, undergo programmed death or progress to semi-differentiated and fully differentiated cells, respectively. The probabilities of each of these events provide the most important parameters of the model. Fully differentiated cells do not divide, but a proportion undergoes programmed death in each generation. Our previous models showed that failure of programmed death--for example, in tumorigenesis--could lead either to exponential growth in cell numbers or to growth to some plateau. Our new models incorporate plausible fluctuation in the parameters of the model and introduce nonlinearity by assuming that the parameters depend on the numbers of cells in each state of differentiation. We present detailed analysis of the equilibrium conditions for various forms of these models and, where appropriate, simulate the changes in cell numbers. We find that the model is characterized by bifurcation between increase in cell numbers to stable equilibrium or explosive exponential growth; in a restricted number of cases, there may be multiple stable equilibria. Fluctuation in cell numbers undergoing programmed death, for example caused by tissue damage, generally makes exponential growth more likely, as long as the size of the fluctuation exceeds a certain critical value for a sufficiently long period of time. In most cases, once exponential growth has started, this process is irreversible. In some circumstances, exponential growth is preceded by a long plateau phase, of variable duration, mimicking equilibrium: thus apparently self-limiting lesions

  9. Localisation of Epithelial Cells Capable of Holoclone Formation In Vitro and Direct Interaction with Stromal Cells in the Native Human Limbal Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Dziasko, Marc A.; Armer, Hannah E.; Levis, Hannah J.; Shortt, Alex J.; Tuft, Stephen; Daniels, Julie T.

    2014-01-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are essential to maintain the transparent ocular surface required for vision. Despite great advances in our understanding of ocular stem cell biology over the last decade, the exact location of the LESC niche remains unclear. In the present study we have used in vitro clonal analysis to confirm that limbal crypts provide a niche for the resident LESCs. We have used high-resolution imaging of the basal epithelial layer at the limbus to identify cells with a morphology consistent with stem cells that were only present within the basal layer of the limbal crypts. These cells are proximal to limbal stromal cells suggesting direct cell-to-cell interaction. Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) confirmed that the putative LESCs are indeed in direct contact with cells in the underlying stroma, a contact that is facilitated by focal basement membrane interruptions. Limbal mesenchymal cells previously identified in the human limbus collocate in the crypt-rich limbal stromal area in the vicinity of LESCs and may be involved in the cell-to-cell contact revealed by SBFSEM. We also observed a high population of melanocytes within the basal layer of the limbal crypts. From these observations we present a three dimensional reconstruction of the LESC niche in which the stem cell is closely associated and maintained by both dendritic pigmented limbal melanocytes and elongated limbal stromal cells. PMID:24714106

  10. Novel Regenerative Peptide TP508 Mitigates Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage By Activating Stem Cells and Preserving Crypt Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M.; Houchen, Courtney W.; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L.; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post-exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin®) 24h after lethal radiation exposure (9Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post-exposure prevents the disintegration of gastrointestinal crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also up-regulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24h post-exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment. PMID:26280221

  11. Novel regenerative peptide TP508 mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage by activating stem cells and preserving crypt integrity.

    PubMed

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M; Houchen, Courtney W; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis, and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin) 24 h after lethal radiation exposure (9 Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post exposure prevents the disintegration of GI crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also upregulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24 h post exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment.

  12. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5 Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  13. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) increases murine intestinal crypt stem cell survival following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ailing; Wang, Zhihong; Gao, Boning; Zhou, Minhang; Cui, Yu; Wang, Lili; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Bianhong; Wang, Li; Liu, Anqi; Qiu, Lanlan; Qian, Kun; Lu, Yejian; Deng, Wanping; Zheng, Xi; Han, Zhengtao; Li, Yonghui; Sun, Junzhong

    2017-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients following radiation therapy. Thus, there is a need for agents that can protect the intestinal epithelium against radiation. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) has been shown to induce differentiation and/or apoptosis in multiple cell lines and primary cells. In the current report, we studied the function of TPA in radiation induced enteropathy in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6 after ionizing radiation (IR) and in mice after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI). In IEC-6 cells, there were reduced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in TPA treated cells after IR. We detected a four-fold increase in crypt cell survival and a two-fold increase in animal survival post TBI in TPA treated mice. The beneficial effects of TPA were accompanied by upregulation of stem cells markers and higher level of proteins that are involved in PKC signaling pathway. In addition, TPA also decreased the TBI-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators. The effects were only observed when TPA was given before irradiation. These results suggest that TPA has the ability to modulate intestinal crypt stem cells survival and this may represent a promising countermeasure against radiation induced enteropathy. PMID:28545017

  14. The crypt cycle. Crypt and villus production in the adult intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Totafurno, J; Bjerknes, M; Cheng, H

    1987-01-01

    We propose a model for the growth of individual crypts that is able to account for the observed changes in the number of cells in crypts under normal conditions, after irradiation, and after 30% resection. Parameter values for this model are estimated both for mouse and man, and detailed predictions of crypt growth rates are made. This model does not predict a steady-state crypt size; rather it suggests that crypts grow until they bifurcate. We therefore propose a crypt cycle (analogous to the cell cycle) and present evidence that most if not all crypts in the adult mouse are cycling asynchronously and independently. This evidence consists of four experiments that indicate that branching crypts are randomly distributed over the intestinal epithelium, that the plane of bifurcation of branching crypts is randomly oriented with respect to the villus base, and that the size distribution of crypts is consistent with an expanding crypt population. We also report for the first time evidence of villus production in the adult mouse intestinal epithelium. We conclude that the crypt and villus populations in the adult mouse are not in a steady state. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:3663832

  15. Lawsonia intracellularis exploits β-catenin/Wnt and Notch signalling pathways during infection of intestinal crypt to alter cell homeostasis and promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Yang W.; Bengtsson, Rebecca J.; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Finlayson, Heather; Smith, Sionagh H.; Archibald, Alan L.; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2017-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in pigs. L. intracellularis infection causes extensive intestinal crypt cell proliferation and inhibits secretory and absorptive cell differentiation. However, the affected host upstream cellular pathways leading to PE are still unknown. β-catenin/Wnt signalling is essential in maintaining intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and self-renewal capacity, while Notch signalling governs differentiation of secretory and absorptive lineage specification. Therefore, in this report we used immunofluorescence (IF) and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTqPCR) to examine β-catenin/Wnt and Notch-1 signalling levels in uninfected and L. intracellularis infected pig ileums at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post challenge (dpc). We found that while the significant increase in Ki67+ nuclei in crypts at the peak of L. intracellularis infection suggested enhanced cell proliferation, the expression of c-MYC and ASCL2, promoters of cell growth and ISC proliferation respectively, was down-regulated. Peak infection also coincided with enhanced cytosolic and membrane-associated β-catenin staining and induction of AXIN2 and SOX9 transcripts, both encoding negative regulators of β-catenin/Wnt signalling and suggesting a potential alteration to β-catenin/Wnt signalling levels, with differential regulation of the expression of its target genes. We found that induction of HES1 and OLFM4 and the down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels was consistent with the increased Notch-1 signalling in crypts at the peak of infection. Interestingly, the significant down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels coincided with the depletion of MUC2 expression at 14 dpc, consistent with the role of ATOH1 in promoting goblet cell maturation. The lack of significant change to LGR5 transcript levels at the peak of infection suggested that the crypt hyperplasia was not due to the expansion

  16. Claudin-4 undergoes age-dependent change in cellular localization on pig jejunal villous epithelial cells, independent of bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, J Alex; Kent-Dennis, Coral; Van Kessel, Andrew G; Wilson, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases.

  17. Claudin-4 Undergoes Age-Dependent Change in Cellular Localization on Pig Jejunal Villous Epithelial Cells, Independent of Bacterial Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Van Kessel, Andrew G.; Wilson, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:25948883

  18. Protein kinase D1 mediates stimulation of DNA synthesis and proliferation in intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells and in mouse intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Sinnett-Smith, James; Rozengurt, Nora; Kui, Robert; Huang, Carlos; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2011-01-07

    We examined whether protein kinase D1 (PKD1), the founding member of a new protein kinase family, plays a critical role in intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate that PKD1 activation is sustained, whereas that of PKD2 is transient in intestinal epithelial IEC-18 stimulated with the G(q)-coupled receptor agonists angiotensin II or vasopressin. PKD1 gene silencing utilizing small interfering RNAs dramatically reduced DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in IEC-18 cells stimulated with G(q)-coupled receptor agonists. To clarify the role of PKD1 in intestinal epithelial cell proliferation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that express elevated PKD1 protein in the intestinal epithelium. Transgenic PKD1 exhibited constitutive catalytic activity and phosphorylation at the activation loop residues Ser(744) and Ser(748) and on the autophosphorylation site, Ser(916). To examine whether PKD1 expression stimulates intestinal cell proliferation, we determined the rate of crypt cell DNA synthesis by detection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporated into the nuclei of crypt cells of the ileum. Our results demonstrate a significant increase (p < 0.005) in DNA-synthesizing cells in the crypts of two independent lines of PKD1 transgenic mice as compared with non-transgenic littermates. Morphometric analysis showed a significant increase in the length and in the total number of cells per crypt in the transgenic PKD1 mice as compared with the non-transgenic littermates (p < 0.01). Thus, transgenic PKD1 signaling increases the number of cells per crypt by stimulating the rate of crypt cell proliferation. Collectively, our results indicate that PKD1 plays a role in promoting cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Structural and functional evolution of jejunal allograft rejection in rats and the ameliorating effects of cyclosporine therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Madara, J L; Kirkman, R L

    1985-01-01

    We assessed the structural and functional evolution of small intestinal transplant rejection in a rat model by use of 1-micron section, electron microscopic, and in vitro electrophysiologic techniques to study jejunal mucosa 3, 6, and 9 d posttransplantation. The earliest structural abnormalities detected in jejunal loops transplanted from Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrids into Lewis rats occurred within 3 d posttransplantation and consisted of focal endothelial cell injury of the microvasculature and focal injury of crypt epithelial cells. Both alterations were associated with adjacent infiltration of large lymphoid cells, and both markedly progressed and became rather diffuse over the following 6 d. In contrast, villus absorptive cells were not markedly altered in structure until the 9th postoperative day. As compared with host jejuna, allograft jejunal epithelium demonstrated multiple functional abnormalities. Transepithelial resistance declined progressively by days 6 and 9 (both P less than 0.05), although baseline transepithelial spontaneous potential difference was only affected at day 9 (P less than 0.01). Stimulated absorption by allograft jejuna, as assessed by measuring electrical response to mucosal glucose, was not significantly diminished until day 9 (P less than 0.05). In contrast, stimulated secretion assessed by measurement of electrical response to serosal theophylline was diminished by day 6 (P less than .01). These data suggest that the earliest epithelial injury during rejection, as judged both structurally and functionally, occurs in the crypt and is paralleled by endothelial injury at the level of the microvasculature. Thus, the primary targets for rejection are most likely endothelial cells and crypt epithelial cells. In contrast, structural and functional impairment of villus epithelium is detectable only at substantially later times during rejection and are most likely secondary processes related to either ischemia produced by microvascular

  20. [Study on detoxication of euphorbia pekinensis radix processed with vinegar on rat small intestinal crypt epithelial cells IEC-6].

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu-Dan; Yan, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Li; Ding, An-Wei

    2014-03-01

    To compare the difference of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix before and after being processed with vinegar in the toxicity on rat small intestinal crypt epithelial cells IEC-6, and make a preliminary study on the mechanism of detoxication of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix processed with vinegar. With rat small intestinal crypt epithelial cells IEC-6 as the study object, the MTT method was adopted to detect the effect of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix before and after being processed with vinegar on IEC-6 cell activity. The morphology of cells were observed by the inverted microscope. The down-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway of enterocytes caused by the vinegar processing was analyzed by using the high content screening. Compared with the negative control group, the proliferation inhibition experiment showed that Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix showed a relatively high intestinal cell toxicity (P < 0.01). The results of HCS analysis showed that Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix could significantly reduce the cell nucleus Hoechst fluorescence intensity and mitochondria membrane (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), and increase Annexin V-FITC and PI fluorescence intensity and membrane permeability (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01). After being processed with vinegar, compared with Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix groups with different doses, Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix processed with vinegar could significantly decrease the cell proliferation inhibition effect on enterocytes, increase the cell nuclear Hoechst fluorescence intensity and mitochondria membrane (P < 0.05, P < 0.05), and decrease Annexin V-FITC and PI fluorescence intensity and membrane permeability (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05), and showed a certain dose-effect relationship. The vinegar processing can further reduce the toxicity of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix on enterocytes. Its possible mechanism can decrease the effect of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix on the permeability of IEC-6 cell membrane, so as to provide a basis for further explanation of

  1. A Study of Appendiceal Crypt Cell Adenocarcinoma (So-Called Goblet Cell Carcinoid and Its Related Adenocarcinoma).

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Daisuke; Papaxoinis, George; Lamarca, Angela; Fulford, Paul; Valle, Juan; Chakrabarty, Bipasha

    2017-08-17

    Goblet cell carcinoids (GCCs) of the appendix are rare tumors, characterized by a carcinoid-like organoid growth pattern. Despite the term carcinoid, neuroendocrine features are inconspicuous, and its behavior is distinct from carcinoid. Its high grade counterpart is designated as adenocarcinoma ex GCC. We conducted a retrospective study of 105 tumors to find prognostic values of a variety of clinico-pathologic features. The tumors were subclassified as low grade, equivalent to classic type, and high grade, defined as loss of organoid pattern, and a proportion (%) of low and high grades were documented in each tumor. Correlations between survival and various clinico-pathologic parameters were investigated. One-third were pure low grade while the remainder contained variable high grade component ranging 5-95%. Neuroendocrine cell component ranged 0-90% (median 5) while mucus cell component ranged 5-100% (median 70). By univariate analysis, size, stage, high grade component, nuclear grade, surgery and chemotherapy correlated with cancer-related survival (CSS), and by multivariate analysis, stage (P=.001), high grade component (P=.008) and tumor size (P=.005) correlated with CSS. There was significant difference in CSS when the cases were grouped in high grade component <40%, 40-90 and ≤90% (P<.001). Our results indicate that staging and proportion of high grade histology may provide important prognostic information. Neuroendocrine component was insignificant in both low and high grade areas. In light of our findings, this tumor type is best regarded as a variant of adenocarcinoma, and the term crypt cell adenocarcinoma more appropriately reflects the nature and origin of this tumor group. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Fluid absorption in isolated perfused colonic crypts.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S K; Binder, H J; Boron, W F; Geibel, J P

    1995-01-01

    A spatial segregation of ion transport processes between crypt and surface epithelial cells is well-accepted and integrated into physiological and pathophysiological paradigms of small and large intestinal function: Absorptive processes are believed to be located in surface (and villous) cells, whereas secretory processes are believed to be present in crypt cells. Validation of this model requires direct determination of fluid movement in intestinal crypts. This study describes the adaptation of techniques from renal tubule microperfusion to hand-dissect and perfuse single, isolated crypts from rat distal colon to measure directly fluid movement. Morphologic analyses of the isolated crypt preparation revealed no extraepithelial cellular elements derived from the lamina propria, including myofibroblasts. In the basal state, crypts exhibited net fluid absorption (mean net fluid movement = 0.34 +/- 0.01 nl.mm-1.min-1), which was Na+ and partially HCO3- dependent. Addition of 1 mM dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, 60 nM vasoactive intestinal peptide, or 0.1 mM acetylcholine to the bath (serosal) solution reversibly induced net fluid secretion (net fluid movement approximately -0.35 +/- 0.01 nl.mm-1.min-1). These observations permit speculation that absorption is a constitutive transport function in crypt cells and that secretion by crypt cells is regulated by one or more neurohumoral agonists that are released in situ from lamina propria cells. The functional, intact polarized crypt described here that both absorbs and secretes will permit future studies that dissect the mechanisms that govern fluid and electrolyte movement in the colonic crypt. Images PMID:7593625

  3. Protective effects of Nigella sativa on gamma radiation-induced jejunal mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Orhon, Zeynep Nur; Uzal, Cem; Kanter, Mehmet; Erboga, Mustafa; Demiroglu, Murat

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Nigella sativa in protection of jejunal mucosa against harmful effects of gamma radiation. Radiotherapy group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to physiological saline. Radiotherapy+Nigella sativa treatment group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to Nigella sativa treatment in the amount of 400mg/kg. Radiotherapy and treatment groups were sacrificed 3 days after the exposure to irradiation. Then, jejunum samples were harvested for biochemical and histological assessment of mucosal injury. Nigella sativa treatment was found to significantly lower elevated tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and, to raise reduced glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in intestinal tissues samples. Single dose 15Gy gamma-irradiation was noted to result in a marked jejunal mucosal injury. Three days after exposure to irradiation, the villi and Lieberkühn crypts were observed as denuded, and villous height diminished. Concomitantly with inflammatory cell invasion, capillary congestion and ulceration were observed in the atrophic mucosa. Nigella sativa treatment significantly attenuated the radiation induced morphological changes in the irradiated rat jejunal mucosa. Nigella sativa has protective effects against radiation-induced damage, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Morphometric study of the jejunal mucosa in various childhood enteropathies with special reference to intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuitunen, P; Kosnai, I; Savilahti, E

    1982-01-01

    A morphometric study of intraepithelial (IE) lymphocytes per 100 epithelial cells, villous heights (VH), crypt depths (CrD), and epithelial cell heights (ECH) was made on jejunal specimens of 17 patients with cow's-milk allergy (CMA), 52 with celiac disease (CD), seven with congenital lactase deficiency (CLD), four with acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE), four with giardiasis, and four with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). The aim of this study was to investigate how the morphometric parameters correlate with each other. All cases with CMA, CD, and DH had villous atrophy with hyperplasia of the crypts, both signs being more severe in cases with CD and DH than with CMA. IE lymphocyte infiltration was more intense in specimens of patients with CD and DH (mean 76.0), than those with CMA (mean 62.5). The ECH were equally reduced in patients with CD and CMA. In a follow-up specimen at 1 year and 10 months for CD patients and 11 months for CMA patients the inflammation was reduced, and the VH were increased but still differed from the controls. In CLD cases the morphology of the villi and crypts of the jejunum was quite normal, with no IE lymphocyte infiltration; ECH were reduced. Minor morphological changes were seen in the specimens of patients with AE and giardiasis. In the whole study group there was a significant linear correlation, either positive or negative, between all variables measured (IE lymphocytes, VH, CrD, and ECH).

  5. Identification of a developmental gene expression signature, including HOX genes, for the normal human colonic crypt stem cell niche: overexpression of the signature parallels stem cell overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bhatlekar, Seema; Addya, Sankar; Salunek, Moreh; Orr, Christopher R; Surrey, Saul; McKenzie, Steven; Fields, Jeremy Z; Boman, Bruce M

    2014-01-15

    Our goal was to identify a unique gene expression signature for human colonic stem cells (SCs). Accordingly, we determined the gene expression pattern for a known SC-enriched region--the crypt bottom. Colonic crypts and isolated crypt subsections (top, middle, and bottom) were purified from fresh, normal, human, surgical specimens. We then used an innovative strategy that used two-color microarrays (∼18,500 genes) to compare gene expression in the crypt bottom with expression in the other crypt subsections (middle or top). Array results were validated by PCR and immunostaining. About 25% of genes analyzed were expressed in crypts: 88 preferentially in the bottom, 68 in the middle, and 131 in the top. Among genes upregulated in the bottom, ∼30% were classified as growth and/or developmental genes including several in the PI3 kinase pathway, a six-transmembrane protein STAMP1, and two homeobox (HOXA4, HOXD10) genes. qPCR and immunostaining validated that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are selectively expressed in the normal crypt bottom and are overexpressed in colon carcinomas (CRCs). Immunostaining showed that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are co-expressed with the SC markers CD166 and ALDH1 in cells at the normal crypt bottom, and the number of these co-expressing cells is increased in CRCs. Thus, our findings show that these two HOX genes are selectively expressed in colonic SCs and that HOX overexpression in CRCs parallels the SC overpopulation that occurs during CRC development. Our study suggests that developmental genes play key roles in the maintenance of normal SCs and crypt renewal, and contribute to the SC overpopulation that drives colon tumorigenesis.

  6. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Existence of Crypt Fission and Fusion in Adult Mouse Intestine.

    PubMed

    Bruens, Lotte; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; van Rheenen, Jacco; Snippert, Hugo J

    2017-09-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a repetitive sheet of crypt and villus units with stem cells at the bottom of the crypts. During postnatal development, crypts multiply via fission, generating 2 daughter crypts from 1 parental crypt. In the adult intestine, crypt fission is observed at a low frequency. Using intravital microscopy in Lgr5(EGFP-Ires-CreERT2) mice, we monitored individual crypt dynamics over multiple days with single-cell resolution. We discovered the existence of crypt fusion, an almost exact reverse phenomenon of crypt fission, in which 2 crypts fuse into 1 daughter crypt. Examining 819 crypts in 4 mice, we found that 3.5% ± 0.6% of all crypts were in the process of fission, whereas 4.1 ± 0.9% of all crypts were undergoing crypt fusion. As counteracting processes, crypt fission and fusion could regulate crypt numbers during the lifetime of a mouse. Identifying the mechanisms that regulate rates of crypt fission and fusion could provide insights into intestinal adaptation to altered environmental conditions and disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intestinal tuft cells regulate the ATM mediated DNA Damage response via Dclk1 dependent mechanism for crypt restitution following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Weygant, Nathaniel; Qu, Dongfeng; Berry, William L.; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Ali, Naushad; Rao, Chinthalapally; Huycke, Mark; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2016-01-01

    Crypt epithelial survival and regeneration after injury require highly coordinated complex interplay between resident stem cells and diverse cell types. The function of Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulating intestinal epithelial DNA damage response for cell survival/self-renewal after radiation-induced injury is unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were isolated and purified and utilized for experimental analysis. We found that small intestinal crypts of VillinCre;Dclk1f/f mice were hypoplastic and more apoptotic 24 h post-total body irradiation, a time when stem cell survival is p53-independent. Injury-induced ATM mediated DNA damage response, pro-survival genes, stem cell markers, and self-renewal ability for survival and restitution were reduced in the isolated intestinal epithelial cells. An even greater reduction in these signaling pathways was observed 3.5 days post-TBI, when peak crypt regeneration occurs. We found that interaction with Dclk1 is critical for ATM and COX2 activation in response to injury. We determined that Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulate the whole intestinal epithelial cells following injury through paracrine mechanism. These findings suggest that intestinal tuft cells play an important role in regulating the ATM mediated DNA damage response, for epithelial cell survival/self-renewal via a Dclk1 dependent mechanism, and these processes are indispensable for restitution and function after severe radiation-induced injury. PMID:27876863

  8. p21waf1/cip1 deficiency does not perturb the intestinal crypt stem cell population after massive small bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    Longshore, Shannon W.; Nair, Rajalakshmi; Perrone, Erin E.; Erwin, Christopher R.; Guo, Jun; Warner, Brad W.

    2009-01-01

    Background After small bowel resection (SBR), adaptation is initiated in intestinal crypts where stem cells reside. Prior studies revealed SBR induced enterocyte proliferation requires the expression of p21waf1/cip1. Since deficient expression of p21waf1/cip1 has been shown to result in reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells, we sought to test the hypothesis that p21waf1/cip1 deficiency similarly perturbs the intestinal stem cell population after SBR. Methods Control (n=21; C57Bl/6) and p21waf1/cip1-null mice (n=30) underwent 50% proximal SBR or sham operation. After 3 days, the ileum was harvested and the crypt stem cell population evaluated by counting crypt base columnar (CBC) cells on histological sections, determining the expression of Musashi-1 and Lgr5, and profiling the transcriptional expression of 84 known stem cell genes. Results There were no significant differences in CBC cells, expression of Musashi-1 or Lgr5, or in stem cell gene expression after SBR in control mice. Further, there were no differences in these markers between controls and p21waf1/cip1-null mice. Conclusion In contrast with bone marrow stem cells, the stem cell population of the gut is unaffected by deficient expression of p21waf1/cip1. Additional mechanisms for the role of p21waf1/cip1 in small bowel proliferation and adaptation following massive SBR must be considered. PMID:19524718

  9. STUDIES ON SMALL INTESTINAL CRYPT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Jerry S.

    1963-01-01

    Small intestinal crypt epithelium obtained from normal fasting humans by peroral biopsy of the mucosa was studied with the electron microscope. Paneth cells were identified at the base of the crypts by their elaborate highly organized endoplasmic reticulum, large secretory granules, and small lysosome-like dense bodies within the cytoplasm. Undifferentiated cells were characterized by smaller cytoplasmic membrane-bounded granules which were presumed to be secretory in nature, a less elaborate endoplasmic reticulum, many unattached ribosomes and, in some cells, the presence of glycogen. Some undifferentiated cells at the base of the crypts contained lobulated nuclei and striking paranuclear accumulations of mitochondria. Membrane-bounded cytoplasmic fragments, probably originating from undifferentiated and Paneth cells, were frequently apparent within crypt lumina. Of the goblet cells, some were seen actively secreting mucus. In these, apical mucus appeared to exude into the crypt lumen between gaps in the microvilli. The membrane formerly surrounding the apical mucus appeared to fuse with and become part of the plasma membrane of the cell, suggesting a merocrine secretory mechanism. Enterochromaffin cells were identified by their location between the basal regions of other crypt cells and by their unique intracytoplasmic granules. PMID:14064112

  10. Differential expression of proteins involved in energy production along the crypt-villus axis in early-weaning pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xia; Yang, Huansheng; Tan, Bie; Yang, Chengbo; Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Gang; Kim, Sung Woo; Li, Tiejun; Li, Lili; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-08-15

    Weaning of piglets reflects intestinal dysfunction and atrophy and affected the physiological state of enterocytes. However, few studies have defined physiological state of enterocytes along the crypt-villus axis in early-weaning piglets. A total of 16 piglets from 8 litters were used in the experiment. One group of piglets was nursed by sows until age 21 days, and another group was weaned at age 14 days and then fed creep feed instead of breast milk for 7 days. Piglets were killed at 21 days, and the jejunum segments were dissected. After sequential isolation of jejunum epithelial cells along the crypt-villus axis, their proteins were analyzed through the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification, and proteins involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and proliferating cell nuclear antigen abundances in jejunal epithelial cells of weaning or suckling group were determined by Western blotting. The differential proteins in three cell fractions were identified and analyzed. The results showed that proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation, and the glycolysis pathway were significantly downregulated in the upper and middle villus of the early-weaned group. However, proteins involved in glycolysis were significantly upregulated in crypt cells. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway-related proteins was decreased (P < 0.05) in the early-weaned group. The present results showed that early-weaning differentially affect the expression of proteins involved in energy production of enterocytes along the jejunal crypt-villus axis.

  11. Interactions between stromal cell--derived keratinocyte growth factor and epithelial transforming growth factor in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj-Elliott, M; Poulsom, R; Pender, S L; Wathen, N C; MacDonald, T T

    1998-01-01

    Immune reactions in the gut are associated with increased epithelial cell proliferation. Here we have studied the role of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF; FGF7) and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) in the epithelial cell hyperplasia seen in explants of fetal human small intestine after activation of lamina propria T cells with the superantigen Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB). After the addition of SEB to the explants there is a 10-fold increase in KGF mRNA by 72 h of culture. KGF transcripts were abundant in the lamina propria using in situ hybridization and the culture supernatants contained elevated amounts of KGF protein. SEB had no direct effect on KGF mRNA and protein production by cultured lamina propria mesenchymal cells, but both were upregulated by TNF-alpha. Accompanying the increase in KGF there was also an increase in TGF-alpha precursor proteins in the culture supernatants and the phosphorylated form of the EGFR receptor was also detected in the tissue. Increased TGF-alpha precursor proteins were also detected in the supernatants of control explants stimulated with KGF alone. The direct addition of KGF and TGF-alpha enhanced epithelial cell proliferation and antibodies against KGF and TGF-alpha partially inhibited SEB-induced crypt hyperplasia. These results suggest molecular cross-talk between the KGF/KGFR and the TGF-alpha/EGFR in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia. PMID:9788959

  12. Raised number of jejunal IgG2-producing cells in untreated adult coeliac disease compared with food allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Rognum, T O; Kett, K; Fausa, O; Bengtsson, U; Kilander, A; Scott, H; Gaarder, P I; Brandtzaeg, P

    1989-01-01

    The subclass distribution of IgG-producing immunocytes was studied by two colour immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies in jejunal biopsy specimens from 10 adults with untreated coeliac disease, 11 coeliac disease patients on a gluten free diet, and seven patients with established food allergy. Paired immunofluorescence staining was performed with subclass specific murine monoclonal antibodies in combination with polyclonal rabbit antibody reagent to total IgG; the proportion of cells belonging to each subclass could thereby be determined. The ratio of IgG2 immunocytes was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in untreated coeliac disease patients (median, 35.2%; range, 26.7-65.2%) than in those on a gluten free diet (median, 7.3%; range, 0-31.9%) or those having food allergy (median, 12.5%; range, 0-36.5%). The disparity in the local IgG2 response between patients with untreated coeliac disease and those with food allergy might be due to differences in the nature of the antigenic stimuli, dissimilar genetic 'make-up' of the subjects, or both. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2599444

  13. Optimality in the Development of Intestinal Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Blat, Irene C.; Jacks, Tyler; Clevers, Hans; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Intestinal crypts in mammals are comprised of long-lived stem cells and shorter-lived progenies. These two populations are maintained in specific proportions during adult life. Here, we investigate the design principles governing the dynamics of these proportions during crypt morphogenesis. Using optimal control theory, we show that a proliferation strategy known as a “bang-bang” control minimizes the time to obtain a mature crypt. This strategy consists of a surge of symmetric stem cell divisions, establishing the entire stem cell pool first, followed by a sharp transition to strictly asymmetric stem cell divisions, producing nonstem cells with a delay. We validate these predictions using lineage tracing and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization of intestinal crypts in infant mice, uncovering small crypts that are entirely composed of Lgr5-labeled stem cells, which become a minority as crypts continue to grow. Our approach can be used to uncover similar design principles in other developmental systems. PMID:22304925

  14. Effect of genetically modified corn on the jejunal mucosa of adult male albino rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Marwa A A; Okasha, Ebtsam F

    2016-11-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants expressing insecticidal traits offer a new strategy for crop protection. GM-corn contains Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes producing delta endotoxins in the whole plant. Diet can influence the characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract altering its function and structure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GM-corn on the histological structure of jejunal mucosa of adult male albino rat using different histological, immunohistochemical and morphometrical methods. Twenty adult male albino rats were divided into two equal groups; control and GM-corn fed group administered with 30% GM-corn for 90days. Specimens from the jejunum were processed for light and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical study was carried out using antibody against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Different morphometrical parameters were assessed. Specimens from GM-corn fed group showed different forms of structural changes. Focal destruction and loss of the villi leaving denuded mucosal surface alternating with stratified areas were observed, while some crypts appeared totally disrupted. Congested blood capillaries and focal infiltration with mononuclear cells were detected. Significant upregulation of PCNA expression, increase in number of goblet cells and a significant increase in both villous height and crypt depth were detected. Marked ultrastructural changes of some enterocytes with focal loss of the microvillous border were observed. Some enterocytes had vacuolated cytoplasm, swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER). Some cells had dark irregular nuclei with abnormally clumped chromatin. It could be concluded that consumption of GM-corn profoundly alters the jejunal histological structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. K-ras mutations, rectal crypt cells proliferation, and meat consumption in patients with left-sided colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, H; Matthew, J A; Gee, J M; Watson, M; Rhodes, M; Speakman, C T; Stebbings, W S; Kennedy, H J; Johnson, I T

    2000-02-01

    It has been suggested that N-nitroso compounds derived from meat may increase the risk of K-ras mutations in the human colon. We sought evidence of associations between red meat consumption, frequency and type of K-ras mutations in resected tumours, and the rate of crypt cell proliferation (CCP) in the normal mucosa of patients with left-sided colorectal carcinoma. Meat consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and CCP was determined in rectal biopsies obtained prior to surgery. K-ras mutations in the resected tumours were determined using a PCR-based oligonucleotide hybridization assay. Fifteen K-ras mutations were detected in tumours from 43 patients; 13/15 in codon 12, 3/15 in codon 13, and 1/15 in both codons 12 and 13. All mutations were G-->A or G-->T transitions. There was no statistically significant difference between intakes of red meat in patients with a K-ras mutation (92.4 +/- 9.7 g/day) and those without (82.3 +/- 7.7 g/day). Rectal CCP was significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls, but there was no correlation with meat consumption or K-ras mutation. These data do not support the hypothesis that meat consumption is a risk factor for acquisition of K-ras mutations during colorectal carcinogenesis.

  16. The identification of high and low risk groups for colorectal cancer using rectal mucosal crypt cell production rate (CCPR).

    PubMed

    Rooney, P S; Clarke, P A; Gifford, K A; Hardcastle, J D; Armitage, N C

    1993-07-01

    Rectal mucosal proliferation was measured in 116 individuals using the metaphase arrest technique crypt cell production rate (CCPR). CCPR was found to be significantly elevated in individuals with adenomas (n = 42, CCPR = 13 cc c-1h-1, range 7-25 Cl 10-15) compared with normals (n = 21, CCPR = 10 cc c-1h-1 range 5-24 Cl 7-11, Mann-Whitney P = 0.001 z = 3.2). Mucosal proliferation was increased among individuals who were undergoing adenoma follow up but in whom no further adenomas were found (n = 37 CCPR = 12 range 5-26 cc c-1h-1 Cl 10-14) compared to controls (Mann-Whitney P = 0.01 z = 2.4) Proliferation in vegetarians i.e. low risk (n = 16) was similar to controls. Measurement of proliferative indices in rectal mucosa by the stathmokinetic technique CCPR can discriminate between high and low risk groups for colorectal cancer.

  17. The response of murine intestinal crypts to short-range promethium-147 beta irradiation: deductions concerning clonogenic cell numbers and positions.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Potten, C S; Ghafoor, A; Moore, J V; Roberts, S A; Williams, P C

    1989-05-01

    An exteriorized loop of mouse intestine was exposed to 147Pm low-energy electrons, where the dose rate decreased by a factor of 5 from the base of the crypt to the top of the proliferative zone. A crypt survival curve was obtained, expressed in terms of exposure time. The shape of the curve was interpreted in terms of survival parameters for colony-forming cells (clonogens) derived using 137Cs gamma rays and the depth-dose curve measured for 147Pm electrons. It is concluded that the shape of the crypt survival curve using 147Pm electrons is inconsistent with the notion of either the presence of a large number of clonogens or a small number near the top of the proliferative zone. A computer fitting procedure showed that the best agreement between predicted and observed curves was achieved with 2.7 +/- 0.5 clonogens at cell position 5.6 +/- 0.6, in the putative stem-cell zone.

  18. The response of murine intestinal crypts to short-range promethium-147 beta irradiation: Deductions concerning clonogenic cell numbers and positions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.; Ghafoor, A.; Moore, J.V.; Roberts, S.A.; Williams, P.C.

    1989-05-01

    An exteriorized loop of mouse intestine was exposed to /sup 147/Pm low-energy electrons, where the dose rate decreased by a factor of 5 from the base of the crypt to the top of the proliferative zone. A crypt survival curve was obtained, expressed in terms of exposure time. The shape of the curve was interpreted in terms of survival parameters for colony-forming cells (clonogens) derived using /sup 137/Cs gamma rays and the depth-dose curve measured for /sup 147/Pm electrons. It is concluded that the shape of the crypt survival curve using /sup 147/Pm electrons is inconsistent with the notion of either the presence of a large number of clonogens or a small number near the top of the proliferative zone. A computer fitting procedure showed that the best agreement between predicted and observed curves was achieved with 2.7 +/- 0.5 clonogens at cell position 5.6 +/- 0.6, in the putative stem-cell zone.

  19. Selection of multipotent stem cells during morphogenesis of small intestinal crypts of Lieberkuhn is perturbed by stimulation of Lef-1/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melissa H; Huelsken, Joerg; Birchmeier, Walter; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2002-05-03

    Studies of chimeric mice have disclosed that the stem cell hierarchy in the small intestinal epithelium is established during formation of its proliferative units (crypts of Lieberkühn). This process involves a selection among several multipotential progenitors so that ultimately only one survives to supply descendants to the fully formed crypt. In this report, we examine the hypothesis that the level of beta-catenin (beta-cat)-mediated signaling is an important factor regulating this stem cell selection. In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, beta-catenin can partner with Lef-1/Tcf high mobility group (HMG) box transcription factors to control gene expression. Both Lef-1 and Tcf-4 mRNAs are produced in the fetal mouse small intestine. Tcf-4 expression is sustained, whereas Lef-1 levels fall as crypt formation is completed during the first two postnatal weeks. A Tcf-4 gene knockout is known to block intestinal epithelial proliferation in late fetal life. Therefore, to test the hypothesis, we enhanced beta-catenin signaling in a chimeric mouse model in which the stem cell selection could be monitored. A fusion protein containing the HMG box domain of Lef-1 linked to the trans-activation domain of beta-catenin (Lef-1/beta-cat) was constructed to promote direct stimulation of signaling without being retained in the cytoplasm through interactions with E-cadherin and Apc/Axin. Lef-1/beta-cat was expressed in 129/Sv embryonic stem cell-derived small intestinal epithelial progenitors present in developing B6-ROSA26<-->129/Sv chimeras. Lef-1/beta-cat stimulated expression of a known beta-catenin target (E-cadherin), suppressed expression of Apc and Axin, and induced apoptosis in 129/Sv but not in neighboring B6-ROSA26 epithelial cells. This apoptotic response was not associated with any detectable changes in cell division within the Lef-1/beta-cat-expressing epithelium. By the time crypt development was completed, all 129/Sv epithelial cells were lost. These results

  20. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Anita; Stearns, Adam T.; Park, Peter J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Rhoads, David B.; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  1. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  2. Comparison of goblet cell staining methods in jejunal mucosa of turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Osho, S O; Wang, T; Horn, N L; Adeola, O

    2017-03-01

    This study compared the intestinal goblet cell density of turkey poults at 2 different ages using Alcian blue-periodic acid-Shiff (AB-PAS) and mucicarmine stains. Neutral mucins are stained with periodic acid-Shiff whereas acidic mucins are stained with Alcian blue. Mucicarmine and AB-PAS are specific to the mucins of epithelial origin. Mucicarmine has only been used for the assessment of goblet cells in human specimens, and it may have advantages for use in animals as a result of the methodological simplicity of staining as compared to AB-PAS. A mid-section of jejunum was taken from 80 turkey poults at 21 and 28 d, and fixed in 10% buffered formalin for 48 h. Each fixed tissue was dehydrated with ethanol, cleared with Sub-X, placed in paraffin wax, prepared on 2 slides, cleared and hydrated. The 2 slides were randomly assigned to 2 treatments which consisted of AB-PAS and mucicarmine stains in a completely randomized design. Goblet cell counts were taken from four villi per slide and the villus height was measured and averaged. There was no difference in the goblet cell density between the staining methods AB-PAS and mucicarmine at 21 or 28 d posthatch. These results show that both staining methods are viable for assessment of goblet cell density in turkey poults. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  3. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  4. The RBE-LET relationship for rodent intestinal crypt cell survival, testes weight loss, and multicellular spheroid cell survival after heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E. L.; Powers-Risius, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents data for survival of mouse intestinal crypt cells, mouse testes weight loss as an indicator of survival of spermatogonial stem cells, and survival of rat 9L spheroid cells after irradiation in the plateau region of unmodified particle beams ranging in mass from 4He to 139La. The LET values range from 1.6 to 953 keV/microns. These studies examine the RBE-LET relationship for two normal tissues and for an in vitro tissue model, multicellular spheroids. When the RBE values are plotted as a function of LET, the resulting curve is characterized by a region in which RBE increases with LET, a peak RBE at an LET value of 100 keV/microns, and a region of decreasing RBE at LETs greater than 100 keV/microns. Inactivation cross sections (sigma) for these three biological systems have been calculated from the exponential terminal slope of the dose-response relationship for each ion. For this determination the dose is expressed as particle fluence and the parameter sigma indicates effect per particle. A plot of sigma versus LET shows that the curve for testes weight loss is shifted to the left, indicating greater radiosensitivity at lower LETs than for crypt cell and spheroid cell survival. The curves for cross section versus LET for all three model systems show similar characteristics with a relatively linear portion below 100 keV/microns and a region of lessened slope in the LET range above 100 keV/microns for testes and spheroids. The data indicate that the effectiveness per particle increases as a function of LET and, to a limited extent, Z, at LET values greater than 100 keV/microns. Previously published results for spread Bragg peaks are also summarized, and they suggest that RBE is dependent on both the LET and the Z of the particle.

  5. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, P<0.001) and showed significant suppression of multi-crypt foci (~30-50%, P<0.05-0.001). Omeprazole produced significant dose-response effects on inhibition of multi-crypt foci (≥4). Omeprazole treatment in human colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  6. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  7. Jejunal perforation: an unusual presentation of metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in an immunosuppressed patient.

    PubMed

    Hitchen, N; Warnapala, D; Fisher, R M; Dua, J; Pratsou, P; Freebairn, A

    2017-01-06

    We report the rare occurrence of a small bowel perforation secondary to a metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). A 70-year-old woman, who had previously undergone renal transplantation, presented with severe, sudden-onset abdominal pain. She was peritonitic on initial examination, with evidence of free intra-abdominal air on radiographic imaging. During an exploratory laparotomy, she was found to have a perforated jejunum secondary to disseminated metastases seen throughout her peritoneum. Following histopathological analysis, as well as further imaging studies, the primary malignancy was eventually identified as a cSCC on her upper back. Palliative care was started and the patient died 8 weeks following her initial presentation. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. CD44 and TLR4 mediate hyaluronic acid regulation of Lgr5+ stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal growth in postnatal and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Terrence E; Santhanam, Srikanth; Foster, Lynne; Ciorba, Matthew; Stenson, William F

    2015-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid, a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix, binds to CD44 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We previously addressed the role of hyaluronic acid in small intestinal and colonic growth in mice. We addressed the role of exogenous hyaluronic acid by giving hyaluronic acid intraperitoneally and the role of endogenous hyaluronic acid by giving PEP-1, a peptide that blocks hyaluronic acid binding to its receptors. Exogenous hyaluronic acid increased epithelial proliferation but had no effect on intestinal length. PEP-1 resulted in a shortened small intestine and colon and diminished epithelial proliferation. In the current study, we sought to determine whether the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth were mediated by signaling through CD44 or TLR4 by giving exogenous hyaluronic acid or PEP-1 twice a week from 3-8 wk of age to wild-type, CD44(-/-), and TLR4(-/-) mice. These studies demonstrated that signaling through both CD44 and TLR4 were important in mediating the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth in the small intestine and colon. Extending our studies to early postnatal life, we assessed the effects of exogenous hyaluronic acid and PEP-1 on Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation and crypt fission. Administration of PEP-1 to Lgr5(+) reporter mice from postnatal day 7 to day 14 decreased Lgr5(+) cell proliferation and decreased crypt fission. These studies indicate that endogenous hyaluronic acid increases Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal lengthening and that these effects are dependent on signaling through CD44 and TLR4.

  9. CD44 and TLR4 mediate hyaluronic acid regulation of Lgr5+ stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal growth in postnatal and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Terrence E.; Santhanam, Srikanth; Foster, Lynne; Ciorba, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid, a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix, binds to CD44 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We previously addressed the role of hyaluronic acid in small intestinal and colonic growth in mice. We addressed the role of exogenous hyaluronic acid by giving hyaluronic acid intraperitoneally and the role of endogenous hyaluronic acid by giving PEP-1, a peptide that blocks hyaluronic acid binding to its receptors. Exogenous hyaluronic acid increased epithelial proliferation but had no effect on intestinal length. PEP-1 resulted in a shortened small intestine and colon and diminished epithelial proliferation. In the current study, we sought to determine whether the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth were mediated by signaling through CD44 or TLR4 by giving exogenous hyaluronic acid or PEP-1 twice a week from 3–8 wk of age to wild-type, CD44−/−, and TLR4−/− mice. These studies demonstrated that signaling through both CD44 and TLR4 were important in mediating the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth in the small intestine and colon. Extending our studies to early postnatal life, we assessed the effects of exogenous hyaluronic acid and PEP-1 on Lgr5+ stem cell proliferation and crypt fission. Administration of PEP-1 to Lgr5+ reporter mice from postnatal day 7 to day 14 decreased Lgr5+ cell proliferation and decreased crypt fission. These studies indicate that endogenous hyaluronic acid increases Lgr5+ stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal lengthening and that these effects are dependent on signaling through CD44 and TLR4. PMID:26505972

  10. The glycan-binding protein galectin-1 controls survival of epithelial cells along the crypt-villus axis of small intestine.

    PubMed

    Muglia, C; Mercer, N; Toscano, M A; Schattner, M; Pozner, R; Cerliani, J P; Gobbi, R Papa; Rabinovich, G A; Docena, G H

    2011-05-26

    Intestinal epithelial cells serve as mechanical barriers and active components of the mucosal immune system. These cells migrate from the crypt to the tip of the villus, where different stimuli can differentially affect their survival. Here we investigated, using in vitro and in vivo strategies, the role of galectin-1 (Gal-1), an evolutionarily conserved glycan-binding protein, in modulating the survival of human and mouse enterocytes. Both Gal-1 and its specific glyco-receptors were broadly expressed in small bowel enterocytes. Exogenous Gal-1 reduced the viability of enterocytes through apoptotic mechanisms involving activation of both caspase and mitochondrial pathways. Consistent with these findings, apoptotic cells were mainly detected at the tip of the villi, following administration of Gal-1. Moreover, Gal-1-deficient (Lgals1(-/-)) mice showed longer villi compared with their wild-type counterparts in vivo. In an experimental model of starvation, fasted wild-type mice displayed reduced villi and lower intestinal weight compared with Lgals1(-/-) mutant mice, an effect reflected by changes in the frequency of enterocyte apoptosis. Of note, human small bowel enterocytes were also prone to this pro-apoptotic effect. Thus, Gal-1 is broadly expressed in mucosal tissue and influences the viability of human and mouse enterocytes, an effect which might influence the migration of these cells from the crypt, the integrity of the villus and the epithelial barrier function.

  11. Apoptosis induction in colon cancer cell lines and alteration of aberrant crypt foci in rat colon by purple rice (Oryza sativa L. var. glutinosa) extracts.

    PubMed

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Summart, Ratasak; Chewonarin, Teera

    2014-01-01

    Crude ethanol extracts (CEE) of purple rice was fractionated to obtain hexane soluble (HSF) and ethyl acetate soluble fractions (EASF). Total antioxidant capacity was higher in CEE than the HSF and EASF. However, HSF exhibited strong antiproliferation and apoptosis induction against colon cancer cell lines, both p53 wild-type (RKO) and mutant (SW620) strains. Then, the CEE was used to determine the effects on the progression of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a preneoplastic lesion seen in colon carcinogenesis in rats. Male Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected of 40 mg/kg body weight dimethylhydrazin (DMH) once weekly for 2 wk. After 2 wk, rats were orally administered ethanol extract at 100 and 1000 mg/kg body weight, for 4 wk. Rats fed with only the high dose of CEE had significantly decreased numbers of ACF per rat (45.56%) and crypt multiplicity (AC/focus) (16.67%) compared to rats that received DMH alone. The result also demonstrated that CEE induced apoptosis in colonic epithelium cells of rat received colon carcinogen as detected the increasing of caspase-3 activity. This finding could be concluded that purple rice extracts inhibited aberrant colonic epithelial cell progression via apoptosis induction.

  12. Saireito (TJ-114), a Japanese traditional herbal medicine, reduces 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice by inhibiting cytokine-mediated apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinichi; Hayashi, Shusaku; Kitahara, Yumeno; Nagasawa, Koyo; Aono, Hitomi; Shibata, Junichiro; Utsumi, Daichi; Amagase, Kikuko; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Clinical chemotherapy frequently causes intestinal mucositis as a side effect, which is accompanied by severe diarrhea. We recently showed that the cytokine-mediated apoptotic pathway might be important for the development of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Saireito, the traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo) medicine, is widely used to treat diarrhea and various inflammatory diseases in Japan. In the present study, we investigated the effect of saireito on 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice, especially in relation to apoptosis in the intestinal crypt. Male C57BL/6 mice were given 5-FU (50 mg/kg), i.p. once daily for 6 days. Intestinal mucositis was evaluated histochemically. Saireito (100-1000 mg/kg) was administered p.o. twice daily for 6 days. Repeated 5-FU treatment caused severe intestinal mucositis including morphological damage, which was accompanied by body weight loss and diarrhea. Daily administration of saireito reduced the severity of intestinal mucositis in a dose-dependent manner. Body weight loss and diarrhea during 5-FU treatment were also significantly attenuated by saireito administration. The number of apoptotic and caspase-3-activated cells in the intestinal crypt was increased, and was accompanied by up-regulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β mRNA within 24 h of the first 5-FU injection. However, all of these measures were significantly lower after saireito administration. These results suggest that saireito attenuates 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. This action may come from the reduction of apoptosis in the intestinal crypt via suppression of the up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, saireito may be clinically useful for the prevention of intestinal mucositis during cancer chemotherapy.

