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Sample records for jejunal mesentery presenting

  1. An Atypical Presentation of Sporadic Jejunal Burkitt's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a very aggressive type of B-cell NHL with replication approaching 100%. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is rare. In our case, a 24-year-old male initially presented with symptomatic anemia. He was initially evaluated with colonoscopy and EGD, both of which were unremarkable. A capsule endoscopy was then performed to further evaluate his significant anemia which revealed friable inflamed ulcerated mass in the jejunum. A push enteroscopy was then performed to obtain tissue from the jejunal mass. Biopsy results and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with Burkitt's lymphoma. PET/CT scan revealed only jejunal involvement. Treatment consisted of bowel resection prior to chemotherapy due to concern for perforation with chemotherapy. Patient achieved complete remission after the treatment. PMID:27672459

  2. Rapunzel syndrome presenting as jejuno-jejunal intussusception.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Sanjay; Pandey, Siddharth; Raj, Abhishek; Jangra, Mahavir Singh; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    The term Rapunzel syndrome is used to describe a trichobezoar of the stomach with a long tail of hair extending into the duodenum and small intestine. It is a rare clinical entity, and it is even rarer in these cases that jejuno-jejunal intussusception and resulting intestinal obstruction is a presenting feature. We report one such case, a young female who presented in the emergency department with abdominal pain and bilious vomiting of short duration. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen enabled a diagnosis of a trichobezoar in the stomach extending into the small gut, along with jejuno-jejunal intussusception. On exploration, gastrotomy was performed to remove the gastric trichobezoar, and jejuno-jejunal intussusception was found on three segments in the proximal jejunum, which was resolved upon complete removal of the tail of the bezoar. This case report is unusual, since intussusception is a rare occurrence in Rapunzel syndrome, and this is the first time that it has been diagnosed preoperatively.

  3. Giant cystic lymphangioma of the mesentery: varied clinical presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rami, Mohamed; Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; El Madi, Aziz; Khalid; Khattala; Afifi, Moulay Abderrahmane; Bouabdallah, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    Giant cystic lymphangioma is an uncommon mesenteric tumor which is usually reported in children. In this paper, we describe 3 cases, that was admitted in our department, two with abdominal distension, pain, and an abdominopelvic mass; the other present an acute abdomen. Preoperative studies including abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography failed to determine the cause of the pain for the female patients. The laparotomy found a giant cystic tumor of the small bowel mesentery. The histological study showed a tumor that was diagnosed as a cystic lymphangioma. Based on those three cases a review of the literature is suggested.

  4. Computed tomography of the normal mesentery

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Kelvin, F.M.; Korobkin, M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-11-01

    Thirty patients were studied to evaluate the CT appearance of the normal mesentery and its vasculature. Mesenteric vessels were identified by determining their relations to segments of the small bowel and colon in the 30 patients. Jejunal and ileal branches supplying small bowel were identified in all patients. The ileocolic and right colic branches of the ascending colon were identified in 27 and 26 patients, respectively; middle colic vessels were identified in 29 patients. The vessels showed a characteristic wavy appearance as they coursed through mesenteric fat. Normal lymph nodes were not routinely identified within the mesentery. Various pathologic processes altered the normal appearance of the components of the mesentery.

  5. Jejunal Perforation: A Rare Presentation of Burkitt's Lymphoma—Successful Management

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Samir Ranjan; Rao, Ganni Bhaskara; Yerraguntla, Subramanya Sarma; Bodepudi, Sisir

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the small bowel presenting as acute abdomen are a rare occurrence. Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as a surgical emergency needing emergency laparotomy is an uncommon presentation of this tumor. We present an interesting case of jejunal perforation as a first manifestation of Burkitt's lymphoma which was successfully managed with surgical resection, high dose chemotherapy, and good supportive care. PMID:24995139

  6. Jejunal Diverticulosis Presented with Acute Abdomen and Diverticulitis Complication: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Nurdan; Mermi, Esra Ummuhan; Acay, Mehtap Beker; Murat, Muammer; Zobaci, Ethem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare, usually asymptomatic disease. Its incidence increases with age. If symptomatic, diverticulosis may cause life-threatening acute complications such as diverticulitis, perforation, intestinal hemorrhage and obstruction. In this report, we aimed to present a 67-year-old male patient with jejunal diverticulitis accompanying with abdominal pain and vomiting. Case Report A 67-year-old male patient complaining of epigastric pain for a week and nausea and fever for a day presented to our emergency department. Ultrasonographic examination in our clinic revealed diverticulum-like images with thickened walls adjacent to the small intestine loops, and increase in the echogenicity of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography showed multiple diverticula, thickened walls with showing contrast enhancement and adjacent jejunum in the left middle quadrant, increased density of the surrounding mesenteric fat tissue, and mesenteric lymph nodes. The patient was hospitalized by general surgery department with the diagnosis of jejunal diverticulitis. Conservative intravenous fluid administration and antibiotic therapy were initiated. Clinical symptoms regressed and the patient was discharged from hospital after 2 weeks. Conclusions In cases of diverticulitis it should be kept in mind that in patients with advanced age and pain in the left quadrant of the abdomen, diverticular disease causing mortality and morbidity does not always originate from the colon but might also originate from the jejunum. PMID:26715947

  7. An unusual presentation of a malignant jejunal tumor and a different management strategy.

    PubMed

    Samaiya, Atul; Deo, Sv Suryanarayana; Thulkar, Sanjay; Hazarika, Sidhartha; Kumar, Sunil; Parida, Dillip K; Shukla, Nootan K

    2005-01-09

    BACKGROUND: Malignant small bowel tumors are very rare and leiomyosarcoma accounts for less than 15% of the cases. Management of these tumors is challenging in view of nonspecific symptoms, unusual presentation and high incidence of metastasis. In this case report, an unusual presentation of jejunal sarcoma and management of liver metastasis with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is discussed. CASE PRESENTATION: A 45-year-old male presented with anemia and features of small bowel obstruction. Operative findings revealed a mass lesion in jejunum with intussusception of proximal loop. Resection of bowel mass was performed. Histopathological findings were suggestive of leiomyosarcoma. After 3-years of follow-up, the patient developed recurrence in infracolic omentum and a liver metastasis. The omental mass was resected and liver lesion was managed with radiofrequency ablation. CONCLUSION: Jejunal leiomyosarcoma is a rare variety of malignant small bowel tumor and a clinical presentation with intussusception is unusual. We suggest that an aggressive management approach using a combination of surgery and a newer technique like RFA can be attempted in patients with limited metastatic spread to liver to prolong the long-term survival in a subset of patients.

  8. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-11-02

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Anemia and jejunal intussusception: An unusual presentation for a metastatic phyllodes breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    Schechet, Sidney A.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Dhamne, Sagar; Scott, Bradford G.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare cause of breast cancer, accounting for less than 0.5% of breast cancers. These tumors are classified as benign, borderline, or malignant, with malignant tumors compromising nearly 25% of cases. Metastases occur in 20% of malignant tumors, lungs, bones, liver and brain being the frequent sites of metastases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a metastatic phyllodes tumor to the small bowel causing jejunal intussusception, symptomatic anemia, and small bowel obstruction. DISCUSSION Patients with phyllodes tumor of the breast can develop disease recurrence even years after initial treatment. Phyllodes tumor metastasizing to the small bowel is extremely rare, with only three known previously described case reports in the literature. CONCLUSION High risk patients, with a past medical history of phyllodes breast cancer, should be monitored closely. Even years after breast cancer treatment, these patients may present with gastrointestinal complaints such as obstruction or bleeding, and therefore metastatic disease to the small bowel should be considered on the differential with subsequent abdominal imaging obtained. PMID:22288047

  10. Anemia and jejunal intussusception: An unusual presentation for a metastatic phyllodes breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Schechet, Sidney A; Askenasy, Erik P; Dhamne, Sagar; Scott, Bradford G

    2012-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare cause of breast cancer, accounting for less than 0.5% of breast cancers. These tumors are classified as benign, borderline, or malignant, with malignant tumors compromising nearly 25% of cases. Metastases occur in 20% of malignant tumors, lungs, bones, liver and brain being the frequent sites of metastases. We present a case of a metastatic phyllodes tumor to the small bowel causing jejunal intussusception, symptomatic anemia, and small bowel obstruction. Patients with phyllodes tumor of the breast can develop disease recurrence even years after initial treatment. Phyllodes tumor metastasizing to the small bowel is extremely rare, with only three known previously described case reports in the literature. High risk patients, with a past medical history of phyllodes breast cancer, should be monitored closely. Even years after breast cancer treatment, these patients may present with gastrointestinal complaints such as obstruction or bleeding, and therefore metastatic disease to the small bowel should be considered on the differential with subsequent abdominal imaging obtained.

  11. A life-threatening presentation of child physical abuse: jejunal perforation.

    PubMed

    Kondolot, Meda; Yağmur, Fatih; Yıkılmaz, Ali; Turan, Cüneyt; Öztop, Didem B; Oral, Resmiye

    2011-11-01

    Intra-abdominal injuries from impacts are the second most common cause of death in battered children. However, it may be difficult to distinguish between accidental abdominal injury and abuse, especially in the absence of other clinical findings. Published reports are also limited about the diagnosis of abuse in children with intra-abdominal injury. We report a case with jejunal perforation, multiple soft tissue injuries, and occipital fracture secondary to child abuse who was initially admitted to our hospital with complaint of fever, cough, and vomiting. An exploratory laparotomy revealed perforation of the jejunum, and an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The patient was evaluated by the hospital's child protective team to implement appropriate diagnostic and child-protective interventions, and the child was discharged home in 10 days.

  12. Isolated Small Bowel Mesentery Injury After Steering Wheel Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Imtiaz; Bhat, Rayees A; Wani, Shayiq; Khan, Nawab; Wani, Rauf A; Parray, Fazal Q

    2012-01-01

    Background Isolated small gut mesentery injury after blunt abdominal trauma from the steering wheel in road traffic accidents is rare. These are always challenging to diagnose and pose a diagnostic dilemma. Objectives To study the pattern of small gut mesenteric injury by steering wheel blunt abdominal trauma in road traffic accidents in patients who had laparotomy. Patients and Methods A 10-year retrospective study was done to study isolated small gut mesentery injury. Results All patients who had isolated mesenteric small gut injury were males. Jejunal mesentery was involved in 13 whereas 4 had ileal mesentery injury. Tear were longitudinal or transverse. Conclusions Isolated small mesentery injury after blunt abdominal trauma from the steering wheel in road traffic accidents is rare. Tears are either longitudinal or transverse. Suture repair is to be done. Delay in reaching hospital or reaching the diagnosis could lead to morbidity and mortality. Isolated mesenteric injury should be considered in any patient with blunt abdominal trauma from steering wheel injury with no evidence of any solid organ injury in unstable patients. PMID:24350106

  13. Segmental misty mesentery: analysis of CT features and primary causes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Bo Kyoung; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Tae Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon-Gyu; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Yu, Eun-Sil; Kim, Jin Ho

    2003-01-01

    To review the computed tomographic (CT) features of segmental misty mesentery (SMM) in 29 patients and assess the primary causes of this CT finding. The authors analyzed the medical records and CT features of SMM in 29 patients. CT images were evaluated for the site, thickness, and vascular changes of the involved mesentery; bowel wall changes; lymphadenopathy; and the fat ring sign. The primary cause of SMM in five patients was determined at histopathologic examination, that in three patients was determined at surgical observation of the mesentery, and that in nine patients was determined on the basis of follow-up CT and clinical data. The primary cause of SMM in 12 patients was unknown. Twenty-five of the 29 patients had various underlying diseases. Fourteen (48%) patients had a malignancy: 11 had intraabdominal cancer and three had extraabdominal cancer. Jejunal mesentery was more commonly involved than was ileal mesentery (P <.05). The mean thickness of the SMM was 4.0 cm. Mesenteric vessels were dilated in 27 patients (93%): 19 with venous dilatation and eight with either arterial dilatation only or both arterial and venous dilatation. At CT, seven (24%) patients had a thickened bowel wall; nine (31%) patients, lymphadenopathy; and two (7%) patients, the fat ring sign. The primary cause of SMM was edema in eight, malignant neoplasm in four, inflammation and/or fibrosis in five, and idiopathic in 12 patients. At CT, SMM appears as a result of malignant neoplasms, inflammation, or vascular disorders. Copyright RSNA, 2002

  14. Complicated Jejunal Diverticulosis: Small Bowel Volvulus with Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohi, Rommel Singh; Moudgil, Ashish; Bhatia, Suresh Kumar; Seth, Kaushal; Kaur, Tajinder

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the diverticulum of the small bowel varies from 0.2-1.3% in autopsy studies to 2.3% when assessed on enteroclysis. It occurs mostly in patients in the 6th decade of their life. Of all the small bowel diverticuli, jejunal diverticulum is the most common type. This rare entity is usually asymptomatic. However, they may cause chronic non-specific symptoms for a long period of time like dyspepsia, chronic postprandial pain, nausea, vomiting, borborgymi, alternating diarrhoea and constipation, weight loss, anaemia, steatorrhea or rarely lead to complications like haemorrhage, obstruction, perforation. Obstruction can be due to enterolith, adhesions, intussusception, and volvulus. The condition is difficult to diagnose because patients are generally presented with symptoms that mimic other diseases. It is important for clinicians to have awareness of this entity. Here, we present a case of multiple jejunal diverticuli with a history of repeated attacks of diverticulitis over past 20 years, which were misdiagnosed and now presented with intestinal obstruction due to volvulus of the involved segment along with mesentery around its axis. Resection of the diverticuli segment of jejunum was done with end-to-end jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. The patient is asymptomatic since 10 months of follow-up. PMID:27853337

  15. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  16. Perforation of jejunal diverticulum with ectopic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shintani, Yukako; Murono, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Perforation of jejunal diverticulum is a rare complication. Here, we report a case of jejunal diverticulum penetration with surrounding ectopic pancreas. An 83-year-old female patient was admitted to our department with acute onset of severe abdominal pain lasting for half a day. Abdominal computed tomography showed outpouching of the small intestine that contained air/fluid, with multiple surrounding air bubbles in the mesentery of the small intestine. She was diagnosed with penetration of the small intestine, and an emergency laparotomy was indicated. The penetrated jejunal diverticulum was identified ~20-cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed, and her postoperative course was uneventful. The pathological findings confirmed diverticulum penetration into the mesentery and severe inflammation at the site, with surrounding ectopic pancreas. Furthermore, the pancreatic ducts were opened through the penetrated diverticulum. This rare case shows that the ectopic pancreas might have caused penetration of jejunal diverticulum owing to the pancreatic duct opening through the diverticulum.

  17. Jejunal perforation: an unusual presentation of metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in an immunosuppressed patient.

    PubMed

    Hitchen, N; Warnapala, D; Fisher, R M; Dua, J; Pratsou, P; Freebairn, A

    2017-01-06

    We report the rare occurrence of a small bowel perforation secondary to a metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). A 70-year-old woman, who had previously undergone renal transplantation, presented with severe, sudden-onset abdominal pain. She was peritonitic on initial examination, with evidence of free intra-abdominal air on radiographic imaging. During an exploratory laparotomy, she was found to have a perforated jejunum secondary to disseminated metastases seen throughout her peritoneum. Following histopathological analysis, as well as further imaging studies, the primary malignancy was eventually identified as a cSCC on her upper back. Palliative care was started and the patient died 8 weeks following her initial presentation. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. The medical mystery of the fatty mesentery.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Ambika; Rayner, Hugh

    2012-08-27

    An 86-year-old gentleman presented with a 3-month history of nausea, anorexia and excruciating generalised abdominal pain. He had been discharged a week earlier from another hospital. No diagnosis had been made. Clinically the patient was feverish, with a palpable, tender and poorly defined mass in his epigastrium. He had elevated inflammatory markers and deranged electrolytes. An ultrasound scan revealed thickening and hyper echogenicity of the small bowel mesentery. A CT scan was recommended; this revealed a diagnosis of mesenteric panniculitis. First described in 1924, mesenteric panniculitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the bowel mesentery. With only a handful of cases being reported in the UK, the authors thought that they had come across a rarity. This case report focuses on the aetiology, diagnosis, pathology and treatment of mesenteric panniculitis. By examining the literature, the authors also suggest that it is relatively underdiagnosed and may be more common than first thought.

  19. Mesentery neurilemmoma: CT, MRI and angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Lao, Wilson T; Yang, Shih-Hung; Chen, Chi-Long; Chan, Wing P

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric neurilemmoma is extremely rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old man with mesenteric neurilemmoma, with CT, MRI and angiographic findings. The patient was healthy and had had no symptoms previously. CT and MRI images revealed a 2.2-cm well-defined, soft-tissue mass adjacent to the posterior border of the left lobe of the liver. The tumor mass displayed a heterogenous low signal on T2-weighted image and peripheral enhancement after gadolinium administration. Angiography showed a hypervascular mass beneath the tail of pancreas, which was supplied by small branches of middle splenic artery. Histopathology revealed a mesentery neurilemmoma composed of spindle tumor cells.

  20. Jejunal Epiphany: Diverticulae, Enteroliths and Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rehmani, Babar; Kumar, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple jejunal diverticulae represent a rare entity and are usually asymptomatic. This case report is about one such jejunal diverticulae along with multiple enteroliths and jejunal strictures. All these three different findings in a short segment of jejunum is a very rare finding with all three variants seen in a segment of jejunum. We herein present a case of a 45-year-old male, who presented with vague abdominal pain for one and half years associated with nausea and vomiting and altered bowel habits. Laparotomy revealed multiple large jejunal diverticulae compressing the bowel with multiple enteroliths and two strictures in a short segment of jejunum leading to intestinal obstruction. Patient underwent resection of the involved jejunal segment and then repair by anastomosis. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:28208925

  1. Primarily Proximal Jejunal Stone Causing Enterolith Ileus in a Patient without Evidence of Cholecystoenteric Fistula or Jejunal Diverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Abtar, Houssam Khodor; Mneimneh, Mostapha; Hammoud, Mazen M; Zaaroura, Ahmed; Papas, Yasmina S

    2016-01-01

    Stone formation within the intestinal lumen is called enterolith. This stone can encroach into the lumen causing obstruction and surgical emergency. Jejunal obstruction by an enterolith is a very rare entity and often missed preoperatively. To our knowledge, most cases of jejunal obstruction, secondary to stone, were associated with biliary disease (cholecystoenteric fistula), bezoar, jejunal diverticulosis, or foreign body. Hereby we present a rare case report of small bowel obstruction in an elderly man who was diagnosed lately to have primary proximal jejunal obstruction by an enterolith without evidence of a cholecystoenteric fistula or jejunal diverticulosis. This patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with stone extraction, and subsequent primary repair of the bowel.

  2. Primarily Proximal Jejunal Stone Causing Enterolith Ileus in a Patient without Evidence of Cholecystoenteric Fistula or Jejunal Diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Mneimneh, Mostapha; Hammoud, Mazen M.; Zaaroura, Ahmed; Papas, Yasmina S.

    2016-01-01

    Stone formation within the intestinal lumen is called enterolith. This stone can encroach into the lumen causing obstruction and surgical emergency. Jejunal obstruction by an enterolith is a very rare entity and often missed preoperatively. To our knowledge, most cases of jejunal obstruction, secondary to stone, were associated with biliary disease (cholecystoenteric fistula), bezoar, jejunal diverticulosis, or foreign body. Hereby we present a rare case report of small bowel obstruction in an elderly man who was diagnosed lately to have primary proximal jejunal obstruction by an enterolith without evidence of a cholecystoenteric fistula or jejunal diverticulosis. This patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with stone extraction, and subsequent primary repair of the bowel. PMID:27803836

  3. Mucinous Cystic Borderline Tumor of the Mesentery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Poudel, R; Acharya, A; Pokhrel, S; Adhikari, S K

    2015-01-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms are rare tumors of uncertain histogenesis. They arise from the ovaries, pancreas, and other intra-abdominal sites but more unusually from the mesentery. They can present with abdominal pain, distension, or a palpable mass but are commonly an incidental finding. We present a case of a 33-year-old female who presented with complain of pain abdomen for one-year duration. On Physical examination there was a palpable lump in right lumbar region extending to right iliac fossa. CT scan of abdomen and pelvis suggested the mass to be a Mesenteric Cyst. Enucleation of the cyst was done and histopathology report revealed Mucinous Cystic borderline tumor of the Mesentery.

  4. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Georgios; Tangalos, Athanasios; Pappa, Polyxeni; Papageorgiou, Irene

    2009-05-19

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms arise in the ovary and various extra-ovarian sites. While their pathogenesis remains conjectural, their similarities suggest a common pathway of development. There have been rare reports involving the mesentery as a primary tumour site. A cystic mass of uncertain origin was demonstrated radiologically in a 22 year old female with chronic abdominal pain. At laparotomy, the mass was fixed within the colonic mesentery. Histology demonstrated a benign mucinous cystadenoma. We review the literature on mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery and report on the pathogenesis, biologic behavior, diagnosis and treatment of similar extra-ovarian tumors. We propose an updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery present almost exclusively in women and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenteric tumors. Only full histological examination of a mucinous cystic neoplasm can exclude a borderline or malignant component. An updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors is proposed.

  5. Putative primo-vascular system in mesentery of rats.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Dai, Jingxing; Su, Zhendong; Yoo, Jung-Sun; Qu, Rongmei; Lee, Sung-Woo; Eom, Ki-Hoon; Bae, Kyang-Hee; Luo, Hesheng; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2010-12-01

    Primo-vessels have been observed in the rat abdominal cavity as floating thread like structures on and not adhering to fascia-wrapped internal organs. To date their presence, locations, and lengths have been irregular and unpredictable, and their identification not regularly repeatable, thus they have remained a nagging enigma in primo-vascular system research for several years. In this work, locations were found where primo-vessels were regularly present and observed repeatedly. These vessels were not floating or freely movable but lay in a regular position in the mesentery in the abdominal cavity of the rat, being observed between the cecum and small intestine and between the colon and mesentery root. The difference between a lymph vessel and a primo-vessel is described in anatomical and histological aspects. In addition, trypan blue was found to enter primo-vessels through the surrounding membranes and filled spaces between fibers comprising the primo-vessels. It is conjectured that the previously observed floating primo-vessels had anomalously and irregularly emerged, for some unknown physiological reasons, from primo-vessels normally located in the fascia-like mesentery.

  6. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  7. Thromboxane synthesis inhibitors and postprandial jejunal capillary exchange capacity.

    PubMed

    Mangino, M J; Chou, C C

    1988-05-01

    The effects of thromboxane synthesis inhibitors (imidazole and U 63557A; Upjohn) and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, mefenamic acid, on jejunal capillary filtration coefficients (Kfc) were determined in dogs before and during the presence of predigested food in the jejunal lumen. The jejunal Kfc increased significantly soon after the placement of a predigested test food containing all major constituents of diet. The Kfc remained elevated as long as the food was present in the lumen (15 min). Mefenamic acid (10 mg/kg iv) did not significantly alter resting jejunal Kfc or alter the food-induced increase in Kfc. Imidazole (5.0 mg/min ia) or U 63557A (5.0 mg/kg iv) per se significantly increased jejunal Kfc. Placement of digested food further increased the Kfc to levels significantly higher than those observed before administration of the two thromboxane synthase inhibitors. Production of thromboxane B2 by jejunal tissue was significantly reduced and 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha (the stable hydrolysis product of prostacyclin) production was significantly increased after administration of U 63557A. Our study indicates that the relative production of endogenous thromboxanes and other prostanoids modulates jejunal capillary exchange capacity in the absence or presence of digested food in the jejunal lumen.

  8. Malignant mesenterial mesothelioma in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Budiyasa, Dewa Gde Agung; Wibawa, I Dewa Nyoman

    2008-10-01

    Mesothel is the cell lining of serosal surface of the pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, and testis. Malignant mesothelioma is a highly aggressive tumor from mesothel that has a tendency to grow rapidly and invade locally. Although the incidence of malignant mesenterial mesothelioma is not so high, the case fatality rate is very high. The aim of this case report is to report the rare and difficult case with several complications. A Balinese man, 64 years old, came with chief complaint of weakness, abdominal enlargement, and nausea, with history of previous liver disease. On physical examination were found a decrease of conciousness, subfebrile, abdominal distension, ascites, negative traube space, and paralysis of the left side of the body. Laboratory examination results showed leukocytosis, hypochromic-micrositic anemia, trombocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, increase of alkaline phosphatase, and mild hyponatremia. Abdominal USG showed intraperitoneal mass which some of them attach to abdominal wall, possibly from mesenterium and ascites, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed reflux esofagitis and anthral erossive gastritis, skull CT scan showed small infarction at left parietal medulla and right basal ganglia, cytology showed spreaded and grouped mesothel with reactive lymphocyte and amorph back ground. FNAB result showed malignant mesothelioma, and normal colonoscopy. Based on the above data, the diagnoses were malignant mesenterial mesothelioma, reflux esofagitis and anthral erossive gastritis, and non hemorrhagic stroke. Malignant mesenterial mesothelioma should be considered in patient with the combination of unexplained ascites and abdominal pain. Although the result of treatment is very disappointing, the patient had to be treated optimally to increase quality of life.

  9. A Giant Lymphatic Cyst of the Transverse Colon Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Batool, Tayyaba; Ahmed, Soofia

    2010-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are not uncommon in pediatric age group but giant lymphatic cysts of mesentery are reported infrequently. This is a report of six years old female who had vague abdominal pain with distension for two years. Investigations revealed a large cystic mass in abdomen. On exploration a giant lymphatic cyst in the mesentery of transverse colon found. More than 1500 ml of milky fluid was drained. The cyst was unilocular and appeared to be the collection of lymph (chyle) between two leaves of the mesentery of transverse colon. It is postulated that trauma to or malformation of lymphatics at the root of mesentery might have lead to this pathology. PMID:22953250

  10. A giant lymphatic cyst of the transverse colon mesentery.

    PubMed

    Batool, Tayyaba; Ahmed, Soofia; Akhtar, Jamshed

    2010-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are not uncommon in pediatric age group but giant lymphatic cysts of mesentery are reported infrequently. This is a report of six years old female who had vague abdominal pain with distension for two years. Investigations revealed a large cystic mass in abdomen. On exploration a giant lymphatic cyst in the mesentery of transverse colon found. More than 1500 ml of milky fluid was drained. The cyst was unilocular and appeared to be the collection of lymph (chyle) between two leaves of the mesentery of transverse colon. It is postulated that trauma to or malformation of lymphatics at the root of mesentery might have lead to this pathology.

  11. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Georgios; Tangalos, Athanasios; Pappa, Polyxeni; Papageorgiou, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Background Mucinous cystic neoplasms arise in the ovary and various extra-ovarian sites. While their pathogenesis remains conjectural, their similarities suggest a common pathway of development. There have been rare reports involving the mesentery as a primary tumour site. Case presentation A cystic mass of uncertain origin was demonstrated radiologically in a 22 year old female with chronic abdominal pain. At laparotomy, the mass was fixed within the colonic mesentery. Histology demonstrated a benign mucinous cystadenoma. Methods and results We review the literature on mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery and report on the pathogenesis, biologic behavior, diagnosis and treatment of similar extra-ovarian tumors. We propose an updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors. Conclusion Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery present almost exclusively in women and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenteric tumors. Only full histological examination of a mucinous cystic neoplasm can exclude a borderline or malignant component. An updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors is proposed. PMID:19454018

  12. Characteristics of nobiletin-induced effects on jejunal contractility.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yong-Jian; Chen, Da-Peng; Lv, Bo-Chao; Liu, Fang-Fei; Wang, Li; Lin, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, exhibits multiple biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-insulin resistance effects. The present study found that nobiletin exerted significant stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments in all 6 different low contractile states, and meanwhile significant inhibitory effects in all 6 different high contractile states, showing characteristics of bidirectional regulation (BR). Nobiletin-exerted BR on jejunal contractility was abolished in the presence of c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib or Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil. In the presence of neuroxin tetrodotoxin, nobiletin only exerted stimulatory effects on jejunal contractility in both low and high contractile states. Hemicholinium-3 and atropine partially blocked nobiletin-exerted stimulatory effects on jejunal contractility in low-Ca(2+)-induced low contractile state. Phentolamine or propranolol or l-NG-nitro-arginine significantly blocked nobiletin-exerted inhibitory effects on jejunal contractility in high-Ca(2+)-induced high contractile state respectively. The effects of nobiletin on myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, MLCK protein content, and myosin light chain phosphorylation extent were also bidirectional. In summary, nobiletin-exerted BR depends on the contractile states of rat jejunal segments. Nobiletin-exerted BR requires the enteric nervous system, interstitial cell of Cajal, Ca(2+), and myosin phosphorylation-related mechanisms.

  13. Anatomical discrimination of the differences between torn mesentery tissue and internal organ-surface primo-vessels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghun; Ryu, Yeonhee; Yun, Yungju; Lee, Sungwon; Kwon, Ohsang; Kim, Jaehyo; Sohn, Inchul; Ahn, Seonghun

    2010-03-01

    The most difficult step in the morphological study of the internal organ-surface primo-vessel (Bong-Han duct) system is the correct identification of samples, due to similarities between torn mesentery and primo-vessel tissue. Without proper sample discernment, the subsequent parts of morphological studies cannot be trusted. Here, we present differences between torn mesentery and primo-vessel tissues as determined by minimal operation, using stereoscopic and microscopic observation. Stereoscopic observation revealed that torn mesentery is tightly connected to the organ surface and does not branch; the detached margin has a fan-shaped membrane without any swollen portions. Primo-vessels are slightly connected to the organ surface and branched, while detached margins lack a membrane and possess a swelling termed the primo-node (Bong-Han corpuscle). Microscopic observation shows bundle patterns in primo-vessel tissue, but irregular arrangement in torn mesentery tissue. These characteristics can be used to distinguish torn mesentery from primo-vessels.

  14. Perforated jejunal diverticulum: a rare case of acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Cheung, Cherry X.; Hills, Tristram; Waris, Aqueel; Healy, Donagh; Khan, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Jejunal pseudo-diverticulosis is a rare acquired herniation of the mucosa and submucosa through weakened areas of the muscularis mucosa of the mesenteric aspect of the bowel. They are asymptomatic in the majority of cases; however, they can present with a wide spectrum of non-specific symptoms such as chronic abdominal discomfort, postprandial flatulence, diarrhoea, malabsorption and steattorhoea. In up to 15% of cases, more serious acute complications may arise such as the development of intestinal obstruction, haemorrhage or as in our case, localized peritonitis secondary to perforation. Perforation carries an overall mortality rate of up to 40% and exploratory laparotomy followed by copious lavage with segmental resection and primary anastomosis remains the mainstay of managing such sequalae of jejunal pseudo-diverticulosis. Our case report highlights the importance of maintaining a high clinical suspicion of a perforated jejunal diverticulum in an elderly patient presenting with an acute abdomen. PMID:27765806

  15. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal UR Rehman

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia. PMID:26500958

  16. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanjeev B; Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal Ur Rehman

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia.

  17. Laparoscopic Management of a Proximal Jejunal Gallstone Ileus with Patulous Ampulla and Choledochal Cyst-a Report of Unusual Presentation and a Review.

    PubMed

    Narkhede, Rajvilas Anil; Bada, Vijaykumar C; Kona, Lakshmi Kumari

    2017-02-01

    Gallstone ileus is a diagnosis of rarity, and a proximal site of obstruction in a young patient is even rare. Of the three cases in our experience, we found two cases of gallstone ileus (GSI) with typical epidemiology and presentation, one had combination of multiple rare associations. We report such a case, suspected to have gallstone ileus on ultrasound and confirmed diagnosis on computed tomography. Presence of biliary-enteric fistula, old age, and obstructive features, as in typical cases, was a bigger asset for diagnosis, but it was difficult to entertain diagnosis of GSI in young girl in absence of a demonstrable biliary-enteric fistula, with uncommon association of choledochal cyst and sickle cell disease. A very surprising finding, dilated major papilla, could however explain the pathogenesis which has also been reported in the past. Although differential opinions regarding management exist, we decided to follow two-stage surgery as our institute protocol. A minimal access approach has been immensely helpful in accurate diagnosis, and expedative management with early recovery has been proven in the past studies which we agreed with our experience.

  18. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Koshimune, Seijiro; Onoda, Tomoo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    Free jejunal transfer using microsurgery after oesophageal or pharyngeal cancer resection is a useful operative approach. However, the disadvantage of free tissue transfer is the risk of necrosis of the transferred tissue due to impaired blood supply. In addition, jejunal flaps are more prone to blood-flow disorders such as ischaemia and congestion compared with other types of flaps. The causes of local blood supply disorders after microsurgery are divided broadly into two classes: one is thrombosis of an artery and/or vein in the anastomotic region and the other consists of local physical factors such as compressive pressure derived from haematoma formation and the effect of infection of the vascular pedicle. In this report, two rare cases of blood-flow disorder of the transferred free jejunum are described. In both cases, no signs of significant infection or occlusion of the vascular pedicles were present and late necrosis progressed gradually. The patients showed remarkable weight loss and a poor nutritional state due to inadequate preoperative nutritional intake. The necrosis was considered to be a result of non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap, and the factors contributing to free jejunal necrosis were reviewed.

  19. Occult solitary submucosal jejunal metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmann, Joerg; Gollowitsch, Franz; Matzi, Veronika; Porubsky, Christian; Maier, Alfred; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja Maria

    2005-01-01

    Background Metastatic tumors of the intestinal tract from extra-abdominal sites are rare. In esophageal cancer, the liver, lung and the bones are the most common sites of metastases. Metastasis to intestines are very rare. Case presentation A 54-year old male was admitted with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) associated with dysphagia II-III and weight loss of 20 kg. Preoperative routine staging failed to detect any metastases. A transthoracic esophagectomy and orthotopic gastric pull-up with collar esophago-gastrostomy, associated with 2-field lymphadenectomy was perfromed. During the digital placement of the naso-jejunal feeding catheter a submucosal jejunal nodule with a diameter of 1 cm, about 40 cm distal to the duodeno-jejunal fold was detected which was completely resected by jejunotomy. Histopathology of jejunal nodule showed metastasis from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Because of the extensic esophageal lymphatic system, an occult widespread dissemination of the tumor cells into the abdominal cavity is possible. Additional intraoperative evaluation of the small intestine and the complete abdominal cavity should be performed in every operation of esophageal carcinoma to detect possible occult intraabdominal metastases. PMID:16022736

  20. Delayed jejunal perforation after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Ikennah L.; Dixon, Elijah

    2016-01-01

    Bowel perforation is a rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which if left undiagnosed can have fatal consequences. In addition, isolated small bowel perforation is extremely rare and should be considered in patients presenting with sudden onset abdominal pain in the postoperative period. A 57-year-old male with symptomatic gallstones underwent urgent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and was discharged home on postoperative day (POD) 1 without complications. He presented to the emergency department on POD 11 complaining of sudden onset abdominal pain. A CT scan did not confirm a diagnosis and he was admitted for observation. On post admission day 2, he became significantly peritonitic and laparotomy revealed jejunal perforation. Bowel resection with hand-sewn anastomosis was completed and he was discharged on POD 10. Follow-up at 6 weeks revealed no further issues. We review the literature on small bowel perforation post laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:26908534

  1. Calcified cystic lymphangioma of the mesentery: case report.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Castiglione, Francesca; Maio, Vincenza; Morelli, Caterina; Martin, Alessandra; Messineo, Antonio; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare and are associated with heterogeneous pathological conditions. We describe an extraordinary case of mesenteric calcified cystic lymphangioma in a 10-year-old boy. To the best of our knowledge only 6 mesenteric calcified cystic lymphangioma have been reported. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain and vomiting. Abdominal X-ray and computed tomography scan documented a calcified cyst which dislocated and compressed the ileum. Laparatomy revealed that the cyst arose in the mesentery at 100 cm from the ileocecal valve. The cystic wall was composed of fibrosclerotic calcified tissue and had an endothelial lining. In the adjacent fibrofatty stroma there were distended hemolymphatics. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. At follow-up 6 months after surgery the patient is well. Calcified cystic lymphangioma of the mesentery should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an intra-abdominal calcified cyst in children.

  2. A Urachal Cyst Case with Painful Mass Locates at Ileal Mesentery.

    PubMed

    Okur, Selahattin Koray; Pülat, Hüseyin; Karaköse, Oktay; Zihni, Ismail; Özçelik, Kazım Çağlar; Eroğlu, Hasan Erol

    2015-01-01

    Urachal cyst is an unusual clinical condition, which is usually asymptomatic. In some adult cases, it may lead to complications. The cyst is between umbilicus and urinary bladder. It is diagnosed via ultrasonography and computed tomography. However, in some cases, the diagnosis is made by means of surgical exploration and histopathological evaluation. In this paper, we report a case of a 17-year-old female presenting with painful abdominal mass. At the first evaluation, the case was diagnosed as a mesenteric cyst because the mass located in the mesentery, and final histopathological report revealed the urachal cyst.

  3. A Urachal Cyst Case with Painful Mass Locates at Ileal Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Okur, Selahattin Koray; Pülat, Hüseyin; Karaköse, Oktay; Zihni, Ismail; Özçelik, Kazım Çağlar; Eroğlu, Hasan Erol

    2015-01-01

    Urachal cyst is an unusual clinical condition, which is usually asymptomatic. In some adult cases, it may lead to complications. The cyst is between umbilicus and urinary bladder. It is diagnosed via ultrasonography and computed tomography. However, in some cases, the diagnosis is made by means of surgical exploration and histopathological evaluation. In this paper, we report a case of a 17-year-old female presenting with painful abdominal mass. At the first evaluation, the case was diagnosed as a mesenteric cyst because the mass located in the mesentery, and final histopathological report revealed the urachal cyst. PMID:26783487

  4. Modulatory effects of taurine on jejunal contractility

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Q.Y.; Chen, D.P.; Ye, D.M.; Diao, Y.P.; Lin, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is widely distributed in animal tissues and has diverse pharmacological effects. However, the role of taurine in modulating smooth muscle contractility is still controversial. We propose that taurine (5-80 mM) can exert bidirectional modulation on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments. Different low and high contractile states were induced in isolated jejunal segments of rats to observe the effects of taurine and the associated mechanisms. Taurine induced stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments at 3 different low contractile states, and inhibitory effects at 3 different high contractile states. Bidirectional modulation was not observed in the presence of verapamil or tetrodotoxin, suggesting that taurine-induced bidirectional modulation is Ca2+ dependent and requires the presence of the enteric nervous system. The stimulatory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments was blocked by atropine but not by diphenhydramine or by cimetidine, suggesting that muscarinic-linked activation was involved in the stimulatory effects when isolated jejunal segments were in a low contractile state. The inhibitory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments were blocked by propranolol and L-NG-nitroarginine but not by phentolamine, suggesting that adrenergic β receptors and a nitric oxide relaxing mechanism were involved when isolated jejunal segments were in high contractile states. No bidirectional effects of taurine on myosin phosphorylation were observed. The contractile states of jejunal segments determine taurine-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects, which are associated with muscarinic receptors and adrenergic β receptors, and a nitric oxide associated relaxing mechanism. PMID:25387674

  5. Modulatory effects of taurine on jejunal contractility.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q Y; Chen, D P; Ye, D M; Diao, Y P; Lin, Y

    2014-12-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is widely distributed in animal tissues and has diverse pharmacological effects. However, the role of taurine in modulating smooth muscle contractility is still controversial. We propose that taurine (5-80 mM) can exert bidirectional modulation on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments. Different low and high contractile states were induced in isolated jejunal segments of rats to observe the effects of taurine and the associated mechanisms. Taurine induced stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments at 3 different low contractile states, and inhibitory effects at 3 different high contractile states. Bidirectional modulation was not observed in the presence of verapamil or tetrodotoxin, suggesting that taurine-induced bidirectional modulation is Ca(2+) dependent and requires the presence of the enteric nervous system. The stimulatory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments was blocked by atropine but not by diphenhydramine or by cimetidine, suggesting that muscarinic-linked activation was involved in the stimulatory effects when isolated jejunal segments were in a low contractile state. The inhibitory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments were blocked by propranolol and L-NG-nitroarginine but not by phentolamine, suggesting that adrenergic β receptors and a nitric oxide relaxing mechanism were involved when isolated jejunal segments were in high contractile states. No bidirectional effects of taurine on myosin phosphorylation were observed. The contractile states of jejunal segments determine taurine-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects, which are associated with muscarinic receptors and adrenergic β receptors, and a nitric oxide associated relaxing mechanism.

  6. Chylolymphatic Cyst of Mesentery of Terminal Ileum: A Case Report in 8 Year-old Boy

    PubMed Central

    More, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign intra peritoneal tumor and more than half of the mesenteric cysts involve the mesentery of the terminal ileum. We present 8 year-old boy, who presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction. Ultrasonography (USG) of the abdomen revealed a cystic mass in the peritoneal cavity with dilated loops of bowel. Exploration of the abdomen revealed a solitary cyst of the mesentery of the terminal ileum measured 10 x 8 cm. There was twisting of the part of the ileum (volvulus) due to the cyst. It also involved the wall and lumen of the adjacent ileum and there were dilated bowel loops proximal to the cyst. Complete cyst excision and resection of the part of the ileum involved with the cyst was done en bloc. An ileostomy was created due to gross disparity in the lumen of the ileum, which was closed two and half month later. Histopathology of the excised cyst was consistent with the chylolymphatic cyst (mesenteric cyst). PMID:25584262

  7. Chylolymphatic Cyst of Mesentery of Terminal Ileum: A Case Report in 8 Year-old Boy.

    PubMed

    Ghritlaharey, Rajendra K; More, Santosh

    2014-11-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign intra peritoneal tumor and more than half of the mesenteric cysts involve the mesentery of the terminal ileum. We present 8 year-old boy, who presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction. Ultrasonography (USG) of the abdomen revealed a cystic mass in the peritoneal cavity with dilated loops of bowel. Exploration of the abdomen revealed a solitary cyst of the mesentery of the terminal ileum measured 10 x 8 cm. There was twisting of the part of the ileum (volvulus) due to the cyst. It also involved the wall and lumen of the adjacent ileum and there were dilated bowel loops proximal to the cyst. Complete cyst excision and resection of the part of the ileum involved with the cyst was done en bloc. An ileostomy was created due to gross disparity in the lumen of the ileum, which was closed two and half month later. Histopathology of the excised cyst was consistent with the chylolymphatic cyst (mesenteric cyst).

  8. Gross anatomy of the intestine and its mesentery in the nutria (Myocastor coypus).

    PubMed

    Pérez, W; Lima, M; Bielli, A

    2008-11-01

    The intestines and mesentery of the nutria (Myocastor coypus) have not been fully described. In the present study 30 adult nutrias were studied using gross dissection. The small intestine was divided into the duodenum, jejunum and ileum as usual. The duodenum started at the pylorus with a cranial portion, which dilated forming a duodenal ampulla. The ileum was located within the concavity of the caecum and attached to the coiled caecum by means of the iliocaecal fold. The ascending colon had two ansae, one proximal and one distal. The proximal ansa was fixed to the caecum by the caecocolic fold. The base of the caecum and a short proximal part of the ascending colon belonging to the proximal ansa were attached to the mesoduodenum descendens. The distal ansa of the ascending colon had a proximal part which was sacculated and a distal part which was smooth. The two parts of the distal ansa of the ascending colon were parallel and joined by a flexure of variable localisation. The smooth part of the distal ansa of the ascending colon was attached to the initial portion of the descending colon by a peritoneal fold. The short transverse colon was directly attached to the mesoduodenum and greater omentum. In conclusion, we have described the anatomy of the intestines of the nutria and its mesentery in detail, and provided a nomenclature list adapted to the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria.

  9. Monitoring of the regional blood flow in the rat mesentery under the drug's effect by using laser speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haiying; Luo, Qingming; Wang, Zheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Cen, Jian; Li, Pengcheng

    2003-07-01

    Monitoring the spatio-temporal characteristics of blood flow (BF) is crucial for physiological studies. At present, most optical techniques used for monitoring the BF utilize either the Doppler effect or the temporal statistics of time-varying speckle to measure the blood velocity at a point. If a map of blood velocity distribution is required, some form of scanning must be introduced, thus limiting the temporal and spatial resolution. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) technique could provide real-time spatially resolved BF images without the need for scanning by utilizing the spatial statistics of time-integrated speckle. In present paper, the regional blood flows in the rat mesentery under the effect of phentolamine with incremental concentration were monitored using LSI method. Our results showed that for arterioles, the vessels expanded and BF increased under the treatment with phentolamine of 1μg/ml. However, as the concentration increased, the BF decreased and dilation only happened at the concentration of 100μg/ml For venules, no dilation was observed except for the case of 100μg/ml while BF decreased. These suggested that compared with the conventional methods, LSI could obtain the spatio-temporal dynamic of BF in the mesentery with high resolution without scan, providing a new approach in studying the microcirculation in the mesentery.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide modulates neutrophil recruitment and macrophage polarization on lymphatic vessels and impairs lymphatic function in rat mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Zawieja, Scott D.; Wang, Wei; Lee, Yang; Wang, Yuan J.; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Zawieja, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of the lymphatic system is apparent in multiple inflammatory pathologies connected to elevated endotoxins such as LPS. However, the direct mechanisms by which LPS influences the lymphatic contractility are not well understood. We hypothesized that a dynamic modulation of innate immune cell populations in mesentery under inflammatory conditions perturbs tissue cytokine/chemokine homeostasis and subsequently influences lymphatic function. We used rats that were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) to determine the changes in the profiles of innate immune cells in the mesentery and in the stretch-mediated contractile responses of isolated lymphatic preparations. Results demonstrated a reduction in the phasic contractile activity of mesenteric lymphatic vessels from LPS-injected rats and a severe impairment of lymphatic pump function and flow. There was a significant reduction in the number of neutrophils and an increase in monocytes/macrophages present on the lymphatic vessels and in the clear mesentery of the LPS group. This population of monocytes and macrophages established a robust M2 phenotype, with the majority showing high expression of CD163 and CD206. Several cytokines and chemoattractants for neutrophils and macrophages were significantly changed in the mesentery of LPS-injected rats. Treatment of lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) with LPS showed significant changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM1, ICAM1, CXCR2, and galectin-9. LPS-TLR4-mediated regulation of pAKT, pERK pI-κB, and pMLC20 in LMCs promoted both contractile and inflammatory pathways. Thus, our data provide the first evidence connecting the dynamic changes in innate immune cells on or near the lymphatics and complex cytokine milieu during inflammation with lymphatic dysfunction. PMID:26453331

  11. Lipopolysaccharide modulates neutrophil recruitment and macrophage polarization on lymphatic vessels and impairs lymphatic function in rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Zawieja, Scott D; Wang, Wei; Lee, Yang; Wang, Yuan J; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Zawieja, David C; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2015-12-15

    Impairment of the lymphatic system is apparent in multiple inflammatory pathologies connected to elevated endotoxins such as LPS. However, the direct mechanisms by which LPS influences the lymphatic contractility are not well understood. We hypothesized that a dynamic modulation of innate immune cell populations in mesentery under inflammatory conditions perturbs tissue cytokine/chemokine homeostasis and subsequently influences lymphatic function. We used rats that were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) to determine the changes in the profiles of innate immune cells in the mesentery and in the stretch-mediated contractile responses of isolated lymphatic preparations. Results demonstrated a reduction in the phasic contractile activity of mesenteric lymphatic vessels from LPS-injected rats and a severe impairment of lymphatic pump function and flow. There was a significant reduction in the number of neutrophils and an increase in monocytes/macrophages present on the lymphatic vessels and in the clear mesentery of the LPS group. This population of monocytes and macrophages established a robust M2 phenotype, with the majority showing high expression of CD163 and CD206. Several cytokines and chemoattractants for neutrophils and macrophages were significantly changed in the mesentery of LPS-injected rats. Treatment of lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) with LPS showed significant changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM1, ICAM1, CXCR2, and galectin-9. LPS-TLR4-mediated regulation of pAKT, pERK pI-κB, and pMLC20 in LMCs promoted both contractile and inflammatory pathways. Thus, our data provide the first evidence connecting the dynamic changes in innate immune cells on or near the lymphatics and complex cytokine milieu during inflammation with lymphatic dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The complex arrangement of an "aorto-jejunal paraduodenal" fossa, as revealed by dissection of human posterior parietal peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Barberini, Fabrizio; Zani, Augusto; Ripani, Maurizio; Di Nitto, Valentina; Brunone, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    Peritoneal fossae derive from normal or anomalous coalescence of the peritoneum during fetal development, or from the course of retroperitoneal vessels. Clinically, internal abdominal hernias may be housed inside these fossae. In this report from an autopsy, a singular peritoneal fossa was delimited superiorly by an arcuate serous fold, raised up by the inferior mesenteric vein, and infero-posteriorly by two (right and left) avascular folds, extending from the abdominal aorta to the jejunum. The right fold reached the duodeno-jejunal flexure, which was located on the right side of the aorta. The left fold subdivided into two, anterior and posterior, secondary folds. The anterior fold reached the superior edge of the first jejunal loop, and the posterior fold turned medially to connect with the inferior edge of the proximal limb of the same loop. This fossa consisted of three recesses: superior, Located behind the subserous vascular arch, antero-inferior and postero-inferior, separated by interposition of the left posterior secondary fold, between the jejunum and aorta. The complex arrangement of this fossa suggests that it might have originated from a coalescence arising beyond the duodeno-jejunal flexure and including the first jejunal loop, and from the subserous course of the inferior mesenteric vein. Because of displacement to the right of the flexure, processes of coalescence in a location normally occupied by the ascending duodenum might have occurred in a similar pattern for the jejunum, involving the mesoduodenum and the proximal part of the mesentery. Labyrinthine fossae like this might cause strangulation of internal abdominal hernias and hinder intraoperative maneuvers.

  13. Mǔllerian cyst of the mesentery: A case report of an unusual location.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, Shahe; Dasgupta, Kaushik; Haugk, Beate; White, Steve

    2010-10-01

    Mǔllerian cysts or paramesonephric cysts arise from the fused embryonic ducts, which typically regress in the uterus. These cysts are usually located paravertebrally. We present an unusual case of a Mǔllerian cyst developing within the mesentery of the ileocecum that was successfully resected. The patient presented to our surgical unit with abdominal pain and swelling. She underwent all the necessary tests to rule out other pathologies before she underwent right hemicolectomy. The patient was discharged without complications. Histopathology confirmed the presence of female reproductive tract epithelium, which was conclusive of a Mǔllerian cyst or paramesonephric cyst. Mǔllerian cysts are rarely malignant, and they are usually treated surgically. The incidence of Mǔllerian cysts is one in 105,000, with almost equal sex distribution. Their unusual intraperitoneal location further demonstrates their uncommon presentation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Phytobezoars are concretions of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibers found in the alimentary tract. Previous gastric resection, gastrojejunostomy, or pyloroplasty predispose people to bezoar formation. Small-bowel bezoars normally come from the stomach, and primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare. They are seen only in patients with underlying small-bowel diseases such as diverticula, strictures, or tumors. Primary small-bowel bezoars almost always present as intestinal obstructions, although it is a very rare cause, being responsible for less than 3% of all small-bowel obstructions in one series. Jejunal diverticula are rare, with an incidence of less than 0.5%. They are usually asymptomatic pseudodiverticula of pulsion type, and complications are reported in 10% to 30% of patients. A phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum is an extremely rare presentation. Case presentation A 78-year-old Pakistani man presented to our clinic with small-bowel obstruction. Upon exploration, we found a primary small-bowel bezoar originating in a jejunal diverticulum and causing jejunal obstruction. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment harboring the diverticulum was performed, and our patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare but must be kept in mind as a possible cause of small-bowel obstruction. PMID:21951579

  15. Endoscopic jejunal access for enteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Coates, N E; MacFadyen, B V

    1995-06-01

    Enteral (gut) alimentation appears to offer greater benefit for patients than calories delivered via a parenteral (intravenous) route. Enteral alimentation prevents mucosal atrophy, maintains normal gut flora, decreases bacterial translocation, and enhances enteral immunological competence. Reliable delivery into the jejunum without the placement of an operative feeding tube is difficult, however. We have been interested for some time in endoscopically placing a jejunal tube for enteral nutrition early (within 24 hours) after trauma resuscitation or operation. A simplified technique is described for the endoscopic placement of a jejunal feeding tube, with or without a concomitant percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

  16. Lymphangioma of the small bowel mesentery: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Kiatipunsodsai, Siriphut; Kwankua, Amolchaya; Chaumrattanakul, Utairat

    2012-11-21

    Lymphangioma is a rare benign condition characterized by proliferation of lymphatic spaces. It is usually found in the head and neck of affected children. Lymphangioma of the small-bowel mesentery is rare, having been reported for less than 1% of all lymphangiomas. Importantly, it can cause fatal complications such as volvulus or involvement of the main branch of the mesenteric arteries, requiring emergency surgery. Moreover, the gross and histopathologic findings may resemble benign multicystic mesothelioma and lymphangiomyoma. Immunohistochemical study for factor VIII-related antigen, D2-40, calretinin and human melanoma black-45 (HMB-45) are essential for diagnosis. Factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 are positive in lymphangioma but negative in benign multicystic mesothelioma. HMB-45 shows positive study in the smooth-muscle cells around the lymphatic spaces of the lymphangiomyoma. We report a case of small-bowel volvulus induced by mesenteric lymphangioma in a 2-year-and-9-mo-old boy who presented with rapid abdominal distension and vomiting. The abdominal computed tomography scan showed a multiseptated mass at the right lower quadrant with a whirl-like small-bowel dilatation, suggestive of a mesenteric cyst with midgut volvulus. The intraoperative findings revealed a huge, lobulated, yellowish pink, cystic mass measuring 20 cm × 20 cm × 10 cm, that was originated from the small bowel mesentery with small-bowel volvulus and small-bowel dilatation. Cut surface of the mass revealed multicystic spaces containing a milky white fluid. The patient underwent tumor removal with small-bowel resection and end-to-end anastomosis. Microscopic examination revealed that the cystic walls were lined with flat endothelial cells and comprised of smooth muscle in the walls. The flat endothelial cells were positive for factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 but negative for calretinin. HMB-45 showed negative study in the smooth-muscle cells around the lymphatic spaces. Thus

  17. Jejuno-jejunal invagination due to intestinal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Resta, Giuseppe; Anania, Gabriele; Messina, Federico; de Tullio, Damiano; Ferrocci, Gloria; Zanzi, Federico; Pellegrini, Davide; Stano, Rocco; Cavallesco, Giorgio; Azzena, Gianfranco; Occhionorelli, Savino

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most studied neoplastic lesions in biology and clinical oncology. It has been well documented that this type of neoplasm presents a high metastatic rate, and is able to involve nearly every tissue. Non-cutaneous melanoma represents an unusual pattern of melanoma, and the small intestine is an uncommon anatomic localization. Herein we report an extremely rare clinical case of a young woman affected by a bleeding jejunal melanoma, whose early clinical presentation was an intestinal invagination. PMID:17226915

  18. [Jejunal perforation by a plastic biliary stent after injury].

    PubMed

    Krska, Z; Brůha, R; Sváb, J; Demes, R; Votrubová, J; Petrtýl, J; Horejs, J

    2004-02-01

    The authors present case of patient with biliary stent dislocation after chest injury and fracture of VIII. rib. Polymorbid patient with cirrhosis, chronic pancreatitis, portal hypertension (Child Plugh B) and biliary stent insertion came with acute abdominal pain and inflammatory signs. Progressive signs of acute abdomen have led to laparotomy. Perforation of duodeno-jejunal-loop due to dislocated biliary stent, small loop adhesions and thickened intestine wall were found. Postsurgical period was complicated with obstructive ileus, cholecystitis and cholangiolitis and the second biliary stent was inserted. Present-day status of the patient is satisfactory.

  19. [Pathologic fluid collection of mesentery, differential diagnosis of mesenteric cysts - case report].

    PubMed

    Chovanec, Z; Hnízdil, L; Capov, I

    2014-03-01

    Mesenteric cyst is a pathologic fluid collection that very rarely occurs anywhere in the mesentery of the gastrointestinal tract from the duodenum to the rectum. The etiology of mesenteric cysts has not yet been completely understood. It ranges from tumorous, infectious, lymphatic and embryological to post-traumatic or post-operative origin. Symptoms of the illness are usually non-specific, caused mainly by intestinal obstruction. Diagnosis is often accidental. Therapy is exclusively surgical. In the following text, the authors present a case report of a 50-year-old patient operated on due to a mesenteric cyst. The patient had undergone bilateral nephrectomy for polycystic kidney disease and was followed up for polycystic liver disease. CT accidentally revealed a mesenteric cyst around 14 cm in size in the right meso-hypogastrium. It was necessary to perform its histological verification before the planned renal transplantation.

  20. Adult suprapatellar pleiomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma with jejunal metastasis causing intussusception: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gys, Ben; Peeters, Dieter; Driessen, Ann; Snoeckx, Annemie; Komen, Niels

    2016-12-01

    Jejuno-jejunal intussusception is rarely encountered in adults. Management depends on the viability of the involved bowel. Exploration is favored because in adults generally an underlying 'lead point' is found to be present. Pleimorphic rhabdomyosarcoma (pRMS) arises from striated muscle cells. They are usually diagnosed during childhood and can occur virtually all over the body, controversially in places were few striated cells are found. In adults, these tumors are rare and are mostly encountered in the head-and-neck region. We present the case of a 48-year-old woman with a jejunal metastasis from a suprapatellar pRMS diagnosed 2.5 years earlier resulting in a jejuno-jejunal intussusception.

  1. Abdominal Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Lymphangiomatosis Involving Mesentery and Ileum: A Case Report of MRI, CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; He, Tianlin; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-02-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH) is a rare vascular tumor of intermediate malignancy that occurs mainly in the childhood. Adult patients with KH are rare. Imaging findings of KH have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in an adult patient with KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum.A 22-year-old female complained of a 9-month history of intermittent melena, weakness, and palpitation. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoproteinemia. Fecal occult blood test was positive. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed a large abdominal mass involving mesentery and ileum. On enhanced MRI, there were many hypervascular nodules in the mass. On FDG PET/CT, the mass and the nodules showed slight FDG uptake. Small bowel capsule endoscopy showed numerous grape-shaped red nodules in the luminal wall of the involved ileum. The patient underwent resection of the abdominal mass and a segment of the ileum invaded by the abdominal mass. KH arising within lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum was confirmed by pathology. After surgery, the patient's symptoms improved.This is the first case of KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. In this case, the lymphangiomatosis overshadowed the small tumor nodules resulting in unusual imaging findings. Familiarity with these imaging findings is helpful for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of KH.

  2. Rapunzel syndrome-a rare cause of multiple jejunal intussusception.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Rizwan; Michail, Sonia; Ali, Syed A

    2009-04-01

    Trichobezoars are usually without symptoms until they reach a large size. The "Rapunzel" syndrome is a trichobezoar with a long tail extending from the stomach to small bowel. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with a history of trichotillomania and hair ingestion for three years, who presented with multiple jejunojejunal intussusceptions due to a trichobezoar with a long, 90-cm tail into the small bowel. To our knowledge, this is the first report of trichobezoars as a cause of jejunal intussusceptions, which should be suspected in the appropriate clinical circumstances.

  3. Microvascular and Tissue Oxygen Gradients in the Rat Mesentery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Amy G.; Friesenecker, Barbara; Mazzoni, Michelle C.; Kerger, Heinz; Buerk, Donald G.; Johnson, Paul C.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    1998-06-01

    One of the most important functions of the blood circulation is O2 delivery to the tissue. This process occurs primarily in microvessels that also regulate blood flow and are the site of many metabolic processes that require O2. We measured the intraluminal and perivascular pO2 in rat mesenteric arterioles in vivo by using noninvasive phosphorescence quenching microscopy. From these measurements, we calculated the rate at which O2 diffuses out of microvessels from the blood. The rate of O2 efflux and the O2 gradients found in the immediate vicinity of arterioles indicate the presence of a large O2 sink at the interface between blood and tissue, a region that includes smooth muscle and endothelium. Mass balance analyses show that the loss of O2 from the arterioles in this vascular bed primarily is caused by O2 consumption in the microvascular wall. The high metabolic rate of the vessel wall relative to parenchymal tissue in the rat mesentery suggests that in addition to serving as a conduit for the delivery of O2 the microvasculature has other functions that require a significant amount of O2.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of pressure in the interstitium and the terminal lymphatics of the cat mesentery.

    PubMed Central

    Clough, G; Smaje, L H

    1978-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of the pressure in terminal lymphatics and interstitial tissue have been made in the exteriorized cat mesentery superfused with either physiological salt solution (Krebs solution) or a water-immiscible fluorocarbon, FC-80. 2. The pressures within individual terminal lymphatics were measured using glass micropipettes attached to a servo pressure-measuring system. Tissue pressures were recorded using saline-filled cotton-wool wicks. 3. Mean pressure recorded in the terminal lymphatics of the Krebs-superfused mesentery were slightly above atmospheric (+0.2 mmHg, n = 45), while those recorded in the FC-80-superfused mesentery were slightly below atmospheric (-0.2 mmHg, n = 46). 4. Tissue pressures were also slightly subatmospheric in the in situ mesentery, and the recently exposed tissue. Continuous superfusion with Krebs solution caused the tissue pressure to rise to atmospheric pressure or above; with FC-80-superfusion the tissue pressure also rose, but never to above atmospheric pressure. 5. Isolated strips of mesentery immersed in Krebs solutions of different concentrations gained weight, but when immersed in FC-80 no change in weight was detected. 6. It was concluded that the interstitial gel of the mesentery is normally unsaturated and that superfusion with Krebs solution leads to tissue oedema. This tendency is less marked in FC-80-superfused preparations. Possible mechanisms for lymph formation and propulsion are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:722586

  5. Effects of spaceflight on the proliferation of jejunal mucosal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, Heywood R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  6. One of the Rare Causes of Acute Abdomen Leading to Subileus: Jejunal Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Elçin; Yerli, Hasan; Avcı, Tevfik; Yılmaz, Tuğbahan; Gülay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Jejunal diverticulitis is one of the rare causes of acute abdomen generally seen in the elderly. Jejunal diverticulosis was defined as the herniation of the mucosa and the submucosa from the inside of the muscular layer of the bowel wall on the mesenteric side of the intestine. Case Report: We presented the intraoperative and pathological findings of a 69-year-old male patient who had presented with complaints about abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting and been operated upon due to subileus and peritonitis induced by large-sized jejunal diverticulitis, along with his computed tomography (CT) findings. Conclusion: Jejunal diverticulitis is uncommon and may be a disease which might be difficult to diagnose when it develops on the basis of the large-sized diverticula resembling intestinal ansae. To the best of our knowledge, the computed tomography and intraoperative findings of a case in which partial resection is applied to the jejunum due to subileus have not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:27308082

  7. Electrophysiological response of chicken's jejunal epithelium to increasing levels of T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Kröger, Susan; Tichy, Alexander; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2013-02-01

    The present investigations were conducted to test the effects of T-2 toxin on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of chicken. Jejunal segments of broilers were monitored in Ussing chambers in the presence of T-2 toxin at the levels of 0 (negative control), 0 (methanol/vehicle control), 0.1, 1, 5, and 10 μg/ml of buffer. T-2 toxin did not affect basal values of short circuit current (I(sc)), transmural potential difference, or tissue conductivity in the jejunal epithelium. T-2 toxin also did not statistically affect glucose-induced electrophysiological variables during the first 3 min of glucose induction. Compared to the vehicle control, the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) was negatively affected (P = 0.008) only under 5 μg of T-2 toxin/ml. Increasing levels of T-2 toxin negatively affected the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) in a cubic (P = 0.007) fashion. These data indicate that acute exposure to moderate levels of T-2 toxin may progressively impair the cation gradient across the jejunal epithelium.

