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Sample records for jen-kun lin editor

  1. New Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    It is an honour and a challenge to take up the editorship of the Messenger at this time of ESO's expanding role in European and worldwide astronomy. In order to mark the change, we have made a few adjustments to the appearance without departing from the overall style that Peter Shaver had evolved during his term as editor. I would like to thank Peter for gen-tly coaching me into the position and Jutta Boxheimer, the technical editor, for the high quality of the layout.

  2. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umapathy, Siva

    2017-01-01

    This is an editor's note related to the publication 'Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects' by Raza Rasool and Sumaiya Hasnain, which appeared in Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy 148 (2015) 435-443.

  3. TOAD Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1993-01-01

    Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) computer program (LAR-13755), implements format designed to facilitate transfer of data across communication networks and dissimilar host computer systems. Any data file conforming to TOAD format standard called TOAD file. TOAD Editor is interactive software tool for manipulating contents of TOAD files. Commonly used to extract filtered subsets of data for visualization of results of computation. Also offers such user-oriented features as on-line help, clear English error messages, startup file, macroinstructions defined by user, command history, user variables, UNDO features, and full complement of mathematical statistical, and conversion functions. Companion program, TOAD Gateway (LAR-14484), converts data files from variety of other file formats to that of TOAD. TOAD Editor written in FORTRAN 77.

  4. WRR editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New editors of AGU's Water Resources Research journal will be Soroosh Sorooshian and Roger E. Smith.Soroosh Sorooshian was born in Kerman, Iran. He received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, in 1971. He received his M.S. degree in operations research in 1973 and his Ph.D. degree in water resources systems engineering in 1978, both from the University of California, Los Angeles.

  5. MPS Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and

  6. Journal Editors Celebrated at Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    At the Fall Meeting, the premiere social event for AGU's many journal editors is the annual Editors' Evening, an opportunity for members to celebrate and to recognize the efforts of retiring editors. At the event, AGU president Carol Finn welcomed all those in attendance and thanked them for volunteering their time for the benefit of AGU and the wider research community.

  7. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  8. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  9. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  10. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  11. MSSP Associate Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.

    2015-08-01

    MSSP is pleased to announce the appointment of three distinguished researchers, Professors Jerome Antoni, Spilios Fassois and Paolo Pennacchi, as Associate Editors. The broad coverage of MSSP research topics demands editorial expertise in several disciplines and the appointment of an editorial team of the highest quality is essential in maintaining and further enhancing the reputation of MSSP as a journal at the forefront of modern experimental mechanics that combines dynamic systems with measurement technology, signal processing and active control. Brief descriptions of the backgrounds and experience of the Associate Editors are provided in the following paragraphs.

  12. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  13. The Lin28 Expression in Stallion Testes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Minjung

    2016-01-01

    The molecular markers for specific germ cell stages can be utilized for identifying, monitoring, and separating a particular stage of germ cells. The RNA-binding protein Lin28 is expressed in gonocytes of human fetal testes. The Lin28 expression is restricted to a very small population of spermatogonial cells in human, mice, and monkey. The main objective of this study was to investigate the expression pattern of Lin28 in stallion testes at different reproductive stages. Based on the presence or absence of full spermatogenesis and lumina in seminiferous tubules, the testicular samples were categorized into two reproductive stages pre-pubertal and post-pubertal. We performed a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to confirm the presence of Lin28 mRNA in the testicular tissues and a western blot analysis to verify the cross-reactivity of rabbit Lin28 antibody with horse testicular tissue. For immunohistochemistry, Lin28 (rabbit anti-human), GATA4 (goat anti-human) or DAZL (goat anti-human) antibodies were used. The results of RT-PCR confirmed the expression of Lin28 mRNA in the stallion testes. The western blot analysis showed that the expression of 28 kDa Lin28 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of spermatogonia at both reproductive stages. The numbers of Lin28-positive germ cells per 1000 Sertoli cells in pre- and post-pubertal stages were 253 ± 8.66 and 29.67 ± 2.18, respectively. At both reproductive stages, all Lin28 positive cells showed no co-stained with GATA4 antibody, whereas only some of the Lin28-positive germ cells showed co-staining with DAZL antibody. The results from whole-mount staining showed that the Lin28 expression was limited to Asingle (As) and Apaired (Apr) spermatogonia. In conclusion, Lin28 might be utilized as a molecular marker for undifferentiated spermatogonial stem cells when used with DAZL antibody. PMID:27798668