  13. Site of Substrate Stimulation of Jejunal Sucrase in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ulshen, Martin H.; Grand, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    To identify the site of stimulation of sucrase by a sucrose diet, changes in sucrase-specific activity of jejunal mucosa were studied after introduction of sucrose diet to carbohydrate-deprived rats. Results were correlated with simultaneous changes in villus gradients of sucrase-specific activity. Simultaneous with the introduction of sucrose diet, [3H]thymidine (100 μCi) was administered intravenously, and rates of cell migration measured during adaptation to the new diet. After a 72-h fast, rats fed sucrose diet for 6, 12, or 18 h showed no change in sucrase-specific activity in either whole mucosa or villus gradients. However, within 18-24 h after starting a sucrose diet, there was a marked rise in whole mucosal sucrase-specific activity above fasting values (99 ± 14 vs. 38 ± 4 μM glucose/min per g protein, P < 0.001) in association with the development of a region of increased activity at the lower villus (154 ± 22 vs. 60 ± 9 μM glucose/min per g protein, P < 0.02, but with no change in villus tip activity (56 ± 5 vs. 46 ± 8 μM glucose/min per g protein). Similar changes were seen in animals fed 24 h of sucrose diet after a 72-h carbohydratefree diet. Fasted animals fed sucrose diet for 36 h had increased sucrase-specific activity at the villus tip (144 ± 11 μM glucose/min per g protein) as well as at the lower villus region, and this pattern persisted at 1 wk of sucrose diet. Maximal activity patterns for isomaltase and maltase paralleled those for sucrase, but the villus gradients for lactase were unaffected by sucrose diet. The region of maximal sucrase-specific activity always coincided with or followed the leading edge of radioactivity as determined by liquid scintillation counting. Therefore, sucrose-mediated changes in sucrase activity of the jejunal mucosa in the rat appear to be initiated at the level of the crypt epithelial cell and are expressed after a latent period of 18-24 h during which these cells mature and migrate toward the

  14. Ex vivo culture of intestinal crypt organoids as a model system for assessing cell death induction in intestinal epithelial cells and enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, T; Luks, L; Kostadinova, F; Zimberlin, C; Medema, J P; Leist, M; Brunner, T

    2014-05-15

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) not only have a critical function in the absorption of nutrients, but also act as a physical barrier between our body and the outside world. Damage and death of the epithelial cells lead to the breakdown of this barrier function and inflammation due to access of the immune system to compounds of the intestinal flora. Intestinal epithelial damage is frequently associated with various inflammatory disorders, chemo- and radiotherapy as well as drug-mediated toxicity. Until recently, intestinal epithelial-damaging activities of drugs and treatments could be tested only in vivo in animal models because of the poor survival rate of primary IECs ex vivo. The three-dimensional culture and outgrowth of intestinal crypt stem cells into organoids have offered new possibilities to culture and study IECs ex vivo. Here we demonstrate that intestinal organoids are a useful and physiologically relevant model system to study cell death and survival in IECs. We further describe a number of microscopy-based as well as colorimetric methods to monitor and score survival and death of intestinal organoids. Finally, the comparison of organoids isolated from gene-deficient mice and wild-type mice allows investigating the role of specific genes in the regulation of IEC death. Owing to their comparable structure and behavior, intestinal organoids may serve as an interesting and physiologically relevant surrogate system for large- and mid-scale in vitro testing of intestinal epithelium-damaging drugs and toxins, and for the investigation of cell death pathways.

  15. The role of cell proliferation and crypt fission in adenoma aggressiveness: a comparison of ileoanal pouch and rectal adenomas in familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R. K. S.; Clark, S. K.; Tomlinson, I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim In patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), ileoanal pouch cancer is rare whereas rectal cancer is common, despite polyp initiation at the two sites being similar at the molecular level. This study investigated whether the disparity in adenoma aggressiveness reflects underlying differences in histogenesis. Method Normal mucosal biopsies and 2–3 mm adenomas from patients with FAP were dissected into individual crypts. Crypt area, morphology, fission and mitoses were analysed for crypts from pouch, rectum and supra-anastomotic ileum. Immunohistochemistry of similar archival samples was performed for lysozyme, β-catenin and TP53 expression. Results The morphology of normal crypts was similar at each site, although crypt area differed. The area of normal pouch crypts was intermediate between rectum and ileum. The area of adenomatous crypts of rectum and pouch was similar, but the latter had increased asymmetrical fission. Crypt mitoses were proportional to area in all tissues, but crypt fission was reduced in adenomatous crypts from the rectum compared with the pouch. Pouch adenomas retained lysozyme expression as seen in normal ileum. Nuclear β-catenin accumulation was similar, but TP53 expression was increased in rectal adenomas. Conclusion Diminutive polyps from rectum and pouch differ in morphology and proliferation. Aggressiveness in rectal polyps is not conferred by increased crypt proliferation, fission, or activation of the Wnt signalling pathway. Increased TP53 expression suggests other molecular mechanisms may be responsible. While crypt mitoses are proportional to crypt area, the threshold for fission may be site specific, indicating that tissue origin may influence histogenesis and thus malignant potential. PMID:20002690

  16. Use of transgenic mice to map cis-acting elements in the intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene (Fabpi) that control its cell lineage- specific and regional patterns of expression along the duodenal-colonic and crypt-villus axes of the gut epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    to sustain high levels of hGH production after weaning. Nucleotides -277 to -185 contain part of a domain conserved between the three orthologous Fabpi genes (nucleotides -240 to -159), a 24-bp element (nucleotides -212 to -188) that binds nuclear factors present in colonic but not small intestinal epithelial cells, and a portion of a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein footprint (C/EBP alpha, nucleotides - 188 to -167). Removal of nucleotides -277 to -185 (yielding I-FABP-184 to +28/hGH+3) results in inappropriate expression of hGH in proliferating and nonproliferating epithelial cells located in the mid and upper portions of duodenal, jejunal, ileal, and colonic crypts without affecting the "shape" of the cephalocaudal gradient of transgene expression.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1527171

  17. Effects of dietary administering chitosan on growth performance, jejunal morphology, jejunal mucosal sIgA, occludin, claudin-1 and TLR4 expression in weaned piglets challenged by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dingfu; Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Xionggui; Feng, Zemeng; Wang, Jinquan

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how chitosan (COS) affects intestinal mucosal barrier function and to further explain mechanisms of COS on growth performance. Thirty piglets, weaned at 21 days of age, were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli during preliminary trial period. Three groups of Piglets in individual pens were fed a corn-soybean meal diet containing no addition, 50 mg/kg chlortetracycline, or 300 mg/kg COS for 21 days. Jejunal morphology and histology were analyzed under light microscope. The concentrations of occludin proteins were determined by western blot. Immunohistochemistry assays were used to determine secretory immunoglobulin (sIgA) level. Real-time PCR was used to detect Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Claudin-1 in jejunal mucosa. Feeding COS or chlortetracycline reduced (P<0.05) feed conversion ratio. Villus length, villus length/crypt depth, and goblet cells, were increased (P<0.05), but villus width and crypt depth were decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. Intraepithelial lymphocytes were higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both chlortetracycline and control groups. Occludin protein expression was increased (P<0.01) in the COS group, but was decreased (P<0.05) in the chlortetracycline group. Expression of sIgA protein was higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both control and chlortetracycline groups, however TLR4 mRNA expression was decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. There was no difference in expression of claudin-1 among the three groups. In conclusion, chitosan and the antibiotic have similar effects in promoting piglet growth and reducing intestinal inflammation, but different effects on intestinal mucosal barrier function. This indicates that chitosan can replace chlortetracycline as a feed additive for piglets. © 2013.

  18. Using crypts as iris minutiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Feng; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2013-05-01

    Iris recognition is one of the most reliable biometric technologies for identity recognition and verification, but it has not been used in a forensic context because the representation and matching of iris features are not straightforward for traditional iris recognition techniques. In this paper we concentrate on the iris crypt as a visible feature used to represent the characteristics of irises in a similar way to fingerprint minutiae. The matching of crypts is based on their appearances and locations. The number of matching crypt pairs found between two irises can be used for identity verification and the convenience of manual inspection makes iris crypts a potential candidate for forensic applications.

  19. Jejunal Brush Border Microvillous Alterations in Giardia muris-Infected Mice: Role of T Lymphocytes and Interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K. G.-E.; Logan, M. R.; Klammer, G. M.; Teoh, D. A.; Buret, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal colonization with the protozoan Giardia causes diffuse brush border microvillous alterations and disaccharidase deficiencies, which in turn are responsible for intestinal malabsorption and maldigestion. The role of T cells and/or cytokines in the pathogenesis of Giardia-induced microvillous injury remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the role of T cells and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brush border pathophysiology of acute murine giardiasis in vivo. Athymic nude (nu−/nu−) CD-1 mice and isogenic immunocompetent (nu+/nu+) CD-1 mice (4 weeks old) received an axenic Giardia muris trophozoite inoculum or vehicle (control) via orogastric gavage. Weight gain and food intake were assessed daily. On day 6, segments of jejunum were assessed for parasite load, brush border ultrastructure, IL-6 content, maltase and sucrase activities, villus-crypt architecture, and intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) infiltration. Despite similar parasitic loads on day 6, infected immunocompetent animals, but not infected nude mice, showed a diffuse loss of brush border microvillous surface area, which was correlated with a significant reduction in maltase and sucrase activities and a decrease in jejunal IL-6 concentration. In both athymic control and infected mice, jejunal brush border surface area and disaccharidases were high, but levels of tissue IL-6 were low and comparable to the concentration measured in immunocompetent infected animals. In both immunocompetent and nude mice, infection caused a small but significant increase in the numbers of IELs. These findings suggest that the enterocyte brush border injury and malfunction seen in giardiasis is, at least in part, mediated by thymus-derived T lymphocytes and that suppressed jejunal IL-6 does not necessarily accompany microvillous shortening. PMID:10816492

  20. Patterns of Proliferative Activity in the Colonic Crypt Determine Crypt Stability and Rates of Somatic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Michor, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cells in the colon are arranged in cylindrical structures called crypts in which cellular proliferation and migration are tightly regulated. We hypothesized that the proliferation patterns of cells may determine the stability of crypts as well as the rates of somatic evolution towards colorectal tumorigenesis. Here, we propose a linear process model of colonic epithelial cells that explicitly takes into account the proliferation kinetics of cells as a function of cell position within the crypt. Our results indicate that proliferation kinetics has significant influence on the speed of cell movement, kinetics of mutation propagation, and sensitivity of the system to selective effects of mutated cells. We found that, of all proliferation curves tested, those with mitotic activities concentrated near the stem cell, including the actual proliferation kinetics determined in in vivo labeling experiments, have a greater ability of delaying the rate of mutation accumulation in colonic stem cells compared to hypothetical proliferation curves with mitotic activities focused near the top of the crypt column. Our model can be used to investigate the dynamics of proliferation and mutation accumulation in spatially arranged tissues. PMID:23785264

  1. The drug monosodium luminol (GVT) preserves crypt-villus epithelial organization and allows survival of intestinal T cells in mice infected with the ts1 retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Virginia L; Yan, Mingshan; Kuang, Xianghong; Kim, Soo-Jin; Wong, Paul K Y

    2009-02-21

    Of the cytopathic retroviruses that affect mammals, including HIV-1, many selectively infect CD4+ T cells and cause immunosuppressive syndromes. These diseases destroy both the thymus and the small and large intestines, after infecting and killing T-lineage cells in both tissues. A mutant of the murine leukemia retrovirus MoMuLV-TB, called ts1, causes this syndrome in susceptible strains of mice. In FVB/N strain mice that are infected at birth, thymic atrophy, CD4+ T cell loss, intestinal collapse, body wasting, and death occur by approximately 30-40 days postinfection (dpi). Apoptosis of ts1-infected T-lineage cells, in the thymus, peripheral lymphoid system and intestines is caused by accumulation of the ts1 mutant viral envelope preprotein gPr80(env), which is inefficiently cleaved into the mature viral proteins gp70 and PrP15E. We show here that ts1 infection in the small intestine is followed by loss of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and cell cycling gradients (along the crypt-villus axes), accumulation of gPr80(env) in intestinal cells, apoptosis of developing T cells in the lamina propria (LP), and intestinal collapse by approximately 30 dpi. In infected mice treated with the antioxidant drug monosodium luminol (GVT), however, normal intestinal epithelial cell gradients are still in place at 30 dpi, and IECs covering both the crypts and villi contain large amounts of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2. In addition, no apoptotic cells are present, and accumulated gpr80(env) is absent from the tissue at this time. We conclude that GVT treatment can make ts1 a noncytopathic virus for intestinal lymphoid cells, as it does for thymocytes [25]. As in the thymus, GVT may protect the intestine by reducing oxidant stress in infected intestinal T cells, perhaps by prevention of gPr80(env) accumulation via Nrf2 upregulation in the IECs. These results identify GVT as a potential therapy for intestinal diseases or inflammatory

  2. Characteristics of nobiletin-induced effects on jejunal contractility.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yong-Jian; Chen, Da-Peng; Lv, Bo-Chao; Liu, Fang-Fei; Wang, Li; Lin, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, exhibits multiple biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-insulin resistance effects. The present study found that nobiletin exerted significant stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments in all 6 different low contractile states, and meanwhile significant inhibitory effects in all 6 different high contractile states, showing characteristics of bidirectional regulation (BR). Nobiletin-exerted BR on jejunal contractility was abolished in the presence of c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib or Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil. In the presence of neuroxin tetrodotoxin, nobiletin only exerted stimulatory effects on jejunal contractility in both low and high contractile states. Hemicholinium-3 and atropine partially blocked nobiletin-exerted stimulatory effects on jejunal contractility in low-Ca(2+)-induced low contractile state. Phentolamine or propranolol or l-NG-nitro-arginine significantly blocked nobiletin-exerted inhibitory effects on jejunal contractility in high-Ca(2+)-induced high contractile state respectively. The effects of nobiletin on myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, MLCK protein content, and myosin light chain phosphorylation extent were also bidirectional. In summary, nobiletin-exerted BR depends on the contractile states of rat jejunal segments. Nobiletin-exerted BR requires the enteric nervous system, interstitial cell of Cajal, Ca(2+), and myosin phosphorylation-related mechanisms.

  3. Corrupted colonic crypt fission in carcinogen-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    The colonic crypts in rats reproduce themselves by symmetric fission at the base of the crypts, and proceeding upwards, generate two separate identical crypts. Recently we reported corrupted colonic crypt fission (CCCF) in rats with colonic carcinoma. Here we investigated whether CCCF also occurred in the colonic mucosa without carcinoma in carcinogen-treated rats. Filed Swiss-roll sections from 35 male rats (25 treated with 1,2-dimethyhydrazine (DMH) suspended in EDTA solution, and 10 EDTA-treated) were reviewed. CCCF were regarded those with either asymmetric basal fission, asymmetric lateral sprouting/lateral fission, basal dilatations, or spatial aberrations of the normal (vertical) axis. 202 CCCF (38%) were recorded amongst 533 crypts with fission in DMH-treated rats, and only one CCCF (0.1%) was found amongst 571 crypts with fission in EDTA-treated rats (p<0.05). The basal aspect of four adenomas included in Swiss roll sections exhibited CCCF lined either with indigenous (non-dysplastic) epithelium or with dysplastic epithelium. It was demonstrated that CCCF without dysplasia develop in carcinogen-treated SD rats. As judged by the figures presented, the possibility that the epithelium in those corrupted crypts was successively replaced by top-down growing dysplastic cells, could not be totally rejected. This is the first report showing that non-dysplastic CCCF may antedate the very early stages of colonic carcinogenesis in SD rats.

  4. Corrupted colonic crypt fission in carcinogen-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background The colonic crypts in rats reproduce themselves by symmetric fission at the base of the crypts, and proceeding upwards, generate two separate identical crypts. Recently we reported corrupted colonic crypt fission (CCCF) in rats with colonic carcinoma. Here we investigated whether CCCF also occurred in the colonic mucosa without carcinoma in carcinogen-treated rats. Methods Filed Swiss-roll sections from 35 male rats (25 treated with 1,2-dimethyhydrazine (DMH) suspended in EDTA solution, and 10 EDTA-treated) were reviewed. CCCF were regarded those with either asymmetric basal fission, asymmetric lateral sprouting/lateral fission, basal dilatations, or spatial aberrations of the normal (vertical) axis. Results 202 CCCF (38%) were recorded amongst 533 crypts with fission in DMH-treated rats, and only one CCCF (0.1%) was found amongst 571 crypts with fission in EDTA-treated rats (p<0.05). The basal aspect of four adenomas included in Swiss roll sections exhibited CCCF lined either with indigenous (non-dysplastic) epithelium or with dysplastic epithelium. Conclusion It was demonstrated that CCCF without dysplasia develop in carcinogen-treated SD rats. As judged by the figures presented, the possibility that the epithelium in those corrupted crypts was successively replaced by top-down growing dysplastic cells, could not be totally rejected. This is the first report showing that non-dysplastic CCCF may antedate the very early stages of colonic carcinogenesis in SD rats. PMID:28273142

  5. Effects of chronic 137Cs ingestion on barrier properties of jejunal epithelium in rats.

    PubMed

    Dublineau, I; Grison, S; Grandcolas, L; Baudelin, C; Paquet, F; Voisin, P; Aigueperse, J; Gourmelon, P

    2007-05-15

    Environmental contamination by 137Cs is of particular public health interest because of the various sources of fallout originating from nuclear weapons, radiological source disruptions, and the Chernobyl disaster. This dispersion may lead to a chronic ecosystem contamination and subsequent ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. The aim of this study was to thus determine the impact of a chronic ingestion of low-dose 137Cs on small intestine functions in rats. The animals received 150 Bq per day in drinking water over 3 mo. At these environmental doses, 137Cs contamination did not modify the crypt and villus architecture. In addition, epithelial integrity was maintained following the chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as demonstrated by histological analyses (no breakdown of the surface mucosa) and electrical transepithelial parameters (no change in potential difference and tissue conductance). Furthermore, cesium contamination seemed to induce contradictory effects on the apoptosis pathway, with an increase in the gene expression of Fas/FasL and a decrease in the apoptotic cell number present in intestinal mucosa. No marked inflammation was observed following chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as indicated by neutrophil infiltration and gene expression of cytokines and chemokines. Results indicated no imbalance in the Th1/Th2 response induced by cesium at low doses. Finally, evaluation of the functionality of the jejunal epithelium in rats contaminated chronically with 137Cs did not demonstrate changes in the maximal response to carbachol, nor in the cholinergic sensitivity of rat jejunal epithelium. In conclusion, this study shows that chronic ingestion of 137Cs over 3 mo at postaccidental doses exerts few biological effects on the epithelium of rat jejunum with regard to morphology, inflammation status, apoptosis/proliferation processes, and secretory functions.

  6. Critical role of microbiota within cecal crypts on the regenerative capacity of the intestinal epithelium following surgical stress.

    PubMed

    Zaborin, Alexander; Krezalek, Monika; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Defazio, Jennifer R; Setia, Namrata; Belogortseva, Natalia; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Guo, Qiti; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2017-02-01

    Cecal crypts represent a unique niche that are normally occupied by the commensal microbiota. Due to their density and close proximity to stem cells, microbiota within cecal crypts may modulate epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that surgical stress, a process that invariably involves a short period of starvation, antibiotic exposure, and tissue injury, results in cecal crypt evacuation of their microbiota. Crypts devoid of their microbiota display pathophysiological features characterized by abnormal stem cell activation as judged by leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) staining, expansion of the proliferative zone toward the tips of the crypts, and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, crypts devoid of their microbiota display loss of their regenerative capacity as assessed by their ability to form organoids ex vivo. When a four-member human pathogen community isolated from the stool of a critically ill patient is introduced into the cecum of mice with empty crypts, crypts become occupied by the pathogens and further disruption of crypt homeostasis is observed. Fecal microbiota transplantation restores the cecal crypts' microbiota, normalizes homeostasis within crypts, and reestablishes crypt regenerative capacity. Taken together, these findings define an emerging role for the microbiota within cecal crypts to maintain epithelial cell homeostasis in a manner that may enhance recovery in response to the physiological stress imposed by the process of surgery.

  7. Memory based active contour algorithm using pixel-level classified images for colon crypt segmentation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Assaf; Rivlin, Ehud; Shimshoni, Ilan; Sabo, Edmond

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method for detection and segmentation of crypts in colon biopsies. Most of the approaches proposed in the literature try to segment the crypts using only the biopsy image without understanding the meaning of each pixel. The proposed method differs in that we segment the crypts using an automatically generated pixel-level classification image of the original biopsy image and handle the artifacts due to the sectioning process and variance in color, shape and size of the crypts. The biopsy image pixels are classified to nuclei, immune system, lumen, cytoplasm, stroma and goblet cells. The crypts are then segmented using a novel active contour approach, where the external force is determined by the semantics of each pixel and the model of the crypt. The active contour is applied for every lumen candidate detected using the pixel-level classification. Finally, a false positive crypt elimination process is performed to remove segmentation errors. This is done by measuring their adherence to the crypt model using the pixel level classification results. The method was tested on 54 biopsy images containing 4944 healthy and 2236 cancerous crypts, resulting in 87% detection of the crypts with 9% of false positive segments (segments that do not represent a crypt). The segmentation accuracy of the true positive segments is 96%.

  8. Preferential Entry of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Hc Domain through Intestinal Crypt Cells and Targeting to Cholinergic Neurons of the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R.

    2012-01-01

    Botulism, characterized by flaccid paralysis, commonly results from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) absorption across the epithelial barrier from the digestive tract and then dissemination through the blood circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve terminals. The trafficking pathway of BoNT/A passage through the intestinal barrier is not yet fully understood. We report that intralumenal administration of purified BoNT/A into mouse ileum segment impaired spontaneous muscle contractions and abolished the smooth muscle contractions evoked by electric field stimulation. Entry of BoNT/A into the mouse upper small intestine was monitored with fluorescent HcA (half C-terminal domain of heavy chain) which interacts with cell surface receptor(s). We show that HcA preferentially recognizes a subset of neuroendocrine intestinal crypt cells, which probably represent the entry site of the toxin through the intestinal barrier, then targets specific neurons in the submucosa and later (90–120 min) in the musculosa. HcA mainly binds to certain cholinergic neurons of both submucosal and myenteric plexuses, but also recognizes, although to a lower extent, other neuronal cells including glutamatergic and serotoninergic neurons in the submucosa. Intestinal cholinergic neuron targeting by HcA could account for the inhibition of intestinal peristaltism and secretion observed in botulism, but the consequences of the targeting to non-cholinergic neurons remains to be determined. PMID:22438808

  9. The utility of [11C] dihydrotetrabenazine positron emission tomography scanning in assessing β-cell performance after sleeve gastrectomy and duodenal-jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    Inabnet, William B.; Milone, Luca; Harris, Paul; Durak, Evren; Freeby, Matthew J.; Ahmed, Leaque; Sebastian, Manu; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Bessler, Marc; Korner, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) on glucose homeostasis and to evaluate the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) scanning for assessing β-cell mass. Methods Goto-Kakizaki rats were divided into 4 groups: control, sham, SG, or DJB. Oral glucose tolerance, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured before and after surgery. Before and 90 days after treatment, [11C] DTBZ micro PET scanning was performed. Results The control and sham animals gained more weight compared with SG and DJB animals (P ≤ .05). Compared with control animals, the glucose area under the curve was lower in DJB animals 30 and 45 days after operations (P ≤ .05). At killing, GLP-1 levels were greater in the DJB group compared with sham and SG (P ≤ .05), whereas insulin levels were greater in both DJB and SG compared with sham (P ≤ .05). With PET scanning, the 90-day posttreatment mean vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 binding index was greatest in the DJB animals (2.45) compared with SG (1.17), both of which were greater than baseline control animals (0.81). Conclusion In type 2 diabetic rodents, DJB leads to improved glucose homeostasis and an increase in VMAT2 density as measured by PET scanning. PMID:19828168

  10. A milk diet partly containing soy protein does not change growth but regulates jejunal proteins in young goats.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, S; Rudolph, P E; Albrecht, D; Schoenhusen, U; Zitnan, R; Tomek, W; Huber, K; Voigt, J; Metges, C C

    2007-09-01

    Soy protein is known to alter intestinal function and structure. We determined in young goats whether a diet partly containing soy protein differently affects intestinal morphology and the jejunal and hepatic proteome as compared with a milk diet. Fourteen male 2-wk-old White German dairy goat kids were fed comparable diets based on whole cow's milk in which 35% of the crude protein was casein (milk protein group; MP) or soy protein supplemented by indispensable AA (SPAA) for 34 d (n = 7/group). Body weight gain and food efficiency were not different. Jejunal and hepatic tissue was collected to determine intestinal morphology by microscopy and protein repertoire by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Jejunal crypt depth was reduced and villus height to crypt depth ratio was higher in SPAA than in milk protein. Out of 131 proteins identified, 32 proteins were found to be differently expressed in both groups. In SPAA, down-regulated jejunal proteins were involved in processes related to cytoskeleton generation, protein, lipid, and energy metabolism. Downregulated hepatic proteins were related to glycolysis and Krebs cycle. Thirteen proteins were upregulated in SPAA. Among these, 2 hepatic proteins were related to carbohydrate breakdown. The other 11 jejunal proteins were involved in cytoskeleton assembly, proteolysis, and carbohydrate breakdown. In addition, glutathione-S-transferase was found to be upregulated in the medial jejunum. In conclusion, a SPAA diet as compared with a milk diet was related to changes in jejunal morphology and jejunal proteins relevant for protein turnover, energy metabolism, and cytoskeleton assembly with no apparent impact on animal BW gain.

  11. Colorectal Cancers Mimic Structural Organization of Normal Colonic Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Cernat, Laura; Blaj, Cristina; Jackstadt, Rene; Brandl, Lydia; Engel, Jutta; Hermeking, Heiko; Jung, Andreas; Kirchner, Thomas; Horst, David

    2014-01-01

    Colonic crypts are stereotypical structures with distinct stem cell, proliferating, and differentiating compartments. Colorectal cancers derive from colonic crypt epithelia but, in contrast, form morphologically disarrayed glands. In this study, we investigated to which extent colorectal cancers phenocopy colonic crypt architecture and thus preserve structural organization of the normal intestinal epithelium. A subset of colon cancers showed crypt-like compartments with high WNT activity and nuclear β-Catenin at the leading tumor edge, adjacent proliferation, and enhanced Cytokeratin 20 expression in most differentiated tumor epithelia of the tumor center. This architecture strongly depended on growth conditions, and was fully reproducible in mouse xenografts of cultured and primary colon cancer cells. Full crypt-like organization was associated with low tumor grade and was an independent prognostic marker of better survival in a collection of 221 colorectal cancers. Our findings suggest that full activation of preserved intestinal morphogenetic programs in colon cancer requires in vivo growth environments. Furthermore, crypt-like architecture was linked with less aggressive tumor biology, and may be useful to improve current colon cancer grading schemes. PMID:25111606

  12. Somatostatin peptides inhibit basolateral potassium channels in human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Warhurst, G; Butterfield, I; Higgs, N B; Lomax, R B

    1999-11-01

    Somatostatin is a powerful inhibitor of intestinal Cl(-) secretion. We used patch-clamp recording techniques to investigate the effects of somatostatin on low-conductance (23-pS) K(+) channels in the basolateral membrane of human colonic crypts, which are an important component of the Cl(-) secretory process. Somatostatin (2 microM) elicited a >80% decrease in "spontaneous" K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patches in nonstimulated crypts (50% inhibition = approximately 8 min), which was voltage-independent and was prevented by pretreating crypts for 18 h with pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml), implicating a G protein-dependent mechanism. In crypts stimulated with 100-200 microM dibutyryl cAMP, 2 microM somatostatin and its synthetic analog octreotide (2 microM) both produced similar degrees of K(+) channel inhibition to that seen in nonstimulated crypts, which was also present under low-Cl(-) (5 mM) conditions. In addition, 2 microM somatostatin abolished the increase in K(+) channel activity stimulated by 2 microM thapsigargin but had no effect on the thapsigargin-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca(2+). These results indicate that somatostatin peptides inhibit 23-pS basolateral K(+) channels in human colonic crypt cells via a G protein-dependent mechanism, which may result in loss of the channel's inherent Ca(2+) sensitivity.

  13. Resistant carbohydrates stimulate cell proliferation and crypt fission in wild-type mice and in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal cancer, association with enhanced polyp development.

    PubMed

    Mandir, Nikki; Englyst, Hans; Goodlad, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Fermentation of carbohydrates in the colon can stimulate cell proliferation and could thus be a cancer risk. The effects of resistant carbohydrates, i.e. those not digested and absorbed in the small intestine, on cell proliferation, crypt fission and polyp development were investigated in wild-type and adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasia (Apc(Min/+)) mice. Fifteen 4-week-old female wild-type and fifteen Apc(Min/+) mice were used for each group and fed a chow diet, a semi-synthetic diet or the semi-synthetic supplemented with wheat bran or an apple pomace preparation, both high in resistant carbohydrates, for 8 weeks. Tissue from all mice was used to measure cell proliferation and crypt fission and tissue from the Apc(Min/+) mice was scored for polyp number and tumour burden. There were slight reductions in intestinal mass in the mice fed the semi-synthetic diets and this was increased by the inclusion of resistant carbohydrates. The Apc(Min/+) mice had elevated cell proliferation and crypt fission in the distal small intestine and colon and these were increased by the resistant carbohydrates. Bran or apple pomace significantly increased polyp number in the proximal third of the small intestine. Apple pulp more than doubled polyp number throughout the small bowel (99.2 (SEM 11.1) v. 40.0 (SEM 8.2), P<0.004). Bran and apple pomace increased polyp diameter and hence burden in the colon by 243 and 150 %, respectively (P<0.05). In conclusion, both types of resistant carbohydrates increased polyp number and tumour burden and this was associated with elevated epithelial cell proliferation and crypt fission.

  14. Fibronectin Assembly in the Crypts of Cytokinesis-Blocked Multilobular Cells Promotes Anchorage-Independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Johansson, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    Anchorage-independent growth is a characteristic feature of cancer cells. However, it is unclear whether it represents a cause or a consequence of tumorigenesis. For normal cells, integrin-mediated adhesion is required for completion of the G1 and cytokinesis stages of the cell cycle. This study identified a mechanism that can drive anchorage-independent growth if the G1 checkpoint is suppressed. Cells with defective G1 checkpoint progressed through several rounds of the cell cycle in suspension in spite of uncompleted cytokinesis, thereby forming bi- and multilobular cells. Aurora B and CEP55 were localized to midbodies between the lobes, suggesting that the cytokinesis process reached close to abscission. Integrin-mediated re-attachment of such cells induced cytokinesis completion uncoupled from karyokinesis in most cells. However, a portion of the cells instead lost the constriction and became binucleated. Also, long-term suspension culture in soft agar produced colonies where the cytokinesis block was overcome. This process was fibronectin-dependent since fibronectin-deficient cells did not form colonies unless fibronectin was expressed or exogenously added. While fibronectin normally is not deposited on non-adherent single cells, bi/multilobular cells accumulated fibronectin in the intussusceptions. Based on our data we conclude: 1) Suppression of the G1 checkpoint allows multiple rounds of the cell cycle in detached cells and thereby enables matrix formation on their surface. 2) Uncompleted cytokinesis due to cell detachment resumes if integrin interactions are re-formed, allowing colony formation in soft agar 3) Such delayed cell division can generate binucleated cells, a feature known to cause chromosomal instability. PMID:23951336

  15. Individual and combined effects of Fusarium toxins on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in swine jejunal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lam-Yim Murphy; Woo, Chit-Shing Jackson; Turner, Paul C; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan; El-Nezami, Hani

    2013-07-18

    Fusarium toxins have been arousing public interest in recent years because of their potential health hazards for humans and agricultural livestock. It was hypothesized that selected pro-inflammatory cytokines might serve as sensitive biomarkers of the predicted adverse effects of Fusarium toxins on the basis of their potential ability to induce immune and intestinal alterations comparable to those in human chronic inflammatory infection. Consequently, the aim of this study was to elucidate individual and combined effects of four common Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), zearalenone (ZEA) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1α, IL1β, IL6, IL8, TNFα and MCP-1) using a porcine jejunal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. Based on a dose-response relationship between individual mycotoxins and cell viability (MTT assay) that was previously established, cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic concentrations were selected to investigate combinations of two, three and all four of the mycotoxins. In general, up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression occurred for both individual and mixtures of Fusarium toxins at cytotoxic concentrations, whereas significant up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA mostly obtained when the toxins existed in mixtures at non-cytotoxic concentrations and these mixtures were found to cause cytotoxicity from MTT assay determined previously. Therefore, it may be concluded that some of the changes in the mRNA expression of IL1α, IL1β, IL6, IL8, TNFα and MCP-1 could be cytotoxicity-related. It was also noted that additive effects were not always observed for the mixtures. These data suggest that individual or mixtures of Fusarium toxins could cause or exacerbate intestinal inflammation. These also provide a better understanding of the possible effects of Fusarium toxins, alone or in combinations on the immunological defense mechanisms of IECs, which would contribute to the

  16. Morphological study of the regeneration mechanism of acetic acid-injured colon crypts in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Araki, K; Furuya, Y; Matsuoka, T; Mashima, K; Kobayashi, M; Matsuura, K

    2000-01-01

    The regeneration mechanism of injured rat colonic mucosa with 1% acetic acid was certified in this study. The injured colons were studied periodically on experimental days 1, 3, 5, 7, 15, and 20 with light and scanning electron microscopy. Specimens were examined in paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin; crypts were isolated with the HCl digestion method; and three-dimensional stromal collagen tissue was prepared with the NaOH cell maceration method. Damage to the mucosal and submucosal layers peaked between the 1st and 3rd days with edema, regeneration, necrosis, and inflammation. The edema and inflammation subsided, and mucosal atrophy and crypt reduction remained at around 1 week. At 2 weeks the mucosa became thick, and crypts showed many branches in their lower two-thirds; and by 3 weeks the mucosa had recovered to almost normal. The ratio of number of crypts at the base and surface was almost 1.5 on the 15th day and 1.0 on the 20th day, suggesting that each branch progresses upward to create an independent crypt. We believe that the fission mechanism plays an important role in crypt repair after acetic acid injury of the colonic mucosa. As the proliferative zone of the colonic crypt is localized at the crypt base, fission of the crypt starting at the base and progressing up to the surface is the most reasonable and efficient mechanism for repair by increasing the number of crypts.

  17. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids (‘adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids’) are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29–84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n =3) and lung (n =1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed ‘other’ carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular (‘carcinoid pattern’) was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, ‘adenocarcinoma ex

  18. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-10-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids ('adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids') are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29-84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n=3) and lung (n=1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed 'other' carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular ('carcinoid pattern') was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, 'adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid' is

  19. Effects of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (ST) and Choleraesuis (SC) on chemokine and cytokine expression in swine ileum and jejunal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Skjolaas, K A; Burkey, T E; Dritz, S S; Minton, J E

    2006-06-15

    The gastrointestinal epithelium represents a barrier to potentially invasive enteric pathogens, maintains a role in innate immune surveillance, and is a source of both chemokine and cytokine chemotactic mediators in response to bacterial invasion. In the current study, we evaluated cytokine and chemokine mediators known to regulate movement of macrophages (macrophage migration inhibitory factor; MIF), neutrophils (IL8), dendritic cells (CCL20), and epithelial remodeling (osteopontin; OPN) in response to invasive swine enteropathogens Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) or Choleraesuis (SC). For the in vivo experiment, weaned pigs served as uninfected controls (0 h) or were given 3 x 10(9) CFU ST orally. Pigs were sacrificed at 8, 24, 48, and 144 h after inoculation and total RNA was extracted from defined segments of proximal (PI) and distal (DI) ileum. Relative expression of MIF and OPN were not affected by ST. IL8 expression was increased numerically (P = 0.17 for the interaction term) at 24 and 144 h in the PI and these increases accounted for greater expression in the PI relative to the DI (P < 0.05). Relative expression of CCL20 was increased at 24 h after ST (P < 0.05). Next, we evaluated the time course of MIF, IL8, CCL20, and OPN mRNA expression induced by application of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), ST or SC in vitro using pig jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Cells were grown to confluency on permeable membranes, and treated apically with LPS (10 ng/mL), ST or SC (10(8)/well). After 1 h, cells were washed to remove LPS or extracellular bacteria, and media containing gentamicin was added to kill remaining extracellular bacteria. Media and RNA were collected at 1.5, 3, and 6 h after treatment. MIF mRNA was not affected by LPS or bacterial treatment. Similarly, IL8 expression was not affected by LPS, but was increased by ST and SC relative to controls at 1.5 and 3 h post exposure (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Treatment with SC increased CCL20 m

  20. Chemopreventive effect of Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) blume tuber against aberrant crypt foci and cell proliferation in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ansil, Puthuparampil Nazarudeen; Prabha, Santhibhavan Prabhakaran; Nitha, Anand; Latha, Mukalel Sankunni

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death, both in men and women. This study investigated the effects of Amorphophallus campanulatus tuber methanolic extract (ACME) on aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, colonic cell proliferation, lipid peroxidative damage and the antioxidant status in a long term preclinical model of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups, viz., group I rats served as controls; group II rats treated as drug controls receiving 250 mg/ kg body weight of ACME orally; group III rats received DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) subcutaneously once a week for the first 15 weeks; groups IV, V and VI rats received ACME along with DMH during the initiation, post- initiation stages and the entire period of the study, respectively. All the rats were sacrificed at the end of 30 weeks and the intestinal and colonic tissues from different groups were subjected to biochemical and histological studies. Administration of DMH resulted in significant (p ≤ 0.05) intestinal and colonic lipid peroxidation (MDA) and reduction of antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S- transferase and reduced glutathione. Whereas the supplementation of ACME significantly (p ≤ 0.05) improved the intestinal and colonic MDA and reduced glutathione levels and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in DMH intoxicated rats. ACME administration also significantly suppressed the formation and multiplicity of ACF. In addition, the DMH administered rats showed amplified expression of PCNA in the colon and decreased expression of this proliferative marker was clearly noted with initiation, post-initiation and entire period of ACME treatment regimens. These results indicate that ACME could exert a significant chemopreventive effect on colon carcinogenesis induced by DMH.

  1. Analysis of Wnt signalling dynamics during colon crypt development in 3D culture

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Wee; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Burgess, Antony W.

    2015-01-01

    Many systems biology studies lack context-relevant data and as a consequence the predictive capabilities can be limited in developing targeted cancer therapeutics. Production of colon crypt in vitro is ideal for studying colon systems biology. This report presents the first production of, to our knowledge, physiologically-shaped, functional colon crypts in vitro (i.e. single crypts with cells expressing Mucin 2 and Chromogranin A). Time-lapsed monitoring of crypt formation revealed an increased frequency of single-crypt formation in the absence of noggin. Using quantitative 3D immunofluorescence of β-catenin and E-cadherin, spatial-temporal dynamics of these proteins in normal colon crypt cells stimulated with Wnt3A or inhibited by cycloheximide has been measured. Colon adenoma cultures established from APCmin/+ mouse have developmental differences and β-catenin spatial localization compared to normal crypts. Quantitative data describing the effects of signalling pathways and proteins dynamics for both normal and adenomatous colon crypts is now within reach to inform a systems approach to colon crypt biology. PMID:26087250

  2. Nanoselenium Supplementation of Heat-Stressed Broilers: Effects on Performance, Carcass Characteristics, Blood Metabolites, Immune Response, Antioxidant Status, and Jejunal Morphology.

    PubMed

    Safdari-Rostamabad, Morteza; Hosseini-Vashan, Seyyed Javad; Perai, Ali Hossein; Sarir, Hadi

    2016-11-22

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary nanoselenium supplementation at 0, 0.6 and 1.2 mg/kg of diet on growth performance, serum biochemical parameters, immune response, antioxidant capacity, and jejunal morphology of 29-d-old male broilers subjected to heat stress at 37 ± 1°C for 14 d. Broilers were fed for 42 d on the experimental diets. The results showed that nanoselenium supplementation had no effect on growth performance, but it supplementation at the rate of 1.2 mg/kg diet decreased the serum concentration of cholesterol prior to the heat exposure. Further, dietary nanoselenium supplementation linearly increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, while linearly decreased those of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and aspartate aminotransferase in the serum before applying heat stress. Compared with thermoneutral temperature, heat stress reduced body mass gain, feed intake, percentages of carcass, breast, leg, abdominal fat, bursa of Fabricius, thymus, antibody response against sheep red blood cells, serum concentration of protein, erythrocyte activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, jejunal villus height, and villus height to crypt depth ratio, while increased feed conversion ratio, percentages of liver, gizzard, pancreas, gallbladder, heart, and the concentrations of aspartate aminotransferase and malondialdehyde. Dietary supplementation of nanoselenium linearly reduced the abdominal fat and liver percentages, while linearly increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and villus height in heat-stressed broilers. Furthermore, the lower level of nanoselenium decreased the percentages of gizzard and heart in broilers under heat stress. The diet supplemented with 1.2 mg/kg nanoselenium improved feed conversion ratio and increased antibody response against sheep red blood cells, activity of superoxide dismutase, and villus height to crypt depth ratio, but decreased the serum

  3. Constructing Proteome Reference Map of the Porcine Jejunal Cell Line (IPEC-J2) by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Pajarillo, Edward Alain B; Balolong, Marilen P; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-06-28

    In this study, the global proteome of the IPEC-J2 cell line was evaluated using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole Q Exactive™ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Proteins were isolated from highly confluent IPEC-J2 cells in biological replicates and analyzed by label-free mass spectrometry prior to matching against a porcine genomic dataset. The results identified 1,517 proteins, accounting for 7.35% of all genes in the porcine genome. The highly abundant proteins detected, such as actin, annexin A2, and AHNAK nucleoprotein, are involved in structural integrity, signaling mechanisms, and cellular homeostasis. The high abundance of heat shock proteins indicated their significance in cellular defenses, barrier function, and gut homeostasis. Pathway analysis and annotation using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database resulted in a putative protein network map of the regulation of immunological responses and structural integrity in the cell line. The comprehensive proteome analysis of IPEC-J2 cells provides fundamental insights into overall protein expression and pathway dynamics that might be useful in cell adhesion studies and immunological applications.

  4. The alpha1H Ca2+ channel subunit is expressed in mouse jejunal interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Simon J; Strege, Peter R; Lei, Sha; Roeder, Jaime L; Mazzone, Amelia; Ou, Yijun; Rich, Adam; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2009-01-01

    T-type Ca(2+) currents have been detected in cells from the external muscular layers of gastrointestinal smooth muscles and appear to contribute to the generation of pacemaker potentials in interstitial cells of Cajal from those tissues. However, the Ca(2+) channel alpha subunit responsible for these currents has not been determined. We established that the alpha subunit of the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel is expressed in single myocytes and interstitial cells of Cajal using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction from whole tissue, laser capture microdissected tissue and single cells isolated from the mouse jejunum. Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings demonstrated that a nifedipine and Cd(2+) resistant, mibefradil-sensitive current is present in myocytes dissociated from the jejunum. Electrical recordings from the circular muscle layer demonstrated that mibefradil reduced the frequency and initial rate of rise of the electrical slow wave. Gene targeted knockout of both alleles of the cacna1h gene, which encodes the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel subunit, resulted in embryonic lethality because of death of the homozygous knockouts prior to E13.5 days in utero. We conclude that a channel with the pharmacological and molecular characteristics of the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel subunit is expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes from the mouse jejunum, and that ionic conductances through the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel contribute to the upstroke of the pacemaker potential. Furthermore, the survival of mice that do not express the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel protein is dependent on the genetic background and targeting approach used to generate the knockout mice.

  5. The α1H Ca2+ channel subunit is expressed in mouse jejunal interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Simon J; Strege, Peter R; Lei, Sha; Roeder, Jaime L; Mazzone, Amelia; Ou, Yijun; Rich, Adam; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2009-01-01

    T-type Ca2+ currents have been detected in cells from the external muscular layers of gastrointestinal smooth muscles and appear to contribute to the generation of pacemaker potentials in interstitial cells of Cajal from those tissues. However, the Ca2+ channel α subunit responsible for these currents has not been determined. We established that the α subunit of the α1H Ca2+ channel is expressed in single myocytes and interstitial cells of Cajal using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction from whole tissue, laser capture microdissected tissue and single cells isolated from the mouse jejunum. Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings demonstrated that a nifedipine and Cd2+ resistant, mibefradil-sensitive current is present in myocytes dissociated from the jejunum. Electrical recordings from the circular muscle layer demonstrated that mibefradil reduced the frequency and initial rate of rise of the electrical slow wave. Gene targeted knockout of both alleles of the cacna1h gene, which encodes the α1H Ca2+ channel subunit, resulted in embryonic lethality because of death of the homozygous knockouts prior to E13.5 days in utero. We conclude that a channel with the pharmacological and molecular characteristics of the α1H Ca2+ channel subunit is expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes from the mouse jejunum, and that ionic conductances through the α1H Ca2+ channel contribute to the upstroke of the pacemaker potential. Furthermore, the survival of mice that do not express the α1H Ca2+ channel protein is dependent on the genetic background and targeting approach used to generate the knockout mice. PMID:19413888

  6. Regulation of intestinal epithelial cell growth by transforming growth factor type. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.A.; Beauchamp, R.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Moses, H.L. )

    1989-03-01

    A nontransformed rat jejunal crypt cell line (IEC-6) expresses transforming growth factor type {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) mRNA, secretes latent {sup 125}I-labeled TGF-{beta}1 to specific, high-affinity cell surface receptors. IEC-6 cell growth is markedly inhibited by TGF-{beta}1 and TGF-{beta}2 with half-maximal inhibition occurring between 0.1 and 1.0 ng of TGF-{beta}1 per ml. TGF-{beta}1-mediated growth inhibition is not associated with the appearance of biochemical markers of enterocyte differentiation such as alkaline phosphatase expression and sucrase activity. TGF-{beta}1 increases steady-state levels of its own mRNA expression within 8 hr of treatment of rapidly growing IEC-6 cells. In freshly isolated rat jejunal enterocytes that are sequentially eluted from the crypt villus axis, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression is most abundant in terminally differentiated villus tip cells and least abundant in the less differentiated, mitotically active crypt cells. The authors conclude that TGF-{beta}1 is an autoregulated growth inhibitor in IEC-6 cells that potentially functions in an autocrine manner. In the rat jejunal epithelium, TGF-{beta}1 expression is most prominently localized to the villus tip--i.e., the region of the crypt villus unit that is characterized by the terminally differentiated phenotype. These data suggest that TGF-{beta}1 may function in coordination of the rapid cell turnover typical for the intestinal epithelium.

  7. Delphinidin Reduces Glucose Uptake in Mice Jejunal Tissue and Human Intestinal Cells Lines through FFA1/GPR40.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Teuber, Stefanie; Morera, Francisco J; Ojeda, Camila; Flores, Carlos A; Hidalgo, María A; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos; Burgos, Rafael A

    2017-04-05

    Anthocyanins are pigments with antihyperglycemic properties, and they are potential candidates for developing functional foods for the therapy or prevention of Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The mechanism of these beneficial effects of anthocyanins are, however, hard to explain, given their very low bioavailability due to poor intestinal absorption. We propose that free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also named GPR40), is involved in an inhibitory effect of the anthocyanidin delphinidin over intestinal glucose absorption. We show the direct effects of delphinidin on the intestine using jejunum samples from RF/J mice, and the human intestinal cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, and NCM460. By the use of specific pharmacological antagonists, we determined that delphinidin inhibits glucose absorption in both mouse jejunum and a human enterocytic cell line in a FFA1-dependent manner. Delphinidin also affects the function of sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). Intracellular signaling after FFA1 activation involved cAMP increase and cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations originated from intracellular Ca(2+) stores and were followed by store-operated Ca(2+) entry. Taken together, our results suggest a new GPR-40 mediated local mechanism of action for delphinidin over intestinal cells that may in part explain its antidiabetic effect. These findings are promising for the search for new prevention and pharmacological treatment strategies for DM2 management.

  8. Delphinidin Reduces Glucose Uptake in Mice Jejunal Tissue and Human Intestinal Cells Lines through FFA1/GPR40

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Teuber, Stefanie; Morera, Francisco J.; Ojeda, Camila; Flores, Carlos A.; Hidalgo, María A.; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos; Burgos, Rafael A.

    2017-01-01

    Anthocyanins are pigments with antihyperglycemic properties, and they are potential candidates for developing functional foods for the therapy or prevention of Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The mechanism of these beneficial effects of anthocyanins are, however, hard to explain, given their very low bioavailability due to poor intestinal absorption. We propose that free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also named GPR40), is involved in an inhibitory effect of the anthocyanidin delphinidin over intestinal glucose absorption. We show the direct effects of delphinidin on the intestine using jejunum samples from RF/J mice, and the human intestinal cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, and NCM460. By the use of specific pharmacological antagonists, we determined that delphinidin inhibits glucose absorption in both mouse jejunum and a human enterocytic cell line in a FFA1-dependent manner. Delphinidin also affects the function of sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). Intracellular signaling after FFA1 activation involved cAMP increase and cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations originated from intracellular Ca2+ stores and were followed by store-operated Ca2+ entry. Taken together, our results suggest a new GPR-40 mediated local mechanism of action for delphinidin over intestinal cells that may in part explain its antidiabetic effect. These findings are promising for the search for new prevention and pharmacological treatment strategies for DM2 management. PMID:28379159

  9. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    PubMed

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  10. Occult solitary submucosal jejunal metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmann, Joerg; Gollowitsch, Franz; Matzi, Veronika; Porubsky, Christian; Maier, Alfred; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja Maria

    2005-01-01

    Background Metastatic tumors of the intestinal tract from extra-abdominal sites are rare. In esophageal cancer, the liver, lung and the bones are the most common sites of metastases. Metastasis to intestines are very rare. Case presentation A 54-year old male was admitted with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) associated with dysphagia II-III and weight loss of 20 kg. Preoperative routine staging failed to detect any metastases. A transthoracic esophagectomy and orthotopic gastric pull-up with collar esophago-gastrostomy, associated with 2-field lymphadenectomy was perfromed. During the digital placement of the naso-jejunal feeding catheter a submucosal jejunal nodule with a diameter of 1 cm, about 40 cm distal to the duodeno-jejunal fold was detected which was completely resected by jejunotomy. Histopathology of jejunal nodule showed metastasis from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Because of the extensic esophageal lymphatic system, an occult widespread dissemination of the tumor cells into the abdominal cavity is possible. Additional intraoperative evaluation of the small intestine and the complete abdominal cavity should be performed in every operation of esophageal carcinoma to detect possible occult intraabdominal metastases. PMID:16022736

  11. Epithelial crypts: A complex and enigmatic olfactory organ in African and South American lungfish (Lepidosireniformes, Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Wittmer, Carolin; Nowack, Christine

    2017-06-01

    African lungfish (Protopterus) seem unique among osteognathostomes in possessing a potential vomeronasal organ homolog in form of accessory epithelial crypts within their nasal cavity. Many details regarding structural and functional properties of these crypts are still unexplored. In this study, we reinvestigate the issue and also present the first data on epithelial crypts in the South American lungfish Lepidosiren paradoxa. The nasal cavities of L. paradoxa and Protopterus annectens were studied using histology, scanning electron microscopy, and alcian blue and PAS staining. In both species, the epithelial crypts consist of a pseudostratified sensory epithelium and a monolayer of elongated glandular cells, in accordance with previously published data on Protopterus. In addition, we found a new second and anatomically distinct type of mucous cell within the duct leading into the crypt. These glandular duct cells are PAS positive, whereas the elongated glandular cells are stainable with alcian blue, suggesting distinct functions of their respective secretions. Furthermore, the two lungfish species show differently structured crypt sensory epithelia and external crypt morphology, with conspicuous bilaterally symmetrical stripes of ciliated cells in L. paradoxa. Taken together, our data suggest that stimulus transport into the crypts involves both ciliary movement and odorant binding mucus. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Critical role of microbiota within cecal crypts on the regenerative capacity of the intestinal epithelium following surgical stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaborin, Alexander; Krezalek, Monika; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Defazio, Jennifer R.; Setia, Namrata; Belogortseva, Natalia; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Guo, Qiti; Zaborina, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Cecal crypts represent a unique niche that are normally occupied by the commensal microbiota. Due to their density and close proximity to stem cells, microbiota within cecal crypts may modulate epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that surgical stress, a process that invariably involves a short period of starvation, antibiotic exposure, and tissue injury, results in cecal crypt evacuation of their microbiota. Crypts devoid of their microbiota display pathophysiological features characterized by abnormal stem cell activation as judged by leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) staining, expansion of the proliferative zone toward the tips of the crypts, and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, crypts devoid of their microbiota display loss of their regenerative capacity as assessed by their ability to form organoids ex vivo. When a four-member human pathogen community isolated from the stool of a critically ill patient is introduced into the cecum of mice with empty crypts, crypts become occupied by the pathogens and further disruption of crypt homeostasis is observed. Fecal microbiota transplantation restores the cecal crypts’ microbiota, normalizes homeostasis within crypts, and reestablishes crypt regenerative capacity. Taken together, these findings define an emerging role for the microbiota within cecal crypts to maintain epithelial cell homeostasis in a manner that may enhance recovery in response to the physiological stress imposed by the process of surgery. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study provides novel insight into the process by which surgical injury places the intestinal epithelium at risk for colonization by pathogenic microbes and impairment of its regenerative capacity via loss of its microbiota. We show that fecal transplant restores crypt homeostasis in association with repopulation of the microbiota within cecal crypts. PMID:27979825

  13. Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 and fructo-oligosaccharide partially reduce jejunal inflammation in a model of intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cassie L; Geier, Mark S; Yazbeck, Roger; Torres, Diana M; Butler, Ross N; Howarth, Gordon S

    2008-01-01

    Although probiotics are beginning to enter mainstream medicine for disorders of the colon, their effects on the small bowel remain largely unexplored. We investigated the recently identified probiotic, Lactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum) BR11 (BR11) and the prebiotic, fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), both individually and in synbiotic combination, for their potential to alleviate intestinal mucositis. From Days 0-9, rats consumed skim milk (SM; saline + SM), low dose (LD-BR11; 1 x 10(6)cfu/ml), high dose (HD-BR11; 1 x 10(9)cfu/ml), LD-FOS (3%), HD-FOS (6%), or synbiotic (HD-BR11/FOS). On Day 7, rats were injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 150 mg/kg). All rats were sacrificed on Day 10. Intestinal tissues were collected for quantitative histology, sucrase, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) determinations. 5-FU decreased sucrase activity, villus height, crypt depth, and crypt cell proliferation compared to controls. Compared to 5-FU + SM, histological damage severity scores were increased for all treatments, although all were effective at reducing jejunal inflammation, indicated by reduced MPO activity (P < 0.05). The combination of BR11 and FOS did not provide additional protection. Moreover, HD-FOS and the synbiotic actually increased clinical mucositis severity (P < 0.05). We conclude that L. fermentum BR11 has the potential to reduce inflammation of the upper small intestine. However, its combination with FOS does not appear to confer any further therapeutic benefit for the alleviation of mucositis.