  8. Larynx-preserving limited resection and free jejunal graft for carcinoma of the cervical esophagus.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2013-03-01

    There is no generally accepted treatment strategy for cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of larynx-preserving limited resection with free jejunal graft for cervical esophageal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data of 58 patients with cervical esophageal cancer who underwent limited resection and free jejunal graft with or without laryngeal preservation. Among them, 45 patients received neoadjuvant treatment. Larynx-preserving surgery was conducted in 33 of the 58 patients (56.9%). A higher proportion of patients who underwent laryngopharyngectomy with cervical esophagectomy (larynx-nonpreserving group) had cT4 tumors than those who underwent larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (larynx-preserving group) (72 vs. 12%). The overall incidence of postoperative complications was similar in the two groups (56 vs. 52%). The 5-year survival rate was 44.9% for the entire group. Laryngeal preservation did not reduce overall survival compared with the larynx-nonpreserving operation (5-year survival rate: 57.8 vs. 25.8%). Multivariate analysis identified the number of metastatic lymph nodes as the only independent prognostic factor. The present study demonstrated that larynx-preserving limited resection with free jejunal graft is feasible. Also, this approach did not worsen the prognosis compared with the larynx-nonpreserving operation. Limited resection with free jejunal graft and laryngeal preservation is a promising treatment strategy for cervical esophageal cancer.

  9. Jejunal intussusception: a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Akter, Farhana; Harilingam, Mohanraj

    2012-11-21

    Intussusception is an important cause of abdominal pain in the paediatric population and is the most common abdominal emergency in early childhood. Intussusception in adults is, however, rare and can lead to diagnostic challenges for admitting physicians/surgeons. We present a case of a 76-year-old lady with history of a recent myocardial infarction and vasculitis presenting with melaena and bleeding per rectum, with suspicion of haematochezia. She complained of abdominal pain but was not clinically obstructed. Gastroscopy performed was negative. Colonoscopy was attempted; however, it was inconclusive because of active bleeding. A CT angiogram of the abdomen was performed, which showed a jejunal intussusception. There was no evidence of vasculitis or small bowel obstruction. She was not considered fit for surgery and was managed conservatively.

  10. Jejunal intussusception: a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Farhana; Harilingam, Mohanraj

    2012-01-01

    Intussusception is an important cause of abdominal pain in the paediatric population and is the most common abdominal emergency in early childhood. Intussusception in adults is, however, rare and can lead to diagnostic challenges for admitting physicians/surgeons. We present a case of a 76-year-old lady with history of a recent myocardial infarction and vasculitis presenting with melaena and bleeding per rectum, with suspicion of haematochezia. She complained of abdominal pain but was not clinically obstructed. Gastroscopy performed was negative. Colonoscopy was attempted; however, it was inconclusive because of active bleeding. A CT angiogram of the abdomen was performed, which showed a jejunal intussusception. There was no evidence of vasculitis or small bowel obstruction. She was not considered fit for surgery and was managed conservatively. PMID:23175009

  11. Oncological outcome after free jejunal flap reconstruction for carcinoma of the hypopharynx.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jimmy Yu Wai; Chow, Velda Ling Yu; Chan, Richie Chiu Lung; Lau, Gregory Ian Siu Kee

    2012-07-01

    It has been a common practice among the oncologist to reduce the dosage of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients after free jejunal flap reconstruction. The current aims to study potential risk of radiation to the visceral flap and the subsequent oncological outcome. Between 1996 and 2010, consecutive patients with carcinoma of the hypopharynx requiring laryngectomy, circumferential pharyngectomy and post-operative irradiation were recruited. Ninety-six patients were recruited. TNM tumor staging at presentation was: stage II (40.6%), stage III (34.4%) and stage IV (25.0%). Median follow-up period after surgery was 68 months. After tumor ablation, reconstruction was performed using free jejunal flap (60.4%), pectoralis major myocutaneous (PM) flap (31.3%) and free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap (8.3%). All patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy within 6.4 weeks after surgery. The mean total dose of radiation given to those receiving cutaneous and jejunal flap reconstruction was 62.2 Gy and 54.8 Gy, respectively. There was no secondary ischaemia or necrosis of the flaps after radiotherapy. The 5-year actuarial loco-regional tumor control for the cutaneous flap and jejunal flap group was: stage II (61 vs. 69%, p = 0.9), stage III (36 vs. 46%, p = 0.2) and stage IV (32 vs. 14%, p = 0.04), respectively. Reduction of radiation dosage in free jejunal group adversely affects the oncological control in stage IV hypopharyngeal carcinoma. In such circumstances, tubed cutaneous flaps are the preferred reconstructive option, so that full-dose radiotherapy can be given.

  12. Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma metastasized to the peritoneum, omentum and mesentery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Sanita; Fu, Hua; Zhang, Wei Wen; Gu, Yong Hong

    2015-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHAE) is a malignant vascular tumor derived from endothelial cell often misdiagnosed as Hepatic carcinoma on the basis of radiological features. Till now etiology of this rare curiosity is unknown but it is related with use of oral contraceptives pills (OCP), liver trauma, exposure to vinyl chloride and hepatitis. We herein report on a case which failed to be diagnosed by cytopathology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patient was a 46 yr old man presented with abdominal distension for a month. Initial liver function test (LFT) was increased whereas renal function test (RFT) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were normal. His abdominal ultrasound revealed multiple hypoechoic nodules and multiple liver calcifications. Subsequently laparoscopic omental biopsy and Ultrasound guided liver biopsy was done showing the neoplastic cells scattered in fibrous stroma. The immunohistochemistry for endothelial tumor cells stained positive for Vimentin (+++), CD10 (+++), CD34 (++), CD31 (+), Factor VIII antigen (focal) (+) and low proliferative activity for ki-67. Our case is very interesting in which patient admitted with nonspecific symptoms of abdominal pain and diagnosed to be a Malignant Hepatic EHAE metastasized to the peritoneum, omentum and mesentery. The patient was on thalidomide 50 mg/day and increased to 100 mg/day. 5-Flurouracil (FU) intraperitoneal chemotherapy and other symptomatic and supportive treatment was given to the patient. Our case highlights on the importance of immunohistopathological diagnosis, compare the radiological findings of this disease and discuss the treatment strategy with review of available literature. PMID:26191313

  13. Late metastatic colon cancer masquerading as primary jejunal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, A-WN; Joudeh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the small bowel from a previously resected colorectal cancer is rare and may erroneously be diagnosed as a primary small bowel carcinoma. It usually occurs several years after the primary resection. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone left hemicolectomy for colon cancer 3 years earlier and returned with subacute small bowel obstruction. This was initially thought, based on preoperative radiological findings and normal colonoscopic examination, to be due a primary jejunal cancer. Even at surgery, the lesion convincingly appeared as an obstructing primary small bowel carcinoma. However, the histology of the resected small bowel revealed metastatic colon cancer. This rare and an unusual metastatic occurrence some years after the primary resection is described and reviewed. PMID:26890851

  14. Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic and Definitive Therapeutic Tool in Cases of Inflamed Simple Lymphatic Cysts of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Sulieman, Ibnouf; Aftab, Zia; Ahmed, Ayman; Al-Mudares, Saif; Al Tarakji, Mohannad; Almuzrakchi, Ahmad; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign abdominal tumors. These cysts, especially those of lymphatic origin, very rarely become inflamed. The diagnosis of inflamed lymphatic cysts of the mesentery may be difficult. We herein report two cases of inflamed simple lymphatic cysts of the mesentery definitively diagnosed and excised by laparoscopy. PMID:26064760

  15. Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic and Definitive Therapeutic Tool in Cases of Inflamed Simple Lymphatic Cysts of the Mesentery.

    PubMed

    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Sulieman, Ibnouf; Aftab, Zia; Ahmed, Ayman; Al-Mudares, Saif; Al Tarakji, Mohannad; Almuzrakchi, Ahmad; Toro, Adriana; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign abdominal tumors. These cysts, especially those of lymphatic origin, very rarely become inflamed. The diagnosis of inflamed lymphatic cysts of the mesentery may be difficult. We herein report two cases of inflamed simple lymphatic cysts of the mesentery definitively diagnosed and excised by laparoscopy.

  16. Glyprolines and semax prevent stress-induced microcirculatory disturbances in the mesentery.

    PubMed

    Kopylova, G N; Smirnova, E A; Sanzhieva, L Ts; Umarova, B A; Lelekova, T V; Samonina, G E

    2003-11-01

    One-hour immobilization stress considerably disturbed microcirculation in the mesentery: blood flow in small mesenteric vessels decreased or stopped and numerous hemorrhages appeared. Lymphatic vessels lost spontaneous activity and did not respond to norepinephrine. Administration of Semax and glyprolines 1 h before stress decreased the severity of stress-induced microcirculatory disturbances. PGP and GP were most effective in this respect.

  17. Isolated primary hydatid cyst of small intestinal mesentery: an exceptional location of hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Najih, Mohammed; Chabni, Ali; Attoulou, Gilles; Yamoul, Rajae; Yakka, Mbarek; Ehirchiou, Abdelkader; Alkandry, Siffedine

    2012-01-01

    Hydatid disease is an endemic problem in some areas of the world. Common sites include liver and lungs. We report an unusual case of isolated primary Hydatid cyst of small gut mesentery. Characteristics of this uncommon location, mechanism, diagnostic difficulties, and treatment are discussed.

  18. Isolated primary hydatid cyst of small intestinal mesentery: an exceptional location of hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Najih, Mohammed; Chabni, Ali; Attoulou, Gilles; Yamoul, Rajae; Yakka, Mbarek; Ehirchiou, Abdelkader; AlKandry, Siffedine

    2012-01-01

    Hydatid disease is an endemic problem in some areas of the world. Common sites include liver and lungs. We report an unusual case of isolated primary Hydatid cyst of small gut mesentery. Characteristics of this uncommon location, mechanism, diagnostic difficulties, and treatment are discussed. PMID:23308322

  19. Cystic jejunal duplication with Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas, incidentally discovered in a patient with pancreatic tail neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Bara Jr, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a case of enteric duplication cyst and criteria for a proper differential diagnosis. A 51-year-old male was hospitalized for pancreatic tail neoplasm and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. During surgery, a jejunal cystic lesion was incidentally detected and jejunectomy was performed. Microscopically, the cyst was observed to be covered by Keratin 7/Keratin 20 positive intestinal type epithelium and the muscularis layer was shared by the cyst and adjacent jejunum, without a cleavage plane between the cyst wall and jejunal muscularis propria. In the deep muscularis propria, a Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas was also noted. In the pancreatic tail, a low grade intraepithelial lesion (panIN-1a) was diagnosed. This case highlights the necessity for a correct differential diagnosis of such rare lesions. Roughly 30 cases of jejunal duplication cysts have been reported to date in the PubMed database. PMID:27672644

  20. Histopathological analysis of rat mesentery as a method for evaluating neutrophil migration: differential effects of dexamethasone and pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Brito, G A; Falcão, J L; Saraiva, S N; Lima, A A; Flores, C A; Ribeiro, R A

    1998-10-01

    In the present study, histopathological analysis of rat mesentery was used to quantify the effect of two anti-inflammatory agents, dexamethasone (Dex) and pertussis toxin (Ptx), on leukocyte migration. The intravenous injection of Dex (1 mg/kg) and Ptx (1,200 ng) 1 h prior to the intraperitoneal injection of the inflammatory stimuli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) significantly reduced the neutrophil diapedesis (LPS: Ptx = 0.86 +/- 0.19 and Dex = 0.35 +/- 0.13 vs saline (S) = 2.85 +/- 0.59; fMLP: Ptx = 0.43 +/- 0.09 and Dex 0.01 +/- 0.01 vs S = 1.08 +/- 0.15 neutrophil diapedesis/field) and infiltration (LPS: Ptx = 6.29 +/- 1.4 and Dex = 3.06 +/- 0.76 vs S = 15.94 +/- 3.97; fMLP: Ptx = 3.85 +/- 0.56 and Dex = 0.40 +/- 0.16 vs S = 7.15 +/- 1.17 neutrophils/field) induced by the two agonists in the rat mesentery. The inhibitory effect of Dex and Ptx was clearly visible in the fields nearest the venule (up to 200 microns), demonstrating that these anti-inflammatory agents act preferentially in the transmigration of neutrophils from the vascular lumen into the interstitial space, but not in cell movement in response to a haptotactic gradient. The mesentery of rats pretreated with Dex showed a decreased number of neutrophils within the venules (LPS: Dex = 1.50 +/- 0.38 vs S = 4.20 +/- 1.01; fMLP: Dex = 0.25 +/- 0.11 vs S = 2.20 +/- 0.34 neutrophils in the lumen/field), suggesting that this inhibitor may be acting at a step that precedes neutrophil arrival in the inflamed tissue. In contrast to that observed with Dex treatment, the number of neutrophils found in mesenteric venules was significantly elevated in animals pretreated with Ptx (LPS: Ptx = 9.85 +/- 2.25 vs S = 4.20 +/- 1.01; fMLP: Ptx = 4.66 +/- 1.24 vs S = 2.20 +/- 0.34 neutrophils in the lumen/field). This discrepancy shows that Ptx and Dex act via different mechanisms and suggests that Ptx prevents locomotion of neutrophils from the vascular lumen to the interstitial

  1. Simultaneous occurrence of jejuno-jejunal and ileo-ileal intussusception in a child: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Rawat, J D; Wakhlu, A; Kureel, S N; Gopal, S C

    2011-01-11

    Intussusception is the most common cause of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. This condition is frequent in children and presents with the classic triad of cramping abdominal pain, bloody diarrhoea and a palpable tender mass. Small bowel intussusceptions are much less common, with jejuno-ileal and duodeno-jejunal intussusceptions being the rarest types of all. Multiple simultaneous intussusception is a peculiar variety of intussusception. The authors report the simultaneous occurrence of jejuno-jejunal and ileo-ileal intussusception in a patient. As this is an extremely uncommon entity, it is being reported with a brief review of the relevant literature.

  2. Using fluorescence lymphangiography to define the ileocolic mesentery: proof of concept for the watershed area using real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Keller, D S; Joshi, H M; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Walsh, D; Coffey, J C; Chand, M

    2017-08-29

    Recent advances in mesenteric science have demonstrated that the mesentery is a continuous structure with a 'watershed' area at the mesenteric apex between the right colon and terminal ileum, where lymphatic flow can proceed either proximally or distally. With this new understanding of the anatomy, functional features are emerging, which can have an impact on surgical management. Fluorescence lymphangiography or lymphoscintigraphy with indocyanine green allows real-time visualization of lymphatic channels, which highlights sentinel lymph nodes and may facilitate identification of the ideal margins for mesenteric lymphadenectomy during bowel resection for colon cancer. By using this novel technology, it is possible to demonstrate a watershed area in the ileocolic region and may facilitate more precise mesenteric dissection. In the present study, we provide proof of concept for the ileocolic watershed area using fluorescence lymphangiography.

  3. Huge peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the small bowel mesentery at nonage: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Ge, Chun-Lin; Long, Jin; Du, Rui-Xia; Guo, Ke-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (E-EWS/pPNET) is a rare aggressive malignant small round cell tumor. In this report, we present the case of a 15-year-old boy who suffered from acute abdominal pain accompanied by hematemesis and melena, and was eventually diagnosed with E-EWS/pPNET. To date, there have been only five reported cases of E-EWS/pPNET of the small bowel including the patient in this report. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of a pPNET of the small bowel mesentery at nonage. All these have made this report rare and significant. PMID:27672649

  4. Free jejunal flaps can be monitored by use of microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Hanne Birke

    2008-08-01

    When new combinations of preoperative treatments of carcinoma of the esophagus are implemented, surgical morbidity and mortality become even more important risk factors. This study investigated whether the risk of postoperative complications caused by ischemia in the reconstructed esophagus can be reduced using microdialysis as monitoring method. This is a retrospective study of 14 patients undergoing resection of carcinoma in the upper part of the esophagus and reconstruction with a free jejunal flap. The metabolism in all 14 jejunal transfers was monitored by use of microdialysis. The data were analyzed looking for reliable parameters detecting critical ischemia. Critical ischemia was suspected in two cases. Both of these cases were surgically revised, ischemia in the jejunal flap was verified, and the jejunal flaps were revascularized. All 14 jejunal flaps survived. Using the concentration of glucose in the microdialysate, it was possible to detect the two cases of critical ischemia. Yet, the most reliable parameter seemed to be the retrospectively calculated lactate:glucose ratio; in both the ischemic flaps, the lactate:glucose ratio exceeded more than 1000% the maximum values found in all the nonischemic flaps. Microdialysis is a promising monitoring method for surveillance of free jejunal flaps.

  5. Pseudo Double Bubble: Jejunal Duplication Mimicking Duodenal Atresia on Prenatal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ultrasound showing a double bubble is considered to be pathognomonic of duodenal atresia. We recently encountered an infant with prenatal findings suggestive of duodenal atresia with a normal karyotype who actually had a jejunal duplication cyst on exploration. A finding of an antenatal double bubble should lead to a thorough evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract and appropriate prenatal/neonatal testing and management as many cystic lesions within the abdomen can present with this prenatal finding. PMID:26023462

  6. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Mancini Filho, J.; Lajolo, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6696828

  7. Jejunal intussusception caused by a huge Vanek's tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Neishaboori, Hassan; Emadian, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp (known also as Vanek's tumor) is a type of localized, non-neoplastic inflammatory pseudotumor or inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor that occurs most commonly in the stomach but also in the small and large bowel. It is a documented cause of intussusception in adults. We report a case of a 40-year-old woman who presented with severe, postprandial abdominal pain followed by projectile vomiting over a period of three days. Ultrasonography demonstrated a solid and echogenic mass surrounded by the typical mural layers of an invaginated jejunum. She underwent urgent laparotomy and resection of an 18 cm tumor from the distal jejunum. The immuno-histopathological diagnosis after segmental jejunal resection was a jejunal inflammatory fibroid polyp. Although inflammatory fibroid polyps are seen very rarely in adults, they are among the probable diagnoses that should be considered in obstructive tumors of the small bowel causing intussusceptions. PMID:24834274

  8. The Combination of Gastroschisis, Jejunal Atresia, and Colonic Atresia in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Zachary; Nanagas, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a rare case of gastroschisis associated with jejunal atresia and colonic atresia. In our case, the jejunal atresia was not discovered for 27 days after the initial abdominal wall closure. The colonic atresia was not discovered for 48 days after initial repair of the gastroschisis secondary to the rarity of the disorder. Both types of atresia were repaired with primary hand-sewn anastomoses. Other than the prolonged parenteral nutrition and hyperbilirubinemia, our patient did very well throughout his hospital course. Based on our case presentation, small bowel atresia and colonic atresia must be considered in patients who undergo abdominal wall closure for gastroschisis with prolonged symptoms suggestive of bowel obstruction. Our case report also demonstrates primary enteric anastomosis as a safe, well-tolerated surgical option for patients with types of intestinal atresia. PMID:26180651

  9. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M A; Mancini Filho, J; Lajolo, F M

    1984-02-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed.

  10. Jejunal Diverticulitis Ascending to the Duodenum as a Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Fresow, Robert; Kamusella, Peter; Talanow, Roland; Andresen, Reimer

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 73 year-old Caucasian male with acute abdominal pain, peritonism and vomiting. Due to the severity of symptoms a CT examination of the abdomen was performed. The scans revealed multiple jejunal diverticula, wall thickening of the duodenum and jejunum, and free peritoneal fluid. No clear signs of mesenteric infarction, free abdominal air or abscess formation were seen. An additional exploratory laparotomy was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out the need for resection of small bowel. Since the results were matching, conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Jejunal diverticulitis is a rare cause of acute abdomen, however has to be considered as a differential diagnosis to more common entities. It usually stays localized, while in our case the inflammation ascended to the duodenum. CT is the modality of choice to diagnose and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:25302248

  11. MicroRNA changes in rat mesentery and serum associated with drug-induced vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Roberta A. Scicchitano, Marshall S.; Mirabile, Rosanna C.; Chau, Nancy T.; Frazier, Kendall S.; Thomas, Heath C.

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory miRNAs play a role in vascular biology and are involved in biochemical and molecular pathways dysregulated during vascular injury. Collection and integration of functional miRNA data into these pathways can provide insight into pathogenesis at the site of injury; the same technologies applied to biofluids may provide diagnostic or surrogate biomarkers. miRNA was analyzed from mesentery and serum from rats given vasculotoxic compounds for 4 days. Fenoldopam, dopamine and midodrine each alter hemodynamics and are associated with histologic evidence of vascular injury, while yohimbine is vasoactive but does not cause histologic evidence of vascular injury in rat. There were 38 and 35 miRNAs altered in a statistically significant manner with a fold change of 2 or greater in mesenteries of fenoldopam- and dopamine-dosed rats, respectively, with 9 of these miRNAs shared. 10 miRNAs were altered in rats given midodrine; 6 were shared with either fenoldopam or dopamine. In situ hybridization demonstrated strong expression and co-localization of miR-134 in affected but not in adjacent unaffected vessels. Mesenteric miRNA expression may provide clarity or avenues of research into mechanisms involved in vascular injury once the functional role of specific miRNAs becomes better characterized. 102 miRNAs were altered in serum from rats with drug-induced vascular injury. 10 miRNAs were commonly altered in serum from dopamine and either fenoldopam or midodrine dosed rats; 18 of these 102 were also altered in mesenteries from rats with drug-induced vascular injury, suggesting their possible utility as peripheral biomarkers. -- Highlights: ► Mesentery and serum were examined from rats given vasoactive compounds for 4 days. ► 72 miRNAs were altered in mesenteries from rats with vascular injury. ► miR-134 was localized to affected but not adjacent unaffected vessels. ► 102 miRNAs were changed in serum from rats with vascular injury. ► 18 miRNAs changed in both

  12. Meal-stimulated release of methionine-enkephalin into the canine jejunal lumen.

    PubMed Central

    Money, S R; Petroianu, A; Gintzler, A R; Jaffe, B M

    1988-01-01

    Application of enkephalins to the luminal surface of the bowel augments intestinal absorption. However, to date, endogenous enkephalins have not been demonstrated within intestinal luminal fluid. To determine whether enkephalins are present in the intestinal lumen, five adult dogs had 25-cm chronic jejunal Thiry-Vella loops constructed. Dogs were studied in the awake, fasted state. Jejunal loops were perfused with isoosmotic, neutral Krebs buffer containing protease inhibitors. After basal sampling, the dogs received a high fat meat meal. Collections were made during the meal and for 60 min postprandially. Luminal met-enkephalin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay and confirmed by HPLC. HPLC separation of luminal samples demonstrated two immunoreactive peaks which co-eluted with pure met-enkephalin and met-enkephalin-sulfoxide. Basal met-enkephalin outputs averaged 52 +/- 13 ng/min. The meal significantly increased mean luminal met-enkephalin output to 137 +/- 71 ng/min. During the initial 20-min postprandial period, output remained elevated (180 +/- 73 ng/min), after which it returned to basal levels. We conclude that met-enkephalin is present in the jejunal lumen, and that luminal release of this opioid is augmented by a meal. Images PMID:3343342

  13. Lanreotide inhibits human jejunal secretion induced by prostaglandin E1 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, I; René, E; Ramdani, A; Bayod, F; Sabbagh, L C; Thomas, F; Mignon, M

    1996-02-01

    1. Somatostatin inhibits hormonal secretions in the gastrointestinal tract. Somatostatin analogues are used in the treatment of VIPome-related watery diarrhoea. In addition, more than 10% of patients with AIDS suffer from diarrhoea likely due to the increased intestinal secretion of water and ions. However, the direct effect of somatostatin on the flux of water and ions in the intestine has not been, so far, analyzed in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of lanreotide, a somatostatin analogue, on the movements of water and ions in the jejunum in man. 2. Accordingly, 10 healthy volunteers (age 18-35 years, mean 27) and two patients with AIDS (26 and 33 years) suffering from water diarrhoea (> 800 ml day-1) underwent intestinal perfusion using a four lumen tube with proximal occluding balloon. The segment tested was 25 cm long. The jejunum was infused by an isotonic control saline solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as nonabsorbable marker. Basal jejunal secretions were measured in all subjects. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) was administered intraluminally to stimulate jejunal secretion in healthy volunteers. The effect of intravenous lanreotide on the jejunal PGE1-induced secretions of water and electrolytes was analysed in healthy subjects and on the basal secretions in AIDS patients. Each period was analyzed on the basis of three (10 min) successive intestinal juice collections after 20-30 min equilibration time. The antisecretory effect of lanreotide was evaluated in each subject as the difference between fluxes compared to the control period. 3. In healthy volunteers, PGE1 induced secretion of H2O, Na+, K+ and Cl- in the jejunum and lanreotide reduced significantly PGE1-induced response. In both AIDS patients basal fluxes of water and ions were reduced by lanreotide in a dose-dependent manner. 4. Somatostatin can reduce stimulated-jejunal secretion of ions and water in normal subjects and may improve water diarrhoea in AIDS

  14. Chloride ion transport into pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Gabriel, S E

    1988-01-01

    1. This study was carried out to determine the types and activities of carrier proteins which transport the chloride ion in pig jejunal brush-border membranes, with an emphasis on studying the properties of chloride conductance activity in vesicles prepared from these membranes. 2. Sodium-chloride co-transport activity was not detected in this tissue. A sodium-proton antiport with typical amiloride sensitivity was present. An anion exchanger linking chloride to hydroxyl or bicarbonate ions was also found in the pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles. 3. Chloride conductance activity in this system was specifically dependent on the buffering agents used for vesicle preparation. Conductance activity could not be demonstrated in vesicles prepared in imidazolium acetate or in HEPES-Tris buffers. HEPES-tetramethylammonium buffering of vesicles in the chloride uptake system produced a significant conductance response to a potassium gradient plus valinomycin. 4. Chloride conductance showed saturable kinetics with respect to substrate concentration, with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of approximately 116 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 132 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. 5. Preliminary screening of potential inhibitors of chloride conductance showed only minimal inhibitor effects of SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-sulphonic acid), anthracene-9-carboxylate, N-phenylanthranilate and piretanide. 6. The conductance activity in pig jejunal vesicles appears to have stringent buffer requirements, and to be relatively insensitive to the effects of reported conductance inhibitors. PMID:2466986

  15. Discovery of endothelium and mesenchymal properties of primo vessels in the mesentery.

    PubMed

    Ping, An; Zhendong, Su; Jingxing, Dai; Yaling, Liu; Bae, Kyung-Hee; Shiyun, Tan; Hesheng, Luo; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sungchul

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidences demonstrated that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) has a crucial role in cancer and is recognized as a unique source of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Primo vascular system (PVS) is a new circulatory system which may play an important role in cancer metastasis and regeneration. In the current study, we applied previously established time-saving method to identify primo vessels and further investigated the immunocytochemical properties of primo vessels. Both primo vessels and primary primo vessel cells in the mesentery expressed endothelial markers and fibroblast markers. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated that endothelial and fibroblast markers are coexpressed in primo vessels. In addition, under the stimulation of TGF-β1 in vitro, primary primo vessel cells differentiated into fibroblasts. Therefore, we found that primo vessels in the mesentery had a transitional structure between endothelium and mesenchymal. This is a new finding of EndMT in normal postnatal animals.

  16. Discovery of Endothelium and Mesenchymal Properties of Primo Vessels in the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Ping, An; Zhendong, Su; Jingxing, Dai; Yaling, Liu; Bae, Kyung-Hee; Shiyun, Tan; Hesheng, Luo; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sungchul

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidences demonstrated that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) has a crucial role in cancer and is recognized as a unique source of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Primo vascular system (PVS) is a new circulatory system which may play an important role in cancer metastasis and regeneration. In the current study, we applied previously established time-saving method to identify primo vessels and further investigated the immunocytochemical properties of primo vessels. Both primo vessels and primary primo vessel cells in the mesentery expressed endothelial markers and fibroblast markers. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated that endothelial and fibroblast markers are coexpressed in primo vessels. In addition, under the stimulation of TGF-β1 in vitro, primary primo vessel cells differentiated into fibroblasts. Therefore, we found that primo vessels in the mesentery had a transitional structure between endothelium and mesenchymal. This is a new finding of EndMT in normal postnatal animals. PMID:23662116

  17. Development of sympathetic innervation to proximal and distal arteries of the rat mesentery.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C E; Hirst, G D; van Helden, D F

    1983-01-01

    The changes which occur during the post-natal development of sympathetic innervation to proximal and distal arteries of the rat mesentery have been examined using intracellular recording and histochemical techniques. In the youngest animals examined, single perivascular stimuli initiated slow depolarizing potentials which were not calcium-dependent. After day 4, single stimuli failed to initiate membrane potential changes in a proportion of preparations. This stage coincided with the period of extensive ramification of sympathetic nerve fibres over the surface of the arterioles. From day 9 onwards, membrane potential changes were again initiated by single stimuli in the distal arteries. These responses were distinct from those recorded from the younger animals and in many ways resembled excitatory junction potentials recorded from the arteries of mature animals. There was a gradient in the development of the innervation to the arteries of the rat mesentery, with that to the distal vessels maturing earlier than that to the more proximal vessels. PMID:6875954

  18. Are children on jejunal feeds at risk of iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Tan, Li-Zsa; Adams, Susan E; Kennedy, Alison; Kepreotes, Helen; Ooi, Chee Y

    2015-05-14

    Children on exclusive jejunal feeding may be at risk of iron deficiency due to the feeds bypassing the duodenum, which is the primary site for iron absorption. We describe the biochemical and hematological features of six children on exclusive jejunal feeding who did not receive iron supplementation. At a mean (standard deviation) period of 11 (6.5) mo after commencing jejunal feeds, there was a significant reduction in both serum iron (18.5 g/L vs 9.8 g/L, P = 0.01) and transferrin saturation levels (23.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.02), suggesting iron deficiency. However, there was no significant change in ferritin, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume levels post-commencement of jejunal feeds. This may be the result of small bowel adaptation in response to early iron deficiency. Larger and longer term prospective studies are required to investigate if children on jejunal feeds are at risk of developing iron deficiency.

  19. A 5-year-old boy with unicentric Castleman disease affecting the mesentery: utility of serum IL-6 level and (18)F-FDG PET for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Toita, Nariaki; Kawamura, Nobuaki; Hatano, Norikazu; Takezaki, Syun-ichiro; Ohkura, Yuka; Yamada, Masafumi; Okano, Motohiko; Okada, Tadao; Sasaki, Fumiaki; Kubota, Kanako C; Itoh, Tomoo; Ariga, Tadashi

    2009-09-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. It is quite difficult to diagnose CD without typical localized signs or symptoms. We present a 5-year-old boy with unicentric plasma cell CD in the mesentery, which was too small to be detected by any conventional imaging. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography image and a serum cytokine profile prompted us to perform a curative surgical excision, confirming his diagnosis. Our case also supported an important role of interleukin-6 in the pathophysiology of plasma cell CD.

  20. Symbolic dynamics of jejunal motility in the irritable bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wackerbauer, Renate; Schmidt, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Different studies of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by conventional analysis of jejunal motility report conflicting results. Therefore, our aim is to quantify the jejunal contraction activity by symbolic dynamics in order to discriminate between IBS and control subjects. Contraction amplitudes during fasting motility (phase II) are analyzed for 30 IBS and 30 healthy subjects. On the basis of a particular scale-independent discretization of the contraction amplitudes with respect to the median, IBS patients are characterized by increased block entropy as well as increased mean contraction amplitude. In a further more elementary level of analysis these differences can be reduced to specific contraction patterns within the time series, namely the fact that successive large contraction amplitudes are less ordered in IBS than in controls. These significant differences in jejunal motility may point to an altered control of the gut in IBS, although further studies on a representative number of patients have to be done for a validation of these findings.

  1. Laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with double jejunal loop reconstruction: an old trick for a new dog.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marcel Autran C; Makdissi, Fabio F; Surjan, Rodrigo C T; Machado, Marcel C C

    2013-02-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy is an established procedure for the treatment of benign and malignant diseases located at the pancreatic head and periampullary region. In order to decrease morbidity and mortality, we devised a unique technique using two different jejunal loops to avoid activation of pancreatic juice by biliary secretion and therefore reduce the severity of pancreatic fistula. This technique has been used for open pancreatoduodenectomy worldwide but to date has never been described for laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy. This article reports the technique of laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with two jejunal loops for reconstruction of the alimentary tract. After pancreatic head resection, retrocolic end-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy with duct-to-mucosa anastomosis is performed. The jejunal loop is divided with a stapler, and side-to-side jejunojejunostomy is performed with the stapler, leaving a 40-cm jejunal loop for retrocolic hepaticojejunostomy. Finally, end-to-side duodenojejunostomy is performed in an antecolic fashion. This technique has been successfully used in 3 consecutive patients with pancreatic head tumors: 2 patients underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy, and 1 patient underwent totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy. One patient presented a Grade A pancreatic fistula that was managed conservatively. One patient received blood transfusion. Mean operative time was 9 hours. Mean hospital stay was 7 days. No postoperative mortality was observed. Laparoscopic pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with double jejunal loop reconstruction is feasible and may be useful to decrease morbidity and mortality after pancreatoduodenectomy. This operation is challenging and may be reserved for highly skilled laparoscopic surgeons.

  2. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  3. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling.

  4. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacy L.; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic. PMID:24489394

  5. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacy L; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-02-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic.

  6. [Major intestinal resections and short-bowel syndrome in patients with the acute mesenterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Khripun, A I; Shurygin, S N; Priamikov, A D; Mironkov, A B; Urvantseva, O M; Movsesiants, M Iu; Izvekov, A A; Abashin, M V

    2012-01-01

    The study represents the retrospective analysis of major intestinal resections (the length of the left in olace bowel less then 200 sm) and non-major resections in 52 patients operated on the acute mesenterial thrombosis. Major bowel resection was performed in 30 patients (57.7%). 66.7% of those patients (20 of 30) died soon after the operation. Whereas lethality rate among patients with non-major resections was 54.5% (12 of 22). All 10 survived patients demonstrated the short-bowel syndrome during the follow-up period (the median follow-up time was 25 months).

  7. A Rare Case of Jejunal Arterio-Venous Fistula: Treatment with Superselective Catheter Embolization with a Tracker-18 Catheter and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Martin J. Anderson, Suzanne E.; Lourens, Steven; Triller, Juergen

    2004-11-15

    Arterio-venous fistulas may develop spontaneously, following trauma or infection, or be iatrogenic in nature. We present a rare case of a jejunal arterio- venous fistula in a 35-year-old man with a history of pancreatic head resection that had been performed two years previously because of chronic pancreatitis. The patient was admitted with acute upper abdominal pain, vomiting and an abdominal machinery-type bruit. The diagnosis of a jejunal arterio-venous fistula was established by MR imaging. Transfemoral angiography was performed to assess the possibility of catheter embolization. The angiographic study revealed a small aneurysm of the third jejunal artery, abnormal early filling of dilated jejunal veins and marked filling of the slightly dilated portal vein (13-14 mm). We considered the presence of segmental portal hypertension. The patient was treated with coil embolization in the same angiographic session. This case report demonstrates the importance of auscultation of the abdomen in the initial clinical examination. MR imaging and color Doppler ultrasound are excellent noninvasive tools in establishing the diagnosis. The role of interventional radiological techniques in the treatment of early portal hypertension secondary to jejunal arterio-venous fistula is discussed at a time when this condition is still asymptomatic. A review of the current literature is included.

  8. Peritoneal dialysis fluid-induced angiogenesis in rat mesentery is increased by lactate in the presence or absence of glucose.

    PubMed

    Albrektsson, Ann; Bazargani, Farhan; Wieslander, Anders; Braide, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis may be an important mechanism behind the functional deterioration of the peritoneum leading to ultrafiltration failure in peritoneal dialysis. The present study was designed to compare the angiogenic properties of lactate-, bicarbonate-, and pyruvate-buffered fluids, evaluated separately with and without glucose. Five different fluids (lactate and bicarbonate with and without 2.5% glucose and pyruvate without glucose) were studied for 5 weeks of twice-daily injections in rats. The respective buffers (40 mmol/l) were adjusted to pH 7.2, and sodium, chloride, calcium, and magnesium were present at standard concentrations. The mesenteric window model, based on observation of the translucent peritoneal sections of the small intestine mesentery, was used for immunohistochemical imaging of microvessels (RECA-1 antigen) and macrophages (ED1 and ED2 antigens). All fluids induced angiogenesis as compared with untreated controls. The lactate-buffered fluids induced larger vascularized zones than did their bicarbonate- and pyruvate-buffered counterparts. Angiogenesis was accompanied by a local recruitment of ED1 macrophages from blood. Addition of glucose to the lactate- and bicarbonate-buffered fluids did not seem to alter their pro-angiogenic properties. In conclusion, intraperitoneal exposure to lactate buffer, compared with bicarbonate, stimulates angiogenesis in the presence or absence of glucose.

  9. Conversion of choledochojejunostomy stents to jejunal feeding tubes for postoperative enteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Burke, D R; Torosian, M H; McLean, G K; Meranze, S G; Rosato, E F

    1988-01-01

    The problem of protein calorie malnutrition following major gastrointestinal surgery can be treated with central venous or enteric alimentation, with the latter being preferred. The authors describe a simple technique for the conversion of biliary stents placed after pancreaticoduodenal surgery into jejunal feeding tubes when the stenting function is no longer needed. Three illustrative cases are presented. In each case, the procedure took less than 30 min and had no associated morbidity. This technique allows early conversion from central venous to enteric alimentation without the need to create a second surgical enterostomy.

  10. Primary extragastrointestinal stromal tumors in the omentum and mesentery: a clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Llenas-García, J; Guerra-Vales, J M; Moreno, A; Ibarrola, C; Castelbon, F J; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Meneu, J C; Ballestin, C; Moreno, E

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the clinical, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of primary extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) of the omentum and mesentery diagnosed in the Hospital 12 de Octubre, in Madrid, Spain, from 1993-2005. The clinical data and histological and immunohistochemical findings of primary mesenchymal neoplasias were revised using the Department of Pathological Anatomy databases. Six EGISTs were identified. Three were primarily of the omentum and 3 mesenteric. They were found in 4 males and 2 females with an average age of 65.16 years. All were c-KIT positive, and the majority CD34 positive, while 3 were positive for muscle-specific actin. The 3 omentum cases had a mixed spindle/epithelioid pattern and low mitotic rate, while the 3 mesenteric cases had a spindle pattern, with a high mitotic rate in 2 cases, where hepatic metastasis appeared at 6 and 32 months respectively. The 3 omentum cases were alive at the time of writing, and free of disease at 16, 21 and 34 months of follow-up. EGISTs represent 11.9% of GIST cases diagnosed in the hospital over the period 2000-2005. In this study primary EGISTs of the omentum and mesentery showed clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics similar to those previously in the literature for GISTs of the digestive tract, which supports the hypothesis that these tumors originate from extragastrointestinal c-KIT positive cells. Mesenteric location appears to be associated with a poorer prognosis.

  11. In vivo PIV measurement of red blood cell velocity field in microvessels considering mesentery motion.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Shigeru; Okamoto, Koji

    2002-05-01

    As endothelial cells are subject to flow shear stress, it is important to determine the detailed velocity distribution in microvessels in the study of mechanical interactions between blood and endothelium. Recently, particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been proposed as a quantitative method of measuring velocity fields instantaneously in experimental fluid mechanics. The authors have developed a highly accurate PIV technique with improved dynamic range. spatial resolution and measurement accuracy. In this paper, the proposed method was applied to images of the arteriole in the rat mesentery using an intravital microscope and high-speed digital video system. Taking the mesentery motion into account, the PIV technique was improved to measure red blood cell (RBC) velocity. Velocity distributions with spatial resolutions of 0.8 x 0.8 microm were obtained even near the wall in the centre plane of the arteriole. The arteriole velocity profile was blunt in the centre region of the vessel cross-section and sharp in the near-wall region. Typical flow features for non-Newtonian fluid were shown. Time-averaged velocity profiles in six cross sections with different diameters were compared.

  12. The diagnosis of lymph microcirculation in experimental studies on rat mesentery in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekateryna I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.; Solovieva, Anastasia V.; Stepanova, Tatyana V.; Brill, Gregory E.

    2003-07-01

    The many biological and medical problems associated with microlymphatic functioning and its disturbances at different diseases, include primary and secondary lymphedema, inflammation, lymphatic malformations, and so on. It is important both to establish an adequate animal model for study lymph microcirculation in vivo and to match it with corresponding diagnostic techniques. The rat mesentery has been successfully used in experiments focusing on the microcirculation, including small lymphatics. Among optical methods the transmittance microscopy is most widely employed to study microcirculation. We have undertaken following investigations: development and evaluation of capability of transmission microscopy for in vivo studies of microcirculation; obtaining of single cell images; estimation of lymph microcirculation parameters, including the relation of forward to backward flow in intact lymphatics; regulation of microlymphatic function by nitric oxide and study of microlymphatic disturbances at the experimental lymphedema. Although interesting data has been obtained, the transmission microscopy has the relatively low absorption sensitivity and prevents obtaining good absorption contrast. To obtain more comprehensive physiological data, the further development and improvement imaging of rat mesentery is discussed with focus on new combined optical imaging systems which integrate recent advances in video-transmission and photothermal (PT) microscopy, PT fluid velocimetry, and laser spectroscopy.

  13. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo. Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry, super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers, drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and high-speed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow. In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell’s functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic), and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed. PMID:17226898

  14. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass complicated by a mesocolic jejunal stricture successfully treated with endoscopic TTS balloon dilation.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Stephanie Christine; Jackson, Christian; Rendon, Stewart

    2010-12-01

    Even though Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric surgery in the United States, it is not without post surgical complications. The development of a mesocolic jejunal stricture after a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) is a rare complication. We present a patient who manifested, at 5 weeks post-LRYGBP, symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and an inability to tolerate an oral diet. The patient was found to have a stricture at the efferent Roux limb consistent with a mesocolic stricture which was successfully resolved with through the scope (TTS) balloon dilatation. There was no apparent cause of the patient's stenosis with no evidence of an anastomotic breakdown or major inflammatory process. The patient presented for follow-up after her dilatation was noted to have complete resolution of her symptoms and continued to lose weight. This is the first known case of a mesocolic jejunal stricture successfully treated with TTS balloon dilation.

  15. [A case of jejunal perforation in gallstone ileus].

    PubMed

    Taira, Akiko; Yamada, Masami; Takehira, Yasunori; Kageyama, Fujito; Yoshii, Shigeto; Murohisa, Gou; Yoshida, Kenichi; Iwaoka, Yasushi; Terai, Tomohiro; Uotani, Takahiro; Watanabe, Shinya; Noritake, Hidenao; Ikematu, Yoshito; Kanai, Toshikazu

    2008-04-01

    Gallstone ileus is a rare but important cause of small bowel obstruction in the geriatric population. A 65-year-old man with a twenty year history of cholecystolithiasis was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain and vomiting. Physical exams showed abdominal defence and rebound tenderness. A plain abdominal X-ray suggested a small bowel obstruction and pneumobilia. CT scan revealed a 2.5-cm gallstone at the jejunum and air in the biliary tree. The patient underwent a emergency laparotomy based on a diagnosis of panperitonitis with a perforation associated with gallstone ileus. Operative findings revealed a jejunal perforation and a impacted stone on the anal side of perforation. Enterolithotomy and jejunal resection were performed with cholecystectomy and repairment of the cholecystoduodenal fistula.

  16. A new tube for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal alimentation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R; Nyhus, L M

    1985-04-01

    A new tube has been devised for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal enteral alimentation. The tube is inserted by the nasogastric route intraoperatively. What differentiates this from earlier tubes is the addition of two inflatable balloons that facilitate passage of the tip of the tube through the retroperitoneal duodenum and into the proximal jejunum. Such a device is needed because the advantages of enteral alimentation in the postoperative patient include safety, low cost and significant metabolic benefits.

  17. Replaceable Jejunal Feeding Tubes in Severely Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tabea; Holland-Cunz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Long-term enteral nutrition in chronically ill, malnourished children represents a clinical challenge if adequate feeding via nasogastric or gastrostomy tubes fails. We evaluated the usefulness and complications of a new type of surgical jejunostomy that allows for easier positioning and replacement of the jejunal feeding tube in children. We surgically inserted replaceable jejunal feeding tubes (RJFT) connected to a guide thread which exited through a separate tiny opening of the abdominal wall. In a retrospective case series, we assessed the effectiveness and complications of this technique in severely ill children suffering from malnutrition and complex disorders. Three surgical complications occurred, and these were addressed by reoperation. Four children died from their severe chronic disorders within the study period. The RJFT permitted continuous enteral feeding and facilitated easy replacement of the tube. After the postoperative period, jejunal feeding by RJFT resulted in adequate weight gain. This feeding access represents an option for children in whom sufficient enteral nutrition by nasogastric tubes or gastrostomy proved impossible. Further studies are required to investigate the safety and effectiveness of this surgical technique in a larger case series. PMID:28232847

  18. Life-threating upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to a primary aorto-jejunal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Fernández de Sevilla, Elena; Echeverri, Juan Andrés; Boqué, Miriam; Valverde, Silvia; Ortega, Nuria; Gené, Anna; Rodríguez, Nivardo; Balibrea, José María; Armengol, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary aorto-enteric fistula (AEF) is an uncommon life-threating condition. Only 4% of them involve the jejunum or ileum and its mortality ranges from 33 to 85%. Presentation of case A 54-year-old female was admitted to the Emergency Department with syncope and hematemesis. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy found a pulsatile vessel in the second portion of the duodenum. A computed tomography scan showed an AEF with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and iliac artery thrombosis. During surgery, an infrarenal aortic aneurysm complicated with an aorto-jejunal fistula was found. An axilo-bifemoral bypass, open repair of the aneurysm and segmental small bowel resection with primary suture of the jejunal defect were performed. Discussion Depending on previous aortic grafting, AEF can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary AEF is usually caused by an untreated abdominal aortic aneurysm, commonly presenting an infectious etiology. The main clinical sign is a “herald” hemorrhage. The EGD is considered as the first step in diagnosing AEF. The treatment of choice for AEF is emergent surgery. Use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is mandatory in the postoperative period to avoid fistula recurrence. Conclusion AEF is a rare entity with a high mortality. High clinical suspicion is essential to make a correct diagnosis, which is crucial for the prognosis of these patients, such is the case of our patient. If hemodynamic stability is achieved, it allows to employ surgical strategies in which extra-abdominal bypass is performed before fistula is treated. PMID:25616071

  19. Experiment K-7-17: Effects of Spaceflight on the Proliferation of Jejunal Mucosal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  20. Experiment K-7-17: Effects of Spaceflight on the Proliferation of Jejunal Mucosal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  1. Jejunal lymphangioma: an unusual cause of intussusception in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Limaiem, F; Khalfallah, T; Marsaoui, L; Bouraoui, S; Lahmar, A; Mzabi, S

    2015-03-01

    Adult intussusception is a relatively rare clinical entity. Almost 90% of cases of intussusception in adults are secondary to a pathologic condition that serves as a lead point. Lymphangioma of the small bowel is an unusual tumour that has been rarely reported to cause intussusception. In this paper, we present a rare case of adult intussusception due to jejunal lymphangioma. A 22-year-old female patient with a medical history significant for anaemia presented with intermittent colicky abdominal pain, diarrhoea and oedema of the inferior limbs for the past three months. Ultrasonography and CT scan revealed a typical target sign with dilated intestinal loops. At laparotomy, a jejuno-jejunal intussusception was found. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed. Macroscopic examination of the surgical specimen revealed a pedunculated polyp measuring 2 cm in diameter. Histological sections of the polyp revealed in the lamina propria and submucosal layer of the jejunum several markedly dilated thin-walled lymphatic spaces lined with single layers of flat endothelial cells. The final pathologic diagnosis was submucosal lymphangioma. This case report indicates that intussusception, although rare in adults, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. Moreover, it should be taken into consideration that lymphangioma is one of the possible lesions that can cause intussusception.

  2. [Surgical Removal of Migrated Coil after Embolization of Jejunal Variceal Bleeding: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Lee, Danbi; Oh, Kyunghwan; Lee, Mingee; So, Seol; Yang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Chan Wook; Gwon, Dong Il; Chung, Young Hwa

    2017-01-25

    Jejunal variceal bleeding is less common compared with esophagogastric varices in patients with portal hypertension. However, jejunal variceal bleeding can be fatal without treatment. Treatments include surgery, transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS), endoscopic sclerotherapy, percutaneous coil embolization, and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO). Percutaneous coil embolization can be considered as an alternative treatment option for those where endoscopic sclerotherapy, surgery, TIPS or BRTO are not possible. Complications of percutaneous coil embolization have been reported, including coil migration. Herein, we report a case of migration of the coil into the jejunal lumen after percutaneous coil embolization for jejunal variceal bleeding. The migrated coil was successfully removed using surgery.

  3. [Jejunal ulcerations - a diagnostic challenge in a patient with coeliac disease].

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Schumann, M; Felber, J; Mireskandari, M; Schmidt, C; Stallmach, A

    2015-11-01

    A subset of patients with coeliac disease (CD) suffers persistent or recurrent complaints despite a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) that can be caused by refractory coeliac disease (RCD). We present a patient with weight loss and signs of malassimilation secondary to villous atrophy and jejunal ulcerations complicating known CD. We demonstrate a stepwise approach to the diagnosis and subtyping of RCD and to rule out important alternative causes of jejunal ulcerations. RCD can be classified as type I based on the absence or as type II based on the presence of an aberrant intestinal mucosal lymphocyte population. RCD type I shows a more benign course as these patients usually improve on a treatment consisting of nutritional support and immunosuppressive therapies such as budesonide or azathioprine. In contrast, clinical response to standard therapies in RCD type II is less certain and the prognosis is poor. Several groups suggest that RCD type II should be regarded as low-grade intraepithelial lymphoma which frequently transforms into an aggressive enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma with a high mortality rate. Therefore, a rapid differentiation of RCD type I and RCD type II is a major clinical challenge to early initiate appropriate treatment modalities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A case of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis diagnosed by double-balloon enteroscopy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ignacio; Latorre, Rafael; Soria, Federico; Carballo, Fernando; Lopez-Albors, Octavio; Buendia, Antonio J; Perez-Cuadrado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    A 3 yr old male English setter dog was presented for evaluation of a 6-wk history of intermittent diarrhea. After standard gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy showed normal mucosa, double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) was used via both oral and anal approaches. Gross changes consistent with inflammation in the jejunum were seen, and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histologic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis. Clinical remission of the disease occurred after 3 mo of therapy with prednisone, metronidazole, and a novel protein diet. Use of DBE has not been previously reported in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease, and isolated lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis has not been described. The described cases of intestinal inflammatory disease diagnosed by conventional endoscopy were related to pathologic changes in the duodenum, ileum or colon, but not the jejunum. The main advantage of the DBE technique allowed examination of portions of the small intestine (jejunum) that were not commonly accessible by standard endoscopic techniques, and permitted a minimally invasive collection of biopsy samples compared with surgical biopsy. This case highlights the need to consider using DBE in animals with gastrointestinal disorders, whose symptoms are not readily explained by routine tests, conventional endoscopy, and dietary or therapeutic trials.

  5. GASTRIC AND JEJUNAL HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rosemary Simões Nomelini; Almeida, Élia Cláudia de Souza; Camilo, Silvia Maria Perrone; Terra-Júnior, Júverson Alves; Guimarães, Lucinda Calheiros; Duque, Ana Cristina da Rocha; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida

    Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that increasingly is being treated by surgery. To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative). The postoperative group had a significant reduction in H. pylori infection (p=0.0001). A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients. A obesidade mórbida é doença multifatorial cujo tratamento cirúrgico é cada vez mais indicado. Avaliar alterações histopatológicas gástricas em obesos e comparar com os submetidos à bypass gastrojejunal e a mucosa jejunal após a operação. Estudo observacional realizado em hospital público terciário avaliando biópsias endoscópicas de 36 pacientes no pré-operatório e 35 no pós-operatório. No pré-operatório 80,6% apresentaram gastrite crônica, 38,9% em atividade (77,1% e 20,1%, respectivamente, no pós-operatório). O grupo pós-operatório apresentou diminuição significativa na infecção por Helicobacter pylory (p=0,0001). Maior comprimento do coto gástrico e tempo de operação superior a dois anos associaram-se a infecção por Helicobacter pylori. A mucosa jejunal foi normal em 91,4% e

  6. Intussusception and volvulus secondary to jejunal adenocarcinoma in an adult Nigerian male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okolo, C A; Afolabi, A O; Sahabi, S M

    2010-12-01

    A 31 year-old Nigerian man with jejuno-jejunal intussusception with the lead point being an adenocarcinoma complicated by small intestinal volvulus is presented. The subtle clinical features of an underlying small bowel malignancy were masked by the overwhelming clinical and radiological features of intussusception. rare case is reported to remind clinicians to have an increased index of suspicion of malignancy in patients who present with the usual features of chronic anemia, weight loss and loss of appetite with an intra-abdominal mass. The presentation of acute intestinal obstruction, with mesenteric vein thrombosis probably due to intussusception or volvulus should not however lower the suspicion. Histological evaluation of surgical biopsies is of immense importance.

  7. Jejunal intussusception: a rare cause of an acute abdomen in adults.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonali; Eagles, Natasha; Thomas, Peter

    2014-05-28

    Abdominal pain secondary to intussusception is a common presentation in the paediatric population but rare in adults. Diagnosis is often difficult due to non-specific signs and symptoms. Adult intussusception presents more insidiously with intermittent abdominal pain and signs and symptoms of an acute abdomen are rare. In children, the aetiological factor is usually idiopathic, whereas intussusception in adults is more commonly due to an underlying pathology giving rise to a lead point. Consequently the treatment of choice is different-while it is supportive in children, surgical management is typically indicated in adults. In addition, the causes of a lead point precipitating adult intussusception are different depending on whether they arise from the small or large bowel. This report presents a case of jejunal intussusception in a 30-year-old man with a characteristic CT scan who required exploratory laparotomy and small bowel resection. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Jejunal intussusception: a rare cause of an acute abdomen in adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonali; Eagles, Natasha; Thomas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain secondary to intussusception is a common presentation in the paediatric population but rare in adults. Diagnosis is often difficult due to non-specific signs and symptoms. Adult intussusception presents more insidiously with intermittent abdominal pain and signs and symptoms of an acute abdomen are rare. In children, the aetiological factor is usually idiopathic, whereas intussusception in adults is more commonly due to an underlying pathology giving rise to a lead point. Consequently the treatment of choice is different—while it is supportive in children, surgical management is typically indicated in adults. In addition, the causes of a lead point precipitating adult intussusception are different depending on whether they arise from the small or large bowel. This report presents a case of jejunal intussusception in a 30-year-old man with a characteristic CT scan who required exploratory laparotomy and small bowel resection. PMID:24872480

  9. Chagas' achalasia treated by a jejunal interposed segment.

    PubMed

    Dantas, A N; Carvalho, J L; Coelho, F K; Teixeira, A M; Lyra, L G; Rebouças, G; Didier, F V

    1975-01-01

    Resection of the achalasic area and replacement by a segment of jejunal loop, associated with vagotomy and pyloroplasty, has been performed in 21 patients. The majority of these patients had Chagas' disease, with a dilated esophagus wider than 7 cm. This surgical procedure offered symptomatic relief in 20 of our 21 cases. One patient died, but the death was not necessarily related to the operation. Although disphagia and regurgitation did not disappear entirely in all cases the decrease in severity of these symptoms was such to allow the few symptomatic patients to lead an entirely normal life after the operation.

  10. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly.

    PubMed

    Davis, Heather A; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction.

  11. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Heather A.; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction. PMID:22753967

  12. Jejunal and ileal absorption of oxprenolol in man: influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability.

    PubMed Central

    Godbillon, J; Vidon, N; Palma, R; Pfeiffer, A; Franchisseur, C; Bovet, M; Gosset, G; Bernier, J J; Hirtz, J

    1987-01-01

    1 Study I evaluated the absorption of oxprenolol in the ileum, compared to jejunum, in healthy volunteers by an intestinal perfusion technique. Around 80 mg of drug were delivered as a saline solution directly in the small bowel. 2 Samples taken 30 cm distally to the site of perfusion showed that 63% of perfused oxprenolol was absorbed in the jejunum and 48% in the ileum; the differences were significant. 3 The plasma concentration-time profiles were similar for the two perfusions. The AUC and Cmax values of free and conjugated oxprenolol for the jejunal perfusion were significantly lower than those of ileum. They showed large but consistent intersubject variations in the two treatments. 4 Study II investigated, using the same technique, the influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability of this drug. A saline (in treatments A and B) or a nutrient (in treatment C) solution containing oxprenolol was perfused into the jejunum below a balloon either inflated (A) or deflated (B and C). 5 The disappearance rate of oxprenolol from the jejunum was unaffected by endogenous secretions. The mean amount of drug absorbed along a 30-cm jejunal segment accounted for 52 (A) and 57% (B) of the total amount perfused. The intestinal absorption rate was markedly increased in the presence of nutrients (mean amount absorbed 96% for C). 6 The change in the rate of disappearance from the intestine had no effect on the systemic availability of oxprenolol (mean AUC values 8740, 8250 and 8020 nmol l-1 h for A, B and C, respectively) or its elimination from plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3663450

  13. Jejunal enteropathy associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: quantitative histology.

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P A; Miller, A R; Forster, S M; Harris, J R; Pinching, A J; Griffin, G E

    1989-01-01

    Jejunal biopsy specimens from 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive male homosexual patients were analysed and compared with those of a control group to determine whether the abnormalities were caused by the virus or by opportunistic infection. The degree of villous atrophy was estimated with a Weibel eyepiece graticule, and this correlated strongly with the degree of crypt hyperplasia, which was assessed by deriving the mean number of enterocytes in the crypts. The density of villous intraepithelial lymphocytes fell largely within the normal range, either when expressed in relation to the number of villous enterocytes or in relation to the length of muscularis mucosae. Villous enterocytes showed mild non-specific abnormalities. Pathogens were sought in biopsy sections and in faeces. Crypt hyperplastic villous atrophy occurred at all clinical stages of HIV disease and in the absence of detectable enteropathogens. An analogy was drawn between HIV enteropathy and the small bowel changes seen in experimental graft-versus-host disease. It is suggested that the pathogenesis of villous atrophy is similar in the two states, the damage to the jejunal mucosa in HIV enteropathy being inflicted by an immune reaction mounted in the lamina propria against cells infected with HIV. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2703544

  14. Calcium mediation of the pig jejunal secretory response.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Wong, P H; Maenz, D D

    1985-01-01

    The involvement of Ca++ ions as secretory mediators in pig jejunal epithelia has been investigated with an in vitro system. Omission of Ca++ from the Ringer-HCO3 bathing media on both sides of the tissue had minor effects on the basal electrical activity of pig jejunal mucosa. There were only slight decreases in transepithelial potential difference and increases in conductance with Ca++ free media. Low EGTA concentrations which reversibly blocked potential difference responses to secretory agents also had minimal effects on basal electrical activity. The in vitro secretory responses to A23187, to theophylline, and to Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin were all eliminated by Ca++ depletion and restored by replacing normal Ca++ concentrations in the bathing media. Dantrolene prevented the secretory response but not the potential difference increases caused by heat-stable enterotoxin and A23187, suggesting that intracellular Ca++ stores may be reservoirs of secretory signal agent. Verapamil only blocked the secretory response to heat-stable enterotoxin. Chlorpromazine had negligible effects on basal conditions, but totally blocked both the secretory response and the Ca++-dependent effects of A23187 and heat-stable enterotoxin on potential difference. The response to theophylline was only partially inhibited by chlorpromazine, implying some involvement of both cAMP and Ca++ as secretory signals for theophylline. Cytoplasmic Ca++ concentrations appear to be at least as important as cyclic nucleotides in regulating the secretory effects of pig jejunum. PMID:2410089

  15. Induction by endotoxin of nitric oxide synthase in the rat mesentery: lack of effect on action of vasoconstrictors.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. A.; Kohlhaas, K. L.; Sorrentino, R.; Warner, T. D.; Murad, F.; Vane, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Male Sprague-Dawley or Wistar rats were injected with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 mg kg-1, i.p.) and killed after 1, 3, 6, 15, and 24 h. The brains, mesenteries, spleens, lungs, livers, kidneys, hearts, aortae and diaphragms were removed and frozen immediately. Control rats were injected with sterile saline and killed after 6 h. 2. The organs were homogenized in a semi-frozen state and NO synthase (NOS) activity measured in tissues from both LPS-treated and saline-treated groups by the ability of homogenates to convert [3H]-L-arginine to [3H]-L-citrulline in a NADPH-dependent manner. 3. The NOS activity in all organs taken from control animals was found to be calcium-dependent, with the highest activity being in the brain. After LPS-treatment an induced calcium-independent NOS was detected in all tissues tested, with the exception of the brain. The spleen, lung, mesentery and liver had the highest amounts of LPS-induced NOS activity. No induction of calcium-dependent NOS was detected. 4. Induction of NOS was maximum 6 h after administration of LPS and had returned to control levels in 24 h. 5. The constitutive NOS in brain and mesentery and the LPS-induced activities in the spleen, lung, liver and mesentery were inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) according to concentration. The IC50 for L-NAME was 2.5 microM against the constitutive NOS from brain, and 20-25 microM against the inducible NOS. For L-NMMA the IC50 was 20-25 microM against either NOS isoform.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7684306

  16. First jejunal artery, an alternative graft for right hepatic artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Komokata, Teruo; Kadono, Jun; Motodaka, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Tetsuya; Furoi, Akira; Imoto, Yutaka

    2015-04-08

    Common bile duct cancer invading right hepatic artery is sometimes diagnosed intraoperatively. Excision and safe reconstruction of the artery with suitable graft is essential. Arterial reconstruction with autologous saphenous vein graft is the preferred method practiced routinely. However the right hepatic artery reconstruction has also been carried out with several other vessels like gastroduodenal artery, right gastroepiploic artery or the splenic artery. We report a case of 63-year-old man presenting with history of progressive jaundice, pruritus and impaired appetite. Following various imaging modalities including computed tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, intraductal ultrasound extrahepatic bile duct cancer was diagnosed; however, none of those detected vessel invasion. Intraoperatively, right hepatic artery invasion was revealed. Right hepatic artery was resected and reconstructed with a graft harvested from the first jejunal artery (JA). Postoperative outcome was satisfactory with a long-term graft patency. First JA can be a reliable graft option for right hepatic artery reconstruction.