  14. WRR editor Ronald Cummings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    It has been nearly a year since Ronald Cummings took over as policy sciences editor of Water Resources Research (WRR), and in that time he has worked to make the journal live up to its role as “an interdisciplinary journal integrating research in the social and natural sciences of water.” Cummings takes the “interdisciplinary” part seriously. “I'd like to see a much broader range of policy issues presented to readers,” he says. “I would hope it would then stimulate interchange between our colleagues concerning evolving issues of the '80s and '90s.”Cummings brings a solid background as a resource economist to his 4-year term as editor, which began last January and runs until December 1987. Cummings succeeds Jared Cohon as policy sciences editor. Stephen J. Burges is the WRR editor for hydrological, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Now a Professor of Economics and Director of the Program in Natural Resources Economics at the University of New Mexico, Cummings is a past president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. He has been a consultant in matters of water resources management, forestry management, and energy policy for more than a decade, working on projects in both the United States and Latin America. Since joining the faculty at New Mexico in 1975, he has, among other things, worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation'management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems.

  15. LDAP Browser/Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Gawor, Jarek; Laszewski, Gregor von

    2000-07-18

    The LDAP Browser/Editor provides a user-friendly Java-based interface to LDAP databases with tightly integrated browsing and editing capabilities. Entirely written in Java with help of the JFC (Swingset) and JNDI class libraries. It connects to any X.500, LDAP v2 and v3 servers and supports editing of multiple-value attributes.

  16. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  17. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  18. [Brief explanation of shi lin (urolithic stranguria)].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-yuan

    2010-05-01

    Shi lin (urolithic stranguria) is a kind of stranguria, manifested as pain occurred when pissing and sand-like in the urine, developed from the early concept of shi long. This name of disease was appeared firstly in Shen nong ben cao jing (Shennong's Classic of Materia Medica), and then, the disease name of sha lin, sha shi lin and sha lin were derived from it by the Song Dynasty. It was said that the disease with sha (sand-like) was easy to treat, and with shi (stone-like) was difficult to cure. This disease was also happened in the children, and the reasons were the same with ones of the adult. Furthermore, there was a name of disease, xue sha lin, which was a kind of woman disease and had nothing to do with shi lin.

  19. Guest Editors' Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, Peter; Miller, Wolfram; Sangwal, Keshra; Talik, Ewa

    2014-09-01

    The 17th International Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy (ICCGE-17) was held in Warsaw during 11 and 16 August 2013. The contributions during the ICCGE-17 were of three types: Invited lectures, oral presentations and poster presentions. The conference participants were also invited to submit manuscripts based on their contributions for publication in the ICCGE-17 Proceedings volume of Journal of Crystal Growth. The present volume contains manuscripts accepted by the guest editors for this conference volume.

  20. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  1. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Comment on `Magnetic and electric field strengths of high voltage power lines and household appliances' José Luis Giordano Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, CPSI, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Twins paradox S R Carson Norton College, Malton, North Yorkshire, UK On alternative ways of finding the ratio of specific heats of gases Tomas Ficker Physics Department, Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic

  2. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Physics and history Arthur I Miller Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Physics and history: a reply David Miller Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Cathode rays, the electron and Thomson's discovery John Harris 33 Glentham Road, London SW13 9JD, UK Vectors: swallow them whole! David Wheeler Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

  3. LIN-44/Wnt directs dendrite outgrowth through LIN-17/Frizzled in C. elegans Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kirszenblat, Leonie; Pattabiraman, Divya; Hilliard, Massimo A

    2011-09-01

    Nervous system function requires proper development of two functional and morphological domains of neurons, axons and dendrites. Although both these domains are equally important for signal transmission, our understanding of dendrite development remains relatively poor. Here, we show that in C. elegans the Wnt ligand, LIN-44, and its Frizzled receptor, LIN-17, regulate dendrite development of the PQR oxygen sensory neuron. In lin-44 and lin-17 mutants, PQR dendrites fail to form, display stunted growth, or are misrouted. Manipulation of temporal and spatial expression of LIN-44, combined with cell-ablation experiments, indicates that this molecule is patterned during embryogenesis and acts as an attractive cue to define the site from which the dendrite emerges. Genetic interaction between lin-44 and lin-17 suggests that the LIN-44 signal is transmitted through the LIN-17 receptor, which acts cell autonomously in PQR. Furthermore, we provide evidence that LIN-17 interacts with another Wnt molecule, EGL-20, and functions in parallel to MIG-1/Frizzled in this process. Taken together, our results reveal a crucial role for Wnt and Frizzled molecules in regulating dendrite development in vivo.