  14. Morphological characteristics of the limbal epithelial crypt.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Vijay A; Foster, Toshana; Kulkarni, Bina B; Hopkinson, Andrew; Gray, Trevor; Powe, Des G; Lowe, James; Dua, Harminder S

    2007-04-01

    In 2005 we reported the discovery of a novel anatomical structure at the limbus, which we termed the limbal epithelial crypt (LEC). The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the distribution, immunophenotypical, and ultra structural characteristics of the LEC as a putative niche of stem cells. Sequential histological sections of human corneo-scleral limbal rims were examined for the presence and distribution of the LEC. Immunophenotypical characterisation of the LEC cells using a panel of antibodies of interest was undertaken. Transmission electron microscopy of the LEC was used to examine the ultra structural and morphometric features of cells within the LEC and adjacent limbus. A total of 74 LECs were identified in eight corneo-scleral rims. These varied in number, size and distribution within rims. Cells within the crypt demonstrated the following phenotype: CK3-/CK19+/CD 34-/Vimentin+/p63+/Connexin 43+/MIB1 (Ki67)-. Presence of Cx43 was also demonstrated in the rete pegs adjacent to the LEC. Basal cells of the LEC were significantly smaller than basal cells found in adjacent rete pegs and also smaller than suprabasal limbal and central corneal epithelial cells (p<0.05). Morphologically they had a high nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and were adherent to the underlying basement membrane by means of complex convolutions of cytoplasmic processes. LECs are sparse but a consistent finding in the human corneo-scleral limbus. The LEC contains a unique sub-population of cells expressing several characteristics that are consistent with it representing a putative stem cell niche.

  15. Morphological characteristics of the limbal epithelial crypt

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Vijay A; Foster, Toshana; Kulkarni, Bina B; Hopkinson, Andrew; Gray, Trevor; Powe, Des G; Lowe, James; Dua, Harminder S

    2007-01-01

    Aim In 2005 we reported the discovery of a novel anatomical structure at the limbus, which we termed the limbal epithelial crypt (LEC). The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the distribution, immunophenotypical, and ultra structural characteristics of the LEC as a putative niche of stem cells. Methods Sequential histological sections of human corneo‐scleral limbal rims were examined for the presence and distribution of the LEC. Immunophenotypical characterisation of the LEC cells using a panel of antibodies of interest was undertaken. Transmission electron microscopy of the LEC was used to examine the ultra structural and morphometric features of cells within the LEC and adjacent limbus. Results A total of 74 LECs were identified in eight corneo‐scleral rims. These varied in number, size and distribution within rims. Cells within the crypt demonstrated the following phenotype: CK3−/CK19+/CD 34−/Vimentin+/p63+/Connexin 43+/MIB1 (Ki67)−. Presence of Cx43 was also demonstrated in the rete pegs adjacent to the LEC. Basal cells of the LEC were significantly smaller than basal cells found in adjacent rete pegs and also smaller than suprabasal limbal and central corneal epithelial cells (p<0.05). Morphologically they had a high nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and were adherent to the underlying basement membrane by means of complex convolutions of cytoplasmic processes. Conclusions LECs are sparse but a consistent finding in the human corneo‐scleral limbus. The LEC contains a unique sub‐population of cells expressing several characteristics that are consistent with it representing a putative stem cell niche. PMID:17020899

  16. Daily variations in colchicine-induced apoptosis in duodenal crypts.

    PubMed

    Norma, V González; Badrán, Amado F; Barbeito, Claudio G

    2005-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death can be induced by several agents, among them colchicine, a microtubule disrupting-drug that affects continuously renewing cell populations, such as the intestinal crypt enterocytes. The objectives of this investigation were (1) to confirm in vivo colchicines-inductive effect and (2) to determine the existence of 24 h variations in the crypt enterocytes apoptotic indices. The study was done on C3H/S male adult mice housed under standardized conditions. Starting at midnight until the end of a circadian period, subgroups of mice were sacrificed after having been injected with colchicine or saline i.p. 4h beforehand. Duodenal samples were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL technique. In order to score the number of apoptosis, the longitudinal sections of the crypts were divided into three regions comprised, respectively, of tiers 1-4, 5-12, and 13-20, proceeding from the bottom to the top of the crypt. Values of each lot were expressed as mean +/- SEM. A highly significant statistical difference in apoptotic indices was found for colchicine-treated animals. The 24 h curve for colchicine-induced apoptosis displayed qualitative and quantitative differences compared to other inducer agents. Highest apoptotic indices were found in the deepest crypt regions. Daily variations were observed in all the crypt sectors of the colchicine-treated animals and in tiers 5-12 of the saline controls. The present work demonstrates that the colchicine cytotoxicity due to its apoptotic-inducing effect depends on the dosing time during the 24 h in this mouse strain.

  17. Calcium transport by rat duodenal villus and crypt basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, J.R.F.; Weiser, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    Rat duodenal cells were isolated sequentially to give fractions enriched for villus and crypt cells. From each of these fractions, basolateral-enriched membrane vesicles were prepared and ATP-dependent calcium uptake was studied. Calcium uptake was sensitive to temperature, was inhibited by vanadate and by A23187, and was lower in vitamin D-deficient animals. In normal animals, (UVCa)-transport was approximately twofold greater in villus-tip than in crypt cell-fraction basolateral membranes though the affinity of the uptake for calcium was similar (K/sub m/ = 0.3 M). In vitamin D-deficient animals, the crypt-to-villus gradient was reduced, and in all fractions, calcium transport was similar to or lower than that in the crypts of normal animals. Six hours after vitamin D-deficient animals were repleted with 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, a significant increase in calcium transport by everted gut sacs was present; however, basolateral calcium transport was significantly increased in only the mid-villus fractions, and no change was seen in the villus-tip fractions. Thus vitamin D appears necessary for the development of increased basolateral membrane calcium pump activity in duodenal villus cells, but not all cells in vitamin D-deficient rats are able to respond to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

  18. Experiment K-6-17. Structural changes and cell turnover in the rats small intestine induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity associated with microgravity conditions of space flight as evidenced by negative nitrogen balance and muscle atrophy (Nicogossian and Parker, 1982; Oganov, 1981), as well as inhibited lymphocyte proliferation (Bechler and Cogoli, 1986), would be evident in cells characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. As a model, researchers chose to study the turnover of mucosal cells lining the jejunum of the small intestine, since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Under normal conditions, epithelial cells that line the small intestine are continually produced in the crypts of Lieberkuhn. These cells migrate out of the crypts onto intestinal villi, are progressively pushed up the villus as new crypt cells are formed, and ultimately reach the tip of villi where they are then descquamated. In rats, the entire process, from initial proliferation in crypts to desquamation, takes approximately 2 days (Cairnie et al., 1965; Lipkin, 1973). In this study, researchers determined the mitotic index for mucosal cells lining the proximal, middle, and distal regions of the jejunum in rats from three treatment groups (synchronous control, vivarium control and flight), and measured the depth of the crypts of Lieberkuhn and the length of villi present in each of the three jejunal regions sampled.

  19. Jejunal Epiphany: Diverticulae, Enteroliths and Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rehmani, Babar; Kumar, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple jejunal diverticulae represent a rare entity and are usually asymptomatic. This case report is about one such jejunal diverticulae along with multiple enteroliths and jejunal strictures. All these three different findings in a short segment of jejunum is a very rare finding with all three variants seen in a segment of jejunum. We herein present a case of a 45-year-old male, who presented with vague abdominal pain for one and half years associated with nausea and vomiting and altered bowel habits. Laparotomy revealed multiple large jejunal diverticulae compressing the bowel with multiple enteroliths and two strictures in a short segment of jejunum leading to intestinal obstruction. Patient underwent resection of the involved jejunal segment and then repair by anastomosis. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:28208925

  20. Iron homeostasis: new tales from the crypt.

    PubMed

    Roy, C N; Enns, C A

    2000-12-15

    The enterocyte is a highly specialized cell of the duodenal epithelium that coordinates iron uptake and transport into the body. Until recently, the molecular mechanisms underlying iron absorption and iron homeostasis have remained a mystery. This review focuses on the proteins and regulatory mechanisms known to be present in the enterocyte precursor cell and in the mature enterocyte. The recent cloning of a basolateral iron transporter and investigations into its regulation provide new insights into possible mechanisms for iron transport and homeostasis. The roles of proteins such as iron regulatory proteins, the hereditary hemochromatosis protein (HFE)-transferrin receptor complex, and hephaestin in regulating this transporter and in regulating iron transport across the intestinal epithelium are discussed. A speculative, but testable, model for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which incorporates the changes in the iron-related proteins associated with the life cycle of the enterocyte as it journeys from the crypt to the tip of the villous is proposed.

  1. Radiation-induced hyperproliferation of intestinal crypts results in elevated genome instability with inactive p53-related genomic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Ma, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Chao; Wang, Yupei; He, Yang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-12-15

    Radiation-induced hyperproliferation of intestinal crypts is well documented, but its potential tumorigenic effects remain elusive. Here we aim to determine the genomic surveillance process during crypt hyperproliferation, and its consequential outcome after ionizing radiation. Crypt regeneration in the intestine was induced by a single dose of 12Gy abdominal irradiation. γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and DNA-PKcs were used as DNA repair surrogates to investigate the inherent ability of intestinal crypt cells to recognize and repair double-strand breaks. Ki67 staining and the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assay were used to study patterns of cell proliferation in regenerating crypts. Staining for ATM, p53, Chk1 and Chk2 was performed to study checkpoint activation and release. Apoptosis was evaluated through H&E staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP) nick-end labeling. The ATM-p53 pathway was immediately activated after irradiation. A second wave of DSBs in crypt cells was observed in regenerating crypts, accompanied with significantly increased chromosomal bridges. The p53-related genomic surveillance pathway was not active during the regeneration phase despite DSBs and chromosomal bridges in the cells of regenerating crypts. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSBs repair was involved in the DSBs repair process, as indicated by p-DNA-PKcs staining. Intestinal crypt cells retained hyperproliferation with inactive p53-related genomic surveillance system. NHEJ was involved in the resultant genomic instability during hyperproliferation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Beta-escin inhibits colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats and regulates the cell cycle growth by inducing p21(waf1/cip1) in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Raju, Jayadev; Swamy, Malisetty V; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2006-06-01

    Extracts of Aesculus hippocastanum (horse chestnut) seed have been used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, edema, and hemorrhoids. Most of the beneficial effects of horse chestnut are attributed to its principal component beta-escin or aescin. Recent studies suggest that beta-escin may possess anti-inflammatory, anti-hyaluronidase, and anti-histamine properties. We have evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of dietary beta-escin on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF). In addition, we analyzed the cell growth inhibitory effects and the induction of apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. To evaluate the inhibitory properties of beta-escin on colonic ACF, 7-week-old male F344 rats were fed experimental diets containing 0%, 0.025%, or 0.05% beta-escin. After 1 week, the rats received s.c. injections of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 2 weeks) or an equal volume of normal saline (vehicle). Rats were continued on respective experimental diets and sacrificed 8 weeks after the azoxymethane treatment. Colons were evaluated histopathologically for ACF. Administration of dietary 0.025% and 0.05% beta-escin significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation up to approximately 40% (P < 0.001) and approximately 50% (P < 0.0001), respectively, when compared with control diet group. Importantly, rats fed beta-escin showed dose-dependent inhibition (approximately 49% to 65%, P < 0.0001) of foci containing four or more aberrant crypts. To understand the growth inhibitory effects, HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of beta-escin and analyzed by flow cytometry for apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Beta-escin treatment in HT-29 cells induced growth arrest at the G1-S phase, which was associated with the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1), and this correlated with reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Results also indicate that

  3. Effect of different levels of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli colonization and jejunal morphology in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Boka, J; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, R

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli count and morphology of jejunal epithelial cells in laying hens. A total of 100 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) of 49 weeks old were randomly distributed among five cage replicates of five birds each. Experimental diets consisted of different levels (0%, 1%, 2% and 3% of diet) of dietary black cumin inclusion. The experimental period lasted for a total of 10 weeks, and egg quality indexes and laying hens' performance were measured as two 35-day trial periods. At the final day, two hens per replicate were slaughtered to investigate the influence of dietary treatments on intestinal E. coli colonization and morphology of jejunal cells. Although dietary black cumin in all supplementation levels decreased (p < 0.05) the enumeration of ileal E. coli, the morphological and histological alterations in small intestine such as enhancement of villus height to crypt depth ratio, increased goblet cell numbers and proliferation of lamina propria lymphatic follicles were observed after dietary supplementation with at least 2% black cumin. Dietary treatments decreased (p < 0.05) the concentration of serum cholesterol and triglycerides and increased (p < 0.05) serum HDL concentration and relative weight of pancreas; however, the egg yolk cholesterol was not influenced by dietary treatments. In addition, dietary supplementation with black cumin improved (p < 0.05) eggshell quality and Haugh unit. The best feed conversion ratio was obtained when diets were supplemented with 2% black cumin. This improvement was due to the increase (p < 0.05) in egg mass and contemporaneous decrease (p < 0.01) in feed consumption. The present results indicated that regardless of supplementation level, dietary inclusion of black cumin decreased E. coli enumeration in ileal digesta and improved serum lipid profile and eggshell quality, whereas the

  4. Effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed diets with different levels of crude protein.

    PubMed

    Bavarsadi, M; Mahdavi, A H; Ansari-Mahyari, S; Jahanian, E

    2016-06-08

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, serum biochemical parameters, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed on diets with different levels of crude protein (CP). A total of 180 laying hens were subjected into nine dietary treatments with four cages of five birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of CP (85.0, 92.5 and 100% of Hy-Line W36 manual recommendation) and three levels of sanguinarine (0.00, 3.75 and 7.50 mg/kg) as a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of laying hens which fed during a 70-day feeding trial. The in vitro study showed that sanguinarine exhibited sevenfold and threefold decreased antioxidant activities to inhibit 2-2-diphenyl-1-picric hydrazyl free radical as well as ferric ion reducing rather than butylated hydroxyl toluene. Although using the decremental levels of CP caused the increase in heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.01), dietary administration of sanguinarine could suppress the serum cholesterol and malondialdehyde concentrations as well as heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.05). Additionally, decreasing CP content resulted in the decreased percentage of albumin (p < 0.05); however, it had no negative effects on humoral immunity. Nonetheless, feeding of at least 3.75 mg/kg sanguinarine led to the remarkable increases in serum gamma globulin concentration (p < 0.01) and secondary (p < 0.05) antibody titres against sheep red blood cells. Moreover, a decline in dietary CP content led to higher villi height and crypt depth (p < 0.05; p < 0.001) and consequently decreased villi height-to-crypt depth ratio (p < 0.001) than the optimum level (100% CP). In spite of the effects of sanguinarine on the suppression of Escherichia coli and Salmonella counts (p < 0.05), it markedly enhanced villi height-to-crypt depth ratio as well as lamina propria lymphatic follicles extent

  5. An individual based computational model of intestinal crypt fission and its application to predicting unrestrictive growth of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pin, Carmen; Parker, Aimee; Gunning, A Patrick; Ohta, Yuki; Johnson, Ian T; Carding, Simon R; Sato, Toshiro

    2015-02-01

    Intestinal crypt fission is a homeostatic phenomenon, observable in healthy adult mucosa, but which also plays a pathological role as the main mode of growth of some intestinal polyps. Building on our previous individual based model for the small intestinal crypt and on in vitro cultured intestinal organoids, we here model crypt fission as a budding process based on fluid mechanics at the individual cell level and extrapolated predictions for growth of the intestinal epithelium. Budding was always observed in regions of organoids with abundant Paneth cells. Our data support a model in which buds are biomechanically initiated by single stem cells surrounded by Paneth cells which exhibit greater resistance to viscoelastic deformation, a hypothesis supported by atomic force measurements of single cells. Time intervals between consecutive budding events, as simulated by the model and observed in vitro, were 2.84 and 2.62 days, respectively. Predicted cell dynamics was unaffected within the original crypt which retained its full capability of providing cells to the epithelium throughout fission. Mitotic pressure in simulated primary crypts forced upward migration of buds, which simultaneously grew into new protruding crypts at a rate equal to 1.03 days(-1) in simulations and 0.99 days(-1) in cultured organoids. Simulated crypts reached their final size in 4.6 days, and required 6.2 days to migrate to the top of the primary crypt. The growth of the secondary crypt is independent of its migration along the original crypt. Assuming unrestricted crypt fission and multiple budding events, a maximal growth rate of the intestinal epithelium of 0.10 days(-1) is predicted and thus approximately 22 days are required for a 10-fold increase of polyp size. These predictions are in agreement with the time reported to develop macroscopic adenomas in mice after loss of Apc in intestinal stem cells.

  6. Intestinal absorptive capacity, intestinal permeability and jejunal histology in HIV and their relation to diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, J; Bjarnason, I; Somasundaram, S; Macpherson, A; Francis, N; Price, A B; Sharpstone, D; Smithson, J; Menzies, I S; Gazzard, B G

    1995-01-01

    Intestinal function is poorly defined in patients with HIV infection. Absorptive capacity and intestinal permeability were assessed using 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose in 88 HIV infected patients and the findings were correlated with the degree of immunosuppression (CD4 counts), diarrhoea, wasting, intestinal pathogen status, and histomorphometric analysis of jejunal biopsy samples. Malabsorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and D-xylose was prevalent in all groups of patients with AIDS but not in asymptomatic, well patients with HIV. Malabsorption correlated significantly (r = 0.34-0.56, p < 0.005) with the degree of immune suppression and with body mass index. Increased intestinal permeability was found in all subgroups of patients. The changes in absorption-permeability were of comparable severity to those found in patients with untreated coeliac disease. Jejunal histology, however, showed only mild changes in the villus height/crypt depth ratio as compared with subtotal villus atrophy in coeliac disease. Malabsorption and increased intestinal permeability are common in AIDS patients. Malabsorption, which has nutritional implications, relates more to immune suppression than jejunal morphological changes. PMID:8549936

  7. Experimental studies of immunologically mediated enteropathy. Development of cell mediated immunity and intestinal pathology during a graft-versus-host reaction in irradiated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, A M; Felstein, M V; Borland, A; Parrott, D M

    1988-01-01

    The intestinal component of a graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR) provides a useful experimental model to elucidate the pathogenesis of clinical enteropathies which cause villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia and which are associated with a local immune response. One to three days after induction of GvHR in heavily irradiated (CBAxBALB/c)F1 mice, a proliferative form of enteropathy developed. Compared with controls, these mice had increased counts of jejunal intraepithelial lymphocytes and had a four-fold increase in crypt cell production rate as well as an increase in crypt length. These changes were accompanied by a marked enhancement of splenic natural killer cell activity. After day three, the crypt cell production rate fell to zero and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) which could lyse targets of host origin appeared. In parallel, mice with GvHR developed significant villus shortening and their clinical condition deteriorated. Further experiments showed that increased counts of intraepithelial lymphocytes, villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia also occurred in grafts of fetal CBA intestine implanted under the kidney capsule of (CBAxBALB/c)F1 mice with GvHR. As these grafts are syngeneic to the injected CBA spleen cells, they should not be attacked by anti-host cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We suggest that the proliferative and destructive components of enteropathy in GvHR are caused by lymphokines released by an anti-host delayed type hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:3294125

  8. An Atypical Presentation of Sporadic Jejunal Burkitt's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a very aggressive type of B-cell NHL with replication approaching 100%. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is rare. In our case, a 24-year-old male initially presented with symptomatic anemia. He was initially evaluated with colonoscopy and EGD, both of which were unremarkable. A capsule endoscopy was then performed to further evaluate his significant anemia which revealed friable inflamed ulcerated mass in the jejunum. A push enteroscopy was then performed to obtain tissue from the jejunal mass. Biopsy results and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with Burkitt's lymphoma. PET/CT scan revealed only jejunal involvement. Treatment consisted of bowel resection prior to chemotherapy due to concern for perforation with chemotherapy. Patient achieved complete remission after the treatment. PMID:27672459

  9. Modulatory effects of taurine on jejunal contractility

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Q.Y.; Chen, D.P.; Ye, D.M.; Diao, Y.P.; Lin, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is widely distributed in animal tissues and has diverse pharmacological effects. However, the role of taurine in modulating smooth muscle contractility is still controversial. We propose that taurine (5-80 mM) can exert bidirectional modulation on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments. Different low and high contractile states were induced in isolated jejunal segments of rats to observe the effects of taurine and the associated mechanisms. Taurine induced stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments at 3 different low contractile states, and inhibitory effects at 3 different high contractile states. Bidirectional modulation was not observed in the presence of verapamil or tetrodotoxin, suggesting that taurine-induced bidirectional modulation is Ca2+ dependent and requires the presence of the enteric nervous system. The stimulatory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments was blocked by atropine but not by diphenhydramine or by cimetidine, suggesting that muscarinic-linked activation was involved in the stimulatory effects when isolated jejunal segments were in a low contractile state. The inhibitory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments were blocked by propranolol and L-NG-nitroarginine but not by phentolamine, suggesting that adrenergic β receptors and a nitric oxide relaxing mechanism were involved when isolated jejunal segments were in high contractile states. No bidirectional effects of taurine on myosin phosphorylation were observed. The contractile states of jejunal segments determine taurine-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects, which are associated with muscarinic receptors and adrenergic β receptors, and a nitric oxide associated relaxing mechanism. PMID:25387674

  10. Modulatory effects of taurine on jejunal contractility.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q Y; Chen, D P; Ye, D M; Diao, Y P; Lin, Y

    2014-12-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is widely distributed in animal tissues and has diverse pharmacological effects. However, the role of taurine in modulating smooth muscle contractility is still controversial. We propose that taurine (5-80 mM) can exert bidirectional modulation on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments. Different low and high contractile states were induced in isolated jejunal segments of rats to observe the effects of taurine and the associated mechanisms. Taurine induced stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments at 3 different low contractile states, and inhibitory effects at 3 different high contractile states. Bidirectional modulation was not observed in the presence of verapamil or tetrodotoxin, suggesting that taurine-induced bidirectional modulation is Ca(2+) dependent and requires the presence of the enteric nervous system. The stimulatory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments was blocked by atropine but not by diphenhydramine or by cimetidine, suggesting that muscarinic-linked activation was involved in the stimulatory effects when isolated jejunal segments were in a low contractile state. The inhibitory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments were blocked by propranolol and L-NG-nitroarginine but not by phentolamine, suggesting that adrenergic β receptors and a nitric oxide relaxing mechanism were involved when isolated jejunal segments were in high contractile states. No bidirectional effects of taurine on myosin phosphorylation were observed. The contractile states of jejunal segments determine taurine-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects, which are associated with muscarinic receptors and adrenergic β receptors, and a nitric oxide associated relaxing mechanism.

  11. Investigating the Relation between Stochastic Differentiation, Homeostasis and Clonal Expansion in Intestinal Crypts via Multiscale Modeling

    PubMed Central

    De Matteis, Giovanni; Antoniotti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal tumors originate and develop within intestinal crypts. Even though some of the essential phenomena that characterize crypt structure and dynamics have been effectively described in the past, the relation between the differentiation process and the overall crypt homeostasis is still only partially understood. We here investigate this relation and other important biological phenomena by introducing a novel multiscale model that combines a morphological description of the crypt with a gene regulation model: the emergent dynamical behavior of the underlying gene regulatory network drives cell growth and differentiation processes, linking the two distinct spatio-temporal levels. The model relies on a few a priori assumptions, yet accounting for several key processes related to crypt functioning, such as: dynamic gene activation patterns, stochastic differentiation, signaling pathways ruling cell adhesion properties, cell displacement, cell growth, mitosis, apoptosis and the presence of biological noise. We show that this modeling approach captures the major dynamical phenomena that characterize the regular physiology of crypts, such as cell sorting, coordinate migration, dynamic turnover, stem cell niche correct positioning and clonal expansion. All in all, the model suggests that the process of stochastic differentiation might be sufficient to drive the crypt to homeostasis, under certain crypt configurations. Besides, our approach allows to make precise quantitative inferences that, when possible, were matched to the current biological knowledge and it permits to investigate the role of gene-level perturbations, with reference to cancer development. We also remark the theoretical framework is general and may be applied to different tissues, organs or organisms. PMID:24869488

  12. The Viral Mimetic Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid Alters the Growth Characteristics of Small Intestinal and Colonic Crypt Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julie M.; Santaolalla, Rebeca; von Furstenberg, Richard J.; Henning, Susan J.; Abreu, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The intestinal epithelium is the first line of defense against enteric pathogens. We investigated the response of small intestinal and colonic crypt cultures to a panel of toll-like receptor ligands to assess the impact of microbial pattern recognition on epithelial growth. Methods Primary murine jejunal enteroids and colonoids were cultured with lipopeptide Pam3CSK4, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) for 4 to 6 days. Surface area, budding and survival were assessed. Proliferation and numbers of lysozyme positive cells were quantified by flow cytometry. Gene expression was assessed by Nanostring and qRT-PCR. Results Exposure to Pam3CSK4 and LPS had minimal impact on either enteroids or colonoids. In contrast, Poly I:C increased the surface area of enteroids, while colonoids demonstrated decreased budding. Survival was decreased by Poly I:C in enteroids but not in colonoids. Both enteroids and colonoids exhibited upregulated gene expression of chemokines, but these were increased in magnitude in enteroids. Decreases in gene expression associated with epithelial differentiation and lysozyme positive cells were more apparent in enteroids than in colonoids. Baseline gene expression between enteroids and colonoids differed markedly in levels of stem cell and inflammatory markers. The changes in morphology induced by Poly I:C were mediated by the toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 1 (Ticam1) in enteroids but not in colonoids. Conclusions Poly I:C alters the molecular program of epithelial cells and shifts from absorption and digestion towards defense and inflammation. Diversity of responses to microbial patterns in enteroids and colonoids may underlie differences in susceptibility to infection along the intestinal tract. PMID:26414184

  13. Separate effects of irradiation and of graft-versus-host reaction on rat mucosal mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, A G; Munro, G H; Huntley, J F; Miller, H R; Ferguson, A

    1989-01-01

    T cell mediated immune responses in the gut can produce enteropathy and malabsorption. We have investigated the relevance of mucosal mast cells (MMC) to the mechanisms of this enteropathy by using graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR) in the rat as a model of mucosal delayed type hypersensitivity. Measurements of mucosal architecture, intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) and MMC counts were performed in control and experimental rats, and release of rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII) into the bloodstream was used as an index of MMC activation. In unirradiated rats, jejunal MMC count was increased on day 14 of the GvHR (mean 272/mm2 v 182 in controls, p less than 0.01), as was serum RMCPII (p less than 0.01). Irradiated rats (4.5 Gy, reconstituted with isogeneic spleen cells) had low counts of IEL and crypt hyperplasia seven to 14 days after irradiation. Irradiated rats with GvHR (induced by ip injection of parental strain spleen cells) and studied on days 7, 10 and 14, had significant enteropathy with longer crypts and higher CCPR than matched irradiated animals (p less than 0.05 on day 14 when compared with irradiation alone). Intraepithelial lymphocytes counts, however, reflected only the effect of radiation. Irradiation, with or without GvHR, led to the virtual disappearance of jejunal MMC, undetectable jejunal RMCPII and very low levels of RMCPII in serum (all p less than 0.01 when compared with unirradiated controls). These experiments show that there is a modest expansion in jejunal MMC in unirradiated rats with semiallogeneic GvHR, whereas irradiation, alone or associated with GvHR, profoundly depletes MMC for at least two weeks. The enteropathy of GvHR can evolve in the virtual absence of MMC. PMID:2707634

  14. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    PubMed Central

    Rayyan, Esa; Polito, Sarah; Leung, Lana; Bhakta, Ashesh; Kang, Jonathan; Willey, Justin; Mansour, Wasim; Drumm, Mitchell L; Al-Nakkash, Layla

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride channel. The third most common CFTR mutation seen clinically is R117H. Genistein, a naturally occurring phytoestrogen, is known to stimulate CFTR function in vitro. We aimed to determine whether route of administration of genistein could mediate differential effects in R117H male and female CF mice. Mice were fed (4 weeks) or injected subcutaneously (1 week) with the following: genistein 600 mg/kg diet (600Gd); genistein-free diet (0Gd); genistein injection 600 mg/kg body weight (600Gi); dimethyl sulfoxide control (0Gi). In male R117H mice fed 600Gd, basal short circuit current (Isc) was unchanged. In 600Gd-fed female mice, there was a subgroup that demonstrated a significant increase in basal Isc (53.14±7.92 μA/cm2, n=6, P<0.05) and a subgroup of nonresponders (12.05±6.59 μA/cm2, n=4), compared to 0Gd controls (29.3±6.5 μA/cm2, n=7). In R117H mice injected with 600Gi, basal Isc was unchanged in both male and female mice compared to 0Gi controls. Isc was measured in response to the following: the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μM, bilateral), bumetanide (100 μM, basolateral) to indicate the Cl− secretory component, and acetazolamide (100 μM, bilateral) to indicate the HCO3− secretory component; however, there was no effect of genistein (diet or injection) on any of these parameters. Jejunal morphology (ie, villi length, number of goblet cells per villus, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells per crypt) in R117H mice suggested no genistein-mediated difference among the groups. Serum levels of genistein were significantly elevated, compared to respective controls, by either 600Gd (equally elevated in males and females) or 600Gi (elevated more in females versus males). These data suggest a sex-dependent increase in basal Isc of R117H mice and that the increase is also specific for route of

  15. Actinomyces denticolens colonisation identified in equine tonsillar crypts

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, S.; Otaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Higuchi, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Torii, Y.; Yokoyama, E.; Azuma, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, submandibular abscesses associated with Actinomyces denticolens have been reported in horses. The actinomycotic clumps have been observed in the tonsillar crypts. The aim of this study was to demonstrate colonisation of A denticolens in equine tonsils. Twelve equine tonsils obtained from a slaughterhouse were divided into two parts for histopathological examination and for isolation of A denticolens. When actinomycotic clumps were found in these tonsillar crypts, immunohistochemistry using hyperimmune serum against A denticolens (DMS 20671) was performed on the serial sections. To determine whether Actinomyces-like bacteria isolated using immunoantigenic separation technique were A denticolens, the isolates were analysed for the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Actinomycotic clumps were found in the tonsillar crypts of 11 (91.7 per cent) horses. The clumps were of the saprophytic type accompanied with the feedstuffs, but a few clumps were surrounded by inflammatory cells. A denticolens antigens were immunodetected not only in the clumps of 11 (100 per cent) tonsils, but also in the tonsillar parenchyma. Six isolates obtained from four tonsils showed 99.7–99.9 per cent similarity to A denticolens in the 16S rRNA gene sequence. In horses, the colonisation sites of A denticolens are the tonsils, thus the authors suggest that the tonsils provide the intrinsic infection site for A denticolens. PMID:27651913

  16. Endoscopic jejunal access for enteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Coates, N E; MacFadyen, B V

    1995-06-01

    Enteral (gut) alimentation appears to offer greater benefit for patients than calories delivered via a parenteral (intravenous) route. Enteral alimentation prevents mucosal atrophy, maintains normal gut flora, decreases bacterial translocation, and enhances enteral immunological competence. Reliable delivery into the jejunum without the placement of an operative feeding tube is difficult, however. We have been interested for some time in endoscopically placing a jejunal tube for enteral nutrition early (within 24 hours) after trauma resuscitation or operation. A simplified technique is described for the endoscopic placement of a jejunal feeding tube, with or without a concomitant percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

  17. Adult suprapatellar pleiomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma with jejunal metastasis causing intussusception: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gys, Ben; Peeters, Dieter; Driessen, Ann; Snoeckx, Annemie; Komen, Niels

    2016-12-01

    Jejuno-jejunal intussusception is rarely encountered in adults. Management depends on the viability of the involved bowel. Exploration is favored because in adults generally an underlying 'lead point' is found to be present. Pleimorphic rhabdomyosarcoma (pRMS) arises from striated muscle cells. They are usually diagnosed during childhood and can occur virtually all over the body, controversially in places were few striated cells are found. In adults, these tumors are rare and are mostly encountered in the head-and-neck region. We present the case of a 48-year-old woman with a jejunal metastasis from a suprapatellar pRMS diagnosed 2.5 years earlier resulting in a jejuno-jejunal intussusception.

  18. Effect of fasting and feeding on polyamines and related enzymes along the villus: crypt axis.

    PubMed

    Bamba, T; Vaja, S; Murphy, G M; Dowling, R H

    1990-01-01

    Fasting and feeding have profound effects on crypt cell production and small bowel mucosal growth but the mechanism whereby food stimulates villus tip enterocytes to influence crypt cell production is unknown. We therefore measured the activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), diamine oxidase (DAO) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP--a marker of enterocyte maturity) and polyamine concentrations in epithelial cells from villus tips, mid villi, lower villi and crypts of small intestine in non-fasted controls and 18-24 h fasted rats. Fasting reduced crypt cell production and caused villus hyperplasia, DAO activity (mU/g) increased in control villus tips from 9.6 +/- (SEM) 0.8 to 12.3 +/- 1.5 after fasting (NS), from 7.6 +/- 0.4 to 13.9 +/- 3.0 in mid villi (p less than 0.01), from 5.7 +/- 1.0 to 10.4 +/- 7.4 in lower villi (p less than 0.01) and from 5.4 +/- 0.9 to 12.8 +/- 1.5 in the crypts (p less than 0.001). ALP showed a similar pattern of results. In contrast, fasting lowered ODC activity (pmol/mg protein/h) dramatically from 319 +/- 82 in control villus tips to 16.7 +/- 3.0 during fasting, from 297 +/- 59 to 10.7 +/- 3.6 in mid villi, from 224 +/- 45 to 6.3 +/- 2.8 in lower villi and from 150 +/- 31 to 5.8 +/- 3.3 in the crypts. Fasting reduced putrescine concentrations in all fractions but particularly in the crypts and in general was associated with increases in spermidine and spermine concentrations. The role of DAO in the maintenance of low putrescine concentrations during fasting is unclear.

  19. Perforation of jejunal diverticulum with ectopic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shintani, Yukako; Murono, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Perforation of jejunal diverticulum is a rare complication. Here, we report a case of jejunal diverticulum penetration with surrounding ectopic pancreas. An 83-year-old female patient was admitted to our department with acute onset of severe abdominal pain lasting for half a day. Abdominal computed tomography showed outpouching of the small intestine that contained air/fluid, with multiple surrounding air bubbles in the mesentery of the small intestine. She was diagnosed with penetration of the small intestine, and an emergency laparotomy was indicated. The penetrated jejunal diverticulum was identified ~20-cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed, and her postoperative course was uneventful. The pathological findings confirmed diverticulum penetration into the mesentery and severe inflammation at the site, with surrounding ectopic pancreas. Furthermore, the pancreatic ducts were opened through the penetrated diverticulum. This rare case shows that the ectopic pancreas might have caused penetration of jejunal diverticulum owing to the pancreatic duct opening through the diverticulum.

  20. Probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum modulates the formation of aberrant crypt foci, mucin-depleted foci, and cell proliferation on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Kansal, Vinod K; Kruzliak, Peter; Kumari, Archana

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) are pre-neoplastic lesions identified in the colon of carcinogen-treated rodents and in humans at high risk for colon cancer. The present study was carried out to divulge the protective potential of the probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LaVK2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BbVK3 alone or in combination with piroxicam (PXC) on the development of early biomarkers of colorectal carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats administered 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). DMH was injected subcutaneously at the rate of 40 mg/kg body weight per animal twice a week for 2 weeks. A total of 120 male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to five groups, each group having 24 animals. The rats were fed with buffalo milk or probiotic supplement (20 grams) alone or as an adjunct with PXC in addition to a basal diet ad libitum for 32 weeks. Group I was offered buffalo milk (BM) and served as the control group. Group II was administered DMH along with BM and served as the DMH-control group; group III was administered BM-DMH-PXC, in which besides administering BM-DMH, PXC was also offered. Group IV was offered probiotic LaBb Dahi and DMH, and group V was offered both probiotic LaBb Dahi and PXC along with DMH. The rats were euthanized at the 8(th), 16(th), and 32(nd) week of the experiment and examined for development of ACF, aberrant crypts per ACF (AC/ACF), mucin-depleted foci (MDF), large MDF, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling index. Administration of DMH in rats induced pre-neoplastic lesions (ACF and MDF) and increased the PCNA index in colorectal tissue. A significant (p<0.05) reduction in the number of ACF, AC/ACF, MDF, large MDF, and PCNA labeling index were observed in the probiotic LaBb Dahi group compared with the DMH control group. Feeding rats with LaBb Dahi or treatment with PXC diminished the initiation and progression of DMH-induced pre-neoplastic lesions and the PCNA index, and treatment with

  1. Effects of benzoic acid (VevoVitall®) on the performance and jejunal digestive physiology in young pigs.

    PubMed

    Diao, Hui; Gao, Zengbing; Yu, Bing; Zheng, Ping; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Huang, Zhiqing; Chen, Daiwen; Mao, Xiangbing

    2016-01-01

    As a organic acid, benzoic acid has become one of the most important alternatives for antibiotics, and its beneficial effect on performance in animals has been proven for a decade. However, knowledge of the effects of benzoic acid on jejunal digestive physiology, especially the antioxidant capacity and mucosal glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) concentrations is lacking. A total of 20 barrows [Duroc × (Yorkshire × Landrace)] with an average body weight (BW) of 18.75 ± 0.2 kg were used in a 14-d trial to determine the potential mechanisms of benzoic acid supplementation on the performance, nutrient digestibility and jejunal digestive physiology in young pigs. All pigs were randomly allotted to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 0 or 5000 mg/kg benzoic acid. Relative to the control, benzoic acid supplementation increased the average daily feed intake (ADFI), and average daily gain (ADG) in young pigs (P < 0.05), improved the apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), gross energy (GE) and crude ash (P < 0.05), and enhanced the activities of trypsin, lipase and amylase in the jejunum (P < 0.05). Similarly, relative to the control, supplementing benzoic acid in the diet resulted in a trend to reduce the pH values of the digesta (P = 0.06), decreased crypt depth and increased the villus height to crypt depth ratio (P < 0.05) in the jejunum of pigs. Finally, benzoic acid supplementation increased the mRNA expression and concentration of glucagon-like peptide 2 and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in the jejunal mucosa of young pigs (P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation with 5000 mg/kg benzoic acid improved the performance of young pigs through promoting nutrient digestion, improving jejunal antioxidant capacity, and maintaining the jejunal morphology in young pigs.

  2. Primarily Proximal Jejunal Stone Causing Enterolith Ileus in a Patient without Evidence of Cholecystoenteric Fistula or Jejunal Diverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Abtar, Houssam Khodor; Mneimneh, Mostapha; Hammoud, Mazen M; Zaaroura, Ahmed; Papas, Yasmina S

    2016-01-01

    Stone formation within the intestinal lumen is called enterolith. This stone can encroach into the lumen causing obstruction and surgical emergency. Jejunal obstruction by an enterolith is a very rare entity and often missed preoperatively. To our knowledge, most cases of jejunal obstruction, secondary to stone, were associated with biliary disease (cholecystoenteric fistula), bezoar, jejunal diverticulosis, or foreign body. Hereby we present a rare case report of small bowel obstruction in an elderly man who was diagnosed lately to have primary proximal jejunal obstruction by an enterolith without evidence of a cholecystoenteric fistula or jejunal diverticulosis. This patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with stone extraction, and subsequent primary repair of the bowel.

  3. Primarily Proximal Jejunal Stone Causing Enterolith Ileus in a Patient without Evidence of Cholecystoenteric Fistula or Jejunal Diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Mneimneh, Mostapha; Hammoud, Mazen M.; Zaaroura, Ahmed; Papas, Yasmina S.

    2016-01-01

    Stone formation within the intestinal lumen is called enterolith. This stone can encroach into the lumen causing obstruction and surgical emergency. Jejunal obstruction by an enterolith is a very rare entity and often missed preoperatively. To our knowledge, most cases of jejunal obstruction, secondary to stone, were associated with biliary disease (cholecystoenteric fistula), bezoar, jejunal diverticulosis, or foreign body. Hereby we present a rare case report of small bowel obstruction in an elderly man who was diagnosed lately to have primary proximal jejunal obstruction by an enterolith without evidence of a cholecystoenteric fistula or jejunal diverticulosis. This patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with stone extraction, and subsequent primary repair of the bowel. PMID:27803836

  4. Instabilities of Monolayered Epithelia: Shape and Structure of Villi and Crypts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannezo, E.; Prost, J.; Joanny, J.-F.

    2011-08-01

    We study theoretically the shapes of a dividing epithelial monolayer of cells lying on top of an elastic stroma. The negative tension created by cell division provokes a buckling instability at a finite wave vector leading to the formation of periodic arrays of villi and crypts. The instability is similar to the buckling of a metallic plate under compression. We use the results to rationalize the various structures of the intestinal lining observed in vivo. Taking into account the coupling between cell division and local curvature, we obtain different patterns of villi and crypts, which could explain the different morphologies of the small intestine and the colon.

  5. An agent-based model of anoikis in the colon crypt displays novel emergent behaviour consistent with biological observations.

    PubMed

    Ingham-Dempster, Tim; Walker, Dawn C; Corfe, Bernard M

    2017-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer mortality. Colon crypts are multi-cellular flask-shaped invaginations of the colonic epithelium, with stem cells at their base which support the continual turnover of the epithelium with loss of cells by anoikis from the flat mucosa. Mutations in these stem cells can become embedded in the crypts, a process that is strongly implicated in CRC initiation. We describe a computational model which includes novel features, including an accurate representation of the geometry of the crypt mouth. Model simulations yield previously unseen emergent phenomena, such as localization of cell death to a small region of the crypt mouth which corresponds with that observed in vivo. A mechanism emerges in the model for regulation of crypt cellularity in response to changes in either cell proliferation rates or membrane adhesion strengths. We show that cell shape assumptions influence this behaviour, with cylinders recapitulating biology better than spheres. Potential applications of the model include determination of roles of mutations in neoplasia and exploring factors for altered crypt morphodynamics.

  6. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  7. Differences in transcriptomic profile and IgA repertoire between jejunal and ileal Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Levast, Benoît; De Monte, Michèle; Melo, Sandrine; Chevaleyre, Claire; Berri, Mustapha; Salmon, Henri; Meurens, François

    2010-02-01

    In many species such as sheep and pig, there are two types of Peyer's patches (PP): several discrete patches in the jejunum and a long and continuous patch in the ileum. Most of the immunoglobulin A in the gut is generated by B-cells in the PP germinal centers. Moreover, swine like ovine ileal PP might be important for antigen independent B-cell repertoire diversification. We examined, by quantitative real-time PCR, the expression of 36 transcripts of antimicrobial peptides, chemokines, interleukines, Toll-like receptors and transcription factors from both PP and we highlighted the differences by a principal component analysis. Ileal PP was characterized by a higher mRNA expression of CCL28, IL5, IL10, TLR2 and TLR4 while jejunal PP showed higher mRNA expression of antimicrobial peptides, CCL25, FOXP3, IL4, T-Bet, TSLP and SOCS2. Then, we analyzed some VDJ rearrangements to assess immunoglobulin repertoire diversity in jejunal and ileal PP from weaned piglets. The IgA and IgM repertoires were more diverse in ileal than in jejunal piglet PP. All these results could be related to the rarefaction of interfollicular T-cell zone and the presence in ileal versus jejunal lumen of a more diversified microflora. These findings shed a light on the functional differences between both PP.

  8. Rapid tissue engineering of biomimetic human corneal limbal crypts with 3D niche architecture.

    PubMed

    Levis, Hannah J; Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc A; Kaasi, Andreas; Daniels, Julie T

    2013-11-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of the human corneal epithelium and these cells reside in a specialised stem cell niche. They are located at the base of limbal crypts, in a physically protected microenvironment in close proximity to a variety of neighbouring niche cells. Design and recreation of elements of various stem cell niches have allowed researchers to simplify aspects of these complex microenvironments for further study in vitro. We have developed a method to rapidly and reproducibly create bioengineered limbal crypts (BLCs) in a collagen construct using a simple one-step method. Liquid is removed from collagen hydrogels using hydrophilic porous absorbers (HPAs) that have custom moulded micro-ridges on the base. The resulting topography on the surface of the thin collagen constructs resembles the dimensions of the stromal crypts of the human limbus. Human limbal epithelial cells seeded onto the surface of the constructs populate these BLCs and form numerous layers with a high proportion of the cells lining the crypts expressing putative stem cell marker, p63α. The HPAs are produced using a moulding process that is flexible and can be adapted depending on the requirements of the end user. Creation of defined topographical features using this process could be applicable to numerous tissue-engineering applications where varied 3-dimensional niche architectures are required.

  9. Distinct cytoprotective roles of pyruvate and ATP by glucose metabolism on epithelial necroptosis and crypt proliferation in ischaemic gut.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Ying; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chung-Yen; Lee, Tsung-Chun; Chen, Chin-Tin; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Yang, Chung-Yi; Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2017-01-15

    Intestinal ischaemia causes epithelial death and crypt dysfunction, leading to barrier defects and gut bacteria-derived septic complications. Enteral glucose protects against ischaemic injury; however, the roles played by glucose metabolites such as pyruvate and ATP on epithelial death and crypt dysfunction remain elusive. A novel form of necrotic death that involves the assembly and phosphorylation of receptor interacting protein kinase 1/3 complex was found in ischaemic enterocytes. Pyruvate suppressed epithelial cell death in an ATP-independent manner and failed to maintain crypt function. Conversely, replenishment of ATP partly restored crypt proliferation but had no effect on epithelial necroptosis in ischaemic gut. Our data argue against the traditional view of ATP as the main cytoprotective factor by glucose metabolism, and indicate a novel anti-necroptotic role of glycolytic pyruvate under ischaemic stress. Mesenteric ischaemia/reperfusion induces epithelial death in both forms of apoptosis and necrosis, leading to villus denudation and gut barrier damage. It remains unclear whether programmed cell necrosis [i.e. receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP)-dependent necroptosis] is involved in ischaemic injury. Previous studies have demonstrated that enteral glucose uptake by sodium-glucose transporter 1 ameliorated ischaemia/reperfusion-induced epithelial injury, partly via anti-apoptotic signalling and maintenance of crypt proliferation. Glucose metabolism is generally assumed to be cytoprotective; however, the roles played by glucose metabolites (e.g. pyruvate and ATP) on epithelial cell death and crypt dysfunction remain elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the cytoprotective effects exerted by distinct glycolytic metabolites in ischaemic gut. Wistar rats subjected to mesenteric ischaemia were enterally instilled glucose, pyruvate or liposomal ATP. The results showed that intestinal ischaemia caused RIP1-dependent epithelial necroptosis and

  10. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine.

  11. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  12. The chemopotential effect of Annona muricata leaves against azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats and the apoptotic effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 cells: a bioassay-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  13. The Chemopotential Effect of Annona muricata Leaves against Azoxymethane-Induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci in Rats and the Apoptotic Effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 Cells: A Bioassay-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  14. Apoptosis of ileal crypt epithelia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Andreas; Russo, Alexandra; Lux, Steffi; Waiz, Lioudmila; Seidmann, Larissa; Faber, Jörg; Kirkpatrick, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Intestinal crypt cell apoptosis may occur after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without clinically overt graft-versus-host disease. We describe this phenomenon in a case of a 12-year-old girl who had segments of the ileum resected because of a relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnostic difficulties are discussed. PMID:25984309

  15. Thromboxane synthesis inhibitors and postprandial jejunal capillary exchange capacity.

    PubMed

    Mangino, M J; Chou, C C

    1988-05-01

    The effects of thromboxane synthesis inhibitors (imidazole and U 63557A; Upjohn) and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, mefenamic acid, on jejunal capillary filtration coefficients (Kfc) were determined in dogs before and during the presence of predigested food in the jejunal lumen. The jejunal Kfc increased significantly soon after the placement of a predigested test food containing all major constituents of diet. The Kfc remained elevated as long as the food was present in the lumen (15 min). Mefenamic acid (10 mg/kg iv) did not significantly alter resting jejunal Kfc or alter the food-induced increase in Kfc. Imidazole (5.0 mg/min ia) or U 63557A (5.0 mg/kg iv) per se significantly increased jejunal Kfc. Placement of digested food further increased the Kfc to levels significantly higher than those observed before administration of the two thromboxane synthase inhibitors. Production of thromboxane B2 by jejunal tissue was significantly reduced and 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha (the stable hydrolysis product of prostacyclin) production was significantly increased after administration of U 63557A. Our study indicates that the relative production of endogenous thromboxanes and other prostanoids modulates jejunal capillary exchange capacity in the absence or presence of digested food in the jejunal lumen.