  17. The effects of progressive anemia on jejunal mucosal and serosal tissue oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Haisjackl, M; Luz, G; Sparr, H; Germann, R; Salak, N; Friesenecker, B; Deusch, E; Meusburger, S; Hasibeder, W

    1997-03-01

    Anemia may promote intestinal hypoxia. We studied the effects of progressive isovolemic hemodilution on jejunal mucosal (Po2muc), and serosal tissue oxygen tension (Po2ser, Clark-type surface electrodes), mucosal microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hbo2muc), and hematocrit (Hctmuc; tissue reflectance spectophotometry) in a jejunal segment. Twelve domestic pigs were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Laparatomy was performed, arterial supply of a jejunal segment isolated, and constant pressure pump perfused. Seven animals were progressively hemodiluted to systemic hematocrits (Hctsys) of 20%, 15%, 10%, and 6%. Baseline for Po2muc, Po2ser and Hbo2muc was 23.5 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, 57.5 +/- 4 mm Hg, and 47.0% +/- 6.4% which were not different from the five controls. Despite a significant increase in jejunal blood flow, jejunal oxygen delivery decreased and oxygen extraction ratio increased significantly at Hctsys 10% and 6%. Po2ser decreased significantly below or at Hctsys of 15%, whereas Po2muc and Hbo2muc were maintained to Hctsys of 10%, but less than 10% Hbo2muc and mesenteric venous pH decreased significantly, implying that physiological limits of jejunal microvascular adaptation to severe anemia were reached. Decrease of Hctmuc was less pronounced than Hctsys. In conclusion, redistribution of jejunal blood flow and an increase in the ratio of mucosal to systemic hematocrit are the main mechanisms maintaining mucosal oxygen supply during progressive anemia.

  18. Surgery for nonobese type 2 diabetic patients: an interventional study with duodenal-jejunal exclusion.

    PubMed

    Geloneze, Bruno; Geloneze, Sylka R; Fiori, Carla; Stabe, Christiane; Tambascia, Marcos A; Chaim, Elinton A; Astiarraga, Brenno D; Pareja, Jose Carlos

    2009-08-01

    A 24-week interventional prospective trial was performed to compare the benefits of open duodenal-jejunal exclusion surgery (GJB) with a matched control group on standard medical care. One-hundred eighty patients were screened for the surgical approach. Twelve patients accepted to be operated and presented the full eligibility criteria for surgery that includes overweight BMI (25-29.9 kg/m2), T2DM diagnosis for less than 15 years, insulin-treated patients, no history of major complications, preserved beta-cell function, and absence of autoimmunity. A matched control group (CG) of patients whom refused surgical treatment was placed to receive standard care. Patients had age of 50 (5) years, time of diagnosis 9 years (range, 3 to 15 years), time of insulin usage 6 months (range, 3 to 48 months), fasting glucose (FG), 9.8 (2.5) mg/dL, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C) 8.90 (2.12)%. At 24 weeks after surgery, patients experienced greater reductions on FG (14% vs. 7% on CG), A1C (from 8.78 to 7.84 in GJB-p<0.01 and 8.93 to 8.71 in CG; p<0.05 between groups) and reductions on average daily insulin requirement (93% vs. 29%, p<0.01). Ten patients stopped insulin usage in GJB but they remain taking oral medications. No differences were observed in both groups regarding BMI, body distribution and composition, blood pressure, and lipids. In conclusion, duodenal-jejunal exclusion was an effective treatment for nonobese T2DM subjects. GJB was superior to standard care in achieving better glycemic control along with reduction in insulin requirements.

  19. Effects of chronic 137Cs ingestion on barrier properties of jejunal epithelium in rats.

    PubMed

    Dublineau, I; Grison, S; Grandcolas, L; Baudelin, C; Paquet, F; Voisin, P; Aigueperse, J; Gourmelon, P

    2007-05-15

    Environmental contamination by 137Cs is of particular public health interest because of the various sources of fallout originating from nuclear weapons, radiological source disruptions, and the Chernobyl disaster. This dispersion may lead to a chronic ecosystem contamination and subsequent ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. The aim of this study was to thus determine the impact of a chronic ingestion of low-dose 137Cs on small intestine functions in rats. The animals received 150 Bq per day in drinking water over 3 mo. At these environmental doses, 137Cs contamination did not modify the crypt and villus architecture. In addition, epithelial integrity was maintained following the chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as demonstrated by histological analyses (no breakdown of the surface mucosa) and electrical transepithelial parameters (no change in potential difference and tissue conductance). Furthermore, cesium contamination seemed to induce contradictory effects on the apoptosis pathway, with an increase in the gene expression of Fas/FasL and a decrease in the apoptotic cell number present in intestinal mucosa. No marked inflammation was observed following chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as indicated by neutrophil infiltration and gene expression of cytokines and chemokines. Results indicated no imbalance in the Th1/Th2 response induced by cesium at low doses. Finally, evaluation of the functionality of the jejunal epithelium in rats contaminated chronically with 137Cs did not demonstrate changes in the maximal response to carbachol, nor in the cholinergic sensitivity of rat jejunal epithelium. In conclusion, this study shows that chronic ingestion of 137Cs over 3 mo at postaccidental doses exerts few biological effects on the epithelium of rat jejunum with regard to morphology, inflammation status, apoptosis/proliferation processes, and secretory functions.

  20. Characteristics of histamine-induced leukocyte rolling in the undisturbed microcirculation of the rat mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Yamaki, Kohji; Thorlacius, Henrik; Xie, Xun; Lindbom, Lennart; Hedqvist, Per; Raud, Johan

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyse the role and mode of action of the mast cell mediator histamine in leukocyte-endothelium interactions in small venules in vivo. For this purpose, we used a histological approach (combined with intravital microscopy) that allows studies of rapid mediator-induced venular leukocyte accumulation, reflecting leukocyte rolling, in the undisturbed microcirculation of the rat mesentery where rolling is normally absent. We first examined the relative importance of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in acute mast cell-dependent leukocyte recruitment. The mast cell secretagogue compound 48/80 (i.p. for 15 min) induced a marked venular accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) which was almost abolished by combined histamine1 (H1)- and histamine2 (H2)-receptor blockade. In contrast, the 5-HT-receptor antagonist methysergide was inactive in this regard. Moreover, exogenous 5-HT was less active than exogenous histamine in evoking venular PMNL accumulation (histamine response dose-dependent; 5-HT response bell shaped). Prostaglandin D2 did not cause PMNL accumulation. The venular PMNL response to exogenous histamine peaked between 15 min and 1 h, was still significantly elevated at 2 h, and then returned to prechallenge values after 3 h. At all time points, the histamine-induced PMNL accumulation was nearly abolished by i.v. treatment with the polysaccharide fucoidin (which blocks rolling but not firm adhesion per se), suggesting that the PMNL response to histamine was due to rolling rather than firm adhesion over the entire 3 h period. At no time point did histamine trigger accumulation of mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). To examine the role of histamine-receptors in the histamine-induced PMNL accumulation (i.e. rolling), the animals were pretreated with diphenhydramine (H1-receptor antagonist), cimetidine, or ranitidine (H2-receptor antagonists). Diphenhydramine alone inhibited the venular PMNL response to

  1. Reconstruction of esophageal defects with microsurgically revascularized jejunal segments: a report of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, T S; Hwang, O L; Wang-Wei

    1980-12-01

    Experimental free transfer of a jejunal segment to a recipient bed in the neck was successfully performed in 5 mongrel dogs. This was followed by clinical application of 2 different microvascular procedures in 13 patients for repair of esophageal defects. In 7 of these patients a free jejunal transfer was used; in 6 of these patients a pedicled jejunal graft with revascularization of its distal end by microvascular anastomosis was used. The esophageal defects were located in the cervical portion in 7 cases, the cervicothoracic portion in 5 cases, and the thoracic portion in 1 case. Ten (77%) of the 13 procedures were successful.

  2. Effects of hydroxyethylrutosides on the permeability of microvessels in the frog mesentery.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, S.; Towart, R.; Michel, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of a standardised mixture of hydroxyethylrutosides (HR, Venoruton), a mixture of five of its main components (M) and each of the five components separately (7-mono-HR, 7,4'-di-HR, 7,3',4'-tri-HR, 5,7,3',4'-tetra-HR and 7,3'4'-tri HQ) upon the permeability of single perfused capillaries and venules in the mesenteries of pithed frogs. 2. In each experiment, the hydraulic permeability (Lp) of a single perfused microvessel and the effective osmotic pressure (sigma delta pi) exerted by macromolecules across its walls were estimated by a microcclusion technique, first during control perfusion and then in the presence of a known concentration of test substance. 3. HR, M and 7,4'-di-HR reduced Lp in a similar concentration-dependent manner over the range of 1 microgram ml-1 to 1 mg ml-1 (maximum reduction was to 40% of control Lp at 1 mg ml-1). At perfusate concentrations greater than 1 mg ml-1, these substances reduced Lp to a lesser extent. While the four other test substances reduced Lp significantly when their perfusate concentrations equalled or exceeded 100 micrograms ml-1, they were all less potent than 7,4'-di-HR. 4. The reduction in Lp induced by the mixture of flavonoids was only slightly reversed by subsequent perfusion with flavonoid-free solutions. 5. When permeability was increased by perfusing with protein-free solutions, both HR and 7,4'-di-HR reduced and then reversed the increase in Lp in a concentration-dependent manner over the range of 1 microgram ml-1 to 100 micrograms ml-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220880

  3. Determinants of valve gating in collecting lymphatic vessels from rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Rahbar, Elaheh; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James E

    2011-07-01

    Secondary lymphatic valves are essential for minimizing backflow of lymph and are presumed to gate passively according to the instantaneous trans-valve pressure gradient. We hypothesized that valve gating is also modulated by vessel distention, which could alter leaflet stiffness and coaptation. To test this hypothesis, we devised protocols to measure the small pressure gradients required to open or close lymphatic valves and determine if the gradients varied as a function of vessel diameter. Lymphatic vessels were isolated from rat mesentery, cannulated, and pressurized using a servo-control system. Detection of valve leaflet position simultaneously with diameter and intraluminal pressure changes in two-valve segments revealed the detailed temporal relationships between these parameters during the lymphatic contraction cycle. The timing of valve movements was similar to that of cardiac valves, but only when lymphatic vessel afterload was elevated. The pressure gradients required to open or close a valve were determined in one-valve segments during slow, ramp-wise pressure elevation, either from the input or output side of the valve. Tests were conducted over a wide range of baseline pressures (and thus diameters) in passive vessels as well as in vessels with two levels of imposed tone. Surprisingly, the pressure gradient required for valve closure varied >20-fold (0.1-2.2 cmH(2)O) as a passive vessel progressively distended. Similarly, the pressure gradient required for valve opening varied sixfold with vessel distention. Finally, our functional evidence supports the concept that lymphatic muscle tone exerts an indirect effect on valve gating.

  4. Vasodilator responses to dopamine in rat perfused mesentery are age-dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Wanstall, J. C.; O'Donnell, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Dose-dependent vasodilator responses to dopamine, isoprenaline, noradrenaline, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and sodium nitroprusside were obtained in isolated perfused mesentery preparations, taken from reserpine-treated rats of different ages. The preparations were pretreated with phenoxybenzamine (1 microM) and perfused with physiological salt solution containing cocaine (10 microM), additional KCl (20 mM) and vasopressin (0.1 microM). 2. Vasodilator responses to dopamine were abolished by the dopamine1 (DA1)-selective antagonist SCH 23390 (10 nM) and those to isoprenaline by propranolol (1 microM), but the vasodilator responses to noradrenaline were abolished only when SCH 23390 and propranolol were used together. This indicated that dopamine was acting via DA1-receptors, isoprenaline via beta-adrenoceptors and that noradrenaline could act via DA1-receptors and beta-adrenoceptors in this preparation. 3. Responses to all the vasodilator drugs decreased in magnitude between the ages of 1 and 2 months. Responses to dopamine declined further in 4 month-old rats and were negligible at 6 or 22-24 months of age. Responses to isoprenaline were well maintained up to 6 months of age, but were negligible at 22-24 months. 4. It is concluded that, in the rat mesenteric vasculature, there is a non-specific decline in responses to vasodilator drugs during development (1 to 2 months). Subsequently there is a specific decline in DA1-receptor-mediated and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated responses; the former are lost at an earlier age than the latter. This different time course suggests that age influences receptor numbers, or their coupling to adenylate cyclase, rather than a post-receptor event in the adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:2804550

  5. The distribution of blood rheological parameters in the microvasculature of cat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Lipowsky, H H; Kovalcheck, S; Zweifach, B W

    1978-11-01

    In vivo studies of the rheological behavior of blood in the microcirculation were conducted by direct in situ measurements in cat mesentery. Upstream to downstream pressure drops were measured in unbranched arterioles, capillaries, and venules, with diameters from 7 to 58 micrometer. Simultaneous measurements of red cell velocity and vessel geometry facilitated computation of bulk velocity, pressure gradient, apparent viscosity, wall shear stress, and resistance. Arteriovenous distributions of these parameters revealed the following. Maximum pressure gradient (0.015 cm H20/micrometer) occurs in the true capillaries (7 micrometer in diameter); intravascular wall shear stress averaged 47.1 dynes/cm2 in arterioles and 29.0 dynes/cm2 in venules. Extreme values as great as 200 dynes/cm2 were observed in a few shunting arterioles. Apparent viscosity averaged 3.59 cP in arterioles, 5.15 cP in venules, and 4.22 cP overall. Intravascular resistance per unit length of microvessel varied with luminal diameter as a power law function with exponents of -4.04 for arterioles, -3.94 for venules, and -3.99 for all vessels combined. This apparent maintenance of Poiseuille's law is attributed to the opposing processes of hematocrit reduction and decreasing shear rate as blood is dispersed in successive arteriolar segments, and the converse action of these processes in the venous confluences which lessen the extent of network variations in apparent viscosity. Reductions in bulk velocity from the normal flow state to below 0.5 mm/sec resulted in increases in apparent viscosity by a factor of 2 to 10, which are attributed primarily to obstruction of the lumen by leukocyte-endothelium adhesion.

  6. Determinants of valve gating in collecting lymphatic vessels from rat mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Zawieja, David C.; Moore, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary lymphatic valves are essential for minimizing backflow of lymph and are presumed to gate passively according to the instantaneous trans-valve pressure gradient. We hypothesized that valve gating is also modulated by vessel distention, which could alter leaflet stiffness and coaptation. To test this hypothesis, we devised protocols to measure the small pressure gradients required to open or close lymphatic valves and determine if the gradients varied as a function of vessel diameter. Lymphatic vessels were isolated from rat mesentery, cannulated, and pressurized using a servo-control system. Detection of valve leaflet position simultaneously with diameter and intraluminal pressure changes in two-valve segments revealed the detailed temporal relationships between these parameters during the lymphatic contraction cycle. The timing of valve movements was similar to that of cardiac valves, but only when lymphatic vessel afterload was elevated. The pressure gradients required to open or close a valve were determined in one-valve segments during slow, ramp-wise pressure elevation, either from the input or output side of the valve. Tests were conducted over a wide range of baseline pressures (and thus diameters) in passive vessels as well as in vessels with two levels of imposed tone. Surprisingly, the pressure gradient required for valve closure varied >20-fold (0.1–2.2 cmH2O) as a passive vessel progressively distended. Similarly, the pressure gradient required for valve opening varied sixfold with vessel distention. Finally, our functional evidence supports the concept that lymphatic muscle tone exerts an indirect effect on valve gating. PMID:21460194

  7. Serous cystadenocarcinoma of the mesentery in a man: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Obuchi, Toru; Shimooki, Osamu; Sasaki, Akira; Abe, Tadashi; Wakabayashi, Go

    2014-01-01

    In February 2007, a 41-year-old Japanese male was admitted to our hospital with increasing upper abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen demonstrated a well-demarcated, hypodense cystic mass with a thickened wall in the mesocolon. The laboratory results were within normal limits, except for increased carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, DUPAN-2 and SPAN-1. The patient was diagnosed as having a mesenteric malignant cyst, and during a laparotomy, a right hemicolectomy with mesenteric cystectomy was performed without rupture in March 2007. In the microscopic findings, there was a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in the inner surface of the cyst and in the fibrous connective tissue of the hypertrophic cystic wall. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically reactive to cytokeratin (CK) 7, CK18 and CK20. No remnant of the malignancy was detected in the resected margin of the colon, cyst, liver or peritoneum nor was an uptake detected in an 18[F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT examination of other organs. Finally, the malignancy was concluded to be a serous cystadenocarcinoma of the mesentery. Nineteen months after the operation, the patient died from peritonitis carcinomatosa due to a small intestine rupture. This report suggests mesenteric cystadenocarcinomas originating in the ovary, oviduct and intestinal mucosa, but these were ruled out in our patient. In this report, we discuss a case of the malignant transformation of a cyst into adenocarcinoma, which to our knowledge has never been previously reported in a male patient. PMID:24759353

  8. Duodeno-Jejunal Varicosities Following Extrahepatic Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Varsamidakis, Nick; Hobbs, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A 31 year old man, under investigation for melena, was found at endoscopy to have varicosities at the site of a duodeno-jejunostomy which had been performed for duodenal atresia when he was three days old. Angiography revealed an occluded portal vein with an extensive collateral circulation. At laparotomy some of the collateral vessels were found to pass through the anastomotic site and directly into the left lobe of the liver. The portal pressure was found to be minimally elevated. Resection of the anastomotic segment was performed with reconstruction using a Roux en Y jejunal loop. Bleeding from collateral vessels passing through an anastomosis site in a patient with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis has not previously been reported. PMID:1610726

  9. Effect of proinflammatory interleukins on jejunal nutrient transport

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, J; Kroeker, K; Chung, B; Gall, D

    2000-01-01

    AIM—We examined the effect of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory interleukins on jejunal nutrient transport and expression of the sodium-glucose linked cotransporter (SGLT-1).
METHODS—3-O-methyl glucose and L-proline transport rates were examined in New Zealand White rabbit stripped, short circuited jejunal tissue. The effects of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, and IL-8, IL-1α plus the specific IL-1 antagonist, IL-1ra, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were investigated. In separate experiments, passive tissue permeability was assessed and brush border SGLT-1 expression was measured by western blot in tissues exposed to proinflammatory interleukins.
RESULTS—The proinflammatory interleukins IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-8 significantly increased glucose absorption compared with control levels. This increase in glucose absorption was due to an increase in mucosal to serosal flux. IL-1α and IL-8 also significantly increased L-proline absorption due to an increase in absorptive flux. The anti-inflammatory IL-10 had no effect on glucose transport. The receptor antagonist IL-1ra blocked the ability of IL-1α to stimulate glucose transport. IL-8 had no effect on passive tissue permeability. SGLT-1 content did not differ in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from control or interleukin treated tissue.
CONCLUSIONS—These findings suggest that intestinal inflammation and release of inflammatory mediators such as interleukins increase nutrient absorption in the gut. The increase in glucose transport does not appear to be due to changes in BBMV SGLT-1 content.


Keywords: glucose transport; small intestine; intestinal inflammation; inflammation PMID:10896908

  10. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  11. Preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and high jejunal atresia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baglaj, Maciej; Gerus, Sylwester

    2012-01-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare congenital anomaly. In most patients, it is associated with other congenital defects including situs inversus, malrotation, and biliary atresia or occurs as part of the heterotaxia syndrome or polysplenia syndrome. We describe a newborn affected by high jejunal atresia, malrotation, and a complex cardiac anomaly, in whom PDPV was diagnosed at early relaparotomy because of stenosis of the jejunal anastomosis. Occurrence of PDPV with intestinal atresia has not been previously reported in the literature.

  12. Indwelling voice prosthesis insertion after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Hirofumi; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Mitani, Hiroki; Yonekawa, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Shimbashi, Wataru; Seto, Akira; Kamiyama, Ryousuke; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Asakage, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction is often performed in patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma. However, postoperative speechlessness significantly decreases patient quality of life. We investigated whether Provox® insertion could preserve speech after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction. Study Design Retrospective chart review. Methods A total of 130 cases of secondary Provox® insertions after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction were analyzed. Communication outcomes were compared using the Head and Neck Cancer Understandability of Speech Subscale. Outcomes and complications associated with insertion site (jejunal insertion vs. esophageal insertion) and adjuvant irradiation therapy were also evaluated. Results Provox® insertion had favorable communication outcomes in 102 cases (78.4%). Neither the insertion site nor irradiation affected the communication outcome. Complications were observed in 20 cases (15.4%). Local infection was the most common complication. Free jejunal insertion, in which the resection range was enlarged, had a lower complication rate than did esophageal insertion, and its complication rate was unaffected by previous irradiation. For all patients, the hospitalization duration and duration of speechlessness were 13.4 days and 14.6 months, respectively. Patients receiving jejunal insertions had a significantly shorter hospitalization duration than did those receiving esophageal insertions. Unlike Provox®2, Provox®Vega significantly reduced the complication rate to zero. Conclusion For jejunal inserson of a Provox® prosthetic, a sufficient margin can be maintained during total pharyngolaryngectomy and irradiation can be performed, and satisfactory communication outcomes were observed. Provox® insertion after total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal reconstruction should be considered the standard therapy for voice restoration. Level of Evidence 4. PMID

  13. The mesenterially perfused rat small intestine: A versatile approach for pharmacological testings.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Dominik; Klotz, Markus; Laures, Kerstin; Clasohm, Jasmin; Bischof, Michael; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds enter the body via several major natural gateways; i.e. the lung, the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Drug application during surgical operations can lead to severe impairment of gastrointestinal motility, which can contribute to a paralytic ileus. Here we investigated an ex vivo perfused small intestine model that allows us to ascertain the influence of pharmaceuticals upon the gut. Corresponding segments from the proximal jejunum of adult rats were used. Their mesenteric arteries and veins were cannulated and the jejunal segment excised. The individual segments were placed in a custom designed perfusion chamber and perfusion performed through the intestinal lumen as well as the mesenteric superior artery. Three test drugs, which are commonly used in anesthesiology; i.e. pentobarbital, propofol and ketamine were administered via the blood vessels. Their effects upon gastrointestinal motility patterns were evaluated by optical measurements. Longitudinal and pendular movements were distinguishable and separately analyzed. Pharmacological effects of the individual substances could be investigated. Propofol (50-200 μg/ml) was found to decrease intestinal motility, especially longitudinal movements in a dose dependent manner. Pentobarbital decreased intestinal motility only at high concentrations, above 2.5 mg/ml. A dose of 2.5 mg/ml lead to an increase in longitudinal- and pendular movements in comparison to control, while ketamine (2.5-10 mg/ml) did not alter intestinal motility at all. Histological examination of the perfused segments revealed only minor changes in tissue morphology after perfusion. The perfusion approach shown here allows for the identification of compounds which interfere with gut motility in a highly sophisticated way. It is suitable for characterization of drug and dose specific changes in motility patterns and can be used in drug development and preclinical studies.

  14. Thromboxane plays a role in postprandial jejunal oxygen uptake and capillary exchange.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, A; Chou, C C

    1990-09-01

    The effects of a thromboxane A2 (TxA2)-endoperoxide receptor antagonist, SQ 29548, on jejunal blood flow, oxygen uptake, and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in anesthetized dogs under resting conditions and during the presence of predigested food in the jejunal lumen in three series of experiments. In series 1, 2.0 micrograms intra-arterial administration of SQ 29548 was found to abolish completely the vasoconstrictor action of graded doses (0.05-2.0 micrograms) of intra-arterial injection of a TxA2-endoperoxide analogue, U44069. SQ 29548 (2.0 micrograms ia) per se did not significantly alter resting jejunal blood flow, oxygen uptake, capillary pressure, or Kfc. Before SQ 29548, placement of food plus bile into the jejunal lumen increased blood flow +42 +/- 9%, oxygen uptake +28 +/- 7%, and Kfc +24 +/- 6%. After SQ 29548, the food placement increased blood flow +37 +/- 8%, oxygen uptake +52 +/- 11%, and Kfc +63 +/- 20%. The food-induced increases in oxygen uptake and Kfc after SQ 29548 were significantly greater than those induced before the blocking of TxA2-endoperoxide receptors by SQ 29548. Our study indicates that endogenous thromboxane does not play a role in regulating jejunal blood flow, capillary filtration, and oxygen uptake under resting conditions. However, it plays a role in limiting the food-induced increases in jejunal oxygen uptake and capillary exchange capacity without influencing the food-induced hyperemia.

  15. The visceromotor responses to colorectal distension and skin pinch are inhibited by simultaneous jejunal distension.

    PubMed

    Shafton, Anthony D; Furness, John B; Ferens, Dorota; Bogeski, Goce; Koh, Shir Lin; Lean, Nicholas P; Kitchener, Peter D

    2006-07-01

    Noxious stimuli that are applied to different somatic sites interact; often one stimulus diminishes the sensation elicited from another site. By contrast, inhibitory interactions between visceral stimuli are not well documented. We investigated the interaction between the effects of noxious distension of the colorectum and noxious stimuli applied to the jejunum, in the rat. Colorectal distension elicited a visceromotor reflex, which was quantified using electromyographic (EMG) recordings from the external oblique muscle of the upper abdomen. The same motor units were activated when a strong pinch was applied to the flank skin. Distension of the jejunum did not provoke an EMG response at this site, but when it was applied during colorectal distension it blocked the EMG response. Jejunal distension also inhibited the response to noxious skin pinch. The inhibition of the visceromotor response to colorectal distension was prevented by local application of tetrodotoxin to the jejunum, and was markedly reduced when nicardipine was infused into the local jejunal circulation. Chronic sub-diaphragmatic vagotomy had no effect on the colorectal distension-induced EMG activity or its inhibition by jejunal distension. The nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium suppressed phasic contractile activity in the jejunum, had only a small effect on the inhibition of visceromotor response by jejunal distension. It is concluded that signals that arise from skin pinch and colorectal distension converge in the central nervous system with pathways that are activated by jejunal spinal afferents; the jejunal signals strongly inhibit the abdominal motor activity evoked by noxious stimuli.

  16. A comparison of laparoscopic energy devices on charges in thermal power after application to porcine mesentery.

    PubMed

    Eto, Ken; Omura, Nobuo; Haruki, Koichiro; Uno, Yoshiko; Ohkuma, Masahisa; Nakajima, Shintaro; Anan, Tadashi; Kosuge, Makoto; Fujita, Tetsuji; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-02-01

    Advances in energy devices have played a major role in the rapid expansion of laparoscopic surgery. However, complications due to these energy devices are occasionally reported, and if the characteristics of these devices are not well understood, serious complications may occur. This study evaluated various typical energy devices and measured temperature rises in the adjacent tissue and in the devices themselves. We used the following 7 types of energy devices: AutoSonix (AU), SonoSurg (SS), Harmonic Scalpel (HS), LigaSure Atlas (LA), LigaSure Dolphin Tip (LD), monopolar diathermy (Mono), and bipolar scissors (Bi). Laparoscopy was performed under general anesthesia in pigs, and the mesentery was dissected using each energy device. Tissue temperature at a distance of 1 mm from the energy device blade before and after dissection was measured. Temperature of the device blade both before and after dissection, time required for dissection, and interval until the temperature fell to 100°C, 75°C, and 50°C were documented. Temperature of the surrounding tissue using each device rose the most with the Mono (50.5±8.0°C) and the least with the HS in full mode (6.2±0.7°C). Device temperature itself rose the highest with the AU in full mode (318.2±49.6°C), and the least with the Bi (61.9±4.8°C). All ultrasonic coagulation and cutting devices (AU, SS, and HS) had device temperatures increase up to ≥100°C, and even at 8 seconds after completing dissection, temperatures remained at ≥100°C. Because the adjacent tissue temperature peaked with the Mono, cautious use near the intestine and blood vessels is necessary. In addition, the active blades of all ultrasonic coagulation and cutting devices, regardless of model, developed high temperatures exceeding 100°C. Therefore, an adequate cooling period after using these devices is therefore necessary between applications.

  17. Total salvianolic acid improves ischemia-reperfusion-induced microcirculatory disturbance in rat mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Xia; Liu, Yu-Ying; Hu, Bai-He; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Chang, Xin; Sun, Kai; Fan, Jing-Yu; Liao, Fu-Long; Wang, Chuan-She; Zheng, Jun; Han, Jing-Yan

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of total salvianolic acid (TSA) on ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced rat mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunctions. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups (n = 6 each): Sham group and I/R group (infused with saline), TSA group, TSA + I/R group and I/R + TSA group (infused with TSA, 5 mg/kg per hour). Mesenteric I/R were conducted by a ligation of the mesenteric artery and vein (10 min) and subsequent release of the occlusion. TSA was continuously infused either starting from 10 min before the ischemia or 10 min after reperfusion. Changes in mesenteric microcirculatory variables, including diameter of venule, velocity of red blood cells in venule, leukocyte adhesion, free radicals released from venule, albumin leakage and mast cell degranulation, were observed through an inverted intravital microscope. Meanwhile, the expression of adhesion molecules CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils was evaluated by flow cytometry. Ultrastructural evidence of mesenteric venules damage was assessed after microcirculation observation. RESULTS: I/R led to multiple responses in mesenteric post-capillary venules, including a significant increase in the adhesion of leukocytes, production of oxygen radicals in the venular wall, albumin efflux and enhanced mast cell degranulation in vivo. All the I/R-induced manifestations were significantly reduced by pre- or post-treatment with TSA, with the exception that the I/R-induced increase in mast cell degranulation was inhibited only by pre-treatment with TSA. Moreover, pre- or post-treatment with TSA significantly attenuated the expression of CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils, reducing the increase in the number of caveolae in the endothelial cells of mesentery post-capillary venules induced by I/R. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated that TSA protects from and ameliorates the microcirculation disturbance induced by I/R, which was associated with TSA inhibiting the production of oxygen-free radicals in

  18. The inside mystery of jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dhull, A K; Kaushal, V; Dhankhar, R; Atri, R; Singh, H; Marwah, N

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are malignant and rare form of soft tissue sarcoma of the digestive tract. The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors is very low Kramer et al. 2005 Jejunal GISTs are extremely rare. Here we present a rare case of jejunal GIST with unusually large size at presentation. The patient presented with severe abdomen pain, exophytic growth, and dimorphic anemia. Surgical resection of the tumor was carried out, and operative findings revealed a 15 × 10 cm growth, arising from serosal surface of jejunum, at the antimesenteric surface. Diagnosis in this case was made by subjecting the resected specimen to immunohistochemical analysis. In view of large size of the resected tumor, and high-risk histopathological features, imatinib mesylate 400 mg once daily was given as adjuvant chemotherapy. Patient is asymptomatic without any evidence of tumor recurrence after six months of postoperative followup. Imatinib as such is recommended in metastatic, residual or recurrent cases of GISTs or which are surgically not removable; however, recent recommendations suggests the use of imatinib mesylate after radical surgery in high-risk cases, because it has shown a significant decrease in the recurrence rate, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also approved the use of imatinib as adjuvant therapy after complete resection of localized, primary GIST.

  19. Site of Substrate Stimulation of Jejunal Sucrase in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ulshen, Martin H.; Grand, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    To identify the site of stimulation of sucrase by a sucrose diet, changes in sucrase-specific activity of jejunal mucosa were studied after introduction of sucrose diet to carbohydrate-deprived rats. Results were correlated with simultaneous changes in villus gradients of sucrase-specific activity. Simultaneous with the introduction of sucrose diet, [3H]thymidine (100 μCi) was administered intravenously, and rates of cell migration measured during adaptation to the new diet. After a 72-h fast, rats fed sucrose diet for 6, 12, or 18 h showed no change in sucrase-specific activity in either whole mucosa or villus gradients. However, within 18-24 h after starting a sucrose diet, there was a marked rise in whole mucosal sucrase-specific activity above fasting values (99 ± 14 vs. 38 ± 4 μM glucose/min per g protein, P < 0.001) in association with the development of a region of increased activity at the lower villus (154 ± 22 vs. 60 ± 9 μM glucose/min per g protein, P < 0.02, but with no change in villus tip activity (56 ± 5 vs. 46 ± 8 μM glucose/min per g protein). Similar changes were seen in animals fed 24 h of sucrose diet after a 72-h carbohydratefree diet. Fasted animals fed sucrose diet for 36 h had increased sucrase-specific activity at the villus tip (144 ± 11 μM glucose/min per g protein) as well as at the lower villus region, and this pattern persisted at 1 wk of sucrose diet. Maximal activity patterns for isomaltase and maltase paralleled those for sucrase, but the villus gradients for lactase were unaffected by sucrose diet. The region of maximal sucrase-specific activity always coincided with or followed the leading edge of radioactivity as determined by liquid scintillation counting. Therefore, sucrose-mediated changes in sucrase activity of the jejunal mucosa in the rat appear to be initiated at the level of the crypt epithelial cell and are expressed after a latent period of 18-24 h during which these cells mature and migrate toward the

  20. [Digestive bleeding due to jejunal diverticula: A case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Blake-Siemsen, Jorge Cuauhtémoc; Kortright-Farías, Marisol; Casale-Menier, Dante Rafael; Gámez-Araujo, Jesús

    2017-01-02

    Bleeding from the small bowel is a rare pathology that represents 5-10% of gastrointestinal bleeding; 0.06% to 5% of cases are due to the presence of diverticula of the small intestine. The majority of diverticula are asymptomatic and present symptoms when there is a complication. We present the case of a 53-year-old male with a history of chronic renal failure and hypertension. While he was hospitalized due to cerebrovascular disease he recurrently presented lower gastrointestinal bleeding that required blood transfusion on several occasions. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding and colon bleeding were ruled out by endoscopy. It was not until an arteriography was performed that we identified bleeding at proximal jejunum level, and therefore we performed a laparotomy. We present the studies and management that the patient underwent. Although jejunal diverticula are rare, they must be included in the differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding when present in a patient. Arteriography is a study of great use in locating the site, provided the bleeding is more than 0.5ml/minute. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Solid tumors of the peritoneum, omentum, and mesentery in children: radiologic-pathologic correlation: from the radiologic pathology archives.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Biko, David M; Arzamendi, Aaron M; Meldrum, Jaren T; Stocker, J Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Intraperitoneal solid tumors are far less common in children than in adults, and the histologic spectrum of neoplasms of the peritoneum and its specialized folds in young patients differs from that in older patients. Localized masses may be caused by inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, Castleman disease, mesenteric fibromatosis, or other mesenchymal masses. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a mesenchymal tumor of borderline biologic potential that appears as a solitary circumscribed mass, possibly with central calcification. Castleman disease is an idiopathic lymphoproliferative disorder that appears as a circumscribed, intensely enhancing mass in the mesentery. Mesenteric fibromatosis, or intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign tumor of mesenchymal origin associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Mesenteric fibromatosis appears as a mildly enhancing, circumscribed solitary mass without metastases. Diffuse peritoneal disease may be due to desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or rhabdomyosarcoma. DSRCT is a rare member of the small round blue cell tumor family that causes diffuse peritoneal masses without a visible primary tumor. A dominant mass is typically found in the retrovesical space. Burkitt lymphoma is a pediatric tumor that manifests with extensive disease because of its short doubling time. The bowel and adjacent mesentery are commonly involved. Rhabdomyosarcoma may arise as a primary tumor of the omentum or may spread from a primary tumor in the bladder, prostate, or scrotum. Knowledge of this spectrum of disease allows the radiologist to provide an appropriate differential diagnosis and suggest proper patient management.

  2. Nanoparticle passage through porcine jejunal mucus: Microfluidics and rheology.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; Mahon, Eugene; Harrison, Sabine M; McGetrick, Jim; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Carrington, Stephen D; Brayden, David J

    2017-04-01

    A micro-slide chamber was used to screen and rank sixteen functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles (SiNP) of different sizes (10, 50, 100 and 200 nm) and surface coatings (aminated, carboxylated, methyl-PEG1000ylated, and methyl-PEG2000ylated) according to their capacity to permeate porcine jejunal mucus. Variables investigated were influence of particle size, surface charge and methyl-PEGylation. The anionic SiNP showed higher transport through mucus whereas the cationic SiNP exhibited higher binding with lower transport. A size-dependence in transport was identified - 10 and 50 nm anionic (uncoated or methyl-PEGylated) SiNP showed higher transport compared to the larger 100 and 200 nm SiNP. The cationic SiNP of all sizes interacted with the mucus, making it more viscous and less capable of swelling. In contrast, the anionic SiNP (uncoated or methyl-PEGylated) caused minimal changes in the viscoelasticity of mucus. The data provide insights into mucus-NP interactions and suggest a rationale for designing oral nanomedicines with improved mucopermeability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. HIV enteropathy: comparative morphometry of the jejunal mucosa of HIV infected patients resident in the United Kingdom and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P; Kapembwa, M; Miller, A; Sedgwick, P; Lucas, S; Sewankambo, N; Serwadda, D; Pudney, J; Moody, A; Harris, J; Griffin, G

    1998-01-01

    Aims—To compare jejunal mucosal morphometry in HIV infected patients resident in London and Uganda. 
Patients—Twenty HIV positive patients from London and 16 from Uganda were studied, and compared with HIV negative control subjects from both sites. 
Methods—Stools and biopsy specimens were examined for enteropathogens. Surface area to volume (S:V) ratio was estimated morphometrically, mean crypt length of jejunal biopsy specimens was measured, and HIV infected cells detected immunohistochemically were quantified. 
Results—Enteric pathogens were detected in none of the London patients, and in three Ugandan patients. S:V ratio was lower, and mean crypt length higher, in the specimens of London patients than in normal subjects, but there was no difference in S:V ratio or mean crypt length between Ugandan patients and controls. A negative correlation was present between S:V ratio and mean crypt length in all biopsy specimens analysed. HIV infected cells were detected only in lamina propria. 
Conclusion—Infection of cells in the lamina propria of the jejunum with HIV stimulates crypt cell proliferation, and a fall in villous surface area. The mucosal response to HIV is masked by other pathogens in the African environment. 

 Keywords: HIV; jejunum; AIDS; enteropathy PMID:9863480

  4. Claudin-4 undergoes age-dependent change in cellular localization on pig jejunal villous epithelial cells, independent of bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, J Alex; Kent-Dennis, Coral; Van Kessel, Andrew G; Wilson, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases.

  5. Claudin-4 Undergoes Age-Dependent Change in Cellular Localization on Pig Jejunal Villous Epithelial Cells, Independent of Bacterial Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Van Kessel, Andrew G.; Wilson, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:25948883

  6. Effect of diet and age on jejunal and circulating lymphocyte subsets in children with coeliac disease: persistence of CD4-8-intraepithelial T cells through treatment.

    PubMed

    Verkasalo, M A; Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M

    1990-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the relative numbers of T lymphocyte subsets in 61 jejunal biopsies and in peripheral blood of 35 children with coeliac disease, and of 13 healthy controls. The T cell numbers in the lamina propria were unaffected by a change from gluten-free to gluten containing diet in the patients. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (where the CD8 cells predominated) were significantly raised in patients taking gluten. Ten to 20% of the patients' intraepithelial CD3 (mature T) cells expressed neither CD8 nor CD4 surface antigens. This CD4 8 T cell population persisted through gluten elimination and challenge. The circulating lymphocyte subsets showed little variation with the diet although there was a marked increase in the proportion (14.9%) of CD4 8 T cells in patients during gluten elimination. In the histologically normal jejunal mucosa from control subjects, the age of the subject showed a positive correlation with villus intraepithelial CD3+ and CD8+ cells, and crypt intraepithelial CD4+ cells. No clear cut effect of age was observed on lamina propria lymphocyte counts of the controls, or on the lymphocyte counts in jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients. The observed CD3+4-8- lymphocytes may represent activated cells unable to present their surface antigens, or they may be gamma delta-receptor bearing T cells, which could have a significant role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  7. Creation of a Jejunal Pouch During Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y Esophagojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marc A; Ujiki, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    The creation of Hunt-Lawrence jejunal pouches after total gastrectomy is associated with a better quality of life compared with the standard Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first video to show the technical aspects of creating a jejunal pouch during a laparoscopic total gastrectomy. A 35-year-old woman was seen for surgical evaluation of a newly diagnosed CDH1 gene mutation. The authors recommended a laparoscopic total gastrectomy with Hunt-Lawrence pouch reconstruction. The jejunal pouch was created using an extracorporeal approach after removal of the stomach. A laparoscopic gel port was then placed over the extraction site to maintain pneumoperitoneum to facilitate a laparoscopic esophagojejunal pouch anastomosis using a circular stapler. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 4. Her pathology showed no gastric cancer, and all 31 lymph nodes harvested were free of malignancy. At 1 year postoperatively, she had lost 25 lb from her presurgerical weight and was maintaining a healthy body mass index of 24 kg/m(2). Hunt-Lawerence jejunal pouches have been shown to improve quality of life compared with esophagojejunostomy without pouch formation after total gastrectomy. This video shows a novel technique for jejunal pouch creation during laparoscopic total gastrectomy using a laparoscopic gel port after gastric extraction to facilitate a laparoscopic esophagojejunal pouch anastomosis.

  8. Spontaneous Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of Jejunal Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-yan; Wei, Jiang-peng; Zhao, Xiu-yuan; Wang, Yue; Wu, Huan-huan; Shi, Tao; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rupture of jejunal artery aneurysm is a very rare event resulting in life-threatening hemorrhage in Behcet disease (BD). We report a case of ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm in a 35-year-old patient with BD. The patient had a 1-year history of intermittent abdominal pain caused by superior mesenteric artery aneurysm with thrombosis. Anticoagulation treatment showed a good response. Past surgical history included stenting for aortic pseudoaneurysm. On admission, the patient underwent an urgent operation due to sudden hemorrhagic shock. Resection was performed for jejunal artery aneurysm and partial ischemia of intestine. The patient was diagnosed with BD, based on a history of recurrent oral and skin lesions over the past 6 years. Treatment with anti-inflammatory medications showed a good response during the 8-month follow-up. An increased awareness of BD and its vascular complications is essential. Aneurysms in BD involving jejunal artery are rare, neglected and require proper management to prevent rupture and death. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of jejunal artery aneurysm caused by BD. PMID:26559278

  9. Jejunal small ectopic pancreas developing into jejunojejunal intussusception: a rare cause of ileus.

    PubMed

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Kubo, Motoharu; Inoue, Atsushi; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Oshiro, Hisako

    2009-08-21

    Intussusception is rare in adults. We describe a 62-year-old man with jejunal ectopic pancreas that led to jejunojejunal intussusception and ileus. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of intermittent abdominal pain. Plain abdominal radiography showed some intestinal gas and fluid levels. Abdominal CT scan demonstrated a target sign suggesting bowel intussusception. Jejunography using a naso-jejunal tube showed an oval-shaped mass about 15 mm in diameter with a smooth surface in the jejunum, which suggested a submucosal tumor (SMT), and edematous mucosa around the mass. Partial jejunal resection was carried out and the resected oval-shaped tumor, 14 mm x 11 mm in size, was found to be covered with normal jejunal mucosa. The tumor was histologically diagnosed as type III ectopic pancreas according to the classification proposed by Heinrich. Abdominal pain resolved postoperatively. This case reminds us that jejunal ectopic pancreas should be included in the differential diagnosis of intussusception caused by an SMT in the intestine.

  10. Phytic acid decreases deoxynivalenol and fumonisin B1-induced changes on swine jejunal explants.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Elisângela Olegário; Gerez, Juliana Rubira; do Carmo Drape, Thalisie; Bracarense, Ana Paula F R L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of phytic acid (IP6) on morphological and immunohistochemical parameters on intestinal explants exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1). The jejunal explants were exposed for 4 h to different treatments: control, DON (10 μM), DON plus 2.5 mM or 5 mM IP6, FB1 (70 μM), and FB1 plus 2.5 mM or 5 mM IP6. Both mycotoxins induced significant intestinal lesions and decreased villi height. The presence of 2.5 mM and 5 mM IP6 significantly inhibited the morphological changes caused by the mycotoxins. DON induced a significant increase in caspase-3 (83%) and cyclooxygenase-2 (71.3%) expression compared with the control. The presence of 5 mM IP6 induced a significant decrease in caspase-3 (43.7%) and Cox-2 (48%) expression compared with the DON group. FB1 induced a significant increase in caspase-3 expression (47%) compared to the control, whereas IP6 induced no significant change in this expression. A significant decrease in cell proliferation was observed when explants were exposed to 5 mM of IP6 in comparison with the DON and FB1 groups. The present data provide evidence that phytic acid modulates the toxic effects induced by DON and FB1 on intestinal tissue.

  11. [Jejunal perforation secondary to pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma metastasis. Case report and review].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Aguilera, Eduardo; Galeana-Nogueda, Francisco Iván; Vera-Aguilera, Jesús; Vera-Aguilera, Carlos; Ley-Marcial, Luis Alfonso

    The first reported case of intestinal perforation secondary to metastatic lung carcinoma was reported in 1957. Intestinal metastases are present in up to 1.8% of the cases, with small bowel obstruction as the most common clinical presentation. An 89 year-old male, who was diagnosed with a high-grade pulmonary mucoepidermoid tumour 2 months previously. The patient was admitted to the hospital for 3 days due to diffuse colic abdominal pain of moderate to severe intensity, accompanied by nausea and gastric vomiting, as well as 2 episodes of bloody bowel movements. On physical examination, the patient was noted to have tachycardia and tachypnoea, as well as clinical signs of acute abdomen. He had white cells of 24,900 per mm(3), and 87% neutrophils. Exploratory laparotomy was performed, which showed a bowel perforation associated with a tumour mass 15cm beyond the angle of Treitz. Bowel resection and primary anastomosis were performed. The histopathological analysis reported the diagnosis of a high-grade mucoepidermoid tumour with small bowel and mesentery with disease-free surgical margins. Unfortunately the patient had a fatal outcome secondary to hospital-acquired pneumonia. The cases of metastases to small bowel are extremely rare, and to our knowledge this is first case reported in Mexico. The patient described went to the emergency room with gastrointestinal bleed and intestinal perforation that required urgent surgical intervention with small bowel resection and primary anastomosis. Unfortunately the patient died secondary to hospital acquired pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Primary extragastrointestinal stromal tumour of the whole abdominal cavity, omentum, peritoneum and mesentery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The gastrointestinal stromal tumour is one of the common mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. It originates from the interstitial cells of Cajal. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours that present outside the gastrointestinal tract are called extragastrointestinal stromal tumours; they share the same morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics. Here we describe an unusual case of extragastrointestinal stromal tumour that presented with gooseberry-like multiple nodules involving the whole abdominal cavity. Case presentation A 65-year-old Sudanese man presented with vague abdominal pain and progressive abdominal distension for 6 months. The pain was associated with mild loss of weight despite good appetite. A physical examination revealed distended abdomen with multiple firm nodules involving his whole abdomen. The results of haematological tests were within normal range. Ultrasound of his abdomen showed multiple nodules of varying sizes in the peritoneal cavity. A computed tomography scan of his abdomen showed numerous nodules of different sizes (1 to 3cm in diameter) filling the whole peritoneal cavity with intense peripheral enhancement. Ultrasound-guided biopsy was not informative. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were normal. Exploration of his abdomen revealed multiple firm gooseberry-like nodules of different sizes involving the greater omentum, peritoneal cavity and the mesentery. The liver, spleen and pancreas were normal. The result of the histopathology was conclusive for gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Conclusions Here we present a rare case of extragastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient who presented with vague abdominal pain and progressive abdominal distension. A laparotomy showed gooseberry-like multiple nodules of different sizes involving his whole abdominal cavity. He underwent debulking surgery and received imatinib. PMID:25303935

  13. Primary extragastrointestinal stromal tumour of the whole abdominal cavity, omentum, peritoneum and mesentery: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Nassir Alhaboob; Musaad, Abdulmagid M; Ahmed, Elsaggad Eltayeb; Abdo, Abdulmunem A; Elhassan, Ahmed M; Hassan, Hiba; Adam, Nasreeldeen; Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Ibnouf, Mohamed A

    2014-10-10

    The gastrointestinal stromal tumour is one of the common mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. It originates from the interstitial cells of Cajal. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours that present outside the gastrointestinal tract are called extragastrointestinal stromal tumours; they share the same morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics. Here we describe an unusual case of extragastrointestinal stromal tumour that presented with gooseberry-like multiple nodules involving the whole abdominal cavity. A 65-year-old Sudanese man presented with vague abdominal pain and progressive abdominal distension for 6 months. The pain was associated with mild loss of weight despite good appetite. A physical examination revealed distended abdomen with multiple firm nodules involving his whole abdomen. The results of haematological tests were within normal range. Ultrasound of his abdomen showed multiple nodules of varying sizes in the peritoneal cavity. A computed tomography scan of his abdomen showed numerous nodules of different sizes (1 to 3 cm in diameter) filling the whole peritoneal cavity with intense peripheral enhancement. Ultrasound-guided biopsy was not informative. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were normal. Exploration of his abdomen revealed multiple firm gooseberry-like nodules of different sizes involving the greater omentum, peritoneal cavity and the mesentery. The liver, spleen and pancreas were normal. The result of the histopathology was conclusive for gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Here we present a rare case of extragastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient who presented with vague abdominal pain and progressive abdominal distension. A laparotomy showed gooseberry-like multiple nodules of different sizes involving his whole abdominal cavity. He underwent debulking surgery and received imatinib.

  14. Stress and strain analysis of contractions during ramp distension in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian; Gregersen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated morphological and biomechanical remodeling in the intestine proximal to an obstruction. The present study aimed to obtain stress and strain thresholds to initiate contraction and the maximal contraction stress and strain in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments. Partial obstruction and sham operations were surgically created in mid-jejunum of male guinea pigs. The animals survived 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. Animals not being operated on served as normal controls. The segments were used for no-load state, zero-stress state and distension analyses. The segment was inflated to 10 cmH2O pressure in an organ bath containing 37°C Krebs solution and the outer diameter change was monitored. The stress and strain at the contraction threshold and at maximum contraction were computed from the diameter, pressure and the zero-stress state data. Young’s modulus was determined at the contraction threshold. The muscle layer thickness in obstructed intestinal segments increased up to 300%. Compared with sham-obstructed and normal groups, the contraction stress threshold, the maximum contraction stress and the Young’s modulus at the contraction threshold increased whereas the strain threshold and maximum contraction strain decreased after 7 days obstruction (P<0.05 and 0.01). In conclusion, in the partially obstructed intestinal segments, a larger distension force was needed to evoke contraction likely due to tissue remodeling. Higher contraction stresses were produced and the contraction deformation (strain) became smaller. PMID:21632056

  15. Role of CD8+ and CD4+ T Lymphocytes in Jejunal Mucosal Injury during Murine Giardiasis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kevin G.-E.; Yu, Linda C. H.; Buret, André G.

    2004-01-01

    T-cell-mediated pathogenesis has been documented in various idiopathic and microbially induced intestinal disorders. Diffuse microvillous shortening seen in giardiasis is responsible for disaccharidase insufficiencies and malabsorption of electrolytes, nutrients, and water. Other mucosal changes include crypt hyperplasia and increased numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). A recent report using an athymic mouse model of infection showed that these epithelial injuries were dependent on T cells. The aim of the present study was to identify which subset of superior mesenteric lymph node (SMLN) T cells were responsible for mucosal alterations in giardiasis. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, as well as whole lymphocyte populations, were isolated from SMLN of Giardia muris-infected mice for adoptive transfer. Jejunal segments of recipient mice were assessed for brush border ultrastructure, sucrase activity, crypt/villus ratio, and IEL numbers. Mice that received enriched CD8+ and whole SMLN lymphocytes, but not CD4+ T cells, from infected donors showed diffuse shortening of microvilli, loss of brush border surface area, impaired sucrase activity, and increased crypt/villus ratios compared to respective controls. Transfer of whole SMLN lymphocytes, as well as enriched CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, from infected donors led to increased IEL numbers in the recipient jejunum. The findings indicate that loss of intestinal brush border surface area, reduced disaccharidase activities, and increased crypt/villus ratios in giardiasis are mediated by CD8+ T cells, whereas both CD8+ and CD4+ SMLN T cells regulate the influx of IEL. PMID:15155662

  16. Stress and strain analysis of contractions during ramp distension in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian; Gregersen, Hans

    2011-07-28

    Previous studies have demonstrated morphological and biomechanical remodeling in the intestine proximal to an obstruction. The present study aimed to obtain stress and strain thresholds to initiate contraction and the maximal contraction stress and strain in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments. Partial obstruction and sham operations were surgically created in mid-jejunum of male guinea pigs. The animals survived 2, 4, 7 and 14 days. Animals not being operated on served as normal controls. The segments were used for no-load state, zero-stress state and distension analyses. The segment was inflated to 10 cmH(2)O pressure in an organ bath containing 37°C Krebs solution and the outer diameter change was monitored. The stress and strain at the contraction threshold and at maximum contraction were computed from the diameter, pressure and the zero-stress state data. Young's modulus was determined at the contraction threshold. The muscle layer thickness in obstructed intestinal segments increased up to 300%. Compared with sham-obstructed and normal groups, the contraction stress threshold, the maximum contraction stress and the Young's modulus at the contraction threshold increased whereas the strain threshold and maximum contraction strain decreased after 7 days obstruction (P<0.05 and 0.01). In conclusion, in the partially obstructed intestinal segments, a larger distension force was needed to evoke contraction likely due to tissue remodeling. Higher contraction stresses were produced and the contraction deformation (strain) became smaller. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Castleman disease of the mesentery as the great mimic: Incidental finding of one case and the literature review.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ang; Hao, Chunyi; Qian, Honggang; Leng, Jiahua; Liu, Wendy

    2015-06-01

    Castleman disease is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by hyperplasia of lymphoid follicles. More commonly described in the mediastinum, its occurrence in the mesentery is exceedingly rare, which is easily to be ignored in differential diagnosis when an abdominal mass is found. We report the case of an asymptomatic 71-year-old woman with a homogenous and hypervascular mass at the inner side of duodenojejunal junction. Based on the clinical suspicion of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a surgical resection was performed. Final diagnosis of the mass was hyaline vascular variant of Castleman disease. Here, we summarize the clinicopathological and radiological features of this disease by literature review, which may be helpful to bring awareness of this entity and improve the clinical decision making when similar scenarios are encountered.

  18. Evaluation of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction from the lateral tailhead, inguinal region, and mesentery of horses

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Garrett L.; McClure, Scott R.; Hostetter, Jesse M.; Martinez, Rudy F.; Wang, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) found in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of equine adipose tissue has promising applications for regenerative therapies. The most commonly used source of equine adipose tissue is the subcutaneous tailhead. The objective of this study was to compare 3 adipose depot sites in horses and determine the viability and cellular yield, capillary density, gene expression for selected markers, and colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) in adipose tissue taken from these sites. Adipose tissue was excised from the area lateral to the tailhead, the inguinal region, and the small colon mesentery of 6 horses. Lipoaspirate was also collected from the area lateral to the tailhead. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) was prepared in duplicate from the 3 different adipose tissue depots. The total nucleated and dead cell counts was determined manually using a hemocytometer and percent viability was calculated. Mass and volume of adipose were determined in order to calculate density and factor-VIII immunohistochemical staining was used to determine vascular density in the excisional adipose tissue samples from each horse. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to quantify gene expression for selected cellular markers from each site. There were significant differences in viability, yield of nucleated cells/gram of adipose tissue, vascular density, gene expression, and CFU-Fs among adipose depots. Adipose from the mesentery yielded the highest number of nucleated cells/gram of tissue and the highest vascular density and percentage of CFU-Fs. In the horse, both the anatomical site of collection and the method of tissue collection significantly impact the yield and composition of cells in the SVF. Further study is needed to assess whether one adipose source is superior for harvesting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and whether the differences among sources are clinically relevant for in-vivo treatment of musculoskeletal injuries in horses

  19. Evaluation of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction from the lateral tailhead, inguinal region, and mesentery of horses.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Garrett L; McClure, Scott R; Hostetter, Jesse M; Martinez, Rudy F; Wang, Chong

    2016-10-01

    Use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) found in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of equine adipose tissue has promising applications for regenerative therapies. The most commonly used source of equine adipose tissue is the subcutaneous tailhead. The objective of this study was to compare 3 adipose depot sites in horses and determine the viability and cellular yield, capillary density, gene expression for selected markers, and colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) in adipose tissue taken from these sites. Adipose tissue was excised from the area lateral to the tailhead, the inguinal region, and the small colon mesentery of 6 horses. Lipoaspirate was also collected from the area lateral to the tailhead. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) was prepared in duplicate from the 3 different adipose tissue depots. The total nucleated and dead cell counts was determined manually using a hemocytometer and percent viability was calculated. Mass and volume of adipose were determined in order to calculate density and factor-VIII immunohistochemical staining was used to determine vascular density in the excisional adipose tissue samples from each horse. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to quantify gene expression for selected cellular markers from each site. There were significant differences in viability, yield of nucleated cells/gram of adipose tissue, vascular density, gene expression, and CFU-Fs among adipose depots. Adipose from the mesentery yielded the highest number of nucleated cells/gram of tissue and the highest vascular density and percentage of CFU-Fs. In the horse, both the anatomical site of collection and the method of tissue collection significantly impact the yield and composition of cells in the SVF. Further study is needed to assess whether one adipose source is superior for harvesting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and whether the differences among sources are clinically relevant for in-vivo treatment of musculoskeletal injuries in horses.

  20. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  1. Lengthening of the mesentery using the marginal vascular arcade of the right colon as the blood supply to the ileal pouch.

    PubMed

    Goes, R N; Nguyen, P; Huang, D; Beart, R W

    1995-08-01

    Creation of a safe ileal pouch requires a tension-free anastomosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate a technical procedure that increases the length of the mesentery while preserving the blood supply to the ileal pouch. Preservation of the marginal vascular arcade (MVA) of the right colon will allow ligation of more mesenteric vessels and increase the mesenteric length. Six fresh cadavers were dissected. Measurement of the apex of the terminal ileum was done in relation to the pubic symphysis. Measurements were taken after 1) complete mobilization of the terminal ileum, right colon, and hepatic flexure; 2) vascular ligation between colon wall and the MVA, preserving the latter from the right branch of the middle colic artery to the ileal branch of the ileocolic artery (ICA); 3) ligation of the distal third of the superior mesenteric artery; 4) ligation of the ICA at its origin; 5) ligation of the right colon artery; and 6) division of the terminal ileal mesentery. This technique enabled complete division of the terminal ileal mesentery, adding a mean additional 3.6 (range, 2.5 - 5.0) cm (36.5 +/- 16.5 percent) in length to the mesentery, compared with superior mesenteric artery, ICA, and right colic artery ligation. Patients who have a shorter mesentery and concern of excessive mesenteric tension should have colectomy performed, preserving the MVA from the middle colic artery to the ileal branch of the ICA. The preserved MVA can be a reliable alternative blood supply to the pouch if more mesenteric vessel ligations are necessary.

  2. Pharyngoesophageal stricture and fistula. Treatment by free jejunal graft.

    PubMed Central

    Hester, T R; McConnel, F; Nahai, F; Cunningham, S J; Jurkiewicz, M J

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with disorders of the pharynx or cervical esophagus requiring extensive ablative therapy were reconstructed by heterotopic autotransplantation of a segment of jejunum. Of these 55 patients, the overwhelming majority were treated for squamous cell carcinoma or the complications of combined radiation and operative therapy. There were six graft failures in the entire group of 55 patients for a transfer reliability of 90%. Three patients died in the perioperative period (5%). The purpose of this paper is to report on the treatment of a subset of these patients in whom fixed cicatricial stenosis of the gullet was the problem or in whom a radionecrotic cutaneous fistula existed. Fourteen such patients were treated, ten with stricture and four with fistula. Both patch grafts of on-lay segments and more routine circumferentially intact tubed segments of jejunum were used depending upon the nature of the defect. The youngest patient in this group was a 3-year-old juvenile diabetic with caustic stricture and the oldest was a 75-year-old man with fixed stricture following operation and radiation for cancer. Nine of ten and four of four anatomic reconstructions were successful in the stricture and fistula patients, respectively. All of these 13 patients with a neo- gullet of jejunum were able to handle secretions and liquids satisfactorily. Eleven patients were on a regular diet and had no discernible physiological impairment in alimentation. One patient had mild dysphagia and used a blenderized diet. One patient was able to swallow liquids only. In this patient the resection for tumor was so high and so extensive that the physiologic act of deglutition itself was impaired. There were no perioperative deaths, although one patient has succumbed to recurrent and metastatic carcinoma. When conventional treatment for stricture or fistula in the cervical alimentary tract has failed, reconstruction can be accomplished safely by free revascularized jejunal graft

  3. Risk factors for wound complications in head and neck reconstruction: 773 free jejunal reconstruction procedures after total pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Narushi; Takao, Soshi; Suzuki, Etsuji; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2017-10-01

    Most studies that examined risk factors for wound complications after head and neck reconstruction analyzed various complications collectively. Moreover, they included a wide variety of resection areas and reconstruction materials. To overcome these limitations, both the resection area and reconstruction method were constrained in the present study. Patients who underwent free jejunal graft reconstruction after pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy for hypopharyngeal cancer were enrolled. The outcomes of interest were abscesses, fistulas, and cervical skin flap necrosis. Abscesses, fistulas, and cervical skin flap necrosis developed in 19.3%, 11.3%, and 8.2% of 773 patients, respectively. A significant relationship was found between use of an open drain and abscess formation and between a longer operation time and cervical skin flap necrosis. Our findings suggest that use of an open drain, cardiovascular disease, and a longer operation time are significant risk factors for abscess formation, fistula formation, and cervical skin flap necrosis, respectively. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Lidocaine effect on flotillin-2 distribution in detergent-resistant membranes of equine jejunal smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tappenbeck, Karen; Schmidt, Sonja; Feige, Karsten; Naim, Hassan Y; Huber, Korinna

    2014-05-01

    Lidocaine is the most commonly chosen prokinetic for treating postoperative ileus in horses, a motility disorder associated with ischaemia-reperfusion injury of intestinal tissues. Despite the frequent use of lidocaine, the mechanism underlying its prokinetic effects is still unclear. Previous studies suggested that lidocaine altered cell membrane characteristics of smooth muscle cells. Therefore, the present study aimed to elucidate effects of lidocaine administration on characteristics of detergent-resistant membranes in equine jejunal smooth muscle. Lidocaine administration caused significant redistribution of flotillin-2, a protein marker of detergent-resistant membranes, in fractions of sucrose-density-gradients obtained from ischaemia-reperfusion injured smooth muscle solubilised with Triton X-100. It was concluded that lidocaine induced disruption of detergent-resistant membranes which might affect ion channel activity and therefore enhance smooth muscle contractility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is laparoscopic resection the appropriate management of a jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)? Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, Michail; Zezos, Petros; Courcoutsakis, Nikos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Kouklakis, Georgios; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2010-10-01

    A 51-year-old female patient presented with iron deficiency anemia. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy were unremarkable. Computed tomography enteroclysis showed an ovoid 3×4-cm jejunal tumor with intraluminal protrusion and exophytic growth pattern, without lymphadenopathy or metastatic disease. Laparoscopic resection of the tumor was successfully carried out. Histologically, a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with an interlacing bundle pattern and high-mitotic activity greater than 10 mitoses/50 high-power fields were observed. The immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was KIT (CD117)-, vimentin-, smooth muscle actin-, and S-100-positive, whereas it was CD34-negative. These findings were consistent with the features of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and after 10 months of follow-up, she is well without any evidence of tumor recurrence.