  4. New TOR editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    1984-04-01

    David A. Brooks, associate professor at Texas A&M University's oceanography department, has been appointed editor designate of The Oceanography Report (TOR). He succeeds Arnold L. Gordon of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Gordon, who initiated TOR in September 1981, is the new president-elect of the AGU Ocean Sciences Section.Brooks, a physical oceanographer, has been at Texas A&M for 6 years. His research interests include waves and tides, the interaction of waves and currents, Gulf Stream fluctuations, and Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of Maine circulation. Before going to Texas A&M, Brooks was a research associate and graduate faculty member at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

  5. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans

  6. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  7. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  8. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    . Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  9. Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2008-01-01

    As of 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes has reached its all-time high regarding the ISI journal impact factor, with an impressive increase of 60% compared to 2005. We now rank at position 1,399, as shown in the statistics below. This is solely due to the increased number and quality of published articles: In 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes published 208 research papers and received 1,033 citations -- five citations per paper on average. In 2007, we have published 177 research papers, and one may be curious to see how their factor will develop. In co-operation with Wiley InterScience we have achieved an average o nline publication time of just 4.5 months. As in the past, publication in Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes} continues to be free of charge. Also, all articles of the first issue of each volume can be downloaded free of charge, as can all articles labelled ``Editor's Choice'', which are additionally featured with a color image on the front cover.

  10. Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    As of 2007, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes has reached its all-time high regarding the ISI journal impact factor, with an impressive increase of 60% compared to 2005. We now rank at 1,461, as shown in the statistics below. This is solely due to the increased quality of the published articles: In 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes published 208 research papers and received 1,033 citations -- five citations per paper on average. In 2007, we have published 177 research papers with roughly the same number of citations. In co-operation with Wiley InterScience we have achieved an average online publication time of just 4.5 months. We hope that the year 2008 will be comparably prosperous. As in the past, publication in Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes continues to be free of charge. Also, all articles of the first issue of each volume can be downloaded free of charge, as can all articles labelled ``Editor's Choice'', which are additionally featured with a color image on the front cover.

  11. STE - The Software Tools Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Software tools is an excellent book written by B. W. Kernighan and P. J. Plauger, published by Addison-Wesley. In it the authors discuss how to write programs that make good tools, and how to program well in the process. One of the tools they develop is a fairly powerful editor, written in Ratfor (a structured form of FORTRAN IV). This program has been implemented on the UCL Starlink VAX (with a few modifications and extensions) and is recommended as the editor to use on the VAX. This note gives a brief introduction to, and description of, the editor which has been abstracted from the book (which you are recommended to buy). There are some short command summary sections at the end of this note. After reading this note you may like to print these short files and use them for reference when using the editor.

  12. Remarks from a retiring Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, Louis K.

    2015-10-01

    At the end of 2015 I plan to step down as Chairman of Editors for the Journal of Nuclear Materials. I use the opportunity to express thoughts that have recurred to me but were muted in comparison with the day to day priorities of editorial work. The most important is that I hold the deepest gratitude for your enduring support- authors, reviewers, readers, the Advisory Editorial Board, and my fellow Editors.

  13. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  14. Lin28a regulates germ cell pool size and fertility

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Gen; de Soysa, T. Yvanka; Seligson, Marc T.; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Huang, Pei Yi; Hagan, John P.; Gregory, Richard I.; Moss, Eric G.; Daley, George Q.

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of LIN28A is associated with human germ cell tumors and promotes primordial germ cell (PGC) development from embryonic stem cells in vitro and in chimeric mice. Knockdown of Lin28a inhibits PGC development in vitro, but how constitutional Lin28a deficiency affects the mammalian reproductive system in vivo remains unknown. Here, we generated Lin28a knockout (KO) mice and found that Lin28a deficiency compromises the size of the germ cell pool in both males and females by affecting PGC proliferation during embryogenesis. Interestingly however, in Lin28a KO males the germ cell pool partially recovers during postnatal expansion, while fertility remains impaired in both males and females mated to wild type mice. Embryonic overexpression of let-7, a microRNA negatively regulated by Lin28a, reduces the germ cell pool, corroborating the role of the Lin28a/let-7 axis in regulating the germ lineage. PMID:23378032

  15. Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-03-01

    pleasure to be Guest Editor and I look forward to future developments in this growing research area and expositions in Distributed Systems Engineering. Peter G Harrison Imperial College, London

  16. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in recent years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA-Cadarache, France Jiaqui Dong, Southwestern Institute of Physics, China Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Ambrogio Fasoli, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland Eric Fredrickson, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Manuel Garcia-Munoz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany William Heidbrink, California University, USA Katsumi Ida, National Inst. For Fusion Science, Japan Peter Stangeby, Toronto University, Canada James Strachan, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Victor Yavorskij, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2012. Our thanks to them!