  16. Effects of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, or serovar Choleraesuis, Lactobacillus reuteri and Bacillus licheniformis on chemokine and cytokine expression in the swine jejunal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2.

    PubMed

    Skjolaas, K A; Burkey, T E; Dritz, S S; Minton, J E

    2007-02-15

    Direct-fed microbials, including Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp., are potential replacements for low dose in-feed antibiotics for swine and other livestock. To understand the function of these microbes in the gut, the current study used pig jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) to evaluate how Lactobacillus reuteri (LR) and Bacillus licheniformis (BL) differed from Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (ST) or Choleraesuis (SC) in their ability to regulate, stimulate, or modify the proinflammatory mediators, interleukin 8 (IL8), CC chemokine 20 (CCL20), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). To optimize the positive control to drive IL8 secretion by IPEC-J2 cells, cells were treated apically with various concentrations of ST (versus control (CTL)) for 1h, followed by a wash. Media containing gentamicin was added and collected at 6h post-treatment. Compared to CTL, 10(8) ST produced maximal IL8 secretion in both the apical and basolateral directions, with significant basolateral polarization (P<0.0001). We next evaluated the time course of IL8 secretion, and IL8, CCL20, and TNFalpha mRNA expression by IPEC-J2 cells treated apically with 10(8) ST, SC, LR, and BL versus CTL. Media and RNA were collected at 1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 h post treatment. Only ST stimulated an increase in IL8 secretion at any time point, with increases in IL8 mRNA at both 3 and 6h (P<0.05). However, BL increased IL8 mRNA at 1.5h (P<0.0001). Neither LR nor SC affected IL8 mRNA expression. CCL20 mRNA was strongly upregulated by ST (P<0.05) and BL (1.5 and 3.0 h; P<0.05), but not LR or SC. Only ST increased TNFalpha mRNA relative to CTL (P<0.05). Two experiments were conducted to determine if pre-exposure of IPEC-J2 cells to LR or BL modified ST induced IL8 secretion. Confluent cells were treated apically overnight with various levels of LR or BL (in separate experiments) followed by ST challenge. Media were collected at 4 (LR experiment) or 5h (BL experiment) post ST. In the LR study, IL8

  17. Investigation of computer-aided colonic crypt pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xin; Pan, Yinsheng; Sivak, Michael V., Jr.; Olowe, Kayode; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Approximately 50% of these deaths could be prevented by earlier detection through screening. Magnification chromoendoscopy is a technique which utilizes tissue stains applied to the gastrointestinal mucosa and high-magnification endoscopy to better visualize and characterize lesions. Prior studies have shown that shapes of colonic crypts change with disease and show characteristic patterns. Current methods for assessing colonic crypt patterns are somewhat subjective and not standardized. Computerized algorithms could be used to standardize colonic crypt pattern assessment. We have imaged resected colonic mucosa in vitro (N = 70) using methylene blue dye and a surgical microscope to approximately simulate in vivo imaging with magnification chromoendoscopy. We have developed a method of computerized processing to analyze the crypt patterns in the images. The quantitative image analysis consists of three steps. First, the crypts within the region of interest of colonic tissue are semi-automatically segmented using watershed morphological processing. Second, crypt size and shape parameters are extracted from the segmented crypts. Third, each sample is assigned to a category according to the Kudo criteria. The computerized classification is validated by comparison with human classification using the Kudo classification criteria. The computerized colonic crypt pattern analysis algorithm will enable a study of in vivo magnification chromoendoscopy of colonic crypt pattern correlated with risk of colorectal cancer. This study will assess the feasibility of screening and surveillance of the colon using magnification chromoendoscopy.

  18. Foci of aberrant crypts in the colons of mice and rats exposed to carcinogens associated with foods

    SciTech Connect

    Tudek, B.; Bird, R.P.; Bruce, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci can be identified in the colons of rodents treated 3 wk earlier with azoxymethane, a known colon carcinogen. These crypts can easily be visualized in the unsectioned methylene blue-stained colons under light microscopy, where they are distinguished by their increased size, more prominent epithelial cells, and pericryptal space. They occur as single aberrant crypts or as two, three, or four aberrant crypts in a cluster. We compared the reported ability of carcinogens associated with the human diet to induce colon cancer with the measured rate of induction of aberrant crypts in female CF1 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. The carcinogens used were 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, methyl nitrosourea, N-nitrosodimethylamine, benzo(a)pyrene, aflatoxin B1, 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido(1,2-alpha:3',2'-d)imidazole, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-P)quinoline, 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-P)quinoline, and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-b)indole. Graded doses of these compounds were given to the animals by gavage twice with a 4-day interval, and the animals were terminated 3 wk later. All colon carcinogens induced aberrant crypts in a dose-related fashion. N-Nitrosodimethylamine and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-b)indole, carcinogenic compounds that do not induce colon cancer, did not induce them. The ability of the studied compounds to induce aberrant crypts was species specific; e.g., aflatoxin B1 and 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-P)quinoline induce about 20 times more in rats than mice. This relationship was consistent with their reported ability to induce colon cancer in these species. Results of the present study support the use of the aberrant crypt assays to screen colon-specific carcinogens and to study the process of colon carcinogenesis.

  19. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Mancini Filho, J.; Lajolo, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6696828

  20. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M A; Mancini Filho, J; Lajolo, F M

    1984-02-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed.

  1. Direct inhibitory effect of nicardipine on basolateral K+ channels in human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Butterfield, I; Higgs, N B; Warhurst, G

    1999-03-01

    The most abundant basolateral K+ channels in human colonic crypt cells have a low conductance (23 pS), respond to increases in intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP, and have been implicated in intestinal electrogenic Cl- secretion. The effect of nicardipine on the activity of these K+ channels was examined by patch-clamp recording in the cell-attached and excised inside-out configurations from the basolateral membrane of single crypts isolated from biopsied samples of human distal colon. During cell-attached recordings, addition of 2 micromol/l nicardipine to crypts pretreated with 200 micromol/l dibutyryl cAMP decreased single-channel open probability by 87%, but in parallel studies nicardipine had no effect on the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Using inside-out patches from crypts pretreated with dibutyryl cAMP (bathed in 1.2 mmol/l Ca2+), the addition of increasing concentrations of nicardipine (200 nmol/l, 2 micromol/l and 20 micromol/l) decreased single-channel open probability in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 0.47 micromol/l). In additional experiments using stripped rat distal colonic mucosa mounted in conventional Ussing chambers, serosal addition of nicardipine at increasing concentrations (ranging from 200 nmol/l to 20 micromol/l) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of dibutyryl-cAMP-stimulated electrogenic Cl- secretion (IC50 2 micromol/l). Taken together, these results indicate that nicardipine has a direct inhibitory action on 23-pS basolateral K+ channels in human intestinal crypt cells, which is likely to decrease cAMP-stimulated electrogenic Cl- secretion. These basolateral K+ channels may provide a focal point for the development of new strategies in the treatment of secretory diarrhoeal diseases.

  2. Enteral glutamine differentially regulates Nrf 2 along the villus-crypt axis of the intestine to enhance glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Venoji, Raghupathy; Amirtharaj, Gnanaraj Jayakumar; Kini, Archana; Vanaparthi, Sivakumar; Venkatraman, Aparna; Ramachandran, Anup

    2015-12-01

    Glutamine is an important energy source for the intestinal epithelium, and its supplementation protects intestinal epithelial cells by induction of glutathione. However, mechanisms of glutathione induction in cells at various stages of differentiation along the crypt to villus axis are not well understood. This study examined induction of glutathione in response to glutamine along the intestinal villus-crypt axis and evaluated regulatory mediators involved in the process. Animals were administered 4% glutamine in feed for 7 days, following which enterocytes at various stages of differentiation were isolated and glutathione levels and signaling mediators involved in its regulation were studied. In control animals, glutathione levels were higher in the intestinal crypt than in the villus or middle region. This was accompanied by elevated expression of the modifier subunit of glutathione synthetase (GCLM) and the transcription factor Nrf2 when compared with cells from the villus and middle regions. These levels were further enhanced by glutamine throughout the intestine, although the effects were more dramatic in the crypt. In parallel to glutathione induction, glutamine supplementation also altered actin dynamics and proliferation in cells of the crypt. These results suggest that the variation of glutathione levels along the villus-crypt axis in the intestine is due to gradients in expression of mediators such as glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit and Nrf2. The protective effects of glutamine supplementation seem to be most pronounced in the crypt, where it upregulates proliferation, glutathione levels and alters actin dynamics. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Ultrastructural study of postnatal development of the tonsillar crypt epithelium of the musk shrew, Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Tohya, K; Kimura, M

    1992-09-01

    An ultrastructural study was made of the postnatal development of the tonsillar crypt epithelium in the musk shrew, Suncus murinus. On day 3 after birth, a particular kind of large lymphoid cell was first seen to move through the basement membrane into the epithelium. The next migration was that of lymphocytes, which passed through holes in the basement membrane. On days 5 to 7, the lymphocytes formed clusters, and pale epithelial cells of low electron density appeared. The cell clusters and pale epithelial cells fused on day 10. By day 14, these epithelial cells extended cytoplasmic projections to the surface of the epithelium, which had many heterophagic vacuoles and some microvilli-like structures. These findings suggest that the lymphoepithelial relationship is important for the organization of the immunological microenvironment in tonsillar crypt epithelium of the neonatal musk shrew.

  4. One-hit effects in cancer: Altered proteome of morphologically normal colon crypts in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Anthony T.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Li, Xin-Ming; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Coudry, Renata A.; Cooper, Harry S.; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Boman, Bruce M.; Zhang, Tao; Litwin, Samuel; Ross, Eric A.; Conrad, Peggy; Crowell, James A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Knudson, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    We studied patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), because they are virtually certain to develop colon cancer, and because much is known about the causative APC gene. We hypothesized that the inherited heterozygous mutation itself leads to changes in the proteome of morphologically normal crypts and the proteins that changed may represent targets for preventive and therapeutic agents. We determined the differential protein expression of morphologically normal colon crypts of FAP patients versus those of individuals without the mutation, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and validation by 2D gel Western blotting. Approximately 13% of 1,695 identified proteins were abnormally expressed in the morphologically normal crypts of APC mutation carriers, indicating that a colon crypt cell under the one-hit state is already abnormal. Many of the expression changes affect pathways consistent with the function of the APC protein, including apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell motility, cytoskeletal organization and biogenesis, mitosis, transcription and oxidative stress response. Thus, heterozygosity for a mutant APC tumor suppressor gene alters the proteome of normal-appearing crypt cells in a gene-specific manner, consistent with a detectable one-hit event. These changes may represent the earliest biomarkers of colorectal cancer development, potentially leading to the identification of molecular targets for cancer prevention. PMID:18794146

  5. A Crypt-Specific Core Microbiota Resides in the Mouse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Pédron, Thierry; Mulet, Céline; Dauga, Catherine; Frangeul, Lionel; Chervaux, Christian; Grompone, Gianfranco; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to explore the microbial content of functionally critical niches of the mouse gastrointestinal tract, we targeted molecular microbial diagnostics of the crypts that contain the intestinal stem cells, which account for epithelial regeneration. As current evidence indicates, the gut microbiota affects epithelial regeneration; bacteria that are likely to primarily participate in this essential step of the gut, microbiota cross talk, have been identified. We show in this article that only the cecal and colonic crypts harbor resident microbiota in the mouse and that regardless of the line and breeding origin of these mice, this bacterial population is unexpectedly dominated by aerobic genera. Interestingly, this microbiota resembles the restricted microbiota found in the midgut of invertebrates; thus, the presence of our so-called “crypt-specific core microbiota” (CSCM) in the mouse colon potentially reflects a coevolutionary process under selective conditions that can now be addressed. We suggest that CSCM could play both a protective and a homeostatic role within the colon. This article is setting the bases for such studies, particularly by providing a bona fide—and essentially cultivable—crypt microbiota of reference. PMID:22617141

  6. Delayed jejunal perforation after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Ikennah L.; Dixon, Elijah

    2016-01-01

    Bowel perforation is a rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which if left undiagnosed can have fatal consequences. In addition, isolated small bowel perforation is extremely rare and should be considered in patients presenting with sudden onset abdominal pain in the postoperative period. A 57-year-old male with symptomatic gallstones underwent urgent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and was discharged home on postoperative day (POD) 1 without complications. He presented to the emergency department on POD 11 complaining of sudden onset abdominal pain. A CT scan did not confirm a diagnosis and he was admitted for observation. On post admission day 2, he became significantly peritonitic and laparotomy revealed jejunal perforation. Bowel resection with hand-sewn anastomosis was completed and he was discharged on POD 10. Follow-up at 6 weeks revealed no further issues. We review the literature on small bowel perforation post laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:26908534

  7. Free jejunal flaps can be monitored by use of microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Hanne Birke

    2008-08-01

    When new combinations of preoperative treatments of carcinoma of the esophagus are implemented, surgical morbidity and mortality become even more important risk factors. This study investigated whether the risk of postoperative complications caused by ischemia in the reconstructed esophagus can be reduced using microdialysis as monitoring method. This is a retrospective study of 14 patients undergoing resection of carcinoma in the upper part of the esophagus and reconstruction with a free jejunal flap. The metabolism in all 14 jejunal transfers was monitored by use of microdialysis. The data were analyzed looking for reliable parameters detecting critical ischemia. Critical ischemia was suspected in two cases. Both of these cases were surgically revised, ischemia in the jejunal flap was verified, and the jejunal flaps were revascularized. All 14 jejunal flaps survived. Using the concentration of glucose in the microdialysate, it was possible to detect the two cases of critical ischemia. Yet, the most reliable parameter seemed to be the retrospectively calculated lactate:glucose ratio; in both the ischemic flaps, the lactate:glucose ratio exceeded more than 1000% the maximum values found in all the nonischemic flaps. Microdialysis is a promising monitoring method for surveillance of free jejunal flaps.

  8. Morphological alterations in the jejunal mucosa of aged rats and the possible protective role of green tea.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zeinab Abel-Rehim; Zauszkiewicz-Pawlak, Agata; Abdelrahman, Shaimaa A; Algaidi, Sami; Desouky, Maha; Shalaby, Sally M

    2017-08-16

    Gastrointestinal disorders become more prevalent with ageing. This study is aimed to describe morphological changes that occur in the jejunal mucosa of male albino rats as a result of ageing and the protective effect of green tea supplements. The experiment was performed on sixty rats: thirty young-adult (6-month old, body mass 200-220 g) and thirty old (24-month-old, body mass 220-260 g) animals. Each group was further divided into two subgroups (n = 15 each): control rats and green tea-treated rats that received 1.5 mL (300 mg/kg/day) of green tea extract for 14 weeks by oral gavage. Sections of the jejunum were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid Schiff and Mallory trichrome methods and toluidine blue. The presence of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)- and CD68-positive cells was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Ultrathin sections were prepared and examined by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Jejunal sections of the old control rats showed distortion of submucosa and attenuated muscularis externa with decreased height of intestinal villi. The villi also showed partial loss of acidophilic brush border with wide spaces between enterocytes. Swollen, short, blunt or broad villi with abundant mononuclear cell infiltration of lamina propria and congested blood vessels were evident both by light and electron microscopy. The number of PCNA- and CD68-positive cells in jejunal mucosa of old rats was higher than in young rats. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the mucosa of old control rats were lower, whereas malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were higher in the jejunal homogenates of old rats as compared to young control rats. Administration of green tea extract protected the jejunal mucosa from age-related changes by restoring its histological structure. The age-related changes of the morphology of rat jejunum could be ameliorated by prolonged supplementation of the green tea extract.

  9. The molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Heng; Jiang, Min; Peng, Xi; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; He, Min; Zuo, Zhicai; Ouyang, Ping; Fan, Junde; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has potent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and other adverse effects in human and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum of broilers. Broilers, as experimental animals, were fed 0.6 mg/kg AFB1 diet for 3 weeks. Our results showed that AFB1 reduced the jejunal villus height, villus height/crypt ratio and caused G2/M cell cycle arrest. The G2/M cell cycle was accompanied by the increase of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Chk2, p21 protein and mRNA expression, and the decrease of Mdm2, cdc25C, cdc2, cyclin B and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and mRNA expression. In conclusion, AFB1 blocked G2/M cell cycle by ATM pathway in the jejunum of broilers. PMID:27232757

  10. Are children on jejunal feeds at risk of iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Tan, Li-Zsa; Adams, Susan E; Kennedy, Alison; Kepreotes, Helen; Ooi, Chee Y

    2015-05-14

    Children on exclusive jejunal feeding may be at risk of iron deficiency due to the feeds bypassing the duodenum, which is the primary site for iron absorption. We describe the biochemical and hematological features of six children on exclusive jejunal feeding who did not receive iron supplementation. At a mean (standard deviation) period of 11 (6.5) mo after commencing jejunal feeds, there was a significant reduction in both serum iron (18.5 g/L vs 9.8 g/L, P = 0.01) and transferrin saturation levels (23.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.02), suggesting iron deficiency. However, there was no significant change in ferritin, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume levels post-commencement of jejunal feeds. This may be the result of small bowel adaptation in response to early iron deficiency. Larger and longer term prospective studies are required to investigate if children on jejunal feeds are at risk of developing iron deficiency.

  11. Application of three-dimensional imaging to the intestinal crypt organoids and biopsied intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Tsai, Ya-Hui; Liu, Yuan-An; Lee, Shih-Hua; Tseng, Sheng-Hong; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) histopathology is the standard analytical method for intestinal biopsied tissues; however, the role of 3-dimensional (3D) imaging system in the analysis of the intestinal tissues is unclear. The 3D structure of the crypt organoids from the intestinal stem cell culture and intestinal tissues from the donors and recipients after intestinal transplantation was observed using a 3D imaging system and compared with 2D histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The crypt organoids and intestinal tissues showed well-defined 3D structures. The 3D images of the intestinal tissues with acute rejection revealed absence of villi and few crypts, which were consistent with the histopathological features. In the intestinal transplant for megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, the donor's intestinal tissues had well-developed nerve networks and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the muscle layer, while the recipient's intestinal tissues had distorted nerve network and the ICCs were few and sparsely distributed, relative to those of the donor. The 3D images showed a clear spatial relationship between the microstructures of the small bowel and the features of graft rejection. In conclusion, integration of the 3D imaging and 2D histopathology provided a global view of the intestinal tissues from the transplant patients.

  12. Combined changes in Wnt signaling response and contact inhibition induce altered proliferation in radiation-treated intestinal crypts

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, S.-J.; Osborne, J. M.; Appleton, P. L.; Näthke, I.

    2016-01-01

    Curative intervention is possible if colorectal cancer is identified early, underscoring the need to detect the earliest stages of malignant transformation. A candidate biomarker is the expanded proliferative zone observed in crypts before adenoma formation, also found in irradiated crypts. However, the underlying driving mechanism for this is not known. Wnt signaling is a key regulator of proliferation, and elevated Wnt signaling is implicated in cancer. Nonetheless, how cells differentiate Wnt signals of varying strengths is not understood. We use computational modeling to compare alternative hypotheses about how Wnt signaling and contact inhibition affect proliferation. Direct comparison of simulations with published experimental data revealed that the model that best reproduces proliferation patterns in normal crypts stipulates that proliferative fate and cell cycle duration are set by the Wnt stimulus experienced at birth. The model also showed that the broadened proliferation zone induced by tumorigenic radiation can be attributed to cells responding to lower Wnt concentrations and dividing at smaller volumes. Application of the model to data from irradiated crypts after an extended recovery period permitted deductions about the extent of the initial insult. Application of computational modeling to experimental data revealed how mechanisms that control cell dynamics are altered at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:27053661

  13. Crypt abscesses in the caeca of feral rabbits in a rabbit haemorrhagic disease endemic region of New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Henning, J; Alley, M R

    2007-10-01

    To describe the pathology of crypt abscesses in the caeca of feral rabbits in the Manawatu region of New Zealand, and to examine the possible relationship between their prevalence and rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) virus (RHDV) infection. During the course of a 3-year study of RHD, 173 wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were shot on three pastoral livestock farms in the Manawatu region of New Zealand. All rabbits were necropsied, and tissue samples of the caeca were examined histologically. The age of each animal was determined, and blood samples collected for the detection of RHDV antibodies. Logistic regression was used to model the odds of rabbits having crypt abscesses. At necropsy, 63/173 (36.4%) rabbits were found to have small circular black nodules on the mucosal surface of their appendix caecum and/or sacculus rotundus. Microscopically, these were identified as small crypt abscesses composed of dilated sacs at the base of the mucosa that were often lined by a thin layer of attenuated epithelial cells. They usually contained large amounts of concentrically-laminated mucopolysaccharide material that was sometimes pigmented, inflammatory debris, and were often the site of a moderate multifocal appendicitis. Although RHDV was active in the study area, no association was found between RHDV antibodies in serum and the presence of lesions. The lesions were more common in older individuals and those born in summer or autumn. This is the first report of crypt abscesses with inflammation and necrotic debris in the caeca of rabbits. No association between the occurrence of crypt abscesses and RHDV infection was identified. Wild rabbits born in a particular season were presumably exposed very early in life to conditions that caused the crypt abscesses to develop. Alternatively, association with season of birth may represent rabbits that were of similar age in a later stage of their lives, when they became exposed to the cause of the lesions, which remains

  14. Perforated jejunal diverticulum: a rare case of acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Cheung, Cherry X.; Hills, Tristram; Waris, Aqueel; Healy, Donagh; Khan, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Jejunal pseudo-diverticulosis is a rare acquired herniation of the mucosa and submucosa through weakened areas of the muscularis mucosa of the mesenteric aspect of the bowel. They are asymptomatic in the majority of cases; however, they can present with a wide spectrum of non-specific symptoms such as chronic abdominal discomfort, postprandial flatulence, diarrhoea, malabsorption and steattorhoea. In up to 15% of cases, more serious acute complications may arise such as the development of intestinal obstruction, haemorrhage or as in our case, localized peritonitis secondary to perforation. Perforation carries an overall mortality rate of up to 40% and exploratory laparotomy followed by copious lavage with segmental resection and primary anastomosis remains the mainstay of managing such sequalae of jejunal pseudo-diverticulosis. Our case report highlights the importance of maintaining a high clinical suspicion of a perforated jejunal diverticulum in an elderly patient presenting with an acute abdomen. PMID:27765806

  15. Symbolic dynamics of jejunal motility in the irritable bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wackerbauer, Renate; Schmidt, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Different studies of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by conventional analysis of jejunal motility report conflicting results. Therefore, our aim is to quantify the jejunal contraction activity by symbolic dynamics in order to discriminate between IBS and control subjects. Contraction amplitudes during fasting motility (phase II) are analyzed for 30 IBS and 30 healthy subjects. On the basis of a particular scale-independent discretization of the contraction amplitudes with respect to the median, IBS patients are characterized by increased block entropy as well as increased mean contraction amplitude. In a further more elementary level of analysis these differences can be reduced to specific contraction patterns within the time series, namely the fact that successive large contraction amplitudes are less ordered in IBS than in controls. These significant differences in jejunal motility may point to an altered control of the gut in IBS, although further studies on a representative number of patients have to be done for a validation of these findings.

  16. Aberrant crypt foci in human colons: distribution and histomorphologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shpitz, B; Bomstein, Y; Mekori, Y; Cohen, R; Kaufman, Z; Neufeld, D; Galkin, M; Bernheim, J

    1998-05-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are one of the earliest putative preneoplastic, and in some cases, neoplastic lesions in human colons. These microscopic lesions, identified on methylene blue-stained mucosa with a low-power-magnification microscope, are thought to be closely related to the earliest steps in multistage colonic tumorigenesis. We investigated the distribution pattern and histomorphological features of ACF in 74 patients with sporadic colorectal cancer. The distribution pattern shows a slightly higher prevalence with older age. The prevalence of the ACF in sigmoid colon was significantly higher in patients with colorectal cancer as compared with patients with benign colonic diseases. Also, significantly more ACF were detected in distal parts of the large bowel (descending, sigmoid colon, and rectum) than in proximal parts. Of 42 microdissected lesions, 12 were dysplastic and 30 were hyperplastic foci. The average size of dysplastic lesions was significantly larger than hyperplastic foci. More apoptotic bodies were found in dysplastic lesions. These lesions also showed an upward expansion of proliferative compartment and higher proliferation indices expressed as proliferating cell nuclear antigen-labeling index. Lymphoid follicles were frequently observed in the base of both hyperplastic and dysplastic foci (40% and 66.6%, respectively). The coincidence of lymphoid follicles was 2.5 to 8 times higher than expected. These features may be related to further progression of selected ACF during colorectal tumorigenesis.

  17. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal UR Rehman

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia. PMID:26500958

  18. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanjeev B; Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal Ur Rehman

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia.

  19. Clonality assessment and clonal ordering of individual neoplastic crypts shows polyclonality of colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Thirlwell, Christina; Will, Olivia C C; Domingo, E; Graham, Trevor A; McDonald, Stuart A C; Oukrif, Dahmane; Jeffrey, Rosemary; Gorman, Maggie; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Chin-Aleong, Joanne; Clark, Sue K; Novelli, Marco R; Jankowski, Janusz A; Wright, Nicholas A; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Leedham, Simon J

    2010-04-01

    According to the somatic mutation theory, monoclonal colorectal lesions arise from sequential mutations in the progeny of a single stem cell. However, studies in a sex chromosome mixoploid mosaic (XO/XY) patient indicated that colorectal adenomas were polyclonal. We assessed adenoma clonality on an individual crypt basis and completed a genetic dependency analysis in carcinomas-in-adenomas to assess mutation order and timing. Polyp samples were analyzed from the XO/XY individual, patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, patients with small sporadic adenomas, and patients with sporadic carcinoma-in-adenomas. Clonality was analyzed using X/Y chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization, analysis of 5q loss of heterozygosity in XO/XY tissue, and sequencing of adenomatous polyposis coli. Individual crypts and different phenotypic areas of carcinoma-in-adenoma lesions were analyzed for mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli, p53, and K-RAS; loss of heterozygosity at 5q, 17p, and 18q; and aneuploidy. Phylogenetic trees were constructed. All familial adenomatous polyposis-associated adenomas and some sporadic lesions had polyclonal genetic defects. Some independent clones appeared to be maintained in advanced adenomas. No clear obligate order of genetic events was established. Top-down growth of dysplastic tissue into neighboring crypts was a possible mechanism of clonal competition. Human colorectal microadenomas are polyclonal and may arise from a combination of host genetic features, mucosal exposures, and active crypt interactions. Analyses of tumor phylogenies show that most lesions undergo intermittent genetic homogenization, but heterotypic mutation patterns indicate that independent clonal evolution can occur throughout adenoma development. Based on observations of clonal ordering the requirement and timing of genetic events during neoplastic progression may be more variable than previously thought. 2010 AGA

  20. In vitro model of intestinal crypt abscess. A novel neutrophil-derived secretagogue activity.

    PubMed Central

    Nash, S; Parkos, C; Nusrat, A; Delp, C; Madara, J L

    1991-01-01

    In order to model crypt abscesses, a histological finding which correlates with disease activity in intestinal inflammation, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were layered onto monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84, a crypt-like epithelium which is capable of Cl- secretion. Such PMN-epithelial interaction had no substantial effect on monolayer integrity or function. However, when PMN were stimulated by conditions including those present naturally in the human colonic lumen, monolayers responded with a bumetanide-sensitive short circuit current (Isc) indicative of Cl- secretion, the basis of secretory diarrhea. This Isc response was induced by a neutrophil-derived secretagogue (NDS), which was only active when applied to the luminal surface of monolayers and did not require PMN-epithelial contact. NDS activity is resistant to boiling, acid, and trypsin and passes a 500 nominal mol wt cutoff filter. NDS activity is not secondary to the respiratory burst products O2- or H2O2 and does not appear to be a myeloperoxidase product. We speculate NDS elicited Cl- secretion may contribute to the secretory diarrhea seen in patients with intestinal inflammation and crypt abscesses. PMID:2010557

  1. Duodenal crypt health following exposure to Cr(VI): Micronucleus scoring, γ-H2AX immunostaining, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Chad M.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Elbekai, Reem H.; Paranjpe, Madhav G.; Seiter, Jennifer M.; Chappell, Mark A.; Tappero, Ryan V.; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M.; Bichteler, Anne; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.

    2015-08-01

    Lifetime exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal damage and an increase in duodenal tumors in B6C3F1 mice. To assess whether these tumors could be the result of a direct mutagenic or genotoxic mode of action, we conducted a GLP-compliant 7-day drinking water study to assess crypt health along the entire length of the duodenum. Mice were exposed to water (vehicle control), 1.4, 21, or 180 ppm Cr(VI) via drinking water for 7 consecutive days. Crypt enterocytes in Swiss roll sections were scored as normal, mitotic, apoptotic, karyorrhectic, or as having micronuclei. A single oral gavage of 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide served as a positive control for micronucleus induction. Exposure to 21 and 180 ppm Cr(VI) significantly increased the number of crypt enterocytes. Micronuclei and γ-H2AX immunostaining were not elevated in the crypts of Cr(VI)-treated mice. In contrast, treatment with cyclophosphamide significantly increased numbers of crypt micronuclei and qualitatively increased γ-H2AX immunostaining. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy revealed the presence of strong Cr fluorescence in duodenal villi, but negligible Cr fluorescence in the crypt compartment. Together, these data indicate that Cr(VI) does not adversely effect the crypt compartment where intestinal stem cells reside, and provide additional evidence that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal cancer in B6C3F1 mice involves chronic villous wounding resulting in compensatory crypt enterocyte hyperplasia.

  2. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  3. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm.

    PubMed

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-05-29

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms.

  4. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Koshimune, Seijiro; Onoda, Tomoo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    Free jejunal transfer using microsurgery after oesophageal or pharyngeal cancer resection is a useful operative approach. However, the disadvantage of free tissue transfer is the risk of necrosis of the transferred tissue due to impaired blood supply. In addition, jejunal flaps are more prone to blood-flow disorders such as ischaemia and congestion compared with other types of flaps. The causes of local blood supply disorders after microsurgery are divided broadly into two classes: one is thrombosis of an artery and/or vein in the anastomotic region and the other consists of local physical factors such as compressive pressure derived from haematoma formation and the effect of infection of the vascular pedicle. In this report, two rare cases of blood-flow disorder of the transferred free jejunum are described. In both cases, no signs of significant infection or occlusion of the vascular pedicles were present and late necrosis progressed gradually. The patients showed remarkable weight loss and a poor nutritional state due to inadequate preoperative nutritional intake. The necrosis was considered to be a result of non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap, and the factors contributing to free jejunal necrosis were reviewed.

  5. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacy L.; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic. PMID:24489394

  6. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacy L; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-02-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic.

  7. Effects of milk thistle meal on performance, ileal bacterial enumeration, jejunal morphology and blood lipid peroxidation in laying hens fed diets with different levels of metabolizable energy.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Jabali, N S; Mahdavi, A H; Ansari Mahyari, S; Sedghi, M; Akbari Moghaddam Kakhki, R

    2017-06-13

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different levels of milk thistle meal on performance, blood biochemical indices, ileal bacterial counts and intestinal histology in laying hens fed diets containing different levels of metabolizable energy. A total number of 200 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) were randomly assigned to eight experimental treatments with five cage replicates of five birds each. Dietary treatments consisted of four levels of milk thistle meal (0%, 15%, 30% and 60%) and two levels of AMEn (11.09 and 12.34 MJ/kg) fed over a period of 80 days. In vitro studies revealed that the total phenolic component of milk thistle meal was 470.64 mg gallic acid equivalent/g of the sample, and its antioxidant activity for inhibiting the 2-2-diphenyl-1-picrichydrazyl free radical and reducing ferric ions was about 21% higher than that of butylated hydroxyltoluene (p < .05). Diets containing high level of AMEn led to improved egg production (p < .05), egg weight (p < .05), egg mass (p < .01) and feed conversion ratio (p < .01). In addition, offering diets containing high energy significantly enhanced (p < .01) serum triglyceride and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations as well as jejunal villus height. Dietary supplementation of 3% milk thistle meal resulted in the best feed conversion ratio (p < .05), reduction of ileal Escherichia coli enumeration (p < .01) and an enhancement in the villus height-to-crypt depth ratio (p < .05). Furthermore, feeding incremental levels of this meal led to remarkable decrease in serum cholesterol, triglyceride and MDA (p < .01) concentrations while significant increase in blood high-density lipoprotein content and goblet cell numbers (p < .05). The present findings indicate that milk thistle meal with high antioxidant and antibacterial properties in laying hen diets may improve health indices and productive performance. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. The gut microbiota elicits a profound metabolic reorientation in the mouse jejunal mucosa during conventionalisation.

    PubMed

    El Aidy, Sahar; Merrifield, Claire A; Derrien, Muriel; van Baarlen, Peter; Hooiveld, Guido; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Dekker, Jan; Holmes, Elaine; Claus, Sandrine P; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-09-01

    Proper interactions between the intestinal mucosa, gut microbiota and nutrient flow are required to establish homoeostasis of the host. Since the proximal part of the small intestine is the first region where these interactions occur, and since most of the nutrient absorption occurs in the jejunum, it is important to understand the dynamics of metabolic responses of the mucosa in this intestinal region. Germ-free mice aged 8-10 weeks were conventionalised with faecal microbiota, and responses of the jejunal mucosa to bacterial colonisation were followed over a 30-day time course. Combined transcriptome, histology, (1)H NMR metabonomics and microbiota phylogenetic profiling analyses were used. The jejunal mucosa showed a two-phase response to the colonising microbiota. The acute-phase response, which had already started 1 day after conventionalisation, involved repression of the cell cycle and parts of the basal metabolism. The secondary-phase response, which was consolidated during conventionalisation (days 4-30), was characterised by a metabolic shift from an oxidative energy supply to anabolic metabolism, as inferred from the tissue transcriptome and metabonome changes. Detailed transcriptome analysis identified tissue transcriptional signatures for the dynamic control of the metabolic reorientation in the jejunum. The molecular components identified in the response signatures have known roles in human metabolic disorders, including insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study elucidates the dynamic jejunal response to the microbiota and supports a prominent role for the jejunum in metabolic control, including glucose and energy homoeostasis. The molecular signatures of this process may help to find risk markers in the declining insulin sensitivity seen in human type 2 diabetes mellitus, for instance.

  9. Alanyl-glutamine promotes intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis in vitro and in a murine model of weanling undernutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Priscilla M.; Oriá, Reinaldo B.; Maier, Elizabeth A.; Guedes, Marjorie; de Azevedo, Orleancio G.; Wu, David; Willson, Tara; Hogan, Simon P.; Lima, Aldo A. M.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Polk, D. Brent; Denson, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    Alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) has recently been shown to enhance catch-up growth and gut integrity in undernourished children from Northeast Brazil. We hypothesized that the intestinal epithelial effects of Ala-Gln in malnourished weanling mice and mouse small intestinal epithelial (MSIE) cells would include modulation of barrier function, proliferation, and apoptosis. Dams of 10-day-old suckling C57BL/6 pups were randomized to a standard diet or an isocaloric Northeast Brazil “regional basic diet,” moderately deficient in protein, fat, and minerals. Upon weaning to their dam's diet on day of life 21, pups were randomized to Ala-Gln solution or water. At 6 wk of age, mice were killed, and jejunal tissue was collected for morphology, immunohistochemistry, and Ussing chamber analysis of transmucosal resistance and permeability. Proliferation of MSIE cells in the presence or absence of Ala-Gln was measured by MTS and bromodeoxyuridine assays. MSIE apoptosis was assessed by annexin and 7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Pups of regional basic diet-fed dams exhibited failure to thrive. Jejunal specimens from undernourished weanlings showed decreased villous height and crypt depth, decreased transmucosal resistance, increased permeability to FITC-dextran, increased claudin-3 expression, and decreased epithelial proliferation and increased epithelial apoptosis (as measured by bromodeoxyuridine and cleaved caspase-3 staining, respectively). Undernourished weanlings supplemented with Ala-Gln showed improvements in weight velocity, villous height, crypt depth, transmucosal resistance, and epithelial proliferation/apoptosis compared with unsupplemented controls. Similarly, Ala-Gln increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis in MSIE cells. In summary, Ala-Gln promotes intestinal epithelial homeostasis in a mouse model of malnutrition-associated enteropathy, mimicking key features of the human disease. PMID:21799183

  10. [A case of jejunal perforation in gallstone ileus].

    PubMed

    Taira, Akiko; Yamada, Masami; Takehira, Yasunori; Kageyama, Fujito; Yoshii, Shigeto; Murohisa, Gou; Yoshida, Kenichi; Iwaoka, Yasushi; Terai, Tomohiro; Uotani, Takahiro; Watanabe, Shinya; Noritake, Hidenao; Ikematu, Yoshito; Kanai, Toshikazu

    2008-04-01

    Gallstone ileus is a rare but important cause of small bowel obstruction in the geriatric population. A 65-year-old man with a twenty year history of cholecystolithiasis was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain and vomiting. Physical exams showed abdominal defence and rebound tenderness. A plain abdominal X-ray suggested a small bowel obstruction and pneumobilia. CT scan revealed a 2.5-cm gallstone at the jejunum and air in the biliary tree. The patient underwent a emergency laparotomy based on a diagnosis of panperitonitis with a perforation associated with gallstone ileus. Operative findings revealed a jejunal perforation and a impacted stone on the anal side of perforation. Enterolithotomy and jejunal resection were performed with cholecystectomy and repairment of the cholecystoduodenal fistula.

  11. A new tube for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal alimentation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R; Nyhus, L M

    1985-04-01

    A new tube has been devised for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal enteral alimentation. The tube is inserted by the nasogastric route intraoperatively. What differentiates this from earlier tubes is the addition of two inflatable balloons that facilitate passage of the tip of the tube through the retroperitoneal duodenum and into the proximal jejunum. Such a device is needed because the advantages of enteral alimentation in the postoperative patient include safety, low cost and significant metabolic benefits.

  12. [Jejunal ulcerations - a diagnostic challenge in a patient with coeliac disease].

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Schumann, M; Felber, J; Mireskandari, M; Schmidt, C; Stallmach, A

    2015-11-01

    A subset of patients with coeliac disease (CD) suffers persistent or recurrent complaints despite a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) that can be caused by refractory coeliac disease (RCD). We present a patient with weight loss and signs of malassimilation secondary to villous atrophy and jejunal ulcerations complicating known CD. We demonstrate a stepwise approach to the diagnosis and subtyping of RCD and to rule out important alternative causes of jejunal ulcerations. RCD can be classified as type I based on the absence or as type II based on the presence of an aberrant intestinal mucosal lymphocyte population. RCD type I shows a more benign course as these patients usually improve on a treatment consisting of nutritional support and immunosuppressive therapies such as budesonide or azathioprine. In contrast, clinical response to standard therapies in RCD type II is less certain and the prognosis is poor. Several groups suggest that RCD type II should be regarded as low-grade intraepithelial lymphoma which frequently transforms into an aggressive enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma with a high mortality rate. Therefore, a rapid differentiation of RCD type I and RCD type II is a major clinical challenge to early initiate appropriate treatment modalities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Jejunal lymphangioma: an unusual cause of intussusception in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Limaiem, F; Khalfallah, T; Marsaoui, L; Bouraoui, S; Lahmar, A; Mzabi, S

    2015-03-01

    Adult intussusception is a relatively rare clinical entity. Almost 90% of cases of intussusception in adults are secondary to a pathologic condition that serves as a lead point. Lymphangioma of the small bowel is an unusual tumour that has been rarely reported to cause intussusception. In this paper, we present a rare case of adult intussusception due to jejunal lymphangioma. A 22-year-old female patient with a medical history significant for anaemia presented with intermittent colicky abdominal pain, diarrhoea and oedema of the inferior limbs for the past three months. Ultrasonography and CT scan revealed a typical target sign with dilated intestinal loops. At laparotomy, a jejuno-jejunal intussusception was found. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed. Macroscopic examination of the surgical specimen revealed a pedunculated polyp measuring 2 cm in diameter. Histological sections of the polyp revealed in the lamina propria and submucosal layer of the jejunum several markedly dilated thin-walled lymphatic spaces lined with single layers of flat endothelial cells. The final pathologic diagnosis was submucosal lymphangioma. This case report indicates that intussusception, although rare in adults, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. Moreover, it should be taken into consideration that lymphangioma is one of the possible lesions that can cause intussusception.

  14. Replaceable Jejunal Feeding Tubes in Severely Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tabea; Holland-Cunz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Long-term enteral nutrition in chronically ill, malnourished children represents a clinical challenge if adequate feeding via nasogastric or gastrostomy tubes fails. We evaluated the usefulness and complications of a new type of surgical jejunostomy that allows for easier positioning and replacement of the jejunal feeding tube in children. We surgically inserted replaceable jejunal feeding tubes (RJFT) connected to a guide thread which exited through a separate tiny opening of the abdominal wall. In a retrospective case series, we assessed the effectiveness and complications of this technique in severely ill children suffering from malnutrition and complex disorders. Three surgical complications occurred, and these were addressed by reoperation. Four children died from their severe chronic disorders within the study period. The RJFT permitted continuous enteral feeding and facilitated easy replacement of the tube. After the postoperative period, jejunal feeding by RJFT resulted in adequate weight gain. This feeding access represents an option for children in whom sufficient enteral nutrition by nasogastric tubes or gastrostomy proved impossible. Further studies are required to investigate the safety and effectiveness of this surgical technique in a larger case series. PMID:28232847

  15. Rapunzel syndrome presenting as jejuno-jejunal intussusception.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Sanjay; Pandey, Siddharth; Raj, Abhishek; Jangra, Mahavir Singh; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    The term Rapunzel syndrome is used to describe a trichobezoar of the stomach with a long tail of hair extending into the duodenum and small intestine. It is a rare clinical entity, and it is even rarer in these cases that jejuno-jejunal intussusception and resulting intestinal obstruction is a presenting feature. We report one such case, a young female who presented in the emergency department with abdominal pain and bilious vomiting of short duration. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen enabled a diagnosis of a trichobezoar in the stomach extending into the small gut, along with jejuno-jejunal intussusception. On exploration, gastrotomy was performed to remove the gastric trichobezoar, and jejuno-jejunal intussusception was found on three segments in the proximal jejunum, which was resolved upon complete removal of the tail of the bezoar. This case report is unusual, since intussusception is a rare occurrence in Rapunzel syndrome, and this is the first time that it has been diagnosed preoperatively.

  16. Complicated Jejunal Diverticulosis: Small Bowel Volvulus with Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohi, Rommel Singh; Moudgil, Ashish; Bhatia, Suresh Kumar; Seth, Kaushal; Kaur, Tajinder

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the diverticulum of the small bowel varies from 0.2-1.3% in autopsy studies to 2.3% when assessed on enteroclysis. It occurs mostly in patients in the 6th decade of their life. Of all the small bowel diverticuli, jejunal diverticulum is the most common type. This rare entity is usually asymptomatic. However, they may cause chronic non-specific symptoms for a long period of time like dyspepsia, chronic postprandial pain, nausea, vomiting, borborgymi, alternating diarrhoea and constipation, weight loss, anaemia, steatorrhea or rarely lead to complications like haemorrhage, obstruction, perforation. Obstruction can be due to enterolith, adhesions, intussusception, and volvulus. The condition is difficult to diagnose because patients are generally presented with symptoms that mimic other diseases. It is important for clinicians to have awareness of this entity. Here, we present a case of multiple jejunal diverticuli with a history of repeated attacks of diverticulitis over past 20 years, which were misdiagnosed and now presented with intestinal obstruction due to volvulus of the involved segment along with mesentery around its axis. Resection of the diverticuli segment of jejunum was done with end-to-end jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. The patient is asymptomatic since 10 months of follow-up. PMID:27853337

  17. Radiation induced cytochrome c release causes loss of rat colonic fluid absorption by damage to crypts and pericryptal myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, J; Gourmelon, P; Griffiths, N; Lebrun, F; Naftalin, R; Pedley, K

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Therapeutic or accidental exposure to radiation commonly causes gastrointestinal disturbances, including diarrhoea. Rats subjected to whole body ionising radiation at a dose of 8 Gy lose their capacity to absorb fluid via the descending colon after four days. After seven days, fluid absorption recovers to control levels.
AIMS—To investigate the effect of ionising radiation on colonic permeability together with its effect on mitochondria dependent apoptotic signals and intercellular adhesion molecules.
METHODS—Rats were irradiated with doses of 0-12 Gy. Colonic permeability was measured by accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dextran in crypt lumens. Changes in levels of cytochrome c, caspase 3, E and OB cadherin, β-catenin smooth muscle actin, and collagen IV were assessed using immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy.
RESULTS—Cytosolic cytochrome c increased after 8 Gy (t1/2 1.4 (0.6) hours) and peaked at approximately six hours. Caspase 3 increased more slowly, particularly in crypt epithelial cells (t1/2 57 (14.5) hours). Pericryptal myofibroblasts disintegrated within 24 hours as was evident from loss of OB cadherin and smooth muscle actin. This coincided with increased crypt permeability to dextran. Intercellular adhesion between crypt luminal cells was not lost until day 4 when both β-catenin and E-cadherin were minimal. The half maximal dose-response for these effects was in the range 2-4 Gy. Recovery of colonic transport was concurrent with recovery of pericryptal smooth muscle actin and OB cadherin. The pan caspase inhibitor Z-Val-Ala-Asp.fluoromethylketone (1 mg/kg per day) had a small effect in conserving the pericryptal sheath myofibroblasts and sheath permeability but had no systemic therapeutic effects.
CONCLUSIONS—These data suggest that radiation damage to the colon may be initiated by mitochondrial events. Loss of crypt fluid absorption and increased permeability coincided with decreased

  18. Pharyngoesophageal stricture and fistula. Treatment by free jejunal graft.

    PubMed Central

    Hester, T R; McConnel, F; Nahai, F; Cunningham, S J; Jurkiewicz, M J

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with disorders of the pharynx or cervical esophagus requiring extensive ablative therapy were reconstructed by heterotopic autotransplantation of a segment of jejunum. Of these 55 patients, the overwhelming majority were treated for squamous cell carcinoma or the complications of combined radiation and operative therapy. There were six graft failures in the entire group of 55 patients for a transfer reliability of 90%. Three patients died in the perioperative period (5%). The purpose of this paper is to report on the treatment of a subset of these patients in whom fixed cicatricial stenosis of the gullet was the problem or in whom a radionecrotic cutaneous fistula existed. Fourteen such patients were treated, ten with stricture and four with fistula. Both patch grafts of on-lay segments and more routine circumferentially intact tubed segments of jejunum were used depending upon the nature of the defect. The youngest patient in this group was a 3-year-old juvenile diabetic with caustic stricture and the oldest was a 75-year-old man with fixed stricture following operation and radiation for cancer. Nine of ten and four of four anatomic reconstructions were successful in the stricture and fistula patients, respectively. All of these 13 patients with a neo- gullet of jejunum were able to handle secretions and liquids satisfactorily. Eleven patients were on a regular diet and had no discernible physiological impairment in alimentation. One patient had mild dysphagia and used a blenderized diet. One patient was able to swallow liquids only. In this patient the resection for tumor was so high and so extensive that the physiologic act of deglutition itself was impaired. There were no perioperative deaths, although one patient has succumbed to recurrent and metastatic carcinoma. When conventional treatment for stricture or fistula in the cervical alimentary tract has failed, reconstruction can be accomplished safely by free revascularized jejunal graft

  19. [Surgical Removal of Migrated Coil after Embolization of Jejunal Variceal Bleeding: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Lee, Danbi; Oh, Kyunghwan; Lee, Mingee; So, Seol; Yang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Chan Wook; Gwon, Dong Il; Chung, Young Hwa

    2017-01-25

    Jejunal variceal bleeding is less common compared with esophagogastric varices in patients with portal hypertension. However, jejunal variceal bleeding can be fatal without treatment. Treatments include surgery, transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS), endoscopic sclerotherapy, percutaneous coil embolization, and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO). Percutaneous coil embolization can be considered as an alternative treatment option for those where endoscopic sclerotherapy, surgery, TIPS or BRTO are not possible. Complications of percutaneous coil embolization have been reported, including coil migration. Herein, we report a case of migration of the coil into the jejunal lumen after percutaneous coil embolization for jejunal variceal bleeding. The migrated coil was successfully removed using surgery.

  20. Histomorphology of aberrant crypt foci in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Norlida, A Ojep; Phang, Koon Seng

    2010-12-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex multistep process that includes changes in histomorphological appearance of the colonic mucosa and changes at molecular level. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was first described by Bird in 1987 on examination of methylene-blue-stained colonic mucosa of azoxymethane-treated mice under light microscopy. Since then ACF was considered as the earliest preneoplastic change that can be seen in the colonic mucosa. The aim of this study was to look at the histomorphology and distribution of ACF in colorectal carcinoma. 50 formalin-fixed archival colectomy specimens for colorectal carcinoma were examined under light microscopy after staining with 0.2% methylene blue. ACF was identified by larger and darker crypts with thickened epithelium, and often elevated from adjacent normal mucosa. ACF was found in 41 of 50 colectomy specimens examined. There were 328 ACF consisting of 36 (11.0%) ACF without hyperplasia or dysplasia, 263 (80.2%) ACF with hyperplasia and 29 (8.8%) ACF with dysplasia. Of these 29 ACF with dysplasia, 25 showed low grade dysplasia and four high grade dysplasia. The density of ACF was higher in the left colon, those older than 65 years of age and among males but these findings were statistically not significant. The crypt multiplicity of hyperplastic ACF (30.149, SD 28.395) was larger than dysplastic ACF (20.613, SD 40.128). The spectrum of histological changes observed probably represent the evolution of ACF in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  1. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent.

  2. Apc Restoration Promotes Cellular Differentiation and Reestablishes Crypt Homeostasis in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dow, Lukas E; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Simon, Janelle; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-06-18

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated in the vast majority of human colorectal cancers (CRC) and leads to deregulated Wnt signaling. To determine whether Apc disruption is required for tumor maintenance, we developed a mouse model of CRC whereby Apc can be conditionally suppressed using a doxycycline-regulated shRNA. Apc suppression produces adenomas in both the small intestine and colon that, in the presence of Kras and p53 mutations, can progress to invasive carcinoma. In established tumors, Apc restoration drives rapid and widespread tumor-cell differentiation and sustained regression without relapse. Tumor regression is accompanied by the re-establishment of normal crypt-villus homeostasis, such that once aberrantly proliferating cells reacquire self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capability. Our study reveals that CRC cells can revert to functioning normal cells given appropriate signals and provide compelling in vivo validation of the Wnt pathway as a therapeutic target for treatment of CRC.