  6. [Hepato-splenic hemangiosarcoma: presentation of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Antoniello, L; Cohen, H; Rondán, M; Rodríguez, J; Fosman, E

    1989-09-01

    A 65-year-old farmer who had used arsenic as a plaguicide for many years developed a hepatosplenic hemangiosarcoma with metastasis in the colonic serosa, mesentery and omental. The tumor was complicated with intraabdominal hemorrhage originated by spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture. The echographic and post-mortem findings are presented. This is the first case of hepatic hemangiosarcoma reported in Uruguay.

  7. The TRPA1 Activator Allyl Isothiocyanate (AITC) Contracts Human Jejunal Muscle: Pharmacological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Zsolt; Dekany, Andras; Kelemen, Dezsö; Bencsik, Timea; Papp, Robert; Bartho, Lorand

    2016-09-01

    The contractile effect of AITC (300 μM) on human jejunal longitudinal strips was inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonist HC 030031 and atropine or scopolamine, but was insensitive to tetrodotoxin, purinoceptor antagonists or capsaicin desensitization. It is concluded that TRPA1 activation stimulates a cholinergic mechanism in a tetrodotoxin-resistant manner.

  8. Effect of jejunal infusion of nutrients on gastrointestinal transit and hormonal response in man.

    PubMed

    Vidon, N; Pfeiffer, A; Chayvialle, J A; Merite, F; Maurel, M; Franchisseur, C; Huchet, B; Bernier, J J

    1989-12-01

    The effects of jejunal infusion of nutrients on gastric emptying and secretion, intestinal transit and hormone release were studied in human volunteers. Two caloric loads, 1.3 and 3.3 kcal/min, of a nutrient solution consisting of 18 percent protein, 27 percent lipids, and 55 percent carbohydrates were tested. These were first used in random order in 6 subjects to assess the effects on intestinal transit. For the study of gastric emptying, jejunal infusion was started 1 h after intragastric instillation of a 490 kcal, 400 ml, homogenized meal. Intestinal transit time and gastric emptying half-time increased with the rate of nutrient infusion into the jejunum. Postprandial gastric secretion was reduced. The two caloric loads induced significant rises of plasma cholecystokinin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide concentrations. Plasma motilin decreased in relation to the jejunal caloric load. The other peptides were essentially not affected by jejunal nutrient infusion in fasting subjects. We conclude that in man, gastric emptying rate, gastric secretion, and intestinal transit are regulated by the presence of nutrients in the jejunum.

  9. Differences in transcriptomic profile and IgA repertoire between jejunal and ileal Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Levast, Benoît; De Monte, Michèle; Melo, Sandrine; Chevaleyre, Claire; Berri, Mustapha; Salmon, Henri; Meurens, François

    2010-02-01

    In many species such as sheep and pig, there are two types of Peyer's patches (PP): several discrete patches in the jejunum and a long and continuous patch in the ileum. Most of the immunoglobulin A in the gut is generated by B-cells in the PP germinal centers. Moreover, swine like ovine ileal PP might be important for antigen independent B-cell repertoire diversification. We examined, by quantitative real-time PCR, the expression of 36 transcripts of antimicrobial peptides, chemokines, interleukines, Toll-like receptors and transcription factors from both PP and we highlighted the differences by a principal component analysis. Ileal PP was characterized by a higher mRNA expression of CCL28, IL5, IL10, TLR2 and TLR4 while jejunal PP showed higher mRNA expression of antimicrobial peptides, CCL25, FOXP3, IL4, T-Bet, TSLP and SOCS2. Then, we analyzed some VDJ rearrangements to assess immunoglobulin repertoire diversity in jejunal and ileal PP from weaned piglets. The IgA and IgM repertoires were more diverse in ileal than in jejunal piglet PP. All these results could be related to the rarefaction of interfollicular T-cell zone and the presence in ileal versus jejunal lumen of a more diversified microflora. These findings shed a light on the functional differences between both PP.

  10. Jejunal water and electrolyte secretion induced by L-arginine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, J E; Fairclough, P D; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1981-01-01

    In this study a perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal secretion in response to the dibasic amino acid L-arginine. L-arginine at 5, 15, and 40 mmol/l in isotonic saline solutions induced net intestinal secretion of water and Na+. The structurally similar dibasic amino acid L-lysine caused net absorption at 5 and 15 mmol/l, and only modest net secretion of water and Na+ at 40 mmol/l, although absorption rates of the two amino acids were similar. D-arginine (15 mmol/l) was without effect on net water and Na+ absorption. L-arginine 15 mmol/l inhibited glucose-stimulated water and Na+ absorption when perfused in the same intestinal segment, but was without effect when perfused in separate jejunal or ileal segments. Parenteral chlorpromazine inhibited L-arginine induced jejunal water and Na+ secretion. Jejunal secretion induced by L-arginine thus appears not to be due to passive osmotic water flow, nor to release of circulating secretagogues. Stimulation of a mucosal secretory process is most likely to be the mechanism. PMID:6783480

  11. Electroacupuncture at ST37 Enhances Jejunal Motility via Excitation of the Parasympathetic System in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Mengqian; Li, Yuqin; Wang, Yidan; Zhang, Na; Hu, XuanMing; Yin, Yin; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. The roles of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems in mediating the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at ST37 on jejunal motility have yet to be demonstrated. Aim. We used rats and mice to investigate the effect and mechanism of action of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility. Methods. Jejunal motility was recorded by a balloon placed in the jejunum and connected to a biological signal collection system through a transducer. The effects of EA (3 mA) at ST37 were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats without drugs and with the administration of clenbuterol, propranolol, acetylcholine, and atropine. Further, the efficacy of EA at different intensities (1/2/4/6/8 mA) was measured in wild-type mice and β1β2−/− mice and M2M3−/− mice. Results. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the excitatory effect of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility disappeared in the presence of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. EA at ST37 was less effective in M2M3−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Furthermore, to a certain extent, there existed “intensity-response” relationship between jejunal motility and EA. Conclusions. EA at ST37 can enhance jejunal motility in rats and mice mainly via excitation of the parasympathetic pathway. There is an “intensity-response” relationship between EA and effect on jejunal motility. PMID:27818700

  12. The ileal brake--inhibition of jejunal motility after ileal fat perfusion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R C; Trotman, I F; Higgins, B E; Ghatei, M A; Grimble, G K; Lee, Y C; Bloom, S R; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1984-01-01

    The possibility that malabsorbed fat passing through the human ileum exerts an inhibitory feedback control on jejunal motility has been investigated in 24 normal subjects by perfusing the ileum with a fat containing solution designed to produce ileal luminal fat concentrations similar to those in steatorrhoea (30-40 mg/ml). Mean transit times through a 30 cm saline perfused jejunal segment were measured by a dye dilution technique. Thirty minutes after ileal fat perfusion, mean transit times rose markedly to 18.9 +/- 2.5 minutes from a control value of 7.5 +/- 0.9 minutes (n = 5; p less than 0.05). This was associated with an increase in volume of the perfused segment which rose to 175.1 +/- 22.9 ml (control 97.6 +/- 10.3 ml, n = 5; p less than 0.05). Transit times and segmental volumes had returned towards basal values 90 minutes after completing the fat perfusion. Further studies showed that ileal fat perfusion produced a pronounced inhibition of jejunal pressure wave activity, percentage duration of activity falling from a control level of 40.3 +/- 5.0% to 14.9 +/- 2.8% in the hour after ileal perfusion (p less than 0.01). Ileal fat perfusion was associated with marked rises in plasma enteroglucagon and neurotensin, the peak values (218 +/- 37 and 68 +/- 13.1 pmol/l) being comparable with those observed postprandially in coeliac disease. These observations show the existence in man of an inhibitory intestinal control mechanism, whereby ileal fat perfusion inhibits jejunal motility and delays caudal transit of jejunal contents. PMID:6706215

  13. Disruption of the jejunal migrating motor complex by gastric distension and feeding in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, J S; Grundy, D; Scratcherd, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The jejunal motor response to gastric distension has been quantified in the conscious dog and compared with that of feeding in order to determine the role of the physical bulk of a meal in the conversion from fasted to fed motor activity. 2. In six dogs gastric distension abolished the cyclical migrating motor complex (m.m.c.) and evoked a pattern of continuous irregular jejunal motility similar to that seen postprandially, but only after a latency of 21.5 +/- 2.7 min compared to that of 7.1 +/- 1.2 min for the response to feeding. Computer analysis of distension and fed jejunal motility revealed similar distributions of intervals between contractions and contraction amplitudes with comparable mean values for both. 3. In two dogs with antrum and corpus surgically divided distension of the corpus had a similar effect on jejunal motility although the latency to both distension and feeding were considerably less. 4. By varying the period of distension it has been possible to control accurately the duration of the jejunal motor response and so assess its effectiveness in disrupting the timing of the m.m.c. The return to m.m.c. cycling following deflation was independent of preceding complexes. The occurrence of the post-distension activity front was closely related to the act of deflation itself (R = 0.94) following a latency of 26.2 +/- 2.1 min (n = 39). 5. It is concluded that the bulk of a meal contributes significantly to the early part of postprandial motility and is capable of disrupting the timing of subsequent migrating motor complexes. PMID:3443971

  14. Computed Tomographic presentation of obstructive jejunal adenocarcinoma associated with celiac disease and incomplete intestinal malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Ines, Marzouk Moussa; Ennaifer, Rym; Omrani, Sahir; Ahlem, Lahmar Boufaroua; Ouji, Rym; Hendaoui, Lotfi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel adenocarcinoma is a rare entity most frequently observed with celiac disease. This is the first case report on the association of celiac disease, small bowel adenocarcinoma and intestinal malrotation. Case report A 40 year-old male patient diagnosed with celiac disease since the age of 5 years complained of epigastric pain and vomiting for three days. Computed tomography (CT) showed a significant gastroduodenal dilatation with thickened intestinal wall proximal to the duodenojejunal flexure. The lumen contained a food bezoar in the center. The duodenojejunal angle was abnormally on the right side of the abdomen and the superior mesenteric vein was anterior to the superior mesenteric artery. Endoscopy after aspiration found a hemi-circumferential and irregular mass which bled at the contact of fibroscope. Biopsies showed an adenocarcinoma and small bowel resection was performed. Discussion Celiac disease is associated with a high risk of small bowel cancer. The association of incomplete intestinal malrotation, duodenojejunal flexure tumor and celiac disease made the surgery challenging. Conclusion Patients with celiac disease should be carefully monitored and endoscopic or radiologic investigations should be carried out in patients with any doubtful symptoms. PMID:26670410

  15. Computed Tomographic presentation of obstructive jejunal adenocarcinoma associated with celiac disease and incomplete intestinal malrotation.

    PubMed

    Ines, Marzouk Moussa; Ennaifer, Rym; Omrani, Sahir; Ahlem, Lahmar Boufaroua; Ouji, Rym; Hendaoui, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma is a rare entity most frequently observed with celiac disease. This is the first case report on the association of celiac disease, small bowel adenocarcinoma and intestinal malrotation. A 40 year-old male patient diagnosed with celiac disease since the age of 5 years complained of epigastric pain and vomiting for three days. Computed tomography (CT) showed a significant gastroduodenal dilatation with thickened intestinal wall proximal to the duodenojejunal flexure. The lumen contained a food bezoar in the center. The duodenojejunal angle was abnormally on the right side of the abdomen and the superior mesenteric vein was anterior to the superior mesenteric artery. Endoscopy after aspiration found a hemi-circumferential and irregular mass which bled at the contact of fibroscope. Biopsies showed an adenocarcinoma and small bowel resection was performed. Celiac disease is associated with a high risk of small bowel cancer. The association of incomplete intestinal malrotation, duodenojejunal flexure tumor and celiac disease made the surgery challenging. Patients with celiac disease should be carefully monitored and endoscopic or radiologic investigations should be carried out in patients with any doubtful symptoms. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Malignant perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of mesentery with lymph node involvement: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1309992178882788 Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare but distinct mesenchymal neoplasm composed of histologically and immunohistochemically unique perivascular epithelioid cells. Due to its relative rarity, little is known about the histogenesis and prognostic factors of this tumor. We describe a case of unusual mesenteric PEComa in a 38-year-old female patient with regional lymph node involvement. Histologically, the tumor was composed of sheet of epithelioid cells with abundant clear or eosinophillic cytoplasms. Extensive coagulative necrosis and a few mitotic figures (2/50 high power field) could be found in tumor. The epithelioid tumor cells were diffusely positive for HMB-45, Melan-A, and focally positive for calponin. One of enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes was observed to be involved by tumor. A diagnosis of malignant mesenteric PEComa with lymph node involvement was made. The patient received chemotherapy after total resection of tumor and segmental resection of involved jejunum. There was no sign of recurrence of tumor found in period of 6-month regular follow-up after chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of malignant PEComa in mesentery accompanied with regional lymph node involvement. The literature on this rare tumor is reviewed and diagnostic criteria of malignant PEComa are discussed. PMID:23587410

  17. Bronchogenic/foregut cyst of the ileal mesentery in a child mimicking ovarian mass.

    PubMed

    Markel, Troy A; Lin, Jingmei; Fan, Rong; Billmire, Deborah F

    2013-10-01

    Intraabdominal bronchogenic cysts, a type of foregut cyst, are very rare. We report a case in a 12-year-old female who presented with severe abdominal pain and, in radiology workup, a cystic lesion that mimicked ovarian mass.

  18. Free jejunal flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction in head and neck cancer patients: An evaluation of donor site complications

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, Shantanu N.; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Matros, Evan; Paty, Philip B.; Cordeiro, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Free jejunal transfer for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction has often been criticized for its associated donor site morbidity. Conversely, the same argument has been invoked to support use of fasciocutaneous flaps, given their low incidence of donor site complications. The purpose of the current study was to document donor site complication rate with free jejunal flaps for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction, in the hands of an experienced surgeon. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of consecutive patients who underwent free jejunal transfer between 1992 and 2012 by the senior author. Demographic data, abdominal complications, surgical characteristics of small bowel anastomoses and postoperative bowel function were specifically noted. Results Ninety-two jejunal flap reconstructions were performed in 90 patients. Mean follow up time was 29 months. Twelve (13%) patients had prior abdominal surgery. Donor site complications included ileus (n=2), wound cellulitis (n=1), wound dehiscence (n=1) and small bowel obstruction (n=1). Mean time to initiation of tube feeds after reconstruction was 5 days. Seventy-seven (86.5%) patients were discharged on an oral diet. The perioperative mortality rate of 2% was not associated with any donor site complication. Conclusion Free jejunal transfer is associated with minimal and acceptable donor site complication rates. The choice of flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction should be determined by the type of defect, potential recipient site complications and the surgeon’s familiarity with the flap. Potential donor site complications should not be a deterrent for free jejunal flaps given the low rate described in this study. PMID:26220434

  19. Tips and tricks for deep jejunal enteral access: modifying techniques to maximize success.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lena B; McClave, Stephen A; Bechtold, Matthew L; Nguyen, Douglas L; Martindale, Robert G; Evans, David C

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopic insertion of enteral feeding tubes is a major advance in the delivery of nutrition therapy. Since the first report of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in 1980 (Gauderer et al. J Pediatr Surg. 15:872-5, 1980), insertion techniques and equipment have been refined and improved. Despite this progress, deep jejunal enteral access remains a difficult procedure, and many endoscopists do not have experience with the techniques of nasojejunal (NJ) placement, percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy (PEGJ), or direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) (Shike and Latkany, Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am. 8:569-80, 1998). The difference between an exasperating experience and a rewarding procedure lies in mastering the "tips and tricks" that make insertion easy. While the basic techniques are described elsewhere (McClave and Chang 2011), we review several universal basic principles to enhance deep jejunal access, which should promote a more efficient and successful procedure.

  20. Portal vein stent placement with or without varix embolization of jejunal variceal bleeding after hepatopancreatobiliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Shim, Dong Jae; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Yook; Han, Kichang; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Background Extrahepatic portal hypertension after surgery involving the duodenum or jejunum might result in massive ectopic variceal bleeding. Purpose To report the results of portal vein stent placement with the addition of variceal embolization. Material and Methods Between January 2000 and June 2015, portal vein stent placement was attempted in 477 patients. Of these, 22 patients (age, 63 ± 10 years) with jejunal variceal bleeding caused by portal vein obstruction after surgery were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) findings before and after treatment and the rates of technical and clinical success, complications, and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results Stent placement was successful in 19 of 22 patients. Additional variceal embolization was performed in five cases. Clinical success, defined as the cessation of bleeding without recurrence within 1 month, was achieved in 18 of 19 patients with technical success. One patient developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after stent placement and was successfully treated with additional variceal embolization. There were no procedure-related complications. A regression of the jejunal varices was noted in 14 of 19 patients on follow-up CT scans. During the follow-up period (258 days; range, 7-1196 days), stent occlusion and recurrent bleeding occurred in six and four patients, respectively, of the 19 patients who achieved technical success. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences regarding stent patency between benign and malignant strictures. Conclusion Percutaneous, transhepatic, portal vein stent placement with or without jejunal variceal embolization appears to be a safe and effective treatment for jejunal variceal bleeding after surgery.

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) permeates ovine ruminal and jejunal epithelia, mainly by passive diffusion.

    PubMed

    Rackwitz, R; Gäbel, G

    2017-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) represents the most abundant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. GABA is also produced in plants and/or by the microbial conversion of amino acids. Thus, ruminants may be forced to take up significant amounts of GABA from their diet. However, it is not known whether exogenously acquired GABA might permeate the gastrointestinal barrier in such quantities as to induce systemic alterations. Thus, this study pursues the question of where within the ruminant's GI tract and by which pathways GABA may be taken up from the ingesta. The jejunal and ruminal epithelia of sheep were mounted in Ussing chambers under short-circuit conditions. The flux rates of radiolabelled GABA from the mucosal to the serosal side (Jms ) and vice versa (Jsm ) were measured. GABA was applied in various concentrations with adjustment of the mucosal pH to 6.1 or 7.4. Furthermore, beta-alanine or glycine was used as a competitive inhibitor for GABA transport. In both the jejunal and ruminal epithelium, the Jms of GABA was linearly correlated to the mucosal GABA concentration. However, Jms across the jejunal epithelium was approximately 10-fold higher than Jms across the ruminal epithelium. When 0.5 mmol/l GABA was applied on both sides of the epithelium, no net flux could be observed in the jejunal epithelia. Additionally, there was no effect of decreased mucosal pH or the application of glycine or beta-alanine under these conditions. The Jms and Jsm of GABA were linearly correlated to the transepithelial conductance. Our results suggest that GABA is taken up from the small intestine rather than from the rumen. Due to the lack of influence of pH and competitive inhibitors, this uptake seems to occur primarily via passive diffusion. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. The in vitro metabolism of ethinyloestradiol, mestranol and levonorgestrel by human jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Back, D J; Bates, M; Breckenridge, A M; Ellis, A; Hall, J M; Maciver, M; Orme, M L; Rowe, P H

    1981-01-01

    1 Ethinyloestradiol was extensively metabolised in vitro by human jejunal mucosa to form ethinyloestradiol sulphate. 2 The amount of conjugation was directly related to the weight of biopsy tissue. 3 The degree of conjugation of mestranol and levonorgestrel was much lower than for ethinyloestradiol suggesting that the 17-position of the steroid nucleus is relatively inaccessible for conjugation. 4 No Phase I metabolism of ethinyloestradiol or levonorgestrel was apparent in the conditions used in these experiments. PMID:6783058

  3. Colectomy induces an aldosterone-mediated increase in jejunal glucose uptake in rats.

    PubMed

    Khachab, Maha; Kanaan, Amjad; Awad, Dania; Deeba, Elie; Osman, Samira; Nassar, Camille F

    2017-04-01

    The main function of the colon is water and electrolyte absorption. Total colectomy eliminates this colonic function and may alter the absorptive capacity of the small intestine for nutrients. This study examines the effect of total colectomy on jejunal glucose absorption and investigates the potential role of aldosterone in mediating the alterations in glucose uptake post-colectomy using the aldosterone antagonist spironolactone. Total colectomy with ileo-rectal anastomosis was performed on anesthetized rats. Sham rats were identically handled without colon resection. Two days post-surgery, groups of colectomized rats were injected with either a daily subcutaneous dose of spironolactone or sesame oil for 12days. Body weight changes and food and water intake were measured in all experimental groups. Glucose absorption was measured by in-vivo single pass perfusion in the rat jejunum of control, sham, colectomized, colectomized with spironolactone, and colectomized with sesame oil treatment. Na/K ATPase, SGK1, SGLT1 and GLUT2 expressions were determined in jejunal mucosa in control, colectomized and colectomized/spironolactone injected rats by Western blot analysis. Histological assessment was performed on jejunal sections in control and colectomized groups. Glucose absorption significantly increased in colectomized rats with an observed increase in Na/K ATPase and SGK1 expression. No significant expression change in SGLT1 and GLUT2 was detected in the jejunum in colectomized rats. Spironolactone, however, significantly decreased the glucose uptake post-colectomy and normalized Na/K ATPase and SGK1 expression. Our results suggest that jejunal glucose uptake increases post-colectomy as a possible consequence of an aldosterone-mediated function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Abnormal leukotriene C4 released by unaffected jejunal mucosa in patients with inactive Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Guarner, F; Antolín, M; Rodríguez, R; Salas, A; Malagelada, J R

    1994-01-01

    The mucosal release of inflammatory mediators is enhanced in active inflammatory bowel disease. This study examines whether leukotriene C4 production occurs in apparently unaffected segments of the gut. The intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 was determined by jejunal perfusion in seven healthy controls, in nine patients with chronic ulcerative colitis, and in 13 patients with Crohn's disease (six with ileal disease, and seven with only colonic). All patients were in clinical remission and none of them had evidence of jejunal involvement. Mild intraluminal irritation with a 2.5 mmol/l deoxycholic acid solution was induced to stimulate local inflammatory mechanisms. The release of DNA (a marker of mucosal desquamation) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was simultaneously measured. Jejunal release of DNA was higher in Crohn's disease patients than in ulcerative colitis or healthy controls. Basal release of PGE2 was similar in the three groups of patients. Basal release of leukotriene C4 was considerably enhanced, however, in Crohn's disease patients compared with healthy controls. In ulcerative colitis patients, basal leukotriene C4 release was non-significantly different from controls. Bile acid perfusion stimulated PGE2, leukotriene C4, and DNA release in all groups studied, but leukotriene C4 release was significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients. It is concluded that in inactive Crohn's disease there is an enhanced intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 in apparently unaffected segments of proximal small bowel, which may reflect fundamental changes in the function of the gut mucosal barrier. PMID:8174991

  5. Microvascular Reconstruction of Free Jejunal Graft in Larynx-preserving Esophagectomy for Cervical Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Natori, Yuhei; Komoto, Masakazu; Matsumura, Takashi; Horiguchi, Masatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahioko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Losing the ability to speak severely affects the quality of life, and patients who have undergone laryngectomy tend to become depressed, which may lead to social withdrawal. Recently, with advancements in chemoradiotherapy and with alternative perspectives on postoperative quality of life, larynx preservation has been pursued; however, the selection of candidates and the optimal reconstructive procedure remain controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed our experience with free jejunal graft for larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (LPCE), focusing on microvascular reconstruction. Methods: Seven patients underwent LPCE for cervical esophageal carcinoma, and defects were reconstructed by free jejunal transfer subsequently. We collected preoperative and postoperative data of the patients and assessed the importance of the procedure. Results: We mostly used the transverse cervical artery as the recipient, and a longer operative time was required, particularly for the regrowth cases. The operative field for microvascular anastomosis was more limited and deeper than those in the laryngectomy cases. Two graft necrosis cases were confirmed at postoperative day 9 or 15, and vessels contralateral from the graft were chosen as recipients in both patients. Conclusions: Microvascular reconstruction for free jejunal graft in LPCE differed in several ways from the procedure combined with laryngectomy. Compression from the tracheal cartilage to the pedicle was suspected as the reason of the necrosis clinically and pathologically. Therefore, we should select recipient vessels from the ipsilateral side of the graft, and careful and extended monitoring of the flap should be considered to make this procedure successful. PMID:27257562

  6. Jejunal bypass stimulation of pancreatic growth and cholecystokinin secretion in rats: importance of luminal nutrients.

    PubMed Central

    Levan, V H; Liddle, R A; Green, G M

    1987-01-01

    The effect of jejunal bypass on pancreatic growth and plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) was investigated in rats. Rats underwent bypass of jejunum or sham operation. Rats with jejunal bypass were further divided into three groups; one group received a continuous infusion of a partially hydrolysed liquid diet (Vital) into the bypassed jejunum; a second group received the nutrient solution mixed with trypsin and infused into the bypassed jejunum; the third bypass group did not receive infusion of nutrient or trypsin into the jejunum. Jejunal bypass alone did not significantly stimulate pancreatic growth or DNA content at one or two weeks postoperative. Infusion of nutrient solution into the bypassed jejunum stimulated pancreatic growth and DNA content, with maximal increases of 185% and 181% for pancreatic weight and DNA content, respectively, at two weeks. This coincided with significant increases in postabsorptive plasma CCK concentrations. Infusion of pancreatic proteases into the bypassed jejunum partially reversed the effects of nutrient infusion. These results suggest that exclusion of bile-pancreatic juice or pancreatic proteases from the jejunum does not lead to maximal release of CCK unless the jejunum receives luminal nutrients. It is proposed that CCK release from rat jejunum occurs spontaneously in the absence of pancreatic proteases, and that luminal nutrients in bypassed jejunum increase plasma CCK and stimulate pancreatic growth by maintaining synthesis of CCK. PMID:3692314

  7. Intestinal absorptive capacity, intestinal permeability and jejunal histology in HIV and their relation to diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, J; Bjarnason, I; Somasundaram, S; Macpherson, A; Francis, N; Price, A B; Sharpstone, D; Smithson, J; Menzies, I S; Gazzard, B G

    1995-01-01

    Intestinal function is poorly defined in patients with HIV infection. Absorptive capacity and intestinal permeability were assessed using 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose in 88 HIV infected patients and the findings were correlated with the degree of immunosuppression (CD4 counts), diarrhoea, wasting, intestinal pathogen status, and histomorphometric analysis of jejunal biopsy samples. Malabsorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and D-xylose was prevalent in all groups of patients with AIDS but not in asymptomatic, well patients with HIV. Malabsorption correlated significantly (r = 0.34-0.56, p < 0.005) with the degree of immune suppression and with body mass index. Increased intestinal permeability was found in all subgroups of patients. The changes in absorption-permeability were of comparable severity to those found in patients with untreated coeliac disease. Jejunal histology, however, showed only mild changes in the villus height/crypt depth ratio as compared with subtotal villus atrophy in coeliac disease. Malabsorption and increased intestinal permeability are common in AIDS patients. Malabsorption, which has nutritional implications, relates more to immune suppression than jejunal morphological changes. PMID:8549936

  8. Effect of ethanol on jejunal regional blood flow in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Buell, M G; Beck, I T

    1983-01-01

    The effects of intraluminal ethanol perfusion (3.0% and 6.0% vt/vol) on mucosal morphology, water transport, and regional blood flow were examined in in vivo jejunal segments of pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits. Compared with control segments, ethanol-perfused segments exhibited morphological alterations of the mucosa consisting of subepithelial fluid accumulation (bleb formation), exfoliation of enterocytes, and vascular congestion. The prevalence of epithelial damage was significantly increased in the segments perfused with 6% ethanol. Net water transport was significant (p less than 0.025) depressed in segments perfused with 3.0% and 6.0% wt/vol ethanol. In animals in which the control segment was absorbing water, ethanol led to a depression in net water absorption or to the reversal of absorption to net secretion. In animals in which the control segment exhibited secretion, ethanol led to an enhanced net secretion. Blood flow through the total jejunal wall and through the luminal layer (consisting of mucosa plus submucosa) was significantly (p less than 0.05) increased by the presence of 3.0% and 6.0% wt/vol ethanol in the intestinal lumen. Blood flow in the external layer of the jejunum (consisting of muscularis plus serosa) did not change significantly. It therefore appears that the ethanol-induced alterations in jejunal mucosal morphology and water transport are accompanied by a localized mucosal or submucosal hyperemia, or both. However, a direct cause and effect relationship between these remains to be established.

  9. Protective effects of Nigella sativa on gamma radiation-induced jejunal mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Orhon, Zeynep Nur; Uzal, Cem; Kanter, Mehmet; Erboga, Mustafa; Demiroglu, Murat

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Nigella sativa in protection of jejunal mucosa against harmful effects of gamma radiation. Radiotherapy group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to physiological saline. Radiotherapy+Nigella sativa treatment group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to Nigella sativa treatment in the amount of 400mg/kg. Radiotherapy and treatment groups were sacrificed 3 days after the exposure to irradiation. Then, jejunum samples were harvested for biochemical and histological assessment of mucosal injury. Nigella sativa treatment was found to significantly lower elevated tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and, to raise reduced glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in intestinal tissues samples. Single dose 15Gy gamma-irradiation was noted to result in a marked jejunal mucosal injury. Three days after exposure to irradiation, the villi and Lieberkühn crypts were observed as denuded, and villous height diminished. Concomitantly with inflammatory cell invasion, capillary congestion and ulceration were observed in the atrophic mucosa. Nigella sativa treatment significantly attenuated the radiation induced morphological changes in the irradiated rat jejunal mucosa. Nigella sativa has protective effects against radiation-induced damage, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Recurrent adult jejuno-jejunal intussusception due to inflammatory fibroid polyp – Vanek’s tumour: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adult intussusception is a rare but challenging condition. Preoperative diagnosis is frequently missed or delayed because of nonspecific or sub-acute symptoms. Case presentation We present the case of a sixty-two year old gentleman who initially presented with pseudo-obstruction. Computerised tomography displayed a jejuno-jejunal intussusception, which was treated by primary laparoscopic reduction. The patient re-presented with acute small bowel obstruction two weeks later. He underwent a laparotomy showing recurrent intussusception and required a small bowel resection with primary anastomosis. Histological examination of the specimen revealed that the intussusception lead point was due to an inflammatory fibroid polyp (Vanek’s tumour) causing double invagination. Conclusions Adult intussusception presents with a variety of acute, intermittent, and chronic symptoms, thus making its preoperative diagnosis difficult. Although computed tomography is useful in confirming an anatomical abnormality, final diagnosis requires histopathological analysis. Vanek’s tumours arising within the small bowel rarely present with obstruction or intussusception. The optimal surgical management of adult small bowel intussusception varies between reduction and resection. Reduction can be attempted in small bowel intussusceptions provided that the segment involved is viable and malignancy is not suspected. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/7292185123639943 PMID:24968941

  11. Gallstone ileus--an atypical presentation and unusual location.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Shamita; Chaudhuri, Tamonas; Ghosh, Goutam; Ganguly, Ambar

    2008-12-01

    Gallstone ileus is an uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction and is rarely suspected preoperatively. Patients are usually elderly and present with features of small bowel obstruction. Commonest site of impaction of the gallstone is the terminal ileum. We report a case of gallstone ileus in a 37-year-old female who presented with vomiting and anuria, and without any symptoms of intestinal obstruction. Intraoperatively the gallstone was found impacted at the duodeno-jejunal flexure. Impaction of gallstone at the duodeno-jejunal flexure is yet to be reported in literature.

  12. Evidence of altered structural and secretory glycoconjugates in the jejunal mucosa of patients with gluten sensitive enteropathy and subtotal villous atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Vecchi, M; Torgano, G; de Franchis, R; Tronconi, S; Agape, D; Ronchi, G

    1989-01-01

    The pattern of lectin histochemistry in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded normal jejunal and subtotal villous atrophy specimens from patients with gluten sensitive enteropathy were compared. There was no significant difference in the binding pattern of five lectins (Arachis hypogaea, Canavalia ensiformis, Lens culinaris, Phaseolus vulgaris and Triticum vulgaris) between normal and abnormal specimens. There were significant changes in the binding pattern of three lectins (Dolichos biflorus, Ulex europaeus, Ricinus communis), with special reference to goblet cells staining. These changes were present in all the specimens studied, regardless of the clinical diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis or coeliac disease. Dolichos biflorus reactive goblet cells were significantly decreased (p less than 0.001) in abnormal tissue and confined to the luminal edge of the mucosa. Strong reactivity of goblet cells in abnormal tissue was recorded with Ricinus communis and Ulex europaeus, lectins that bind to few or no goblet cells in normal tissue. These findings show that modifications of structural and secretory glycoconjugates occur in the jejunal mucosa of patients with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2753405

  13. A milk diet partly containing soy protein does not change growth but regulates jejunal proteins in young goats.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, S; Rudolph, P E; Albrecht, D; Schoenhusen, U; Zitnan, R; Tomek, W; Huber, K; Voigt, J; Metges, C C

    2007-09-01

    Soy protein is known to alter intestinal function and structure. We determined in young goats whether a diet partly containing soy protein differently affects intestinal morphology and the jejunal and hepatic proteome as compared with a milk diet. Fourteen male 2-wk-old White German dairy goat kids were fed comparable diets based on whole cow's milk in which 35% of the crude protein was casein (milk protein group; MP) or soy protein supplemented by indispensable AA (SPAA) for 34 d (n = 7/group). Body weight gain and food efficiency were not different. Jejunal and hepatic tissue was collected to determine intestinal morphology by microscopy and protein repertoire by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Jejunal crypt depth was reduced and villus height to crypt depth ratio was higher in SPAA than in milk protein. Out of 131 proteins identified, 32 proteins were found to be differently expressed in both groups. In SPAA, down-regulated jejunal proteins were involved in processes related to cytoskeleton generation, protein, lipid, and energy metabolism. Downregulated hepatic proteins were related to glycolysis and Krebs cycle. Thirteen proteins were upregulated in SPAA. Among these, 2 hepatic proteins were related to carbohydrate breakdown. The other 11 jejunal proteins were involved in cytoskeleton assembly, proteolysis, and carbohydrate breakdown. In addition, glutathione-S-transferase was found to be upregulated in the medial jejunum. In conclusion, a SPAA diet as compared with a milk diet was related to changes in jejunal morphology and jejunal proteins relevant for protein turnover, energy metabolism, and cytoskeleton assembly with no apparent impact on animal BW gain.

  14. Effects of different sulphur amino acids and dietary electrolyte balance levels on performance, jejunal morphology, and immunocompetence of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, V; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, E

    2016-02-01

    As alterations of dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) can influence amino acid metabolism via changes the ions incur in their configurations, performance and immunological responses of broiler chicks might be affected. So, the current study was carried out to investigate the effects of different levels of sulphur amino acids (SAA) and DEB on performance, jejunal morphology and immunocompetence of broiler chicks. A total of 360 1-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to nine experimental treatments with four replicates of 10 birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of SAA (100, 110, and 120% of NRC recommendation, provided by methionine supplementation in diets with the same cysteine level) and three levels of DEB (150, 250, and 350 mEq/kg) that were fed during the entire of trial in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement. Results showed that the relative weights of intestine and abdominal fat were decreased markedly (p < 0.001) with increasing levels of SAA and DEB respectively. Antibody titre against sheep red blood cell was neither individually nor in combination influenced by supplementation of SAA or DEB. Nevertheless, a decrease in DEB level led to a suppression in heterophile (p < 0.05) and an increase in lymphocyte counts (p = 0.06); consequently, heterophile to lymphocyte ratio was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by decremental levels of DEB. Albumin to globulin ratio was increased after inclusion of at least 10% SAA (p < 0.001) and 150 mEq DEB/kg in the diet (p = 0.11). Although feeding high-DEB level led to a remarkable decrease in villus height (p < 0.01) and goblet cell numbers (p < 0.001), supplementing the highest level of SAA improved the height of jejunal villus. During the entire trial period, average daily feed intake (ADFI) was increased by incremental SAA levels (p < 0.05). However, inclusion of 150 mEq/kg led to not only a remarkable increase (p < 0.0001) in both ADFI and average daily weight gain (ADWG) but

  15. Jejunal wall triglyceride concentration of morbidly obese persons is lower in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Soriguer, F.; García-Serrano, S.; Garrido-Sánchez, L.; Gutierrez-Repiso, C.; Rojo-Martínez, G.; Garcia-Escobar, E.; García-Arnés, J.; Gallego-Perales, J. L.; Delgado, V.; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The overproduction of intestinal lipoproteins may contribute to the dyslipidemia found in diabetes. We studied the influence of diabetes on the fasting jejunal lipid content and its association with plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in the synthesis and secretion of these lipoproteins. The study was undertaken in 27 morbidly obese persons, 12 of whom had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The morbidly obese persons with diabetes had higher levels of chylomicron (CM) triglycerides (P < 0.001) and apolipoprotein (apo)B48 (P = 0.012). The jejunum samples obtained from the subjects with diabetes had a lower jejunal triglyceride content (P = 0.012) and angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) mRNA expression (P = 0.043). However, the apoA-IV mRNA expression was significantly greater (P = 0.036). The jejunal triglyceride content correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression (r = −0.587, P = 0.027). The variables that explained the jejunal triglyceride content in a multiple linear regression model were the insulin resistance state and the apoA-IV mRNA expression. Our results show that the morbidly obese subjects with diabetes had lower jejunal lipid content and that this correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression. These findings show that the jejunum appears to play an active role in lipid homeostasis in the fasting state. PMID:20855567

  16. Jejunal wall triglyceride concentration of morbidly obese persons is lower in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Soriguer, F; García-Serrano, S; Garrido-Sánchez, L; Gutierrez-Repiso, C; Rojo-Martínez, G; Garcia-Escobar, E; García-Arnés, J; Gallego-Perales, J L; Delgado, V; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The overproduction of intestinal lipoproteins may contribute to the dyslipidemia found in diabetes. We studied the influence of diabetes on the fasting jejunal lipid content and its association with plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in the synthesis and secretion of these lipoproteins. The study was undertaken in 27 morbidly obese persons, 12 of whom had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The morbidly obese persons with diabetes had higher levels of chylomicron (CM) triglycerides (P < 0.001) and apolipoprotein (apo)B48 (P = 0.012). The jejunum samples obtained from the subjects with diabetes had a lower jejunal triglyceride content (P = 0.012) and angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) mRNA expression (P = 0.043). However, the apoA-IV mRNA expression was significantly greater (P = 0.036). The jejunal triglyceride content correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression (r = -0.587, P = 0.027). The variables that explained the jejunal triglyceride content in a multiple linear regression model were the insulin resistance state and the apoA-IV mRNA expression. Our results show that the morbidly obese subjects with diabetes had lower jejunal lipid content and that this correlated negatively with apoA-IV mRNA expression. These findings show that the jejunum appears to play an active role in lipid homeostasis in the fasting state.

  17. Caco-2 cells - expression, regulation and function of drug transporters compared with human jejunal tissue.

    PubMed

    Brück, S; Strohmeier, J; Busch, D; Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2017-03-01

    Induction or inhibition of drug transporting proteins by concomitantly administered drugs can cause serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, in vitro assays currently available are mostly for studying the inhibitory potential of drugs on intestinal transporter proteins, rather than induction. Therefore, this study investigated the suitability of the frequently used intestinal Caco-2 cell line to predict transporter-mediated DDIs as caused by induction via activation of nuclear receptors. TaqMan® low density arrays and LC-MS/MS based targeted proteomics were used to evaluate transporter expression in Caco-2 cells in comparison with jejunal tissue, in culture-time dependence studies and after incubation with different known inducers of drug metabolism and transport. Additionally, studies on ABCB1 function were performed using Transwell® assays with [(3) H]-digoxin and [(3) H]-talinolol as substrates after incubation with the prototypical inducers rifampicin, St John's wort, carbamazepine and efavirenz. The gene and protein expression pattern of drug transporters in Caco-2 cells and jejunal tissue differed considerably. For some transporters culture-time dependent differences in mRNA expression and/or protein abundance could be determined. Finally, none of the studied prototypical inducers showed an effect either on mRNA expression and protein abundance or on the function of ABCB1. Differences in transporter expression in Caco-2 cells compared with jejunal tissue, as well as expression dependence on culture time must be considered in in vitro studies to avoid under- or overestimation of certain transporters. The Caco-2 cell model is not suitable for the evaluation of DDIs caused by transporter induction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Fractionated low doses of abdominal irradiation alters jejunal uptake of nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, A.B.; Keelan, M.; Cheeseman, C.I.; Walker, K.

    1986-06-01

    Abdominal radiation is associated with changes in intestinal uptake of nutrients that begins within three days and persist for over 33 weeks. Clinically, fractionated doses of radiation (FDR) are used in an attempt to minimize the complications of this therapy, but the effects of fractionated doses of radiation on intestinal transport have not been defined. An in vitro technique was used to assess the jejunal and ileal uptake of varying concentrations of glucose and leucine, as well as the uptake of single concentrations of fatty acids and decanol in rats exposed 3, 7, and 14 days previously to a course of 200 cGy given on each of five consecutive days. FDR was associated with an increase in the uptake of decanol, and therefore a decrease in the effective resistance of the unstirred water layer. FDR had a variable effect on the uptake of glucose and leucine, with a decline in the value of the Michaelis constant (Km) and the passive permeability coefficient for glucose (Pd), whereas the Km for leucine was unchanged and the Pd for leucine was variably affected by FDR. The maximal transport rate (Jdm) for leucine progressively rose following FDR, whereas the Jdm for glucose initially rose, then fell. The uptake of galactose and medium chain-length fatty acids was unchanged by FDR, whereas the jejunal uptake of myristic acid rose, and the uptake of cholic acid declined, then returned to normal. FDR was associated with greater body weight gain and jejunal and ileal weight. The changes in nutrient uptake following FDR differed from the absorption changes occurring after a single dose of radiation. Thus, fractionated doses of abdominal radiation produce complex changes in the intestinal uptake of actively and passively transported nutrients, and these variable changes are influenced by the time following radiation exposure and by the solute studied.

  19. The gut microbiota elicits a profound metabolic reorientation in the mouse jejunal mucosa during conventionalisation.

    PubMed

    El Aidy, Sahar; Merrifield, Claire A; Derrien, Muriel; van Baarlen, Peter; Hooiveld, Guido; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Dekker, Jan; Holmes, Elaine; Claus, Sandrine P; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-09-01

    Proper interactions between the intestinal mucosa, gut microbiota and nutrient flow are required to establish homoeostasis of the host. Since the proximal part of the small intestine is the first region where these interactions occur, and since most of the nutrient absorption occurs in the jejunum, it is important to understand the dynamics of metabolic responses of the mucosa in this intestinal region. Germ-free mice aged 8-10 weeks were conventionalised with faecal microbiota, and responses of the jejunal mucosa to bacterial colonisation were followed over a 30-day time course. Combined transcriptome, histology, (1)H NMR metabonomics and microbiota phylogenetic profiling analyses were used. The jejunal mucosa showed a two-phase response to the colonising microbiota. The acute-phase response, which had already started 1 day after conventionalisation, involved repression of the cell cycle and parts of the basal metabolism. The secondary-phase response, which was consolidated during conventionalisation (days 4-30), was characterised by a metabolic shift from an oxidative energy supply to anabolic metabolism, as inferred from the tissue transcriptome and metabonome changes. Detailed transcriptome analysis identified tissue transcriptional signatures for the dynamic control of the metabolic reorientation in the jejunum. The molecular components identified in the response signatures have known roles in human metabolic disorders, including insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study elucidates the dynamic jejunal response to the microbiota and supports a prominent role for the jejunum in metabolic control, including glucose and energy homoeostasis. The molecular signatures of this process may help to find risk markers in the declining insulin sensitivity seen in human type 2 diabetes mellitus, for instance.

  20. Response to early repeat celiotomy in horses after a surgical treatment of jejunal strangulation.

    PubMed

    Bauck, Anje G; Easley, Jeremiah T; Cleary, Orlaith B; Graham, Sarah; Morton, Alison J; Rötting, Anna K; Schaeffer, David J; Smith, Andrew D; Freeman, David E

    2017-08-01

    To determine the outcome after early repeat celiotomy in horses operated for jejunal strangulation. Retrospective case series. Horses (n = 22) that underwent repeat celiotomy for postoperative reflux (POR) and/or postoperative colic (POC) that did not improve within 48 hours from onset after initial surgical treatment of strangulating jejunal lesions by jejunojejunostomy (n = 14) or no resection (n = 8). Medical records were reviewed for clinical signs, duration of signs before repeat surgery, surgical findings and treatment, and outcome. Survival was documented by phone call at long-term follow-up. The influence of POC and POR on timing of surgery were analyzed. Long-term survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier analyses. Repeat celiotomy was performed at a median of 57 hours after initial surgery and 16.5 hours from onset of signs, and earlier in horses with POC compared with POR (P < .05). A total of 3/22 horses were euthanatized under anesthesia. A total of 9 of 11 horses with initial jejunojejunostomy required resection of the original anastomosis due to anastomotic complications. In 8 horses without resection, second surgery included resection (4) or decompression (4). Repeat celiotomy was successful in 13/16 horses with POR. Repeat celiotomy eliminated POC in all horses (n = 9). A total of 19 horses were recovered from anesthesia and all survived to discharge. Incisional infections were diagnosed in 13/17 horses where both surgeries were performed through the same ventral median approach, and hernias developed in 4/13 infected incisions. Median survival time was 90 months. Repeat celiotomy can eliminate signs of POR and/or POC, and the additional surgery does not appear to aggravate POR. Criteria for repeat celiotomy in this study could provide guidelines for managing POC and POR after surgery for jejunal strangulation. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. [Reconstruction of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus using a free jejunal graft].

    PubMed

    Pesko, P; Bumbasirević, M; Knezević, J; Dunjić, M; Djukić, V; Simić, A; Stojakov, D; Sabljak, P; Bjelović, M; Janković, Z; Micev, M; Saranović, D

    2000-01-01

    Extensive malignant tumors of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus continue to challenge surgeons in respect to both type and extent of resection as well as type of reconstruction. In the period between November 1st, 1996 and November 1st, 1998, at our Department, five patients have been operated due to squamocellular carcinoma of the hypopharynx using a free jejunal graft reconstruction method. The first free jejunal graft operation due to hypopharyngeal carcinoma, at the same time the first operation of this kind ever done in our Country, was performed on November 13th, 1998. There were 4 female and one male patient, average age 47.75 years. Disfagia for solid foods was a leading symptom in all patients (mean duration of 3.5 months) and was always accompanied with weight loss (average of 8 kg for two months). In all patients barium swallow, endoscopy, CT as well as intraoperative endoscopy was performed. Radical surgical procedure was always accompanied with the bilateral modified lympf node neck dissection. As a arterial donor vessel superior thyroid artery was used in all patients. As a venous drainage in three patients a external jugular vein was used and in two facial vein. Reconstruction using a free jejunal graft of approximately 25 cm long was performed in all patients creating upper, oropharingeal, anastomosis end to side and distal, esophageal, end to end (in only one patients side to end) using 3/0 apsorbable sutures. Mean duration of the operation was six hours. The postoperative course in all patients was uneventful. On the 9th postoperative day gastrografin and three days later barium swallow radiography was performed as a standard control study. Regular check ups were done on three, six, nine months, year and two years. On all controls all patients were symptom free and feeling well. It is our opinion that in the patients with isolated carcinoma of the hypopharynx due to low morbidity and mortality rate, free jejunal graft method is the surgical

  2. Acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints enhances jejunal motility in constipated and diarrheic rats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qing-Guang; Gao, Xin-Yan; Liu, Kun; Yu, Xiao-Chun; Li, Liang; Wang, Hai-Ping; Zhu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect and mechanism of acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints on jejunal motility, particularly in pathological conditions. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately 18-20 cm downstream from the pylorus and filled with approximately 0.1 mL warm water in anesthetized normal rats or rats with diarrhea or constipation. The heterotopic acupoints including LI11 (Quchi), ST37 (Shangjuxu), BL25 (Dachangshu), and the homotopic acupoint ST25 (Tianshu), and were stimulated for 60 s by rotating acupuncture needles right and left at a frequency of 2 Hz. To determine the type of afferent fibers mediating the regulation of jejunal motility by manual acupuncture, the ipsilateral sciatic A or C fibers of ST37 were inactivated by local application of the A-fiber selective demyelination agent cobra venom or the C fiber blocker capsaicin. Methoctramine, a selective M2 receptor antagonist, was injected intravenously to identify a specific role for M2 receptors in mediating the effect of acupuncture on jejunal motility. RESULTS: Acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints, such as LI11 and ST37, increased jejunal motility not only in normal rats, but also in rats with constipation or diarrhea. In normal rats, manual acupuncture at LI11 or ST37 enhanced jejunal pressure from 7.34 ± 0.19 cmH2O to 7.93 ± 0.20 cmH2O, an increase of 9.05% ± 0.82% (P < 0.05), and from 6.95 ± 0.14 cmH2O to 8.97 ± 0.22 cmH2O, a significant increase of 27.44% ± 1.96% (P < 0.01), respectively. In constipated rats, manual acupuncture at LI11 or ST37 increased intrajejunal pressure from 8.17 ± 0.31 cmH2O to 9.86 ± 0.36 cmH2O, an increase of 20.69% ± 2.10% (P < 0.05), and from 8.82 ± 0.28 cmH2O to 10.83 ± 0.28 cmH2O, an increase of 22.81% ± 1.46% (P < 0.05), respectively. In rats with diarrhea, MA at LI11 or ST37 increased intrajejunal pressure from 11.95 ± 0.35 cmH2O to 13.96 ± 0.39 cmH2O, an increase of 16.82% ± 2.35% (P

  3. Studies of intestinal lymphoid tissue. VII. The secondary nature of lymphoid cell "activation" in the jejunal lesion of tropical sprue.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, M. N.; Mathan, M.; Mathan, V. I.

    1983-01-01

    Morphometric techniques were used in the evaluation of lymphocyte morphology and activity in tropical sprue. jejunal biopsies from control subjects (8), patients with epidemic disease (7), patients with endemic disease (11), and subjects who had recovered from sprue (4) were analyzed blindly. In patients with sprue, lymphocytes were increased significantly within crypt (but not surface) epithelium. Immunoblasts (greater than 6 mu in diameter) were increased by 5% over control subjects. Group means for lymphocytic mitotic indexes were also significantly raised, while flux ratios only differed significantly between endemic sprue patients and control subjects. The lymphocytic infiltration was distributed focally in the upper crypt and crypt-villus interzones. Analysis of epidemic cases (presenting within 4-28 days) revealed detectable changes in lymphocyte behavior only after 3 weeks' illness, whereas mucosal lesions and malabsorption were already established during the first week. These data indicate that lymphocyte activation, suggestive of a local cell-mediated immune reaction, does occur in tropical sprue but is secondary to damage already inflicted on enterocytes and their function. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6614143

  4. Waardenburg syndrome presenting with constipation since birth.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Sharma, S B; Mathur, P; Agrawal, L D

    2014-12-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is Waardenburg syndrome associated with Hirschsprung's disease. A 10-day-old full-term male neonate of Waardenburg syndrome presented with constipation since birth along with features of small bowel obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy revealed distended proximal jejunal and ileal loops along with microcolon; an ileostomy was performed. Postoperatively patient developed sepsis and died. Histopathology confirmed total colonic aganglionosis. Suspect familial Shah-Waardenburg syndrome in a neonate of Waardenburg syndrome presenting with constipation since birth or intestinal obstruction.

  5. A young woman with a jejuno-jejunal intussusception.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Louisa J D; Noordman, Bo Jan; Scheepers, Joris J; Hartholt, Klaas A

    2015-11-25

    A 27-year-old woman presented at the emergency department, with pain in the epigastric region. Because physical examination, blood results, urine tests and an X-ray of the thorax showed no abnormalities, she was discharged. Twelve hours later, she presented again at the emergency department, with intense abdominal pain. The blood results, an X-ray and ultrasound of the abdomen were now aberrant. A CT of the abdomen showed an extensive intussusception. During an emergency laparotomy, the intussusception of the proximal jejunum was confirmed. Owing to gangrene of the proximal jejunum, a resection was inevitable. A polyp in the resected part of the jejunum was the lead point of the intussusception. This case report shows the challenges of diagnosing an 'intussusception' and gives a short overview of this condition in adults. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Laparoscopic resection of a jejunal mesenteric pseudocyst: case report

    PubMed Central

    RESTA, G.; TARTARINI, D.; FABBRI, N.; BIANCHINI, E.; ANANIA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare and can occur at any age. They can manifest with abdominal pain or compressive mass effect. The exact etiology is unknown. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and laparoscopy are used in diagnosing mesenteric cysts. Laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst is possible and should be considered as the treatment of choice. We present a case of mesenteric pseudocyst of small bowel treated by laparoscopic excision. PMID:25644729

  7. Beneficial effects of jejunal continuity and duodenal food passage after total gastrectomy: a retrospective study of 704 patients.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Li, Q; Wang, D C; Wang, J C; Liang, H; Liu, J Z; Cui, Q H; Sun, T; Zhang, R P; Kong, D L; Hao, X S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate effects of reconstruction procedures on post-operative outcomes and nutritional status after total gastrectomy. The study group comprised 704 consecutive patients with gastric cancer who underwent total gastrectomy between December 1985 and December 2003. Six alimentary reconstruction procedures were performed, including jejunal continuity [Braun, modified Braun I and II and functional jejunal interposition (FJI)] and jejunum transection ["P" Roux-en-Y and "P" jejunal interposition (PJI)]. The duodenal food passage was maintained only by FJI and PJI. We evaluated the time interval to restore food intake after surgery and the incidence of complications and nutritional status for 12 months. Patients who received jejunum transection required 7.8+/-2.5 days and 11.9+/-4.9 days to restore liquid and semi-liquid food intake, respectively, which reduced to 3.9+/-2.1 days for liquid and 7.9+/-3.9 days for semi-liquid food intake by jejunum continuity. The incidence rates of reflux esophagitis and Roux-en-Y syndrome in patients receiving jejunum transection were 23.5% and 42.4%, respectively, which were decreased to 9.35% and 14.7%, respectively, by jejunal continuity. Furthermore, prognostic nutrition index score of patients receiving the procedures maintaining duodenal food passage (52.9+/-10.9) was higher than that of patients without the duodenal food passage (46.7+/-8.2). Jejunal continuity and duodenal food passage showed beneficial effects on clinical outcomes after surgery. Among these six procedures, FJI was the only procedure to combine the benefits of jejunal continuity and maintaining the duodenal food passage, indicating that FJI has potential clinical application to improve the quality of patient's life after total gastrectomy.

  8. Dual effect of chronic nicotine administration: augmentation of jejunitis and amelioration of colitis induced by iodoacetamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Cohen, P; Heyman, S N; Rachmilewitz, D

    2001-02-01

    Smoking has a dichotomous effect on inflammatory bowel disease, ameliorating disease activity in ulcerative colitis but having a deleterious effect on Crohn's disease. This effect is thought to be due to nicotine. We investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on the small and large bowel in iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis and colitis. Jejunitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intrajejunal administration of 0.1 ml 2% iodoacetamide and colitis by intrarectal administration of 0.1 ml 3% iodoacetamide. Nicotine was dissolved in drinking water (12.5 or 250 micrograms/ml), rats drinking ad libitum. Nicotine administration started 10 days prior to damage induction and throughout the experiment and had no effect on weight gain or daily food intake of rats. Rats were killed 5 days after iodoacetamide-induced colitis and 7 days after induction of jejunitis. The jejunum and colon were resected, rinsed, weighed, damage assessed macroscopically and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation. Effects of nicotine on gut microcirculation were also assessed. Nicotine by itself caused no damage to the colon. Nicotine had a dichotomous effect on jejunitis and colitis. At a dose of 12.5 micrograms/ml nicotine improved the macroscopic damage of colitis from 252 +/- 66 to 70 +/- 31 mm2, and segmental weight also declined significantly in the colon (from 1.7 +/- 0.2 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 g/10 cm). In contrast, the same dose of nicotine had a deleterious effect on iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis, increasing the macroscopic damage from 368 +/- 38 to 460 +/- 97 mm2 in rats treated with injury escalating to 970 +/- 147 in rats treated with 250 micrograms/ml nicotine. Nicotine treatment also significantly increased jejunal segmental weight. By itself nicotine did not change NOS activity or PGE2 generation compared to control rats, but it enhanced microcirculation in the colon

  9. Undiagnosed Sjögren's Syndrome Presenting as Mesenteric Panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Rebecca L.; Bhavnagri, Sharukh J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare inflammatory and fibrotic process that affects the small intestine mesentery. It may occur following abdominal surgery or in association with a variety of conditions, including malignancy, infection, and certain autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Herein, an unusual case of mesenteric panniculitis in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome will be presented. The patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, sicca symptoms, fatigue, and arthralgia. An abdominal CT revealed mesenteric fat stranding and prominent lymph nodes of the small intestine mesentery. She was found on laboratory workup to have positive antinuclear and anti-SSa antibodies. Minor salivary gland lip biopsy revealed focal lymphocytic sialadenitis. The patient's symptoms and CT findings improved with corticosteroids. This case suggests that Sjögren's syndrome should be considered as an underlying disease process in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis. PMID:27366340

  10. Laparoscopic enucleation of a jejunal mesenteric cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vadala', S; Caldarera, G; Li Volti, G; Biondi, A; Giannone, G

    2010-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts (MC) are a rare surgical condition occurring approximately in 1/200.000-350.000. The aetiology is unknown and the rarity of the tumor has led to confusion about their nature and classifi cation. They can be uni- or multi-locular, and are mostly benign. Approximately 830 cases have been reported in the literature and only four of them were found to be malignant. Cysts are usually diagnosed during routine abdominal examinations, they can present with various signs, such as acute abdominal pain, chronic abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, or change in bowel habit. Although rare, shock due to rupture or bleeding of the cyst, intestinal obstruction secondary to external compression and volvulus or torsion of the cyst have been reported. Defi nitive treatment requires complete surgical resection of the cyst and is indicated when the lesion causes symptoms. We report a case of calcifi ed MC which was completely excised using the laparoscopic approach.

  11. Vagal influences on the jejunal 'minute rhythm' in the anaesthetized ferret.

    PubMed Central

    Collman, P I; Grundy, D; Scratcherd, T

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous jejunal motility in the urethane-anaesthetized ferret shows a cyclical pattern of contraction bursts alternating with quiescent periods described as 'minute rhythm' in conscious animals. Cooling the cervical vagi to below 4 degrees C or acute vagotomy abolished this pattern of motility. On re-warming the vagi there was a return to cyclical motility after a latency which depended upon the contractile state at the time vagal conduction was restored. Electrical vagal stimulation produced bursts of contractions at the same frequency as the spontaneous motility. Longer periods of stimulation gave rise to bursts of contractions interrupted by periods of relative quiescence, mimicking the spontaneous motility, despite the continuous stimulation. Following atropinization all spontaneous motility was abolished, but electrical stimulation of the vagi revealed a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic response whose characteristics differed from that of the cholinergic response. It is concluded that the vagus plays a permissive role in regulating the jejunal 'minute rhythm' via a cholinergic pathway and that there is a second excitatory vagal pathway which innervates non-cholinergic post-ganglionic neurones whose functional significance and transmitter mechanism is unknown. PMID:6663513

  12. Control of jejunal sucrase and maltase activity by dietary sucrose of fructose in man

    PubMed Central

    Rosensweig, Norton S.; Herman, Robert H.

    1968-01-01

    The specific effect of dietary sugars on jejunal disaccharidase activity in seven normal nonfasted male volunteers was studied. The sugars tested were sucrose, maltose, lactose, glucose, fructose, and galactose. Comparisons were made of the effects of each sugar in an isocaloric liquid diet. In all subjects, sucrose feeding, as compared to glucose feeding, significantly increased jejunal sucrase (S) and maltase (M) activities, but not lactase (L) activity. The S/L and M/L ratios increased to a significant degree. Fructose feeding, in two subjects, gave results similar to sucrose when comparing fructose and glucose diets. One subject was fed lactose, galactose, and maltose. These sugars, compared to glucose, did not increase disaccharidase activity. Fructose appears to be the active principle in the sucrose molecule. These results demonstrate that specific dietary sugars can alter enzyme activity in the small intestine of man in a specific fashion. Sucrose and fructose are able to regulate sucrase and maltase activity. Dietary alteration of intestinal enzymes may represent a suitable system for studying the regulation of enzyme activity in man. PMID:5676520

  13. In vitro uptake of amino acids in the jejunal mucosa of patients with cholera.

    PubMed

    Khin Maung, U

    1993-06-01

    In vitro uptake of 14C-labelled amino acids was studied in jejunal mucosa biopsy specimens from 64 adults admitted for treatment of cholera (proven by stool culture) within 48 hours of onset of watery diarrhoea to determine the state of amino acid carriers in the jejunal mucosa during actively purging disease. Continued absorption of amino acids by the NBB carrier (for neutral amino acids), the Y+ system (for dibasic amino acids), and the PHE carrier were operative even during the actively purging stage of watery diarrhoea due to cholera. The IMINO carrier for absorption of N-substituted amino acids was found to be inoperative during cholera but the imino acids could be absorbed by the PHE carrier. This study demonstrates continued intestinal absorption of amino acids during cholera, provides scientific basis for use of amino acids in "improved" oral rehydration solutions utilising amino acid transport systems which are linked to the absorption of sodium (and water) so that reduction in diarrhoeal stools can be achieved, and emphasises the importance of maintaining feeding during acute diarrhoea to prevent the development of malnutrition.