  3. Diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: an organic disorder with structural abnormalities in the jejunal epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Cristina; Lobo, Beatriz; Pigrau, Marc; Ramos, Laura; González-Castro, Ana Maria; Alonso, Carmen; Guilarte, Mar; Guilá, Meritxell; de Torres, Ines; Azpiroz, Fernando; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2013-08-01

    Recently, the authors demonstrated altered gene expression in the jejunal mucosa of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients (IBS-D); specifically, the authors showed that genes related to mast cells and the intercellular apical junction complex (AJC) were expressed differently than in healthy subjects. The aim of the authors here was to determine whether these alterations are associated with structural abnormalities in AJC and their relationship with mast cell activation and IBS-D clinical manifestations. A clinical assessment and a jejunal biopsy were obtained in IBS-D patients (n=45) and healthy subjects (n=30). Mucosal mast cell number and activation were determined by quantifying CD117(+) cells/hpf and tryptase expression, respectively. Expression and distribution of AJC specific proteins were evaluated by western blot and confocal microscopy. AJC ultrastructure was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Compared with healthy subjects, IBS-D patients exhibited: (a) increased mast cell counts and activation; (b) increased protein expression of claudin-2, reduced occludin phosphorylation and enhanced redistribution from the membrane to the cytoplasm; and (c) increased myosin kinase expression, reduced myosin phosphatase and, consequently, enhanced phosphorylation of myosin. These molecular alterations were associated with ultrastructural abnormalities at the AJC, specifically, perijunctional cytoskeleton condensation and enlarged apical intercellular distance. Moreover, AJC structural alterations positively correlated both with mast cell activation and clinical symptoms. The jejunal mucosa of IBS-D patients displays disrupted apical junctional complex integrity associated with mast cell activation and clinical manifestations. These results provide evidence for the organic nature of IBS-D, a heretofore model disease of functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  4. Epithelial cell differentiation in normal and transgenic mouse intestinal isografts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transgenes consisting of segments of the rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene's 5' non-transcribed domain linked to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (minus its regulatory elements) have provided useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms that regulate cellular and spatial differentiation of the continuously renewing gut epithelium. We have removed the jejunum from normal and transgenic fetal mice before or coincident with, cytodifferentiation of its epithelium. These segments were implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of young adult CBY/B6 nude mouse hosts to determine whether the bipolar, migration- dependent differentiation pathways of gut epithelial cells can be established and maintained in the absence of its normal luminal environment. Immunocytochemical analysis of isografts harvested 4-6 wk after implantation revealed that activation of the intact endogenous mouse L-FABP gene (fabpl) in differentiating enterocytes is perfectly recapitulated as these cells are translocated along the crypt-to-villus axis. Similarly, Paneth and goblet cells appear to appropriately differentiate as they migrate to the crypt base and villus tip, respectively. The enteroendocrine cell subpopulations present in intact 4-6-wk-old jejunum are represented in these isografts. Their precise spatial distribution along the crypt-to-villus axis mimics that seen in the intact gut. A number of complex interrelationships between enteroendocrine subpopulations are also recapitulated. In both "intact" and isografted jejunum, nucleotides -596 to +21 of the rat L-FABP gene were sufficient to direct efficient expression of the hGH reporter to enterocytes although precocious expression of the transgene occurred in cells located in the upper crypt, before their translocation to the villus base. Inappropriate expression of hGH occurred in a high percentage (greater than 80%) of secretin, gastrin, cholecystokinin, and gastric inhibitory peptide producing enteroendocrine cells present

  5. GASTRIC AND JEJUNAL HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rosemary Simões Nomelini; Almeida, Élia Cláudia de Souza; Camilo, Silvia Maria Perrone; Terra-Júnior, Júverson Alves; Guimarães, Lucinda Calheiros; Duque, Ana Cristina da Rocha; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida

    Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that increasingly is being treated by surgery. To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative). The postoperative group had a significant reduction in H. pylori infection (p=0.0001). A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients. A obesidade mórbida é doença multifatorial cujo tratamento cirúrgico é cada vez mais indicado. Avaliar alterações histopatológicas gástricas em obesos e comparar com os submetidos à bypass gastrojejunal e a mucosa jejunal após a operação. Estudo observacional realizado em hospital público terciário avaliando biópsias endoscópicas de 36 pacientes no pré-operatório e 35 no pós-operatório. No pré-operatório 80,6% apresentaram gastrite crônica, 38,9% em atividade (77,1% e 20,1%, respectivamente, no pós-operatório). O grupo pós-operatório apresentou diminuição significativa na infecção por Helicobacter pylory (p=0,0001). Maior comprimento do coto gástrico e tempo de operação superior a dois anos associaram-se a infecção por Helicobacter pylori. A mucosa jejunal foi normal em 91,4% e

  6. Chagas' achalasia treated by a jejunal interposed segment.

    PubMed

    Dantas, A N; Carvalho, J L; Coelho, F K; Teixeira, A M; Lyra, L G; Rebouças, G; Didier, F V

    1975-01-01

    Resection of the achalasic area and replacement by a segment of jejunal loop, associated with vagotomy and pyloroplasty, has been performed in 21 patients. The majority of these patients had Chagas' disease, with a dilated esophagus wider than 7 cm. This surgical procedure offered symptomatic relief in 20 of our 21 cases. One patient died, but the death was not necessarily related to the operation. Although disphagia and regurgitation did not disappear entirely in all cases the decrease in severity of these symptoms was such to allow the few symptomatic patients to lead an entirely normal life after the operation.

  7. Jejuno-jejunal invagination due to intestinal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Resta, Giuseppe; Anania, Gabriele; Messina, Federico; de Tullio, Damiano; Ferrocci, Gloria; Zanzi, Federico; Pellegrini, Davide; Stano, Rocco; Cavallesco, Giorgio; Azzena, Gianfranco; Occhionorelli, Savino

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most studied neoplastic lesions in biology and clinical oncology. It has been well documented that this type of neoplasm presents a high metastatic rate, and is able to involve nearly every tissue. Non-cutaneous melanoma represents an unusual pattern of melanoma, and the small intestine is an uncommon anatomic localization. Herein we report an extremely rare clinical case of a young woman affected by a bleeding jejunal melanoma, whose early clinical presentation was an intestinal invagination. PMID:17226915

  8. Rapunzel syndrome-a rare cause of multiple jejunal intussusception.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Rizwan; Michail, Sonia; Ali, Syed A

    2009-04-01

    Trichobezoars are usually without symptoms until they reach a large size. The "Rapunzel" syndrome is a trichobezoar with a long tail extending from the stomach to small bowel. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with a history of trichotillomania and hair ingestion for three years, who presented with multiple jejunojejunal intussusceptions due to a trichobezoar with a long, 90-cm tail into the small bowel. To our knowledge, this is the first report of trichobezoars as a cause of jejunal intussusceptions, which should be suspected in the appropriate clinical circumstances.

  9. [Jejunal perforation by a plastic biliary stent after injury].

    PubMed

    Krska, Z; Brůha, R; Sváb, J; Demes, R; Votrubová, J; Petrtýl, J; Horejs, J

    2004-02-01

    The authors present case of patient with biliary stent dislocation after chest injury and fracture of VIII. rib. Polymorbid patient with cirrhosis, chronic pancreatitis, portal hypertension (Child Plugh B) and biliary stent insertion came with acute abdominal pain and inflammatory signs. Progressive signs of acute abdomen have led to laparotomy. Perforation of duodeno-jejunal-loop due to dislocated biliary stent, small loop adhesions and thickened intestine wall were found. Postsurgical period was complicated with obstructive ileus, cholecystitis and cholangiolitis and the second biliary stent was inserted. Present-day status of the patient is satisfactory.

  10. PepT1 Expression Helps Maintain Intestinal Homeostasis by Mediating the Differential Expression of miRNAs along the Crypt-Villus Axis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Mingzhen; Xiao, Bo; Han, Moon Kwon; Walter, Lewins; Garg, Pallavi; Merlin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In the jejunum, PepT1 is particularly enriched in the well-differentiated absorptive epithelial cells in the villi. Studies of expression and function of PepT1 along the crypt-villus axis demonstrated that this protein is crucial to the process of di/tripeptide absorption. We recently exhibited that PepT1 plays an important role in multiple biological functions, including the ability to regulate the expression/secretion of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and the expression levels of multiple proteins. In this study, we observed that PepT1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited reduced body weight and shorten intestinal microvilli. We then examined the expression levels of various miRNAs and their target proteins along the crypt-villi axis in the jejunum of PepT1 KO mice. We found that PepT1 KO altered the distribution of miRNAs along the crypt-villus axis and changed the miRNA profiles of both villi and crypts. Using miRNA-target prediction and 2D-DIGE/mass spectrometry on villi and crypts samples, we found that ablation of PepT1 further directly or indirectly altered expression levels of certain protein targets. Collectively, our results suggest that PepT1 contributes to maintain balance of homeostasis and proper functions in the small intestine, and dysregulated miRNAs and proteins along the crypt-villus axis are highly related to this process. PMID:27250880

  11. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly.

    PubMed

    Davis, Heather A; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction.

  12. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Heather A.; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction. PMID:22753967

  13. A kinetic model to study the regulation of [Formula: see text]-catenin, APC, and Axin in the human colonic crypt.

    PubMed

    Emerick, Brooks; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Boman, Bruce M

    2017-03-07

    The Wnt/[Formula: see text]-catenin pathway plays a crucial role in stem cell renewal and differentiation in the normal human colonic crypt. The balance between [Formula: see text]-catenin and APC along the crypt axis determines its normal functionality. The mechanism that deregulates this balance may give insight into the initiation of colorectal cancer. This is significant because the spatial dysregulation of [Formula: see text]-catenin by the mutated tumor suppressor gene/protein APC in human colonic crypts is responsible for the initiation and growth of colorectal cancer. We consider a regulatory function that promotes APC synthesis within the cell and its effect on the accumulation of the Wnt target protein, [Formula: see text]-catenin. It is evident that an APC gradient exists along the crypt axis; however, the mechanism by which APC expression is regulated within the cell is not well known. We investigate the dynamics of an APC regulatory mechanism with an increased level of Axin at the subcellular level. Model output shows an increase of APC for a diminished Wnt signal, which explains the APC gradient along the crypt. We find that the dynamic interplay between [Formula: see text]-catenin, APC, and Axin produces oscillatory behavior, which is controlled by the Wnt stimulus. In the presence of reduced functional APC, the oscillations are amplified, which suggests that the cell remains in a more proliferative state for longer periods of time. Increased Axin levels (typical of mammalian cells) reduce oscillatory behavior and minimize the levels of [Formula: see text]-catenin within the cell while raising the levels of APC.

  14. Properties of Adenyl Cyclase from Human Jejunal Mucosa during Naturally Acquired Cholera and Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lincoln C.; Rohde, Jon E.; Sharp, Geoffrey W. G.

    1972-01-01

    The enterotoxin of Vibrio cholerae causes copious fluid production throughout the lenght of the small intestine. As this is thought to be mediated by stimulation of adenyl cyclase, a study has been made of the activity and properties of this enzyme in jejunal biopsy tissue taken from patients during the diarrheal phase of cholera and after recovery. Adenyl cyclase activity during cholera was increased more than twofold relative to the enzyme in convalescence. Under both conditions stimulation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and by fluoride was observed. The responsiveness to PGE1 was not altered in cholera; the total activity of the fluoride-stimulated enzyme was similar, a finding that suggests cholera toxin stimulates pre-existing enzyme in the intestinal cell. The enzymes during cholera and convalescence were similar in all other properties examined. Optimal Mg++ concentration was 10 mM; Mn++ at 5 mM stimulated the enzyme but could not replace Mg++ except in the presence of 10 mM fluoride. Calcium was markedly inhibitory at concentrations greater than 10-4 M. The pH optimum was 7.5 and the Michaelis constant (Km) for ATP concentration approximated 10-4 M. Thus the interaction of cholera toxin with human intestinal adenyl cyclase does not alter the basic properties of the enzyme. When biopsy specimens were maintained intact in oxygenated Ringer's solution at 0°C, no loss of activity was observed at 1½ and 3 hr. In contrast, when the cells were homogenized, rapid loss of activity, with a half-life of 90 min was seen even at 0°C. Consequently for comparative assays of human jejunal adenyl cyclase, strict control of the experimental conditions is required. It was under such conditions that a twofold increase in basal adenyl cyclase activity during cholera was observed. Images PMID:4335441

  15. Jejunal and ileal absorption of oxprenolol in man: influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability.

    PubMed Central

    Godbillon, J; Vidon, N; Palma, R; Pfeiffer, A; Franchisseur, C; Bovet, M; Gosset, G; Bernier, J J; Hirtz, J

    1987-01-01

    1 Study I evaluated the absorption of oxprenolol in the ileum, compared to jejunum, in healthy volunteers by an intestinal perfusion technique. Around 80 mg of drug were delivered as a saline solution directly in the small bowel. 2 Samples taken 30 cm distally to the site of perfusion showed that 63% of perfused oxprenolol was absorbed in the jejunum and 48% in the ileum; the differences were significant. 3 The plasma concentration-time profiles were similar for the two perfusions. The AUC and Cmax values of free and conjugated oxprenolol for the jejunal perfusion were significantly lower than those of ileum. They showed large but consistent intersubject variations in the two treatments. 4 Study II investigated, using the same technique, the influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability of this drug. A saline (in treatments A and B) or a nutrient (in treatment C) solution containing oxprenolol was perfused into the jejunum below a balloon either inflated (A) or deflated (B and C). 5 The disappearance rate of oxprenolol from the jejunum was unaffected by endogenous secretions. The mean amount of drug absorbed along a 30-cm jejunal segment accounted for 52 (A) and 57% (B) of the total amount perfused. The intestinal absorption rate was markedly increased in the presence of nutrients (mean amount absorbed 96% for C). 6 The change in the rate of disappearance from the intestine had no effect on the systemic availability of oxprenolol (mean AUC values 8740, 8250 and 8020 nmol l-1 h for A, B and C, respectively) or its elimination from plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3663450

  16. Preventive effects of chrysin on the development of azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Kohno, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Rikako; Sugie, Shigeyuki; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Tanaka, Takuji

    2006-05-01

    The modifying effects of dietary feeding with chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were investigated in male F344 rats. We also assessed the effect of chrysin on mitosis and apoptosis in 'normal appearing' crypts. To induce ACF, rats were given two weekly subcutaneous injections of AOM (20 mg/kg body weight). They also received an experimental diet containing chrysin (0.001 or 0.01%) for 4 weeks, starting 1 week before the first dose of AOM. AOM exposure produced a substantial number of ACF (73+/-13/rat) at the end of the study (week 4). Dietary administration of chrysin caused significant reduction in the frequency of ACF: 0.001% chrysin, 37+/-17/rat (49% reduction, P<0.001); and 0.01% chrysin, 40+/-10/rat (45% reduction, P<0.001). In addition, chrysin administration significantly reduced the mitotic index and significantly increased the apoptotic index in 'normal appearing' crypts. These findings might suggest a possible chemopreventive activity of chrysin in the early step of colon tumorigenesis through modulation of cryptal cell proliferation activity and apoptosis.

  17. [Infected jejunal mesenteric pseudocyst: A case report].

    PubMed

    Bolívar-Rodríguez, Martín Adrián; Cazarez-Aguilar, Marcel Antonio; Luna-Madrid, Eduardo Esaú; Morgan-Ortiz, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are very rare abdominal growths, generally asymptomatic, and which are usually detected incidentally while performing a physical examination or an imaging test. Complications such as infections, haemorrhage, torsion, rupture, or bowel obstruction, are seldom found in this pathology, but they can be a cause of acute abdomen. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics and the clinical outcome of a male patient with an infected mesenteric pseudocyst of the jejunum. A 49 year-old male was admitted to the emergency department with 6-day onset of abdominal pain, bowel obstruction signs, palpable tumour located in the upper hemi-abdomen, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, 36,100/mm(3) white cells, 4.21 ng/ml procalcitonin, abdominal computed tomography scan with evidence of a mesenteric cystic tumour. An exploratory laparotomy was performed, finding the presence of a mesenteric pseudocyst of the jejunum with infection signs, extirpated and sent for histopathological examination. The clinical progress of the patient was satisfactory with the discharge of the patient 7 days after the surgical intervention. These cysts can debut as an acute abdomen due to haemorrhage, infection, obstruction and/or bowel perforation, complications can be life threatening if not detected and surgically treated at an early stage by performing a resection of the pseudocysts, with or without bowel resection, depending on the location and the size of the cyst. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium mediation of the pig jejunal secretory response.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Wong, P H; Maenz, D D

    1985-01-01

    The involvement of Ca++ ions as secretory mediators in pig jejunal epithelia has been investigated with an in vitro system. Omission of Ca++ from the Ringer-HCO3 bathing media on both sides of the tissue had minor effects on the basal electrical activity of pig jejunal mucosa. There were only slight decreases in transepithelial potential difference and increases in conductance with Ca++ free media. Low EGTA concentrations which reversibly blocked potential difference responses to secretory agents also had minimal effects on basal electrical activity. The in vitro secretory responses to A23187, to theophylline, and to Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin were all eliminated by Ca++ depletion and restored by replacing normal Ca++ concentrations in the bathing media. Dantrolene prevented the secretory response but not the potential difference increases caused by heat-stable enterotoxin and A23187, suggesting that intracellular Ca++ stores may be reservoirs of secretory signal agent. Verapamil only blocked the secretory response to heat-stable enterotoxin. Chlorpromazine had negligible effects on basal conditions, but totally blocked both the secretory response and the Ca++-dependent effects of A23187 and heat-stable enterotoxin on potential difference. The response to theophylline was only partially inhibited by chlorpromazine, implying some involvement of both cAMP and Ca++ as secretory signals for theophylline. Cytoplasmic Ca++ concentrations appear to be at least as important as cyclic nucleotides in regulating the secretory effects of pig jejunum. PMID:2410089

  19. Leucine stimulates ASCT2 amino acid transporter expression in porcine jejunal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Ren, Man; Zeng, Xiangfang; He, Pingli; Ma, Xi; Qiao, Shiyan

    2014-12-01

    Leucine has been shown to influence intestinal protein metabolism, cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, our previous study demonstrated that branched-chain amino acids could modulate the intestinal amino acid and peptide transporters in vivo. As the possible mechanisms are still largely unknown, in the present work, we studied the transcriptional and translational regulation of leucine on amino acid transporter production in IPEC-J2 cells and the signaling pathways involved. Treatment of IPEC-J2 cells with 7.5 mM leucine enhanced the mRNA expression of the Na(+)-neutral AA exchanger 2 (ASCT2) and 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc) and caused an increase in ASCT2 protein expression. Leucine also activated phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and eIF4E through the phosphorylation of mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling pathways in IPEC-J2 cells. Pre-treatment of IPEC-J2 cells with inhibitors of mTOR and Akt (rapamycin and wortmannin) or an inhibitor of ERK (PD098059) for 30 min before leucine treatment attenuated the positive effect of leucine in enhancing the protein abundance of ASCT2. These results demonstrate that leucine could up-regulate the expression of the amino acid transporters (ASCT2) through transcriptional and translational regulation by ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR activation.

  20. Lentinan diminishes apoptotic bodies in the ileal crypts associated with S-1 administration.

    PubMed

    Suga, Yasuyo; Takehana, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    S-1 is an oral agent containing tegafur (a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil) that is used to treat various cancers, but adverse effects are frequent. Two pilot clinical studies have suggested that lentinan (LNT; β-1,3-glucan) may reduce the incidence of adverse effects caused by S-1 therapy. In this study, we established a murine model for assessment of gastrointestinal toxicity associated with S-1 and studied the effect of LNT. S-1 was administered orally to BALB/c mice at the effective dose (8.3mg/kg, as tegafur equivalent) once daily (5days per week) for 3weeks. Stool consistency and intestinal specimens were examined. We investigated the effect of combined intravenous administration of LNT at 0.1mg, which is an effective dose in murine tumor models. We also investigated the effect of a single administration of S-1. During long-term administration of S-1, some mice had loose stools and an increase in apoptotic bodies was observed in the ileal crypts. An increase in apoptotic bodies was also noted after a single administration of S-1 (15mg/kg). Prior or concomitant administration of LNT inhibited the increase in apoptotic bodies in both settings. Administration of LNT also increased the accumulation of CD11b(+)TIM-4(+) cells in the ileum, while depletion of these cells by liposomal clodronate diminished the inhibitory effect of LNT on S-1 toxicity. Combined administration of LNT with S-1 led to a decrease in apoptotic bodies in the ileal crypts, possibly because LNT promoted phagocytosis of damaged cells by CD11b(+)TIM-4(+) cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgery for nonobese type 2 diabetic patients: an interventional study with duodenal-jejunal exclusion.

    PubMed

    Geloneze, Bruno; Geloneze, Sylka R; Fiori, Carla; Stabe, Christiane; Tambascia, Marcos A; Chaim, Elinton A; Astiarraga, Brenno D; Pareja, Jose Carlos

    2009-08-01

    A 24-week interventional prospective trial was performed to compare the benefits of open duodenal-jejunal exclusion surgery (GJB) with a matched control group on standard medical care. One-hundred eighty patients were screened for the surgical approach. Twelve patients accepted to be operated and presented the full eligibility criteria for surgery that includes overweight BMI (25-29.9 kg/m2), T2DM diagnosis for less than 15 years, insulin-treated patients, no history of major complications, preserved beta-cell function, and absence of autoimmunity. A matched control group (CG) of patients whom refused surgical treatment was placed to receive standard care. Patients had age of 50 (5) years, time of diagnosis 9 years (range, 3 to 15 years), time of insulin usage 6 months (range, 3 to 48 months), fasting glucose (FG), 9.8 (2.5) mg/dL, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C) 8.90 (2.12)%. At 24 weeks after surgery, patients experienced greater reductions on FG (14% vs. 7% on CG), A1C (from 8.78 to 7.84 in GJB-p<0.01 and 8.93 to 8.71 in CG; p<0.05 between groups) and reductions on average daily insulin requirement (93% vs. 29%, p<0.01). Ten patients stopped insulin usage in GJB but they remain taking oral medications. No differences were observed in both groups regarding BMI, body distribution and composition, blood pressure, and lipids. In conclusion, duodenal-jejunal exclusion was an effective treatment for nonobese T2DM subjects. GJB was superior to standard care in achieving better glycemic control along with reduction in insulin requirements.

  2. The colon-selective spasmolytic otilonium bromide inhibits muscarinic M3 receptor-coupled calcium signals in isolated human colonic crypts

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Susanne; Hernon, James; Sharp, Paul; Johns, Neil; Addison, Sarah; Watson, Mark; Tighe, Richard; Greer, Shaun; Mackay, Jean; Rhodes, Michael; Lewis, Michael; Stebbings, William; Speakman, Chris; Evangelista, Stefano; Johnson, Ian; Williams, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Otilonium bromide has been shown to interfere with the mobilization of calcium in intestinal smooth muscle, but the effects on other intestinal tissues have not been investigated. We identified the muscarinic receptor subtype coupled to calcium signals in colonic crypt derived from the human colonic epithelium and evaluated the inhibitory effects of OB. Calcium signals were monitored by fluorescence imaging of isolated human colonic crypts and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned human muscarinic M3 receptor subtype (CHO-M3). Colonic crypt receptor expression was investigated by pharmacological and immunohistochemical techniques. The secretagogue acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated calcium mobilization from intracellular calcium stores at the base of human colonic crypts with an EC50 of 14 μM. The muscarinic receptor antagonists 4-DAMP, AF-DX 384, pirenzepine and methroctamine inhibited the ACh-induced calcium signal with the following respective IC50 (pKb) values: 0.78 nM (9.1), 69 nM (7.2), 128 nM (7.1), and 2510 nM (5.8). Immunohistochemical analyses of muscarinic receptor expression demonstrated the presence of M3 receptor subtype expression at the crypt-base. Otilonium bromide inhibited the generation of ACh-induced calcium signals in a dose dependent manner (IC50=880 nM). In CHO-M3 cells, OB inhibited calcium signals induced by ACh, but not ATP. In addition, OB did not inhibit histamine-induced colonic crypt calcium signals. The present studies have demonstrated that OB inhibited M3 receptor-coupled calcium signals in human colonic crypts and CHO-M3 cells, but not those induced by stimulation of other endogenous receptor types. We propose that the M3 receptor-coupled calcium signalling pathway is directly targeted by OB at the level of the colonic epithelium, suggestive of an anti-secretory action in IBS patients suffering with diarrhoea. PMID

  3. The colon-selective spasmolytic otilonium bromide inhibits muscarinic M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signals in isolated human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Susanne; Hernon, James; Sharp, Paul; Johns, Neil; Addison, Sarah; Watson, Mark; Tighe, Richard; Greer, Shaun; Mackay, Jean; Rhodes, Michael; Lewis, Michael; Stebbings, William; Speakman, Chris; Evangelista, Stefano; Johnson, Ian; Williams, Mark

    2002-12-01

    1. Otilonium bromide (OB) is a smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Otilonium bromide has been shown to interfere with the mobilization of calcium in intestinal smooth muscle, but the effects on other intestinal tissues have not been investigated. We identified the muscarinic receptor subtype coupled to calcium signals in colonic crypt derived from the human colonic epithelium and evaluated the inhibitory effects of OB. 2. Calcium signals were monitored by fluorescence imaging of isolated human colonic crypts and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned human muscarinic M(3) receptor subtype (CHO-M(3)). Colonic crypt receptor expression was investigated by pharmacological and immunohistochemical techniques. 3. The secretagogue acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated calcium mobilization from intracellular calcium stores at the base of human colonic crypts with an EC(50) of 14 micro M. The muscarinic receptor antagonists 4-DAMP, AF-DX 384, pirenzepine and methroctamine inhibited the ACh-induced calcium signal with the following respective IC(50) (pK(b)) values: 0.78 nM (9.1), 69 nM (7.2), 128 nM (7.1), and 2510 nM (5.8). 4. Immunohistochemical analyses of muscarinic receptor expression demonstrated the presence of M(3) receptor subtype expression at the crypt-base. 5. Otilonium bromide inhibited the generation of ACh-induced calcium signals in a dose dependent manner (IC(50)=880 nM). 6. In CHO-M(3) cells, OB inhibited calcium signals induced by ACh, but not ATP. In addition, OB did not inhibit histamine-induced colonic crypt calcium signals. 7. The present studies have demonstrated that OB inhibited M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signals in human colonic crypts and CHO-M(3) cells, but not those induced by stimulation of other endogenous receptor types. We propose that the M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signalling pathway is directly targeted by OB at the level of the colonic epithelium, suggestive of an anti-secretory action

  4. The effects of progressive anemia on jejunal mucosal and serosal tissue oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Haisjackl, M; Luz, G; Sparr, H; Germann, R; Salak, N; Friesenecker, B; Deusch, E; Meusburger, S; Hasibeder, W

    1997-03-01

    Anemia may promote intestinal hypoxia. We studied the effects of progressive isovolemic hemodilution on jejunal mucosal (Po2muc), and serosal tissue oxygen tension (Po2ser, Clark-type surface electrodes), mucosal microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hbo2muc), and hematocrit (Hctmuc; tissue reflectance spectophotometry) in a jejunal segment. Twelve domestic pigs were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Laparatomy was performed, arterial supply of a jejunal segment isolated, and constant pressure pump perfused. Seven animals were progressively hemodiluted to systemic hematocrits (Hctsys) of 20%, 15%, 10%, and 6%. Baseline for Po2muc, Po2ser and Hbo2muc was 23.5 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, 57.5 +/- 4 mm Hg, and 47.0% +/- 6.4% which were not different from the five controls. Despite a significant increase in jejunal blood flow, jejunal oxygen delivery decreased and oxygen extraction ratio increased significantly at Hctsys 10% and 6%. Po2ser decreased significantly below or at Hctsys of 15%, whereas Po2muc and Hbo2muc were maintained to Hctsys of 10%, but less than 10% Hbo2muc and mesenteric venous pH decreased significantly, implying that physiological limits of jejunal microvascular adaptation to severe anemia were reached. Decrease of Hctmuc was less pronounced than Hctsys. In conclusion, redistribution of jejunal blood flow and an increase in the ratio of mucosal to systemic hematocrit are the main mechanisms maintaining mucosal oxygen supply during progressive anemia.

  5. Environmental cues and symbiont microbe-associated molecular patterns function in concert to drive the daily remodelling of the crypt-cell brush border of the Euprymna scolopes light organ.

    PubMed

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Foster, Jamie; Apicella, Michael A; Goldman, William E; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2016-11-01

    Recent research has shown that the microbiota affects the biology of associated host epithelial tissues, including their circadian rhythms, although few data are available on how such influences shape the microarchitecture of the brush border. The squid-vibrio system exhibits two modifications of the brush border that supports the symbionts: effacement and repolarization. Together these occur on a daily rhythm in adult animals, at the dawn expulsion of symbionts into the environment, and symbiont colonization of the juvenile host induces an increase in microvillar density. Here we sought to define how these processes are related and the roles of both symbiont colonization and environmental cues. Ultrastructural analyses showed that the juvenile-organ brush borders also efface concomitantly with daily dawn-cued expulsion of symbionts. Manipulation of the environmental light cue and juvenile symbiotic state demonstrated that this behaviour requires the light cue, but not colonization. In contrast, symbionts were required for the observed increase in microvillar density that accompanies post dawn brush-border repolarization; this increase was induced solely by host exposure to phosphorylated lipid A of symbiont cells. These data demonstrate that a partnering of environmental and symbiont cues shapes the brush border and that microbe-associated molecular patterns play a role in the regulation of brush-border microarchitecture. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Reconstruction of esophageal defects with microsurgically revascularized jejunal segments: a report of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, T S; Hwang, O L; Wang-Wei

    1980-12-01

    Experimental free transfer of a jejunal segment to a recipient bed in the neck was successfully performed in 5 mongrel dogs. This was followed by clinical application of 2 different microvascular procedures in 13 patients for repair of esophageal defects. In 7 of these patients a free jejunal transfer was used; in 6 of these patients a pedicled jejunal graft with revascularization of its distal end by microvascular anastomosis was used. The esophageal defects were located in the cervical portion in 7 cases, the cervicothoracic portion in 5 cases, and the thoracic portion in 1 case. Ten (77%) of the 13 procedures were successful.

  7. Effect of vegetable and carotenoid consumption on aberrant crypt multiplicity, a surrogate end-point marker for colorectal cancer in azoxymethane-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Rijken, P J; Timmer, W G; van de Kooij, A J; van Benschop, I M; Wiseman, S A; Meijers, M; Tijburg, L B

    1999-12-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that increased vegetable consumption reduces the risk of colorectal cancer mortality. In the present study we have investigated the effect of consumption of standard diets supplemented with freeze-dried vegetables (peas, spinach, sprouts and broccoli) and carotenoids (all-trans beta-carotene and palm oil carotenoid extract) on surrogate end-point markers for colorectal cancer in an azoxymethane-induced rat model. Mean aberrant crypt multiplicity was reduced (19%) by the pea-supplemented diet only (P < 0.05). The vegetable-induced effect was more apparent in aberrant crypt foci with higher multiplicity. Intervention with diets supplemented with peas, spinach, sprouts and a mix of all vegetables reduced the number of foci with >2 aberrant crypts/focus by 37, 26, 23 and 26%, respectively (P < 0.05). Even more pronounced effects were observed in foci with >3 aberrant crypts/focus, with reductions of approximately 50% in the pea and spinach intervention groups. All-trans beta-carotene and palm oil-derived carotenoids, supplied at similar doses to those expected in the vegetable diets, inhibited ACM only marginally. Aberrant crypt foci formation in groups fed a sprout-supplemented diet prior to or following azoxymethane treatment was similar, indicating that this effect is due to inhibition of promotion rather than initiation of colorectal carcinogenesis. Vegetable and carotenoid consumption did not affect in situ proliferation of colonic crypt cells, as assessed by semi-automated image analysis of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive nuclei. BrdU-negative nuclei of colonic crypt cells were reduced slightly in the combined vegetable groups, as compared with the control (P < 0.05). These data: (i) are in line with epidemiological evidence regarding beneficial effects of vegetable consumption on colorectal carcinogenesis; (ii) indicate that consumption of several types of vegetables inhibits early post-initiation events in colorectal

  8. Late metastatic colon cancer masquerading as primary jejunal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, A-WN; Joudeh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the small bowel from a previously resected colorectal cancer is rare and may erroneously be diagnosed as a primary small bowel carcinoma. It usually occurs several years after the primary resection. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone left hemicolectomy for colon cancer 3 years earlier and returned with subacute small bowel obstruction. This was initially thought, based on preoperative radiological findings and normal colonoscopic examination, to be due a primary jejunal cancer. Even at surgery, the lesion convincingly appeared as an obstructing primary small bowel carcinoma. However, the histology of the resected small bowel revealed metastatic colon cancer. This rare and an unusual metastatic occurrence some years after the primary resection is described and reviewed. PMID:26890851

  9. Jejunal intussusception: a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Akter, Farhana; Harilingam, Mohanraj

    2012-11-21

    Intussusception is an important cause of abdominal pain in the paediatric population and is the most common abdominal emergency in early childhood. Intussusception in adults is, however, rare and can lead to diagnostic challenges for admitting physicians/surgeons. We present a case of a 76-year-old lady with history of a recent myocardial infarction and vasculitis presenting with melaena and bleeding per rectum, with suspicion of haematochezia. She complained of abdominal pain but was not clinically obstructed. Gastroscopy performed was negative. Colonoscopy was attempted; however, it was inconclusive because of active bleeding. A CT angiogram of the abdomen was performed, which showed a jejunal intussusception. There was no evidence of vasculitis or small bowel obstruction. She was not considered fit for surgery and was managed conservatively.

  10. Jejunal intussusception: a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Farhana; Harilingam, Mohanraj

    2012-01-01

    Intussusception is an important cause of abdominal pain in the paediatric population and is the most common abdominal emergency in early childhood. Intussusception in adults is, however, rare and can lead to diagnostic challenges for admitting physicians/surgeons. We present a case of a 76-year-old lady with history of a recent myocardial infarction and vasculitis presenting with melaena and bleeding per rectum, with suspicion of haematochezia. She complained of abdominal pain but was not clinically obstructed. Gastroscopy performed was negative. Colonoscopy was attempted; however, it was inconclusive because of active bleeding. A CT angiogram of the abdomen was performed, which showed a jejunal intussusception. There was no evidence of vasculitis or small bowel obstruction. She was not considered fit for surgery and was managed conservatively. PMID:23175009

  11. Duodeno-Jejunal Varicosities Following Extrahepatic Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Varsamidakis, Nick; Hobbs, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A 31 year old man, under investigation for melena, was found at endoscopy to have varicosities at the site of a duodeno-jejunostomy which had been performed for duodenal atresia when he was three days old. Angiography revealed an occluded portal vein with an extensive collateral circulation. At laparotomy some of the collateral vessels were found to pass through the anastomotic site and directly into the left lobe of the liver. The portal pressure was found to be minimally elevated. Resection of the anastomotic segment was performed with reconstruction using a Roux en Y jejunal loop. Bleeding from collateral vessels passing through an anastomosis site in a patient with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis has not previously been reported. PMID:1610726

  12. Effect of proinflammatory interleukins on jejunal nutrient transport

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, J; Kroeker, K; Chung, B; Gall, D

    2000-01-01

    AIM—We examined the effect of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory interleukins on jejunal nutrient transport and expression of the sodium-glucose linked cotransporter (SGLT-1).
METHODS—3-O-methyl glucose and L-proline transport rates were examined in New Zealand White rabbit stripped, short circuited jejunal tissue. The effects of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, and IL-8, IL-1α plus the specific IL-1 antagonist, IL-1ra, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were investigated. In separate experiments, passive tissue permeability was assessed and brush border SGLT-1 expression was measured by western blot in tissues exposed to proinflammatory interleukins.
RESULTS—The proinflammatory interleukins IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-8 significantly increased glucose absorption compared with control levels. This increase in glucose absorption was due to an increase in mucosal to serosal flux. IL-1α and IL-8 also significantly increased L-proline absorption due to an increase in absorptive flux. The anti-inflammatory IL-10 had no effect on glucose transport. The receptor antagonist IL-1ra blocked the ability of IL-1α to stimulate glucose transport. IL-8 had no effect on passive tissue permeability. SGLT-1 content did not differ in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from control or interleukin treated tissue.
CONCLUSIONS—These findings suggest that intestinal inflammation and release of inflammatory mediators such as interleukins increase nutrient absorption in the gut. The increase in glucose transport does not appear to be due to changes in BBMV SGLT-1 content.


Keywords: glucose transport; small intestine; intestinal inflammation; inflammation PMID:10896908

  13. [Aberrant crypt foci as biomarkers in chemoprevention for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Katsuki, S; Oui, M; Takayama, T; Takahashi, Y; Shuichi, N; Niitsu, Y

    1998-06-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are small lesions identifiable in whole-mount preparations of normal-appearing human colonic mucosa with the aid of methyleneblue staining under stereoscopic microscope. Highly frequent mutations of K-ras genes were found, and increased proliferative activities were also observed. Therefore, K-ras gene mutation may have some role in formation of ACF. Using rat experimental model, formation of ACF was shown to be enhanced by cancer promoters (such as secondary bile acids), and to be suppressed by chemopreventive agents (deoxycholic acid and aspirin). Based on these findings, ACF are considered to be precursors of colon cancer. We demonstrated that ACF are the precursors of adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Moreover, we showed that ACF may be suitable biomarkers of chemopreventive agents for colon cancers.

  14. Effects of inulin and enzyme complex, individually or in combination, on growth performance, intestinal microflora, cecal fermentation characteristics, and jejunal histomorphology in broiler chickens fed a wheat- and barley-based diet.

    PubMed

    Rebolé, A; Ortiz, L T; Rodríguez, M L; Alzueta, C; Treviño, J; Velasco, S

    2010-02-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the effects of inulin, alone or in combination with enzyme complex (primarily xylanase and beta-glucanase), on growth performance, ileal and cecal microflora, cecal short-chain fatty acids, and d-lactic acid and jejunal histomorphology of broiler chickens fed a wheat- and barley-based diet from 7 to 35 d of age. A total of 240 seven-day-old male Cobb broilers were allocated to 1 of 6 treatments, with 8 replicate pens per treatment and 5 birds per pen. The experiment consisted of a 3x2 factorial arrangement of the treatments with 3 concentrations of inulin (0, 10, or 20 g/kg of diet) and 2 concentrations of enzyme complex (0 or 100 mg/kg of diet). At the end of the experiment, 8 birds per treatment (one from each pen) were randomly chosen and slaughtered. Birds fed inulin-containing diets exhibited significantly (P=0.043) improved final BW gain. Dietary inulin had a positive and significant (P<0.002 to 0.009) effect on bifidobacteria and lactobacilli counts in both ileal and cecal contents and, to an extent, also altered the fermentation patterns in the ceca, increasing the concentration of n-butyric and d-lactic acids and the n-butyric acid:acetic acid ratio. Inulin inclusion had no effect on villus height and crypt depth or microvillus length, width, and density in the jejunum. Enzyme supplementation of the control diet and inulin-containing diets had no effect on many of the variables studied and only resulted in a decrease in crypt depth and an increase in villus height:crypt depth ratio in the jejunum.

  15. Ratiometric Imaging of Tissue by Two-Photon Microscopy: Observation of a High Level of Formaldehyde around Mouse Intestinal Crypts.

    PubMed

    Singha, Subhankar; Jun, Yong Woong; Bae, Juryang; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2017-03-21

    Ratiometric imaging by two-photon microscopy can offer a viable tool for the relative quantification of biological analytes inside tissue with minimal influence from environmental factors that affect fluorescence signal. We demonstrate the ratiometric imaging of formaldehyde at the suborgan level using a two-photon fluorescent probe, which involves pixel-to-pixel ratiometric data transformation. This study reveals for the first time a high level of formaldehyde around the crypts of mouse small intestine, implicating its possible protective role along with the released antimicrobials from the Paneth cells.

  16. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  17. Preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and high jejunal atresia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baglaj, Maciej; Gerus, Sylwester

    2012-01-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare congenital anomaly. In most patients, it is associated with other congenital defects including situs inversus, malrotation, and biliary atresia or occurs as part of the heterotaxia syndrome or polysplenia syndrome. We describe a newborn affected by high jejunal atresia, malrotation, and a complex cardiac anomaly, in whom PDPV was diagnosed at early relaparotomy because of stenosis of the jejunal anastomosis. Occurrence of PDPV with intestinal atresia has not been previously reported in the literature.

  18. Indwelling voice prosthesis insertion after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Hirofumi; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Mitani, Hiroki; Yonekawa, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Shimbashi, Wataru; Seto, Akira; Kamiyama, Ryousuke; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Asakage, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction is often performed in patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma. However, postoperative speechlessness significantly decreases patient quality of life. We investigated whether Provox® insertion could preserve speech after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction. Study Design Retrospective chart review. Methods A total of 130 cases of secondary Provox® insertions after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction were analyzed. Communication outcomes were compared using the Head and Neck Cancer Understandability of Speech Subscale. Outcomes and complications associated with insertion site (jejunal insertion vs. esophageal insertion) and adjuvant irradiation therapy were also evaluated. Results Provox® insertion had favorable communication outcomes in 102 cases (78.4%). Neither the insertion site nor irradiation affected the communication outcome. Complications were observed in 20 cases (15.4%). Local infection was the most common complication. Free jejunal insertion, in which the resection range was enlarged, had a lower complication rate than did esophageal insertion, and its complication rate was unaffected by previous irradiation. For all patients, the hospitalization duration and duration of speechlessness were 13.4 days and 14.6 months, respectively. Patients receiving jejunal insertions had a significantly shorter hospitalization duration than did those receiving esophageal insertions. Unlike Provox®2, Provox®Vega significantly reduced the complication rate to zero. Conclusion For jejunal inserson of a Provox® prosthetic, a sufficient margin can be maintained during total pharyngolaryngectomy and irradiation can be performed, and satisfactory communication outcomes were observed. Provox® insertion after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction should be considered the standard therapy for voice restoration. Level of Evidence 4. PMID

  19. Thromboxane plays a role in postprandial jejunal oxygen uptake and capillary exchange.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, A; Chou, C C

    1990-09-01

    The effects of a thromboxane A2 (TxA2)-endoperoxide receptor antagonist, SQ 29548, on jejunal blood flow, oxygen uptake, and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in anesthetized dogs under resting conditions and during the presence of predigested food in the jejunal lumen in three series of experiments. In series 1, 2.0 micrograms intra-arterial administration of SQ 29548 was found to abolish completely the vasoconstrictor action of graded doses (0.05-2.0 micrograms) of intra-arterial injection of a TxA2-endoperoxide analogue, U44069. SQ 29548 (2.0 micrograms ia) per se did not significantly alter resting jejunal blood flow, oxygen uptake, capillary pressure, or Kfc. Before SQ 29548, placement of food plus bile into the jejunal lumen increased blood flow +42 +/- 9%, oxygen uptake +28 +/- 7%, and Kfc +24 +/- 6%. After SQ 29548, the food placement increased blood flow +37 +/- 8%, oxygen uptake +52 +/- 11%, and Kfc +63 +/- 20%. The food-induced increases in oxygen uptake and Kfc after SQ 29548 were significantly greater than those induced before the blocking of TxA2-endoperoxide receptors by SQ 29548. Our study indicates that endogenous thromboxane does not play a role in regulating jejunal blood flow, capillary filtration, and oxygen uptake under resting conditions. However, it plays a role in limiting the food-induced increases in jejunal oxygen uptake and capillary exchange capacity without influencing the food-induced hyperemia.

  20. The visceromotor responses to colorectal distension and skin pinch are inhibited by simultaneous jejunal distension.

    PubMed

    Shafton, Anthony D; Furness, John B; Ferens, Dorota; Bogeski, Goce; Koh, Shir Lin; Lean, Nicholas P; Kitchener, Peter D

    2006-07-01

    Noxious stimuli that are applied to different somatic sites interact; often one stimulus diminishes the sensation elicited from another site. By contrast, inhibitory interactions between visceral stimuli are not well documented. We investigated the interaction between the effects of noxious distension of the colorectum and noxious stimuli applied to the jejunum, in the rat. Colorectal distension elicited a visceromotor reflex, which was quantified using electromyographic (EMG) recordings from the external oblique muscle of the upper abdomen. The same motor units were activated when a strong pinch was applied to the flank skin. Distension of the jejunum did not provoke an EMG response at this site, but when it was applied during colorectal distension it blocked the EMG response. Jejunal distension also inhibited the response to noxious skin pinch. The inhibition of the visceromotor response to colorectal distension was prevented by local application of tetrodotoxin to the jejunum, and was markedly reduced when nicardipine was infused into the local jejunal circulation. Chronic sub-diaphragmatic vagotomy had no effect on the colorectal distension-induced EMG activity or its inhibition by jejunal distension. The nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium suppressed phasic contractile activity in the jejunum, had only a small effect on the inhibition of visceromotor response by jejunal distension. It is concluded that signals that arise from skin pinch and colorectal distension converge in the central nervous system with pathways that are activated by jejunal spinal afferents; the jejunal signals strongly inhibit the abdominal motor activity evoked by noxious stimuli.

  1. Protective effect of lactofermented beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation and genotoxicity of fecal water in rats.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Cukrowska, Bożena; Błasiak, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 50 mg/kg on the 23rd and 26th day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco 2 cell line, evaluated by MTT/NRU tests and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and DAPI staining. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and MNU treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and MNU treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in MNU-treated rats (from 55±18 to 21±6). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 45±21 to 7±4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with an MNU-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco 2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. The presence of FBJ in the diet significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus, adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with lactofermented beetroot juice may provide protection against precancerous aberrant crypt formation and reduce the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of fecal water.

  2. [CELLULAR COMPOSITION OF THE LAMINA PROPRIA OF JEJUNAL MUCOUS MEMBRANE IN C57BL/6 MICE DURING THE RECOVERY PERIOD AFTER PROLONGED SPACE FLIGHT].

    PubMed

    Aminova, G G

    2015-01-01

    The jejunum of C57 BL/6 mice (n = 5) was examined 7 days after a 30-day-long space flight and in vivarium control animals (n = 6). The cellular composition of the lamina propria of the mucous membranes of the villi and crypt region was studied using histological and morphometric methods. It was found that on Day 7 the recovery of normal cellular composition of the lamina propria was incomplete. In the villi, the number of medium and small lymphocytes, as well as of the plasma cells was reduced. In the crypt region, the changes were less pronounced. In the lamina propria in experimental animals the number of large lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, disintegrating cells and stromal cells was increased. The number of eosinophils was reduced.

  3. Dietary Zinc Oxide Modulates Antioxidant Capacity, Small Intestine Development, and Jejunal Gene Expression in Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui; Lv, Hang; Chen, Zhuang; Wang, Li; Wu, Xiuju; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Liang, Rui; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-02-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) on the antioxidant capacity, small intestine development, and jejunal gene expression in weaned piglets. Ninety-six 21-day-old piglets were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments. Each treatment had eight replicates with four piglets per replicate. The piglets were fed either control diet (control) or control diet supplemented with in-feed antibiotics (300 mg/kg chlortetracycline and 60 mg/kg colistin sulfate) or pharmacological doses of ZnO (3000 mg/kg). The experiment lasted 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected at days 14 and 28, while intestinal samples were harvested at day 28 of the experiment. Dietary high doses of ZnO supplementation significantly increased the body weight (BW) at day 14 and average daily gain (ADG) of days 1 to 14 in weaned piglets, when compared to control group (P < 0.05). The incidence of diarrhea of piglets fed ZnO-supplemented diets, at either days 1 to 14, days 14 to 28, or the overall experimental period, was significantly decreased in comparison with those in other groups (P < 0.05). Supplementation with ZnO increased the villus height of the duodenum and ileum in weaned piglets and decreased the crypt depth of the duodenum, when compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Dietary ZnO supplementation decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration at either day 14 or day 28, but increased total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) at day 14, when compared to that in the control (P < 0.05). ZnO supplementation upregulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin in the jejunum mucosa of weaned piglets, compared to those in the control (P < 0.05). The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) mRNA expression in the jejunum mucosa was downregulated in the ZnO-supplemented group, compared with the control (P < 0.05). Both in-feed antibiotics and ZnO supplementation decreased the m

  4. Cell migration and cortisone induction of sucrase activity in jejunum and ileum

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, John J.; Koldovský, Otakar

    1972-01-01

    The increase of sucrase activity in homogenates of jejunum and ileum of suckling rats after cortisone administration has been investigated. Serial tissue sections of villi and crypts were also assayed for sucrase activity and these results were compared with the migration of cells labelled with [3H]thymidine along the villus. By using a low dose of cortisone (0.5mg/day per 100g body wt.) it was found that the sensitivity of the small intestine producing system to cortisone stimulation increased during the suckling period. On the other hand, 5mg of cortisone/day per 100g body wt. produced practically the same increase of sucrase during the entire suckling period. Sucrase activity in homogenates of the entire small-intestinal wall was first detected 24h after the first injection of cortisone (5mg/day per 100g body weight) to 9-day-old animals and maximum activity both in the jejunum and ileum was reached by 120h. Jejunal activity was greater than ileal activity, but the rate of the increase was similar. The half-time of the increase was 23–27h, whereas enterocytes migrate from the base to the tip of the villi in approximately 72h. Comparison of sucrase activity in serial tissue sections of villi and crypts at various times after cortisone treatment showed that the leading edge of sucrase activity proceeds toward the tip of the villi at the same rate as the advancing edge of newly formed cells. Sucrase activity increased in the newly induced cells as they migrated to the tip of the villi. It was concluded that the increase of sucrase activity in suckling rats after cortisone stimulation is due to at least three factors: (1) increase of activity in newly differentiating cells, (2) increased percentage of villus cells with sucrase activity and (3) continued production or activation of sucrase activity as the cells migrate along the villi. PMID:5075262

  5. A fluorescence-based demonstration of intestinal villi and epithelial cell in chickens fed dietary silicic acid powder including bamboo vinegar compound liquid.