  14. Jejunal uptake of thiamin hydrochloride in man: influence of alcoholism and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Breen, K J; Buttigieg, R; Iossifidis, S; Lourensz, C; Wood, B

    1985-07-01

    The jejunal uptake of 35S-thiamin hydrochloride was examined using an intestinal perfusion technique in six young students (group 1), 12 recently drinking alcoholic men (group 3) and in 6 non-drinking men age-matched with the alcoholic men (group 2). The acute effect of alcohol on thiamin uptake was also examined in the alcoholic subjects. At a perfusate thiamin concentration of 0.5 mumol/l, median thiamin uptake was 34.4, 10.4, and 6.8 ng/cm/min in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively, while for 8.0 mumol thiamin/l, median uptake was 277.2, 102.3, and 98.0 ng/cm/min for these groups respectively. Alcohol, 50 g/l, added to the perfusate gave a 28.9% decrease in uptake of 0.5 microM thiamin, which was not statistically significant. These findings suggest that neither alcoholism nor acute exposure to alcohol limits jejunal uptake of thiamin hydrochloride. Differences noted between young and old controls need further study.

  15. [A cystic mesenteric lymphangioma presented at the colon sigmoid. Case report].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Ortega, Miguel Angel; Villegas-Romero, Javier; Márquez-Díaz, Adrián; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Cystic lymphangioma of the mesentery is an uncommon tumor; its incidence is 1:160,000. Our objective was to present the case of a patient with cystic lymphangioma of mesentery located at the colon. Female 25 years, attending consultation with a clinical picture suggestive of right ovarian cyst and increased abdominal perimeter. On physical examination abdominal painful tumor was identified, with deep palpation and mobilization. Abdominal ultrasound findings suggested giant right ovarian cyst. Laparotomy showed a cystic mass (18 x 11 cm size) depending mesenterium and involving sigmoid colon, surgical intervention was done after two days for bowel preparation. Resection of the cyst, and colon section involving sigmoid colon with termino-terminal anastomosis, was performed. The pathological report was: cystic lymphangioma of sigmoid mesentery. There was no recurrence at six month follow up. Cystic lymphangioma of the mesentery is a benign abdominal tumor, which occurs frequently in children but in adults is rare. We found 49 cases of mesenteric cysts reported in Mexico, of which 21 were lymphangiomas with a range of 1 to 73 years of age.

  16. Morphological alterations in the jejunal mucosa of aged rats and the possible protective role of green tea.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zeinab Abel-Rehim; Zauszkiewicz-Pawlak, Agata; Abdelrahman, Shaimaa A; Algaidi, Sami; Desouky, Maha; Shalaby, Sally M

    2017-08-16

    Gastrointestinal disorders become more prevalent with ageing. This study is aimed to describe morphological changes that occur in the jejunal mucosa of male albino rats as a result of ageing and the protective effect of green tea supplements. The experiment was performed on sixty rats: thirty young-adult (6-month old, body mass 200-220 g) and thirty old (24-month-old, body mass 220-260 g) animals. Each group was further divided into two subgroups (n = 15 each): control rats and green tea-treated rats that received 1.5 mL (300 mg/kg/day) of green tea extract for 14 weeks by oral gavage. Sections of the jejunum were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid Schiff and Mallory trichrome methods and toluidine blue. The presence of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)- and CD68-positive cells was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Ultrathin sections were prepared and examined by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Jejunal sections of the old control rats showed distortion of submucosa and attenuated muscularis externa with decreased height of intestinal villi. The villi also showed partial loss of acidophilic brush border with wide spaces between enterocytes. Swollen, short, blunt or broad villi with abundant mononuclear cell infiltration of lamina propria and congested blood vessels were evident both by light and electron microscopy. The number of PCNA- and CD68-positive cells in jejunal mucosa of old rats was higher than in young rats. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the mucosa of old control rats were lower, whereas malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were higher in the jejunal homogenates of old rats as compared to young control rats. Administration of green tea extract protected the jejunal mucosa from age-related changes by restoring its histological structure. The age-related changes of the morphology of rat jejunum could be ameliorated by prolonged supplementation of the green tea extract.

  17. Effect of different levels of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli colonization and jejunal morphology in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Boka, J; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, R

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli count and morphology of jejunal epithelial cells in laying hens. A total of 100 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) of 49 weeks old were randomly distributed among five cage replicates of five birds each. Experimental diets consisted of different levels (0%, 1%, 2% and 3% of diet) of dietary black cumin inclusion. The experimental period lasted for a total of 10 weeks, and egg quality indexes and laying hens' performance were measured as two 35-day trial periods. At the final day, two hens per replicate were slaughtered to investigate the influence of dietary treatments on intestinal E. coli colonization and morphology of jejunal cells. Although dietary black cumin in all supplementation levels decreased (p < 0.05) the enumeration of ileal E. coli, the morphological and histological alterations in small intestine such as enhancement of villus height to crypt depth ratio, increased goblet cell numbers and proliferation of lamina propria lymphatic follicles were observed after dietary supplementation with at least 2% black cumin. Dietary treatments decreased (p < 0.05) the concentration of serum cholesterol and triglycerides and increased (p < 0.05) serum HDL concentration and relative weight of pancreas; however, the egg yolk cholesterol was not influenced by dietary treatments. In addition, dietary supplementation with black cumin improved (p < 0.05) eggshell quality and Haugh unit. The best feed conversion ratio was obtained when diets were supplemented with 2% black cumin. This improvement was due to the increase (p < 0.05) in egg mass and contemporaneous decrease (p < 0.01) in feed consumption. The present results indicated that regardless of supplementation level, dietary inclusion of black cumin decreased E. coli enumeration in ileal digesta and improved serum lipid profile and eggshell quality, whereas the

  18. Familial Apple Peel Jejunal Atresia with Helical Umbilical Cord Ulcerations in Three Consecutive Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Jaiman, Sunil; Gundabattula, Sirisha Rao; Ratha, Chinmayee

    2016-01-01

    Apple peel deformity is a rare form of upper intestinal atresia of unknown etiology. Umbilical cord ulcers can occur secondary to reflux of gastric juice and bile as a result of the atresia and can cause lethal intrauterine hemorrhage. The authors report 3 instances of congenital apple peel jejunal atresia with helical umbilical cord ulcers afflicting all female offspring in consecutive pregnancies in a single nonconsanguineous family. There was no hemorrhage from the cord ulcers, but all 3 pregnancies resulted in perinatal death. Although familial occurrence is known, our case series is probably the 1st from the Indian subcontinent and warrants further research into the genetic mechanisms and possible ethnic differences of congenital upper intestinal atresia. The causation of sudden fetal demise in the absence of antecedent cord hemorrhage remains elusive.

  19. Kinetics of changes in the crypts of the jejunal mucosa of dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sunter, J. P.; Appleton, D. R.; Wright, N. A.; Watson, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    When symmetrical 1,2 dimethylhydrazine was administered to rats by weekly s.c. injection, 37% of the animals had developed small intestinal carcinomas after 21-27 weeks. These lesions were largely localized to duodenum and upper jejunum. At the same time there was a diffuse crypt hyperplasia in the jejunum which affected all the treated animals, not just those with neoplasms. This marked hyperplasia was preceded by a modest sustained crypt elongation which was seen soon after DMH injections began. In these hyperplastic jejunal crypts the absolute size of the proliferative compartment was increased, but the growth fraction calculated from labelling studies appeared to fall, probably by reduction in relative size of the proliferating population within the proliferative compartment. No convincing alteration in actual cell-cycle time was observed in the abnormal crypts. There was a slight (25%) increase in cell-production rate in the abnormal crypts. Images Fig. 1 PMID:656298

  20. The diagnostic value of the triple bubble sign in proximal jejunal atresia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Amole, A O D; Johnson, A W B R; Adesiyun, O A M

    2003-03-01

    Proximal jejunal atresia (PJA) is a common cause of intestinal obstruction in the newborn. Despite the need for an early surgical intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality, a timely identification is frequently precluded by the absence of specific clinical and investigative clues. Against the background of the limitations in making a timely diagnosis of PJA in a tropical setting, where opportunities for high-tech imaging tools are few, we report the diagnostic value of the "triple bubble" sign on the plain radiograph of a Nigerian infant. This radiologic finding led to an early diagnosis and ultimately a prompt surgical extirpation. The paper suggests that the presence of this sign should be a pointer to an early diagnosis of PJA.

  1. Prognostic indicators for horses with duodenitis-proximal jejunitis. 75 horses (1985-1989).

    PubMed

    Seahorn, T L; Cornick, J L; Cohen, N D

    1992-01-01

    The medical records of 75 horses with duodenitis-proximal jejunitis (DPJ) were reviewed. Ages, physical parameters, laboratory values, and treatment data were compared between horses surviving DPJ and horses not surviving DPJ (Table 1). Fifty of 75 horses (66.6%) survived. Sixty-six horses (88.0%) were managed with medical treatment alone and nine horses (12.0%) were managed with medical treatment plus surgical intervention. Using a logistic regression model, the association of each of the 19 physical and laboratory parameters with death was evaluated retrospectively in the 75 horses. Three parameters (anion gap, abdominal fluid total protein concentration, and volume of gastric fluid for the first 24 hours of hospitalization) were significantly associated with death by univariate analysis. Using a stepwise multiple logistic regression, two parameters remained significantly associated with death (P < 0.05), anion gap and abdominal fluid total protein concentration.

  2. Outcome after radial forearm, gastro-omental, and jejunal free flaps in oral and oropharyngeal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Smith, G I; Brennan, P A; Scott, P J; Ilankovan, V

    2002-08-01

    We undertook a retrospective study of the outcome of radial forearm, gastro-omental, and jejunal free tissue transfer for oral and oropharyngeal reconstruction in 30 patients (10 in each group). No significant differences were found between the type of free flap and the clinical outcome. More long-term difficulties were experienced with swallowing than with speech. The selection of free flap did not correlate with speech function (P=0.44), swallowing (P=0.68), or management of saliva (P=0.59). No significant difference was found between the patients' outcome and the site of resection of the tumour. There were more complications after gastro-omental flaps and this may influence the choice of reconstruction.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF THE GASTRO-JEJUNO-DUODENAL TRANSIT AFTER JEJUNAL POUCH INTERPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; GOMES, Célio Geraldo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background : The jejunal pouch interposition between the gastric body and the duodenum after the gastrectomy, although not frequent in the surgical practice today, has been successfully employed for the prevention and treatment of the postgastrectomy syndromes. In the latter, it is included the dumping syndrome, which affects 13-58% of the patients who undergo gastrectomy. Aim : Retrospective assessment of the results of this procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome. Methods : Fourty patients were selected and treatetd surgically for peptic ulcer, between 1965 and 1970. Of these, 29 underwent vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunalduodenostomy at the lesser curvature level, and the 11 remaining were submitted to vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunal-duodenostomy at the greater curvature level. The gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit was assessed in the immediate or late postoperative with the contrasted study of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The clinical evolution was assessed according to the Visick grade. Results : Of the 40 patients, 28 were followed with the contrast evaluation in the late postoperative. Among those who were followed until the first month (n=22), 20 (90%) had slow gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit and in two (10%) the transit was normal. Among those who were followed after the first month (n=16), three (19%) and 13 (81%) had slow and normal gastric emptying, respectively. None had the contrasted exam compatible with the dumping syndrome. Among the 40 patients, 22 underwent postoperative clinical evaluation. Of these, 19 (86,5%) had excellent and good results (Visick 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusions : The jejunal pouch interposition showed to be a very effective surgical procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome in gastrectomized patients. PMID:26734789

  4. Effect of genetically modified corn on the jejunal mucosa of adult male albino rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Marwa A A; Okasha, Ebtsam F

    2016-11-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants expressing insecticidal traits offer a new strategy for crop protection. GM-corn contains Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes producing delta endotoxins in the whole plant. Diet can influence the characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract altering its function and structure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GM-corn on the histological structure of jejunal mucosa of adult male albino rat using different histological, immunohistochemical and morphometrical methods. Twenty adult male albino rats were divided into two equal groups; control and GM-corn fed group administered with 30% GM-corn for 90days. Specimens from the jejunum were processed for light and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical study was carried out using antibody against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Different morphometrical parameters were assessed. Specimens from GM-corn fed group showed different forms of structural changes. Focal destruction and loss of the villi leaving denuded mucosal surface alternating with stratified areas were observed, while some crypts appeared totally disrupted. Congested blood capillaries and focal infiltration with mononuclear cells were detected. Significant upregulation of PCNA expression, increase in number of goblet cells and a significant increase in both villous height and crypt depth were detected. Marked ultrastructural changes of some enterocytes with focal loss of the microvillous border were observed. Some enterocytes had vacuolated cytoplasm, swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER). Some cells had dark irregular nuclei with abnormally clumped chromatin. It could be concluded that consumption of GM-corn profoundly alters the jejunal histological structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  6. Long-term functional speech and swallowing outcomes following pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sharp, David A; Theile, David R; Cook, Renee; Coman, William B

    2010-06-01

    Surgery for advanced cancer of the hypopharynx is a complex issue. Surgical intervention needs to take into consideration the resultant quality of life, in particular fundamental functional outcomes such as speech and swallowing. The aim of this study is to look at these long-term functional outcomes, following pharyngolaryngectomy and free jejunal reconstruction. A total of 19 patients, each undergoing a pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal graft was included. Each had a primary tracheoesophageal puncture for insertion of an indwelling voice prosthesis for speech. Functional outcomes of speech and swallow were assessed by a qualified speech pathologist. The impact on patients' quality of life was assessed under 4 domains: impairment, disability, handicap, and well being. The mean time period to follow-up was 4 years. Eighteen of the 19 patients were tolerating an oral diet, with one patient reliant on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeds. Seventeen patients (89%) were assessed as either having either no--or only a mild degree--of dysphagia, with no evidence of aspiration. Of the 19 patients, 15 were utilizing tracheosophageal speech for communication with 11 (73%) having no--or only a mild degree--of dsyphonia. Patients assessed as having no evidence of dysphagia or dysphonia also reported reduced levels of handicap and distress compared with patients experiencing any degree of dysphagia (P = 0.46) or dysphonia (P = 0.01). While rates of pharyngolaryngectomy increase, most patients have a poor long-term prognosis, heightening the significance of postoperative outcomes. The results of this study highlight the importance of speech and swallow outcomes, and demonstrate the direct correlation between these functions and resultant quality of life.

  7. Properties of Adenyl Cyclase from Human Jejunal Mucosa during Naturally Acquired Cholera and Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lincoln C.; Rohde, Jon E.; Sharp, Geoffrey W. G.

    1972-01-01

    The enterotoxin of Vibrio cholerae causes copious fluid production throughout the lenght of the small intestine. As this is thought to be mediated by stimulation of adenyl cyclase, a study has been made of the activity and properties of this enzyme in jejunal biopsy tissue taken from patients during the diarrheal phase of cholera and after recovery. Adenyl cyclase activity during cholera was increased more than twofold relative to the enzyme in convalescence. Under both conditions stimulation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and by fluoride was observed. The responsiveness to PGE1 was not altered in cholera; the total activity of the fluoride-stimulated enzyme was similar, a finding that suggests cholera toxin stimulates pre-existing enzyme in the intestinal cell. The enzymes during cholera and convalescence were similar in all other properties examined. Optimal Mg++ concentration was 10 mM; Mn++ at 5 mM stimulated the enzyme but could not replace Mg++ except in the presence of 10 mM fluoride. Calcium was markedly inhibitory at concentrations greater than 10-4 M. The pH optimum was 7.5 and the Michaelis constant (Km) for ATP concentration approximated 10-4 M. Thus the interaction of cholera toxin with human intestinal adenyl cyclase does not alter the basic properties of the enzyme. When biopsy specimens were maintained intact in oxygenated Ringer's solution at 0°C, no loss of activity was observed at 1½ and 3 hr. In contrast, when the cells were homogenized, rapid loss of activity, with a half-life of 90 min was seen even at 0°C. Consequently for comparative assays of human jejunal adenyl cyclase, strict control of the experimental conditions is required. It was under such conditions that a twofold increase in basal adenyl cyclase activity during cholera was observed. Images PMID:4335441

  8. In Vitro Exposure to Escherichia coli Decreases Ion Conductance in the Jejunal Epithelium of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha A.; Hess, Claudia; Khayal, Basel; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Hess, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections are very widespread in poultry. However, little is known about the interaction between the intestinal epithelium and E. coli in chickens. Therefore, the effects of avian non-pathogenic and avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) on the intestinal function of broiler chickens were investigated by measuring the electrogenic ion transport across the isolated jejunal mucosa. In addition, the intestinal epithelial responses to cholera toxin, histamine and carbamoylcholine (carbachol) were evaluated following an E. coli exposure. Jejunal tissues from 5-week-old broilers were exposed to 6×108 CFU/mL of either avian non-pathogenic E. coli IMT11322 (Ont:H16) or avian pathogenic E. coli IMT4529 (O24:H4) in Ussing chambers and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 1 h. After incubation with E. coli for 1 h, either cholera toxin (1 mg/L), histamine (100 μM) or carbachol (100 μM) were added to the incubation medium. Both strains of avian E. coli (non-pathogenic and pathogenic) reduced epithelial ion conductance (Gt) and short-circuit current (Isc). The decrease in ion conductance after exposure to avian pathogenic E. coli was, at least, partly reversed by the histamine or carbachol treatment. Serosal histamine application produced no significant changes in the Isc in any tissues. Only the uninfected control tissues responded significantly to carbachol with an increase of Isc, while the response to carbachol was blunted to non-significant values in infected tissues. Together, these data may explain why chickens rarely respond to intestinal infections with overt secretory diarrhea. Instead, the immediate response to intestinal E. coli infections appears to be a tightening of the epithelial barrier. PMID:24637645

  9. In vitro exposure to Escherichia coli decreases ion conductance in the jejunal epithelium of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Khayal, Basel; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Hess, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections are very widespread in poultry. However, little is known about the interaction between the intestinal epithelium and E. coli in chickens. Therefore, the effects of avian non-pathogenic and avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) on the intestinal function of broiler chickens were investigated by measuring the electrogenic ion transport across the isolated jejunal mucosa. In addition, the intestinal epithelial responses to cholera toxin, histamine and carbamoylcholine (carbachol) were evaluated following an E. coli exposure. Jejunal tissues from 5-week-old broilers were exposed to 6×10(8) CFU/mL of either avian non-pathogenic E. coli IMT11322 (Ont:H16) or avian pathogenic E. coli IMT4529 (O24:H4) in Ussing chambers and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 1 h. After incubation with E. coli for 1 h, either cholera toxin (1 mg/L), histamine (100 μM) or carbachol (100 μM) were added to the incubation medium. Both strains of avian E. coli (non-pathogenic and pathogenic) reduced epithelial ion conductance (Gt) and short-circuit current (Isc). The decrease in ion conductance after exposure to avian pathogenic E. coli was, at least, partly reversed by the histamine or carbachol treatment. Serosal histamine application produced no significant changes in the Isc in any tissues. Only the uninfected control tissues responded significantly to carbachol with an increase of Isc, while the response to carbachol was blunted to non-significant values in infected tissues. Together, these data may explain why chickens rarely respond to intestinal infections with overt secretory diarrhea. Instead, the immediate response to intestinal E. coli infections appears to be a tightening of the epithelial barrier.

  10. Effect of dietary fatty acids on jejunal and ileal oleic acid uptake by rat brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Prieto, R M; Stremmel, W; Sales, C; Tur, J A

    1996-04-18

    To test the effect of dietary fatty acids on fatty acid uptake, the influx kinetics of a representative long-chain fatty acid, 3H-oleic acid, in both the jejunum and ileum of rats has been studied using brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Animals were fed with semipurified diets containing 5 g fat/100 g diet, as corn oil (control group), safflower oil (unsaturated group) and coconut oil hydrogenated (saturated group). With increasing unbound oleate concentration in the medium, the three dietary groups showed saturable kinetics in both jejunal and ileal BBMV (controls: Vmax = 0.15 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 136 +/- 29.1 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 0.23 +/- 0.03 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 196 +/- 50.3 nmol for ileum; unsaturated: Vmax = 0.28 +/- 0.05 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 242.7 +/- 91.8 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 1.29 +/- 0.06 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 509.8 +/- 97.5 nmol for ileum; saturated: Vmax = 0.03 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 124.5 +/- 72.6 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 0.04 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein -1.5 min-1 and Km = 205.6 +/- 85.3 nmol for ileum). These results support the theory that feeding an isocaloric diet containing only unsaturated fatty acids enhanced oleic acid uptake, and feeding an isocaloric diet containing only saturated fatty acids decreased oleic acid uptake. The results obtained in the present work also show the adaptative ability of jejunum and ileum to the type of dietary fat.

  11. Liver steatosis in hypothalamic obese rats improves after duodeno-jejunal bypass by reduction in de novo lipogenesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Soares, Gabriela Moreira; Cantelli, Kathia Regina; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena Cristina; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Araújo, Allan Cezar Faria; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia

    2017-11-01

    Hypothalamic obesity is a severe condition without any effective therapy. Bariatric operations appear as an alternative treatment, but the effects of this procedure are controversial. We, herein, investigated the effects of duodeno-jejunal bypass (DJB) surgery upon the lipid profile and expression of genes and proteins, involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism, in hypothalamic obese (HyO) rats. During the first 5days of life, male newborn Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of monosodium glutamate [4g/kg body weight, HyO group] or saline (control, CTL group). At 90days of life, HyO rats were randomly submitted to DJB (HyO DJB) or Sham-operations (HyO Sham group). Six months after DJB, adiposity, hepatic steatosis and lipid metabolism were verified. HyO Sham rats were obese, hyperinsulinemic, insulin resistant and dyslipidemic. These rats had higher liver contents of trygliceride (TG) and presented disorganization of the hepatocyte structures, in association with higher hepatic contents of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FASN), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 mRNAs and protein. DJB surgery normalized insulinemia, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia in HyO rats. TG content in the liver and the hepatic microscopic structures were also normalized in HyO DJB rats, while the expressions of ACC and FASN proteins were decreased in the liver of these rodents. The DJB-induced amelioration in hepatic steatosis manifested as a late effect in HyO rats, and was partly associated with a downregulation in hepatic de novo lipogenesis processes, indicating that DJB protects against liver steatosis in hypothalamic obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mouldy feed, mycotoxins and Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli colonization associated with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli (STECs) cause serious human disease outbreaks through the consumption of contaminated foods. Cattle are considered the main reservoir but it is unclear how STECs affect mature animals. Neonatal calves are the susceptible age class for STEC infections causing severe enteritis. In an earlier study, we determined that mycotoxins and STECs were part of the disease complex for dairy cattle with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome (JHS). For STECs to play a role in the development of JHS, we hypothesized that STEC colonization should also be evident in beef cattle with JHS. Aggressive medical and surgical therapies are effective for JHS, but rely on early recognition of clinical signs for optimal outcomes suggesting that novel approaches must be developed for managing this disease. The main objective of this study was to confirm that mouldy feeds, mycotoxins and STEC colonization were associated with the development of JHS in beef cattle. Results Beef cattle developed JHS after consuming feed containing several types of mycotoxigenic fungi including Fusarium poae, F. verticillioides, F. sporotrichioides, Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus fumigatus. Mixtures of STECs colonized the mucosa in the hemorrhaged tissues of the cattle and no other pathogen was identified. The STECs expressed Stx1 and Stx2, but more significantly, Stxs were also present in the blood collected from the lumen of the hemorrhaged jejunum. Feed extracts containing mycotoxins were toxic to enterocytes and 0.1% of a prebiotic, Celmanax Trademark, removed the cytotoxicity in vitro. The inclusion of a prebiotic in the care program for symptomatic beef calves was associated with 69% recovery. Conclusions The current study confirmed that STECs and mycotoxins are part of the disease complex for JHS in beef cattle. Mycotoxigenic fungi are only relevant in that they produce the mycotoxins deposited in the feed. A prebiotic, Celmanax

  13. HLA-DR expression, natural killer cells and IgE containing cells in the jejunal mucosa of coeliac children.

    PubMed Central

    Arato, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M; Verkasalo, M; Klemola, T

    1987-01-01

    The expression of HLA-DR by surface and crypt epithelium and the numbers of cells of natural killer (NK) phenotype and of IgE containing cells were studied with monoclonal antisera using the peroxidase technique. We examined 48 jejunal biopsy specimens taken from 35 coeliac children before treatment (11), during gluten free diet (20) and after gluten challenge (17), and 13 control specimens. The luminal surface of the epithelial cells stained with HLA-DR antiserum in all specimens, but the cytoplasm of the surface epithelial cells took up the stain more frequently in the specimens from the controls (5/13) than those from the coeliacs (2/48) (p less than 0.01). In 21/28 specimens taken from coeliacs when on a gluten containing diet the crypt epithelium showed strong HLA-DR expression, while only 4/20 (p less than 0.01) specimens of coeliacs on a gluten free diet and 1/13 specimens of controls had similar staining. Among the intraepithelial lymphocytes no cells of NK phenotype were found in specimens from patients or controls. As compared with control specimens biopsy specimens from untreated coeliac patients showed smaller numbers of NK cells in the lamina propria. No difference was found in the numbers of IgE containing cells between the patients and controls. The strong expression of HLA-DR by the crypt epithelial cells in coeliac children on a normal diet suggest that these cells are involved in the presentation of the antigen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3311907

  14. L-Glutamate supplementation improves small intestinal architecture and enhances the expressions of jejunal mucosa amino acid receptors and transporters in weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng; Zhang, Bolin; Yu, Changning; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Sun, Hui; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2014-01-01

    L-Glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the small intestine. However, few studies have demonstrated the effect of L-glutamate on the intestinal architecture and signaling of amino acids in the small intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary L-glutamate supplementation on the intestinal architecture and expressions of jejunal mucosa amino acid receptors and transporters in weaning piglets. A total of 120 weaning piglets aged 35 ± 1 days with an average body weight at 8.91 ± 0.45 kg were randomly allocated to two treatments with six replicates of ten piglets each, fed with diets containing 1.21% alanine, or 2% L-glutamate. L-Glutamate supplementation increased the activity of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) in the jejunal mucosa. Also, the mRNA expression level of jejunal mucosa glutamine synthetase (GS) was increased by L-glutamate supplementation. The height of villi in duodenal and jejunal segments, and the relative mRNA expression of occludin and zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) in jejunal mucosa were increased by dietary L-glutamate supplementation. L-Glutamate supplementation increased plasma concentrations of glutamate, arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and threonine. L-Glutamate supplementation also increased the relative mRNA expression of the jejunal mucosa Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR), metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4), and neutral amino acid transporter B(0)-like (SLC1A5) in the jejunal mucosa. These findings suggest that dietary addition of 2% L-glutamate improves the intestinal integrity and influences the expression of amino acid receptors and transporters in the jejunum of weaning, which is beneficial for the improvement of jejunal nutrients for digestion and absorption.

  15. Ischaemic jejunal vasculitis during treatment with pegylated interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin for hepatitis C virus related cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Pompili, M; Pizzolante, F; Larocca, L M; Covino, M; Rapaccini, G L; Gasbarrini, G

    2006-05-01

    A 53-year-old male with compensated cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A5) and mixed cryoglobulinaemia (cryocrit: 2.0%), both hepatitis C virus-related, was treated with pegylated interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin. After three months of therapy, he developed segmental jejunal vasculitis requiring emergency resection of an ischaemic intestinal loop 60cm long. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen revealed signs of ischaemic injury with haemorrhagic infarction due to arteritis and arterial occlusion. The postoperative course was complicated by progressive liver and renal failure that led to the patient's death six months after surgery. To our knowledge, ischaemic jejunal vasculitis has never been reported during interferon therapy, but the latter treatment may have played causative roles.

  16. Isolation of Cokeromyces recurvatus, initially misidentified as Coccidioides immitis, from peritoneal fluid in a cat with jejunal perforation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Cheri; Sutton, Deanna A; Matise, Ilze; Kirchhof, Nicole; Libal, Melissa C

    2005-07-01

    Cokeromyces recurvatus, a zygomycete, was isolated by fungal culture from the peritoneal fluid of a cat with jejunal perforation secondary to intestinal lymphosarcoma. This organism has not been recovered previously from a veterinary patient. The tissue form of C. recurvatus is morphologically similar to those of Coccidioides immitis and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and may be misdiagnosed as 1 of these organisms on the basis of cytologic or histopathologic specimens, particularly in geographic regions where these organisms are not endemic.

  17. HIV enteropathy: crypt stem and transit cell hyperproliferation induces villous atrophy in HIV/Microsporidia-infected jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Batman, Philip A; Kotler, Donald P; Kapembwa, Moses S; Booth, Dawn; Potten, Christopher S; Orenstein, Jan M; Scally, Andrew J; Griffin, George E

    2007-02-19

    The study aim was to analyse the kinetics of stem and transit cells in the crypts of jejunal mucosa infected with HIV and Microsporidia. The size of villi, depth of crypts and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were measured using morphometric techniques. The surface area/volume ratio (S/V) of jejunal biopsies was estimated under light microscopy using a Weibel graticule. Crypt length was measured by counting enterocytes along the crypt side from the base to the villus junction, and the mean crypt length was calculated. The S/V and crypt lengths of the jejunal mucosa of 21 HIV and Microsporidia-infected test cases were compared with 14 control cases. The labelling index in relation to the crypt cell position of 10 of the test cases was analysed compared with 13 control cases. Differences were found in the S/V and crypt length, and there was a negative correlation between S/V and crypt length in test and control cases combined. Cell labelling indices fell into low and high proliferation groups. There were significant differences in labelling indices between low proliferation test cases and controls, between high proliferation test cases and controls, and between high and low proliferation test cases. Villous atrophy induced by HIV and Microsporidia is attributed to crypt cell hyperplasia and the encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. These infections induce crypt hypertrophy by stimulating cell mitosis predominantly in transit cells but also in stem cells. Increased stem cell proliferation occurs only in high proliferation cases.

  18. Enhanced jejunal production of antibodies to Klebsiella and other Enterobacteria in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Maki-Ikola, O.; Hallgren, R.; Kanerud, L.; Feltelius, N.; Knutsson, L.; Granfors, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To measure gut immunity directly in jejunal fluid in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Antibodies against three different Enterobacterias were measured in jejunal perfusion fluids (collected by a double balloon perfusion device) of 19 patients with AS, 14 patients with RA, and 22 healthy controls using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.
RESULTS—The AS patients had significantly increased jejunal fluid concentrations of IgM, IgG, and IgA class antibodies against Klebsiella pneumoniae, and IgM and IgA class antibodies against Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis compared with healthy controls. When compared with the patients with RA, the AS patients had higher concentrations of IgA and IgG class antibodies only against K pneumoniae. The RA patients had higher IgM class antibody concentrations against all three studied Enterobacterias, when compared with the healthy controls, suggesting an enhanced mucosal immune response in these patients. A three month treatment with sulphasalazine did not decrease enterobacterial antibody concentrations in the 10 patients with AS.
CONCLUSION—There is strong direct evidence for an abnormal mucosal humoral immune response particularly to K pneumoniae in patients with AS.

 PMID:9486004

  19. Adenocarcinoma arising from jejunal ectopic pancreas mimicking peritoneal metastasis from colon cancer: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Shiomi, Akio; Kagawa, Hiroyasu; Yamakawa, Yushi; Numata, Masakatsu; Sugimoto, Shinya; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Sasaki, Keiko

    2015-12-01

    Adenocarcinoma arising from jejunal ectopic pancreas is very rare. We report a case of a 69-year-old female with adenocarcinoma arising from jejunal ectopic pancreas after resection of advanced colon cancer. She underwent right hemicolectomy for advanced ascending colon cancer (ypT3N0M0, stage IIA) after chemotherapy. Two and half years after colectomy, her tumor markers were elevated, and computed tomography revealed a mass measuring 20 × 20 mm in the small intestine, having an abnormal uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ((18)FDG-PET). Double-balloon enteroscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the jejunum, and histopathology of biopsy specimens from that lesion showed ectopic pancreas without malignancy. Therefore, peritoneal metastasis from colon cancer concomitant with ectopic pancreas or adenocarcinoma arising from ectopic pancreas was considered as a differential diagnosis. She underwent laparoscopic jejunectomy. Pathological examination revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma arising from jejunal ectopic pancreas, not peritoneal metastasis from colon cancer. Even if histopathology of the biopsy specimen shows ectopic pancreas without malignancy, adenocarcinoma arising from ectopic pancreas should be considered when the tumor markers are elevated or the lesion has an abnormal uptake of (18)FDG.

  20. Effect of dietary fiber on absorption of B-6 vitamers in a rat jejunal perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L B; Gregory, J F; Cerda, J J

    1983-09-01

    Previous research has indicated that dietary fiber may affect the absorption and utilization of certain nutrients. To determine the effect of certain fiber materials on the absorption of B-6 vitamers, jejunal segments from young male adult rats were perfused in situ with a control solution containing 0.02 mM pyridoxine (PN), 0.02 mM pyridoxal (PL), and 0.02 mM pyridoxamine (PM), followed by a test solution containing the same vitamin B-6 mixture and one of five fiber-rich test materials (cellulose, pectin, lignin, homogenized fresh carrot, or carrot homogenized after 10 min boiling) added at a concentration of 1-3%. The mean absorption rates of PL, PN, and PM from the control solution were, respectively, 3.66 +/- 0.23, 2.06 +/- 0.23, and 1.74 +/- 0.37 nmole/min/20 cm jejunal segment. There were no significant differences between the absorption rates of B-6 vitamers from control and test solutions containing cellulose, pectin, and lignin. The absorption rates of PM and PL were significantly depressed (P less than 0.05 and P less than 0.01, respectively) by the presence of fresh or cooked carrot. The absorption rate of PN in presence of cooked carrot was also decreased relative to the control value but the difference was only marginally significant (P less than 0.10). When the concentration of fresh carrot in the test solution was increased to 10% by weight and the perfusion rate was decreased from 1.91 to 0.49 ml/min in a second perfusion experiment, there was a significant increase in variability and the differences between absorption rates of the B-6 vitamers in control and test solutions were not statistically significant. The limited evidence of adverse effect of carrot on absorption of vitamin B-6 suggested the need for further clarification of the influence of dietary fiber in an unrefined state on the bioavailability of vitamin B-6.

  1. Formation of independently revascularized bowel segments using the rectus abdominis muscle flap: a rat model for jejunal prefabrication.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Chen, Hung-Chi; Wei, Fu-Chan; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Lan, Chyn-Tair; See, Lai-Chu; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2002-02-01

    Reconstruction of the pharyngoesophagus with free jejunal transfer is a major challenge when recipient neck vessels are absent because of previous surgery or irradiation. In such instances, jejunal transfer using a muscle flap as a "vascular carrier" may be a problem-solving alternative. Pretransfer vascularization of the jejunum is achieved by wrapping the muscle flap around the small bowel segment. After a short staging period, the mesenteric pedicle is divided and the bowel segment is transferred up to the neck based on its new blood supply. The objectives of this study were to develop an animal model for prefabricating independently revascularized jejunal segments using the rectus abdominis muscle flap and to determine the minimal time required for independent bowel survival. Twenty-four mature (500-g to 700-g) rats were divided into six experimental groups of four animals each. In each animal, a 1.5-cm segment of proximal jejunum was isolated on two jejunal arteries and wrapped with a superior pedicled rectus abdominis muscle flap. To determine the time of neovascular takeover, the mesenteric pedicles were ligated on postoperative day 2 (group I), day 3 (group II), day 4 (group III), day 5 (group IV), day 6 (group V), and day 7 (group VI). At the time of pedicle ligation, the composite flap was transposed to a new subcutaneous position. Viability of bowel was assessed according to gross appearance and histologic examination 48 hours after transfer. Complete survival of revascularized jejunum in 11 of 12 animals was obtained after pedicle ligation on postoperative day 5 and beyond (p < 0.0001, Fisher's exact test). These bowel segments demonstrated luminal patency, intact pink mucosa, mucus production, and visible peristalsis. Histologic examination showed healthy intestinal epithelium and tissue integration along the serosa-muscle interphase. In contrast, pedicle ligation on day 4 and earlier resulted in varying degrees of bowel necrosis characterized by

  2. Effects of benzoic acid (VevoVitall®) on the performance and jejunal digestive physiology in young pigs.

    PubMed

    Diao, Hui; Gao, Zengbing; Yu, Bing; Zheng, Ping; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Huang, Zhiqing; Chen, Daiwen; Mao, Xiangbing

    2016-01-01

    As a organic acid, benzoic acid has become one of the most important alternatives for antibiotics, and its beneficial effect on performance in animals has been proven for a decade. However, knowledge of the effects of benzoic acid on jejunal digestive physiology, especially the antioxidant capacity and mucosal glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) concentrations is lacking. A total of 20 barrows [Duroc × (Yorkshire × Landrace)] with an average body weight (BW) of 18.75 ± 0.2 kg were used in a 14-d trial to determine the potential mechanisms of benzoic acid supplementation on the performance, nutrient digestibility and jejunal digestive physiology in young pigs. All pigs were randomly allotted to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 0 or 5000 mg/kg benzoic acid. Relative to the control, benzoic acid supplementation increased the average daily feed intake (ADFI), and average daily gain (ADG) in young pigs (P < 0.05), improved the apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), gross energy (GE) and crude ash (P < 0.05), and enhanced the activities of trypsin, lipase and amylase in the jejunum (P < 0.05). Similarly, relative to the control, supplementing benzoic acid in the diet resulted in a trend to reduce the pH values of the digesta (P = 0.06), decreased crypt depth and increased the villus height to crypt depth ratio (P < 0.05) in the jejunum of pigs. Finally, benzoic acid supplementation increased the mRNA expression and concentration of glucagon-like peptide 2 and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in the jejunal mucosa of young pigs (P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation with 5000 mg/kg benzoic acid improved the performance of young pigs through promoting nutrient digestion, improving jejunal antioxidant capacity, and maintaining the jejunal morphology in young pigs.

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus control and atherosclerosis prevention in a non-obese rat model using duodenal-jejunal bypass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Huang, Zhen; Ran, Wenhua; Liao, Gang; Zha, Lang; Wang, Ziwei

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent disease worldwide and during its conventional treatment, vascular complications remain unavoidable. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) is able to induce the remission of T2DM. However, studies of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), a modified procedure of GBP, are being carried out to investigate its ability to induce the remission of T2DM and protect the aorta from atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of DJB on the rate of T2DM remission and the prevention of atherosclerosis in the aorta in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes without obesity, and to explore the mechanism of DJB in protecting the aorta from atherosclerosis. A T2DM rat model was established with a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. Surgery was performed to analyze its effects on glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, inflammation and pathological changes. Furthermore, changes in c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKKβ) genes in the aorta following DJB surgery were examined. Levels of blood glucose, lipids, insulin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were significantly elevated in the T2DM diabetic model compared with the non-diabetic control. A gradual recovery was observed in the DJB group following surgery. Foam cells and atherosclerotic plaques appeared in the ascending aortic tissue in the sham-surgery and T2DM groups, whereas only slight lesions were observed in the DJB group. The expression levels of JNK1 and IKKβ genes in the aorta were significantly increased in the sham-operated and T2DM groups compared with those in the DJB and normal control groups. The present study demonstrated that DJB caused remission of T2DM without weight loss in non-obese rats. Thus, DJB may delay or prevent the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis in the aorta and this may occur through the JNK1 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways.

  4. Viable intestinal passage of a canine jejunal commensal strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yurui; Saris, Per E J

    2014-10-01

    The strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 with immunomodulatory properties was previously found dominant in the jejunal chyme of four dogs, and the novel surface layer protein of LAB20 suggested its competitive colonization in canine gut. To evaluate the persistence and survival of LAB20 in healthy dogs, LAB20 was fed to five healthy pet dogs for 3 days, at a dosage of 10(8) CFU daily as fermented milk supplement. The fecal samples, from 1 day prior to feeding, three continuous feeding days, and on day 5, 7, 14, and 21, were collected for strain-specific detection of LAB20 using real-time PCR. We found that LAB20 count was significantly increased in dog fecal samples at the second feeding day, but rapidly decreased after feeding ceased. The fecal samples from prior to feeding, during feeding, and post-cessation days were plated onto mLBS7 agar, from where LAB20 was recovered and distinguishable from other fecal lactobacilli based on its colony morphotype. Using strain-specific PCR detection, the colonies were further verified as LAB20 indicating that LAB20 can survive through the passage of the canine intestine. This study suggested that canine-derived strain LAB20 maintained at high numbers during feeding, viably transited through the dog gut, and could be identified based on its colony morphotype.

  5. Jejunal T Cell Inflammation in Human Obesity Correlates with Decreased Enterocyte Insulin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Sepulveda, Milena; Touch, Sothea; Mendes-Sá, Carla; André, Sébastien; Poitou, Christine; Allatif, Omran; Cotillard, Aurélie; Fohrer-Ting, Hélène; Hubert, Edwige-Ludiwyne; Remark, Romain; Genser, Laurent; Tordjman, Joan; Garbin, Kevin; Osinski, Céline; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Leturque, Armelle; Clément, Karine; Brot-Laroche, Edith

    2015-07-07

    In obesity, insulin resistance is linked to inflammation in several tissues. Although the gut is a very large lymphoid tissue, inflammation in the absorptive small intestine, the jejunum, where insulin regulates lipid and sugar absorption is unknown. We analyzed jejunal samples of 185 obese subjects stratified in three metabolic groups: without comorbidity, suffering from obesity-related comorbidity, and diabetic, versus 33 lean controls. Obesity increased both mucosa surface due to lower cell apoptosis and innate and adaptive immune cell populations. The preferential CD8αβ T cell location in epithelium over lamina propria appears a hallmark of obesity. Cytokine secretion by T cells from obese, but not lean, subjects blunted insulin signaling in enterocytes relevant to apical GLUT2 mislocation. Statistical links between T cell densities and BMI, NAFLD, or lipid metabolism suggest tissue crosstalk. Obesity triggers T-cell-mediated inflammation and enterocyte insulin resistance in the jejunum with potential broader systemic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Morphometric study of the jejunal mucosa in various childhood enteropathies with special reference to intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuitunen, P; Kosnai, I; Savilahti, E

    1982-01-01

    A morphometric study of intraepithelial (IE) lymphocytes per 100 epithelial cells, villous heights (VH), crypt depths (CrD), and epithelial cell heights (ECH) was made on jejunal specimens of 17 patients with cow's-milk allergy (CMA), 52 with celiac disease (CD), seven with congenital lactase deficiency (CLD), four with acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE), four with giardiasis, and four with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). The aim of this study was to investigate how the morphometric parameters correlate with each other. All cases with CMA, CD, and DH had villous atrophy with hyperplasia of the crypts, both signs being more severe in cases with CD and DH than with CMA. IE lymphocyte infiltration was more intense in specimens of patients with CD and DH (mean 76.0), than those with CMA (mean 62.5). The ECH were equally reduced in patients with CD and CMA. In a follow-up specimen at 1 year and 10 months for CD patients and 11 months for CMA patients the inflammation was reduced, and the VH were increased but still differed from the controls. In CLD cases the morphology of the villi and crypts of the jejunum was quite normal, with no IE lymphocyte infiltration; ECH were reduced. Minor morphological changes were seen in the specimens of patients with AE and giardiasis. In the whole study group there was a significant linear correlation, either positive or negative, between all variables measured (IE lymphocytes, VH, CrD, and ECH).

  7. Nicotinic acid inhibits enterotoxin-induced jejunal secretion in the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Kapitany, R A; Scoot, A

    1981-01-01

    The use of nicotinic acid for preventing intestinal secretion caused by cholera toxin and by the heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli has been investigated in the weanling pig. Secretory effects were measured in ligated jejunal loops of halothane-anesthetized pigs by dilution of a nonabsorbable marker added to the loop fluid. Different routes of administration and different initial pH values for nicotinate solutions were studied to determine optimal conditions for secretory inhibition. The neutral sodium salt of nicotinic acid had no significant antisecretory activity under any conditions used in these trials. Inhibition of secretion was most effective with partly neutralized nicotinic acid at pH 4.5 added directly to loops containing enterotoxin. Net fluid secretion induced by cholera toxin or heat-stable enterotoxin of E. coli was prevented by this treatment. Reversal of secretion was not accompanied by any measurable changes in cyclic nucleotide concentration in intestinal mucosa. Nicotinic acid antagonism of a secretory step common to cholera toxin and heat-stable enterotoxin of E. coli but subsequent to cyclic nucleotide involvement is indicated by these data. PMID:7020893

  8. Key details of the duodenal-jejunal bypass in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-Ou; Zhou, Li-Hong; Cheng, Su-Jun; Song, Chun; Song, Chun-Fang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate which surgical techniques and perioperative regimens yielded the best survival rates for diabetic rats undergoing gastric bypass. METHODS: We performed Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with reserved gastric volume, a procedure in which gastrointestinal continuity was reestablished while excluding the entire duodenum and proximal jejunal loop. We observed the procedural success rate, long-term survival, and histopathological sequelae associated with a number of technical modifications. These included: use of anatomical markers to precisely identify Treitz’s ligament; careful dissection along surgical planes; careful attention to the choice of regional transection sites; reconstruction using full-thickness anastomoses; use of a minimally invasive procedure with prohemostatic pretreatment and hemorrhage control; prevention of hypothermic damage; reduction in the length of the procedure; and accelerated surgical recovery using fast-track surgical modalities such as perioperative permissive underfeeding and goal-directed volume therapy. RESULTS: The series of modifications we adopted reduced operation time from 110.02 ± 12.34 min to 78.39 ± 7.26 min (P < 0.01), and the procedural success rate increased from 43.3% (13/30) to 90% (18/20) (P < 0.01), with a long-term survival of 83.3% (15/18) (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Using a number of fast-track and damage control surgical techniques, we have successfully established a stable model of gastric bypass in diabetic rats. PMID:22174553

  9. Identification of APC gene mutations in jejunal carcinomas from a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Amano, Kunihiko; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Iwama, Takeo; Higashi, Morihiro; Tamaru, Junichi

    2013-09-01

    Jejunal carcinoma in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis has been rarely reported, and little is known about its association with genetic alterations of the APC gene. A 52-year-old woman with familial adenomatous polyposis underwent palliative resection of the proximal jejunum because of two circumferential tumors associated with peritoneal carcinomatosis. A histological examination revealed that one tumor was a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and that the other was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with adenomatous components. The patient did not respond to standard chemotherapy and died of disseminated disease 8 months after surgery. A genetic analysis of the APC gene identified somatic mutations in each tumor (c.4450delAG and p.R1450X) in addition to the germline mutation (c.3984del5), all of which form stop codons, resulting in truncated APC products. This report is the first description of how a second hit to the APC gene can be involved in carcinogenesis of the jejunum in familial adenomatous polyposis.

  10. The isolation of Salmonella from jejunal and caecal lymph nodes of slaughtered animals.

    PubMed

    Moo, D; O'Boyle, D; Mathers, W; Frost, A J

    1980-04-01

    One jejunal and one caecal lymph node were sampled from each of 50 cows, 40 yearling cattle, 25 sheep, 20 lambs and 45 pigs after slaughter. Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus, all organisms which cause food poisoning in man, were sought by direct plating methods. The samples were also enriched and cultured for Salmonella. Organisms were cultured from 208 (58%) of the 360 lymph nodes; aerobic plate counts yielded up to 25,000 organisms per gram of tissue, although from most infected samples less than 1000 organisms per gram were cultured. Salmonella was isolated directly from 5% of samples, with counts up to 1,500 per gram. After enrichment Salmonella was isolated from nodes taken from 15 cows, 2 yearling cattle, one sheep and 8 pigs. Cl. perfringens was isolated from the caecal nodes of 2 yearling cattle and 2 pigs; S. aureus was not isolated from any sample. It was concluded that mesenteric lymph nodes may be a significant reservoir of Salmonella for transfer to meat and meat products.

  11. Barber Pole Sign in CT Angiography, Adult Presentation of Midgut Malrotation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garcelan-Trigo, Juan Arsenio; Tello-Moreno, Manuel; Rabaza-Espigares, Manuel Jesus; Talavera-Martinez, Ildefonso

    2015-01-01

    Adult midgut volvulus is a challenging diagnosis because of its low incidence and nonspecific symptoms. Diagnostic delay and long-term complaints are frequent in this clinical scenario. We reported a patient referred to our diagnostic imaging unit with intermittent abdominal pain, bloating and episodic vomiting for several years. He underwent barium gastrointestinal transit and abdominal ultrasound, which revealed severe gastric dilatation, food retention and slow transit until a depressed duodenojejunal flexure, with malrotation of the midgut and jejunal loops being located in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography angiography was performed, showing rotation of the small intestine around the mesentery root, suggestive of midgut malrotation. In addition, an abnormal twisted disposition of superior mesenteric artery with corkscrew appearance was seen, shaping the pole-barber sign which was evident in volume rendering three-dimensional reconstructions. The patient underwent scheduled surgical treatment without any complication and had good outcome after hospital discharge and follow-up. Computed tomography plays an important role in evaluation of adult midgut volvulus. In addition, angiographic reconstructions can help us to assess the anatomic disposition of mesenteric vascular supply. Both of these assessments are useful in preoperative management. PMID:26557278

  12. Ruptured mesenteric cyst: a rare presentation after trauma.

    PubMed

    Ekçi, Baki; Ayan, Fadil; Gürses, Bengi

    2007-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare intraabdominal benign cystic lesions. These lesions are most commonly located in the ileal mesentery, without any sex predilection. Mesenteric cysts may be totally asymptomatic and discovered incidentally during routine radiologic examinations. Chronic abdominal pain or acute abdomen may be accompanying to these lesions. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are valuable in the diagnosis. Rarely, these lesions may be presented with rupture after trauma. We present a patient with a ruptured ileal mesenteric cyst due to a blunt abdominal trauma and diagnosed by emergency laparotomy.

  13. Coeliac disease presenting with intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, D J; Sciberras, C M; Whitwell, H

    1984-01-01

    A 22 year old woman presenting with recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction is reported. Jejunal biopsy showed subtotal villous atrophy which improved markedly during a period of total parenteral nutrition and with steroid treatment. It did not relapse on a gluten free diet. The reasons why this patient represents a case of coeliac disease with secondary pseudo-obstruction, rather than primary intestinal pseudo-obstruction with secondary bacterial overgrowth, is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6547920

  14. Changes in glycemic control and body weight after explantation of the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner.

    PubMed

    Betzel, Bark; Koehestanie, Parviez; Homan, Jens; Aarts, Edo O; Janssen, Ignace M C; de Boer, Hans; Wahab, Peter J; Groenen, Marcel J M; Berends, Frits J

    2017-02-01

    The duodenal-jejunal bypass liner (DJBL) is an endoscopic device that induces weight loss and improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of DJBL explantation on glycemic control and body weight. This prospective, observational study included only patients with T2DM who had the DJBL implanted for at least 6 months and had a follow-up of at least 12 months after explantation. The primary endpoints were changes in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and body weight during the 12 months after explantation. Secondary endpoints were changes in fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, and plasma lipid levels. In total, 59 patients completed the 12-month follow-up after explantation. During this period body weight increased by 5.6 (standard deviation, 6.4) kg (P < .001) and HbA1c rose from 65 (SD 17) to 70 (SD 20) mmol/mol (P < .001). However, body weight remained 8.0 (SD 8.6) kg (P < .001) lower than before implantation, that is, corresponding to a net total body weight loss of 7.4% (SD 7.6) (P < .001). Although HbA1c was significantly higher 12 months after explantation compared with baseline and the mean daily dose of insulin used was comparable, the number of patients on insulin remained significantly lower than before implantation. Explantation of the DJBL is associated with weight gain and worsening of glycemic control, although some beneficial effects remained detectable 12 months after explantation. A change in strategy is needed to preserve the beneficial effects of DJBL treatment. (Clinical trial registration number: 746∖100111.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Salmonella on spatial-temporal processes of jejunal development in chickens.

    PubMed

    Schokker, Dirkjan; Smits, Mari A; Hoekman, Arjan J W; Parmentier, Henk K; Rebel, Johanna M J

    2010-10-01

    To study effects of Salmonella enteritidis on morphological and functional changes in chicken jejunal development, we analysed gene expression profiles at seven points post-infection in 1-21 day-old broiler chickens. Nine clusters with different gene expression patterns were identified, and the genes in each cluster were further analyzed by a functional annotation clustering method (DAVID). Functional and morphological developmental processes dominated in all the nine clusters. Salmonella infection caused delays in several intestinal-morphological processes, whereas functional metabolic processes occurred in a similar spatial-temporal frame compared to normal jejunum development. A clear difference between normal developing- and Salmonella disturbed jejunum was the higher expression of genes involved in cell turn-over at early stages in the infected jejunum. Surprisingly, we found no clustered immune related processes in the infected birds. To compare the immunological processes between control and Salmonella infected chickens, the gene expression data was superimposed on known immunological KEGG pathways. Furthermore an in-depth analysis on the immune gene level was performed. As expected, we did find immunological processes in the Salmonella infected jejunum. Several of these processes could be verified by immunohistochemistry measurements of different immunological cell types. However, the well-ordered spatial-temporal development of the immune system, as observed in control non-infected animals, was completely abolished in the infected animals. Several immunological processes started much earlier in time, whereas other processes are disorganised. These data indicate that normal morphological and immunological development of jejunum is changed dramatically by a disturbance due to Salmonella infection. Due to the disturbance, the well-organized spatial-temporal development of morphological processes are delayed, those of the immunological development are

  16. Construction of cDNA library from intestine, mesentery and coelomocyte of Apostichopus japonicus Selenka infected with Vibrio sp. and a preliminary analysis of immunity-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongzhan; Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Xiuqin; Cai, Yimei

    2012-06-01

    The aquaculture of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata, Holothuroidea) has grown rapidly during recent years and has become an important sector of the marine industry in Northern China. However, with the rapid growth of the industry and the use of non-standard culture techniques, epidemic diseases of A. japonicus now pose increasing problems to the industry. To screen the genes with stress response to bacterial infection in sea cucumber at a genome wide level, we constructed a cDNA library from A. japonicus Selenka (Aspidochirotida: Stichopodidae) after infecting them with Vibrio sp. for 48 h. Total RNA was extracted from the intestine, mesentery and coelomocyte of infected sea cucumber using Trizol and mRNA was isolated by Oligotex mRNA Kits. The ligated cDNAs were transformed into DH5α, and a library of 3.24×105 clones (3.24×105 cfu mL-1) was obtained with the sizes of inserted fragments ranging from 0.8 to 2.5 kb. Sequencing the cDNA clones resulted in a total of 1106 ESTs that passed the quality control. BlastX and BlastN searches have identified 168 (31.5%) ESTs sharing significant homology with known sequences in NCBI protein or nucleotide databases. Among a panel of 25 putative immunity-related genes, serum lectin isoform, complement component 3, complement component 3-like genes were further studied by real-time PCR and they all increased more than 5 fold in response to Vibrio sp. challenge. Our library provides a valuable molecular tool for future study of invertebrate immunity against bacterial infection and our gene expression data indicates the importance of the immune system in the evolution and development of sea cucumber.

  17. Ectopic bone formation by marrow stromal osteoblast transplantation using poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams implanted into the rat mesentery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishaug-Riley, S. L.; Crane, G. M.; Gurlek, A.; Miller, M. J.; Yasko, A. W.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Porous biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams were seeded with rat marrow stromal cells and implanted into the rat mesentery to investigate in vivo bone formation at an ectopic site. Cells were seeded at a density of 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 onto polymer foams having pore sizes ranging from either 150 to 300 to 710 microns and cultured for 7 days in vitro prior to implantation. The polymer/cell constructs were harvested after 1, 7, 28, or 49 days in vivo and processed for histology and gel permeation chromatography. Visual observation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and von Kossa-stained sections revealed the formation of mineralized bonelike tissue in the constructs within 7 days postimplantation. Ingrowth of vascular tissue was also found adjacent to the islands of bone, supplying the necessary metabolic requirements to the newly formed tissue. Mineralization and bone tissue formation were investigated by histomorphometry. The average penetration depth of mineralized tissue in the construct ranged from 190 +/- 50 microns for foams with 500-710-microns pores to 370 +/- 160 microns for foams with 150-300-microns pores after 49 days in vivo. The mineralized bone volume per surface area and total bone volume per surface area had maximal values of 0.28 +/- 0.21 mm (500-710-microns pore size, day 28) and 0.038 +/- 0.024 mm (150-300-microns, day 28), respectively. As much as 11% of the foam volume penetrated by bone tissue was filled with mineralized tissue. No significant trends over time were observed for any of the measured values (penetration depth, bone volume/surface area, or percent mineralized bone volume). These results suggest the feasibility of bone formation by osteoblast transplantation in an orthotopic site where not only bone formation from transplanted cells but also ingrowth from adjacent bone may occur.

  18. Ectopic bone formation by marrow stromal osteoblast transplantation using poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams implanted into the rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Ishaug-Riley, S L; Crane, G M; Gurlek, A; Miller, M J; Yasko, A W; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    1997-07-01

    Porous biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams were seeded with rat marrow stromal cells and implanted into the rat mesentery to investigate in vivo bone formation at an ectopic site. Cells were seeded at a density of 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 onto polymer foams having pore sizes ranging from either 150 to 300 to 710 microns and cultured for 7 days in vitro prior to implantation. The polymer/cell constructs were harvested after 1, 7, 28, or 49 days in vivo and processed for histology and gel permeation chromatography. Visual observation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and von Kossa-stained sections revealed the formation of mineralized bonelike tissue in the constructs within 7 days postimplantation. Ingrowth of vascular tissue was also found adjacent to the islands of bone, supplying the necessary metabolic requirements to the newly formed tissue. Mineralization and bone tissue formation were investigated by histomorphometry. The average penetration depth of mineralized tissue in the construct ranged from 190 +/- 50 microns for foams with 500-710-microns pores to 370 +/- 160 microns for foams with 150-300-microns pores after 49 days in vivo. The mineralized bone volume per surface area and total bone volume per surface area had maximal values of 0.28 +/- 0.21 mm (500-710-microns pore size, day 28) and 0.038 +/- 0.024 mm (150-300-microns, day 28), respectively. As much as 11% of the foam volume penetrated by bone tissue was filled with mineralized tissue. No significant trends over time were observed for any of the measured values (penetration depth, bone volume/surface area, or percent mineralized bone volume). These results suggest the feasibility of bone formation by osteoblast transplantation in an orthotopic site where not only bone formation from transplanted cells but also ingrowth from adjacent bone may occur.

  19. Jejunal Brush Border Microvillous Alterations in Giardia muris-Infected Mice: Role of T Lymphocytes and Interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K. G.-E.; Logan, M. R.; Klammer, G. M.; Teoh, D. A.; Buret, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal colonization with the protozoan Giardia causes diffuse brush border microvillous alterations and disaccharidase deficiencies, which in turn are responsible for intestinal malabsorption and maldigestion. The role of T cells and/or cytokines in the pathogenesis of Giardia-induced microvillous injury remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the role of T cells and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brush border pathophysiology of acute murine giardiasis in vivo. Athymic nude (nu−/nu−) CD-1 mice and isogenic immunocompetent (nu+/nu+) CD-1 mice (4 weeks old) received an axenic Giardia muris trophozoite inoculum or vehicle (control) via orogastric gavage. Weight gain and food intake were assessed daily. On day 6, segments of jejunum were assessed for parasite load, brush border ultrastructure, IL-6 content, maltase and sucrase activities, villus-crypt architecture, and intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) infiltration. Despite similar parasitic loads on day 6, infected immunocompetent animals, but not infected nude mice, showed a diffuse loss of brush border microvillous surface area, which was correlated with a significant reduction in maltase and sucrase activities and a decrease in jejunal IL-6 concentration. In both athymic control and infected mice, jejunal brush border surface area and disaccharidases were high, but levels of tissue IL-6 were low and comparable to the concentration measured in immunocompetent infected animals. In both immunocompetent and nude mice, infection caused a small but significant increase in the numbers of IELs. These findings suggest that the enterocyte brush border injury and malfunction seen in giardiasis is, at least in part, mediated by thymus-derived T lymphocytes and that suppressed jejunal IL-6 does not necessarily accompany microvillous shortening. PMID:10816492

  20. Jejunal free flap for reconstruction of pharyngeal defects in patients with head and neck cancer-the Birmingham experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel J; Parmar, Satyesh; Praveen, Prav; Martin, Tim; Pracy, Paul; Jennings, Chris; Simms, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively audited operative complications, success of flaps, and speech and swallowing outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer who had reconstruction with jejunal free tissue transfer to the pharynx. A total of 104 patients had jejunal free flaps between 1987 and 2009 at University Hospital, Birmingham. Management was by a multidisciplinary team, and the same vascular surgeon did all the anastomoses. We investigated the relations between patients, operative factors, and postoperative complications, and noted the ischaemic time of the flaps and coexisting conditions of the patients. Outcomes measured included initial and final survival rates of flaps, donor and recipient site complications, and speech and swallowing outcomes on discharge and up to 2 years postoperatively. Of the 104 patients, 14 (13%) had initial flap complications but overall flap survival was 97%. A total of 11 (11%) patients developed a fistula at a mean of 15 days postoperatively and 11 (11%) had minor donor site complications. A total of 95 (91%) were able to resume oral diet on discharge. Of the 44 who were followed up on discharge, 32 (73%) were able to maintain oral intake at 2 years and 31 (70%) could use their voice in everyday situations. The jejunal free flap enables the tumour to be removed, and reconstruction and restoration of function to be done in a single operation using tissue that is versatile. The operation is associated with low morbidity at the donor and recipient sites, and results in good speech and swallowing outcomes. The flap can also be used to reconstruct pharyngolaryngeal defects.