    PubMed

    Ruttanavut, J; Matsumoto, Y; Yamauchi, K

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the combined effect of silicic acid and bamboo vinegar compound liquid (SPV) on the growth and intestinal histological alterations in poultry. Forty-eight 7-day-old male Sanuki Cochin chickens were fed a commercial mash diet supplemented with SPV at 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% level ad libitum for 112 days. Body weight gain tended to improve with increased concentrations of dietary SPV, although these results were not statistically significant (P<0.1). Tissue observation by light microscopy revealed that the jejunal villus height (P<0.01) and duodenal and jejunal villus area (P<0.05) increased in the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups, respectively, compared with the control. Cell mitosis within the duodenum and jejunum also increased in the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a prominent increase in the number of protuberant cells on the villus apical surface of the duodenum and jejunum for the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups compared with the control. Poultry in the 0.3% SPV group had the highest body weight gain and hypertrophied histological alterations of intestinal villi. Fluorescent microscopic images of cell mitosis and protuberant cells in the duodenal crypt clearly confirmed positive reactions for the activator protein 2α (AP-2α) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), compared with the control. The present results indicate that dietary SPV stimulates adsorption by the epithelial cells, which activate cell proliferation and self-renewal and regulate the expression of cell cycle regulators AP-2α and PCNA, resulting in higher body weight gain. Thus, we can conclude that a concentration of 0.3% dietary SPV is ideal for promoting growth in poultry.

  6. Chemopreventive efficacy of Andrographis paniculata on azoxymethane-induced aberrant colon crypt foci in vivo.

    PubMed

    Al-Henhena, Nawal; Ying, Rozaida Poh Yuen; Ismail, Salmah; Najm, Walaa; Najm, Wala; Khalifa, Shaden A M; El-Seedi, Hesham; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a grass-shaped medicinal herb, traditionally used in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoprotective effects of A. paniculata on colorectal cancer. A. paniculata ethanol extract was tested on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in vivo and in vitro. A. paniculata treated groups showed a significant reduction in the number of ACF of the treated rats. Microscopically, ACF showed remarkably elongated and stratified cells, and depletion of the submucosal glands of AOM group compared to the treated groups. Histologically, staining showed slightly elevated masses above the surrounding mucosa with oval or slit-like orifices. Immunohistochemically, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and β-catenin protein were down-regulated in the A. paniculata treated groups compared to the AOM group. When colon tissue was homogenized, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly decreased, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was increased in the treated groups compared to the AOM group. A. paniculata ethanol extract showed antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity, as elucidated by the measure of oxidative stress markers. Further, the active fractions were assessed against cell lines of CCD841 and HT29 colon cancer cells.

  7. Chemopreventive Efficacy of Andrographis paniculata on Azoxymethane-Induced Aberrant Colon Crypt Foci In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Henhena, Nawal; Ying, Rozaida Poh Yuen; Ismail, Salmah; Najm, Wala; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; El-Seedi, Hesham; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a grass-shaped medicinal herb, traditionally used in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoprotective effects of A. paniculata on colorectal cancer. A. paniculata ethanol extract was tested on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in vivo and in vitro. A. paniculata treated groups showed a significant reduction in the number of ACF of the treated rats. Microscopically, ACF showed remarkably elongated and stratified cells, and depletion of the submucosal glands of AOM group compared to the treated groups. Histologically, staining showed slightly elevated masses above the surrounding mucosa with oval or slit-like orifices. Immunohistochemically, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and β-catenin protein were down-regulated in the A. paniculata treated groups compared to the AOM group. When colon tissue was homogenized, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly decreased, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was increased in the treated groups compared to the AOM group. A. paniculata ethanol extract showed antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity, as elucidated by the measure of oxidative stress markers. Further, the active fractions were assessed against cell lines of CCD841 and HT29 colon cancer cells. PMID:25390042

  8. Prostaglandin-induced radioprotection of murine intestinal crypts and villi by a PGE diene analog (SC-44932) and a PGI analog (Iloprost)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Wayne R.; Collins, Paul W.

    The aminothiols exemplified by WR-2721 are effective radioprotectors; however, their toxicity associated with hypotension, nausea, and emesis has limited their development for applications in medicine or in hazardous radiation environments. There is a need for new radioprotectors that have fewer toxic side effects when given alone or combined with reduced amounts of thiols. A variety of prostaglandins (PGs) have been shown to be radioprotective agents and some appear to have fewer toxic side effects than the aminothiols. Iloprost, a stable PGI, analog protects the clonogenic epithelial cells of intestinal crypts but does not protect epithelial cells of the villi. In contrast, an E-series omega chain diene analog designated SC-44932 protects epithelial cells of both crypts and villi. When the two are combined, protection of the crypts is additive and the villi are protected to the same degree as when SC-44932 is given alone. Since radioprotection for some PGs has been shown to be dependent upon receptors, we suggest that the pattern of radioprotection seen with these two analogs depend on the location of the respective receptors or on the ability of differentiated villus cells to respond to PGs. By studying different analogs, we hope to identify mechanisms associated with PG-induced radioprotection and to identify the most protective PG analogs for applications of radioprotection.

  9. Structural and mechanical architecture of the intestinal villi and crypts in the rat intestine: integrative reevaluation from ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Yasue; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2005-08-01

    The ultrastructure of the rat intestinal interstitium was analyzed from the viewpoint of mechanical dynamics to stabilize the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal folds. In the rat, the small intestine lacks circular folds, but the large intestine possesses spiral folds. The intestinal villi, the largest in the duodenum, decreased in size in the jejunum and ileum successively, and were absent in the large intestine. The intestinal interstitium consisted of lamina propria mucosae (LPM) and tela submucosa (TSM) separated by muscularis mucosae (MM), the LPM was subdivided into an upper part within the villi and a lower part among the crypts in the small intestine. The light microscopic density of interstitium in the intestinal wall was lowest in the upper LPM, moderately dense in the lower LPM and highest in the TSM, and that among the intestinal region was highest in the duodenum and decreased successively in the jejunum and ileum. In the large intestine, the TSM bulged to form spiral folds with very low density. The intestinal epithelium in the villi possessed wide intercellular spaces and that in the crypts had closed intercellular spaces. At electron microscopic level, the upper and lower LPM contained subepithelial supportive meshwork that consisted of collagen fibrils and myofibroblast processes. The lower LPM and TSM contained conspicuous bundles of collagen fibrils and, in addition, TSM contained minor populations of scattered collagen fibrils near the smooth muscle layer (SML). The diameter of collagen fibrils was the largest in the bundles of TSM, and decreased from the duodenum through the jejunum and ileum to the large intestine. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intestinal villi are mechanically stabilized by the balance between the expansive interstitial pressure and inward pull by the subepithelial supportive meshwork. This hypothesis explains the hitherto neglected fact that the intestinal epithelium possesses wide

  10. Nanoparticle passage through porcine jejunal mucus: Microfluidics and rheology.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; Mahon, Eugene; Harrison, Sabine M; McGetrick, Jim; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Carrington, Stephen D; Brayden, David J

    2017-04-01

    A micro-slide chamber was used to screen and rank sixteen functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles (SiNP) of different sizes (10, 50, 100 and 200 nm) and surface coatings (aminated, carboxylated, methyl-PEG1000ylated, and methyl-PEG2000ylated) according to their capacity to permeate porcine jejunal mucus. Variables investigated were influence of particle size, surface charge and methyl-PEGylation. The anionic SiNP showed higher transport through mucus whereas the cationic SiNP exhibited higher binding with lower transport. A size-dependence in transport was identified - 10 and 50 nm anionic (uncoated or methyl-PEGylated) SiNP showed higher transport compared to the larger 100 and 200 nm SiNP. The cationic SiNP of all sizes interacted with the mucus, making it more viscous and less capable of swelling. In contrast, the anionic SiNP (uncoated or methyl-PEGylated) caused minimal changes in the viscoelasticity of mucus. The data provide insights into mucus-NP interactions and suggest a rationale for designing oral nanomedicines with improved mucopermeability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aberrant Crypt Foci and Semiparametric Modeling of Correlated Binary Data

    PubMed Central

    Apanasovich, Tatiyana V.; Ruppert, David; Lupton, Joanne R.; Popovic, Natasa; Turner, Nancy D.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Motivated by the spatial modeling of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in colon carcinogenesis, we consider binary data with probabilities modeled as the sum of a nonparametric mean plus a latent Gaussian spatial process that accounts for short-range dependencies. The mean is modeled in a general way using regression splines. The mean function can be viewed as a fixed effect and is estimated with a penalty for regularization. With the latent process viewed as another random effect, the model becomes a generalized linear mixed model. In our motivating data set and other applications, the sample size is too large to easily accommodate maximum likelihood or restricted maximum likelihood estimation (REML), so pairwise likelihood, a special case of composite likelihood, is used instead. We develop an asymptotic theory for models that are sufficiently general to be used in a wide variety of applications, including, but not limited to, the problem that motivated this work. The splines have penalty parameters that must converge to zero asymptotically: we derive theory for this along with a data-driven method for selecting the penalty parameter, a method that is shown in simulations to improve greatly upon standard devices, such as likelihood crossvalidation. Finally, we apply the methods to the data from our experiment ACF. We discover an unexpected location for peak formation of ACF. PMID:17725810

  12. Aberrant crypt foci and semiparametric modeling of correlated binary data.

    PubMed

    Apanasovich, Tatiyana V; Ruppert, David; Lupton, Joanne R; Popovic, Natasa; Turner, Nancy D; Chapkin, Robert S; Carroll, Raymond J

    2008-06-01

    Motivated by the spatial modeling of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in colon carcinogenesis, we consider binary data with probabilities modeled as the sum of a nonparametric mean plus a latent Gaussian spatial process that accounts for short-range dependencies. The mean is modeled in a general way using regression splines. The mean function can be viewed as a fixed effect and is estimated with a penalty for regularization. With the latent process viewed as another random effect, the model becomes a generalized linear mixed model. In our motivating data set and other applications, the sample size is too large to easily accommodate maximum likelihood or restricted maximum likelihood estimation (REML), so pairwise likelihood, a special case of composite likelihood, is used instead. We develop an asymptotic theory for models that are sufficiently general to be used in a wide variety of applications, including, but not limited to, the problem that motivated this work. The splines have penalty parameters that must converge to zero asymptotically: we derive theory for this along with a data-driven method for selecting the penalty parameter, a method that is shown in simulations to improve greatly upon standard devices, such as likelihood crossvalidation. Finally, we apply the methods to the data from our experiment ACF. We discover an unexpected location for peak formation of ACF.

  13. Lidocaine effect on flotillin-2 distribution in detergent-resistant membranes of equine jejunal smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tappenbeck, Karen; Schmidt, Sonja; Feige, Karsten; Naim, Hassan Y; Huber, Korinna

    2014-05-01

    Lidocaine is the most commonly chosen prokinetic for treating postoperative ileus in horses, a motility disorder associated with ischaemia-reperfusion injury of intestinal tissues. Despite the frequent use of lidocaine, the mechanism underlying its prokinetic effects is still unclear. Previous studies suggested that lidocaine altered cell membrane characteristics of smooth muscle cells. Therefore, the present study aimed to elucidate effects of lidocaine administration on characteristics of detergent-resistant membranes in equine jejunal smooth muscle. Lidocaine administration caused significant redistribution of flotillin-2, a protein marker of detergent-resistant membranes, in fractions of sucrose-density-gradients obtained from ischaemia-reperfusion injured smooth muscle solubilised with Triton X-100. It was concluded that lidocaine induced disruption of detergent-resistant membranes which might affect ion channel activity and therefore enhance smooth muscle contractility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tales from the crypt: a parasitoid manipulates the behaviour of its parasite host.

    PubMed

    Weinersmith, Kelly L; Liu, Sean M; Forbes, Andrew A; Egan, Scott P

    2017-01-25

    There are many examples of apparent manipulation of host phenotype by parasites, yet few examples of hypermanipulation-where a phenotype-manipulating parasite is itself manipulated by a parasite. Moreover, few studies confirm manipulation is occurring by quantifying whether the host's changed phenotype increases parasite fitness. Here we describe a novel case of hypermanipulation, in which the crypt gall wasp Bassettia pallida (a phenotypic manipulator of its tree host) is manipulated by the parasitoid crypt-keeper wasp Euderus set, and show that the host's changed behaviour increases parasitoid fitness. Bassettia pallida parasitizes sand live oaks and induces the formation of a 'crypt' within developing stems. When parasitized by E. set, B. pallida adults excavate an emergence hole in the crypt wall, plug the hole with their head and die. We show experimentally that this phenomenon benefits E. set, as E. set that need to excavate an emergence hole themselves are about three times more likely to die trapped in the crypt. In addition, we discuss museum and field data to explore the distribution of the crypt-keeping phenomena.

  15. Phytic acid decreases deoxynivalenol and fumonisin B1-induced changes on swine jejunal explants.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Elisângela Olegário; Gerez, Juliana Rubira; do Carmo Drape, Thalisie; Bracarense, Ana Paula F R L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of phytic acid (IP6) on morphological and immunohistochemical parameters on intestinal explants exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1). The jejunal explants were exposed for 4 h to different treatments: control, DON (10 μM), DON plus 2.5 mM or 5 mM IP6, FB1 (70 μM), and FB1 plus 2.5 mM or 5 mM IP6. Both mycotoxins induced significant intestinal lesions and decreased villi height. The presence of 2.5 mM and 5 mM IP6 significantly inhibited the morphological changes caused by the mycotoxins. DON induced a significant increase in caspase-3 (83%) and cyclooxygenase-2 (71.3%) expression compared with the control. The presence of 5 mM IP6 induced a significant decrease in caspase-3 (43.7%) and Cox-2 (48%) expression compared with the DON group. FB1 induced a significant increase in caspase-3 expression (47%) compared to the control, whereas IP6 induced no significant change in this expression. A significant decrease in cell proliferation was observed when explants were exposed to 5 mM of IP6 in comparison with the DON and FB1 groups. The present data provide evidence that phytic acid modulates the toxic effects induced by DON and FB1 on intestinal tissue.

  16. Creation of a Jejunal Pouch During Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y Esophagojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marc A; Ujiki, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    The creation of Hunt-Lawrence jejunal pouches after total gastrectomy is associated with a better quality of life compared with the standard Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first video to show the technical aspects of creating a jejunal pouch during a laparoscopic total gastrectomy. A 35-year-old woman was seen for surgical evaluation of a newly diagnosed CDH1 gene mutation. The authors recommended a laparoscopic total gastrectomy with Hunt-Lawrence pouch reconstruction. The jejunal pouch was created using an extracorporeal approach after removal of the stomach. A laparoscopic gel port was then placed over the extraction site to maintain pneumoperitoneum to facilitate a laparoscopic esophagojejunal pouch anastomosis using a circular stapler. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 4. Her pathology showed no gastric cancer, and all 31 lymph nodes harvested were free of malignancy. At 1 year postoperatively, she had lost 25 lb from her presurgerical weight and was maintaining a healthy body mass index of 24 kg/m(2). Hunt-Lawerence jejunal pouches have been shown to improve quality of life compared with esophagojejunostomy without pouch formation after total gastrectomy. This video shows a novel technique for jejunal pouch creation during laparoscopic total gastrectomy using a laparoscopic gel port after gastric extraction to facilitate a laparoscopic esophagojejunal pouch anastomosis.

  17. Spontaneous Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of Jejunal Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-yan; Wei, Jiang-peng; Zhao, Xiu-yuan; Wang, Yue; Wu, Huan-huan; Shi, Tao; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rupture of jejunal artery aneurysm is a very rare event resulting in life-threatening hemorrhage in Behcet disease (BD). We report a case of ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm in a 35-year-old patient with BD. The patient had a 1-year history of intermittent abdominal pain caused by superior mesenteric artery aneurysm with thrombosis. Anticoagulation treatment showed a good response. Past surgical history included stenting for aortic pseudoaneurysm. On admission, the patient underwent an urgent operation due to sudden hemorrhagic shock. Resection was performed for jejunal artery aneurysm and partial ischemia of intestine. The patient was diagnosed with BD, based on a history of recurrent oral and skin lesions over the past 6 years. Treatment with anti-inflammatory medications showed a good response during the 8-month follow-up. An increased awareness of BD and its vascular complications is essential. Aneurysms in BD involving jejunal artery are rare, neglected and require proper management to prevent rupture and death. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of jejunal artery aneurysm caused by BD. PMID:26559278

  18. Phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Phytobezoars are concretions of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibers found in the alimentary tract. Previous gastric resection, gastrojejunostomy, or pyloroplasty predispose people to bezoar formation. Small-bowel bezoars normally come from the stomach, and primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare. They are seen only in patients with underlying small-bowel diseases such as diverticula, strictures, or tumors. Primary small-bowel bezoars almost always present as intestinal obstructions, although it is a very rare cause, being responsible for less than 3% of all small-bowel obstructions in one series. Jejunal diverticula are rare, with an incidence of less than 0.5%. They are usually asymptomatic pseudodiverticula of pulsion type, and complications are reported in 10% to 30% of patients. A phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum is an extremely rare presentation. Case presentation A 78-year-old Pakistani man presented to our clinic with small-bowel obstruction. Upon exploration, we found a primary small-bowel bezoar originating in a jejunal diverticulum and causing jejunal obstruction. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment harboring the diverticulum was performed, and our patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare but must be kept in mind as a possible cause of small-bowel obstruction. PMID:21951579

  19. Jejunal small ectopic pancreas developing into jejunojejunal intussusception: a rare cause of ileus.

    PubMed

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Kubo, Motoharu; Inoue, Atsushi; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Oshiro, Hisako

    2009-08-21

    Intussusception is rare in adults. We describe a 62-year-old man with jejunal ectopic pancreas that led to jejunojejunal intussusception and ileus. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of intermittent abdominal pain. Plain abdominal radiography showed some intestinal gas and fluid levels. Abdominal CT scan demonstrated a target sign suggesting bowel intussusception. Jejunography using a naso-jejunal tube showed an oval-shaped mass about 15 mm in diameter with a smooth surface in the jejunum, which suggested a submucosal tumor (SMT), and edematous mucosa around the mass. Partial jejunal resection was carried out and the resected oval-shaped tumor, 14 mm x 11 mm in size, was found to be covered with normal jejunal mucosa. The tumor was histologically diagnosed as type III ectopic pancreas according to the classification proposed by Heinrich. Abdominal pain resolved postoperatively. This case reminds us that jejunal ectopic pancreas should be included in the differential diagnosis of intussusception caused by an SMT in the intestine.

  20. Effects of dark chocolate on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Nulton, Emily; Shelechi, Mahshid; Hernández, Lisa M; Nemoseck, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports that diets rich in polyphenols promote health and may delay the onset of colon cancer. Cocoa and chocolate products have some of the highest polyphenolic concentrations compared to other polyphenolic food sources. This study tested the hypothesis that a diet including dark chocolate can protect against colon cancer by inhibiting aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, downregulating gene expression of inflammatory mediators, and favorably altering cell kinetics. We also investigated whether bloomed dark chocolate retains the antioxidant capacity and protects against colon cancer. Forty-eight rats received either a diet containing control (no chocolate), regular dark chocolate, or bloomed dark chocolate and were injected subcutaneously with saline or azoxymethane. Relative to control, both regular and bloomed dark chocolate diets lowered the total number of ACF (P = 0.022). Chocolate diet-fed animals downregulated transcription levels of COX-2 (P = 0.035) and RelA (P = 0.045). Both chocolate diets lowered the proliferation index (P = 0.001). These results suggest that a diet including dark chocolate can reduce cell proliferation and some gene expression involving inflammation, which may explain the lower number of early preneoplastic lesions. These results provide new insight on polyphenol-rich chocolate foods and colon cancer prevention.

  1. Lack of chemoprevention of dietary Agaricus blazei against rat colonic aberrant crypt foci.

    PubMed

    Ziliotto, L; Barbisan, L F; Rodrigues, M A M

    2008-06-01

    The mushroom Agaricus blazei (Ab) has been widely used in folk medicine to treat various diseases including cancer. No information is available on its possible protective effects on the development of colon cancer. The potential blocking effect of Ab intake on the initiation stage of colon carcinogenesis was investigated in a short-term (4-week) bioassay using aberrant crypt foci (ACF) as biomarker. Male Wistar rats were given four subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 40 mg/kg bw, twice a week), during 2 weeks to induce ACF. The diet containing Ab at 5% was given 2 weeks before and during carcinogen treatment to investigate the potential beneficial effects of this edible mushroom on DMH-induced ACF. All groups were killed at the end of the fourth week. The colons were analyzed for ACF formation in 1% methylene blue whole-mount preparations and for cell proliferation in histological sections immunohistochemically stained for the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). All DMH-treated rats developed ACF mainly in the middle and distal colon. Agaricus blazei intake at 5% did not alter the number of ACF induced by DMH or the PCNA indices in the colonic mucosa. Thus, the results of the present study did not confirm a chemopreventive activity of Ab on the initiation stage of rat colon carcinogenesis.

  2. Effects of selenium supply and dietary restriction on maternal and fetal body weight, visceral organ mass and cellularity estimates, and jejunal vascularity in pregnant ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Reed, J J; Ward, M A; Vonnahme, K A; Neville, T L; Julius, S L; Borowicz, P P; Taylor, J B; Redmer, D A; Grazul-Bilska, A T; Reynolds, L P; Caton, J S

    2007-10-01

    To examine effects of nutrient restriction and dietary Se on maternal and fetal visceral tissues, 36 pregnant Targhee-cross ewe lambs were allotted randomly to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. Treatments were plane of nutrition [control, 100% of requirements vs. restricted, 60% of controls] and dietary Se [adequate Se, ASe (6 microg/kg of BW) vs. high Se, HSe (80 microg/kg of BW)] from Se-enriched yeast. Selenium treatments were initiated 21 d before breeding and dietary restriction began on d 64 of gestation. Diets contained 16% CP and 2.12 Mcal/kg of ME (DM basis) and differing amounts were fed to control and restricted groups. On d 135 +/- 5 (mean +/- range) of gestation, ewes were slaughtered and visceral tissues were harvested. There was a nutrition x Se interaction (P = 0.02) for maternal jejunal RNA:DNA; no other interactions were detected for maternal measurements. Maternal BW, stomach complex, small intestine, large intestine, liver, and kidney mass were less (P < or = 0.01) in restricted than control ewes. Lung mass (g/kg of empty BW) was greater (P = 0.09) in restricted than control ewes and for HSe compared with ASe ewes. Maternal jejunal protein content and protein:DNA were less (P < or = 0.002) in restricted than control ewes. Maternal jejunal DNA and RNA concentrations and total proliferating jejunal cells were not affected (P > or = 0.11) by treatment. Total jejunal and mucosal vascularity (mL) were less (P < or = 0.01) in restricted than control ewes. Fetuses from restricted ewes had less BW (P = 0.06), empty carcass weight (P = 0.06), crown-rump length (P = 0.03), liver (P = 0.01), pancreas (P = 0.07), perirenal fat (P = 0.02), small intestine (P = 0.007), and spleen weights (P = 0.03) compared with controls. Fetuses from HSe ewes had heavier (P < or = 0.09) BW, and empty carcass, heart, lung, spleen, total viscera, and large intestine weights compared with ASe ewes. Nutrient restriction resulted in less protein content (mg, P

  3. Gastric crypt dysplasia: a distinct subtype of gastric dysplasia with characteristic endoscopic features and immunophenotypic and biological anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ahrong; Ahn, Sang-Jeong; Park, Do Youn; Lee, Bong-Eun; Song, Geum-Am; Kim, Gwang Ha; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2016-05-01

    Previous reports have shown that gastric epithelial dysplasia (GED) limited to the crypt (gastric crypt dysplasia, GCD) is commonly identified at the periphery of gastric carcinoma. However, it is unknown whether GCD is endoscopically identifiable, and how it relates to classic GED lesions. We investigated 1196 consecutive endoscopic resections of GED lesions between January 2011 and December 2014. We also evaluated clinicopathological features of these lesions, as well as the immunohistochemical expression of mucin (Muc)2, Muc5AC, Muc6, CD10, Ki67 and p53. We found 51 (4.3%) lesions composed microscopically of GCD among 1196 GED lesions. Those were elevated mucosal lesions (66.7%) similar in colour and texture to the adjacent mucosa (68.6%). GCD was likely to have an antropyloric location and a higher grade than the adenomatous type, similar to the foveolar and hybrid types (P < 0.05). A gastric immunophenotype was more common in GCD compared to adenomatous GED (P < 0.05). Ki-67- and p53-positive cells were more evident in GCD compared to the adjacent gastric mucosa. Our results demonstrated that GCD can be an endoscopically identifiable lesion, sharing many similarities with foveolar and hybrid GED, for which it may represent a precursor lesion in the gastric carcinogenic sequence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Is laparoscopic resection the appropriate management of a jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)? Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, Michail; Zezos, Petros; Courcoutsakis, Nikos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Kouklakis, Georgios; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2010-10-01

    A 51-year-old female patient presented with iron deficiency anemia. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy were unremarkable. Computed tomography enteroclysis showed an ovoid 3×4-cm jejunal tumor with intraluminal protrusion and exophytic growth pattern, without lymphadenopathy or metastatic disease. Laparoscopic resection of the tumor was successfully carried out. Histologically, a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with an interlacing bundle pattern and high-mitotic activity greater than 10 mitoses/50 high-power fields were observed. The immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was KIT (CD117)-, vimentin-, smooth muscle actin-, and S-100-positive, whereas it was CD34-negative. These findings were consistent with the features of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and after 10 months of follow-up, she is well without any evidence of tumor recurrence.

  5. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  6. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  7. Tales from the crypt: a parasitoid manipulates the behaviour of its parasite host

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sean M.; Forbes, Andrew A.; Egan, Scott P.

    2017-01-01

    There are many examples of apparent manipulation of host phenotype by parasites, yet few examples of hypermanipulation—where a phenotype-manipulating parasite is itself manipulated by a parasite. Moreover, few studies confirm manipulation is occurring by quantifying whether the host's changed phenotype increases parasite fitness. Here we describe a novel case of hypermanipulation, in which the crypt gall wasp Bassettia pallida (a phenotypic manipulator of its tree host) is manipulated by the parasitoid crypt-keeper wasp Euderus set, and show that the host's changed behaviour increases parasitoid fitness. Bassettia pallida parasitizes sand live oaks and induces the formation of a ‘crypt’ within developing stems. When parasitized by E. set, B. pallida adults excavate an emergence hole in the crypt wall, plug the hole with their head and die. We show experimentally that this phenomenon benefits E. set, as E. set that need to excavate an emergence hole themselves are about three times more likely to die trapped in the crypt. In addition, we discuss museum and field data to explore the distribution of the crypt-keeping phenomena. PMID:28123089

  8. Effects of Salmonella on spatial-temporal processes of jejunal development in chickens.

    PubMed

    Schokker, Dirkjan; Smits, Mari A; Hoekman, Arjan J W; Parmentier, Henk K; Rebel, Johanna M J

    2010-10-01

    To study effects of Salmonella enteritidis on morphological and functional changes in chicken jejunal development, we analysed gene expression profiles at seven points post-infection in 1-21 day-old broiler chickens. Nine clusters with different gene expression patterns were identified, and the genes in each cluster were further analyzed by a functional annotation clustering method (DAVID). Functional and morphological developmental processes dominated in all the nine clusters. Salmonella infection caused delays in several intestinal-morphological processes, whereas functional metabolic processes occurred in a similar spatial-temporal frame compared to normal jejunum development. A clear difference between normal developing- and Salmonella disturbed jejunum was the higher expression of genes involved in cell turn-over at early stages in the infected jejunum. Surprisingly, we found no clustered immune related processes in the infected birds. To compare the immunological processes between control and Salmonella infected chickens, the gene expression data was superimposed on known immunological KEGG pathways. Furthermore an in-depth analysis on the immune gene level was performed. As expected, we did find immunological processes in the Salmonella infected jejunum. Several of these processes could be verified by immunohistochemistry measurements of different immunological cell types. However, the well-ordered spatial-temporal development of the immune system, as observed in control non-infected animals, was completely abolished in the infected animals. Several immunological processes started much earlier in time, whereas other processes are disorganised. These data indicate that normal morphological and immunological development of jejunum is changed dramatically by a disturbance due to Salmonella infection. Due to the disturbance, the well-organized spatial-temporal development of morphological processes are delayed, those of the immunological development are

  9. Food deprivation increases alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of jejunal epithelial transport in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Teixeira, V; Vieira-Coelho, M A; Serrão, M P; Soares-da-Silva, P

    2000-10-01

    This study examined the effect of food deprivation on the jejunal response to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor activation in young (20-d-old) and adult (60-d-old) rats, using short-circuit (I(sc)) measurements in the absence or presence of furosemide (1 mmol/L). The effect of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation by 5-bromo-N:-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK 14,304; 0.3-3000 nmol/L) was a concentration-dependent decrease in I(sc) with similar half-maximal effective concentration (EC(50); 12.3 +/- 1.1 vs. 9.6 +/- 1.1 nmol/L) and maximal effect (E(max); 70.6 +/- 6.9 vs. 80.6 +/- 4.5% of reduction) values in adult food-deprived and fed rats. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in fed and food-deprived rats was markedly (P: < 0.05) attenuated by furosemide (1 mmol/L). E(max) values for UK 14,304 in 20-d-old food-deprived rats were higher (P: < 0.05) than those observed in fed rats (93.3 +/- 3.3 vs. 67.0 +/- 11.3% of reduction), without differences in EC(50) values. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in 20-d-old fed rats was completely abolished by furosemide (1 mmol/L). In food-deprived young rats, the effect of UK 14,304 was also markedly (P: < 0.05) antagonized by furosemide, but not completely abolished. Specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding in membranes from jejunal epithelial cells revealed the presence of a single class of binding sites, with an apparent K:(D) in the low nmol/L range. In 20-d-old food-deprived rats, specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding was markedly increased, and this was reversed by refeeding. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in isolated jejunal epithelial cells from 60-d-old fed rats was twice that in 20-d-old fed rats [117 +/- 14 vs. 52 +/- 5 nmol free inorganic phosphorus/(mg protein.min)]. Food deprivation in adult rats, but not in 20-d-old rats, was accompanied by a significant decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In both young and adult rats (fed and food-deprived), UK 14,304 did not affect Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In conclusion, food

  10. Colonic GLP-2 is not Sufficient to Promote Jejunal Adaptation in a PN-Dependent Rat Model of Human Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthew C.; Liu, Xiaowen; Boehler, Christopher J.; Murali, Sangita G.; Holst, Jens J.; Ney, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bowel resection may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS), which often requires parenteral nutrition (PN) due to inadequate intestinal adaptation. The objective of this study was to determine the time course of adaptation and proglucagon system responses after bowel resection in a PN-dependent rat model of SBS. Methods Rats underwent jugular catheter placement and a 60% jejunoileal resection + cecectomy with jejunoileal anastomosis or transection control surgery. Rats were maintained exclusively with PN and killed at 4 hours to 12 days. A nonsurgical group served as baseline. Bowel growth and digestive capacity were assessed by mucosal mass, protein, DNA, histology, and sucrase activity. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and bioactive glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results Jejunum cellularity changed significantly over time with resection but not transection, peaking at days 3–4 and declining by day 12. Jejunum sucrase-specific activity decreased significantly with time after resection and transection. Colon crypt depth increased over time with resection but not transection, peaking at days 7–12. Plasma bioactive GLP-2 and colon proglucagon levels peaked from days 4–7 after resection and then approached baseline. Plasma IGF-I increased with resection through day 12. Jejunum and colon GLP-2 receptor RNAs peaked by day 1 and then declined below baseline. Conclusions After bowel resection resulting in SBS in the rat, peak proglucagon, plasma GLP-2, and GLP-2 receptor levels are insufficient to promote jejunal adaptation. The colon adapts with resection, expresses proglucagon, and should be preserved when possible in massive intestinal resection. PMID:19644131

  11. Jejunal Perforation: A Rare Presentation of Burkitt's Lymphoma—Successful Management

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Samir Ranjan; Rao, Ganni Bhaskara; Yerraguntla, Subramanya Sarma; Bodepudi, Sisir

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the small bowel presenting as acute abdomen are a rare occurrence. Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as a surgical emergency needing emergency laparotomy is an uncommon presentation of this tumor. We present an interesting case of jejunal perforation as a first manifestation of Burkitt's lymphoma which was successfully managed with surgical resection, high dose chemotherapy, and good supportive care. PMID:24995139

  12. The TRPA1 Activator Allyl Isothiocyanate (AITC) Contracts Human Jejunal Muscle: Pharmacological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Zsolt; Dekany, Andras; Kelemen, Dezsö; Bencsik, Timea; Papp, Robert; Bartho, Lorand

    2016-09-01

    The contractile effect of AITC (300 μM) on human jejunal longitudinal strips was inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonist HC 030031 and atropine or scopolamine, but was insensitive to tetrodotoxin, purinoceptor antagonists or capsaicin desensitization. It is concluded that TRPA1 activation stimulates a cholinergic mechanism in a tetrodotoxin-resistant manner.

  13. Effect of jejunal infusion of nutrients on gastrointestinal transit and hormonal response in man.

    PubMed

    Vidon, N; Pfeiffer, A; Chayvialle, J A; Merite, F; Maurel, M; Franchisseur, C; Huchet, B; Bernier, J J

    1989-12-01

    The effects of jejunal infusion of nutrients on gastric emptying and secretion, intestinal transit and hormone release were studied in human volunteers. Two caloric loads, 1.3 and 3.3 kcal/min, of a nutrient solution consisting of 18 percent protein, 27 percent lipids, and 55 percent carbohydrates were tested. These were first used in random order in 6 subjects to assess the effects on intestinal transit. For the study of gastric emptying, jejunal infusion was started 1 h after intragastric instillation of a 490 kcal, 400 ml, homogenized meal. Intestinal transit time and gastric emptying half-time increased with the rate of nutrient infusion into the jejunum. Postprandial gastric secretion was reduced. The two caloric loads induced significant rises of plasma cholecystokinin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide concentrations. Plasma motilin decreased in relation to the jejunal caloric load. The other peptides were essentially not affected by jejunal nutrient infusion in fasting subjects. We conclude that in man, gastric emptying rate, gastric secretion, and intestinal transit are regulated by the presence of nutrients in the jejunum.

  14. One of the Rare Causes of Acute Abdomen Leading to Subileus: Jejunal Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Elçin; Yerli, Hasan; Avcı, Tevfik; Yılmaz, Tuğbahan; Gülay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Jejunal diverticulitis is one of the rare causes of acute abdomen generally seen in the elderly. Jejunal diverticulosis was defined as the herniation of the mucosa and the submucosa from the inside of the muscular layer of the bowel wall on the mesenteric side of the intestine. Case Report: We presented the intraoperative and pathological findings of a 69-year-old male patient who had presented with complaints about abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting and been operated upon due to subileus and peritonitis induced by large-sized jejunal diverticulitis, along with his computed tomography (CT) findings. Conclusion: Jejunal diverticulitis is uncommon and may be a disease which might be difficult to diagnose when it develops on the basis of the large-sized diverticula resembling intestinal ansae. To the best of our knowledge, the computed tomography and intraoperative findings of a case in which partial resection is applied to the jejunum due to subileus have not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:27308082

  15. Electrophysiological response of chicken's jejunal epithelium to increasing levels of T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Kröger, Susan; Tichy, Alexander; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2013-02-01

    The present investigations were conducted to test the effects of T-2 toxin on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of chicken. Jejunal segments of broilers were monitored in Ussing chambers in the presence of T-2 toxin at the levels of 0 (negative control), 0 (methanol/vehicle control), 0.1, 1, 5, and 10 μg/ml of buffer. T-2 toxin did not affect basal values of short circuit current (I(sc)), transmural potential difference, or tissue conductivity in the jejunal epithelium. T-2 toxin also did not statistically affect glucose-induced electrophysiological variables during the first 3 min of glucose induction. Compared to the vehicle control, the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) was negatively affected (P = 0.008) only under 5 μg of T-2 toxin/ml. Increasing levels of T-2 toxin negatively affected the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) in a cubic (P = 0.007) fashion. These data indicate that acute exposure to moderate levels of T-2 toxin may progressively impair the cation gradient across the jejunal epithelium.

  16. Larynx-preserving limited resection and free jejunal graft for carcinoma of the cervical esophagus.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2013-03-01

    There is no generally accepted treatment strategy for cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of larynx-preserving limited resection with free jejunal graft for cervical esophageal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data of 58 patients with cervical esophageal cancer who underwent limited resection and free jejunal graft with or without laryngeal preservation. Among them, 45 patients received neoadjuvant treatment. Larynx-preserving surgery was conducted in 33 of the 58 patients (56.9%). A higher proportion of patients who underwent laryngopharyngectomy with cervical esophagectomy (larynx-nonpreserving group) had cT4 tumors than those who underwent larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (larynx-preserving group) (72 vs. 12%). The overall incidence of postoperative complications was similar in the two groups (56 vs. 52%). The 5-year survival rate was 44.9% for the entire group. Laryngeal preservation did not reduce overall survival compared with the larynx-nonpreserving operation (5-year survival rate: 57.8 vs. 25.8%). Multivariate analysis identified the number of metastatic lymph nodes as the only independent prognostic factor. The present study demonstrated that larynx-preserving limited resection with free jejunal graft is feasible. Also, this approach did not worsen the prognosis compared with the larynx-nonpreserving operation. Limited resection with free jejunal graft and laryngeal preservation is a promising treatment strategy for cervical esophageal cancer.

  17. Jejunal water and electrolyte secretion induced by L-arginine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, J E; Fairclough, P D; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1981-01-01

    In this study a perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal secretion in response to the dibasic amino acid L-arginine. L-arginine at 5, 15, and 40 mmol/l in isotonic saline solutions induced net intestinal secretion of water and Na+. The structurally similar dibasic amino acid L-lysine caused net absorption at 5 and 15 mmol/l, and only modest net secretion of water and Na+ at 40 mmol/l, although absorption rates of the two amino acids were similar. D-arginine (15 mmol/l) was without effect on net water and Na+ absorption. L-arginine 15 mmol/l inhibited glucose-stimulated water and Na+ absorption when perfused in the same intestinal segment, but was without effect when perfused in separate jejunal or ileal segments. Parenteral chlorpromazine inhibited L-arginine induced jejunal water and Na+ secretion. Jejunal secretion induced by L-arginine thus appears not to be due to passive osmotic water flow, nor to release of circulating secretagogues. Stimulation of a mucosal secretory process is most likely to be the mechanism. PMID:6783480

  18. Evidence of altered structural and secretory glycoconjugates in the jejunal mucosa of patients with gluten sensitive enteropathy and subtotal villous atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Vecchi, M; Torgano, G; de Franchis, R; Tronconi, S; Agape, D; Ronchi, G

    1989-01-01

    The pattern of lectin histochemistry in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded normal jejunal and subtotal villous atrophy specimens from patients with gluten sensitive enteropathy were compared. There was no significant difference in the binding pattern of five lectins (Arachis hypogaea, Canavalia ensiformis, Lens culinaris, Phaseolus vulgaris and Triticum vulgaris) between normal and abnormal specimens. There were significant changes in the binding pattern of three lectins (Dolichos biflorus, Ulex europaeus, Ricinus communis), with special reference to goblet cells staining. These changes were present in all the specimens studied, regardless of the clinical diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis or coeliac disease. Dolichos biflorus reactive goblet cells were significantly decreased (p less than 0.001) in abnormal tissue and confined to the luminal edge of the mucosa. Strong reactivity of goblet cells in abnormal tissue was recorded with Ricinus communis and Ulex europaeus, lectins that bind to few or no goblet cells in normal tissue. These findings show that modifications of structural and secretory glycoconjugates occur in the jejunal mucosa of patients with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2753405

  19. Electroacupuncture at ST37 Enhances Jejunal Motility via Excitation of the Parasympathetic System in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Mengqian; Li, Yuqin; Wang, Yidan; Zhang, Na; Hu, XuanMing; Yin, Yin; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. The roles of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems in mediating the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at ST37 on jejunal motility have yet to be demonstrated. Aim. We used rats and mice to investigate the effect and mechanism of action of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility. Methods. Jejunal motility was recorded by a balloon placed in the jejunum and connected to a biological signal collection system through a transducer. The effects of EA (3 mA) at ST37 were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats without drugs and with the administration of clenbuterol, propranolol, acetylcholine, and atropine. Further, the efficacy of EA at different intensities (1/2/4/6/8 mA) was measured in wild-type mice and β1β2−/− mice and M2M3−/− mice. Results. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the excitatory effect of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility disappeared in the presence of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. EA at ST37 was less effective in M2M3−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Furthermore, to a certain extent, there existed “intensity-response” relationship between jejunal motility and EA. Conclusions. EA at ST37 can enhance jejunal motility in rats and mice mainly via excitation of the parasympathetic pathway. There is an “intensity-response” relationship between EA and effect on jejunal motility. PMID:27818700

  20. Oncological outcome after free jejunal flap reconstruction for carcinoma of the hypopharynx.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jimmy Yu Wai; Chow, Velda Ling Yu; Chan, Richie Chiu Lung; Lau, Gregory Ian Siu Kee

    2012-07-01

    It has been a common practice among the oncologist to reduce the dosage of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients after free jejunal flap reconstruction. The current aims to study potential risk of radiation to the visceral flap and the subsequent oncological outcome. Between 1996 and 2010, consecutive patients with carcinoma of the hypopharynx requiring laryngectomy, circumferential pharyngectomy and post-operative irradiation were recruited. Ninety-six patients were recruited. TNM tumor staging at presentation was: stage II (40.6%), stage III (34.4%) and stage IV (25.0%). Median follow-up period after surgery was 68 months. After tumor ablation, reconstruction was performed using free jejunal flap (60.4%), pectoralis major myocutaneous (PM) flap (31.3%) and free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap (8.3%). All patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy within 6.4 weeks after surgery. The mean total dose of radiation given to those receiving cutaneous and jejunal flap reconstruction was 62.2 Gy and 54.8 Gy, respectively. There was no secondary ischaemia or necrosis of the flaps after radiotherapy. The 5-year actuarial loco-regional tumor control for the cutaneous flap and jejunal flap group was: stage II (61 vs. 69%, p = 0.9), stage III (36 vs. 46%, p = 0.2) and stage IV (32 vs. 14%, p = 0.04), respectively. Reduction of radiation dosage in free jejunal group adversely affects the oncological control in stage IV hypopharyngeal carcinoma. In such circumstances, tubed cutaneous flaps are the preferred reconstructive option, so that full-dose radiotherapy can be given.

  1. The ileal brake--inhibition of jejunal motility after ileal fat perfusion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R C; Trotman, I F; Higgins, B E; Ghatei, M A; Grimble, G K; Lee, Y C; Bloom, S R; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1984-01-01

    The possibility that malabsorbed fat passing through the human ileum exerts an inhibitory feedback control on jejunal motility has been investigated in 24 normal subjects by perfusing the ileum with a fat containing solution designed to produce ileal luminal fat concentrations similar to those in steatorrhoea (30-40 mg/ml). Mean transit times through a 30 cm saline perfused jejunal segment were measured by a dye dilution technique. Thirty minutes after ileal fat perfusion, mean transit times rose markedly to 18.9 +/- 2.5 minutes from a control value of 7.5 +/- 0.9 minutes (n = 5; p less than 0.05). This was associated with an increase in volume of the perfused segment which rose to 175.1 +/- 22.9 ml (control 97.6 +/- 10.3 ml, n = 5; p less than 0.05). Transit times and segmental volumes had returned towards basal values 90 minutes after completing the fat perfusion. Further studies showed that ileal fat perfusion produced a pronounced inhibition of jejunal pressure wave activity, percentage duration of activity falling from a control level of 40.3 +/- 5.0% to 14.9 +/- 2.8% in the hour after ileal perfusion (p less than 0.01). Ileal fat perfusion was associated with marked rises in plasma enteroglucagon and neurotensin, the peak values (218 +/- 37 and 68 +/- 13.1 pmol/l) being comparable with those observed postprandially in coeliac disease. These observations show the existence in man of an inhibitory intestinal control mechanism, whereby ileal fat perfusion inhibits jejunal motility and delays caudal transit of jejunal contents. PMID:6706215

  2. Disruption of the jejunal migrating motor complex by gastric distension and feeding in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, J S; Grundy, D; Scratcherd, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The jejunal motor response to gastric distension has been quantified in the conscious dog and compared with that of feeding in order to determine the role of the physical bulk of a meal in the conversion from fasted to fed motor activity. 2. In six dogs gastric distension abolished the cyclical migrating motor complex (m.m.c.) and evoked a pattern of continuous irregular jejunal motility similar to that seen postprandially, but only after a latency of 21.5 +/- 2.7 min compared to that of 7.1 +/- 1.2 min for the response to feeding. Computer analysis of distension and fed jejunal motility revealed similar distributions of intervals between contractions and contraction amplitudes with comparable mean values for both. 3. In two dogs with antrum and corpus surgically divided distension of the corpus had a similar effect on jejunal motility although the latency to both distension and feeding were considerably less. 4. By varying the period of distension it has been possible to control accurately the duration of the jejunal motor response and so assess its effectiveness in disrupting the timing of the m.m.c. The return to m.m.c. cycling following deflation was independent of preceding complexes. The occurrence of the post-distension activity front was closely related to the act of deflation itself (R = 0.94) following a latency of 26.2 +/- 2.1 min (n = 39). 5. It is concluded that the bulk of a meal contributes significantly to the early part of postprandial motility and is capable of disrupting the timing of subsequent migrating motor complexes. PMID:3443971

  3. Dietary-feeding of Grape Seed Extract Prevents Azoxymethane-induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci Formation in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Balaiya; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2010-01-01

    Chemoprevention by dietary agents/supplements has emerged as a novel approach to control various malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). This study assessed dietary grape seed extract (GSE) effectiveness in preventing azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and associated mechanisms in Fischer 344 rats. Six-week old rats were injected with AOM, and fed control diet or the one supplemented with 0.25% or 0.5% (w/w) GSE in pre- and post-AOM or only post-AOM experimental protocols. At 16 weeks of age, rats were sacrificed and colons were evaluated for ACF formation followed by cell proliferation, apoptosis and molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry. GSE-feeding caused strong chemopreventive efficacy against AOM-induced ACF formation in terms of upto 60% (P<0.001) reduction in number of ACF and 66% (P<0.001) reduction in crypt multiplicity. Mechanistic studies showed that GSE-feeding inhibited AOM-induced cell proliferation but enhanced apoptosis in colon including ACF, together with a strong decrease in cyclin D1, COX-2, iNOS and survivin levels. Additional studies showed that GSE-feeding also decreased AOM-caused increase in β-catenin and NF-κB levels in colon tissues. Compared to control animals, GSE alone treatment did not show any considerable change in these biological and molecular events in colon, and was non-toxic. Together, these findings show the chemopreventive efficacy of GSE against the early steps of colon carcinogenesis in rats via likely targeting of β-catenin and NF-κB signaling, and suggest its potential usefulness for the prevention of human CRC. PMID:20564341

  4. Supplementation with L-glutamine prevents tumor growth and cancer-induced cachexia as well as restores cell proliferation of intestinal mucosa of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Heber Amilcar; Sehaber, Camila Caviquioli; Hermes-Uliana, Catchia; Mariani, Fernando Augusto; Guarnier, Flavia Alessandra; Vicentini, Geraldo Emílio; Bossolani, Gleison Daion Piovezana; Jussani, Laraine Almeida; Lima, Mariana Machado; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the intestinal mucosa of the duodenum and jejunum of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats supplemented with L-glutamine. Thirty-two male 50-day-old Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were randomly divided into four groups: control (C), control supplemented with 2 % L-glutamine (GC), Walker-256 tumor (WT), and Walker-256 tumor supplemented with 2 % L-glutamine (TWG). Walker-256 tumor was induced by inoculation viable tumor cells in the right rear flank. After 10 days, celiotomy was performed and duodenal and jejunal tissues were removed and processed. We evaluated the cachexia index, proliferation index, villus height, crypt depth, total height of the intestinal wall, and number of goblet cells by the technique of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Induction of Walker-256 tumor promoted a reduction of metaphase index in the TW group animals, which was accompanied by a reduction in the villous height and crypt depths, resulting in atrophy of the intestinal wall as well as increased PAS-positive goblet cells. Supplementation with L-glutamine reduced the tumor growth and inhibited the development of the cachectic syndrome in animals of the TWG group. Furthermore, amino acid supplementation promoted beneficial effects on the intestinal mucosa in the TWG animals through restoration of the number of PAS-positive goblet cells. Therefore, supplementation with 2 % L-glutamine exhibited a promising role in the prevention of tumor growth and cancer-associated cachexia as well as restoring the intestinal mucosa in the duodenum and jejunum of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

  5. Screening of Intestinal Crypt Organoids: A Simple Readout for Complex Biology.

    PubMed

    Ley, Svenja; Galuba, Olaf; Salathe, Adrian; Melin, Nicolas; Aebi, Alexandra; Pikiolek, Monika; Knehr, Judith; Carbone, Walter; Beibel, Martin; Nigsch, Florian; Roma, Guglielmo; d'Ario, Giovanni; Kirkland, Susan; Bouchez, Laure C; Gubser Keller, Caroline; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Parker, Christian N; Ruffner, Heinz

    2017-06-01

    Oral and intestinal mucositis is a debilitating side effect of radiation treatment. A mouse model of radiation-induced mucositis leads to weight loss and tissue damage, reflecting the human ailment as it responds to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), the standard-of-care treatment. Cultured intestinal crypt organoids allowed the development of an assay monitoring the effect of treatments of intestinal epithelium to radiation-induced damage. This in vitro assay resembles the mouse model as KGF and roof plate-specific spondin-1 (RSPO1) enhanced crypt organoid recovery following radiation. Screening identified compounds that increased the survival of organoids postradiation. Testing of these compounds revealed that the organoids changed their responses over time. Unbiased transcriptome analysis was performed on crypt organoid cultures at various time points in culture to investigate this adaptive behavior. A number of genes and pathways were found to be modulated over time, providing a rationale for the altered sensitivity of the organoid cultures. This report describes an in vitro assay that reflects aspects of human disease. The assay was used to identify bioactive compounds, which served as probes to interrogate the biology of crypt organoids over prolonged culture. The pathways that are changing over time may offer potential targets for treatment of mucositis.

  6. Dietary milk fat globule membrane reduces the incidence of aberrant crypt foci in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Snow, Dallin R; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Ward, Robert E; Cambell, Jesse; Young, Michael J; Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry J

    2010-02-24

    Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is a biopolymer composed primarily of membrane proteins and lipids that surround the fat globules in milk. Although it is considered to have potential as a bioactive ingredient, few feeding studies have been conducted to measure its potential benefits. The aim of this investigation was to determine if dietary MFGM confers protection against colon carcinogenesis compared to diets containing corn oil (CO) or anhydrous milk fat (AMF). Male, weanling Fischer-344 rats were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments that differed only in the fat source: (1) AIN-76A diet, corn oil; (2) AIN-76A diet, AMF; and (3) AIN-76A diet, 50% MFGM, 50% AMF. Each diet contained 50 g/kg diet of fat. With the exception of the fat source, diets were formulated to be identical in macro and micro nutrient content. Animals were injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine once per week at weeks 3 and 4, and fed experimental diets for a total of 13 weeks. Over the course of the study dietary treatment did not affect food consumption, weight gain or body composition. After 13 weeks animals were sacrificed, colons were removed and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were counted by microscopy. Rats fed the MFGM diet (n = 16) had significantly fewer ACF (20.9 +/- 5.7) compared to rats fed corn oil (n = 17) or AMF (n = 16) diets (31.3 +/- 9.5 and 29.8 +/- 11.4 respectively; P < 0.05). Gene expression analysis of colonic mucosa did not reveal differential expression of candidate colon cancer genes, and the sphingolipid profile of the colonic mucosa was not affected by diet. While there were notable and significant differences in plasma and red blood cell lipids, there was no relationship to the cancer protection. These results support previous findings that dietary sphingolipids are protective against colon carcinogenesis yet extend this finding to MFGM, a milk fat fraction available as a food ingredient.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii causes death and plastic alteration in the jejunal myenteric plexus

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Eduardo José de Almeida; Zaniolo, Larissa Marchi; Vicentino, Suellen Laís; Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; Sant’Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of ME-49 Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) strain infection on the myenteric plexus and external muscle of the jejunum in rats. METHODS: Thirty rats were distributed into two groups: the control group (CG) (n = 15) received 1 mL of saline solution orally, and the infected group (IG) (n = 15) inoculated with 1 mL of saline solution containing 500 oocysts of M-49 T. gondii strain orally. After 36 d of infection, the rats were euthanized. Infection with T. gondii was confirmed by blood samples collected from all rats at the beginning and end of the experiment. The jejunum of five animals was removed and submitted to routine histological processing (paraffin) for analysis of external muscle thickness. The remaining jejunum from the others animals was used to analyze the general population and the NADH-diaphorase, VIPergic and nitrergic subpopulations of myenteric neurons; and the enteric glial cells (S100-IR). RESULTS: Serological analysis showed that animals from the IG were infected with the parasite. Hypertrophy affecting jejunal muscle thickness was observed in the IG rats (77.02 ± 42.71) in relation to the CG (51.40 ± 12.34), P < 0.05. In addition, 31.2% of the total number of myenteric neurons died (CG: 39839.3 ± 5362.3; IG: 26766.6 ± 2177.6; P < 0.05); hyperplasia of nitrergic myenteric neurons was observed (CG: 7959.0 ± 1290.4; IG: 10893.0 ± 1156.3; P < 0.05); general hypertrophy of the cell body in the remaining myenteric neurons was noted [CG: 232.5 (187.2-286.0); IG: 248.2 (204.4-293.0); P < 0.05]; hypertrophy of the smallest varicosities containing VIP neurotransmitter was seen (CG: 0.46 ± 0.10; IG: 0.80 ± 0.16; P < 0.05) and a reduction of 25.3% in enteric glia cells (CG: 12.64 ± 1.27; IG: 10.09 ± 2.10; P < 0.05) was observed in the infected rats. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that infection with oocysts of ME-49 T. gondii strain caused quantitative and plastic alterations in the myenteric plexus of the jejunum in rats. PMID

  8. Free jejunal flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction in head and neck cancer patients: An evaluation of donor site complications

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, Shantanu N.; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Matros, Evan; Paty, Philip B.; Cordeiro, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Free jejunal transfer for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction has often been criticized for its associated donor site morbidity. Conversely, the same argument has been invoked to support use of fasciocutaneous flaps, given their low incidence of donor site complications. The purpose of the current study was to document donor site complication rate with free jejunal flaps for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction, in the hands of an experienced surgeon. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of consecutive patients who underwent free jejunal transfer between 1992 and 2012 by the senior author. Demographic data, abdominal complications, surgical characteristics of small bowel anastomoses and postoperative bowel function were specifically noted. Results Ninety-two jejunal flap reconstructions were performed in 90 patients. Mean follow up time was 29 months. Twelve (13%) patients had prior abdominal surgery. Donor site complications included ileus (n=2), wound cellulitis (n=1), wound dehiscence (n=1) and small bowel obstruction (n=1). Mean time to initiation of tube feeds after reconstruction was 5 days. Seventy-seven (86.5%) patients were discharged on an oral diet. The perioperative mortality rate of 2% was not associated with any donor site complication. Conclusion Free jejunal transfer is associated with minimal and acceptable donor site complication rates. The choice of flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction should be determined by the type of defect, potential recipient site complications and the surgeon’s familiarity with the flap. Potential donor site complications should not be a deterrent for free jejunal flaps given the low rate described in this study. PMID:26220434

  9. c-Jun, Fra-2, and ATF-2 immunoreactivity in the jejunal tissues of the healthy rat.

    PubMed

    Keklikoglu, Nurullah

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the localization of some activator protein-1 (AP-1) proteins in healthy rat jejunum. For this purpose, the AP-1 members c-Jun, Fra-2, and ATF-2 immunoreactivity (c-Jun-IR, Fra-2-IR, ATF-2-IR) in villus epithelial cells (ECs), intravillous lamina propria cells (LPCs), crypt cells (CCs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were analyzed by immunohistochemical methods. Among all the cell groups, the lowest positivity ratio was found in c-Jun-IR and the highest positivity ratio was found in ATF-2-IR. For each group of ECs, LPCs, CCs, and SMCs, c-Jun-IR, Fra-2-IR, and ATF-2-IR were compared and statistically significant differences found. There were no significant differences among the cell groups with respect to c-Jun-IR and Fra-2-IR, but there was a statistically significant difference in ATF-2-IR. These findings suggest that each member of AP-1 is expressed differently and that ATF-2 is more active than c-Jun and Fra-2 in physiological conditions in healthy rat jejunum.

  10. Jejunal intussusception caused by a huge Vanek's tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Neishaboori, Hassan; Emadian, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp (known also as Vanek's tumor) is a type of localized, non-neoplastic inflammatory pseudotumor or inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor that occurs most commonly in the stomach but also in the small and large bowel. It is a documented cause of intussusception in adults. We report a case of a 40-year-old woman who presented with severe, postprandial abdominal pain followed by projectile vomiting over a period of three days. Ultrasonography demonstrated a solid and echogenic mass surrounded by the typical mural layers of an invaginated jejunum. She underwent urgent laparotomy and resection of an 18 cm tumor from the distal jejunum. The immuno-histopathological diagnosis after segmental jejunal resection was a jejunal inflammatory fibroid polyp. Although inflammatory fibroid polyps are seen very rarely in adults, they are among the probable diagnoses that should be considered in obstructive tumors of the small bowel causing intussusceptions. PMID:24834274

  11. Tips and tricks for deep jejunal enteral access: modifying techniques to maximize success.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lena B; McClave, Stephen A; Bechtold, Matthew L; Nguyen, Douglas L; Martindale, Robert G; Evans, David C

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopic insertion of enteral feeding tubes is a major advance in the delivery of nutrition therapy. Since the first report of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in 1980 (Gauderer et al. J Pediatr Surg. 15:872-5, 1980), insertion techniques and equipment have been refined and improved. Despite this progress, deep jejunal enteral access remains a difficult procedure, and many endoscopists do not have experience with the techniques of nasojejunal (NJ) placement, percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy (PEGJ), or direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) (Shike and Latkany, Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am. 8:569-80, 1998). The difference between an exasperating experience and a rewarding procedure lies in mastering the "tips and tricks" that make insertion easy. While the basic techniques are described elsewhere (McClave and Chang 2011), we review several universal basic principles to enhance deep jejunal access, which should promote a more efficient and successful procedure.

  12. The Combination of Gastroschisis, Jejunal Atresia, and Colonic Atresia in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Zachary; Nanagas, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a rare case of gastroschisis associated with jejunal atresia and colonic atresia. In our case, the jejunal atresia was not discovered for 27 days after the initial abdominal wall closure. The colonic atresia was not discovered for 48 days after initial repair of the gastroschisis secondary to the rarity of the disorder. Both types of atresia were repaired with primary hand-sewn anastomoses. Other than the prolonged parenteral nutrition and hyperbilirubinemia, our patient did very well throughout his hospital course. Based on our case presentation, small bowel atresia and colonic atresia must be considered in patients who undergo abdominal wall closure for gastroschisis with prolonged symptoms suggestive of bowel obstruction. Our case report also demonstrates primary enteric anastomosis as a safe, well-tolerated surgical option for patients with types of intestinal atresia. PMID:26180651

  13. Jejunal Diverticulitis Ascending to the Duodenum as a Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Fresow, Robert; Kamusella, Peter; Talanow, Roland; Andresen, Reimer

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 73 year-old Caucasian male with acute abdominal pain, peritonism and vomiting. Due to the severity of symptoms a CT examination of the abdomen was performed. The scans revealed multiple jejunal diverticula, wall thickening of the duodenum and jejunum, and free peritoneal fluid. No clear signs of mesenteric infarction, free abdominal air or abscess formation were seen. An additional exploratory laparotomy was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out the need for resection of small bowel. Since the results were matching, conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Jejunal diverticulitis is a rare cause of acute abdomen, however has to be considered as a differential diagnosis to more common entities. It usually stays localized, while in our case the inflammation ascended to the duodenum. CT is the modality of choice to diagnose and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:25302248

  14. [Effects of Jiaweisinisan dispersion on content and gene expression of gastric tissue GASR and jejunal tissue VIPR2 of physical and mental stress model rat].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui-Chen; Liu, Fen; Yang, Qiang; Xiong, Chang-Chu

    2013-11-01

    To observe the effects of Jiaweisini dispersion (JWSNS) on the ultrastructure of gastric mucosa, the content and gene expression of gastric antrum tissue gastrin receptor (GASR) and jejunal tissue vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2) in chronic stress gastric ulcer rats, and to elucidate its mechanism. 60 Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal group, model group, JWSNS large, medium, small dose groups, and omeprazole group, 10 rats in each group. Chronic stress method was used to establish the stress ulcer rat model. The every rat in JWSNS small, medium, large dose groups were gavaged with 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 g/ mL Chinese medicine Decoction on 2 mL respectively daily, rats in omeprazole group were gavaged with 0.3 mg/mL omeprazole solution on 2 mL daily, rats in normal group and model group were gavaged 2 mL NS daily. After modeling was end, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe gastric mucosa cells and intercellular connections changes of ultrastructure of glandular stomach area and immunohistochemical method and Real time-PCR method were used to detect the protein content and gene expression changes of gastric antrum tissue GASR and jejunal tissue cell VIPR2. TEM observation demonstrated that in the normal group the gastric mucosa epithelial cells connected compact, cell membrane integrity, cell nuclear shape and size was normal; in model group rats the gastric mucosal cells were severely damaged; the rats in the rest treatment groups were better than those in the model group in different degree. After The treatment of JWSNS and omeprazole, the expression of GASR protein and mRNA in gastric antrum tissue were increased when compared with that of model group (P < 0.05), the expression of VIPR2 protein and mRNA in the jejunum tissue were lower than that of the model group (P < 0.05). The expression of GASR, VIPR2 protein and mRNA in the JWSNS large dose group was closed to the normal group with no significant difference (P > 0

  15. Portal vein stent placement with or without varix embolization of jejunal variceal bleeding after hepatopancreatobiliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Shim, Dong Jae; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Yook; Han, Kichang; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Background Extrahepatic portal hypertension after surgery involving the duodenum or jejunum might result in massive ectopic variceal bleeding. Purpose To report the results of portal vein stent placement with the addition of variceal embolization. Material and Methods Between January 2000 and June 2015, portal vein stent placement was attempted in 477 patients. Of these, 22 patients (age, 63 ± 10 years) with jejunal variceal bleeding caused by portal vein obstruction after surgery were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) findings before and after treatment and the rates of technical and clinical success, complications, and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results Stent placement was successful in 19 of 22 patients. Additional variceal embolization was performed in five cases. Clinical success, defined as the cessation of bleeding without recurrence within 1 month, was achieved in 18 of 19 patients with technical success. One patient developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after stent placement and was successfully treated with additional variceal embolization. There were no procedure-related complications. A regression of the jejunal varices was noted in 14 of 19 patients on follow-up CT scans. During the follow-up period (258 days; range, 7-1196 days), stent occlusion and recurrent bleeding occurred in six and four patients, respectively, of the 19 patients who achieved technical success. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences regarding stent patency between benign and malignant strictures. Conclusion Percutaneous, transhepatic, portal vein stent placement with or without jejunal variceal embolization appears to be a safe and effective treatment for jejunal variceal bleeding after surgery.

  16. Pseudo Double Bubble: Jejunal Duplication Mimicking Duodenal Atresia on Prenatal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ultrasound showing a double bubble is considered to be pathognomonic of duodenal atresia. We recently encountered an infant with prenatal findings suggestive of duodenal atresia with a normal karyotype who actually had a jejunal duplication cyst on exploration. A finding of an antenatal double bubble should lead to a thorough evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract and appropriate prenatal/neonatal testing and management as many cystic lesions within the abdomen can present with this prenatal finding. PMID:26023462

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) permeates ovine ruminal and jejunal epithelia, mainly by passive diffusion.

    PubMed

    Rackwitz, R; Gäbel, G

    2017-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) represents the most abundant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. GABA is also produced in plants and/or by the microbial conversion of amino acids. Thus, ruminants may be forced to take up significant amounts of GABA from their diet. However, it is not known whether exogenously acquired GABA might permeate the gastrointestinal barrier in such quantities as to induce systemic alterations. Thus, this study pursues the question of where within the ruminant's GI tract and by which pathways GABA may be taken up from the ingesta. The jejunal and ruminal epithelia of sheep were mounted in Ussing chambers under short-circuit conditions. The flux rates of radiolabelled GABA from the mucosal to the serosal side (Jms ) and vice versa (Jsm ) were measured. GABA was applied in various concentrations with adjustment of the mucosal pH to 6.1 or 7.4. Furthermore, beta-alanine or glycine was used as a competitive inhibitor for GABA transport. In both the jejunal and ruminal epithelium, the Jms of GABA was linearly correlated to the mucosal GABA concentration. However, Jms across the jejunal epithelium was approximately 10-fold higher than Jms across the ruminal epithelium. When 0.5 mmol/l GABA was applied on both sides of the epithelium, no net flux could be observed in the jejunal epithelia. Additionally, there was no effect of decreased mucosal pH or the application of glycine or beta-alanine under these conditions. The Jms and Jsm of GABA were linearly correlated to the transepithelial conductance. Our results suggest that GABA is taken up from the small intestine rather than from the rumen. Due to the lack of influence of pH and competitive inhibitors, this uptake seems to occur primarily via passive diffusion. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Lanreotide inhibits human jejunal secretion induced by prostaglandin E1 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, I; René, E; Ramdani, A; Bayod, F; Sabbagh, L C; Thomas, F; Mignon, M

    1996-02-01

    1. Somatostatin inhibits hormonal secretions in the gastrointestinal tract. Somatostatin analogues are used in the treatment of VIPome-related watery diarrhoea. In addition, more than 10% of patients with AIDS suffer from diarrhoea likely due to the increased intestinal secretion of water and ions. However, the direct effect of somatostatin on the flux of water and ions in the intestine has not been, so far, analyzed in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of lanreotide, a somatostatin analogue, on the movements of water and ions in the jejunum in man. 2. Accordingly, 10 healthy volunteers (age 18-35 years, mean 27) and two patients with AIDS (26 and 33 years) suffering from water diarrhoea (> 800 ml day-1) underwent intestinal perfusion using a four lumen tube with proximal occluding balloon. The segment tested was 25 cm long. The jejunum was infused by an isotonic control saline solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as nonabsorbable marker. Basal jejunal secretions were measured in all subjects. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) was administered intraluminally to stimulate jejunal secretion in healthy volunteers. The effect of intravenous lanreotide on the jejunal PGE1-induced secretions of water and electrolytes was analysed in healthy subjects and on the basal secretions in AIDS patients. Each period was analyzed on the basis of three (10 min) successive intestinal juice collections after 20-30 min equilibration time. The antisecretory effect of lanreotide was evaluated in each subject as the difference between fluxes compared to the control period. 3. In healthy volunteers, PGE1 induced secretion of H2O, Na+, K+ and Cl- in the jejunum and lanreotide reduced significantly PGE1-induced response. In both AIDS patients basal fluxes of water and ions were reduced by lanreotide in a dose-dependent manner. 4. Somatostatin can reduce stimulated-jejunal secretion of ions and water in normal subjects and may improve water diarrhoea in AIDS

  19. The in vitro metabolism of ethinyloestradiol, mestranol and levonorgestrel by human jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Back, D J; Bates, M; Breckenridge, A M; Ellis, A; Hall, J M; Maciver, M; Orme, M L; Rowe, P H

    1981-01-01

    1 Ethinyloestradiol was extensively metabolised in vitro by human jejunal mucosa to form ethinyloestradiol sulphate. 2 The amount of conjugation was directly related to the weight of biopsy tissue. 3 The degree of conjugation of mestranol and levonorgestrel was much lower than for ethinyloestradiol suggesting that the 17-position of the steroid nucleus is relatively inaccessible for conjugation. 4 No Phase I metabolism of ethinyloestradiol or levonorgestrel was apparent in the conditions used in these experiments. PMID:6783058

  20. Colectomy induces an aldosterone-mediated increase in jejunal glucose uptake in rats.

    PubMed

    Khachab, Maha; Kanaan, Amjad; Awad, Dania; Deeba, Elie; Osman, Samira; Nassar, Camille F

    2017-04-01

    The main function of the colon is water and electrolyte absorption. Total colectomy eliminates this colonic function and may alter the absorptive capacity of the small intestine for nutrients. This study examines the effect of total colectomy on jejunal glucose absorption and investigates the potential role of aldosterone in mediating the alterations in glucose uptake post-colectomy using the aldosterone antagonist spironolactone. Total colectomy with ileo-rectal anastomosis was performed on anesthetized rats. Sham rats were identically handled without colon resection. Two days post-surgery, groups of colectomized rats were injected with either a daily subcutaneous dose of spironolactone or sesame oil for 12days. Body weight changes and food and water intake were measured in all experimental groups. Glucose absorption was measured by in-vivo single pass perfusion in the rat jejunum of control, sham, colectomized, colectomized with spironolactone, and colectomized with sesame oil treatment. Na/K ATPase, SGK1, SGLT1 and GLUT2 expressions were determined in jejunal mucosa in control, colectomized and colectomized/spironolactone injected rats by Western blot analysis. Histological assessment was performed on jejunal sections in control and colectomized groups. Glucose absorption significantly increased in colectomized rats with an observed increase in Na/K ATPase and SGK1 expression. No significant expression change in SGLT1 and GLUT2 was detected in the jejunum in colectomized rats. Spironolactone, however, significantly decreased the glucose uptake post-colectomy and normalized Na/K ATPase and SGK1 expression. Our results suggest that jejunal glucose uptake increases post-colectomy as a possible consequence of an aldosterone-mediated function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal leukotriene C4 released by unaffected jejunal mucosa in patients with inactive Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Guarner, F; Antolín, M; Rodríguez, R; Salas, A; Malagelada, J R

    1994-01-01

    The mucosal release of inflammatory mediators is enhanced in active inflammatory bowel disease. This study examines whether leukotriene C4 production occurs in apparently unaffected segments of the gut. The intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 was determined by jejunal perfusion in seven healthy controls, in nine patients with chronic ulcerative colitis, and in 13 patients with Crohn's disease (six with ileal disease, and seven with only colonic). All patients were in clinical remission and none of them had evidence of jejunal involvement. Mild intraluminal irritation with a 2.5 mmol/l deoxycholic acid solution was induced to stimulate local inflammatory mechanisms. The release of DNA (a marker of mucosal desquamation) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was simultaneously measured. Jejunal release of DNA was higher in Crohn's disease patients than in ulcerative colitis or healthy controls. Basal release of PGE2 was similar in the three groups of patients. Basal release of leukotriene C4 was considerably enhanced, however, in Crohn's disease patients compared with healthy controls. In ulcerative colitis patients, basal leukotriene C4 release was non-significantly different from controls. Bile acid perfusion stimulated PGE2, leukotriene C4, and DNA release in all groups studied, but leukotriene C4 release was significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients. It is concluded that in inactive Crohn's disease there is an enhanced intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 in apparently unaffected segments of proximal small bowel, which may reflect fundamental changes in the function of the gut mucosal barrier. PMID:8174991

  2. Microvascular Reconstruction of Free Jejunal Graft in Larynx-preserving Esophagectomy for Cervical Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Natori, Yuhei; Komoto, Masakazu; Matsumura, Takashi; Horiguchi, Masatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahioko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Losing the ability to speak severely affects the quality of life, and patients who have undergone laryngectomy tend to become depressed, which may lead to social withdrawal. Recently, with advancements in chemoradiotherapy and with alternative perspectives on postoperative quality of life, larynx preservation has been pursued; however, the selection of candidates and the optimal reconstructive procedure remain controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed our experience with free jejunal graft for larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (LPCE), focusing on microvascular reconstruction. Methods: Seven patients underwent LPCE for cervical esophageal carcinoma, and defects were reconstructed by free jejunal transfer subsequently. We collected preoperative and postoperative data of the patients and assessed the importance of the procedure. Results: We mostly used the transverse cervical artery as the recipient, and a longer operative time was required, particularly for the regrowth cases. The operative field for microvascular anastomosis was more limited and deeper than those in the laryngectomy cases. Two graft necrosis cases were confirmed at postoperative day 9 or 15, and vessels contralateral from the graft were chosen as recipients in both patients. Conclusions: Microvascular reconstruction for free jejunal graft in LPCE differed in several ways from the procedure combined with laryngectomy. Compression from the tracheal cartilage to the pedicle was suspected as the reason of the necrosis clinically and pathologically. Therefore, we should select recipient vessels from the ipsilateral side of the graft, and careful and extended monitoring of the flap should be considered to make this procedure successful. PMID:27257562

  3. Meal-stimulated release of methionine-enkephalin into the canine jejunal lumen.

    PubMed Central

    Money, S R; Petroianu, A; Gintzler, A R; Jaffe, B M

    1988-01-01

    Application of enkephalins to the luminal surface of the bowel augments intestinal absorption. However, to date, endogenous enkephalins have not been demonstrated within intestinal luminal fluid. To determine whether enkephalins are present in the intestinal lumen, five adult dogs had 25-cm chronic jejunal Thiry-Vella loops constructed. Dogs were studied in the awake, fasted state. Jejunal loops were perfused with isoosmotic, neutral Krebs buffer containing protease inhibitors. After basal sampling, the dogs received a high fat meat meal. Collections were made during the meal and for 60 min postprandially. Luminal met-enkephalin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay and confirmed by HPLC. HPLC separation of luminal samples demonstrated two immunoreactive peaks which co-eluted with pure met-enkephalin and met-enkephalin-sulfoxide. Basal met-enkephalin outputs averaged 52 +/- 13 ng/min. The meal significantly increased mean luminal met-enkephalin output to 137 +/- 71 ng/min. During the initial 20-min postprandial period, output remained elevated (180 +/- 73 ng/min), after which it returned to basal levels. We conclude that met-enkephalin is present in the jejunal lumen, and that luminal release of this opioid is augmented by a meal. Images PMID:3343342

  4. Jejunal Diverticulosis Presented with Acute Abdomen and Diverticulitis Complication: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Nurdan; Mermi, Esra Ummuhan; Acay, Mehtap Beker; Murat, Muammer; Zobaci, Ethem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare, usually asymptomatic disease. Its incidence increases with age. If symptomatic, diverticulosis may cause life-threatening acute complications such as diverticulitis, perforation, intestinal hemorrhage and obstruction. In this report, we aimed to present a 67-year-old male patient with jejunal diverticulitis accompanying with abdominal pain and vomiting. Case Report A 67-year-old male patient complaining of epigastric pain for a week and nausea and fever for a day presented to our emergency department. Ultrasonographic examination in our clinic revealed diverticulum-like images with thickened walls adjacent to the small intestine loops, and increase in the echogenicity of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography showed multiple diverticula, thickened walls with showing contrast enhancement and adjacent jejunum in the left middle quadrant, increased density of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue, and mesenteric lymph nodes. The patient was hospitalized by general surgery department with the diagnosis of jejunal diverticulitis. Conservative intravenous fluid administration and antibiotic therapy were initiated. Clinical symptoms regressed and the patient was discharged from hospital after 2 weeks. Conclusions In cases of diverticulitis it should be kept in mind that in patients with advanced age and pain in the left quadrant of the abdomen, diverticular disease causing mortality and morbidity does not always originate from the colon but might also originate from the jejunum. PMID:26715947

  5. Jejunal bypass stimulation of pancreatic growth and cholecystokinin secretion in rats: importance of luminal nutrients.

    PubMed Central

    Levan, V H; Liddle, R A; Green, G M

    1987-01-01

    The effect of jejunal bypass on pancreatic growth and plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) was investigated in rats. Rats underwent bypass of jejunum or sham operation. Rats with jejunal bypass were further divided into three groups; one group received a continuous infusion of a partially hydrolysed liquid diet (Vital) into the bypassed jejunum; a second group received the nutrient solution mixed with trypsin and infused into the bypassed jejunum; the third bypass group did not receive infusion of nutrient or trypsin into the jejunum. Jejunal bypass alone did not significantly stimulate pancreatic growth or DNA content at one or two weeks postoperative. Infusion of nutrient solution into the bypassed jejunum stimulated pancreatic growth and DNA content, with maximal increases of 185% and 181% for pancreatic weight and DNA content, respectively, at two weeks. This coincided with significant increases in postabsorptive plasma CCK concentrations. Infusion of pancreatic proteases into the bypassed jejunum partially reversed the effects of nutrient infusion. These results suggest that exclusion of bile-pancreatic juice or pancreatic proteases from the jejunum does not lead to maximal release of CCK unless the jejunum receives luminal nutrients. It is proposed that CCK release from rat jejunum occurs spontaneously in the absence of pancreatic proteases, and that luminal nutrients in bypassed jejunum increase plasma CCK and stimulate pancreatic growth by maintaining synthesis of CCK. PMID:3692314

  6. Chloride ion transport into pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Gabriel, S E

    1988-01-01

    1. This study was carried out to determine the types and activities of carrier proteins which transport the chloride ion in pig jejunal brush-border membranes, with an emphasis on studying the properties of chloride conductance activity in vesicles prepared from these membranes. 2. Sodium-chloride co-transport activity was not detected in this tissue. A sodium-proton antiport with typical amiloride sensitivity was present. An anion exchanger linking chloride to hydroxyl or bicarbonate ions was also found in the pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles. 3. Chloride conductance activity in this system was specifically dependent on the buffering agents used for vesicle preparation. Conductance activity could not be demonstrated in vesicles prepared in imidazolium acetate or in HEPES-Tris buffers. HEPES-tetramethylammonium buffering of vesicles in the chloride uptake system produced a significant conductance response to a potassium gradient plus valinomycin. 4. Chloride conductance showed saturable kinetics with respect to substrate concentration, with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of approximately 116 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 132 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. 5. Preliminary screening of potential inhibitors of chloride conductance showed only minimal inhibitor effects of SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-sulphonic acid), anthracene-9-carboxylate, N-phenylanthranilate and piretanide. 6. The conductance activity in pig jejunal vesicles appears to have stringent buffer requirements, and to be relatively insensitive to the effects of reported conductance inhibitors. PMID:2466986

  7. Effect of ethanol on jejunal regional blood flow in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Buell, M G; Beck, I T

    1983-01-01

    The effects of intraluminal ethanol perfusion (3.0% and 6.0% vt/vol) on mucosal morphology, water transport, and regional blood flow were examined in in vivo jejunal segments of pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits. Compared with control segments, ethanol-perfused segments exhibited morphological alterations of the mucosa consisting of subepithelial fluid accumulation (bleb formation), exfoliation of enterocytes, and vascular congestion. The prevalence of epithelial damage was significantly increased in the segments perfused with 6% ethanol. Net water transport was significant (p less than 0.025) depressed in segments perfused with 3.0% and 6.0% wt/vol ethanol. In animals in which the control segment was absorbing water, ethanol led to a depression in net water absorption or to the reversal of absorption to net secretion. In animals in which the control segment exhibited secretion, ethanol led to an enhanced net secretion. Blood flow through the total jejunal wall and through the luminal layer (consisting of mucosa plus submucosa) was significantly (p less than 0.05) increased by the presence of 3.0% and 6.0% wt/vol ethanol in the intestinal lumen. Blood flow in the external layer of the jejunum (consisting of muscularis plus serosa) did not change significantly. It therefore appears that the ethanol-induced alterations in jejunal mucosal morphology and water transport are accompanied by a localized mucosal or submucosal hyperemia, or both. However, a direct cause and effect relationship between these remains to be established.

  8. Effects of different sulphur amino acids and dietary electrolyte balance levels on performance, jejunal morphology, and immunocompetence of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, V; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, E

    2016-02-01

    As alterations of dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) can influence amino acid metabolism via changes the ions incur in their configurations, performance and immunological responses of broiler chicks might be affected. So, the current study was carried out to investigate the effects of different levels of sulphur amino acids (SAA) and DEB on performance, jejunal morphology and immunocompetence of broiler chicks. A total of 360 1-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to nine experimental treatments with four replicates of 10 birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of SAA (100, 110, and 120% of NRC recommendation, provided by methionine supplementation in diets with the same cysteine level) and three levels of DEB (150, 250, and 350 mEq/kg) that were fed during the entire of trial in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement. Results showed that the relative weights of intestine and abdominal fat were decreased markedly (p < 0.001) with increasing levels of SAA and DEB respectively. Antibody titre against sheep red blood cell was neither individually nor in combination influenced by supplementation of SAA or DEB. Nevertheless, a decrease in DEB level led to a suppression in heterophile (p < 0.05) and an increase in lymphocyte counts (p = 0.06); consequently, heterophile to lymphocyte ratio was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by decremental levels of DEB. Albumin to globulin ratio was increased after inclusion of at least 10% SAA (p < 0.001) and 150 mEq DEB/kg in the diet (p = 0.11). Although feeding high-DEB level led to a remarkable decrease in villus height (p < 0.01) and goblet cell numbers (p < 0.001), supplementing the highest level of SAA improved the height of jejunal villus. During the entire trial period, average daily feed intake (ADFI) was increased by incremental SAA levels (p < 0.05). However, inclusion of 150 mEq/kg led to not only a remarkable increase (p < 0.0001) in both ADFI and average daily weight gain (ADWG) but

  9. Bivariate flow cytometric analysis of murine intestinal epithelial cells for cytokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Ng, C.R.; Gray, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the small intestine and the lack of methods to obtain pure crypt populations has, in the past, limited the application of standard flow cytometric analysis for cytokinetic studies of the proliferating crypts. The authors describe a flow cytometric technique to discriminate crypt and villus cells in an epithelial cell suspension on the basis of cell length, and to measure the DNA content of the discriminated subpopulations. These data indicate that bivariate analysis of a mixed epithelial cell suspension can be used to distinguish mature villus cells, G/sub 1/ crypt cells, and S-phase crypt cells. In addition, continuous labeling studies suggest that the position of a cell on the cell length axis reflects epithelial cell maturity. The authors applied this flow cytometric technique to determine the cytokinetic nature of epithelial cells obtained by sequential digestion of the small intestine. 22 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  10. The expression of genes involved in jejunal lipogenesis and lipoprotein synthesis is altered in morbidly obese subjects with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Garcia-Arnes, Juan; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalo, Montserrat; Soriguer, Federico; Moreno-Ruiz, Francisco J; Rodriguez-Cañete, Alberto; Gallego-Perales, Jose L; Alcain-Martinez, Guillermo; Vazquez-Pedreño, Luis; Lopez-Enriquez, Soledad; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, until now little attention has been paid to the role that the intestine might have. The aim of this research was to determine the relation between insulin resistance and intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis in morbidly obese subjects and to study the effect of insulin on these processes. Jejunal mRNA expression of the different genes involved in the intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis was analyzed in three groups of morbidly obese subjects: Group 1 with low insulin resistance (MO-low-IR), group 2 with high insulin resistance (MO-high-IR), and group 3 with T2DM and treatment with metformin (MO-metf-T2DM). In addition, intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from MO-low-IR were incubated with different doses of insulin/glucose. In Group 2 (MO-high-IR), the jejunal mRNA expression levels of apo A-IV, ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), pyruvate dehydrogenase (lipoamide) beta (PDHB), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were significantly higher and acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACC1) and fatty-acid synthase lower than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). In Group 3 (MO-metf-T2DM), only the ACLY and PDHB mRNA expressions were significantly higher than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). The mRNA expression of most of the genes studied was significantly linked to insulin and glucose levels. The incubation of IEC with different doses of insulin and glucose produced a higher expression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apo A-IV, SREBP-1c, and ACC1 when both, glucose and insulin, were at a high concentration. However, with only high insulin levels, there were higher apo A-IV, PDHB and SREBP-1c expressions, and a lower ACLY expression. In conclusion, the jejunum of MO-high-IR has a decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in de novo fatty-acid synthesis and an

  11. D-Glucose Acts via SGLTI to Increase NHE3 in Mouse Jejunal Brush Border by a NHERF2-Dependent Process

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rong; Murtazina, Rakhilya; Cha, Boyoung; Chakraborty, Molee; Sarker, Rafiquel; Chen, Tian-e; Lin, Zhihong; Hogema, Boris M.; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Seidler, Ursula; Turner, Jerrold R.; Li, Xuhang; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Oral rehydration solutions (ORS) reduce diarrhea-associated mortality by unclear mechanisms. Sodium absorption is mediated by the Na+/H+ hydrogen exchanger NHE3 and is increased by Na+-glucose co-transport in vitro, but the mechanisms of this process are only partially understood and its in vivo relevance has not been determined. Methods Intracellular pH was measured in jejunal enterocytes of wild-type mice and mice with disrupted Na+/H+ exchange regulatory co-factor 2 (NHERF2−/− mice) by multi-photon microscopy. Diarrhea was induced by cholera toxin. Caco-2BBe cells that express NHE3 and the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT)1 were studied by fluorometery, before and after siRNA-mediated knockdown of NHERF1 or NHERF2. NHE3 distribution was assessed by cell-surface biotinylation and confocal microscopy. Brush border mobility was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and confocal microscopy. Results The non-metabolized SGLT1 substrate α-methyl-D-Glu (α-MD-G) activated jejunal NHE3; this process required Akt and NHERF2. α-MD-G normalized NHE3 activity after cholera toxin-induced diarrhea. α-MD-G–stimulated jejunal NHE3 activity was: defective in NHERF2−/− mice and cells with NHERF2 knockdown, but occurred normally with NHERF1 knockdown; associated with increased NHE3 surface expression in Caco-2 cells, which was also NHERF2-dependent; associated with dissociation of NHE3 from NHERF2 and an increase in the NHE3 mobile fraction from the brush border; and accompanied by a NHERF2 ezrin-radixin-moesin–binding domain-dependent increase in co-precipitation of ezrin with NHE3. Conclusions SGLT1-mediated Na-glucose co-transport stimulates NHE3 activity in vivo by an Akt- and NHERF2-dependent signaling pathway. It is associated with increased brush border NHE3 and association between ezrin and NHE3. Activation of NHE3 corrects cholera toxin-induced defects in Na absorption and might mediate efficacy of ORS. PMID:20977906

  12. Estrogen receptor α or β loss in the colon of Min/+ mice promotes crypt expansion and impairs TGFβ and HNF3β signaling.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Rian M; Briggs, Alexandra; Carothers, Adelaide M; Davids, Jennifer S; Wang, Jiping; Javid, Sara H; Cho, Nancy L; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-regulated Wnt and transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling cooperate in the intestine to maintain normal enterocyte functions. Human clinical trials showed that estrogen [17β-estradiol (E2)], the ligand of nuclear receptors estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ, inhibited colorectal cancer (CRC) in women. Consistent with this finding, we reported that E2, ERα and ERβ suppressed intestinal tumorigenesis in the C57BL/6J-Min/+ (Min/+) mouse, a CRC model. Here, we extended our results with further comparisons of colon and small intestine from intact female Apc (+/+) (WT), Min/+ and ER-deficient Min/+ mice. In the colon of ER-deficient Min/+ mice, ER loss reduced TGFβ signaling in crypt base cells as evidenced by minimal expression of the effectors Smad 2, 3 and 4 in these strains. We also found reduced expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), bone morphogenetic protein 4 and hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β or FoxA2, factors needed for paracrine signaling between enterocytes and mesenchyme. In proximal colon, ER loss produced a >10-fold increased incidence of crypt fission, a marker for wound healing and tumor promotion. These data, combined with our previous work detailing the specific roles of E2, ERα and ERβ in the colon, suggest that ER activity helps to maintain the intestinal stem cell (ISC) microenvironment by modulating epithelial-stromal crosstalk in ways that regulate cytokine, Wnt and Ihh availability in the extracellular matrix (ECM).

  13. Integrated prospecting in the crypt of the Basilica of Saint Nicholas in Bari, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calia, Angela; Leucci, Giovanni; Masini, Nicola; Matera, Loredana; Persico, Raffaele; Sileo, Maria

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of non-destructive integrated geophysical surveys (ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic sonic) performed in the crypt of the Basilica of St Nicholas in Bari, Italy. The aim was twofold, namely to investigate the consistency of restoration work performed in 1950 and the presence of features of archaeological interest. The GPR technique has also been exploited to characterize the subsurface water content under the crypt. In particular, the existence of buried anomalies, probably due to the restoration work, has been identified. Moreover, by means of an electromagnetic-wave velocity analysis, an estimation of the volumetric water content under the floor has been achieved. The results indicate the main causes of the deterioration and have provided significant information for the safeguard of this historical building. Furthermore, the GPR survey allowed us to identify some anomalies buried under the crypt that are probably of archaeological interest. Finally, both sonic tomography and a GPR survey have been performed on an important mosaic, and have enabled us to identify probable ‘internal’ reasons for its decay.

  14. Newly defined aberrant crypt foci as a marker for dysplasia in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Masako; Hippo, Yoshitaka; Izumiya, Masashi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Dysplasia represents a preneoplastic status in multistep colon carcinogenesis. Whereas laborious preparation of thin sections is required for its diagnosis, we here show that newly defined aberrant crypt foci (ACF) simply mark the majority of the dysplasia on the whole colon. Specifically, decoloring of the azoxymethane-treated rat colon after scoring classical ACF (cACF) resulted in visualization of a subset of aberrant crypts that remained densely stained. They were morphologically classified into three subtypes, of which two with compressed luminal openings proved highly correlated with dysplasia. Accordingly, we designated those foci harboring either of the two crypt subtypes as dysplasia-associated ACF (dACF). By serially applying different detection methods for known preneoplastic lesions to the same colon, we showed that most dACF had already been identified as cACF, and a few newly identified dACF contained an entire population of more advanced lesions, such as flat ACF and mucin-depleted foci. Consequently, integrative scoring of cACF and dACF enabled capture of all early lesions of the colon. Furthermore, 94% of the dACF showed dysplasia and 90% of the dysplastic lesions proved to be dACF. Thus, dACF is a promising marker for dysplasia, likely facilitating precise identification of the early stages of colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24827115

  15. Rhythms of cell division of different periodicity in small intestinal cryptic epithelium and their contribution to circadian rhythm formation.

    PubMed

    Antokhin, A I; Zharkova, N A; Zakharchenko, A V; Romanov, Yu A

    2012-02-01

    We used an improved method of chronobiological information processing enabling not only to detect oscillations with different frequencies, but also to determine the significance of each harmonic. This has made it possible to identify significant high-power harmonics present in the majority of cell positions in the crypt. These harmonics make the major contribution to the formation of diurnal rhythm of cell division in the crypt and hence determine spatial and temporal organization of the proliferative system in the crypt.

  16. Extracellular pH regulation in microdomains of colonic crypts: effects of short-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Montrose, M H

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that transepithelial gradients of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs; the major anions in the colonic lumen) generate pH gradients across the colonic epithelium. Quantitative confocal microscopy was used to study extracellular pH in mouse distal colon with intact epithelial architecture, by superfusing tissue with carboxy SNARF-1 (a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye). Results demonstrate extracellular pH regulation in two separate microdomains surrounding colonic crypts: the crypt lumen and the subepithelial tissue adjacent to crypt colonocytes. Apical superfusion with (i) a poorly metabolized SCFA (isobutyrate), (ii) an avidly metabolized SCFA (n-butyrate), or (iii) a physiologic mixture of acetate/propionate/n-butyrate produced similar results: alkalinization of the crypt lumen and acidification of subepithelial tissue. Effects were (i) dependent on the presence and orientation of a transepithelial SCFA gradient, (ii) not observed with gluconate substitution, and (iii) required activation of sustained vectorial acid/base transport by SCFAs. Results suggest that the crypt lumen functions as a pH microdomain due to slow mixing with bulk superfusates and that crypts contribute significant buffering capacity to the lumen. In conclusion, physiologic SCFA gradients cause polarized extracellular pH regulation because epithelial architecture and vectorial transport synergize to establish regulated microenvironments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7724557

  17. Duodenal-jejunal bypass normalizes pancreatic islet proliferation rate and function but not hepatic steatosis in hypothalamic obese rats.

    PubMed

    Cantelli, K R; Soares, G M; Ribeiro, R A; Balbo, S L; Lubaczeuski, C; Boschero, A C; Araújo, A C F; Bonfleur, M L

    2017-03-30

    Modifications in life-style and/or pharmacotherapies contribute to weight loss and ameliorate the metabolic profile of diet-induced obese humans and rodents. Since these strategies fail to treat hypothalamic obesity, we have assessed the possible mechanisms by which duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) surgery regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and the morphophysiology of pancreatic islets, in hypothalamic obese (HyO) rats. During the first 5 days of life, male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of monosodium glutamate (4 g/kg body weight, HyO group), or saline (CTL). At 90 days of age, HyO rats were randomly subjected to DJB (HyO DJB group) or sham surgery (HyO Sham group). HyO Sham rats were morbidly obese, insulin resistant, hypertriglyceridemic and displayed higher serum concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and hepatic triglyceride (TG). These effects were associated with higher expressions of the lipogenic genes and fatty acid synthase (FASN) protein content in the liver. Furthermore, hepatic genes involved in β-oxidation and TG export were down-regulated in HyO rats. In addition, these rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, β-cell hypersecretion, a higher percentage of islets and β-cell area/pancreas section, and enhanced nuclear content of Ki67 protein in islet-cells. At 2 months after DJB surgery, serum concentrations of TG and NEFA, but not hepatic TG accumulation and gene and protein expressions, were normalized in HyO rats. Insulin release and Ki67 positive cells were also normalized in HyO DJB islets. In conclusion, DJB decreased islet-cell proliferation, normalized insulinemia, and ameliorated insulin sensitivity and plasma lipid profile, independently of changes in hepatic metabolism.

  18. Jejunal wall triglyceride concentration of morbidly obese persons is lower in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Soriguer, F.; García-Serrano, S.; Garrido-Sánchez, L.; Gutierrez-Repiso, C.; Rojo-Martínez, G.; Garcia-Escobar, E.; García-Arnés, J.; Gallego-Perales, J. L.; Delgado, V.; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The overproduction of intestinal lipoproteins may contribute to the dyslipidemia found in diabetes. We studied the influence of diabetes on the fasting jejunal lipid content and its association with plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in the synthesis and secretion of these lipoproteins. The study was undertaken in 27 morbidly obese persons, 12 of whom had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The morbidly obese persons with diabetes had higher levels of chylomicron (CM) triglycerides (P < 0.001) and apolipoprotein (apo)B48 (P = 0.012). The jejunum samples obtained from the subjects with diabetes had a lower jejunal triglyceride content (P = 0.012) and angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) mRNA expression (P = 0.043). However, the apoA-IV mRNA expression was significantly greater (P = 0.036). The jejunal triglyceride content correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression (r = −0.587, P = 0.027). The variables that explained the jejunal triglyceride content in a multiple linear regression model were the insulin resistance state and the apoA-IV mRNA expression. Our results show that the morbidly obese subjects with diabetes had lower jejunal lipid content and that this correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression. These findings show that the jejunum appears to play an active role in lipid homeostasis in the fasting state. PMID:20855567

  19. Jejunal wall triglyceride concentration of morbidly obese persons is lower in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Soriguer, F; García-Serrano, S; Garrido-Sánchez, L; Gutierrez-Repiso, C; Rojo-Martínez, G; Garcia-Escobar, E; García-Arnés, J; Gallego-Perales, J L; Delgado, V; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The overproduction of intestinal lipoproteins may contribute to the dyslipidemia found in diabetes. We studied the influence of diabetes on the fasting jejunal lipid content and its association with plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in the synthesis and secretion of these lipoproteins. The study was undertaken in 27 morbidly obese persons, 12 of whom had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The morbidly obese persons with diabetes had higher levels of chylomicron (CM) triglycerides (P < 0.001) and apolipoprotein (apo)B48 (P = 0.012). The jejunum samples obtained from the subjects with diabetes had a lower jejunal triglyceride content (P = 0.012) and angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) mRNA expression (P = 0.043). However, the apoA-IV mRNA expression was significantly greater (P = 0.036). The jejunal triglyceride content correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression (r = -0.587, P = 0.027). The variables that explained the jejunal triglyceride content in a multiple linear regression model were the insulin resistance state and the apoA-IV mRNA expression. Our results show that the morbidly obese subjects with diabetes had lower jejunal lipid content and that this correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression. These findings show that the jejunum appears to play an active role in lipid homeostasis in the fasting state.

  20. Histone H3 modifications and Cdx-2 binding to the sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene is involved in induction of the gene in the transition from the crypt to villus in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuji; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2008-05-02

    Expression of the sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene is induced in cells transitioning from the crypt to the villus of rat jejunum. In the present study, we revealed by ChIP assay using a cryostat sectioning technique that binding of the di-acetylated histone H3 at lysine 9/14 and the transcriptional factor Cdx-2 to the promoter region on the SI gene, as well as mRNA, increased in the transient process. Additionally, di-/tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9/14 on the promoter region of the SI gene rapidly decreased with increasing mRNA. These results suggest that induction of the SI gene during the transition from the crypt to the villi is associated with changes in histone H3 modifications from methylation at lysine 9 to di-acetylation at lysine 9/14, as well as increased binding of Cdx-2 to the SI promoter region.

  1. A rabbit jejunal isolated enterocyte preparation suitable for transport studies.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P D; Sepúlveda, F V

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for isolating viable enterocytes from rabbit jejunum. Estimates of sucrase and gamma-glutamyl transferase activities in cells isolated by this method suggest that they originate from the upper villus only. Isolated cells accumulate both alpha-methyl-D-glucoside and alanine, maintaining high intracellular concentrations for at least 60 and 40 min respectively. Accumulation of alpha-methyl-D-glucoside is inhibited by the presence of phloridzin. The cells accumulate 42K and 86Rb in an identical manner. This uptake, which is maintained for at least 60 min, is inhibited in the presence of ouabain. Passive efflux of 42K and 86Rb occurs with rate constants which are virtually identical. The efflux follows a single exponential suggesting that it originates from only one intracellular compartment. It is suggested that the preparation can be used to study the effect of sugars and amino acids on K efflux. The advantages of using such a preparation are discussed. PMID:2862277

  2. Beef tallow increases apoptosis and decreases aberrant crypt foci formation relative to soybean oil in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Khil, Jinmo; Gallaher, Daniel D

    2004-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies have implicated red meat as increasing colon cancer risk, animal studies have generally not been supportive of such an effect. This study examined red meat components, such as beef protein and tallow, on markers of colon cancer risk. Rats administered dimethylhydrazine were fed either casein or beef protein as the protein source and soybean oil or tallow as the fat source in a 2 2 factorial design for 9 wk. There were fewer preneoplastic lesions [aberrant crypt foci (ACF)] and a greater apoptotic labeling index (P < 0.05) in the distal colonic mucosa of rats fed tallow compared with soybean oil. Fecal bile acid concentrations were significantly lower in rats fed tallow compared with soybean oil. There were no significant differences in mucosal cell proliferation. No significant effects were found due to protein source or to interactions between fat and protein sources for ACF, cell proliferation labeling indexes, or bile acid concentrations. However, there was a significant protein by fat source interaction for the apoptotic labeling index. The decreased number of ACF, decreased fecal bile acid concentration, and increased mucosal apoptosis with tallow consumption are not consistent with a role for this fat in increasing risk of colon cancer.

  3. Cloudy apple juice decreases DNA damage, hyperproliferation and aberrant crypt foci development in the distal colon of DMH-initiated rats.

    PubMed

    Barth, S W; Fähndrich, C; Bub, A; Dietrich, H; Watzl, B; Will, F; Briviba, K; Rechkemmer, G

    2005-08-01

    Clear (CleA) and cloudy (CloA) apple juices containing different amounts of analyzed procyanidins and pectin were investigated for preventive effects of colon cancer and underlying molecular mechanisms in F344 rats given intraperitoneal injections of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH; 20 mg/kg body wt) once a week for 4 weeks. Rats received either water (Cont), CleA or CloA (ad libitum) for 7 weeks starting 1 week before the first DMH injection. CloA inhibited DMH induced genotoxic damage in mucosa cells of the distal colon compared with Cont as investigated by single-cell microgel electrophoresis assay. The mean tail intensity in mucosa cells of DMH-treated controls (Cont/DMH: 6.1+/-0.9%) was significantly reduced by CloA (2.4+/-0.8%; P<0.01) but not by CleA intervention (4.1+/-1.2%; P>0.05). The crypt cell proliferation index induced by DMH (Cont/NaCl: 10.0+/-0.7%; Cont/DMH: 19.9+/-1.0%; P<0.001) was significantly decreased by CleA (15.7+/-0.7%; P<0.001) and CloA intervention (11.9+/-0.4%; P<0.001). CloA but not CleA significantly reduced the number of large aberrant crypt foci (ACF) consisting of more than four aberrant crypts (AC) (Cont/DMH: 37.4+/-5.4; CleA/DMH: 32.8+/-4.4, P>0.05; CloA/DMH: 18.8+/-2.5 ACF; P<0.05) and the overall mean ACF size in the distal colon (Cont/DMH: 2.31+/-0.09; CleA/DMH: 2.27+/-0.05; CloA/DMH: 2.04+/-0.03 AC/ACF; P<0.05). After treatment with DMH and/or apple juices there were no changes in transcript levels of colonic cyclooxygenase isoforms (COX-1, COX-2) or glutathione-associated enzymes (GST-M2, gamma-GCS, GST-P), the splenocyte natural killer cell activity and plasma antioxidant status. However, CloA but not CleA prevented the DMH-induced reduction of splenocyte CD4/CD8 (T-helper cells to cytotoxic lymphocytes) ratio. Since both formulations contained comparable concentrations and types of monomeric polyphenols, complex polyphenols or non-polyphenolic compounds, such as pectin might be responsible for the stronger cancer

  4. Fractionated low doses of abdominal irradiation alters jejunal uptake of nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, A.B.; Keelan, M.; Cheeseman, C.I.; Walker, K.