  1. Indomethacin decreases jejunal fluid secretion in addition to luminal release of prostaglandin E2 in patients with acute cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Van Loon, F P; Rabbani, G H; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Human cholera is associated with an increased luminal release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), but whether inhibition of increased PGE2 synthesis will reduce or control intestinal secretion is uncertain. 'Steady state' perfusions (10 ml/minute) in 12 patients with acute cholera, and repeat perfusions in nine of these patients during the convalescent phase were therefore performed using the triple lumen technique. The proximal jejunum was perfused with isotonic saline containing sodium-sulphobromophthalein as a non-absorbable marker. After intravenous administration of indomethacin (1.0 mg/kg) the jejunal net transfer of fluid and the jejunal flow rate of PGE2 were determined in 30 minute periods for 120 minutes after a 120 minute control period. Indomethacin decreased net fluid secretion (2.1 (0.3-4.2) v 4.5 (2.5-8.4) ml/hour x cm; medians, Q50 ranges, p less than 0.01) and the jejunal flow rate of PGE2 (1.5 (1.2-2.7) v 2.2 (1.4-4.9) ng/minute, p less than 0.05). The results of similar perfusion studies in 22 patients with acute cholera, used to establish the spontaneous time related change in fluid secretion, showed no significant change in net fluid transfer (3.5 (2.2-6.2) to 3.5 (2.6-11.6) ml/hour x cm, p greater than 0.25) over 240 minutes. These data provide further evidence in favour of the hypothesis that prostaglandins have a role in the cholera toxin induced intestinal fluid secretion in man. PMID:1612480

  2. Diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: an organic disorder with structural abnormalities in the jejunal epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Cristina; Lobo, Beatriz; Pigrau, Marc; Ramos, Laura; González-Castro, Ana Maria; Alonso, Carmen; Guilarte, Mar; Guilá, Meritxell; de Torres, Ines; Azpiroz, Fernando; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2013-08-01

    Recently, the authors demonstrated altered gene expression in the jejunal mucosa of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients (IBS-D); specifically, the authors showed that genes related to mast cells and the intercellular apical junction complex (AJC) were expressed differently than in healthy subjects. The aim of the authors here was to determine whether these alterations are associated with structural abnormalities in AJC and their relationship with mast cell activation and IBS-D clinical manifestations. A clinical assessment and a jejunal biopsy were obtained in IBS-D patients (n=45) and healthy subjects (n=30). Mucosal mast cell number and activation were determined by quantifying CD117(+) cells/hpf and tryptase expression, respectively. Expression and distribution of AJC specific proteins were evaluated by western blot and confocal microscopy. AJC ultrastructure was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Compared with healthy subjects, IBS-D patients exhibited: (a) increased mast cell counts and activation; (b) increased protein expression of claudin-2, reduced occludin phosphorylation and enhanced redistribution from the membrane to the cytoplasm; and (c) increased myosin kinase expression, reduced myosin phosphatase and, consequently, enhanced phosphorylation of myosin. These molecular alterations were associated with ultrastructural abnormalities at the AJC, specifically, perijunctional cytoskeleton condensation and enlarged apical intercellular distance. Moreover, AJC structural alterations positively correlated both with mast cell activation and clinical symptoms. The jejunal mucosa of IBS-D patients displays disrupted apical junctional complex integrity associated with mast cell activation and clinical manifestations. These results provide evidence for the organic nature of IBS-D, a heretofore model disease of functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  3. The effect of L-glutamine on salt and water absorption: a jejunal perfusion study in cholera in humans.

    PubMed

    van Loon, F P; Banik, A K; Nath, S K; Patra, F C; Wahed, M A; Darmaun, D; Desjeux, J F; Mahalanabis, D

    1996-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of an L-glutamine solution on jejunal salt and water absorption in cholera patients. A randomized double-blind jejunal perfusion study. International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. Nineteen adults with acute cholera. Perfusion of balanced salt solutions alternated with defined glucose salt solution and glutamine glucose salt or alanine glucose salt solutions. Net jejunal water and sodium secretion. Perfusion of glutamine in the presence of glucose significantly reduced net water secretion (JnetH2O = -2.6 +/- 1.3 ml/h/cm) and also reduced net sodium secretion (JnetNa = -213 +/- 153 mumol/h/cm). Similar results were observed during the perfusion of solutions that contained alanine in addition to glucose (JnetH2O = -4.2 +/- 1.1 ml/h/cm and JnetNa = -444 U +/- 142 mumol/h/cm, respectively) or glucose alone (JnetH2O = -4.3 +/- 1.7 ml/h/cm and JnetNa = -452 +/- 212 mumol/h/cm, respectively). In addition, a higher basal secretion was associated with a greater stimulation of water absorption (F = 17, P < 0.001). Glutamine in the presence of glucose significantly reduces net water secretion and also reduces sodium secretion; higher basal secretion is associated with greater water absorption. As glutamine is able to stimulate water absorption to the same degree as glucose and alanine, and because it has the theoretical advantage of providing fuel for the mucosa, the inclusion of glutamine as the sole substrate in oral rehydration solution warrants further study.

  4. Structural and functional evolution of jejunal allograft rejection in rats and the ameliorating effects of cyclosporine therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Madara, J L; Kirkman, R L

    1985-01-01

    We assessed the structural and functional evolution of small intestinal transplant rejection in a rat model by use of 1-micron section, electron microscopic, and in vitro electrophysiologic techniques to study jejunal mucosa 3, 6, and 9 d posttransplantation. The earliest structural abnormalities detected in jejunal loops transplanted from Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrids into Lewis rats occurred within 3 d posttransplantation and consisted of focal endothelial cell injury of the microvasculature and focal injury of crypt epithelial cells. Both alterations were associated with adjacent infiltration of large lymphoid cells, and both markedly progressed and became rather diffuse over the following 6 d. In contrast, villus absorptive cells were not markedly altered in structure until the 9th postoperative day. As compared with host jejuna, allograft jejunal epithelium demonstrated multiple functional abnormalities. Transepithelial resistance declined progressively by days 6 and 9 (both P less than 0.05), although baseline transepithelial spontaneous potential difference was only affected at day 9 (P less than 0.01). Stimulated absorption by allograft jejuna, as assessed by measuring electrical response to mucosal glucose, was not significantly diminished until day 9 (P less than 0.05). In contrast, stimulated secretion assessed by measurement of electrical response to serosal theophylline was diminished by day 6 (P less than .01). These data suggest that the earliest epithelial injury during rejection, as judged both structurally and functionally, occurs in the crypt and is paralleled by endothelial injury at the level of the microvasculature. Thus, the primary targets for rejection are most likely endothelial cells and crypt epithelial cells. In contrast, structural and functional impairment of villus epithelium is detectable only at substantially later times during rejection and are most likely secondary processes related to either ischemia produced by microvascular

  5. Transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, MIHAELA; JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; MOALE, MIHAI; CHIRA, ROMEO

    2017-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is one of the most common conditions encountered in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is extensive and identifying the underlying etiology can be challenging. We report a case of acute transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection in a patient with no cardiovascular risk factors or autoimmune diseases. Symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain usually treated in the surgical department. The patient had criteria for conservative treatment and rapidly recovered. We highlight a rare condition which should be taken into account for the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. PMID:28246505

  6. Management of a Septic Open Abdomen Patient with Spontaneous Jejunal Perforation after Emergent C/S with Confounding Factor of Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Özer, Mehmet; Yaylak, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the management of a septic Open Abdomen (OA) patient by the help of negative pressure therapy (NPT) and abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system in pregnant woman with spontaneous jejunal perforation after emergent cesarean section (C/S) with confounding factor of mild acute pancreatitis (AP). Presentation of Case. A 29-year-old and 34-week pregnant woman with AP underwent C/S. She was arrested after anesthesia induction and responded to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There were only ash-colored serosanguinous fluid within abdomen during C/S. After C/S, she was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) with vasopressor support. On postoperative 1st day, she underwent reoperation due to fecal fluid coming near the drainage. Leakage point could not be identified exactly and operation had to be deliberately abbreviated due to hemodynamic instability. NPT was applied. Two days later source control was provided by conversion of enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) to jejunostomy. ABRA was added and OA was closed. No hernia developed at 10-month follow-up period. Conclusion. NPT application in septic OA patient may gain time to patient until adequate source control could be achieved. Using ABRA in conjunction with NPT increases the fascial closure rate in infected OA patient. PMID:27006853

  7. Unusual presentation of a familiar pathology: chronic appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Sierakowski, Kyra; Pattichis, Andrew; Russell, Patrick; Wattchow, David

    2016-02-11

    We present a case of a man who experienced night sweats, abdominal pain and fever for over 3 months, with incomplete response to broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Although CT imaging was insufficient to identify the cause for his chronic abdominal pain, the abnormality of a 'misty mesentery' was crucial in guiding further investigation. The final diagnosis of chronic appendicitis was made through laparoscopic and pathological examination. This case highlights the utility of a collaborative diagnostic effort between disciplines. Chronic appendicitis can cause lingering abdominal pain. Early recognition and appropriate referral can save patients months and even years of unnecessary suffering. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Equine histoplasmosis presenting as a tumor in the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Jairo; Mackie, John T; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-09-01

    A 3.5-year-old Thoroughbred mare presented at necropsy with a large mass at the root of the mesentery and multiple smaller mesenteric masses. The mucosa of the small intestine contained numerous raised nodules. Histologic examination revealed severe granulomatous mesenteric lymphadenitis and enteritis. Epithelioid macrophages and multinucleated giant cells frequently contained numerous intracytoplasmic yeast organisms, which were strongly positive on immunohistochemical staining when using a polyclonal antibody against Histoplasma spp. A diagnosis of abdominal histoplasmosis was made based on the gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical findings.

  9. Long-segment, supercharged, pedicled jejunal flap for total esophageal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ascioti, Anthony J; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Miller, Michael J; Rice, David C; Swisher, Stephen G; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Roth, Jack A; Putnam, J B; Smythe, W Roy; Feig, Barry W; Mansfield, Paul F; Pisters, Peter W T; Torres, Marla T; Walsh, Garrett L

    2005-11-01

    Many patients with cancer have limited esophageal reconstruction options when the stomach is unavailable as a replacement conduit or when long-segment discontinuity exists. Jejunum has been used as an alternative conduit, both as a pedicled or free flap interposition; however, reports of this are usually limited to short-segment repairs. Microvascular augmentation of a pedicled jejunal flap allows creation of a longer conduit, making it possible to replace the entire esophagus with jejunum. Few reports describe this technique in patients with cancer. We report our initial experience with "supercharged" pedicled jejunum as an alternative conduit for total esophageal reconstruction. Review of a prospectively collected departmental database was performed to identify those patients who underwent total esophageal reconstruction with supercharged pedicled jejunum. Data regarding their perioperative course and postoperative function were gathered from the prospectively collected clinical data, review of hospital records, and patient interviews. Total esophageal reconstruction with supercharged pedicled jejunum was attempted in 26 patients (age range, 37-74 years) between March 2000 and April 2004. Twenty-four of 26 patients were ultimately discharged with an intact supercharged pedicled jejunum flap, for an overall success rate of 92.3%. One patient experienced intraoperative flap loss caused by technical difficulties harvesting the flap and never had the flap interposed. One other flap loss occurred in the early postoperative period in a patient who had multisystem organ failure after a prolonged reconstruction. Cervical anastomotic leaks occurred in 19.2% (5/26) of the patients. Two midconduit leaks occurred that were suspicious for iatrogenic perforation from nasogastric tube placement; one required reoperation. One additional early reoperation was performed for cecal ischemia. There were no mortalities. Functional results were available in 95.4% (21/22) of the

  10. Toxoplasma gondii causes death and plastic alteration in the jejunal myenteric plexus

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Eduardo José de Almeida; Zaniolo, Larissa Marchi; Vicentino, Suellen Laís; Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; Sant’Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of ME-49 Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) strain infection on the myenteric plexus and external muscle of the jejunum in rats. METHODS: Thirty rats were distributed into two groups: the control group (CG) (n = 15) received 1 mL of saline solution orally, and the infected group (IG) (n = 15) inoculated with 1 mL of saline solution containing 500 oocysts of M-49 T. gondii strain orally. After 36 d of infection, the rats were euthanized. Infection with T. gondii was confirmed by blood samples collected from all rats at the beginning and end of the experiment. The jejunum of five animals was removed and submitted to routine histological processing (paraffin) for analysis of external muscle thickness. The remaining jejunum from the others animals was used to analyze the general population and the NADH-diaphorase, VIPergic and nitrergic subpopulations of myenteric neurons; and the enteric glial cells (S100-IR). RESULTS: Serological analysis showed that animals from the IG were infected with the parasite. Hypertrophy affecting jejunal muscle thickness was observed in the IG rats (77.02 ± 42.71) in relation to the CG (51.40 ± 12.34), P < 0.05. In addition, 31.2% of the total number of myenteric neurons died (CG: 39839.3 ± 5362.3; IG: 26766.6 ± 2177.6; P < 0.05); hyperplasia of nitrergic myenteric neurons was observed (CG: 7959.0 ± 1290.4; IG: 10893.0 ± 1156.3; P < 0.05); general hypertrophy of the cell body in the remaining myenteric neurons was noted [CG: 232.5 (187.2-286.0); IG: 248.2 (204.4-293.0); P < 0.05]; hypertrophy of the smallest varicosities containing VIP neurotransmitter was seen (CG: 0.46 ± 0.10; IG: 0.80 ± 0.16; P < 0.05) and a reduction of 25.3% in enteric glia cells (CG: 12.64 ± 1.27; IG: 10.09 ± 2.10; P < 0.05) was observed in the infected rats. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that infection with oocysts of ME-49 T. gondii strain caused quantitative and plastic alterations in the myenteric plexus of the jejunum in rats. PMID

  11. [Usefulness of endoscopically guided nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube placement in a case of aspiration pneumonia due to postgastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kosei; Totsuka, Osamu; Tamura, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    A 79-year-old man with a history of gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction 27 years previously was admitted to our hospital due to recurrent pneumonia. Because he had dysphagia and had frequently developed pneumonia over the course of a year, enteral nutrition via nasogastric tube was initiated approximately six months before admission. The clinical and computed tomography findings showed that the cause of pneumonia was aspiration of tube feeding nutrients due to gastroesophageal reflux. To prevent gastroesophageal reflux, he was continuously kept in a 30-degree or greater reclining position. However, gastroesophageal reflux was seen at an injection rate of 50 ml/h or greater. After we inserted a nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube guided by endoscopy, gastroesophageal reflux, dumping syndrome and diarrhea were not seen up to an injection rate of 300 ml/h. Endoscopically guided nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube placement is a simple method and may be useful for patients with aspiration pneumonia due to postgastrectomy. Moreover, long-term postgastrectomy patients appear to tolerate the postopyloric injection of enteral nutrition. Because the number of elderly patients who have dysphagia with postgastrectomy is increasing, these findings provide a basis for treatment in elderly medical settings.

  12. Dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose uptake in jejunal epithelium of broilers after acute exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Awad, Wageha A; Kröger, Susan; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of ethanol on gastrointestinal tract of chicken. In this study, we investigated the effects of low levels of ethanol on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of commercial broilers. Jejunal tissues from 35- to 39-day-old broilers were exposed to either 0 or 0.1% ethanol in Ussing chambers, and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 40 min. After 40 and 60 min of incubation, glucose (20 mM) and carbamoylcholine (200 μM), respectively, were introduced into the chambers. The absolute and percent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (Vt) induced by glucose were increased significantly with 0.1% ethanol. There was no significant effect of 0.1% ethanol on carbamoylcholine-induced electrophysiological variables. To investigate if higher levels of ethanol have similar effects, we tested the effects of 0, 0.33, and 0.66% ethanol under similar experimental conditions until the glucose-addition step. Contrary to 0.1% ethanol, both the 0.33 and 0.66% ethanol levels significantly decreased the basal and glucose-induced Isc and Vt. Tissue conductivity remained unaffected in all cases. These results indicate that intestinal epithelia of chicken may be more sensitive to the effects of ethanol as compared with other species. This is the first report indicating dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose absorption in intestinal epithelia in the presence of ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reactive Nodular Fibrous Pseudotumor Presenting as a Huge Intra abdominal Mass after Abdominal Surgery: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Birgul; Vardar, Enver; Tasli, Funda; Yakan, Savas; Top, Erdinc; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Although the majority of mesenchymal lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are neoplastic in nature, but nonneoplastic reactive processes may also involve the gastrointestinal tract and mesentery. Some more aggressive neoplasms located in same area, such as fibromatosis or gastrointestinal stromal tumors may be cause of diagnostic confusion. Reactive nodular fibrous pseudo tumor (RNFP) of the gastrointestinal tract and mesentery is a recently recognized entity. Here we present one such lesion in 71 years-old- man with a history of abdominal surgery. The tumor was firm, tan–white colored, ranged in size 19.5 cm in greatest dimension, and was grossly well circumscribed. Histologically it is composed of spindle-shaped cells resembling fibroblasts arranged haphazardly or in intersecting fascicles, embedded in a collagen-rich stroma with sparse intralesional lymphoid cells frequently arranged in aggregates. We present a case of this entity have largest tumor and also due to the rarity. PMID:26351476

  14. Adult midgut malrotation presented with acute bowel obstruction and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Akile; Uçar, Bercis İmge; Düzgün, Şükrü Aydın; Bayhan, Zülfü; Zeren, Sezgin; Yaylak, Faik; Şanal, Bekir; Bayhan, Nilüfer Araz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation refers to the partial or complete failure of rotation of midgut around the superior mesenteric vessels in embryonic life. Arrested midgut rotation results due to narrow-based mesentery and increases the risk of twisting midgut and subsequent obstruction and necrosis. Presentation of case 40 years old female patient admitted to emergency service with acute abdomen and computerized tomography scan showed dilated large and small intestine segments with air-fluid levels and twisted mesentery around superior mesenteric artery and vein indicating “whirpool sign”. Discussion Malrotation in adults is a rare cause of midgut volvulus as though it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Even though clinical symptoms are obscure, adult patients usually present with vomiting and recurrent abdominal pain due to chronic partial obstruction. Contrast enhanced radiograph has been shown to be the most accurate method. Typical radiological signs are corkscrew sign, which is caused by the dilatation of various duodenal segments at different levels and the relocation of duodenojejunal junction due to jejunum folding. As malrotation commonly causes intestinal obstruction, patients deserve an elective laparotomy. Conclusion Malrotation should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Surgical intervention should be prompt to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27015011

  15. Changes in α-glucosidase activities along the jejunal-ileal axis of normal rats by the α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazuki; Hanai, Emiko; Suruga, Kazuhito; Kuranuki, Sachi; Goda, Toshinao

    2010-10-01

    Miglitol, an α-glucosidase inhibitor that inhibits postprandial hyperglycemia by delaying carbohydrate digestion and absorption along the jejunal-ileal axis, has recently been approved for use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Miglitol treatment may lead to increased α-glucosidase activities toward the ileum because carbohydrate flow toward the ileum increases. However, it is not yet known if miglitol treatment alters the α-glucosidase activities along the jejunal-ileal axis. In this study, we examined the effects of miglitol supplementation for 3 or 7 days on α-glucosidase activities along the jejunal-ileal axis of Wistar rats. Supplementation with miglitol for 3 or 7 days in rats increased tissue weights of the lower jejunum and ileum, but did not alter tissue weights of the upper jejunum and cecum or the contents of the cecum. Furthermore, supplementation with miglitol for 7 days reduced the activities of isomaltase and maltase in the upper jejunum and increased the activities of sucrase, isomaltase, and maltase in the lower jejunum and ileum. These results suggest that the delay in carbohydrate digestion and absorption along the jejunal-ileal axis by miglitol supplementation in rats is associated with increased α-glucosidase activities toward the ileum.

  16. Toxin-associated and other genes in Clostridium perfringens type A isolates from bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS).

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Benjamin J; Nowell, Victoria J; Parreira, Valeria R; Soltes, Glenn; Prescott, John F

    2012-10-01

    This study examined known or possible virulence-associated genes in type A Clostridium perfringens from cases of both bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS) and compared these to isolates from calves that were healthy or had undifferentiated diarrheal illness. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to genotype the 218 C. perfringens isolates. Isolates were sourced from healthy and diarrheic young and mature cattle (n = 191), from calves with confirmed or suspected BCA (n = 22), and from mature cattle with JHS (n = 5). Of 216 isolates (96%), 208 were positive for the cpa gene and 13% (29/218) were positive for atypical cpb2. Three of 8 (37.5%) confirmed BCA isolates, 2 of 13 (15.4%) suspected BCA isolates, and no JHS isolates tested positive for atypical cpb2. As all isolates were negative for cpb, cpb2, cpe, etx, netB, and tpeL, the results of the present study do not support a role for these genes in BCA or JHS. A subset of unique genes identified in 1 bovine clostridial abomasitis isolate (F262), for which a genome sequence is available, was searched for in 8 BCA isolates by PCR. None of the 10 genes was consistently present in all or even in a majority of BCA isolates. Many of these genes were also variably and inconsistently present in type A isolates from calves that did not have BCA. Although a virulence signature to aid in the diagnosis of BCA caused by C. perfringens type A was not identified, further work may discover a gene or group of genes that would constitute such a signature.

  17. The Use of the Sternocleidomastoid Flap Helps Reduce Complications After Free Jejunal Flap Reconstructions in Total Laryngectomy and Cervical Esophagectomy Defects.

    PubMed

    Moody, Lisa; Hunter, Cedric; Nazerali, Rahim; Lee, Gordon K

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal reconstruction after tumor extirpation or ingestion injury is a difficult problem for the reconstructive plastic surgeon. Free tubed fasciocutaneous flaps and intestinal flaps have become the mainstay for reconstruction. The free jejunal flap has the advantage of replacing like-with-like tissue and having lower fistula rates. Additionally, the "mesenteric wrap" modification and prophylactic pectoralis major muscle have been described to further decrease anastomotic leaks and fistulae. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of the prophylactic pedicled sternocleidomastoid (SCM) flap for prevention of anastomotic leaks and fistulae. A retrospective review of patients who underwent reconstruction of circumferential pharyngoesophageal defects with a free jejunal flap by a single surgeon from 2008 to 2012 was performed. Those who received a prophylactic pedicled SCM flap to reinforce one of their jejunal anastomoses were selected for this study, and their outcomes were analyzed. Patients' demographics, comorbidities, complications, and clinical outcomes were collected and analyzed. Three patients underwent reinforcement of one jejunal anastomosis with a pedicled SCM flap. The mean age was 60 years, and average follow-up was 27 months. Two patients received postoperative radiation, and one patient received both preoperative and postoperative radiation. The recipient vessels included the facial artery, internal jugular vein, and facial vein. The flap survival rate was 100%. There was 1 stricture and 1 fistula that occurred at the anastomoses without the SCM muscle reinforcement. There were no complications at the jejunal anastomotic sites that were reinforced with the SCM muscle. Of the 6 anastomotic sites in 3 patients, there was a 0% fistula rate and 0% stricture rate at the sites reinforced with the SCM muscle versus a 33% fistula rate and a 33% stricture rate at the sites without the SCM muscle flap. One patient was diagnosed with local tumor

  18. Postnatal ontogeny of kinetics of porcine jejunal brush border membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase N and sucrase activities.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming Z; Adeola, Olayiwola; Asem, Elikplimi K; King, Dale

    2002-07-01

    Our objectives were to determine postnatal changes in the maximal enzyme activity (V(max)) and enzyme affinity (K(m)) of jejunal mucosal membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase N and sucrase using a porcine model which may more closely resemble the human intestine. Jejunal brush border membrane was prepared by Mg(2+)-precipitation and differential centrifugation from pigs of suckling (8 days), weaning (28 days), post-weaning (35 days) and adult (70 days) stages. p-Nitrophenyl phosphate (0-8 mM), L-alanine-p-nitroanilide hydrochloride (0-28 mM) and sucrose (0-100 mM) were used in alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase N and sucrase kinetic measurements. V(max) of alkaline phosphatase was the lowest in the adult (4.27 micromol.mg(-1) protein.min(-1)), intermediate in the suckling (9.75 micromol.mg(-l) protein.min(-l)) and the highest in the weaning and post-weaning stage (12.83 and 10.40 micromol.mg(-l) protein.min(-l)). K(m) of alkaline phosphatase was high in the suckling and weaning stages (5.14 and 9.93 mM) and low in the adult (0.66 mM). V(max) of aminopeptidase N was low in the suckling (7.04 micromol.mg protein(-1).min(-1)) and high in the post-weaning stage (13.36 micromol.mg(-l) protein.min(-l)). K(m) of aminopeptidase N was the highest in the two weaning stages (2.96 and 3.39 mM), intermediate in the adult (2.33 mM) and the lowest in the suckling stage (1.66 mM). V(max) of sucrase increased from the suckling to the adult (0.48-1.30 micromol.mg(-l) protein.min(-l)). K(m) of sucrase ranged from 11.19 to 16.57 mM. There are dramatic postnatal developmental changes in both the maximal enzyme activity and enzyme affinity of jejunal brush border membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase N and sucrase in the pig.

  19. Dietary Zinc Oxide Modulates Antioxidant Capacity, Small Intestine Development, and Jejunal Gene Expression in Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui; Lv, Hang; Chen, Zhuang; Wang, Li; Wu, Xiuju; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Liang, Rui; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-02-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) on the antioxidant capacity, small intestine development, and jejunal gene expression in weaned piglets. Ninety-six 21-day-old piglets were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments. Each treatment had eight replicates with four piglets per replicate. The piglets were fed either control diet (control) or control diet supplemented with in-feed antibiotics (300 mg/kg chlortetracycline and 60 mg/kg colistin sulfate) or pharmacological doses of ZnO (3000 mg/kg). The experiment lasted 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected at days 14 and 28, while intestinal samples were harvested at day 28 of the experiment. Dietary high doses of ZnO supplementation significantly increased the body weight (BW) at day 14 and average daily gain (ADG) of days 1 to 14 in weaned piglets, when compared to control group (P < 0.05). The incidence of diarrhea of piglets fed ZnO-supplemented diets, at either days 1 to 14, days 14 to 28, or the overall experimental period, was significantly decreased in comparison with those in other groups (P < 0.05). Supplementation with ZnO increased the villus height of the duodenum and ileum in weaned piglets and decreased the crypt depth of the duodenum, when compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Dietary ZnO supplementation decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration at either day 14 or day 28, but increased total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) at day 14, when compared to that in the control (P < 0.05). ZnO supplementation upregulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin in the jejunum mucosa of weaned piglets, compared to those in the control (P < 0.05). The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) mRNA expression in the jejunum mucosa was downregulated in the ZnO-supplemented group, compared with the control (P < 0.05). Both in-feed antibiotics and ZnO supplementation decreased the m

  20. Effects of dietary administering chitosan on growth performance, jejunal morphology, jejunal mucosal sIgA, occludin, claudin-1 and TLR4 expression in weaned piglets challenged by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dingfu; Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Xionggui; Feng, Zemeng; Wang, Jinquan

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how chitosan (COS) affects intestinal mucosal barrier function and to further explain mechanisms of COS on growth performance. Thirty piglets, weaned at 21 days of age, were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli during preliminary trial period. Three groups of Piglets in individual pens were fed a corn-soybean meal diet containing no addition, 50 mg/kg chlortetracycline, or 300 mg/kg COS for 21 days. Jejunal morphology and histology were analyzed under light microscope. The concentrations of occludin proteins were determined by western blot. Immunohistochemistry assays were used to determine secretory immunoglobulin (sIgA) level. Real-time PCR was used to detect Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Claudin-1 in jejunal mucosa. Feeding COS or chlortetracycline reduced (P<0.05) feed conversion ratio. Villus length, villus length/crypt depth, and goblet cells, were increased (P<0.05), but villus width and crypt depth were decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. Intraepithelial lymphocytes were higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both chlortetracycline and control groups. Occludin protein expression was increased (P<0.01) in the COS group, but was decreased (P<0.05) in the chlortetracycline group. Expression of sIgA protein was higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both control and chlortetracycline groups, however TLR4 mRNA expression was decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. There was no difference in expression of claudin-1 among the three groups. In conclusion, chitosan and the antibiotic have similar effects in promoting piglet growth and reducing intestinal inflammation, but different effects on intestinal mucosal barrier function. This indicates that chitosan can replace chlortetracycline as a feed additive for piglets. © 2013.

  1. Case report of severe Cushing's syndrome in medullary thyroid cancer complicated by functional diabetes insipidus, aortic dissection, jejunal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia: remission with sorafenib without reduction in cortisol concentration.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Muhammad M; Duaiji, Najla; Mutairi, Ghazi; Aklabi, Sabah; Qattan, Nasser; Abouzied, Mohei El-Din M; Sous, Mohamed W

    2015-09-09

    Normalization of cortisol concentration by multikinase inhibitors have been reported in three patients with medullary thyroid cancer-related Cushing's syndrome. Aortic dissection has been reported in three patients with Cushing's syndrome. Diabetes insipidus without intrasellar metastasis, intestinal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia have not been reported in medullary thyroid cancer. An adult male with metastatic medullary thyroid cancer presented with hyperglycemia, hypernatremia, hypokalemia, hypertension, acne-like rash, and diabetes insipidus (urine volume >8 L/d, osmolality 190 mOsm/kg). Serum cortisol, adrenocorticoitropic hormone, dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate, and urinary free cortisol were elevated 8, 20, 4.4, and 340 folds, respectively. Pituitary imaging was normal. Computed tomography scan revealed jejunal intussusception and incidental abdominal aortic dissection. Sorafenib treatment was associated with Cushing's syndrome remission, elevated progesterone (>10 fold), normalization of dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate, but persistently elevated cortisol concentration. Newly-developed proximal lower limb weakness and decreased salivation were associated with elevated ganglionic neuronal acetylcholine receptor (alpha-3) and borderline P/Q type calcium channel antibodies. Extreme cortisol concentration may have contributed to aortic dissection and suppressed antidiuretic hormone secretion; which combined with hypokalemia due cortisol activation of mineralocorticoid receptors, manifested as diabetes insipidus. This is the first report of paraneoplastic dysautonomia and jejunal intussusception in medullary thyroid cancer, they may be related to medullary thyroid cancer's neuroendocrine origin and metastasis, respectively. Remission of Cushing's syndrome without measurable reduction in cortisol concentration suggests a novel cortisol-independent mechanism of action or assay cross-reactivity. Normalization of dehydroepiandrostenedione

  2. Food deprivation increases alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of jejunal epithelial transport in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Teixeira, V; Vieira-Coelho, M A; Serrão, M P; Soares-da-Silva, P

    2000-10-01

    This study examined the effect of food deprivation on the jejunal response to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor activation in young (20-d-old) and adult (60-d-old) rats, using short-circuit (I(sc)) measurements in the absence or presence of furosemide (1 mmol/L). The effect of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation by 5-bromo-N:-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK 14,304; 0.3-3000 nmol/L) was a concentration-dependent decrease in I(sc) with similar half-maximal effective concentration (EC(50); 12.3 +/- 1.1 vs. 9.6 +/- 1.1 nmol/L) and maximal effect (E(max); 70.6 +/- 6.9 vs. 80.6 +/- 4.5% of reduction) values in adult food-deprived and fed rats. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in fed and food-deprived rats was markedly (P: < 0.05) attenuated by furosemide (1 mmol/L). E(max) values for UK 14,304 in 20-d-old food-deprived rats were higher (P: < 0.05) than those observed in fed rats (93.3 +/- 3.3 vs. 67.0 +/- 11.3% of reduction), without differences in EC(50) values. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in 20-d-old fed rats was completely abolished by furosemide (1 mmol/L). In food-deprived young rats, the effect of UK 14,304 was also markedly (P: < 0.05) antagonized by furosemide, but not completely abolished. Specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding in membranes from jejunal epithelial cells revealed the presence of a single class of binding sites, with an apparent K:(D) in the low nmol/L range. In 20-d-old food-deprived rats, specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding was markedly increased, and this was reversed by refeeding. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in isolated jejunal epithelial cells from 60-d-old fed rats was twice that in 20-d-old fed rats [117 +/- 14 vs. 52 +/- 5 nmol free inorganic phosphorus/(mg protein.min)]. Food deprivation in adult rats, but not in 20-d-old rats, was accompanied by a significant decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In both young and adult rats (fed and food-deprived), UK 14,304 did not affect Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In conclusion, food

  3. In situ intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the pig: a model using the first jejunal artery for flushing.

    PubMed

    Yandza, Thierry; Mekaouche, Mourad; Bréaud, Jean; Oroboscianu, Ioana; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Ramella-Virieux, Silvina; Benchimol, Daniel; Gugenheim, Jean

    2007-09-01

    We describe a new surgical technique of in situ intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the pig, which includes transection of the small bowel, extrinsic autonomic denervation, lymphatic disruption, and finally in-situ cold ischemia of the graft by flushing through the first jejunal artery. Ten female pigs were used for the study. All neural and lymphatic connections to the jejunoileum were transected. The stripped superior mesenteric vessels remained as the only connections. The skeletonized mesenteric vessels were clamped and the superior mesenteric artery was cannulated through the first jejunal artery. The isolated jejunoileum was flushed with cold IGL-1 solution. A small incision on the superior mesenteric vein was made to allow outflow of the effluent. After the flushing process was complete, the small incision in the superior mesenteric vein was closed and the vascular clamps were removed. The proximal 70% of the graft was resected. The mean preoperative weight of the animals was 25.8 +/-7.6 kg. The mean duration of the operation was 242.0 +/- 28.6 min. The mean cold ischemia time was 47.6 +/- 3.9 min. All animals survived the procedure and were sacrificed at day 8. At sacrifice, there were no adhesions. The small bowel appeared normal. On intestinal histology, there were no significant changes between specimens obtained from the animal immediately at the end of cold flushing (T0), 2 h after reperfusion (T1), and at sacrifice (T2). This novel technique for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the pig provides an extremely useful model for experimental studies of immunological and cold ischemia-reperfusion injury of transplanted small bowels.

  4. Fast sampling, rapid filtration apparatus: principal characteristics and validation from studies of D-glucose transport in human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Berteloot, A; Malo, C; Breton, S; Brunette, M

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic data in (brush-border) membrane vesicles which rely on the validity of the initial rate assumption for their interpretation and depend on tracer flux studies using the rapid filtration technique for their experimental measurement have been limited to some extent by the absence of techniques that would allow for real-time data analysis. In this paper, we report on our successful design of a fast sampling, rapid filtration apparatus (FSRFA) which seems to fill up this technical gap since showing the following characteristics: (i) rapid injection (5 msec) and mixing (less than 100 msec) of small amounts of vesicles (10-40 microliters) with an incubation medium (0.2-1.0 ml); (ii) fast (20 to 80 msec depending on the sample volume) and multiple (up to 18 samples at a maximal rate of 4 sec) sampling of the uptake mixture followed by rapid quenching in the stop solution (approximately 5 msec) according to a predetermined time schedule (any time combination from 0.25 to 9999 sec); and (iii) fast, automated, and sampling-synchronized filtration and washings of the quenched uptake medium (only 15-20 sec are necessary for the first filtration followed by two washings and extra filtrations). As demonstrated using adult human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles and Na(+)-D-glucose cotransport as models, the FSRFA accurately reproduces the manual aspects of the rapid filtration technique while allowing for very precise initial rate determinations. Moreover, the FSRFA has also been designed to provide as much versatility as possible and, in its present version, allows for a very precise control of the incubation temperature and also permits a few efflux protocols to be performed. Finally, its modular design, which separates the fast sampling unit from the rapid filtration device, should help in extending its use to fields other than transport measurement.

  5. The expression of genes involved in jejunal lipogenesis and lipoprotein synthesis is altered in morbidly obese subjects with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Garcia-Arnes, Juan; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalo, Montserrat; Soriguer, Federico; Moreno-Ruiz, Francisco J; Rodriguez-Cañete, Alberto; Gallego-Perales, Jose L; Alcain-Martinez, Guillermo; Vazquez-Pedreño, Luis; Lopez-Enriquez, Soledad; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, until now little attention has been paid to the role that the intestine might have. The aim of this research was to determine the relation between insulin resistance and intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis in morbidly obese subjects and to study the effect of insulin on these processes. Jejunal mRNA expression of the different genes involved in the intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis was analyzed in three groups of morbidly obese subjects: Group 1 with low insulin resistance (MO-low-IR), group 2 with high insulin resistance (MO-high-IR), and group 3 with T2DM and treatment with metformin (MO-metf-T2DM). In addition, intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from MO-low-IR were incubated with different doses of insulin/glucose. In Group 2 (MO-high-IR), the jejunal mRNA expression levels of apo A-IV, ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), pyruvate dehydrogenase (lipoamide) beta (PDHB), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were significantly higher and acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACC1) and fatty-acid synthase lower than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). In Group 3 (MO-metf-T2DM), only the ACLY and PDHB mRNA expressions were significantly higher than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). The mRNA expression of most of the genes studied was significantly linked to insulin and glucose levels. The incubation of IEC with different doses of insulin and glucose produced a higher expression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apo A-IV, SREBP-1c, and ACC1 when both, glucose and insulin, were at a high concentration. However, with only high insulin levels, there were higher apo A-IV, PDHB and SREBP-1c expressions, and a lower ACLY expression. In conclusion, the jejunum of MO-high-IR has a decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in de novo fatty-acid synthesis and an

  6. Unusual Presentation of Intussusception of the Small Bowel with Peutz Jeghers Syndrome: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Akshara; Gupta, Achal; Shrivastava, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    The Peutz Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is characterised by hamartomatous polyposes of the gastrointestinal tract, melanin pigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes, and an increased risk for cancer. We are reporting a case of a 15-year-old male with Peutz Jeghers syndrome, who presented to us with features of chronic intestinal obstruction and anaemia. Initially, patient was managed conservatively, but later on, an elective exploratory laparotomy was done for definitive management of intussusception. Laparotomy revealed a jejuno-jejunal intussusception with spontaneous recanalisation of gut which contained a long segment of gangrenous small bowel in the lumen. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment was done. To the best of our knowledge, this might be the first case report on spontaneous recanalisation of small intestine. PMID:24298508

  7. Effects of selenium supply and dietary restriction on maternal and fetal body weight, visceral organ mass and cellularity estimates, and jejunal vascularity in pregnant ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Reed, J J; Ward, M A; Vonnahme, K A; Neville, T L; Julius, S L; Borowicz, P P; Taylor, J B; Redmer, D A; Grazul-Bilska, A T; Reynolds, L P; Caton, J S

    2007-10-01

    To examine effects of nutrient restriction and dietary Se on maternal and fetal visceral tissues, 36 pregnant Targhee-cross ewe lambs were allotted randomly to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. Treatments were plane of nutrition [control, 100% of requirements vs. restricted, 60% of controls] and dietary Se [adequate Se, ASe (6 microg/kg of BW) vs. high Se, HSe (80 microg/kg of BW)] from Se-enriched yeast. Selenium treatments were initiated 21 d before breeding and dietary restriction began on d 64 of gestation. Diets contained 16% CP and 2.12 Mcal/kg of ME (DM basis) and differing amounts were fed to control and restricted groups. On d 135 +/- 5 (mean +/- range) of gestation, ewes were slaughtered and visceral tissues were harvested. There was a nutrition x Se interaction (P = 0.02) for maternal jejunal RNA:DNA; no other interactions were detected for maternal measurements. Maternal BW, stomach complex, small intestine, large intestine, liver, and kidney mass were less (P < or = 0.01) in restricted than control ewes. Lung mass (g/kg of empty BW) was greater (P = 0.09) in restricted than control ewes and for HSe compared with ASe ewes. Maternal jejunal protein content and protein:DNA were less (P < or = 0.002) in restricted than control ewes. Maternal jejunal DNA and RNA concentrations and total proliferating jejunal cells were not affected (P > or = 0.11) by treatment. Total jejunal and mucosal vascularity (mL) were less (P < or = 0.01) in restricted than control ewes. Fetuses from restricted ewes had less BW (P = 0.06), empty carcass weight (P = 0.06), crown-rump length (P = 0.03), liver (P = 0.01), pancreas (P = 0.07), perirenal fat (P = 0.02), small intestine (P = 0.007), and spleen weights (P = 0.03) compared with controls. Fetuses from HSe ewes had heavier (P < or = 0.09) BW, and empty carcass, heart, lung, spleen, total viscera, and large intestine weights compared with ASe ewes. Nutrient restriction resulted in less protein content (mg, P

  8. HIV enteropathy: HAART reduces HIV-induced stem cell hyperproliferation and crypt hypertrophy to normal in jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Batman, Philip A; Kapembwa, Moses S; Belmonte, Liliana; Tudor, Gregory; Kotler, Donald P; Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro; Griffin, George E

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the structural and kinetic response of small intestinal crypt epithelial cells including stem cells to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Crypt size and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were quantified using morphometric techniques. Crypt length was measured by counting the number of enterocytes along one side of a number of crypts in each biopsy specimen and the mean crypt length was calculated. Proliferating crypt cells were identified with MIB-1 monoclonal antibody, and the percentage of crypt cells in proliferation was calculated at each cell position along the length of the crypt (proliferation index). Data were obtained from 9 HIV-positive test patients co-infected with microsporidia, 34 HIV-positive patients receiving HAART and 13 control cases. Crypt length was significantly greater in test patients than in controls, but crypt length in patients receiving HAART was normal. The proliferation index was greater in test subjects than in controls in stem and transit cell compartments, and was decreased in patients treated with HAART only in the stem cell region of the crypt. Villous atrophy in HIV enteropathy is attributed to crypt hypertrophy and encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. HAART restores normal crypt structure by inhibition of HIV-driven stem cell hyperproliferation at the crypt bases.

  9. Raised number of jejunal IgG2-producing cells in untreated adult coeliac disease compared with food allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Rognum, T O; Kett, K; Fausa, O; Bengtsson, U; Kilander, A; Scott, H; Gaarder, P I; Brandtzaeg, P

    1989-01-01

    The subclass distribution of IgG-producing immunocytes was studied by two colour immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies in jejunal biopsy specimens from 10 adults with untreated coeliac disease, 11 coeliac disease patients on a gluten free diet, and seven patients with established food allergy. Paired immunofluorescence staining was performed with subclass specific murine monoclonal antibodies in combination with polyclonal rabbit antibody reagent to total IgG; the proportion of cells belonging to each subclass could thereby be determined. The ratio of IgG2 immunocytes was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in untreated coeliac disease patients (median, 35.2%; range, 26.7-65.2%) than in those on a gluten free diet (median, 7.3%; range, 0-31.9%) or those having food allergy (median, 12.5%; range, 0-36.5%). The disparity in the local IgG2 response between patients with untreated coeliac disease and those with food allergy might be due to differences in the nature of the antigenic stimuli, dissimilar genetic 'make-up' of the subjects, or both. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2599444

  10. Absence of Role of Dietary Protein Sensing in the Metabolic Benefits of Duodenal-Jejunal Bypass in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Barataud, Aude; Goncalves, Daisy; Vinera, Jennifer; Zitoun, Carine; Duchampt, Adeline; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Mithieux, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) induces remission or substantial improvement of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) but underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The beneficial effects of dietary proteins on energy and glucose homeostasis are mediated by the antagonist effects of peptides toward mu-opioid receptors (MORs), which are highly expressed in the distal gut. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of RYGB could depend at least in part on the interaction of peptides from food with intestinal MORs. Duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) was performed in obese and lean wild-type (WT) or MOR deficient (MOR−/−) mice. Food intake and body weight was monitored daily during 3 weeks. Glucose homeostasis was assessed from glucose and insulin tolerance tests. In obese WT and MOR−/− mice, DJB induced a rapid and sustained weight loss partly independent of food intake, and a rapid improvement in glycaemic parameters. Weight loss was a major determinant of the improvements observed. In lean WT and MOR−/− mice, DJB had no effect on weight loss but significantly enhanced glucose tolerance. We found that MORs are not essential in the metabolic beneficial effects of DJB, suggesting that protein sensing in the distal gut is not a link in the metabolic benefits of gastric surgery. PMID:28332577

  11. Effects of milk thistle meal on performance, ileal bacterial enumeration, jejunal morphology and blood lipid peroxidation in laying hens fed diets with different levels of metabolizable energy.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Jabali, N S; Mahdavi, A H; Ansari Mahyari, S; Sedghi, M; Akbari Moghaddam Kakhki, R

    2017-06-13

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different levels of milk thistle meal on performance, blood biochemical indices, ileal bacterial counts and intestinal histology in laying hens fed diets containing different levels of metabolizable energy. A total number of 200 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) were randomly assigned to eight experimental treatments with five cage replicates of five birds each. Dietary treatments consisted of four levels of milk thistle meal (0%, 15%, 30% and 60%) and two levels of AMEn (11.09 and 12.34 MJ/kg) fed over a period of 80 days. In vitro studies revealed that the total phenolic component of milk thistle meal was 470.64 mg gallic acid equivalent/g of the sample, and its antioxidant activity for inhibiting the 2-2-diphenyl-1-picrichydrazyl free radical and reducing ferric ions was about 21% higher than that of butylated hydroxyltoluene (p < .05). Diets containing high level of AMEn led to improved egg production (p < .05), egg weight (p < .05), egg mass (p < .01) and feed conversion ratio (p < .01). In addition, offering diets containing high energy significantly enhanced (p < .01) serum triglyceride and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations as well as jejunal villus height. Dietary supplementation of 3% milk thistle meal resulted in the best feed conversion ratio (p < .05), reduction of ileal Escherichia coli enumeration (p < .01) and an enhancement in the villus height-to-crypt depth ratio (p < .05). Furthermore, feeding incremental levels of this meal led to remarkable decrease in serum cholesterol, triglyceride and MDA (p < .01) concentrations while significant increase in blood high-density lipoprotein content and goblet cell numbers (p < .05). The present findings indicate that milk thistle meal with high antioxidant and antibacterial properties in laying hen diets may improve health indices and productive performance. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. SOLiD SAGE sequencing shows differential gene expression in jejunal lymph node samples of resistant and susceptible red deer (Cervus elaphus) challenged with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, C G; Griffin, J F T; Scott, I C; O'Brien, R; Stanton, J L; MacLean, P; Brauning, R

    2016-01-01

    and higher MAP numbers in lymph nodes of S animals. By week 50 the number of upregulated genes declined in both groups. A number of genes upregulated in R animals appear to be associated with host resistance and regulation of adaptive immunity, especially CEACAM8. Genes upregulated in S animals involve antigen presentation (ENDOD1) and gut associated immune pathology (HSH2D). In conclusion, gene expression in jejunal lymph nodes of resistant and susceptible deer infer that the resistant phenotype is associated with pathways of adaptive immunity, while susceptibility is linked with upregulated non-protective pro-inflammatory responses, following experimental MAP infection.

  13. A typical presentation of a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Stefan; Bettenworth, Dominik; Mees, Sören Torge; Neumann, Jörg; Beyna, Torsten; Domschke, Wolfram; Wessling, Johannes; Ullerich, Hansjörg

    2011-01-01

    A 52-year-old white woman had suffered from intermittent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding for one year. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and peroral double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) did not detect any bleeding source, suggesting obscure GI bleeding. However, in videocapsule endoscopy a jejunal ulceration without bleeding signs was suspected and this was endoscopically confirmed by another peroral DBE. After transfusion of packed red blood cells, the patient was discharged from our hospital in good general condition. Two weeks later she was readmitted because of another episode of acute bleeding. Multi-detector row computed tomography with 3D reconstruction was performed revealing a jejunal tumor causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with partial jejunal resection and end-to-end jejunostomy for reconstruction. Histological examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Nine days after surgery the patient was discharged in good health. No signs of gastrointestinal rebleeding occurred in a follow-up of eight months. We herein describe the complex presentation and course of this patient with GIST and also review the current approach to treatment. PMID:21403816

  14. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming-Wei; Liu, Shao-Zhuang; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats. METHODS Diabetic rats, which were induced by high-fat diet (HFD), nicotinamide and low-dose streptozotocin, underwent sham operations, SG, SG with jejuno-ileal loop (SG-JI) and SG with jejuno-jejunal loop (SG-JJ) followed by postoperative HFD. Then, at the time points of baseline and 2, 12 and 24 wk postoperatively, we determined and compared several variables, including the area under the curve for the results of oral glucose tolerance test (AUCOGTT), serum levels of triglyceride, cholesterol and ghrelin in fasting state, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), body weight, calorie intake, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin secretions after glucose gavage at dose of 1 g/kg. RESULTS At 2 wk postoperatively, rats that underwent SG, SG-JJ and SG-JI, compared with sham-operated (SHAM) rats, demonstrated lower body weight, calorie intake and ghrelin (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), enhanced secretion of insulin and GLP-1 after glucose gavage (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), improved AUCOGTT, HOMA-IR, fasting serum triglyceride and cholesterol (AUCOGTT: 1616.9 ± 83.2, 837.4 ± 83.7, 874.9 ± 97.2 and 812.6 ± 81.9, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; HOMA-IR: 4.31 ± 0.54, 2.94 ± 0.22, 3.17 ± 0.37 and 3.41 ± 0.22, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Triglyceride: 2.35 ± 0.17, 1.87 ± 0.23, 1.98 ± 0.30 and 2.04 ± 0.21 mmol/L, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Cholesterol: 1.84 ± 0.21, 1.53 ± 0.20, 1.52 ± 0.20 and 1.46 ± 0.23 mmol/L). At 12 wk postoperatively, rats receiving SG-JJ and SG-JI had lower body weight, reduced levels of triglyceride and cholesterol and elevated level of GLP-1 compared to those receiving SG (P < 0.05 vs SG). At 24 wk after surgery, compared with SG, the advantage of SG-JJ and SG-JI for glucolipid metabolism was still evident (P < 0.05 vs SG). SG-JI had a better performance in lipid metabolism and GLP-1 secretion of rats than did SG-JJ. CONCLUSION

  15. Duodenal-jejunal exclusion improves insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats by upregulating the hepatic insulin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ze-Qiang; Zhang, Peng-Bo; Zhang, Xiu-Zhong; Chen, Shou-Kun; Zhang, Hong; Lv, Dun-Tao; Zhuang, Bu-Qiang; Wen, Yu-Qing; Hu, Hui-Hui; Ding, Wei-Chao; Zhang, Chong

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown duodenal-jejunal exclusion (DJE) results in the rapid resolution of type 2 diabetes; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study aimed to measure the hepatic expression of insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) and glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2) in type 2 diabetic rats post-DJE, and to investigate their roles in improved hepatic insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Type 2 diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into DJE operation (DO) and control (DC) groups. Normal SD rats were also divided into DJE operation and control groups. Fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured, and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were calculated. Eight weeks postoperation, the hepatic IRS-2 and GLUT-2 protein and mRNA levels were measured using western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The fasting blood glucose in the DO group decreased from a preoperative level of 20.21 ± 2.14 mmol/L to 8.50 ± 2.19 mmol/L (P < 0.05) 8 wk post-DJE. A change in the QUICKI revealed a dramatic increase, and HOMA-IR showed a significant decrease in the DO group (P < 0.05). Additionally, the IRS-2 and GLUT-2 protein and mRNA levels at 8 wk postoperation were significantly increased in the DO group compared with the DC group. DJE led to upregulated hepatic IRS-2 and GLUT-2 expression in the hepatic insulin signaling pathway and improved insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Duodenal-jejunal bypass normalizes pancreatic islet proliferation rate and function but not hepatic steatosis in hypothalamic obese rats.

    PubMed

    Cantelli, K R; Soares, G M; Ribeiro, R A; Balbo, S L; Lubaczeuski, C; Boschero, A C; Araújo, A C F; Bonfleur, M L

    2017-03-30

    Modifications in life-style and/or pharmacotherapies contribute to weight loss and ameliorate the metabolic profile of diet-induced obese humans and rodents. Since these strategies fail to treat hypothalamic obesity, we have assessed the possible mechanisms by which duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) surgery regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and the morphophysiology of pancreatic islets, in hypothalamic obese (HyO) rats. During the first 5 days of life, male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of monosodium glutamate (4 g/kg body weight, HyO group), or saline (CTL). At 90 days of age, HyO rats were randomly subjected to DJB (HyO DJB group) or sham surgery (HyO Sham group). HyO Sham rats were morbidly obese, insulin resistant, hypertriglyceridemic and displayed higher serum concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and hepatic triglyceride (TG). These effects were associated with higher expressions of the lipogenic genes and fatty acid synthase (FASN) protein content in the liver. Furthermore, hepatic genes involved in β-oxidation and TG export were down-regulated in HyO rats. In addition, these rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, β-cell hypersecretion, a higher percentage of islets and β-cell area/pancreas section, and enhanced nuclear content of Ki67 protein in islet-cells. At 2 months after DJB surgery, serum concentrations of TG and NEFA, but not hepatic TG accumulation and gene and protein expressions, were normalized in HyO rats. Insulin release and Ki67 positive cells were also normalized in HyO DJB islets. In conclusion, DJB decreased islet-cell proliferation, normalized insulinemia, and ameliorated insulin sensitivity and plasma lipid profile, independently of changes in hepatic metabolism.

  17. Effect of Duodenal-Jejunal Bypass Surgery on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Petry, Tarissa Z; Fabbrini, Elisa; Otoch, Jose P; Carmona, Murilo A; Caravatto, Pedro P; Salles, João E; Sarian, Thais; Correa, Jose L; Schiavon, Carlos A; Patterson, Bruce W; Cohen, Ricardo; Klein, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether upper gastrointestinal tract (UGI) bypass itself has beneficial effects on the factors involved in regulating glucose homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A 12-month randomized controlled trial was conducted in 17 overweight/obese subjects with T2D, who received standard medical care (SC, n = 7, BMI = 31.7 ± 3.5 kg/m(2) ) or duodenal-jejunal bypass surgery with minimal gastric resection (DJBm) (n = 10; BMI = 29.7 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)). A 5-h modified oral glucose tolerance test was performed at baseline and at 1, 6, and 12 months after surgery or starting SC. Body weight decreased progressively after DJBm (7.9 ± 4.1%, 9.6 ± 4.2%, and 10.2 ± 4.3% at 1, 6, and 12 months, respectively) but remained stable in the SC group (P < 0.001). DJBm, but not SC, improved: (1) oral glucose tolerance (decreased 2-h glucose concentration, P = 0.039), (2) insulin sensitivity (decreased homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, P = 0.013), (3) early insulin response to a glucose load (increased insulinogenic index, P = 0.022), and (4) overall glycemic control (reduction in HbA1c with fewer diabetes medications). DJBm causes moderate weight loss and improves metabolic function in T2D. However, our study cannot separate the benefits of moderate weight loss from the potential therapeutic effect of UGI tract bypass itself on the observed metabolic improvements. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  18. Effect of duodenal-jejunal bypass surgery on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Tarissa Z.; Fabbrini, Elisa; Otoch, Jose P.; Carmona, Murilo A.; Caravatto, Pedro P.; Salles, João E.; Sarian, Thais; Correa, Jose L.; Schiavon, Carlos A.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Cohen, Ricardo; Klein, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether upper gastrointestinal tract (UGI) bypass itself has beneficial effects on the factors involved in regulating glucose homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods A 12-month randomized controlled trial was conducted in 17 overweight/obese subjects with T2D, who received standard medical care (SC, n=7, BMI=31.7±3.5 kg/m2) or duodenal-jejunal bypass surgery with minimal gastric resection (DJBm) (n=10; BMI=29.7±1.9 kg/m2). A 5-h modified oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at baseline and at 1, 6 and 12 months after surgery or starting SC. Results Body weight decreased progressively after DJBm (7.9±4.1%, 9.6±4.2%, and 10.2±4.3% at 1, 6, and 12 months, respectively), but remained stable in the SC group (P<0.001). DJBm, but not SC, improved: 1) oral glucose tolerance (decreased 2-hr glucose concentration, P=0.039), 2) insulin sensitivity (decreased Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance, P=0.013), 3) early insulin response to a glucose load (increased insulinogenic index, P=0.022), and 4) overall glycemic control (reduction in HbA1c with less diabetes medications). Conclusions DJBm causes moderate weight loss and improves metabolic function in T2D. However, our study cannot separate the benefits of moderate weight loss from the potential therapeutic effect of UGI tract bypass itself on the observed metabolic improvements. PMID:26414562

  19. Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 and fructo-oligosaccharide partially reduce jejunal inflammation in a model of intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cassie L; Geier, Mark S; Yazbeck, Roger; Torres, Diana M; Butler, Ross N; Howarth, Gordon S

    2008-01-01

    Although probiotics are beginning to enter mainstream medicine for disorders of the colon, their effects on the small bowel remain largely unexplored. We investigated the recently identified probiotic, Lactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum) BR11 (BR11) and the prebiotic, fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), both individually and in synbiotic combination, for their potential to alleviate intestinal mucositis. From Days 0-9, rats consumed skim milk (SM; saline + SM), low dose (LD-BR11; 1 x 10(6)cfu/ml), high dose (HD-BR11; 1 x 10(9)cfu/ml), LD-FOS (3%), HD-FOS (6%), or synbiotic (HD-BR11/FOS). On Day 7, rats were injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 150 mg/kg). All rats were sacrificed on Day 10. Intestinal tissues were collected for quantitative histology, sucrase, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) determinations. 5-FU decreased sucrase activity, villus height, crypt depth, and crypt cell proliferation compared to controls. Compared to 5-FU + SM, histological damage severity scores were increased for all treatments, although all were effective at reducing jejunal inflammation, indicated by reduced MPO activity (P < 0.05). The combination of BR11 and FOS did not provide additional protection. Moreover, HD-FOS and the synbiotic actually increased clinical mucositis severity (P < 0.05). We conclude that L. fermentum BR11 has the potential to reduce inflammation of the upper small intestine. However, its combination with FOS does not appear to confer any further therapeutic benefit for the alleviation of mucositis.

  20. Naso-jejunal fluid resuscitation in predicted severe acute pancreatitis: Randomized comparative study with intravenous Ringer's lactate.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Sharma, Ravi; Chaudhary, Vinita; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2016-01-01

    Early management of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) includes intravenous fluid resuscitation. To confirm feasibility of naso-jejunal (NJ) fluid resuscitation using oral hydration solution (ORS) and compare its efficacy with intravenous (IV) fluid resuscitation using Ringer Lactate (RL) in predicted SAP. All patients of predicted SAP (presence of SIRS or BISAP > 2) without significant co morbidities were randomized to NJ group (ORS: 20 ml/kg bolus and then 3 mL/kg/h) or IV group (RL infusion at same rate). The groups were compared vis-à-vis persistent organ failure (POF), pancreatic necrosis, and mortality. Seventy-seven patients were assessed and after exclusion, 49 patients were randomized to either NJ (24 patients) or IV group (25). The demographic and baseline clinical profile of both groups including BISAP score (2.25 ± 0.73 and 2.32 ± 0.56), hematocrit (40.2 ± 6.8 and 38.3 ± 6.6), blood urea nitrogen (16.88 ± 6.69 and 21.44 ± 17.56 mg/dL), and intra-abdominal pressure (14.55 ± 4.8 and 14.76 ± 5.5 cm of water) were similar. NJ resuscitation had to be stopped in two patients because of abdominal discomfort and distension. The change in intra abdominal pressure after 48 h of hydration was comparable in both groups. The occurrence of POF (66.67% and 68%), pancreatic necrosis (69.5% and 76%), intervention (5 each), surgery (1 each), and mortality (16.5% and 8%) were comparable (P > 0.05). In select group of patients with SAP, NJ fluid resuscitation with ORS is feasible and is equally efficacious as IV fluid resuscitation with RL. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Pilot clinical study of an endoscopic, removable duodenal-jejunal bypass liner for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Leonardo; Reyes, Eliana; Fagalde, Pilar; Oltra, Maria Soledad; Saba, Jorge; Aylwin, Carmen Gloria; Prieto, Carolina; Ramos, Almino; Galvao, Manoel; Gersin, Keith S; Sorli, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is associated with the rapid improvement of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Here we report an exploratory trial of a completely endoscopic, removable, duodenal-jejunal bypass liner (DJBL) intended to treat T2DM. Obese T2DM subjects were randomized to receive a DJBL (n = 12) or sham endoscopy (n = 6) in a 24-week study, extended up to 52 weeks. Measurements included weights, hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1c)), meal tolerance testing, fasting glucose, and seven-point glucose profiles. Subjects' diets were adjusted in the first 2 weeks to obtain similar weight loss during this period. Subjects had baseline HbA(1c) of 9.1 +/- 1.7% and body mass index of 38.9 +/- 6.1 kg/m(2) (+/- SD). In the completer population by week 1, change in fasting glucose in the DJBL arm was -55 +/- 21 mg/dL versus +42 +/- 30 mg/dL in the sham arm (P < or = 0.05; +/- SE); the seven-point glucose profiles were reduced in the DJBL arm but not in the sham arm. Mean postprandial glucose area under the curve was reduced in the DJBL arm by 20% and increased 17% in the sham arm (P = 0.016). At week 12, HbA(1c) change was -1.3 +/- 0.9% in the DJBL arm and -0.7 +/- 0.4% in the sham arm (P > 0.05), and at 24 weeks, values were -2.4 +/- 0.7% in the DJBL arm and -0.8 +/- 0.4% in the sham arm (P > 0.05). Device migrations required endoscopic removal prior to reaching 52 weeks. The DJBL rapidly normalized glycemic control in obese T2DM subjects, a promising development in the search for novel therapies less invasive than bariatric surgery.

  2. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  3. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction.

  4. [Multi-disciplinary treatment increases the survival rate of late stage pharyngeal, laryngeal or cervical esophageal cancers treated by free jejunal flap reconstruction after cancer resection].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y M; Zhang, H; Ni, S; Wang, J; Li, D Z; Liu, S Y

    2016-05-23

    To investigate the survival status of patients with pharyngeal, laryngeal or cervical esophageal cancers, who received free jejunal flap (FJF) to repair the defects following tumor resection, and to analyze the effect of multi-disciplinary treatment on their survival. Fifty-eight patients with pharyngeal, laryngeal or cervical esophageal cancer underwent free jejunal flap (FJF) reconstruction after cancer resection between 2010 and 2013. All their clinical records were reviewed and analyzed. The success rate of flap transplantation was 91.4% (53/58). The 2-year overall survival rates (OSR) of cervical esophageal cancer and hypopharyngeal cancer patients were 67.5% and 49.3%, respectively, both were significantly better than that of laryngeal cancer. The main causes of death were local recurrence and distant metastases. The group with no short-term complications had a better two-year OSR (59.0%) than the group with short-term complications (46.6%), however, the difference between them was not significant (P=0.103). The 2-year survival rate of the initial treatment group was 65.0%, better than that of the salvage treatment group (49.4%), but the difference was not significant (P=0.051). For the stage III and IV patients, the multi-disciplinary treatment group had a significantly better 2-year OSR (64.7%) than the single or sequential treatment group (37.0%, P=0.016). Free jejunal flap reconstruction is an ideal option for repairing the cervical digestive tract circumferential defects caused by tumor resection with a high success rate and a low mortality. Compared with the single or sequential treatment, multi-disciplinary treatment can significantly improve the survival rate of late-stage hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal cancer patients.

  5. Imperforate Anus with Jejunal Atresia Complicated by Intestinal Volvulus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Joung, Hae Soo; Guerrero, Alexandra Leon; Tomita, Sandra; Kuenzler, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) commonly co-occur with other congenital anomalies, particularly VACTERL (vertebral, anorectal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb, and duodenal) associations. However, this collection of associations is not comprehensive, and other concurrent anomalies may exist that can be missed during the standard work-up of patients with ARMs. We present a rare case of a neonate with a low ARM with concurrent jejuno-ileal atresia that was diagnosed after the correction of the ARM when the patient developed segmental volvulus. This case illustrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion when deviation from a classic presentation occurs.

  6. Imperforate Anus with Jejunal Atresia Complicated by Intestinal Volvulus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Hae Soo; Guerrero, Alexandra Leon; Tomita, Sandra; Kuenzler, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) commonly co-occur with other congenital anomalies, particularly VACTERL (vertebral, anorectal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb, and duodenal) associations. However, this collection of associations is not comprehensive, and other concurrent anomalies may exist that can be missed during the standard work-up of patients with ARMs. We present a rare case of a neonate with a low ARM with concurrent jejuno-ileal atresia that was diagnosed after the correction of the ARM when the patient developed segmental volvulus. This case illustrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion when deviation from a classic presentation occurs. PMID:27896167

  7. Developmental changes in morphometry of the small intestine and jejunal sucrase activity during the first nine weeks of postnatal growth in pigs.

    PubMed

    Adeola, O; King, D E

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the development of small intestinal size and digestive capacity of the jejunum in growing pigs. The weight, length, surface area, and mucosa weight of the small intestine were measured when pigs were 1, 3, 5, and 9 wk of age. Sucrase and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities of the jejunal brush-border membrane, prepared by differential centrifugation and Mg2+ precipitation, were determined at the respective postnatal stages. Body weights increased 7-fold from 2.7 kg at 1 wk to 23.32 kg at 9 wk postnatal. Body weight gains were greater (P < 0.05) from wk 3 to 5 than from wk 1 to 3. Weights of the small intestine and of the intestinal mucosa increased faster (P < 0.05) from 3 to 5 wk than from 1 to 3 wk; the slowest increase occurred from 5 to 9 wk. Weights of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and mucosa from the respective sections increased (P < 0.05) as pigs grew from 3 to 9 wk. Mucosa weight relative to the weight of the section was greater (P < 0.05) for the duodenum and jejunum than for the ileum at 9 wk of age. Between the ages of 3 and 9 wk, the increase in mucosa weight was highest for the jejunum followed by the duodenum and the ileum. The increase was greatest for the duodenum followed by the jejunum and the ileum when mucosal weight was expressed per unit of appropriate intestinal section weight. There was a 55-fold increase in jejunal sucrase activity from 1 to 9 wk; the greatest rate of increase occurred between 5 and 9 wk. Total jejunal ALP activities in pigs at 9 wk was greater (P < 0.05) than at 5 wk, which in turn was greater than at 1 wk of age. In summary, increases in BW during the first 9 wk of postnatal growth in pigs are accompanied by significant developmental changes in digestive capacity including intestinal weights, length, and area as well as jejunal brush-border sucrase and ALP activities.

  8. Foreign Body Penetration through Jejunal Loops Causing Renal Artery Thrombosis and Renal Infarct

    PubMed Central

    El-Charabaty, Elie; Nasr, Patricia; Barakat, Iskandar; Andrawes, Sherif

    2017-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is common, although perforation after ingestion is rare. We report a case of an ingested sharp wooden stick that perforated the proximal jejunum toward the renal vasculature, causing segmental renal artery thrombosis and renal infarct. The patient presented with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. A computed tomography scan revealed a linear opacity corresponding to the foreign body. The wooden stick was removed endoscopically through deep-push enteroscopy with a rat-tooth forceps. We report this unique case of perforation by a foreign body through the proximal jejunum to the left kidney, which was managed endoscopically. PMID:28144617

  9. Ectopic jejunal pacemakers and gastric emptying after Roux gastrectomy: Effect of intestinal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstrom, L.; Kelly, K.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether ectopic pacemakers are present after meals in the Roux limbs of dogs after vagotomy and Roux gastrectomy, whether these pacemakers slow gastric emptying of liquids or solids, and whether abolishing the pacemakers with electric pacing might speed any slow emptying that occurs. In six dogs that underwent vagotomy and Roux gastrectomy and in four dogs that underwent vagotomy and Billroth gastrectomy (controls), myoelectric activity of the Roux limb or duodenum was measured during gastric emptying of a 500 kcal mixed meal of 99mTc-labeled cooked egg and 111In-labeled milk. Roux dogs were tested with and without pacing of the Roux limb. Roux dogs showed ectopic pacemaker in the Roux limb that drove the pacesetter potentials of the limb in a reverse, or orad, direction during 57% of the postprandial recordings. Billroth dogs had no ectopic pacemakers (p less than 0.05). Liquids emptied more slowly in Roux dogs (half-life (t1/2) = 121 +/- 15 minutes) than in Billroth dogs (t1/2 = 43 +/- 9 minutes; p less than 0.05), but solids emptied similarly in both groups of dogs (t1/2 approximately 8 hours). Pacing the Roux limb abolished the ectopic pacemakers, restored the slow emptying of liquids to the more rapid rate found in the Billroth dogs (t1/2: paced Roux, 72 +/- 15 minutes; Billroth, 43 +/- 9 minutes; p greater than 0.05) and did not change emptying of solids. The conclusion was that ectopic pacemakers present in the Roux limb after vagotomy and Roux gastrectomy drove the limb in a reverse direction and slowed emptying of liquids after the operation. The defect was corrected by pacing the Roux limb in a forward direction.

  10. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    PubMed Central

    Rayyan, Esa; Polito, Sarah; Leung, Lana; Bhakta, Ashesh; Kang, Jonathan; Willey, Justin; Mansour, Wasim; Drumm, Mitchell L; Al-Nakkash, Layla

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride channel. The third most common CFTR mutation seen clinically is R117H. Genistein, a naturally occurring phytoestrogen, is known to stimulate CFTR function in vitro. We aimed to determine whether route of administration of genistein could mediate differential effects in R117H male and female CF mice. Mice were fed (4 weeks) or injected subcutaneously (1 week) with the following: genistein 600 mg/kg diet (600Gd); genistein-free diet (0Gd); genistein injection 600 mg/kg body weight (600Gi); dimethyl sulfoxide control (0Gi). In male R117H mice fed 600Gd, basal short circuit current (Isc) was unchanged. In 600Gd-fed female mice, there was a subgroup that demonstrated a significant increase in basal Isc (53.14±7.92 μA/cm2, n=6, P<0.05) and a subgroup of nonresponders (12.05±6.59 μA/cm2, n=4), compared to 0Gd controls (29.3±6.5 μA/cm2, n=7). In R117H mice injected with 600Gi, basal Isc was unchanged in both male and female mice compared to 0Gi controls. Isc was measured in response to the following: the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μM, bilateral), bumetanide (100 μM, basolateral) to indicate the Cl− secretory component, and acetazolamide (100 μM, bilateral) to indicate the HCO3− secretory component; however, there was no effect of genistein (diet or injection) on any of these parameters. Jejunal morphology (ie, villi length, number of goblet cells per villus, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells per crypt) in R117H mice suggested no genistein-mediated difference among the groups. Serum levels of genistein were significantly elevated, compared to respective controls, by either 600Gd (equally elevated in males and females) or 600Gi (elevated more in females versus males). These data suggest a sex-dependent increase in basal Isc of R117H mice and that the increase is also specific for route of

  11. Duodeno-jejunal tube placement in an experimental model of obesity: effects on food behaviour and basal energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Sabench Pereferrer, Fàtima; Vives Espelta, Margarida; Cabrera Vilanova, Arantxa; Hernández González, Mercè; Feliu Rovira, Albert; Blanco Blasco, Santiago; Molina López, Alicia; Beltrán Nebot, Raul; Joven Maried, Jorge; Del Castillo Déjardin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic surgery can modulate weight as well as food intake and basal energy expenditure. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of duodenal exclusion by analysing anthropometric results, intake variations, food behaviour and calorimetric parameters. This is an experimental study with 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats. The sequences used are as follows: Cafeteria diet for 3 weeks, followed by surgery and sacrifice at 4 weeks. Four experimental groups are as follows: two non-obese groups (n = 15; surgery = 10, sham = 5) and two obese groups by cafeteria diet (n = 15; surgery = 10, sham = 5). Surgery performed was duodenal exclusion with physical barrier. Weight, intake, glycaemia and basal energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry were monitored before and after surgery. Weight changes in groups that underwent intervention were significant. The reduction in calorie consumption after surgery was significant in the obese intervention group despite an increased standard feed consumption (161 ± 11 vs 139 ± 13 Kcal/day, p < 0.05; due to a lower consumption of cafeteria diet). In non-obese animals, changes were transient. Basal energy expenditure decreased in both intervention groups: 6.2 ± 0.5 vs 5.5 ± 0.4 Kcal/kg/h in non-obese animals and 5.6 ± 0.3 vs 4.7 ± 0.3 Kcal/kg/h in obese animals (p < 0.05). Duodeno-jejunal tube placement stops weight gain in obese and non-obese animals. In obese animals, there is an important qualitative change in appetite towards standard feed with a significant decrease in caloric intake. In non-obese animals, changes in quantitative intake are transient. This surgery decreases basal energy expenditure in obese animals. This may be attributed to an enhanced thermogenic effect of food and a slowing in the animal's weight gain.

  12. Uncut Esophagojejunostomy with Double Jejunal Pouch: An Alternative Reconstruction Method that Improves the Quality of Life of Patients after Total Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jia Qing; Cao, Yong Kuan; Zhang, Guo Hu; Wang, Pei Hong; Luo, Guo De

    2017-04-01

    Currently, there is no optimal digestive tract reconstruction technique well recognized by scholars after total gastrectomy. In this study, a new reconstruction method, which is modified from the classic Roux-en-Y procedure, an uncut jejunal esophageal anastomosis with double jejunal pouch (UJEA-DJP) was established, and its advantages for improving the quality of life of patients who undergo total gastrectomy were analyzed. Altogether 160 patients with gastric cancer enrolled in our center from September 2009 to March 2012 received radical D2 total gastrectomy. According to the reconstruction methods used, these patients were divided into three groups: UJEA-DJP (n = 63), Roux-en-Y (n = 45), and P-loop with Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy (P-RY; n = 52). The operation time for reconstruction, complications, prognostic nutritional index (PNI), and the Visick classification among the three groups were analyzed. We found that UJEA-DJP has advantages over Roux-en-Y and P-RY regarding the time of digestive tract reconstruction, incidence rates for long-term complications, postoperative nutritional index, body weight recovery, and the Visick classification for subjective feelings (p < .05). The UJEA-DJP surgical procedure has the advantages of intestinal continuity and double-pouch construction, which can significantly reduce long-term complications and improve the long-term quality of life of patients after surgical procedure.

  13. Continuous jejunal levodopa infusion in patients with advanced parkinson disease: practical aspects and outcome of motor and non-motor complications.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Karla; Schrader, Christoph; Hahn, Michaela; Stamelou, Maria; Rüssmann, Anne; Dengler, Reinhard; Oertel, Wolfgang; Odin, Per

    2008-01-01

    We report here on the experience with continuous jejunal levodopa infusion in 13 German parkinsonian patients who have motor and nonmotor complications despite individually optimized oral treatment. The tolerability, efficacy, and the need for dose adjustment of levodopa infusion were followed-up prospectively. Thereby, we describe clinically relevant details for how to successfully initiate and handle this new treatment strategy. Thirteen patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) who have motor fluctuations and dyskinesia were switched off their conventional PD medication to continuous levodopa infusion and followed-up within a maximum period of 12 months. Time in "off" represented a mean of 50% (+/-14; n = 13) of awake time before levodopa infusion and was reduced to a mean of 11% (+/-9; n = 11) of awake time after 6 months. Time in "on with disabling dyskinesias" represented a mean of 17% (+/-15; n = 13) of awake time before levodopa infusion and was reduced to a mean of 3% (+/-6; n= 11) of awake time after 6 months, thereby increasing the time in good "on" state. A positive effect on nonmotor symptoms (anxiety, sleep disturbances) was also observed. In most cases, dose adjustment was required within the first 6 months (predominantly after months 1-3). The therapy was safe and effective. However, problems with the technical device were common. Continuous jejunal levodopa infusion is an effective and feasible alternative treatment option for patients with advanced PD who can cope with and tolerate the device.

  14. Multiplex PCR-Based Serogrouping and Serotyping of Salmonella enterica from Tonsil and Jejunum with Jejunal Lymph Nodes of Slaughtered Swine in Metro Manila, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kamela Charmaine S; Rivera, Windell L

    2015-05-01

    Food poisoning outbreaks and livestock mortalities caused by Salmonella enterica are widespread in the Philippines, with hogs being the most commonly recognized carriers of the pathogen. To prevent and control the occurrence of S. enterica infection in the country, methods were used in this study to isolate and rapidly detect, differentiate, and characterize S. enterica in tonsils and jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes of swine slaughtered in four locally registered meat establishments (LRMEs) and four meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services in Metro Manila. A total of 480 samples were collected from 240 animals (120 pigs from each type of meat establishment). A significantly higher proportion of pigs were positive for S. enterica in LRMEs (60 of 120) compared with meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services (38 of 120). More S. enterica-positive samples were found in tonsils compared with jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes in LRMEs, but this difference was not significant. A PCR assay targeting the invA gene had sensitivity that was statistically similar to that of the culture method, detecting 93 of 98 culture-confirmed samples. Multiplex PCR-based O-serogrouping and H/Sdf I typing revealed four S. enterica serogroups (B, C1, D, and E) and six serotypes (Agona, Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Typhimurium, and Weltevreden), respectively, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the PCR products. This study was the first to report detection of S. enterica serotype Agona in the country.

  15. D-Glucose Acts via SGLTI to Increase NHE3 in Mouse Jejunal Brush Border by a NHERF2-Dependent Process

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rong; Murtazina, Rakhilya; Cha, Boyoung; Chakraborty, Molee; Sarker, Rafiquel; Chen, Tian-e; Lin, Zhihong; Hogema, Boris M.; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Seidler, Ursula; Turner, Jerrold R.; Li, Xuhang; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Oral rehydration solutions (ORS) reduce diarrhea-associated mortality by unclear mechanisms. Sodium absorption is mediated by the Na+/H+ hydrogen exchanger NHE3 and is increased by Na+-glucose co-transport in vitro, but the mechanisms of this process are only partially understood and its in vivo relevance has not been determined. Methods Intracellular pH was measured in jejunal enterocytes of wild-type mice and mice with disrupted Na+/H+ exchange regulatory co-factor 2 (NHERF2−/− mice) by multi-photon microscopy. Diarrhea was induced by cholera toxin. Caco-2BBe cells that express NHE3 and the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT)1 were studied by fluorometery, before and after siRNA-mediated knockdown of NHERF1 or NHERF2. NHE3 distribution was assessed by cell-surface biotinylation and confocal microscopy. Brush border mobility was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and confocal microscopy. Results The non-metabolized SGLT1 substrate α-methyl-D-Glu (α-MD-G) activated jejunal NHE3; this process required Akt and NHERF2. α-MD-G normalized NHE3 activity after cholera toxin-induced diarrhea. α-MD-G–stimulated jejunal NHE3 activity was: defective in NHERF2−/− mice and cells with NHERF2 knockdown, but occurred normally with NHERF1 knockdown; associated with increased NHE3 surface expression in Caco-2 cells, which was also NHERF2-dependent; associated with dissociation of NHE3 from NHERF2 and an increase in the NHE3 mobile fraction from the brush border; and accompanied by a NHERF2 ezrin-radixin-moesin–binding domain-dependent increase in co-precipitation of ezrin with NHE3. Conclusions SGLT1-mediated Na-glucose co-transport stimulates NHE3 activity in vivo by an Akt- and NHERF2-dependent signaling pathway. It is associated with increased brush border NHE3 and association between ezrin and NHE3. Activation of NHE3 corrects cholera toxin-induced defects in Na absorption and might mediate efficacy of ORS. PMID:20977906

  16. Nanoselenium Supplementation of Heat-Stressed Broilers: Effects on Performance, Carcass Characteristics, Blood Metabolites, Immune Response, Antioxidant Status, and Jejunal Morphology.

    PubMed

    Safdari-Rostamabad, Morteza; Hosseini-Vashan, Seyyed Javad; Perai, Ali Hossein; Sarir, Hadi

    2016-11-22

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary nanoselenium supplementation at 0, 0.6 and 1.2 mg/kg of diet on growth performance, serum biochemical parameters, immune response, antioxidant capacity, and jejunal morphology of 29-d-old male broilers subjected to heat stress at 37 ± 1°C for 14 d. Broilers were fed for 42 d on the experimental diets. The results showed that nanoselenium supplementation had no effect on growth performance, but it supplementation at the rate of 1.2 mg/kg diet decreased the serum concentration of cholesterol prior to the heat exposure. Further, dietary nanoselenium supplementation linearly increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, while linearly decreased those of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and aspartate aminotransferase in the serum before applying heat stress. Compared with thermoneutral temperature, heat stress reduced body mass gain, feed intake, percentages of carcass, breast, leg, abdominal fat, bursa of Fabricius, thymus, antibody response against sheep red blood cells, serum concentration of protein, erythrocyte activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, jejunal villus height, and villus height to crypt depth ratio, while increased feed conversion ratio, percentages of liver, gizzard, pancreas, gallbladder, heart, and the concentrations of aspartate aminotransferase and malondialdehyde. Dietary supplementation of nanoselenium linearly reduced the abdominal fat and liver percentages, while linearly increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and villus height in heat-stressed broilers. Furthermore, the lower level of nanoselenium decreased the percentages of gizzard and heart in broilers under heat stress. The diet supplemented with 1.2 mg/kg nanoselenium improved feed conversion ratio and increased antibody response against sheep red blood cells, activity of superoxide dismutase, and villus height to crypt depth ratio, but decreased the serum

  17. [Effects of Jiaweisinisan dispersion on content and gene expression of gastric tissue GASR and jejunal tissue VIPR2 of physical and mental stress model rat].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui-Chen; Liu, Fen; Yang, Qiang; Xiong, Chang-Chu

    2013-11-01

    To observe the effects of Jiaweisini dispersion (JWSNS) on the ultrastructure of gastric mucosa, the content and gene expression of gastric antrum tissue gastrin receptor (GASR) and jejunal tissue vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2) in chronic stress gastric ulcer rats, and to elucidate its mechanism. 60 Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal group, model group, JWSNS large, medium, small dose groups, and omeprazole group, 10 rats in each group. Chronic stress method was used to establish the stress ulcer rat model. The every rat in JWSNS small, medium, large dose groups were gavaged with 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 g/ mL Chinese medicine Decoction on 2 mL respectively daily, rats in omeprazole group were gavaged with 0.3 mg/mL omeprazole solution on 2 mL daily, rats in normal group and model group were gavaged 2 mL NS daily. After modeling was end, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe gastric mucosa cells and intercellular connections changes of ultrastructure of glandular stomach area and immunohistochemical method and Real time-PCR method were used to detect the protein content and gene expression changes of gastric antrum tissue GASR and jejunal tissue cell VIPR2. TEM observation demonstrated that in the normal group the gastric mucosa epithelial cells connected compact, cell membrane integrity, cell nuclear shape and size was normal; in model group rats the gastric mucosal cells were severely damaged; the rats in the rest treatment groups were better than those in the model group in different degree. After The treatment of JWSNS and omeprazole, the expression of GASR protein and mRNA in gastric antrum tissue were increased when compared with that of model group (P < 0.05), the expression of VIPR2 protein and mRNA in the jejunum tissue were lower than that of the model group (P < 0.05). The expression of GASR, VIPR2 protein and mRNA in the JWSNS large dose group was closed to the normal group with no significant difference (P > 0

  18. Oral Morphine Pharmacokinetic in Obesity: The Role of P-Glycoprotein, MRP2, MRP3, UGT2B7, and CYP3A4 Jejunal Contents and Obesity-Associated Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lloret-Linares, Célia; Miyauchi, Eisuke; Luo, Huilong; Labat, Laurence; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Poitou, Christine; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Mouly, Stéphane; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Bergmann, Jean-François; Declèves, Xavier

    2016-03-07

    The objective of our work was to study the association between the jejunal expression levels of P-gp, MRP2, MRP3, UGT2B7, CYP3A4, the ABCB1 c.3435C > T polymorphism, and several obesity-associated biomarkers, as well as oral morphine and glucuronides pharmacokinetics in a population of morbidly obese subjects. The pharmacokinetics of oral morphine (30 mg) and its glucuronides was performed in obese patients candidate to bariatric surgery. A fragment of jejunal mucosa was preserved during surgery. Subjects were genotyped for the ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.3435C > T. The subjects were 6 males and 23 females, with a mean body mass index of 44.8 (35.4-61.9) kg/m(2). The metabolic ratios AUC0-inf M3G/morphine and AUC0-inf M6G/morphine were highly correlated (rs = 0.8, p < 0.0001) and were 73.2 ± 24.6 (34.7-137.7) and 10.9 ± 4.1 (3.8-20.6). The pharmacokinetic parameters of morphine and its glucuronides were not associated with the jejunal contents of P-gp, CYP3A4, MRP2, and MRP3. The jejunal content of UGT2B7 was positively associated with morphine AUC0-inf (rs = 0.4, p = 0.03). Adiponectin was inversely correlated with morphine Cmax (rs = -0.44, p = 0.03). None of the factors studied was associated with morphine metabolic ratios. The interindividual variability in the jejunal content of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes, the ABCB1 gene polymorphism, and the low-grade inflammation did not explain the variability in morphine and glucuronide exposure. High morphine metabolic ratio argued for an increased morphine glucuronidation in morbidly obese patients.

  19. Jejunal microvilli atrophy and reduced nutrient transport in rats with advanced liver cirrhosis: improvement by Insulin-like Growth Factor I

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Cortázar, Inma; Pascual, María; Urdaneta, Elena; Pardo, Javier; Puche, Juan Enrique; Vivas, Bárbara; Díaz-Casares, Amelia; García, María; Díaz-Sánchez, Matías; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Castilla, Alberto; González-Barón, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    Background Previous results have shown that in rats with non-ascitic cirrhosis there is an altered transport of sugars and amino acids associated with elongated microvilli. These alterations returned to normal with the administration of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I). The aims of this study were to explore the evolution of these alterations and analyse the effect of IGF-I in rats with advanced cirrhosis and ascites. Thus, jejunal structure and nutrient transport (D-galactose, L-leucine, L-proline, L-glutamic acid and L-cystine) were studied in rats with ascitic cirrhosis. Methods Advanced cirrhosis was induced by CCl4 inhalation and Phenobarbital administration for 30 weeks. Cirrhotic animals were divided into two groups which received IGF-I or saline during two weeks. Control group was studied in parallel. Jejunal microvilli were studied by electron microscopy. Nutrient transport was assessed in brush border membrane vesicles using 14C or 35S-labelled subtracts in the three experimental groups. Results Intestinal active Na+-dependent transport was significantly reduced in untreated cirrhotic rats. Kinetic studies showed a decreased Vmax and a reduced affinity for sugar and four amino acids transporters (expressed as an increased Kt) in the brush border membrane vesicles from untreated cirrhotic rats as compared with controls. Both parameters were normalised in the IGF-I-treated cirrhotic group. Electron microscopy showed elongation and fusion of microvilli with degenerative membrane lesions and/or notable atrophy. Conclusions The initial microvilli elongation reported in non ascitic cirrhosis develops into atrophy in rats with advanced cirrhosis and nutrient transports (monosaccharides and amino acids) are progressively reduced. Both morphological and functional alterations improved significantly with low doses of IGF-I. PMID:15196310

  20. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with jejunal interposition for gastric cancer in the proximal third of the stomach: a retrospective comparison with open surgery.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takahiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Kato, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Masaru; Kinoshita, Taira

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of cancer in the proximal third of the stomach is increasing. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) seems an attractive option for the treatment of early-stage proximal gastric cancer but has not gained wide acceptance because of technical difficulties, including the prevention of severe reflux. In this study, we describe our technique for LPG with jejunal interposition (LPG-IP) and evaluate its safety and feasibility. In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed the data of patients with proximal gastric cancer who underwent LPG-IP (n = 22) or the same procedure with open surgery (OPG-IP; n = 68) between January 2008 and September 2011. Short-term surgical variables and outcomes were compared between the groups. The reconstruction method was the same in both groups, with creation of a 15 cm, single-loop, jejunal interposition for anastomosis. There were no differences in patient or tumor characteristics between the groups. Operation time was longer in the LGP-IP group (233 vs. 201 min, p = 0.0002) and estimated blood loss was significantly less (20 vs. 242 g, p < 0.0001). The average number of harvested lymph nodes did not differ between the two groups (17 vs. 20). There also were no differences in the incidence of leakage at the esophagojejunostomy anastomosis (9.1 vs. 7.4%) or other postoperative complications (27 vs. 32%). The number of times additional postoperative analgesia was required was significantly less in the LPG-IP group compared with the OPG-IP group (2 vs. 4, p < 0.0001). LPG-IP has equivalent safety and curability compared with OPG-IP. Our results imply that LPG-IP may lead to faster recovery, better cosmesis, and improved quality of life in the short-term compared with OPG-IP. Because of the limitations of retrospective analysis, a further study should be conducted to obtain definitive conclusions.

  1. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: Diverse clinical presentations and dissimilar treatment options. A case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM) is a rare pathological condition affecting the mesentery. It is a benign, non-specific inflammation of the adipose tissue of the mesentery of the small intestine and colon. It is characterized by a variable amount of chronic fibrosis. Its etiology is unknown, the pathogenesis is obscure, while the pathological characteristics of the disease are unspecific. The initial clinical presentation varies from typically asymptomatic to that of an acute abdomen. The diagnosis is suggested by computed tomography but is usually confirmed by surgical biopsies. Treatment is largely empirical; it is decided upon on the basis of the clinical condition of the patient, and usually a few specific drugs are used. Surgical resection is sometimes attempted for definitive therapy, although the surgical approach is often limited. We will present five cases of SM as well as a review of the available literature in order to state and compare a variety of clinical presentations, diverse possible etiologies and dissimilar treatment options. PMID:21635777

  2. [Gastrocolic omental cyst in an adult: Case presentation and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Rodríguez, Pablo; Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra

    Mesenteric lymphangioma are rare tumours. They usually present early on in life, if congenital, or soon after trauma. The usual sites of presentation of lymphangiomas are in the neck, and axillae. In the abdomen they are more common in the mesentery, primarily of the ileum, or retroperitoneal. A rare case is presented of a mesenteric lymphangioma. It involves an elderly African-American male, many years after trauma, and characterised with early satiety, causing weight loss, but without gastric outlet obstruction or vomiting. Its diagnosis, management and review of literature are presented. Mesenteric cysts are rare tumours that should be included as differential diagnosis in elderly patients with a history of previous abdominal trauma. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Laparoscopy in Afferent Loop Obstruction Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pettinato, Giovanna; Romessis, Matheos; Ferrari Bravo, Andrea; Barozzi, Geraldine; Giovanetti, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    Background: We describe an afferent loop obstruction caused by an adhesion band in a case of distal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y end-to-side jejunal anastomosis for cancer. Methods: An initial clinical presentation of acute pancreatitis was ruled out by a computed tomography scan, which revealed intestinal obstruction; it was then confirmed on laparoscopy. Definitive treatment was laparoscopic adhesiolysis. A complete review of the literature concerning afferent loop obstructions is presented. Results: The treatment was successful, with minimal postoperative pain, and the 5-day hospital stay was uncomplicated. The patient remains asymptomatic at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The authors advocate minimally invasive surgery as a complete diagnostic and therapeutic alternative to emergency laparotomy in cases where afferent loop syndrome is suspected, and acknowledge that prompt surgery has a higher rate of success and reduces operative morbidity and mortality. PMID:16882437

  4. Idiopathic Steatorrhea Presenting with Different Manifestations in Sisters

    PubMed Central

    Rally, C. R.; Munroe, D. S.; Bogoch, A.

    1964-01-01

    Although it is well known that the incidence of idiopathic steatorrhea is much higher in relatives of patients with this disease than it is in the general population, there has been little comment on the variability of symptoms in familial cases. Two sisters with this disease are reported. One presented with a relatively acute history of diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue and peripheral edema and was found to have a normal hemoglobin, hypocalcemia and a markedly decreased prothrombin activity. Her elder sister tended to constipation and had a 10-year history of refractory iron-deficiency anemia. The diagnosis was confirmed in both by peroral jejunal biopsy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14122463

  5. Complicated duplication cysts on the ileum presenting with a mesenteric inflammatory mass.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gye-Yeon; Im, Soo-Ah; Chung, Jae Hee

    2008-04-01

    Mesenteric inflammation caused by complicated duplication cysts rarely occurs. We present and discuss the imaging findings of a mesenteric inflammatory mass caused by complicated duplication cysts in an infant. Sonography showed a complex, echogenic cystic mass occupying the right subhepatic region containing two thick-walled cystic lesions inseparable from the normal bowel loop. On CT images a large, heterogeneously enhancing, hypodense peritoneal mass was observed to infiltrate the mesentery, which contained small cystic masses with enhancing thick walls. At surgery a mesenteric inflammatory mass caused by two complicated duplication cysts was found to be firmly fixed by surface contact with the ileum. A review of the literature relating to the etiologic relationship between a mesenteric inflammatory mass and complicated duplication cysts is presented.

  6. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S. G.; McCann, R. S.; Kaiser, M. K.; Begault, D. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew on flight vehicles, surface landers and habitats, and during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Designers of displays and controls for exploration missions must be prepared to select the text formats, label styles, alarms, electronic procedure designs, and cursor control devices that provide for optimal crew performance on exploration tasks. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP are: 1) Controls, 2) Displays, 3) Procedures, and 4) EVA Operations.

  7. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  8. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Sandor, Aniko; McCann, Robert S.; Kaiser, Mary K.; Adelstein, Barnard D.; Begault, Durand R.; Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.; Godfroy, Martine

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. In addition to addressing display design issues associated with information formatting, style, layout, and interaction, the Information Presentation DRP is also working toward understanding the effects of extreme environments encountered in space travel on information processing. Work is also in progress to refine human factors-based design tools, such as human performance modeling, that will supplement traditional design techniques and help ensure that optimal information design is accomplished in the most cost-efficient manner. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP for FY10 are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. The poster will highlight completed and planned work for each subtask.

  9. Observations on some additional abnormalities in situs inversus viscerum.

    PubMed Central

    Chandraraj, S

    1976-01-01

    The abnormal findings in a case of Situs inversus totalis are described. The duodenum was placed abnormally and retained its primitive mesentery. The proximal 22 in of jejunum were retroperitoneal. The attachment of the root of the mesentery to the posterior abdominal wall had a 7-shaped appearance, and there was a partial failure of the primitive mesocolon to adhere to the posterior abdominal wall. The common hepatic artery arose from the superior meseneric artery, which also provided a branch to the proximal jejunal loop. The right vagus nerve was found anterior to the oesophagus at the oesophageal hiatus in the diaphragm, and the left vagus was posterior. A double ureter was present on the right side. The findings are discussed in relation to mid-gut development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1002609

  10. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  11. Mesenteric pseudocyst of the transverse colon: unusual presentation of more common pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Eun; Jeon, Tae Joo; Park, Ji Young

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presented to the hospital with a cyst in the abdominal cavity as the main finding obtained by abdominal CT. The cyst measured 13.5×9 cm and was located near the proximal wall of the body of the stomach. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed that, the size of the cyst was 8.6×8.8 cm and that most of it was anechoic. However, partially heterogeneous and hypoechoic solid portions and a septum were detected. This cystic lesion was separated from the stomach wall and pancreas. Surgical resection was performed. The final histopathological test results showed that the cystic mass originated from the mesentery of the transverse colon, and the cyst was diagnosed as mesenteric pseudocyst because the cystic wall was composed of granulation tissue without lining epithelial cells. PMID:25320250

  12. Mesenteric pseudocyst of the transverse colon: unusual presentation of more common pathology.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Eun; Jeon, Tae Joo; Park, Ji Young

    2014-10-15

    A 72-year-old man presented to the hospital with a cyst in the abdominal cavity as the main finding obtained by abdominal CT. The cyst measured 13.5×9 cm and was located near the proximal wall of the body of the stomach. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed that, the size of the cyst was 8.6×8.8 cm and that most of it was anechoic. However, partially heterogeneous and hypoechoic solid portions and a septum were detected. This cystic lesion was separated from the stomach wall and pancreas. Surgical resection was performed. The final histopathological test results showed that the cystic mass originated from the mesentery of the transverse colon, and the cyst was diagnosed as mesenteric pseudocyst because the cystic wall was composed of granulation tissue without lining epithelial cells. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Overview Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview presentation of the 2000 NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) Review and Planning Meeting. Topics include: 1) a background of the program; 2) 1999 Industry Feedback; 3) FY00 Status, including resource distribution and major accomplishments; 4) FY01 Major Milestones; and 5) Future direction for the program. Specifically, simulation environment/production software and NPSS CORBA Security Development are discussed.

  14. The utility of [11C] dihydrotetrabenazine positron emission tomography scanning in assessing β-cell performance after sleeve gastrectomy and duodenal-jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    Inabnet, William B.; Milone, Luca; Harris, Paul; Durak, Evren; Freeby, Matthew J.; Ahmed, Leaque; Sebastian, Manu; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Bessler, Marc; Korner, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) on glucose homeostasis and to evaluate the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) scanning for assessing β-cell mass. Methods Goto-Kakizaki rats were divided into 4 groups: control, sham, SG, or DJB. Oral glucose tolerance, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured before and after surgery. Before and 90 days after treatment, [11C] DTBZ micro PET scanning was performed. Results The control and sham animals gained more weight compared with SG and DJB animals (P ≤ .05). Compared with control animals, the glucose area under the curve was lower in DJB animals 30 and 45 days after operations (P ≤ .05). At killing, GLP-1 levels were greater in the DJB group compared with sham and SG (P ≤ .05), whereas insulin levels were greater in both DJB and SG compared with sham (P ≤ .05). With PET scanning, the 90-day posttreatment mean vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 binding index was greatest in the DJB animals (2.45) compared with SG (1.17), both of which were greater than baseline control animals (0.81). Conclusion In type 2 diabetic rodents, DJB leads to improved glucose homeostasis and an increase in VMAT2 density as measured by PET scanning. PMID:19828168

  15. The lack of protective effects of tea supplementation on liver and jejunal epithelium in adult rats exposed to cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Dobrowolski, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Adult rats at the age of 12 weeks were divided into the control group and groups supplemented with green (GT), black (BT), red (RT), or white (WT) tea extracts. The diet (except that for the control) was mixed with 7 mg Cd/kg and 50 mg Pb/kg. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. Basal haematology and plasma biochemical parameters as well as the histomorphometrical parameters of jejunal epithelium and liver were determined. The lowest body mass was found in the RT and WT groups. Some functional (increased plasma ALT and AST, and the de Ritis coefficient) and structural changes in the liver (slight fatty degenerative changes, an increase in the intercellular space) were evident irrespective of the type of tea in the Cd and Pb poisoned rats. This toxic effect was visible especially in rats drinking black or red tea. However, the rats had no elevated LDH and ALT activities. The highest content of Cd and Pb in the liver and blood plasma was found in rats drinking red tea. Based on the results obtained, it is clear that long-term exposure of adult rats with a mature intestinal barrier to Cd and Pb contamination, under higher exposure conditions than the current estimates of weekly exposure of the general population to Cd and Pb through diet, causes a toxic effect, especially in the liver, and can change the structure of intestinal mucosa, irrespective of tea administration.

  16. Effects of stage of gestation and nutrient restriction during early to mid-gestation on maternal and fetal visceral organ mass and indices of jejunal growth and vascularity in beef cows.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A M; Reed, J J; Vonnahme, K A; Soto-Navarro, S A; Reynolds, L P; Ford, S P; Hess, B W; Caton, J S

    2010-07-01

    The objectives were to evaluate effects of maternal nutrient restriction and stage of gestation on maternal and fetal visceral organ mass and indices of jejunal growth and vascularity in beef cows. Thirty multiparous beef cows (BW = 571 +/- 63 kg; BCS = 5.4 +/- 0.7) carrying female fetuses (d 30 of gestation) were allocated to receive a diet of native grass hay (CON; 12.1% CP, 70.7% IVDMD, DM basis) to meet NRC recommendations for BW gain during early gestation or a nutrient-restricted diet of millet straw (NR; 9.9% CP, 54.5% IVDMD, DM basis) to provide 68.1% of NE(m) and 86.7% of MP estimated requirements. On d 125 of gestation, 10 CON and 10 NR cows were killed and necropsied. Five remaining CON cows received the CON diet, and 5 NR cows were realimented with a concentrate supplement (13.2% CP, 77.6% IVDMD, DM basis) and the CON hay to achieve a BCS similar to CON cows by d 220 of gestation. Remaining cows were necropsied on d 245 of gestation. Cow BW and eviscerated BW (EBW) were less (P < 0.01) for NR than CON at d 125 but did not differ (P > 0.63) at d 245. Cows fed the CON diet had greater (P < 0.09) total gastrointestinal (GI) tract, omasal, and pancreatic weights. Stomach complex, ruminal, and liver weights were greater for CON than NR cows (P < 0.09) on d 125. Total GI, stomach complex, and pancreatic weights increased (P < 0.001) with day of gestation. Restricted cows had decreased (P = 0.09) duodenal RNA:DNA compared with CON. Duodenal DNA was less (P = 0.01) and jejunal RNA:DNA (P = 0.09) was greater for cows at d 125 vs. 245. Cow jejunal capillary area density increased with day of gestation (P = 0.02). Fetal BW and EBW were unaffected by dietary treatment (P > or = 0.32). Total GI tract and all components increased in mass with day of gestation (P < 0.001). Fetuses from NR dams had greater (P = 0.003) reticular mass at d 245 than CON fetuses. Fetuses from NR cows had greater (P = 0.02) percent jejunal proliferation at d 125 and greater (P = 0.03) total

  17. Mesothelial neoplasms presenting as, and mimicking, ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mani, Haresh; Merino, Maria J

    2010-11-01

    Mesotheliomas of the abdominal cavity are rare tumors that primarily involve the peritoneum, mesentery, and omentum. The involvement of the viscera is usually secondary to bulky and extensive serosal disease. We describe 7 cases of mesothelioma in which the initial manifestation was that of an ovarian mass. All patients underwent surgery with a primary diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Clinical histories, gross features, and histology slides were reviewed. Immunostains were performed on all cases and electron microscopy was performed in 2 cases. The patients ranged in age from 22 to 52 years and the lesions ranged in size from 3.8 to 9 cm. Of the 7 cases, 4 were predominantly cystic and 3 were solid. Histologically, all cystic tumors were multicystic mesothelioma, whereas the 3 solid tumors were diffuse malignant mesotheliomas. One patient had a borderline mucinous tumor with the mesothelioma occurring as a mural nodule, an association not described earlier. The oldest patient in this series had a diffuse malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum with predominant ovarian surface involvement. Mesothelial neoplasms can present as ovarian masses in young women. Awareness of this presentation is important to establish appropriate management.

  18. Limited systemic sclerosis initially presenting with mesenteric panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Vilá, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis pertains to a group of uncommon disorders named sclerosing mesenteritis that present with different levels of inflammation and fibrosis of the small bowel mesentery. It is associated with abdominal surgeries, trauma, malignancies, infections and connective tissue diseases. To the best of our knowledge, no cases of sclerosing mesenteritis have been reported in patients with systemic sclerosis. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman who had incidental CT findings of mesenteric panniculitis. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy that showed fat necrosis. On further review she had a 1-year history of Raynaud's phenomenon. Physical examination showed sclerodactyly. She had elevated anticentromere antibodies and skin biopsy was consistent with scleroderma. She was diagnosed with limited systemic sclerosis and was treated with D-penicillamine. After 6 years of follow-up, the mesenteric panniculitis and systemic sclerosis both remained stable. This case highlights the importance of considering rheumatic diseases in the differential diagnosis of sclerosing mesenteritis. PMID:25326572

  19. A carvacrol-thymol blend decreased intestinal oxidative stress and influenced selected microbes without changing the messenger RNA levels of tight junction proteins in jejunal mucosa of weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Wei, H-K; Xue, H-X; Zhou, Z X; Peng, J

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that intestinal oxidative stress and microbiota imbalance is involved in weaning-induced intestinal dysfunction in piglets. We have investigated the effect of feeding a carvacrol-thymol blend supplemented diet on intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations and the intestinal barrier in weaning piglets. The piglets (weaned at 21 days of age) were randomly allocated to two groups with six pens per treatment and 10 piglets per pen. At weaning day (21 days of age), six piglets were sacrificed before weaning to serve as the preweaning group. The weaned group was fed with a basal diet, while the weaned-CB group was fed with the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg carvacrol-thymol (1 : 1) blend for 14 days. On day 7 post-weaning, six piglets from each group were sacrificed to determine intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations, messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of intestinal barrier function. Weaning resulted in intestinal oxidative stress, indicated by the increased concentration of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances present in the intestine. Weaning also reduced the population of Lactobacillus genus and increased the populations of Enterococcus genus and Escherichia coli in the jejunum, and increased mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In addition, decreased mRNA levels of zonula occludens and occludin in the jejunal mucosa and increased plasma diamine oxidase concentrations indicated that weaning induced dysfunction of the intestinal barrier. On day 7 post-weaning, supplementation with the carvacrol-thymol blend restored weaning-induced intestinal oxidative stress. Compared with the weaned group, the weaned-CB group had an increased population of Lactobacillus genus but reduced populations of Enterococcus genus and E. coli in the jejunum and decreased mRNA levels of TNF-α. The

  20. The control of bile acid pool size: Effect of jejunal resection and phenobarbitone on bile acid metabolism in the rat 1

    PubMed Central

    Mok, H. Y. I.; Perry, P. M.; Dowling, R. Hermon

    1974-01-01

    In patients with cholesterol gallstones, there is a diminished bile acid pool and the bile becomes supersaturated with cholesterol. Medical treatment has been aimed at re-expanding the pool to improve cholesterol solubility in bile but as yet the factors controlling the size of the bile acid pool' are unknown. Therefore the role of the liver and intestine in controlling bile acid pool size in the rat was studied and the effect of experimental expansion of the pool on bile acid metabolism and bile lipid composition examined. Bile acid absorption was increased from ileum made hyperplastic by previous jejunectomy and hepatic bile acid synthesis was increased by phenobarbitone treatment. Both jejunal resection and phenobarbitone significantly increased the size of the bile acid pool from 32.2 ± SEM 0.94 μmoles/100 g body weight to 42.2 ± 1.71 and 44.4 ± 2.03 respectively. However, the effects of these experimental manipulations on bile acid secretion rate, enterohepatic cycling frequency, and synthesis rates were quite different. Jejunectomy caused a 56% increase in bile acid secretion and more rapid cycling of the bile acid pool but the enhanced absorption did not depress bile acid synthesis. In contrast, phenobarbitone markedly increased synthesis from 14.5 ± 1.42 μmoles.100 g BW−1. 24 hr−1 to 25.9 ± 3.19 but there was no significant change in bile acid secretion and the choleresis seen after phenobarbitone was mainly due to an increase in the bile acid-independent fraction of bile flow. In these experimental studies in the rat, expansion of the bile acid pool did not significantly change bile lipid composition or cholesterol solubility in bile. PMID:4834548

  1. Beneficial Metabolic Effects of Duodenal Jejunal Bypass Liner for the Treatment of Adipose Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Analysis of Responders and Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, B; Krepak, Y; Schiffer, E; Jarick, I; Hauber, M; Lee-Barkey, Y H; Fischer, M; Tschoepe, D

    2016-09-01

    Implantation of a duodenal-jejunal endoluminal bypass liner (DJBL) has shown to induce weight loss and to improve metabolic parameters. DJBL is a reversible endoduodenal sleeve mimicking duodenal bypass while lacking risks and limitations of bariatric surgery.Effects on metabolic control, body mass parameters, appetite regulation, glucose tolerance, organ health, and lipid profile were determined in 16 morbidly overweight patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, relevant hormones (leptin, ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide, glucagon-like peptide, and insulin) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) at 0, 1, 32, and 52 weeks post-implant following a mixed meal tolerance test. Lipoprotein subclasses were analysed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectrometry. DJBL provoked weight loss, a decrease in fat mass, and an improvement in insulin resistance and hepatic function in most but not all of the patients, but in the long term did not increase gut hormone fasting levels pointing to a combined effect of more than gut parameters alone. Lipidome analysis was done in 10 patients, allowing classification to responders and non-responders by reduction of sLDL-p subfraction; and to further analyse the atherogenic profile. Responders showed an overall more pronounced effect regarding improvement of HbA1c, BMI, and HOMA index.Implantation of a DJBL in obese type 2 diabetes patients does not per se lead to an improvement of the metabolic situation. Further analyses including larger cohorts have to be performed to identify responding patients, to better treat non-responders and to analyse the key effectors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Colonic GLP-2 is not Sufficient to Promote Jejunal Adaptation in a PN-Dependent Rat Model of Human Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthew C.; Liu, Xiaowen; Boehler, Christopher J.; Murali, Sangita G.; Holst, Jens J.; Ney, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bowel resection may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS), which often requires parenteral nutrition (PN) due to inadequate intestinal adaptation. The objective of this study was to determine the time course of adaptation and proglucagon system responses after bowel resection in a PN-dependent rat model of SBS. Methods Rats underwent jugular catheter placement and a 60% jejunoileal resection + cecectomy with jejunoileal anastomosis or transection control surgery. Rats were maintained exclusively with PN and killed at 4 hours to 12 days. A nonsurgical group served as baseline. Bowel growth and digestive capacity were assessed by mucosal mass, protein, DNA, histology, and sucrase activity. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and bioactive glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results Jejunum cellularity changed significantly over time with resection but not transection, peaking at days 3–4 and declining by day 12. Jejunum sucrase-specific activity decreased significantly with time after resection and transection. Colon crypt depth increased over time with resection but not transection, peaking at days 7–12. Plasma bioactive GLP-2 and colon proglucagon levels peaked from days 4–7 after resection and then approached baseline. Plasma IGF-I increased with resection through day 12. Jejunum and colon GLP-2 receptor RNAs peaked by day 1 and then declined below baseline. Conclusions After bowel resection resulting in SBS in the rat, peak proglucagon, plasma GLP-2, and GLP-2 receptor levels are insufficient to promote jejunal adaptation. The colon adapts with resection, expresses proglucagon, and should be preserved when possible in massive intestinal resection. PMID:19644131

  3. Effects and mechanism of duodenal-jejunal bypass and sleeve gastrectomy on GLUT2 and glucokinase in diabetic Goto–Kakizaki rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The study investigated the effects and mechanism of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on the expression of liver GLUT2 and glucokinase (GCK) in diabetic rats. Methods Animal models of Goto–Kakizaki (GK) rats were established for the investigation of DJB and SG. Results of weight, food intake, fasting plasma glucose level, oral glucose tolerance test and insulin were compared. Liver tissues were harvested 8 weeks postoperatively. Reverse transcription-PCR and western blot were used to detect liver GLUT2 and GCK mRNA and protein expression after operation. Results Fasting plasma glucose levels of DJB group and SG group in GK rats were markedly declined at 3 days and l, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively (P <0.01), whereas the levels of the sham-operated group only dropped at 3 days and 1 week postoperatively, and there were no significant differences 2 weeks postoperatively (P >0.05). In the liver of GK rats, GLUT2 mRNA level and protein expression after DJB were higher than those in sham-operated group and control group. GLUT2 mRNA level and protein expression after SG were significantly lower than those in control group (P <0.01). GCK mRNA and protein experienced similar expression change. Conclusions Both DJB and SG can decrease the plasma glucose levels of GK rats, whereas they have different effects on the expression of liver GLUT2 and GCK. PMID:22686706

  4. Individual and combined effects of Fusarium toxins on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in swine jejunal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lam-Yim Murphy; Woo, Chit-Shing Jackson; Turner, Paul C; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan; El-Nezami, Hani

    2013-07-18

    Fusarium toxins have been arousing public interest in recent years because of their potential health hazards for humans and agricultural livestock. It was hypothesized that selected pro-inflammatory cytokines might serve as sensitive biomarkers of the predicted adverse effects of Fusarium toxins on the basis of their potential ability to induce immune and intestinal alterations comparable to those in human chronic inflammatory infection. Consequently, the aim of this study was to elucidate individual and combined effects of four common Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), zearalenone (ZEA) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1α, IL1β, IL6, IL8, TNFα and MCP-1) using a porcine jejunal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. Based on a dose-response relationship between individual mycotoxins and cell viability (MTT assay) that was previously established, cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic concentrations were selected to investigate combinations of two, three and all four of the mycotoxins. In general, up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression occurred for both individual and mixtures of Fusarium toxins at cytotoxic concentrations, whereas significant up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA mostly obtained when the toxins existed in mixtures at non-cytotoxic concentrations and these mixtures were found to cause cytotoxicity from MTT assay determined previously. Therefore, it may be concluded that some of the changes in the mRNA expression of IL1α, IL1β, IL6, IL8, TNFα and MCP-1 could be cytotoxicity-related. It was also noted that additive effects were not always observed for the mixtures. These data suggest that individual or mixtures of Fusarium toxins could cause or exacerbate intestinal inflammation. These also provide a better understanding of the possible effects of Fusarium toxins, alone or in combinations on the immunological defense mechanisms of IECs, which would contribute to the

  5. Effects of lipid sources, lysophospholipids and organic acids in maize-based broiler diets on nutrient balance, liver concentration of fat-soluble vitamins, jejunal microbiota and performance.

    PubMed

    Polycarpo, G V; Burbarelli, M F C; CarÃo, A C P; Merseguel, C E B; Dadalt, J C; Maganha, S R L; Sousa, R L M; Cruz-Polycarpo, V C; Albuquerque, R

    2016-12-01

    Three experiments with a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement were conducted to evaluate maize-based diets for broilers containing different lipid sources [soybean oil (S) or beef tallow (T)] supplemented with or without lysophospholipids and organic acids on nutrient balance (Experiment I, evaluation period of 10-14 d), on liver concentration of fat-soluble vitamins, on jejunal microbiota (Experiment II, sampling at d 14) and on performance (Experiment III, accumulated periods of 1-14, 1-21 and 1-42 d). A total of 1344 male chicks were used. In each experiment, the birds were allotted in a completely randomised design with 8 replications. The lysophospholipids were mainly composed of lysolecithins and the organic acids blend was constituted by lactic (40%), acetic (7%) and butyric acids (1%). An interaction between lipid sources and lysophospholipids was observed on faecal apparent digestibility of lipid (ADL), which improved with lysophospholipids addition in T diets. Broilers fed on S had higher ADL and faecal apparent digestibility of nitrogen-corrected gross energy (ADGEN). It was not possible to demonstrate a significant treatment effect on the liver concentration of vitamins A and E, even with the differences in fatty acid profile between S and T. Enterobacteria values were below the detection threshold. Lysophospholipid supplementation reduced gram-positive cocci in T-fed birds. S diets promoted lower total anaerobe counts compared with T diets, independent of additives. S diets increased BW gain and feed:gain ratio in all evaluation periods. Lysophospholipids and organic acids improved feed:gain ratio at 1-21 d in T diets. Furthermore, main effects were observed for lysophospholipids and organic acids at 1-42 d, which increased BW gain and improved feed:gain ratio, respectively. No positive interactions between additives were found.

  6. Influence of dietary supplementation with flaxseed and lactobacilli on the mucosal morphology and proliferative cell rate in the jejunal mucosa of piglets after weaning.

    PubMed

    Jonecova, Zuzana; Toth, Stefan; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Nemcova, Radomira

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of flaxseed and lactobacilli supplementation to the diet of piglets during the time period between 10 days before and 21 days after weaning. The morphometry of the jejunal mucosa and proliferative ratio of both epithelial and lamina propria cells were compared with those found in a group of piglets fed with the usual diet added with sunflower oil during the same time period. The addition of flaxseed oil to the diet significantly increased the crypt depth in comparison with both groups supplemented with sunflower (P < 0.05 and 0.001 respectively) on the weaning day. Moreover, the flaxseed addition caused a significant decrease in villus height (P < 0.01) and crypt depth (P < 0.01) 21 days postweaning in comparison with the sunflower group. The proliferative ratio of the epithelial cells in the sunflower group on the weaning day was significantly higher than in both flaxseed groups (P < 0.01). Paradoxically, significantly higher proliferative activity in the mucosal connective tissue in the group with flaxseed supplementation in comparison with the sunflower group was observed on the day of weaning, as well as 3 days later (P < 0.05 both). A combination of flaxseed with lactobacilli showed significantly lower proliferative activity in the connective tissue cells from weaning up to 7 days after weaning (P < 0.05 all) in comparison with the flaxseed group.

  7. Stress-strain analysis of jejunal contractility in response to flow and ramp distension in type 2 diabetic GK rats: effect of carbachol stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Pengmin; Gregersen, Hans

    2013-09-27

    Investigation of intestinal motility in a genetic model of GK rats abandons the possible neurotoxic effect of streptozotocin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic model. Seven GK male rats (GK group) and nine normal Wistar rats (Normal group) were used in the study. The motility experiments were carried out in an organ bath containing physiological Krebs solution. Before and after 10(-5)M carbachol application, the pressure and diameter changes of jejunum were obtained in relation to (1) basic contraction, (2) flow-induced contraction with different outlet resistance pressures and (3) contractions induced by ramp distension. The frequency and amplitude of contractions were analyzed from pressure-diameter curves. Distension-induced contraction thresholds and maximum contraction amplitude of basic and flow-induced contractions were calculated in terms of stress and strain. (1) The contraction amplitude increased to the peak value in less than 10s after adding carbachol. More than two peaks were observed in the GK group. (2) Carbachol decreased the pressure and stress threshold and Young's modulus in the GK group (P<0.01). (3) Carbachol increased the maximum pressure and stress of flow-induced contractions at most outlet pressure levels in both two groups (P<0.001). Furthermore, the flow-induced contractions were significantly bigger at low outlet pressure levels in GK group (P<0.05 and P<0.01). (4) The contraction frequency, the strain threshold and the maximum contraction strain did not differ between the two groups (P>0.05) and between before and after carbachol application (P>0.05). In GK diabetic rats, the jejunal contractility was hypersensitive to flow and distension stimulation after carbachol application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of dietary supplementation with flaxseed and lactobacilli on the mucosal morphology and proliferative cell rate in the jejunal mucosa of piglets after weaning

    PubMed Central

    Jonecova, Zuzana; Toth, Stefan; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Nemcova, Radomira

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of flaxseed and lactobacilli supplementation to the diet of piglets during the time period between 10 days before and 21 days after weaning. The morphometry of the jejunal mucosa and proliferative ratio of both epithelial and lamina propria cells were compared with those found in a group of piglets fed with the usual diet added with sunflower oil during the same time period. The addition of flaxseed oil to the diet significantly increased the crypt depth in comparison with both groups supplemented with sunflower (P < 0.05 and 0.001 respectively) on the weaning day. Moreover, the flaxseed addition caused a significant decrease in villus height (P < 0.01) and crypt depth (P < 0.01) 21 days postweaning in comparison with the sunflower group. The proliferative ratio of the epithelial cells in the sunflower group on the weaning day was significantly higher than in both flaxseed groups (P < 0.01). Paradoxically, significantly higher proliferative activity in the mucosal connective tissue in the group with flaxseed supplementation in comparison with the sunflower group was observed on the day of weaning, as well as 3 days later (P < 0.05 both). A combination of flaxseed with lactobacilli showed significantly lower proliferative activity in the connective tissue cells from weaning up to 7 days after weaning (P < 0.05 all) in comparison with the flaxseed group. PMID:25929724

  9. Right upper quadrant abdominal pain as the initial presentation of polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Gago, Ricardo; Shum, Lee Ming; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-02-22

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a necrotising vasculitis that involves medium and small vessels. PAN generally presents with constitutional, cutaneous, neurological, renal and gastrointestinal manifestations. However, PAN initially involving a single organ/system is uncommon. Here, we present a 42-year-old man who was hospitalised because of severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain that started 2 months before. Physical examination was remarkable for right upper quadrant abdominal tenderness. Abdominopelvic CT showed lymphadenopathy but no hepatic, gallbladder, pancreatic, intestinal or renal abnormalities. Abdominal angiography showed multiple small aneurysms located in the jejunal and hepatic arteries characteristic of PAN. He had a prompt and remarkable response to high-dose corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide. Our case, together with other reports, suggests that PAN should be considered in patients presenting with right upper abdominal pain. Timely diagnosis and treatment reduce the overall morbidity and mortality of the disease.

  10. Effects of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (ST) and Choleraesuis (SC) on chemokine and cytokine expression in swine ileum and jejunal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Skjolaas, K A; Burkey, T E; Dritz, S S; Minton, J E

    2006-06-15

    The gastrointestinal epithelium represents a barrier to potentially invasive enteric pathogens, maintains a role in innate immune surveillance, and is a source of both chemokine and cytokine chemotactic mediators in response to bacterial invasion. In the current study, we evaluated cytokine and chemokine mediators known to regulate movement of macrophages (macrophage migration inhibitory factor; MIF), neutrophils (IL8), dendritic cells (CCL20), and epithelial remodeling (osteopontin; OPN) in response to invasive swine enteropathogens Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) or Choleraesuis (SC). For the in vivo experiment, weaned pigs served as uninfected controls (0 h) or were given 3 x 10(9) CFU ST orally. Pigs were sacrificed at 8, 24, 48, and 144 h after inoculation and total RNA was extracted from defined segments of proximal (PI) and distal (DI) ileum. Relative expression of MIF and OPN were not affected by ST. IL8 expression was increased numerically (P = 0.17 for the interaction term) at 24 and 144 h in the PI and these increases accounted for greater expression in the PI relative to the DI (P < 0.05). Relative expression of CCL20 was increased at 24 h after ST (P < 0.05). Next, we evaluated the time course of MIF, IL8, CCL20, and OPN mRNA expression induced by application of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), ST or SC in vitro using pig jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Cells were grown to confluency on permeable membranes, and treated apically with LPS (10 ng/mL), ST or SC (10(8)/well). After 1 h, cells were washed to remove LPS or extracellular bacteria, and media containing gentamicin was added to kill remaining extracellular bacteria. Media and RNA were collected at 1.5, 3, and 6 h after treatment. MIF mRNA was not affected by LPS or bacterial treatment. Similarly, IL8 expression was not affected by LPS, but was increased by ST and SC relative to controls at 1.5 and 3 h post exposure (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Treatment with SC increased CCL20 m

  11. Effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed diets with different levels of crude protein.

    PubMed

    Bavarsadi, M; Mahdavi, A H; Ansari-Mahyari, S; Jahanian, E

    2016-06-08

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, serum biochemical parameters, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed on diets with different levels of crude protein (CP). A total of 180 laying hens were subjected into nine dietary treatments with four cages of five birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of CP (85.0, 92.5 and 100% of Hy-Line W36 manual recommendation) and three levels of sanguinarine (0.00, 3.75 and 7.50 mg/kg) as a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of laying hens which fed during a 70-day feeding trial. The in vitro study showed that sanguinarine exhibited sevenfold and threefold decreased antioxidant activities to inhibit 2-2-diphenyl-1-picric hydrazyl free radical as well as ferric ion reducing rather than butylated hydroxyl toluene. Although using the decremental levels of CP caused the increase in heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.01), dietary administration of sanguinarine could suppress the serum cholesterol and malondialdehyde concentrations as well as heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.05). Additionally, decreasing CP content resulted in the decreased percentage of albumin (p < 0.05); however, it had no negative effects on humoral immunity. Nonetheless, feeding of at least 3.75 mg/kg sanguinarine led to the remarkable increases in serum gamma globulin concentration (p < 0.01) and secondary (p < 0.05) antibody titres against sheep red blood cells. Moreover, a decline in dietary CP content led to higher villi height and crypt depth (p < 0.05; p < 0.001) and consequently decreased villi height-to-crypt depth ratio (p < 0.001) than the optimum level (100% CP). In spite of the effects of sanguinarine on the suppression of Escherichia coli and Salmonella counts (p < 0.05), it markedly enhanced villi height-to-crypt depth ratio as well as lamina propria lymphatic follicles extent

  12. The deconjugation ability of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the blind loop syndrome with high sup 14 CO sub 2 excretion. Using the breath analysis technique and thin-layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Mizuno, T.; Shionoiri, H.; Sugiyama, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Five patients with blind loop syndrome (Billroth II) were examined by measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity of expired breath samples taken at intervals after a meal containing glycine-1-{sup 14}C cholate. The 5 patients tested showed a marked increase of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity. Furthermore, the ability of deconjugation of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the efferent loop of these patients was tested by thin-layer chromatography. The bacterial species identified from the samples were as follows: enterococcus, Lactobacillus buchneri, L. bifidus, L. brevis, Eubacterium lentum, Bacteroides vulgaricus, B. filamentosum, Corynebacterium granulosum, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Aerobacter aerogenes. These species of bacteria, except E. coli and A. aerogenes, showed the deconjugation ability by which conjugated bile acids in ox gall was hydrolyzed. Administration of chloramphenicol to the 5 patients reduced {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity significantly. On the other hand, 9 healthy men who were tested showed a flat curve, and 8 of the 9 had no growth of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids. The remaining healthy man showed an over growth of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the species did not have the ability of deconjugation.

  13. The alpha1H Ca2+ channel subunit is expressed in mouse jejunal interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Simon J; Strege, Peter R; Lei, Sha; Roeder, Jaime L; Mazzone, Amelia; Ou, Yijun; Rich, Adam; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2009-01-01

    T-type Ca(2+) currents have been detected in cells from the external muscular layers of gastrointestinal smooth muscles and appear to contribute to the generation of pacemaker potentials in interstitial cells of Cajal from those tissues. However, the Ca(2+) channel alpha subunit responsible for these currents has not been determined. We established that the alpha subunit of the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel is expressed in single myocytes and interstitial cells of Cajal using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction from whole tissue, laser capture microdissected tissue and single cells isolated from the mouse jejunum. Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings demonstrated that a nifedipine and Cd(2+) resistant, mibefradil-sensitive current is present in myocytes dissociated from the jejunum. Electrical recordings from the circular muscle layer demonstrated that mibefradil reduced the frequency and initial rate of rise of the electrical slow wave. Gene targeted knockout of both alleles of the cacna1h gene, which encodes the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel subunit, resulted in embryonic lethality because of death of the homozygous knockouts prior to E13.5 days in utero. We conclude that a channel with the pharmacological and molecular characteristics of the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel subunit is expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes from the mouse jejunum, and that ionic conductances through the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel contribute to the upstroke of the pacemaker potential. Furthermore, the survival of mice that do not express the alpha(1H) Ca(2+) channel protein is dependent on the genetic background and targeting approach used to generate the knockout mice.