    1986-06-01

    Abdominal radiation is associated with changes in intestinal uptake of nutrients that begins within three days and persist for over 33 weeks. Clinically, fractionated doses of radiation (FDR) are used in an attempt to minimize the complications of this therapy, but the effects of fractionated doses of radiation on intestinal transport have not been defined. An in vitro technique was used to assess the jejunal and ileal uptake of varying concentrations of glucose and leucine, as well as the uptake of single concentrations of fatty acids and decanol in rats exposed 3, 7, and 14 days previously to a course of 200 cGy given on each of five consecutive days. FDR was associated with an increase in the uptake of decanol, and therefore a decrease in the effective resistance of the unstirred water layer. FDR had a variable effect on the uptake of glucose and leucine, with a decline in the value of the Michaelis constant (Km) and the passive permeability coefficient for glucose (Pd), whereas the Km for leucine was unchanged and the Pd for leucine was variably affected by FDR. The maximal transport rate (Jdm) for leucine progressively rose following FDR, whereas the Jdm for glucose initially rose, then fell. The uptake of galactose and medium chain-length fatty acids was unchanged by FDR, whereas the jejunal uptake of myristic acid rose, and the uptake of cholic acid declined, then returned to normal. FDR was associated with greater body weight gain and jejunal and ileal weight. The changes in nutrient uptake following FDR differed from the absorption changes occurring after a single dose of radiation. Thus, fractionated doses of abdominal radiation produce complex changes in the intestinal uptake of actively and passively transported nutrients, and these variable changes are influenced by the time following radiation exposure and by the solute studied.

  5. Response to early repeat celiotomy in horses after a surgical treatment of jejunal strangulation.

    PubMed

    Bauck, Anje G; Easley, Jeremiah T; Cleary, Orlaith B; Graham, Sarah; Morton, Alison J; Rötting, Anna K; Schaeffer, David J; Smith, Andrew D; Freeman, David E

    2017-08-01

    To determine the outcome after early repeat celiotomy in horses operated for jejunal strangulation. Retrospective case series. Horses (n = 22) that underwent repeat celiotomy for postoperative reflux (POR) and/or postoperative colic (POC) that did not improve within 48 hours from onset after initial surgical treatment of strangulating jejunal lesions by jejunojejunostomy (n = 14) or no resection (n = 8). Medical records were reviewed for clinical signs, duration of signs before repeat surgery, surgical findings and treatment, and outcome. Survival was documented by phone call at long-term follow-up. The influence of POC and POR on timing of surgery were analyzed. Long-term survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier analyses. Repeat celiotomy was performed at a median of 57 hours after initial surgery and 16.5 hours from onset of signs, and earlier in horses with POC compared with POR (P < .05). A total of 3/22 horses were euthanatized under anesthesia. A total of 9 of 11 horses with initial jejunojejunostomy required resection of the original anastomosis due to anastomotic complications. In 8 horses without resection, second surgery included resection (4) or decompression (4). Repeat celiotomy was successful in 13/16 horses with POR. Repeat celiotomy eliminated POC in all horses (n = 9). A total of 19 horses were recovered from anesthesia and all survived to discharge. Incisional infections were diagnosed in 13/17 horses where both surgeries were performed through the same ventral median approach, and hernias developed in 4/13 infected incisions. Median survival time was 90 months. Repeat celiotomy can eliminate signs of POR and/or POC, and the additional surgery does not appear to aggravate POR. Criteria for repeat celiotomy in this study could provide guidelines for managing POC and POR after surgery for jejunal strangulation. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. [Reconstruction of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus using a free jejunal graft].

    PubMed

    Pesko, P; Bumbasirević, M; Knezević, J; Dunjić, M; Djukić, V; Simić, A; Stojakov, D; Sabljak, P; Bjelović, M; Janković, Z; Micev, M; Saranović, D

    2000-01-01

    Extensive malignant tumors of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus continue to challenge surgeons in respect to both type and extent of resection as well as type of reconstruction. In the period between November 1st, 1996 and November 1st, 1998, at our Department, five patients have been operated due to squamocellular carcinoma of the hypopharynx using a free jejunal graft reconstruction method. The first free jejunal graft operation due to hypopharyngeal carcinoma, at the same time the first operation of this kind ever done in our Country, was performed on November 13th, 1998. There were 4 female and one male patient, average age 47.75 years. Disfagia for solid foods was a leading symptom in all patients (mean duration of 3.5 months) and was always accompanied with weight loss (average of 8 kg for two months). In all patients barium swallow, endoscopy, CT as well as intraoperative endoscopy was performed. Radical surgical procedure was always accompanied with the bilateral modified lympf node neck dissection. As a arterial donor vessel superior thyroid artery was used in all patients. As a venous drainage in three patients a external jugular vein was used and in two facial vein. Reconstruction using a free jejunal graft of approximately 25 cm long was performed in all patients creating upper, oropharingeal, anastomosis end to side and distal, esophageal, end to end (in only one patients side to end) using 3/0 apsorbable sutures. Mean duration of the operation was six hours. The postoperative course in all patients was uneventful. On the 9th postoperative day gastrografin and three days later barium swallow radiography was performed as a standard control study. Regular check ups were done on three, six, nine months, year and two years. On all controls all patients were symptom free and feeling well. It is our opinion that in the patients with isolated carcinoma of the hypopharynx due to low morbidity and mortality rate, free jejunal graft method is the surgical

  7. Acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints enhances jejunal motility in constipated and diarrheic rats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qing-Guang; Gao, Xin-Yan; Liu, Kun; Yu, Xiao-Chun; Li, Liang; Wang, Hai-Ping; Zhu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect and mechanism of acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints on jejunal motility, particularly in pathological conditions. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately 18-20 cm downstream from the pylorus and filled with approximately 0.1 mL warm water in anesthetized normal rats or rats with diarrhea or constipation. The heterotopic acupoints including LI11 (Quchi), ST37 (Shangjuxu), BL25 (Dachangshu), and the homotopic acupoint ST25 (Tianshu), and were stimulated for 60 s by rotating acupuncture needles right and left at a frequency of 2 Hz. To determine the type of afferent fibers mediating the regulation of jejunal motility by manual acupuncture, the ipsilateral sciatic A or C fibers of ST37 were inactivated by local application of the A-fiber selective demyelination agent cobra venom or the C fiber blocker capsaicin. Methoctramine, a selective M2 receptor antagonist, was injected intravenously to identify a specific role for M2 receptors in mediating the effect of acupuncture on jejunal motility. RESULTS: Acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints, such as LI11 and ST37, increased jejunal motility not only in normal rats, but also in rats with constipation or diarrhea. In normal rats, manual acupuncture at LI11 or ST37 enhanced jejunal pressure from 7.34 ± 0.19 cmH2O to 7.93 ± 0.20 cmH2O, an increase of 9.05% ± 0.82% (P < 0.05), and from 6.95 ± 0.14 cmH2O to 8.97 ± 0.22 cmH2O, a significant increase of 27.44% ± 1.96% (P < 0.01), respectively. In constipated rats, manual acupuncture at LI11 or ST37 increased intrajejunal pressure from 8.17 ± 0.31 cmH2O to 9.86 ± 0.36 cmH2O, an increase of 20.69% ± 2.10% (P < 0.05), and from 8.82 ± 0.28 cmH2O to 10.83 ± 0.28 cmH2O, an increase of 22.81% ± 1.46% (P < 0.05), respectively. In rats with diarrhea, MA at LI11 or ST37 increased intrajejunal pressure from 11.95 ± 0.35 cmH2O to 13.96 ± 0.39 cmH2O, an increase of 16.82% ± 2.35% (P

  8. Conversion of choledochojejunostomy stents to jejunal feeding tubes for postoperative enteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Burke, D R; Torosian, M H; McLean, G K; Meranze, S G; Rosato, E F

    1988-01-01

    The problem of protein calorie malnutrition following major gastrointestinal surgery can be treated with central venous or enteric alimentation, with the latter being preferred. The authors describe a simple technique for the conversion of biliary stents placed after pancreaticoduodenal surgery into jejunal feeding tubes when the stenting function is no longer needed. Three illustrative cases are presented. In each case, the procedure took less than 30 min and had no associated morbidity. This technique allows early conversion from central venous to enteric alimentation without the need to create a second surgical enterostomy.

  9. Cystic jejunal duplication with Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas, incidentally discovered in a patient with pancreatic tail neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Bara Jr, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a case of enteric duplication cyst and criteria for a proper differential diagnosis. A 51-year-old male was hospitalized for pancreatic tail neoplasm and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. During surgery, a jejunal cystic lesion was incidentally detected and jejunectomy was performed. Microscopically, the cyst was observed to be covered by Keratin 7/Keratin 20 positive intestinal type epithelium and the muscularis layer was shared by the cyst and adjacent jejunum, without a cleavage plane between the cyst wall and jejunal muscularis propria. In the deep muscularis propria, a Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas was also noted. In the pancreatic tail, a low grade intraepithelial lesion (panIN-1a) was diagnosed. This case highlights the necessity for a correct differential diagnosis of such rare lesions. Roughly 30 cases of jejunal duplication cysts have been reported to date in the PubMed database. PMID:27672644

  10. Antibodies as crypts of antiinfective and antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Cunha, R L O R; Travassos, L R; Polonelli, L

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs), often associated with antimicrobial and antitumor agents, have emerged as an important class of novel drugs for antigen-driven therapeutic purposes in diverse clinical settings, including oncology and infectious diseases. Abs commonly give rise in the treated host to anti-Ab responses, which may induce adverse reactions and limit their therapeutic efficacy. Their modular domain architecture has been exploited to generate alternative reduced formats (Fabs, scFvs, dAbs, minibodies, multibodies), essentially devoid of the Fc region. The presence of complementarity determining regions (CDRs) ensures the maintenance of selective binding to antigens and supports their use for biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Paradigmatic Abs mimicking the wide-spectrum antimicrobial activity of a yeast killer toxin (killer Abs) have revealed the existence of a family of Abs exerting a direct in vitro and/or in vivo microbicidal activity. Based on the variable sequence of an antiidiotypic recombinant killer Ab, CDR-related peptides have been synthesized, engineered by alanine-scanning and selected according to antimicrobial, antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. Irrespective of the native Ab specificity, synthetic CDRs from unrelated murine and human monoclonal Abs, have shown to display differential in vitro, in vivo and/or ex vivo antifungal (Candida albicans), antiviral (HIV-1) and antitumor (melanoma cells) activities. Alanine substitution of single residues of synthetic CDR peptides resulted in further differential increased/unaltered/decreased biological activity. The intriguing potential of Abs as source of antiinfective and antitumor therapeutics will be discussed, in light of recent advances in peptide design, stability and delivery.

  11. Beneficial effects of jejunal continuity and duodenal food passage after total gastrectomy: a retrospective study of 704 patients.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Li, Q; Wang, D C; Wang, J C; Liang, H; Liu, J Z; Cui, Q H; Sun, T; Zhang, R P; Kong, D L; Hao, X S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate effects of reconstruction procedures on post-operative outcomes and nutritional status after total gastrectomy. The study group comprised 704 consecutive patients with gastric cancer who underwent total gastrectomy between December 1985 and December 2003. Six alimentary reconstruction procedures were performed, including jejunal continuity [Braun, modified Braun I and II and functional jejunal interposition (FJI)] and jejunum transection ["P" Roux-en-Y and "P" jejunal interposition (PJI)]. The duodenal food passage was maintained only by FJI and PJI. We evaluated the time interval to restore food intake after surgery and the incidence of complications and nutritional status for 12 months. Patients who received jejunum transection required 7.8+/-2.5 days and 11.9+/-4.9 days to restore liquid and semi-liquid food intake, respectively, which reduced to 3.9+/-2.1 days for liquid and 7.9+/-3.9 days for semi-liquid food intake by jejunum continuity. The incidence rates of reflux esophagitis and Roux-en-Y syndrome in patients receiving jejunum transection were 23.5% and 42.4%, respectively, which were decreased to 9.35% and 14.7%, respectively, by jejunal continuity. Furthermore, prognostic nutrition index score of patients receiving the procedures maintaining duodenal food passage (52.9+/-10.9) was higher than that of patients without the duodenal food passage (46.7+/-8.2). Jejunal continuity and duodenal food passage showed beneficial effects on clinical outcomes after surgery. Among these six procedures, FJI was the only procedure to combine the benefits of jejunal continuity and maintaining the duodenal food passage, indicating that FJI has potential clinical application to improve the quality of patient's life after total gastrectomy.

  12. Effects of stage of gestation and nutrient restriction during early to mid-gestation on maternal and fetal visceral organ mass and indices of jejunal growth and vascularity in beef cows.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A M; Reed, J J; Vonnahme, K A; Soto-Navarro, S A; Reynolds, L P; Ford, S P; Hess, B W; Caton, J S

    2010-07-01

    intestinal vascularity (mL) at d 245. Fetal jejunal DNA decreased (P = 0.09), RNA:DNA increased (P = 0.05), and total jejunal proliferating cells increased (P < 0.001) with day of gestation. Jejunal capillary area density, number density, and surface density were greater (P < 0.008) during late gestation. Results indicate that maternal and fetal intestines undergo changes during gestation, which can be affected by nutrient restriction and may partially explain differences observed in fetal development and postnatal performance.

  13. Simultaneous occurrence of jejuno-jejunal and ileo-ileal intussusception in a child: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Rawat, J D; Wakhlu, A; Kureel, S N; Gopal, S C

    2011-01-11

    Intussusception is the most common cause of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. This condition is frequent in children and presents with the classic triad of cramping abdominal pain, bloody diarrhoea and a palpable tender mass. Small bowel intussusceptions are much less common, with jejuno-ileal and duodeno-jejunal intussusceptions being the rarest types of all. Multiple simultaneous intussusception is a peculiar variety of intussusception. The authors report the simultaneous occurrence of jejuno-jejunal and ileo-ileal intussusception in a patient. As this is an extremely uncommon entity, it is being reported with a brief review of the relevant literature.

  14. Dual effect of chronic nicotine administration: augmentation of jejunitis and amelioration of colitis induced by iodoacetamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Cohen, P; Heyman, S N; Rachmilewitz, D

    2001-02-01

    Smoking has a dichotomous effect on inflammatory bowel disease, ameliorating disease activity in ulcerative colitis but having a deleterious effect on Crohn's disease. This effect is thought to be due to nicotine. We investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on the small and large bowel in iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis and colitis. Jejunitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intrajejunal administration of 0.1 ml 2% iodoacetamide and colitis by intrarectal administration of 0.1 ml 3% iodoacetamide. Nicotine was dissolved in drinking water (12.5 or 250 micrograms/ml), rats drinking ad libitum. Nicotine administration started 10 days prior to damage induction and throughout the experiment and had no effect on weight gain or daily food intake of rats. Rats were killed 5 days after iodoacetamide-induced colitis and 7 days after induction of jejunitis. The jejunum and colon were resected, rinsed, weighed, damage assessed macroscopically and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation. Effects of nicotine on gut microcirculation were also assessed. Nicotine by itself caused no damage to the colon. Nicotine had a dichotomous effect on jejunitis and colitis. At a dose of 12.5 micrograms/ml nicotine improved the macroscopic damage of colitis from 252 +/- 66 to 70 +/- 31 mm2, and segmental weight also declined significantly in the colon (from 1.7 +/- 0.2 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 g/10 cm). In contrast, the same dose of nicotine had a deleterious effect on iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis, increasing the macroscopic damage from 368 +/- 38 to 460 +/- 97 mm2 in rats treated with injury escalating to 970 +/- 147 in rats treated with 250 micrograms/ml nicotine. Nicotine treatment also significantly increased jejunal segmental weight. By itself nicotine did not change NOS activity or PGE2 generation compared to control rats, but it enhanced microcirculation in the colon

  15. Detection and Characterization of Flat Aberrant Crypt Foci (Flat ACF) in the Novel A/J Min/+ Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-06-01

    Flat aberrant crypt foci (flat ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) have previously been described as preneoplastic colonic lesions. We used the novel A/J Min/+ mouse model, that demonstrates extensive spontaneous colon carcinogenesis to refine the method of detection of flat ACF and further characterize and define them as early lesions by histological examination and comparison with MDF. Colons were stained with methylene blue (MB) for flat ACF detection and restained with high-iron diamine-alcian blue (HID-AB) for MDF detection. Optimal flat ACF recognition required at least 24 h of storage post-MB staining and adherence to a set of characteristics. The fraction of flat ACF corresponding with MDF was 93%. Flat ACF/MDF displayed the same picture of severe dysplasia, lack of mucus and goblet cells and accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin. The easily detectable flat ACF are reliable surface biomarkers of Apc-driven colon carcinogenesis. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Vagal influences on the jejunal 'minute rhythm' in the anaesthetized ferret.

    PubMed Central

    Collman, P I; Grundy, D; Scratcherd, T

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous jejunal motility in the urethane-anaesthetized ferret shows a cyclical pattern of contraction bursts alternating with quiescent periods described as 'minute rhythm' in conscious animals. Cooling the cervical vagi to below 4 degrees C or acute vagotomy abolished this pattern of motility. On re-warming the vagi there was a return to cyclical motility after a latency which depended upon the contractile state at the time vagal conduction was restored. Electrical vagal stimulation produced bursts of contractions at the same frequency as the spontaneous motility. Longer periods of stimulation gave rise to bursts of contractions interrupted by periods of relative quiescence, mimicking the spontaneous motility, despite the continuous stimulation. Following atropinization all spontaneous motility was abolished, but electrical stimulation of the vagi revealed a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic response whose characteristics differed from that of the cholinergic response. It is concluded that the vagus plays a permissive role in regulating the jejunal 'minute rhythm' via a cholinergic pathway and that there is a second excitatory vagal pathway which innervates non-cholinergic post-ganglionic neurones whose functional significance and transmitter mechanism is unknown. PMID:6663513

  17. Control of jejunal sucrase and maltase activity by dietary sucrose of fructose in man

    PubMed Central

    Rosensweig, Norton S.; Herman, Robert H.

    1968-01-01

    The specific effect of dietary sugars on jejunal disaccharidase activity in seven normal nonfasted male volunteers was studied. The sugars tested were sucrose, maltose, lactose, glucose, fructose, and galactose. Comparisons were made of the effects of each sugar in an isocaloric liquid diet. In all subjects, sucrose feeding, as compared to glucose feeding, significantly increased jejunal sucrase (S) and maltase (M) activities, but not lactase (L) activity. The S/L and M/L ratios increased to a significant degree. Fructose feeding, in two subjects, gave results similar to sucrose when comparing fructose and glucose diets. One subject was fed lactose, galactose, and maltose. These sugars, compared to glucose, did not increase disaccharidase activity. Fructose appears to be the active principle in the sucrose molecule. These results demonstrate that specific dietary sugars can alter enzyme activity in the small intestine of man in a specific fashion. Sucrose and fructose are able to regulate sucrase and maltase activity. Dietary alteration of intestinal enzymes may represent a suitable system for studying the regulation of enzyme activity in man. PMID:5676520

  18. An unusual presentation of a malignant jejunal tumor and a different management strategy.

    PubMed

    Samaiya, Atul; Deo, Sv Suryanarayana; Thulkar, Sanjay; Hazarika, Sidhartha; Kumar, Sunil; Parida, Dillip K; Shukla, Nootan K

    2005-01-09

    BACKGROUND: Malignant small bowel tumors are very rare and leiomyosarcoma accounts for less than 15% of the cases. Management of these tumors is challenging in view of nonspecific symptoms, unusual presentation and high incidence of metastasis. In this case report, an unusual presentation of jejunal sarcoma and management of liver metastasis with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is discussed. CASE PRESENTATION: A 45-year-old male presented with anemia and features of small bowel obstruction. Operative findings revealed a mass lesion in jejunum with intussusception of proximal loop. Resection of bowel mass was performed. Histopathological findings were suggestive of leiomyosarcoma. After 3-years of follow-up, the patient developed recurrence in infracolic omentum and a liver metastasis. The omental mass was resected and liver lesion was managed with radiofrequency ablation. CONCLUSION: Jejunal leiomyosarcoma is a rare variety of malignant small bowel tumor and a clinical presentation with intussusception is unusual. We suggest that an aggressive management approach using a combination of surgery and a newer technique like RFA can be attempted in patients with limited metastatic spread to liver to prolong the long-term survival in a subset of patients.

  19. Life-threating upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to a primary aorto-jejunal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Fernández de Sevilla, Elena; Echeverri, Juan Andrés; Boqué, Miriam; Valverde, Silvia; Ortega, Nuria; Gené, Anna; Rodríguez, Nivardo; Balibrea, José María; Armengol, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary aorto-enteric fistula (AEF) is an uncommon life-threating condition. Only 4% of them involve the jejunum or ileum and its mortality ranges from 33 to 85%. Presentation of case A 54-year-old female was admitted to the Emergency Department with syncope and hematemesis. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy found a pulsatile vessel in the second portion of the duodenum. A computed tomography scan showed an AEF with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and iliac artery thrombosis. During surgery, an infrarenal aortic aneurysm complicated with an aorto-jejunal fistula was found. An axilo-bifemoral bypass, open repair of the aneurysm and segmental small bowel resection with primary suture of the jejunal defect were performed. Discussion Depending on previous aortic grafting, AEF can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary AEF is usually caused by an untreated abdominal aortic aneurysm, commonly presenting an infectious etiology. The main clinical sign is a “herald” hemorrhage. The EGD is considered as the first step in diagnosing AEF. The treatment of choice for AEF is emergent surgery. Use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is mandatory in the postoperative period to avoid fistula recurrence. Conclusion AEF is a rare entity with a high mortality. High clinical suspicion is essential to make a correct diagnosis, which is crucial for the prognosis of these patients, such is the case of our patient. If hemodynamic stability is achieved, it allows to employ surgical strategies in which extra-abdominal bypass is performed before fistula is treated. PMID:25616071

  20. In vitro uptake of amino acids in the jejunal mucosa of patients with cholera.

    PubMed

    Khin Maung, U

    1993-06-01

    In vitro uptake of 14C-labelled amino acids was studied in jejunal mucosa biopsy specimens from 64 adults admitted for treatment of cholera (proven by stool culture) within 48 hours of onset of watery diarrhoea to determine the state of amino acid carriers in the jejunal mucosa during actively purging disease. Continued absorption of amino acids by the NBB carrier (for neutral amino acids), the Y+ system (for dibasic amino acids), and the PHE carrier were operative even during the actively purging stage of watery diarrhoea due to cholera. The IMINO carrier for absorption of N-substituted amino acids was found to be inoperative during cholera but the imino acids could be absorbed by the PHE carrier. This study demonstrates continued intestinal absorption of amino acids during cholera, provides scientific basis for use of amino acids in "improved" oral rehydration solutions utilising amino acid transport systems which are linked to the absorption of sodium (and water) so that reduction in diarrhoeal stools can be achieved, and emphasises the importance of maintaining feeding during acute diarrhoea to prevent the development of malnutrition.

  1. Jejunal uptake of thiamin hydrochloride in man: influence of alcoholism and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Breen, K J; Buttigieg, R; Iossifidis, S; Lourensz, C; Wood, B

    1985-07-01

    The jejunal uptake of 35S-thiamin hydrochloride was examined using an intestinal perfusion technique in six young students (group 1), 12 recently drinking alcoholic men (group 3) and in 6 non-drinking men age-matched with the alcoholic men (group 2). The acute effect of alcohol on thiamin uptake was also examined in the alcoholic subjects. At a perfusate thiamin concentration of 0.5 mumol/l, median thiamin uptake was 34.4, 10.4, and 6.8 ng/cm/min in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively, while for 8.0 mumol thiamin/l, median uptake was 277.2, 102.3, and 98.0 ng/cm/min for these groups respectively. Alcohol, 50 g/l, added to the perfusate gave a 28.9% decrease in uptake of 0.5 microM thiamin, which was not statistically significant. These findings suggest that neither alcoholism nor acute exposure to alcohol limits jejunal uptake of thiamin hydrochloride. Differences noted between young and old controls need further study.

  2. A case of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis diagnosed by double-balloon enteroscopy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ignacio; Latorre, Rafael; Soria, Federico; Carballo, Fernando; Lopez-Albors, Octavio; Buendia, Antonio J; Perez-Cuadrado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    A 3 yr old male English setter dog was presented for evaluation of a 6-wk history of intermittent diarrhea. After standard gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy showed normal mucosa, double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) was used via both oral and anal approaches. Gross changes consistent with inflammation in the jejunum were seen, and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histologic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis. Clinical remission of the disease occurred after 3 mo of therapy with prednisone, metronidazole, and a novel protein diet. Use of DBE has not been previously reported in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease, and isolated lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis has not been described. The described cases of intestinal inflammatory disease diagnosed by conventional endoscopy were related to pathologic changes in the duodenum, ileum or colon, but not the jejunum. The main advantage of the DBE technique allowed examination of portions of the small intestine (jejunum) that were not commonly accessible by standard endoscopic techniques, and permitted a minimally invasive collection of biopsy samples compared with surgical biopsy. This case highlights the need to consider using DBE in animals with gastrointestinal disorders, whose symptoms are not readily explained by routine tests, conventional endoscopy, and dietary or therapeutic trials.

  3. The correlation of micro-organisms between tonsillar crypt culture and tonsillar core culture in chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Mahakit, Prasit; Moungthong, Greetha; Sombulna, Tananun; Chantaratchada, Sudaluk

    2005-11-01

    This study was undertaken to seek the correlation between tonsillar core and tonsillar crypt cultures and study the incidence of beta- lactamase producing bacteria (BLPB) in chronic tonsillitis patients. The study was carried out in Department of Otolaryngology from Feb 2000 to Dec 2001. Patients with chronic tonsillitis who underwent tonsillectomy were enrolled, and culture results from tonsillar crypts were compared with tonsillar core. The tonsil were removed from 61 patients. Age ranging from 2-14 years (n=21) and 15-50 years (N= 40); H. influenza (25.2%), S. aureus (23.4%), and S. viridian (11.3%) were isolated from tonsillar core, while 25.9% and 24% of organisms isolated from tonsillar crypt were H. influenza and S. aurieus, respectively. Correlations between tonsillar core and tonsillar crypt culture were 100% specificity for Group A beta hemolytic streptococcocus (GABHS), 86.2% for H. influenza and 81.5% for S. aureus. Regarding beta-lactamase production, 29.2% of H. influenza were beta lactamase producing bacteria (BLPB), while 88.9% of S. aureus were BLPB. The present study demonstrates a high correlation in cultures obtained from tonsillar crypt and tonsillar core. The difference in isolated technique may account for the higher correlation when compared to previous studies. The incidence of beta- lactamase producing bacteria in chronic tonsillitis was high.

  4. Evidence of amiloride-sensitive fluid absorption in rat descending colonic crypts from fluorescence recovery of FITC-labelled dextran after photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Pedley, Kevin C; Naftalin, Richard J

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled 10 and 250 kDa dextran (FITC dextran) in isolated rat descending colonic crypts was measured at 35 °C using laser scanning confocal microscopy. FRAP of either 10 or 250 kDa FITC dextran in crypt lumens was almost complete within 2–3 min. In the presence of amiloride (0.1 mm), or in the absence of Na+, the rate of FITC dextran uptake into the crypt lumens was reduced by 70–80 %. The rate of fluid uptake into the crypt lumen, as estimated from the rate of total FITC dextran uptake into the crypt lumen and its adjacent pericryptal region after FRAP, was between 1.3 × 10−3 and 1.7 × 10−3 cm s−1. Convective flow during FRAP was also determined from the initial rate of FITC dextran advance along the crypt lumen. This effect was almost completely blocked by amiloride (0.1 mm). The permeability of 10 kDa FITC dextran across the descending colonic crypt wall was found to be higher than that of 250 kDa FITC dextran (3.7 (± 0.6) × 10−5 and 1.8 (± 0.3) × 10−6 cm s−1, respectively; n = 3 for both, P < 0.01). The permeability of the caecal crypt wall to 10 kDa dextran was higher than that of the descending crypt wall (2.03 (± 0.21) × 10−5 cm s−1; n = 3, P < 0.025). Simulation of the flow of Na+, water and FITC dextran into the crypt lumen and across the crypt wall and pericryptal sheath corroborates the observed parameters of water and Na+ flows. PMID:11600688

  5. Fluorescence-based SMC and OCT endoscope to study aberrant crypt foci in the mouse colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Molly; Leung, Sarah; Rice, Faith; Wall, R. Andrew; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2013-03-01

    The accepted model of colorectal cancer assumes the paradigm that aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are the earliest events in tumorigenesis and develop into adenoma, which further develop into adenocarcinoma. Under this assumption, basic research and drug studies have been performed using ACF as substitute markers for fully developed carcinoma. While studies have shown a correlation between the number of ACF present and the presence of adenoma/adenocarcinoma, a causal relationship has yet to be determined. The mouse has shown to be an excellent model for colorectal cancer; however, the outcomes of such experiments require sacrifice and histologic examination of ex vivo tissue. To better utilize the mouse model to study ACF and adenoma development, an endoscope was constructed for non-destructive in vivo surface visualization, molecular imaging and cross-sectional imaging of the colon. Our system combines surface magnifying chromoendoscopy (SMC) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image colon microstructure. Sixteen mice, treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane, were imaged at 2 week intervals, to visualize carcinogenesis events. With this dual-modality system we are able to visualize crypt structure alteration over time as well as adenoma development over time.

  6. Dietary polyamines promote the growth of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, J E; Reistad, R; Eliassen, K A; Sjaastad, O V; Alexander, J

    1997-10-01

    We have examined whether dietary polyamines influence the formation and initial growth of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. Effects of a combination of dietary polyamines at three dose levels (putrescine: 50, 280, 740 nmol/g; spermidine: 10, 261, 763 nmol/g; spermine: 1, 31, 91 nmol/g) in the polyamine-poor AIN-76A diet were studied in animals in two different experimental situations: animals treated with AOM alone and animals treated with AOM + difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a specific inhibitor of endogenous polyamine synthesis. In both experimental situations, dietary polyamines enhanced the growth of ACF, expressed as the number of large ACF (foci with three or more aberrant crypts, ACF > or = 3), whereas the formation of ACF, expressed as the number of ACF, was apparently not altered. In animals treated with AOM alone, maximal growth enhancing effect on ACF was nearly obtained with the median level of dietary polyamine. In rats fed a low polyamine diet, basic AIN-76A, DFMO reduced the growth of AOM-induced ACF by 83%. This inhibitory effect of DFMO was counteracted by dietary polyamines in a dose-dependent manner, and it was abolished at the highest level of polyamines. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that dietary polyamines are able to enhance the growth of AOM-induced ACF. Further, dietary polyamines reversed the DFMO-caused inhibition of ACF growth, probably by compensating for the DFMO-reduced endogenous polyamine synthesis.

  7. Chromoendoscopy with a Standard-Resolution Colonoscope for Evaluation of Rectal Aberrant Crypt Foci

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Marcin; Zinkiewicz, Krzysztof; Kurpiewski, Waldemar; Kowalczyk, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death worldwide. According to the theory by Vogelstein, colorectal carcinogenesis involves a series of successive changes in the normal colonic mucosa, starting with excessive proliferation and focal disorders of intestinal crypts, followed by adenoma and its subsequent malignant transformation. The first identifiable changes in CRC carcinogenesis are aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ACF are invisible during routine colonoscopy yet are well identifiable in chromoendoscopy using methylene blue or indigo carmine. High-resolution colonoscopes are used for assessment of ACF. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of standard-resolution colonoscopy for identification of rectal ACF. The following parameters were evaluated: duration of chromoendoscopy of a given rectal segment, type of ACF, sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy combined with histopathological evaluation. The mean duration of colonoscopy and chromoendoscopy was 26.8 min. In the study population, typical ACF were found in 73 patients (p = 0.489), hyperplastic ACF in 49 (p = 0.328), and dysplastic ACF in 16 patients (p = 0.107). Mixed ACF were observed in 11 individuals (p = 0.073). The sensitivity of the method was found to be 0.96 whereas its specificity 0.99. Identification of rectal ACF using standard-resolution colonoscopy combined with rectal mucosa staining with 0.25% methylene blue is characterised by high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26886097

  8. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  9. Laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with double jejunal loop reconstruction: an old trick for a new dog.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marcel Autran C; Makdissi, Fabio F; Surjan, Rodrigo C T; Machado, Marcel C C

    2013-02-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy is an established procedure for the treatment of benign and malignant diseases located at the pancreatic head and periampullary region. In order to decrease morbidity and mortality, we devised a unique technique using two different jejunal loops to avoid activation of pancreatic juice by biliary secretion and therefore reduce the severity of pancreatic fistula. This technique has been used for open pancreatoduodenectomy worldwide but to date has never been described for laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy. This article reports the technique of laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with two jejunal loops for reconstruction of the alimentary tract. After pancreatic head resection, retrocolic end-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy with duct-to-mucosa anastomosis is performed. The jejunal loop is divided with a stapler, and side-to-side jejunojejunostomy is performed with the stapler, leaving a 40-cm jejunal loop for retrocolic hepaticojejunostomy. Finally, end-to-side duodenojejunostomy is performed in an antecolic fashion. This technique has been successfully used in 3 consecutive patients with pancreatic head tumors: 2 patients underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy, and 1 patient underwent totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy. One patient presented a Grade A pancreatic fistula that was managed conservatively. One patient received blood transfusion. Mean operative time was 9 hours. Mean hospital stay was 7 days. No postoperative mortality was observed. Laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with double jejunal loop reconstruction is feasible and may be useful to decrease morbidity and mortality after pancreatoduodenectomy. This operation is challenging and may be reserved for highly skilled laparoscopic surgeons.

  10. The chemopreventive potential of Curcuma purpurascens rhizome in reducing azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rouhollahi, Elham; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Al-Henhena, Nawal; Kunasegaran, Thubasni; Hasanpourghadi, Mohadeseh; Looi, Chung Yeng; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri; Awang, Khalijah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    Curcuma purpurascens BI. rhizome, a member of the Zingiberaceae family, is a popular spice in Indonesia that is traditionally used in assorted remedies. Dichloromethane extract of C. purpurascens BI. rhizome (DECPR) has previously been shown to have an apoptosis-inducing effect on colon cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the potential of DECPR to prevent colon cancer development in rats treated with azoxymethane (AOM) (15 mg/kg) by determining the percentage inhibition in incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF). Starting from the day immediately after AOM treatment, three groups of rats were orally administered once a day for 2 months either 10% Tween 20 (5 mL/kg, cancer control), DECPR (250 mg/kg, low dose), or DECPR (500 mg/kg, high dose). Meanwhile, the control group was intraperitoneally injected with 5-fluorouracil (35 mg/kg) for 5 consecutive days. After euthanizing the rats, the number of ACF was enumerated in colon tissues. Bax, Bcl-2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expressions were examined using immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Antioxidant enzymatic activity was measured in colon tissue homogenates and associated with malondialdehyde level. The percentage inhibition of ACF was 56.04% and 68.68% in the low- and high-dose DECPR-treated groups, respectively. The ACF inhibition in the treatment control group was 74.17%. Results revealed that DECPR exposure at both doses significantly decreased AOM-induced ACF formation, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PCNA. Upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 suggested the involvement of apoptosis in the chemopreventive effect of DECPR. In addition, the oxidative stress resulting from AOM treatment was significantly attenuated after administration of DECPR, which was shown by the elevated antioxidant enzymatic activity and reduced malondialdehyde level. Taken together, the present data clearly indicate that DECPR significantly inhibits ACF formation

  11. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  12. First jejunal artery, an alternative graft for right hepatic artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Komokata, Teruo; Kadono, Jun; Motodaka, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Tetsuya; Furoi, Akira; Imoto, Yutaka

    2015-04-08

    Common bile duct cancer invading right hepatic artery is sometimes diagnosed intraoperatively. Excision and safe reconstruction of the artery with suitable graft is essential. Arterial reconstruction with autologous saphenous vein graft is the preferred method practiced routinely. However the right hepatic artery reconstruction has also been carried out with several other vessels like gastroduodenal artery, right gastroepiploic artery or the splenic artery. We report a case of 63-year-old man presenting with history of progressive jaundice, pruritus and impaired appetite. Following various imaging modalities including computed tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, intraductal ultrasound extrahepatic bile duct cancer was diagnosed; however, none of those detected vessel invasion. Intraoperatively, right hepatic artery invasion was revealed. Right hepatic artery was resected and reconstructed with a graft harvested from the first jejunal artery (JA). Postoperative outcome was satisfactory with a long-term graft patency. First JA can be a reliable graft option for right hepatic artery reconstruction.

  13. Intussusception and volvulus secondary to jejunal adenocarcinoma in an adult Nigerian male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okolo, C A; Afolabi, A O; Sahabi, S M

    2010-12-01

    A 31 year-old Nigerian man with jejuno-jejunal intussusception with the lead point being an adenocarcinoma complicated by small intestinal volvulus is presented. The subtle clinical features of an underlying small bowel malignancy were masked by the overwhelming clinical and radiological features of intussusception. rare case is reported to remind clinicians to have an increased index of suspicion of malignancy in patients who present with the usual features of chronic anemia, weight loss and loss of appetite with an intra-abdominal mass. The presentation of acute intestinal obstruction, with mesenteric vein thrombosis probably due to intussusception or volvulus should not however lower the suspicion. Histological evaluation of surgical biopsies is of immense importance.

  14. Familial Apple Peel Jejunal Atresia with Helical Umbilical Cord Ulcerations in Three Consecutive Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Jaiman, Sunil; Gundabattula, Sirisha Rao; Ratha, Chinmayee

    2016-01-01

    Apple peel deformity is a rare form of upper intestinal atresia of unknown etiology. Umbilical cord ulcers can occur secondary to reflux of gastric juice and bile as a result of the atresia and can cause lethal intrauterine hemorrhage. The authors report 3 instances of congenital apple peel jejunal atresia with helical umbilical cord ulcers afflicting all female offspring in consecutive pregnancies in a single nonconsanguineous family. There was no hemorrhage from the cord ulcers, but all 3 pregnancies resulted in perinatal death. Although familial occurrence is known, our case series is probably the 1st from the Indian subcontinent and warrants further research into the genetic mechanisms and possible ethnic differences of congenital upper intestinal atresia. The causation of sudden fetal demise in the absence of antecedent cord hemorrhage remains elusive.

  15. Jejunal intussusception: a rare cause of an acute abdomen in adults.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonali; Eagles, Natasha; Thomas, Peter

    2014-05-28

    Abdominal pain secondary to intussusception is a common presentation in the paediatric population but rare in adults. Diagnosis is often difficult due to non-specific signs and symptoms. Adult intussusception presents more insidiously with intermittent abdominal pain and signs and symptoms of an acute abdomen are rare. In children, the aetiological factor is usually idiopathic, whereas intussusception in adults is more commonly due to an underlying pathology giving rise to a lead point. Consequently the treatment of choice is different-while it is supportive in children, surgical management is typically indicated in adults. In addition, the causes of a lead point precipitating adult intussusception are different depending on whether they arise from the small or large bowel. This report presents a case of jejunal intussusception in a 30-year-old man with a characteristic CT scan who required exploratory laparotomy and small bowel resection. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-11-02

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Jejunal intussusception: a rare cause of an acute abdomen in adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonali; Eagles, Natasha; Thomas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain secondary to intussusception is a common presentation in the paediatric population but rare in adults. Diagnosis is often difficult due to non-specific signs and symptoms. Adult intussusception presents more insidiously with intermittent abdominal pain and signs and symptoms of an acute abdomen are rare. In children, the aetiological factor is usually idiopathic, whereas intussusception in adults is more commonly due to an underlying pathology giving rise to a lead point. Consequently the treatment of choice is different—while it is supportive in children, surgical management is typically indicated in adults. In addition, the causes of a lead point precipitating adult intussusception are different depending on whether they arise from the small or large bowel. This report presents a case of jejunal intussusception in a 30-year-old man with a characteristic CT scan who required exploratory laparotomy and small bowel resection. PMID:24872480

  18. The diagnostic value of the triple bubble sign in proximal jejunal atresia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Amole, A O D; Johnson, A W B R; Adesiyun, O A M

    2003-03-01

    Proximal jejunal atresia (PJA) is a common cause of intestinal obstruction in the newborn. Despite the need for an early surgical intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality, a timely identification is frequently precluded by the absence of specific clinical and investigative clues. Against the background of the limitations in making a timely diagnosis of PJA in a tropical setting, where opportunities for high-tech imaging tools are few, we report the diagnostic value of the "triple bubble" sign on the plain radiograph of a Nigerian infant. This radiologic finding led to an early diagnosis and ultimately a prompt surgical extirpation. The paper suggests that the presence of this sign should be a pointer to an early diagnosis of PJA.

  19. Prognostic indicators for horses with duodenitis-proximal jejunitis. 75 horses (1985-1989).

    PubMed

    Seahorn, T L; Cornick, J L; Cohen, N D

    1992-01-01

    The medical records of 75 horses with duodenitis-proximal jejunitis (DPJ) were reviewed. Ages, physical parameters, laboratory values, and treatment data were compared between horses surviving DPJ and horses not surviving DPJ (Table 1). Fifty of 75 horses (66.6%) survived. Sixty-six horses (88.0%) were managed with medical treatment alone and nine horses (12.0%) were managed with medical treatment plus surgical intervention. Using a logistic regression model, the association of each of the 19 physical and laboratory parameters with death was evaluated retrospectively in the 75 horses. Three parameters (anion gap, abdominal fluid total protein concentration, and volume of gastric fluid for the first 24 hours of hospitalization) were significantly associated with death by univariate analysis. Using a stepwise multiple logistic regression, two parameters remained significantly associated with death (P < 0.05), anion gap and abdominal fluid total protein concentration.

  20. Outcome after radial forearm, gastro-omental, and jejunal free flaps in oral and oropharyngeal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Smith, G I; Brennan, P A; Scott, P J; Ilankovan, V

    2002-08-01

    We undertook a retrospective study of the outcome of radial forearm, gastro-omental, and jejunal free tissue transfer for oral and oropharyngeal reconstruction in 30 patients (10 in each group). No significant differences were found between the type of free flap and the clinical outcome. More long-term difficulties were experienced with swallowing than with speech. The selection of free flap did not correlate with speech function (P=0.44), swallowing (P=0.68), or management of saliva (P=0.59). No significant difference was found between the patients' outcome and the site of resection of the tumour. There were more complications after gastro-omental flaps and this may influence the choice of reconstruction.

  1. A life-threatening presentation of child physical abuse: jejunal perforation.

    PubMed

    Kondolot, Meda; Yağmur, Fatih; Yıkılmaz, Ali; Turan, Cüneyt; Öztop, Didem B; Oral, Resmiye

    2011-11-01

    Intra-abdominal injuries from impacts are the second most common cause of death in battered children. However, it may be difficult to distinguish between accidental abdominal injury and abuse, especially in the absence of other clinical findings. Published reports are also limited about the diagnosis of abuse in children with intra-abdominal injury. We report a case with jejunal perforation, multiple soft tissue injuries, and occipital fracture secondary to child abuse who was initially admitted to our hospital with complaint of fever, cough, and vomiting. An exploratory laparotomy revealed perforation of the jejunum, and an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The patient was evaluated by the hospital's child protective team to implement appropriate diagnostic and child-protective interventions, and the child was discharged home in 10 days.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF THE GASTRO-JEJUNO-DUODENAL TRANSIT AFTER JEJUNAL POUCH INTERPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; GOMES, Célio Geraldo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background : The jejunal pouch interposition between the gastric body and the duodenum after the gastrectomy, although not frequent in the surgical practice today, has been successfully employed for the prevention and treatment of the postgastrectomy syndromes. In the latter, it is included the dumping syndrome, which affects 13-58% of the patients who undergo gastrectomy. Aim : Retrospective assessment of the results of this procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome. Methods : Fourty patients were selected and treatetd surgically for peptic ulcer, between 1965 and 1970. Of these, 29 underwent vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunalduodenostomy at the lesser curvature level, and the 11 remaining were submitted to vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunal-duodenostomy at the greater curvature level. The gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit was assessed in the immediate or late postoperative with the contrasted study of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The clinical evolution was assessed according to the Visick grade. Results : Of the 40 patients, 28 were followed with the contrast evaluation in the late postoperative. Among those who were followed until the first month (n=22), 20 (90%) had slow gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit and in two (10%) the transit was normal. Among those who were followed after the first month (n=16), three (19%) and 13 (81%) had slow and normal gastric emptying, respectively. None had the contrasted exam compatible with the dumping syndrome. Among the 40 patients, 22 underwent postoperative clinical evaluation. Of these, 19 (86,5%) had excellent and good results (Visick 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusions : The jejunal pouch interposition showed to be a very effective surgical procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome in gastrectomized patients. PMID:26734789

  3. Long-term functional speech and swallowing outcomes following pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sharp, David A; Theile, David R; Cook, Renee; Coman, William B

    2010-06-01

    Surgery for advanced cancer of the hypopharynx is a complex issue. Surgical intervention needs to take into consideration the resultant quality of life, in particular fundamental functional outcomes such as speech and swallowing. The aim of this study is to look at these long-term functional outcomes, following pharyngolaryngectomy and free jejunal reconstruction. A total of 19 patients, each undergoing a pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal graft was included. Each had a primary tracheoesophageal puncture for insertion of an indwelling voice prosthesis for speech. Functional outcomes of speech and swallow were assessed by a qualified speech pathologist. The impact on patients' quality of life was assessed under 4 domains: impairment, disability, handicap, and well being. The mean time period to follow-up was 4 years. Eighteen of the 19 patients were tolerating an oral diet, with one patient reliant on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeds. Seventeen patients (89%) were assessed as either having either no--or only a mild degree--of dysphagia, with no evidence of aspiration. Of the 19 patients, 15 were utilizing tracheosophageal speech for communication with 11 (73%) having no--or only a mild degree--of dsyphonia. Patients assessed as having no evidence of dysphagia or dysphonia also reported reduced levels of handicap and distress compared with patients experiencing any degree of dysphagia (P = 0.46) or dysphonia (P = 0.01). While rates of pharyngolaryngectomy increase, most patients have a poor long-term prognosis, heightening the significance of postoperative outcomes. The results of this study highlight the importance of speech and swallow outcomes, and demonstrate the direct correlation between these functions and resultant quality of life.

  4. In Vitro Exposure to Escherichia coli Decreases Ion Conductance in the Jejunal Epithelium of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha A.; Hess, Claudia; Khayal, Basel; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Hess, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections are very widespread in poultry. However, little is known about the interaction between the intestinal epithelium and E. coli in chickens. Therefore, the effects of avian non-pathogenic and avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) on the intestinal function of broiler chickens were investigated by measuring the electrogenic ion transport across the isolated jejunal mucosa. In addition, the intestinal epithelial responses to cholera toxin, histamine and carbamoylcholine (carbachol) were evaluated following an E. coli exposure. Jejunal tissues from 5-week-old broilers were exposed to 6×108 CFU/mL of either avian non-pathogenic E. coli IMT11322 (Ont:H16) or avian pathogenic E. coli IMT4529 (O24:H4) in Ussing chambers and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 1 h. After incubation with E. coli for 1 h, either cholera toxin (1 mg/L), histamine (100 μM) or carbachol (100 μM) were added to the incubation medium. Both strains of avian E. coli (non-pathogenic and pathogenic) reduced epithelial ion conductance (Gt) and short-circuit current (Isc). The decrease in ion conductance after exposure to avian pathogenic E. coli was, at least, partly reversed by the histamine or carbachol treatment. Serosal histamine application produced no significant changes in the Isc in any tissues. Only the uninfected control tissues responded significantly to carbachol with an increase of Isc, while the response to carbachol was blunted to non-significant values in infected tissues. Together, these data may explain why chickens rarely respond to intestinal infections with overt secretory diarrhea. Instead, the immediate response to intestinal E. coli infections appears to be a tightening of the epithelial barrier. PMID:24637645

  5. In vitro exposure to Escherichia coli decreases ion conductance in the jejunal epithelium of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Khayal, Basel; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Hess, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections are very widespread in poultry. However, little is known about the interaction between the intestinal epithelium and E. coli in chickens. Therefore, the effects of avian non-pathogenic and avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) on the intestinal function of broiler chickens were investigated by measuring the electrogenic ion transport across the isolated jejunal mucosa. In addition, the intestinal epithelial responses to cholera toxin, histamine and carbamoylcholine (carbachol) were evaluated following an E. coli exposure. Jejunal tissues from 5-week-old broilers were exposed to 6×10(8) CFU/mL of either avian non-pathogenic E. coli IMT11322 (Ont:H16) or avian pathogenic E. coli IMT4529 (O24:H4) in Ussing chambers and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 1 h. After incubation with E. coli for 1 h, either cholera toxin (1 mg/L), histamine (100 μM) or carbachol (100 μM) were added to the incubation medium. Both strains of avian E. coli (non-pathogenic and pathogenic) reduced epithelial ion conductance (Gt) and short-circuit current (Isc). The decrease in ion conductance after exposure to avian pathogenic E. coli was, at least, partly reversed by the histamine or carbachol treatment. Serosal histamine application produced no significant changes in the Isc in any tissues. Only the uninfected control tissues responded significantly to carbachol with an increase of Isc, while the response to carbachol was blunted to non-significant values in infected tissues. Together, these data may explain why chickens rarely respond to intestinal infections with overt secretory diarrhea. Instead, the immediate response to intestinal E. coli infections appears to be a tightening of the epithelial barrier.

  6. The suppression of aberrant crypt multiplicity in colonic tissue of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated C57BL/6J mice by dietary flavone is associated with an increased expression of Krebs cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Isabel; Diehl, Daniela; Oesterle, Doris; Daniel, Hannelore; Wenzel, Uwe

    2007-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with diet playing a prominent role in disease initiation and progression. Flavonoids are secondary plant compounds that are suggested as protective ingredients of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. We here tested whether flavone, a flavonoid that proved to be an effective apoptosis inducer in colon cancer cells in culture, can affect the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs) in C57BL/6J mice in vivo when preneoplastic lesions were induced by the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Flavone applied at either a low dose (15 mg/kg body wt per day) or a high dose (400 mg/kg body wt per day) reduced the numbers of ACFs significantly, independent of whether it was supplied simultaneously with the carcinogen (blocking group) or subsequent to the tumor induction phase (suppressing group). Proteome analysis performed in colonic tissue samples revealed that flavone treatment increased the expression of a number of Krebs cycle enzymes in the suppressing group and this was associated with reduced crypt multiplicity. It suggests that mitochondrial substrate oxidation is increased by flavone in colonic cells in vivo as already observed in HT-29 cells in vitro as the prime mechanism underlying tumor cell apoptosis induction by flavone. In conclusion, flavone reduces the number of ACFs in DMH-treated mice at doses that can be achieved for flavonoids by a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Moreover, reduction in crypt multiplicity by flavone is most probably due to the preservation of a normal oxidative metabolism.