  14. The α1H Ca2+ channel subunit is expressed in mouse jejunal interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Simon J; Strege, Peter R; Lei, Sha; Roeder, Jaime L; Mazzone, Amelia; Ou, Yijun; Rich, Adam; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2009-01-01

    T-type Ca2+ currents have been detected in cells from the external muscular layers of gastrointestinal smooth muscles and appear to contribute to the generation of pacemaker potentials in interstitial cells of Cajal from those tissues. However, the Ca2+ channel α subunit responsible for these currents has not been determined. We established that the α subunit of the α1H Ca2+ channel is expressed in single myocytes and interstitial cells of Cajal using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction from whole tissue, laser capture microdissected tissue and single cells isolated from the mouse jejunum. Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings demonstrated that a nifedipine and Cd2+ resistant, mibefradil-sensitive current is present in myocytes dissociated from the jejunum. Electrical recordings from the circular muscle layer demonstrated that mibefradil reduced the frequency and initial rate of rise of the electrical slow wave. Gene targeted knockout of both alleles of the cacna1h gene, which encodes the α1H Ca2+ channel subunit, resulted in embryonic lethality because of death of the homozygous knockouts prior to E13.5 days in utero. We conclude that a channel with the pharmacological and molecular characteristics of the α1H Ca2+ channel subunit is expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal and myocytes from the mouse jejunum, and that ionic conductances through the α1H Ca2+ channel contribute to the upstroke of the pacemaker potential. Furthermore, the survival of mice that do not express the α1H Ca2+ channel protein is dependent on the genetic background and targeting approach used to generate the knockout mice. PMID:19413888

  15. Ultrastructural demonstration of the absorption and transportation of minute chylomicrons by subepithelial blood capillaries in rat jejunal villi.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Ei-Ichirou; Mantani, Youhei; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Qi, Wang-Mei; Tanida, Takashi; Takeuchi, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-30

    Chylomicrons from villous columnar epithelial cells are generally known to be transported only by central lymph vessels (CLV), whereas antigenic particulates derived from the intestinal lumen can also be transported by subepithelial blood capillaries (sBCs) in rat intestinal villi. The possibility of chylomicron absorption by sBCs was histoplanimetrically studied in the rat jejunum under a transmission electron microscope. The chylomicrons more abundantly presented in villous venules than in arterioles. The most frequent size (MFS) of chylomicrons was 75 to 90 nm in diameter in the areas near sBCs, while it was 45 to 60 nm in the epithelial intercellular spaces just above sBCs or the intermediate areas between sBCs. The MFS of chylomicrons was 45 to 60 nm in the intermediate areas between sBCs and in the epithelial intercellular spaces just above these areas. The MFS of chylomicrons in CLV was intermediate between that in the area adjacent to sBCs and that in the intermediate areas between sBCs. Chylomicrons were found in small vesicles in the endothelial cytoplasms of sBCs. No chylomicrons larger than 600 nm were observed in the lamina propria. These findings suggest that some of the chylomicrons smaller than 75 nm, which are probable intestinal very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), are directly transported to the liver by hepatic portal blood in addition to CLV and that epithelial fat droplets larger than 600 nm are not discharged into lamina propria in rat jejunum under physiological conditions.

  16. Anisakiasis of the colon presenting as bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Rob; Petrini, John L; Choi, Rosa

    2003-04-01

    Anisakiasis is a disease caused by human infection by the Anisakis larvae, a marine nematode found in raw or undercooked fish. With the increased popularity of eating sushi and raw fish (sashimi) in the United States infection with anisakis is expected to rise. We present the first reported case in the United States of intestinal anisakiasis presenting as a bowel obstruction. A 25-year-old healthy woman with no prior history of surgery presented to the emergency room with bowel obstruction by history and CT. CT also showed a mass in the right lower quadrant. She had eaten seviche, a raw fish appetizer, 2 days earlier and sashimi 3 weeks before admission. She was taken to the operating room for an exploratory laparotomy and was found to have an obstruction, the 2-cm mass in the mesentery, and diffuse mesenteric adenopathy. She had an ileocolectomy. Pathology showed a degenerating fish worm, anisakiasis. She also had a serologic test for immunoglobulin E specific to anisakiasis and it was highly positive. Human infections, as mentioned before, are principally the result of ingestion of the Anisakis larvae. These larvae are usually found in herring, mackerel, salmon, cod, halibut, rockfish, sardine, and squid. Most human infections have been reported from Japan and The Netherlands and involve the stomach. Invasion of the gastric or intestinal wall one to 5 days after eating raw fish may be characterized by the abrupt onset of abdominal pain, nausea and/or vomiting, diarrhea, or an ileus. For transient anisakiasis, supportive measures and reassurance are all that is needed. If the larvae have invaded the intestine or the stomach wall diagnosis and cure occur with endoscopic or surgical removal if evidence of obstruction or perforation is found. The incidence of anisakiasis in the United States is unknown but will likely continue to increase with the popularity of eating sashimi. This case is meant to demonstrate another possible cause for bowel obstruction in the

  17. HISTOPATHOLOGY OF THE DUODENAL-JEJUNAL MUCOSA OBTAINED BY CROSBY BIOPSY IN A CASE OF NUTRITIONAL MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA FOLIC ACID-RESPONSIVE (ISTOPATOLOGIA DELLA MUCOSA DUODENODIGIUNALE OTTENUTA CON BIOPSIA ALLA CROSBY IN UN CASO DI ANEMIA MEGALOBLASTICA NUTRIZIONALE FOLICO-RESPONSIVA),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a nutritional megaloblastic anemia case, responsive to folic acid, partial or subtotal atrophy of the villi was observed in the duodenal-jejunal... villous tunica and of the pericryptic area, the presence of pseudocrypts, alterations of the glandular acini, and hyperplasia of the interstitial

  18. Giant chylolymphatic mesenteric cyst and its successful enucleation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Al Booq, Yousuf; Hussain, Syed S.; Elmy, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cysts of the mesentery are among surgical rarities. The clinical presentation is not characteristic and in addition, the preoperative imaging although suggestive is not diagnostic in this case ultrasound and CTscan was consistent with giant mesenteric cyst. In most cases, the diagnosis is confirmed after surgical exploration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 42 yrs old male patient on exploratory laparotomy had a 14cm×10cm×10 cm cysts which was seen arising from the mesentery ofdistal jejunum 80cm from the duodeno jejunal flexure. The cyst was enucleated successfully from themesentery without entailing resection. The cyst contained milky white fluid consistent with a chylolymphatic cyst. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology which revealed a cyst wall with lymphoidaggregates. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is doing well and there is no evidence of recurrence. DISCUSSION The cysts may be asymptomatic or maymanifest with abdominal pain, distension lump or intestinal obstruction. Our patient was symptomatic with mild and long standing abdominal pain. The definitive diagnosis of these lesions is difficult prior to surgical exploration as there are no pathognomonic symptoms or characteristic imaging findings. CONCLUSION Cysts of the mesentery are among surgical rarities. In most of the cases the diagnosis is confirmed after surgical exploration and removal of thecyst. We would like to emphasize the importance of successful enucleation of the cyst irrespective of its size due to its independent blood supply as opposed to enterogenous cyst which requires bowel resection and anastomosis. PMID:24976602

  19. Giant chylolymphatic mesenteric cyst and its successful enucleation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Al Booq, Yousuf; Hussain, Syed S; Elmy, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Cysts of the mesentery are among surgical rarities. The clinical presentation is not characteristic and in addition, the preoperative imaging although suggestive is not diagnostic in this case ultrasound and CTscan was consistent with giant mesenteric cyst. In most cases, the diagnosis is confirmed after surgical exploration. A 42 yrs old male patient on exploratory laparotomy had a 14cm×10cm×10 cm cysts which was seen arising from the mesentery ofdistal jejunum 80cm from the duodeno jejunal flexure. The cyst was enucleated successfully from themesentery without entailing resection. The cyst contained milky white fluid consistent with a chylolymphatic cyst. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology which revealed a cyst wall with lymphoidaggregates. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is doing well and there is no evidence of recurrence. The cysts may be asymptomatic or maymanifest with abdominal pain, distension lump or intestinal obstruction. Our patient was symptomatic with mild and long standing abdominal pain. The definitive diagnosis of these lesions is difficult prior to surgical exploration as there are no pathognomonic symptoms or characteristic imaging findings. Cysts of the mesentery are among surgical rarities. In most of the cases the diagnosis is confirmed after surgical exploration and removal of thecyst. We would like to emphasize the importance of successful enucleation of the cyst irrespective of its size due to its independent blood supply as opposed to enterogenous cyst which requires bowel resection and anastomosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A rare case of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma presenting as acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Bakrac, Milena; Bonaci, Branka; Krstic, Miodrag; Simic, Sanja; Colovic, Milica

    2006-01-01

    Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATCL) is a high grade, pleomorphic peripheral T-cell lymphoma usually with cytotoxic phenotypes. We describe a first case of patient with EATCL that is remarkable for its fulminant course and invasion of both kidneys manifested as acute renal failure. The patient was a 23 year old woman with a long history of celiac disease. She was presented with acute renal failure and enlarged mononuclear infiltrated kidneys. Diagnosis of tubuloi-nterstitial nephritis and polyserositis was confirmed with consecutive pulse doses of steroid therapy. After reco-very, she had disseminated disease two months later. Magnetic resonance imaging showed thickened intestine wall, extremely augmented kidneys, enlarged intra-abdominal lymph nodes with extra-luminal compression of common bile duct. Laparotomy with mesenterial adipous tissue and lymph glands biopsy was done. Consecutive pathophysiological and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the diagnosis of EATCL: CD45RO+, CD43+, CD3+. The revision of renal pathophysiology sub-stantiated the diagnosis. The patient received chemotherapy, but unfortunately she died manifesting signs of pulmonary embolism caused by tumor cells. PMID:16610043

  1. Making your presentation fun: creative presentation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    KEENEN,MARTHA JANE

    2000-05-18

    What possesses someone to volunteer and go through hoops and red tape to make a presentation at a conference? For that matter, why does anyone ever present anything to anyone? Actually, presentations are a fact of life and there are many reasons for doing a presentation and doing it well. New and existing staff need training and orientation to the way things are done here. Handing all of them a manual and hoping they read it is pretty much a waste of paper. On the other hand, an effective, entertaining and upbeat presentation on the relevant topics is more likely to stick with those people. They will even have a name and face to remember and seek out when they have an issue on or with that topic. This can be a very effective beginning for networking with new peers. The presenter is seen as knowledgeable, as a source of information on company topics and possibly evaluated as a potential mentor or future manager. Project staff and/or peers benefit from clear, concise, presentations of topical knowledge. This is one way that a group working on various aspects of the same project or program can stay in touch and in step with each other. Most importantly, presentations may be the best or only door into the minds (and budgets) of management and customers. These presentations are a wonderful opportunity to address legal and compliance issues, budget, staffing, and services. Here is a chance, maybe the only one, to demonstrate and explain the wonderfulness of a program and the benefit they get by using the services offered most effectively. An interactive presentation on legal and compliance issues can be an effective tool in helping customers and/or management make good risk management decisions.

  2. A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube due to mesenteric penetration.

    PubMed

    Roos, J

    2015-07-01

    A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube is described. At laparotomy, the PEG tube was found to have penetrated the jejunal mesentery at two points, thereby acting as a focus for a volvulus. Direct injury and obstruction to the small bowel have been described but volvulus due to mesenteric penetration has not.

  3. Teaching Presentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William H.; Thompson, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Effective teaching of presentation skills focuses on the most important element of the presentation--the message itself. Some instructors place the heaviest emphasis on the messenger (the presenter) and focus their presentation feedback on all the presenter is doing wrong--saying "um," gesturing awkwardly, and so forth. When students receive this…

  4. Professional presentations made simple.

    PubMed

    Starver, Kelly D; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    One way clinical nurse specialists (CNS) influence nursing practice and share professional expertise is by making presentations. This article presents strategies that clinical nurse specialists can use to enhance the effectiveness of oral presentations. Included are tips for analyzing the audience, developing content and materials, selecting presentation methods, and delivering an effective presentation.

  5. Tularaemia presenting as parapharyngeal abscess: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Koc, S; Gürbüzler, L; Yaman, H; Eyibilen, A; Salman, N; Ekici, A

    2012-05-01

    We report an extremely rare case of the oropharyngeal form of tularaemia, causing a parapharyngeal abscess. A 48-year-old woman presented with fever, sore throat, breathing difficulty and a right-sided neck swelling. This mass had previously been treated with penicillin without response, and had already been surgically drained once in another hospital. On physical examination, the tonsils were exudative and hypertrophic and the pharynx was hyperaemic. A fluctuant, 4 × 4 cm mass was seen on endoscopic examination, originating from the left parapharyngeal area and protruding towards the pyriform sinus, and partly obstructing the airway. Microagglutination test antibody titres for Francisella tularensis were positive (1/1280). The patient healed completely after definitive drainage of the abscess and antimicrobial therapy for 14 days (streptomycin, 2 × 1 g intramuscularly). Tularaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with tonsillopharyngitis, cervical lymphadenitis and parapharyngeal abscess who do not respond to treatment with penicillin, even if they do not live in an endemic region.

  6. Subpart A Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  7. Subpart RR Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  8. Subpart T Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  9. Subpart DD Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  10. Subpart AA Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  11. Subpart C Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  12. Subpart L Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  13. Subpart HH Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  14. Subpart D Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  15. Subpart UU Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  16. Subpart V Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  17. Subpart NN Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  18. Subpart MM Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  19. Subpart PP Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  20. Subpart Z Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  1. Subpart SS Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  2. Subpart G Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  3. Subpart N Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  4. Subpart QQ Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  5. Subpart W Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  6. Subpart Y Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  7. Subpart X Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  8. Subpart P Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  9. Subpart H Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  10. Subpart OO Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  11. Subpart FF Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  12. Subpart II Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  13. Subpart TT Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  14. Subpart S Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  15. Subpart I Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  16. Wegener’s granulomatosis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease and presenting with chronic enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shahedi, Kamyar; Hanna, Ramy Magdy; Melamed, Oleg; Wilson, James

    2013-01-01

    Wegener’s granulomatosis, also known as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, is a small vessel vasculitis with primarily pulmonary, renal, and sinus disease manifestations. The prevalence of Wegener’s granulomatosis is three cases per 100,000 patients. Cardiovascular, neurologic, cutaneous, and joint manifestations have been reported in many case reports and case series. Gastrointestinal manifestations are less noted in Wegener’s granulomatosis, although they have been previously reported in the form of intestinal perforation and intestinal ischemia. Additionally, there are characteristic findings of vasculitis that are noted with active Wegener’s granulomatosis of the small bowel. We report a case of an elderly patient who presented with weight loss, diarrhea, and hematochezia. His symptoms were chronic and had lasted for more than 1 year before diagnosis. Inflammatory bowel disease or chronic enteritis due to Salmonella arizonae because of reptile exposure originally were suspected as etiologies of his presentation. The findings of proteinuria, renal failure, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy, in conjunction with an elevated c-ANCA titer, confirmed the diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis with associated intestinal vasculitis. This case demonstrates an atypical presentation of chronic duodenitis and jejunitis secondary to Wegener’s granulomatosis, which mimicked inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24124396

  17. Marked Differences in Mucosal Immune Responses Induced in Ileal versus Jejunal Peyer’s Patches to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Secreted Proteins following Targeted Enteric Infection in Young Calves

    PubMed Central

    Facciuolo, Antonio; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    In cattle, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection is primarily mediated through M cells overlying Peyer’s patches (PP) in the ileum. The capacity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to invade ileal PP (IPP) versus discrete PP in the jejunum (JPP) and subsequent differences in mucosal immune responses were investigated. Intestinal segments were surgically prepared in both mid-jejunum, containing two JPPs, and in terminal small intestine containing continuous IPP. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (109 CFU) was injected into the lumen of half of each intestinal segment when calves were 10–14 days-old and infection confirmed 1–2 months later by PCR and immunohistochemistry. Thirteen recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins, previously identified as immunogenic, were used to analyze pathogen-specific B- and T-cell responses in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes. IgA plasma cell responses to 9 of 13 recombinant proteins were detected in JPP but not in IPP. Secretory IgA reacting in ELISA with 9 of the 13 recombinant proteins was detected in luminal contents from both jejunal and ileal segments. These observations support the conclusion that pathogen-specific IgA B cells were induced in JPP but not IPP early after a primary infection. The presence of secretory IgA in intestinal contents is consistent with dissemination of IgA plasma cells from the identified mucosa-associated immune induction sites. This is the first direct evidence for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis uptake by bovine JPP and for local induction of pathogen-specific IgA plasma cell responses after enteric infection. We also provide evidence that bacterial invasion of IPP, a primary B lymphoid tissue, provides a novel strategy to evade induction of mucosal immune responses. Over 60% of PPs in the newborn calf small intestine is primary lymphoid tissue, which has significant implications when designing oral vaccines or diagnostic tests to detect early M. avium subsp

  18. Hematological and serum biochemical parameters of blood in adolescent rats and histomorphological changes in the jejunal epithelium and liver after chronic exposure to cadmium and lead in the case of supplementation with green tea vs black, red or white tea.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Dobrowolski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Rats were used to check whether regular consumption of black, red, or white tea would have a protective effect similar to the action of green tea on the intestine and liver in the case of exposure to Cd and Pb within the limits of human environmental exposure to these elements. Rats at the age of 6 weeks were divided into the control and four groups supplemented with green (GT), black (BT), red (RT), or white (WT) tea extracts. Their diet (except the control) was mixed with 7 mg Cd/kg and 50mg Pb/kg. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. The effects of administration of tea in Cd- and Pb-poisoned rats on plasma biochemical parameters and the jejunal epithelium and liver were determined. The highest body mass was found in the GT group. The highest hemoglobin and Fe concentrations were in the control and GT groups. The highest activity of AST was in groups poisoned with Cd and Pb independently on supplementation. The highest ALT activity was in BT and RT groups with lower content of polifenoles. Pb and Cd disturbed the liver leading to necrosis and fatty degenerative changes, and a loss of normal architecture of the hepatocytes. Rats from the GT group had the highest cell proliferation rate in intestinal glands and the largest absorptive surface. Black, red, and white tea exerted a varied impact on the histological structure and innervation of the small intestine wall as well as on the absorptive function of small intestine mucosa in rats poisoned with Pb and Cd than green tea. On the other hand, taking into account the number of apoptotic cells, the effect of the teas was the same. Moreover, it is clear that long term exposure to Cd and Pb contamination causes toxic effect in the liver.

  19. Effects of inulin and enzyme complex, individually or in combination, on growth performance, intestinal microflora, cecal fermentation characteristics, and jejunal histomorphology in broiler chickens fed a wheat- and barley-based diet.

    PubMed

    Rebolé, A; Ortiz, L T; Rodríguez, M L; Alzueta, C; Treviño, J; Velasco, S

    2010-02-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the effects of inulin, alone or in combination with enzyme complex (primarily xylanase and beta-glucanase), on growth performance, ileal and cecal microflora, cecal short-chain fatty acids, and d-lactic acid and jejunal histomorphology of broiler chickens fed a wheat- and barley-based diet from 7 to 35 d of age. A total of 240 seven-day-old male Cobb broilers were allocated to 1 of 6 treatments, with 8 replicate pens per treatment and 5 birds per pen. The experiment consisted of a 3x2 factorial arrangement of the treatments with 3 concentrations of inulin (0, 10, or 20 g/kg of diet) and 2 concentrations of enzyme complex (0 or 100 mg/kg of diet). At the end of the experiment, 8 birds per treatment (one from each pen) were randomly chosen and slaughtered. Birds fed inulin-containing diets exhibited significantly (P=0.043) improved final BW gain. Dietary inulin had a positive and significant (P<0.002 to 0.009) effect on bifidobacteria and lactobacilli counts in both ileal and cecal contents and, to an extent, also altered the fermentation patterns in the ceca, increasing the concentration of n-butyric and d-lactic acids and the n-butyric acid:acetic acid ratio. Inulin inclusion had no effect on villus height and crypt depth or microvillus length, width, and density in the jejunum. Enzyme supplementation of the control diet and inulin-containing diets had no effect on many of the variables studied and only resulted in a decrease in crypt depth and an increase in villus height:crypt depth ratio in the jejunum.

  20. Rare presentation of small bowel intussusception in childhood.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung-Yan Grace; Tsang, Pui-Ki Jane; Chu, Ping-Yung; Wong, Yiu-Chung

    2016-07-01

    Small bowel intussusception complicated simultaneously by volvulus in an older child is rare but clinically significant, necessitating urgent operative management. We report a local case of jejuno-jejunal intussusception complicated by volvulus and bowel infarction in a 9-year-old Chinese girl, with diagnosis made on preoperative computed tomography and confirmed at laparotomy. An intestinal polyp as the lead point for intussusception was identified operatively. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Marketing through Video Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhart, Donna

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using video presentations as marketing tools. Includes information about video news releases, public service announcements, and sales/marketing presentations. Describes the three stages in creating a marketing video: preproduction planning; production; and postproduction. (JOW)

  2. [Laparoscopic resection of a mesenteric cyst].

    PubMed

    Dede, Kristóf; Mersich, Tamás; Faludi, Sándor; Blans, Beáta; Salamon, Ferenc; Jakab, Ferenc

    2010-03-14

    Mesenteric cysts are rare intraabdominal tumors, which cause plain symptoms. Despite the modern imaging techniques, the correct preoperative diagnosis is difficult. The optimal treatment is surgical excision of the cysts with open surgery, laparoscopy, or even retroperitoneoscopy. Surgical excision needs to be considered in case of complaints, growing cyst, or suspicion of malignancy. Indications for urgent surgery treatment are: bleeding, volvulus, torquation or ileus. Most frequently, mesenterial cysts are diagnosed during the operation of an unknown palpable abdominal cystic resistance. We present a case of a 32-year-old female patient with a jejunal mesenteric cyst, treated by laparoscopic resection. Postoperative period was uneventful, and after an early discharge the patient's recovery was free of symptoms. Histopathological examination revealed a benign cyst. We conclude that laparoscopic resection of abdominal cysts with unknown origin is a safe operation and can be recommended.

  3. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  4. Rotating Poster Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagares, Manuel; Reisenleutner, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Oral presentations are a common practice in foreign language classes, often used to assess students' speaking skills. Usually, the presentations are delivered by students in front of the class, often with PowerPoint slides or Prezi as support. However, frequently the audience does not engage with the presentation and thus, the benefits of this…

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  6. Make Your Presentation Powerful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Erik

    2015-01-01

    "I was planning on doing a lot of work today during your presentation, but I couldn't get anything done. I just had to pay attention!" The author received this unexpected feedback from a teacher at the end of a presentation he gave, and although he considered it a compliment, it made him reflect on the dire state of presentations in…

  7. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  8. Make Your Presentation Powerful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Erik

    2015-01-01

    "I was planning on doing a lot of work today during your presentation, but I couldn't get anything done. I just had to pay attention!" The author received this unexpected feedback from a teacher at the end of a presentation he gave, and although he considered it a compliment, it made him reflect on the dire state of presentations in…

  9. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  12. Display and Presentation Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Thomas Keith

    The use of display and presentation boards as tools to help teachers/trainers convey messages more clearly is briefly discussed, and 24 different types of display and presentation boards are described and illustrated; i.e., chalk, paste-up, hook-n-loop, electric, flannel, scroll, communication planning, acetate pocket, slot, pin-tack, preview,…

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  14. The Upside of Presentism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Presentism is generally regarded as a necessary evil in historiography. This paper explores the upside of that inevitability. Using a philosophical approach to discourse analysis in the tradition of new cultural history, the paper distinguishes between a strategic use of presentism on the one hand, and a rationalistic approach to history on the…

  15. Characteristics of Hypermedia Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Wiley B.; Jansen, Duane G.

    This paper addresses those characteristics of effective and efficient hypermedia presentations that are important for consideration by educators in developing and/or selecting such presentations. Definitions of hypertext, hypermedia, and multimedia are provided, and the relationships among these terms are described. Four other terms useful to…

  16. President Reagan Presents Medals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    President Ronald Reagan presents astronaut John Young with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor as well as NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Astronaut Robert C. Crippen also received the Distinguished Service Medal and Dr. Alan Lovelace was presented with the President's Citizens Medal. From left to right: President Ronald Reagan Astronaut, John Young Astronaut, Robert Crippen Dr. Alan Lovelace Vice President George Bush

  17. Conference presentations with confidence.

    PubMed

    Strickland, T

    1999-01-01

    Remember that great presentation you heard at last year's convention? Perhaps the marketing case study was especially interesting. Or perhaps you wondered whether you could use the organizational tools the speaker described in your own work. Finally, you might have wondered, "Could I offer a conference presentation at some point?" The answer: yes!

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  19. Clinical features of mesenteric lymphatic malformation in children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Hyun-Young; Lee, Cheol; Min, Hye Sook; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric lymphatic malformations (MLs) are a heterogeneous group of benign diseases of the lymphatic system that present with cystic dilated lymphatics of the mesentery. MLs are rare and represent less than 5% of all lymphatic malformations. The aims of this study were to analyze the characteristics of MLs in children and to suggest a modified classification. We investigated 25 patients who underwent ML surgery. The clinical data and pathological findings were reviewed retrospectively. We divided the patients into 4 groups according to the operative findings. Group 1 included patients with MLs involving the intestinal walls. Group 2 included patients with pedicle-type MLs with no relationship to the mesenteric vessels. Group 3 patients presented with MLs located in the mesenteric boundaries near the mesenteric vessels. Group 4 patients had multicentric and diffusely infiltrated MLs. The male-to-female ratio was 11:14, and the median age at diagnosis was 5years of age. The most common symptom was abdominal pain. The jejunal mesentery was the most frequently involved site in this study. Five patients showed the macrocystic type and 20 patients showed the mixed cystic type. With the exception of one patient with a large mixed cystic-type ML who underwent incomplete mass excision, 24 patients underwent complete mass excision. The group 1 patients (n=14) underwent mass excision performed with segmental resection of the bowel. The group 2 patients (n=3) only underwent mass excision surgery. The patients in group 3 (n=7) underwent mass excision with segmental resection of the intestine because ML excision altered the blood supply of the adjacent intestines. The group 4 patients (n=1) presented with MLs involving the entire mesentery and underwent incomplete excision. The relationships between MLs and the neighboring organs determine the surgical strategy, and the size and location of MLs affect the operative methods. The modified classification based on these findings

  20. Impact of tetrodotoxin application and lidocaine supplementation on equine jejunal smooth muscle contractility and activity of the enteric nervous system in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tappenbeck, K; Hoppe, S; Geburek, F; Feige, K; Huber, K

    2014-09-01

    By blocking the enteric nervous system (ENS) using tetrodotoxin (TTX), previous studies have documented the contractility-enhancing (CE) effects of lidocaine in equine intestinal smooth muscle (SM) at the level of SM cells and/or interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). The present study examined the impact of ENS deactivation on CE lidocaine effects, and investigated the effects of lidocaine on ENS activity. TTX application did not affect the CE effects of lidocaine, indicating that these were not mediated by TTX-sensitive sodium channels. Application of TTX or ≥100 mg/L lidocaine reduced ENS activity. Although such concentrations of lidocaine exceed therapeutic blood concentrations, tissue concentrations may be higher with the potential to reduce ENS activity and impair intestinal motility in vivo. Improved understanding of underlying mechanisms is relevant for therapeutic use of lidocaine in horses with postoperative ileus.

  1. Mesenteric panniculitis: prevalence, clinicoradiological presentation and 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    van Bommel, E F H; Elgersma, O E; Hendriksz, T R

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine prevalence, clinicoradiological characteristics and outcome of patients with mesenteric panniculitis (MP) in a large hospital-based population. Methods: Consecutive abdominal CT examinations of 3820 patients were evaluated for MP. Clinical characteristics, therapy and outcome of patients with MP were evaluated during a 5-year follow-up period. A matched pair analysis was performed to further investigate the relation between MP and malignancy. Results: 94 (2.5%) patients with MP were identified (mean age, 66.6 ± 11.2 years, 70.2% male). MP coexisted with malignancy (especially prostatic carcinoma) in 48.9% of patients, and this was slightly but significantly higher than in age- and sex-matched control patients (n = 188, 46.3%). In 48 patients, MP was presumed to be idiopathic. The most frequent presenting symptom was pain (54.3%). Laboratory findings revealed increased acute-phase reactants in half of the patients with MP. CT findings included increased density of mesenterial fat (mean, −56.8 ± 10.8 HU), fat ring sign, tumoural pseudocapsule and small soft-tissue nodules. Patients with MP (14.6%) developed significantly more malignancies during a 5-year follow-up than did the control group (6.9%). One patient was treated with prednisone without satisfactory response. Conclusion: The prevalence of MP in this study was 2.5%. In most patients, radiologic features included increased mesenteric fat density, fat ring sign and small soft-tissue nodules. MP was associated with a significant higher prevalence of coexisting malignancies and a higher prevalence of future cancer development. Advances in knowledge: A more accurate prevalence of MP on CT is demonstrated. An underlying malignancy may play a role. PMID:25271412

  2. Solar Data Hub (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, K.

    2011-04-01

    As power grid integration of renewables becomes ever more important and detailed, the need for a centralized place for solar-related resource data is needed. This presentation describes such a place and website.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  6. Biomass Program Overview Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    This presentation is an interactive walk through of the Program's vision of advancing the biofuels and bioproducts industry and highlights the research and development activities that will help achieve it.

  7. STS-128 Auditorium Presentation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-05

    European Space Agency astronaut Christer Fuglesang, a mission specialist on STS-128, far right, smiles during a presentation in the auditorium at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  9. Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, M.

    2014-08-01

    As an invited guest speaker, Michael Desmond presented on NREL's NWTC structural testing methods and capabilities at the 2014 Sandia Blade Workshop held on August 26-28, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM. Although dynamometer and field testing capabilities were mentioned, the presentation focused primarily on wind turbine blade testing, including descriptions and capabilities for accredited certification testing, historical methodology and technology deployment, and current research and development activities.

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  11. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  12. The Relationship Between Ischemia Time and Mucous Secretion in Vaginal Reconstruction With the Jejunal Free Flap: An Experimental Study on the Rat Jejunum.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Omer; Ozkan, Ozlenen; Bektas, Gamze; Cinpolat, Anı; Bassorgun, Ibrahim; Ciftcioglu, Akif

    2015-07-01

    Jejunum flap for reconstruction of the vagina provides a durable, stable coverage; patent tube passage; and natural esthetic appearance. However, excessive mucous secretion is a major drawback of the technique.We have recently presented our cases in which strict 3-hour ischemia with lower mucus secretion was applied. However, a quantitative analysis of goblet cells of the jejunum subjected to ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury on an animal model has not been reported to support this argument.Because goblet cells are responsible for the production and the maintenance of the mucous blanket, we aimed to determine whether goblet cell numbers decrease after ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury.This study was conducted on 3 groups of 10 animals. We applied to the rat jejunum only ischemia in group 1, one hour of ischemia followed by reperfusion in group 2, and 2 hours of ischemia followed by reperfusion in group 3. Histological samples taken from the jejunum exposed to ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury were evaluated in terms of goblet cell numbers, inflammation, apoptotic bodies, and necrosis.Goblet cell numbers significantly decreased in the group of animals exposed to ischemia and exposed to ischemia-reperfusion injury. We think that mucus hypersecretion of the jejenum can be limited by applying a longer period of ischemia time during free flap transfer in vaginal reconstruction.

  13. ESO Presentation in Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C.; D'Odorico, S.

    2004-12-01

    On November 8, ESO continued its series of presentations in memberstates with an event in Copenhagen. So far events have been organised in Belgium, Finland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The purpose of these presentations is to raise the awareness of ESO amongst decision-makers, academia and the media. Over time, the scope and specific focus of the national events have varied, considering the particular circumstances and the wishes of the national hosts, and accordingly, the presentation in Denmark was primarily oriented towards industry. The meeting was initiated by the Royal Danish Consulate General in Munich in conjunction with the Confederation of Danish Industries and the Ministry for Science, Technology and Innovation. Leading up to the meeting, several articles about ESO had appeared in the Danish press and the 2nd TV Channel featured a report on the ESO projects also in connection with the event.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  15. [Atypical presentation of preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Ditisheim, A; Boulvain, M; Irion, O; Pechère-Bertschi, A

    2015-09-09

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related syndrome, which still represents one of the major causes of maternal-fetal mortality and morbidity. Diagnosis can be made difficult due to the complexity of the disorder and its wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. In order to provide an efficient diagnostic tool to the clinician, medical societies regularly rethink the definition criteria. However, there are still clinical presentations of preeclampsia that escape the frame of the definition. The present review will address atypical forms of preeclampsia, such as preeclampsia without proteinuria, normotensive preeclampsia, preeclampsia before 20 weeks of gestation and post-partum preeclampsia.

  16. Milk: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulajić, S.; Đorđević, J.; Ledina, T.; Šarčević, D.; Baltić, M. Ž.

    2017-09-01

    Although milk/dairy consumption is part of many cultures and is recommended in most dietary guidelines around the world, its contribution to overall diet quality remains a matter of controversy, leading to a highly polarized debate within the scientific community, media and public sector. The present article, at first, describes the evolutionary roots of milk consumption, then reviews the milk-derived bioactive peptides as health-promoting components. The third part of the article, in general, presents the associations between milk nutrients, disease prevention, and health promotion.

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  18. Effective lecture presentation skills.

    PubMed

    Gelula, M H

    1997-02-01

    Lectures are the most popular form of teaching in medical education. As much as preparation and organization are key to the lecture's success, the actual presentation also depends upon the presenter's ability to reach the audience. Teaching is a lively activity. It calls for more than just offering ideas and data to an audience. It calls for direct contact with the audience, effective use of language, capability to use limited time effectively, and the ability to be entertaining. This article offers a structure to effective lecturing by highlighting the importance of voice clarity and speaking speed, approaches to using audiovisual aids, effectively using the audience to the lecture, and ways to be entertaining.

  19. Giving effective poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J A

    1998-08-27

    Giving an effective poster presentation can be easy and rewarding with attention to a few proven concepts. Define your audience. Keep the words and graphics clear, concise, and eye-catching. Remember, you have three seconds to attract attention and 30 seconds to get your message across.

  20. Interactive Presentation of Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdin, Martin; Turcáni, Milan; Vrábel, Marek

    2009-01-01

    In the paper we discus about design of universal environment for solution of creating effective multimedia applications with accent on the implementation of interactive elements with the possibility of using the adaptive systems (AS). We also discuss about possibilities of offline presentation of this interactive multimedia adaptive animations…

  1. MOVES Workshops and Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA held a three-day workshop including EPA presentations on MOVES 2010 algorithms and default data, information on ways to use MOVES more efficiently for various purposes, and discussion of ideas and plans for MOVES future development.

  2. Rachael Humberg Exit Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humberg, Rachael

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the experiences of a college student during a summer internship. The student involved in many projects, such as Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), Acoustic Equipment Testing, Acoustic Test planing for the X-48B and Ikhana.

  3. Econophysics: Past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Area Leão Pereira, Eder Johnson; da Silva, Marcus Fernandes; Pereira, H. B. B.

    2017-05-01

    This paper provides a brief historical review of the relationship between economics and physics, beginning with Adam Smith being influenced by Isaac Newton's ideas up to the present day including the new econophysics discipline and some of the tools applied to the economy. Thus, this work is expected to motivate new researchers who are interested in this new discipline.

  4. Poster Plus Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Forty-five "poster session" papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982) are highlighted. These papers focused on computers in chemistry and chemical education (emphasizing programs) and on instructional innovations (including courses, teaching methods, testing, experiments, and others). (JN)

  5. Film Presentation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monod, Pierre

    1976-01-01

    This article discusses three types of films and their use in the second language classroom. The description film is objective and static, and elicits adjectives and adverbs. This kind of film should be presented three times, each time followed by a different set of learning exercises. The culture film - characterized by descriptions, scenes from…

  6. Managing Presentation Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jackie L.; LeMay, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    All business communication professors struggle with anxiety-ridden students when discussing public speaking. To alleviate students' fears of speaking in public a process was designed to allow business communication students to acknowledge, address, and annul their presentation fears. A six-year comparative study using qualitative methods and…

  7. The Persistence of Presentism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy; Shirley, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: This study draws on the voluminous research on teachers' workplace orientations and especially on Dan Lortie's documentation of conservatism, individualism, and presentism among teachers. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: This study investigated a school reform network of over 300 secondary schools entitled…

  8. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Raman, Siva P; Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-01-01

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form (42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare (3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common (20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated. PMID:26435774

  9. Sirenomelia: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ramesh; Srinivas, S; Kumar, Shiva; Reddy, Surweshwar; Prasad, Hari; Irfan, G M

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting two cases of Sirenomelia (Mermaid Syndrome), which is an extreme example of the caudal regression syndrome. It invariably presents with lower limb fusion, sacral and pelvic bony anomalies, absent external genitalia, imperforate anus, and renal agenesis or dysgenesis. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation. One of our cases survived for 12 days after birth. This new born had an unusually high anorectal anomaly in which the colon was ending at the level of mid transverse colon, fused lower limbs and genital anomalies. Ultrasound of the abdomen revealed horseshoe kidney. Colostomy was performed on day 2 of life. The second case encountered was a stillborn baby on whom an autopsy was performed.

  10. Fathers absent and present.

    PubMed

    Adams, P L

    1984-04-01

    Hindering and obfuscating psychiatric scholarship about the father's role, whether he is present or absent, are several widespread notions and practices--including conceptual, assumptive, attitudinal, methodologic and technical matters. Discussed are eleven barriers to research: patriarchal ideology, preference for studying individual and dyad instead of family systems, preference for considering adults not children, overly rigid definition of parental roles, choosing not longitudinal but one-time cross-sectional study, reasoning about linear cause and effect, focus on attitudes not overt behavior, failure to control for adequate number of variables, neglect of adequate sampling procedures, confusing correlation with causation and an overemphasis on obvious pathology. The father, present or absent, may be salient or insignificant in the life of a child. If salient, the father's role may promote health and growth or may be largely pathogenic. The conclusion holds that an irreducible family unit may consist of only one pair: caretaker/child.

  11. Organising and presenting information.

    PubMed

    Kankanady, Raghavendra; Wells, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Information management can be a daunting process for clinicians, health care providers and policy makers within the health care industry. This chapter discusses the importance of information classification and information architecture in the information economy and specific challenges faced within the health care industry. The healthcare sector has industry specific requirements for information management, standards and specifications for information presentation. Classification of information based on information criticality and the value in the health care industry is discussed in this paper. Presentation of information with reference to eHealth standards and specifications for healthcare information systems and their key requirements are also discussed, as are information architecture for eHealth implementation in Australia. This chapter also touches on information management and clinical governance since the importance of information governance is discussed by various researchers and how this is becoming of value to healthcare information management.

  12. [Metachromatic Leukodystrophy. Case Presentation].

    PubMed

    Espejo, Lina María; de la Espriella, Ricardo; Hernández, José Fernando

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a rare demyelinating disease (prevalence 1:40 000), also called arylsulfatase A deficiency (ARS-A), which may present with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Clinical assessment may be difficult, due to unspecific signs and symptoms. A case is presented of a 16 year-old female patient seen in psychiatry due to behavioural changes, psychosis, and with impaired overall performance. She was initially diagnosed with schizophrenia, but the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) scan and laboratory tests lead to the diagnosis of MLD. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Pachygyria Presented as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Seshadri Sekhar; Talapatra, Devlina; Acharya, Rudra; Sarkhel, Sujit

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric manifestation of pachygyria, a neuronal migration disorder is rare in literature; rarer if it is bipolar disorder specifically. Here, we report a case of mania and seizure who subsequently diagnosed as pachygyria. Proper literature about pathophysiology is discussed and recently discovered putative genetic role in bipolar disorder explained. This case also emphasis the importance of detailed history taking and imaging investigation even in a pure psychiatric presentation. PMID:26702182

  14. Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    Mr. Jim Parker Associate Director Ground Vehicle Robotics Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page...Briefing 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2012 to 01-08-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned

  15. Prematurity: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Tsimis, M. E.; Al-Hamayel, N. Abu; Germaine, H.; Burd, I.

    2014-01-01

    The study of preterm labor and prematurity, as with any medical science, has undergone a major transformation in its approach from an inevitable part of obstetrics with few answers to one in which science has led to knowledge and clinical intervention. Despite these advancements, understanding of preterm labor and prevention of prematurity is still limited. In the current review, we begin the discussion with fetal viability, first from a historical perspective and then from the understanding of this issue from a prospective of various professional organizations. We then present the scope of the problem of preterm birth from various countries including the discrepancy between the US and Europe. We continue with updates on extreme prematurity and outcomes with two longitudinal studies from the past 2 years. We further review available interventions for prematurity and discuss the use of antenatal corticosteroids. First, we examine their use in the context of professional recommendations and then examine the trajectory of their continued use in the late preterm period. We focus on a European-based trial with preliminary results and an ongoing American counterpart. The current knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind preterm labor is presented with a focus on the multiple etiologies of preterm labor, both known and presumed, with updates in the basic science realm. Furthermore, up-to-date studies on prediction of preterm birth and prematurity-related morbidity are presented. PMID:25300768

  16. Unusual presentation of phaeochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hope, D C D; Palan, J M

    2016-05-10

    A 44-year-old woman, with a background of heart, lung and renal transplantation secondary to cystic fibrosis and type 1 diabetes, presented with tachycardia, hyperglycaemia, nausea and vomiting. She was initially managed for diabetic ketoacidosis with severe dehydration. However, persistent episodic hypertension and tachycardia led the investigating team to identify significantly raised urinary metanephrines and a left-sided adrenal mass; Iodine-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine single photon emission computer tomography scan (MIBG SPECT/CT) showed avid uptake of tracer, confirming a left-sided phaeochromocytoma. She was started on medical management and is awaiting an elective laparoscopic procedure. This case describes the presentation of a unilateral phaeochromocytoma as ketoacidosis in a patient with type 1 diabetes with no other apparent precipitant. This highlights the metabolic counter-regulatory effect of excess catecholamines in addition to the inotropic/chronotropic effects that are associated with this adrenal tumour. Recognition of atypical signs and symptoms may point towards an atypical precipitant of diabetic ketoacidosis-a medical emergency presenting to front-line clinicians. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. OASIS-CC presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Operations and Science Instrument Support (OASIS) project is a long-term effort to help produce operations capabilities that can support space science missions of the next century. Portions of the OASIS concept in software have been implemented under the general name OASIS-R/T. OASIS-CC is the OASIS Command and Control, for monitoring and controlling science instruments and spacecraft during test, integration, launch and on-orbit operations. Viewgraphs are presented on the OASIS-CC functionality description, OASIS-CC support, and OASIS-CC as a tool.

  18. Choriocarcinoma presenting with thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Sotello, David; Test, Victor J.; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 26-year-old man with metastatic choriocarcinoma who presented with hyperthyroidism associated with elevated β-human chorionic gonadotropin (B-HCG) and respiratory failure secondary to diffuse lung metastasis. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, the concentration of B-HCG dramatically decreased and the patient became euthyroid, allowing us to discontinue antithyroid medications. The patient's hyperthyroidism was caused by stimulation of the thyroid gland by high B-HCG levels, as shown by the marked improvement of the patient's thyroid function panel after chemotherapy. PMID:26722165

  19. Exit Presentation -- Maintaining Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Erin

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the projects which the author engaged in during an internship at Johnson Space Center. Project 1 was involved with Stochastic Resonance (SR). Stochastic resonance is a phenomenon in which the response of a non-linear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the presence of a particular non-zero level of noise. The goal of this project was to develop a countermeasure for sensorimotor disturbances that are experienced after long duration space flight. The second project was a pilot study that was to examine how adaptation to a novel functional task was affected by postural disturbance.

  20. Energy Week presentations

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    Topics covered include: energy security; clean energy and low carbon; energy for growth and poverty reduction in Africa; financing of energy efficiency; SMEs for decentralised energy service provision; potential for biofuels in developing countries; clean energy and sustainable development; clean energy finance and private equity funds; power generation and low carbon technologies; beyond traditional finance; rehabilitation and emission control in thermal power plants; and carbon finance. The presentations are mainly in ppt (Power Point) or pdf (Acrobat) format. Some videos of the conference are also available on the website.

  1. Sarcoidosis Presenting Addison's Disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Kagami, Shin-Ichiro; Kawashima, Hirotoshi; Kashiwakuma, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoshio; Iwamoto, Itsuo

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a second Japanese case of sarcoidosis presenting Addison's disease. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with sarcoidosis based on clinical and laboratory findings, including bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy and elevated levels of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme and lysozyme, as well as the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas. The patient also exhibited general fatigue, pigmentation, weight loss, hypotension and hyponatremia, suggestive of chronic adrenocortical insufficiency. An endocrine examination confirmed primary adrenocortical insufficiency. This case suggests the direct involvement of sarcoid granuloma in the adrenal glands.

  2. Biomarkers present in asphaltenes

    SciTech Connect

    Philp, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The significance and distribution of biomarkers in sediments, source rocks and crude oils are well documented in the literature. Little attention has been directed towards the biomarkers that are present in the asphaltene fractions of crude oils and source rock extracts. Asphaltene fractions by definition are insoluble in certain solvents and consist of high molecular components which makes them difficult to analyze by techniques commonly used to characterize the soluble extracts. Asphaltenes are ideally suited for analysis by microscale pyrolysis techniques (py) combined with gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Utilization of the multiple ion detection technique in conjunction with the py-GC-MS analyses permits the distribution of the steranes, triterpanes and other biomarker produced by pyrolysis of the asphaltenes to be easily determined. It is proposed in this paper to discuss the pyrolysis of asphaltene from a variety of source rocks and analysis of the biomarkers, released by the pyrolysis. These biomarkers distributions can be used to obtain information on source and maturity of the organic matter in a similar manner to using the soluble biomarkers. It is proposed to discuss the asphaltene biomarker distributions and also to speculate as to why certain biomarkers are present only in the extracts and asphaltenes and not produced by pyrolysis of the kerogens.

  3. Wind for Schools (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.

    2007-06-01

    Schools are key to achieving the goal of producing 20% of the nation's electricity demand. Most significantly, schools are training the scientists, technicians, businesspeople, decisionmakers, and teachers of the future. What students learn and believe about wind energy will impact the United States' ability to create markets and policy, develop and improve technology, finance and implement projects, and create change in all of our public and private institutions. In the nearer term, school districts have large facility costs, electrical loads, and utility costs. They are always in search of ways to reduce costs or obtain revenue to improve educational programs. Schools value teaching about the science and technology of renewable energy. They are important opinion leaders, particularly in rural communities. And their financial structures are quite different from other institutions (funding, incentives, restrictions, etc.). Learning objectives: The presentation will use case studies, project experience, and discussion with the audience to convey the current status of wind energy applications and education in U.S. schools and understanding of the elements that create a successful school wind energy project. The presentation will provide attendees with a background in the current level of knowledge and generate discussion on several themes.

  4. EDITORIAL: Presentation of Manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    We wish to draw the attention of authors to two points concerning the presentation of manuscripts. First, some changes have been made recently in our Instructions to Authors. We have reduced from two to one the number of duplicate copies of the manuscript required, asked for corrected proofs to be returned to the Editor rather than directly to the publishers, clarified that a single set of illustration-photographs will suffice, removed a specific suggestion for a style manual that we had offered for general guidance only, and added an instruction on conventions in spelling and hyphenation. Secondly, authors are required, of course, to present a thorough analysis of their experimental data and to include an estimate of their uncertainty. For this purpose, however, we strongly encourage the authors to follow the recommendations put forward by an international working group [1] to the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) and endorsed by that body in its Recommandation 1 (CI-1981). This recommendation has been published by the CIPM [2] and was also summarized recently in this journal [3]. [1] 1981 Metrologia 17 69-74, in particular, see pp 73-74 [2] 1981 ProcA~¨s-Verbaux CIPM 10th Session 49, A1 A12. An English language version is available on application to the Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. [3] 1982 Metrologia 18 41-44, in particular, see p 44.

  5. [Infected jejunal mesenteric pseudocyst: A case report].

    PubMed

    Bolívar-Rodríguez, Martín Adrián; Cazarez-Aguilar, Marcel Antonio; Luna-Madrid, Eduardo Esaú; Morgan-Ortiz, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are very rare abdominal growths, generally asymptomatic, and which are usually detected incidentally while performing a physical examination or an imaging test. Complications such as infections, haemorrhage, torsion, rupture, or bowel obstruction, are seldom found in this pathology, but they can be a cause of acute abdomen. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics and the clinical outcome of a male patient with an infected mesenteric pseudocyst of the jejunum. A 49 year-old male was admitted to the emergency department with 6-day onset of abdominal pain, bowel obstruction signs, palpable tumour located in the upper hemi-abdomen, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, 36,100/mm(3) white cells, 4.21 ng/ml procalcitonin, abdominal computed tomography scan with evidence of a mesenteric cystic tumour. An exploratory laparotomy was performed, finding the presence of a mesenteric pseudocyst of the jejunum with infection signs, extirpated and sent for histopathological examination. The clinical progress of the patient was satisfactory with the discharge of the patient 7 days after the surgical intervention. These cysts can debut as an acute abdomen due to haemorrhage, infection, obstruction and/or bowel perforation, complications can be life threatening if not detected and surgically treated at an early stage by performing a resection of the pseudocysts, with or without bowel resection, depending on the location and the size of the cyst. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Giving effective presentations.

    PubMed

    Englehart, Nadine

    2004-03-01

    Apprehension about oral communication, or public speaking is rated as the number one fear among most individuals. Developing skill in, and comfort with, public speaking is important whether we are presenting oral reports and proposals, responding to questions, or training co-workers. Effective speakers are able to communicate information in a way that stimulates interest, helps the audience to understand and remember, and influences attitudes and behaviours. Many of us think that effective speakers are born rather than made. In truth most successful speakers work hard and invest a great deal of time and effort in to improving their speaking capabilities. Effective public speaking is a learned skill and activity that requires lots of practice. Like other learned skills, having a strategy with clear action steps can help you achieve your goal.

  7. RESRAD model presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Faillace, E.; Chen, S.Y.; Wallo, A. III; Williams, W.A.; Peterson, H.; Domotor, S.

    1998-05-01

    RESRAD was one of the multimedia models selected by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to include in its workshop on radiation dose modeling and demonstration of compliance with the radiological criteria for license termination. This paper is a summary of the presentation made at the workshop and focuses on the 10 questions the NRC distributed to all participants prior to the workshop. The code selection criteria, which were solicited by the NRC, for demonstrating compliance with the license termination rule are also included. Among the RESRAD family of codes, RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD are designed for evaluating radiological contamination in soils and in buildings. Many documents have been published to support the use of these codes. This paper focuses on these two codes. The pathways considered, the databases and parameters used, quality control and quality assurance, benchmarking, verification and validation of these codes, and capabilities as well as limitations of these codes are discussed in detail.

  8. Summer Student Research Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Carol (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, over 150 undergraduate students and first-year graduate students participated in a variety of research programs coordinated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Education Office in conjunction with the Caltech Student- Faculty Programs Office. The programs give students the opportunity to conduct research under the guidance of an experienced mentor for a 10-week period. Students gain valuable experience while contributing to the ongoing goals of JPL. Students are required to submit progress reports and an abstract, and to give an oral presentation of their projects to an audience of JPL staff and other students. This set of abstracts provides brief descriptions of the projects that were conducted by these students and their mentors. A schedule of student talks is also included.

  9. Presenting practice financial information.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lee Ann H

    2007-01-01

    Medical practice leadership teams, often consisting primarily of physicians with limited financial backgrounds, must make important business decisions and continuously monitor practice operations. In order to competently perform this duty, they need financial reports that are relevant and easy to understand. This article explores financial reporting and decision-making in a physician practice. It discusses reports and tools, such as ratios, graphs, and comparisons, that practices typically include in their reports. Because profitability and cash flow are often the most important financial considerations for physician practices, reports should generally focus on the impact of various activities and potential decisions upon these concerns. This article also provides communication tips for both those presenting practice financial information and those making the decisions. By communicating effectively, these leaders can best use financial information to improve decision-making and maximize financial performance.

  10. Acne: clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Shalita, Alan R

    2004-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, the most common disease of the skin, can be manifested in a wide variety of clinical presentations. As a result of this clinical variation, there are almost as many classifications of acne as there are clinicians with particular interest in the disease. Thus acne has been classified as types I-IV, inflammatory versus noninflammatory, comedonal, comedopapular, papular, papulopustular, pustular, and "cystic" or nodular (even nodular-cystic). For those who are enamored of classification, there are subdivisions of the various categories, including "sandpaper comedones" and microcysts. There is even disagreement as to what constitutes a papule versus a nodule. The classic textbook definition of a nodule refers to lesions 1 cm or larger, but the early investigators of oral isotretinoin defined nodules as 4 mm or larger, and this definition has creeped into many texts, recently clarified by Bologna.(1)

  11. Water Past and Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of sulfate and water ice deposits in the Olympia Undae region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 2213 UTC on October 2, 2006 (6:13 p.m. EDT) near 81.6 degrees north latitude, 188.9 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Olympia Undae is a large dune field that stretches some 1,100 kilometers (684 miles) across the northern polar region of Mars, just south of the ice cap. The region holds a vast expanse of complex, shifting dunes and is best described as a sand sea or erg similar to the Sahara.

    The two images above provide interesting clues into Mars' history by revealing the planet's wet past and frozen present. The left image is an infrared, false-color image that reveals dark-colored dunes overlying a lighter substrate. Spectral data from CRISM and its sister instrument OMEGA suggest similar compositions of these dunes and the dark basal, or lowermost, unit of the north polar layered deposits. HIRISE images revealed cross-bedding (crossed layers that are oriented at a different angle to the main layer) in this dark unit. On Earth, cross-bedded sediments can form in both windy and watery environments. The dark polar basal unit on Mars is interpreted as a sand sheet underlying and pre-dating the ice, and now being eroded to dunes by the Martian winds.

    The mineralogy of the Olympia Undae region holds a record of past water. CRISM spectral data (right image) shows that the darker dunes are rich in polyhydrated sulfate (sulfates with more than one water molecule incorporated into each molecule of the mineral). The mineral gypsum is a polyhydrated sulfate, and the most likely constituent in these dunes. The gypsum probably formed by evaporation of ancient, saline water or by aqueous alteration of the silicate portion of the dune material. Areas shaded in red are cover by

  12. Water Past and Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of sulfate and water ice deposits in the Olympia Undae region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 2213 UTC on October 2, 2006 (6:13 p.m. EDT) near 81.6 degrees north latitude, 188.9 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Olympia Undae is a large dune field that stretches some 1,100 kilometers (684 miles) across the northern polar region of Mars, just south of the ice cap. The region holds a vast expanse of complex, shifting dunes and is best described as a sand sea or erg similar to the Sahara.

    The two images above provide interesting clues into Mars' history by revealing the planet's wet past and frozen present. The left image is an infrared, false-color image that reveals dark-colored dunes overlying a lighter substrate. Spectral data from CRISM and its sister instrument OMEGA suggest similar compositions of these dunes and the dark basal, or lowermost, unit of the north polar layered deposits. HIRISE images revealed cross-bedding (crossed layers that are oriented at a different angle to the main layer) in this dark unit. On Earth, cross-bedded sediments can form in both windy and watery environments. The dark polar basal unit on Mars is interpreted as a sand sheet underlying and pre-dating the ice, and now being eroded to dunes by the Martian winds.

    The mineralogy of the Olympia Undae region holds a record of past water. CRISM spectral data (right image) shows that the darker dunes are rich in polyhydrated sulfate (sulfates with more than one water molecule incorporated into each molecule of the mineral). The mineral gypsum is a polyhydrated sulfate, and the most likely constituent in these dunes. The gypsum probably formed by evaporation of ancient, saline water or by aqueous alteration of the silicate portion of the dune material. Areas shaded in red are cover by

  13. IKONOS: future and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Niek

    2003-04-01

    The IKONOS satellite has been operational since January 2000 and was the first commercial satellite collecting imagery with 1 meter resolution. The current life expectancy of the satellite is 10 years. Since the launch, Space Imaging Inc. (the owner of the satellite) supplied IKONOS imagery to users in many vertical markets, such as: agriculture, defense, oil & gas and telecommunications. This oral presentation will give comprehensive information about IKONOS and the future: * Block II, the successor of IKONOS. Space Imaging expects to launch in 2004 a new high-resolution satellite, ensuring both continuity and (for some years) a tandem operation with IKONOS, greatly improving the availability of imagery. * Space Imaging affiliates. IKONOS imagery collected, processed and sold by regional affiliates. These regional affiliates are strategically located around the world, like Japan Space Imaging (Tokyo), Space Imaging Middle East (Dubai) and Space Imaging Eurasia (Ankara, Turkey). * Technical briefing IKONOS. IKONOS (compared to other commercial high-resolution satellites) has superior collection capabilities. Due to, the higher orbit altitude, local reception of the imagery, bi-directional scanning and the high agility of the satellite, is the IKONOS satellite capable to collect the imagery relative quickly.

  14. STS-69 postflight presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    A postflight conference of the STS-69 mission is presented. The flightcrew ('The Dog Team') consisted of Cmdr. David Walker, Pilot Kenneth Cockrell, Payload Cmdr. James Voss, and Mission Specialists James Newman and Michael Gernhardt. The mission's primary objective was the deployment and retrieval of the SPARTAN-201 satellite, which investigated the interaction between the Sun and it's solar wind. Other secondary experiments and shuttle payloads included the Wake Shield Facility (WSF), which grew several layers of semiconductor films, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker (IEH-1), the Capillary Pumped Loop-2/Gas Bridge Assembly (CAPL-2/GBA), several Get Away Specials (GAS) experiments, the Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS), the Thermal Energy Storage (TES-2) experiment, the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus-7 (CGBA-7), the National Institutes of Health-Cells 4 (NIH-C4) experiment, and the Biological Research in Canister-6 (BRIC-6) experiment. Earth views consisted of Saudi Arabia water wells, uncommon vortices over Oman, the Amazon River, the Bahamas, Somalia, a sunset over the Earth's horizon, and two hurricanes, Luis and Marilyn.

  15. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    PubMed

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  16. Sarcoidosis: An unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Pedro; Pimenta, Sofia; Cardoso, Hélder; Guimarães Cunha, Rui; Costa, Lúcia

    A 35-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of arthralgia and purple coloration of the skin of his fingers and feet. Hand and foot radiography showed cystic bone lesions on phalanges suggestive of sarcoidosis. Lab tests revealed increased liver enzymes. Liver MRI evidenced an enlarged liver and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. Histological analysis of the finger skin, lymph nodes and liver demonstrated the presence of granulomas, confirming the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient started prednisolone with rapid improvement of the symptoms. Skin lesions are divided into two groups: specific for sarcoidosis (with granulomas, lupus pernio-like) and nonspecific (without granulomas, erythema nodosum-like). Specific cutaneous lesions usually cause no other symptoms beyond cosmetic changes. Lupus pernio stands out for having distinctive features but, to the best of our knowledge, the simultaneous involvement of both hands and feet has never been reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. [Involuntary movements: video presentation].

    PubMed

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    What's involuntary movement? To define the involuntary movement, we should define the voluntary movement. It is, however, difficult to define the voluntariness. The involuntary movement usually indicates some abnormal movement occurring without any movement intention of the subject which excludes any reflex movements, such as tendon reflexes or normal startle response. How to see patients with involuntary movements Classification of involuntary movements entirely depends on clinical features of movements. The method to see the patients, therefore, follows how to describe the movements when explaining those to others. The three main points to care are as follows. Regularity in time or rhythmicity of the movement: regular, mostly regular, irregular or completely irregular. The most rhythmic one is tremor and most irregular one is myoclonus. Conditions inducing involuntary movement: resting, postural, during movement, emotional stress, sensory trick or others. These are important factor to see actual movements in clinical practice. To make an inducing condition in the clinic is sometimes required to see the symptoms. Pattern of involuntary movements: irregular, stereotypical, distribution of moving muscles, right-left difference and others. Several kinds of involuntary movements are presented in my talk.

  18. Aqueous cleaning design presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltby, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    The phase-out of CFC's and other ozone depleting chemicals has prompted industries to re-evaluate their present methods of cleaning. It has become necessary to find effective substitutes for their processes as well as to meet the new cleaning challenges of improved levels of cleanliness and to satisfy concerns about environmental impact of any alternative selected. One of the most popular alternatives being selected is aqueous cleaning. This method offers an alternative for removal of flux, grease/oil, buffing compound, particulates and other soils while minimizing environmental impact. What I will show are methods that can be employed in an aqueous cleaning system that will make it environmentally friendly, relatively simple to maintain and capable of yielding an even higher quality of cleanliness than previously obtained. I will also explore several drying techniques available for these systems and other alternatives along with recent improvements made in this technology. When considering any type of cleaning system, a number of variables should be determined before selecting the basic configuration. Some of these variables are: (1) Soil or contaminants being removed from your parts; (2) The level of cleanliness required; (3) The environmental considerations of your area; (4) Maintenance requirements; and (5) Operating costs.

  19. Presenting the right evidence.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1987-09-01

    The primary focus in any marketing communication is its theme--the conclusion that audiences are intended to reach as the result of seeing or hearing the message. Two kinds of conclusions are possible. The first type, factual conclusions, are an awareness and acceptance of objective, verifiable information such as services or technologies offered, location, hours, and charges. The second type of conclusion, an opinion, is a conviction that a given healthcare organization offers a positive subjective attribute, such as compassion, competence, or friendliness. To increase the credibility of subjective attribute claims, marketers can provide seven basic forms of evidence: Statistics; Stories; Exhibits; Demonstrations; Examples; Promises; Testimony. To be effective, the evidence presented must be the right evidence. An organization must determine and respond to what signifies and demonstrates specific subjective attributes to its customers. Organizations must known what quality of patient care means in customer terms, as well as in professional terms. Organizations that deliver the right evidence of quality will enjoy the strongest market positions.

  20. Spectrophotometry: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    2009-01-01

    I describe the rise of optical region spectrophotometry in the 1960's and 1970's when it achieved a status as a major tool in stellar research through its decline and near demise at present. With absolutely calibrated fluxes and Balmer profiles usually of H-gamma, astronomers used model atmospheres predictions to find both the effective temperatures and surface gravities of many stars. Spectrophotometry as I knew it was photometrically calibrated low dispersion spectroscopy with a typical resolution of order 25 A. A typical data set consists of 10 to 15 values covering most of the optical spectral region. The strengths and shortcomings of the rotating grating scanners are discussed. The accomplishments achieved using spectrophotometric data, which were obtained with instruments using photomultipliers, are reviewed. Extensions to other spectral regions are noted and attempts to use observations from space to calibrate the optical region will be discussed. There are two steps to fully calibrate flux data. The first requires the calibration of the fluxes of one or more standard stars against sources calibrated absolutely in a laboratory. The use of Vega as the primary standard has been both a blessing as it is so bright and a curse especially as modeling it correctly requires treating it as a fast rotating star seen nearly pole-on. At best its calibration has errors of about 1%. The other step is to apply extinction corrections for the Earth's atmosphere and then calibrate the fluxes using the fluxes of standard stars. Now the ASTRA Spectrophotometer promises a revitalization of the use and availability of optical flux data. Its design specifications included solutions to the problems of past optical spectrophotometric instruments.