  17. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  18. SIERRA Editor v. 1.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Edward; Friedman-Hill, Ernest; Gibson, Marcus; Heinstein, Martin; & Whittford, Greg

    2010-03-24

    The SIERRA Editor is a syntax editor for text-based input decks for the SIERRA modeling and simulations codes. The SIERRA Editor provides color coded syntax, error checking, hyperlink navigation to referenced entities (e.g. functions and materials), and visual verification of mesh entity references (blocks, sidesets, and nodesets). The SIERRA Editor helps modeling and simulation analysts who use the SIERRA codes to produce syntactically correct input decks.

  19. The lin-4 microRNA targets the LIN-14 transcription factor to inhibit netrin-mediated axon attraction.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yan; Chiu, Hui; Domenger, Dorothée; Chuang, Chiou-Fen; Chang, Chieh

    2012-06-12

    miR-125 microRNAs, such as lin-4 in Caenorhabditis elegans, were among the first microRNAs discovered, are phylogenetically conserved, and have been implicated in regulating developmental timing. Here, we showed that loss-of-function mutations in lin-4 microRNA increased axon attraction mediated by the netrin homolog UNC-6. The absence of lin-4 microRNA suppressed the axon guidance defects of anterior ventral microtubule (AVM) neurons caused by loss-of-function mutations in slt-1, which encodes a repulsive guidance cue. Selective expression of lin-4 microRNA in AVM neurons of lin-4-null animals indicated that the effect of lin-4 on AVM axon guidance was cell-autonomous. Promoter reporter analysis suggested that lin-4 was likely expressed strongly in AVM neurons during the developmental time frame that the axons are guided to their targets. In contrast, the lin-4 reporter was barely detectable in anterior lateral microtubule (ALM) neurons, axon guidance of which is insensitive to netrin. In AVM neurons, the transcription factor LIN-14, a target of lin-4 microRNA, stimulated UNC-6-mediated ventral guidance of the AVM axon. LIN-14 promoted attraction of the AVM axon through the UNC-6 receptor UNC-40 [the worm homolog of vertebrate Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC)] and its cofactor MADD-2, which signals through both the UNC-34 (Ena) and the CED-10 (Rac1) downstream pathways. LIN-14 stimulated UNC-6-mediated axon attraction in part by increasing UNC-40 abundance. Our study indicated that lin-4 microRNA reduced the activity of LIN-14 to terminate UNC-6-mediated axon guidance of AVM neurons.

  20. Learning To Use a Text Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Carole R.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.

    Designed to determine how quickly elementary school children can learn to use a text editor and what editing concepts are difficult for them to master, this study presents preliminary data on children's acquisition of text editor skills and on the kinds of revisions they accomplished with the text editor. Observations were made on a total of 25…

  1. Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

  2. Comparison of the expression and function of Lin28A and Lin28B in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mingjiao; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Yan; Ning, Ning; Zhao, Ran; Yang, Weiwei; Jin, Yinji; Li, Jing; Redpath, Riju James Rajkumar Ezakiel; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Xiaoming; Zhong, Zhaohua; Zhang, Fengmin; Wei, Yunwei; Shen, Guomin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Ying; Wang, Guangyu; Li, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Lin28A and Lin28B are highly conserved RNA binding proteins with similar structure and functions. Recent studies demonstrated that both of them act as oncogenes and promote cancer progression. However, few researches compared the expression and functions of both oncogenes in human malignant tumors at same time. Additionally, although the expression and role of Lin28B in colon cancer is frequently reported, the expression and functions of Lin28A in colon cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we have systematically evaluated the expressional pattern, mutation status and correlation of both Lin28A and Lin28B in colon cancer tissues for the first time, and compared the roles of Lin28A and Lin28B in the proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of colon cancer cells in vitro. We have showed that they are co-expressed and have functional similarities, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying their similar functions may not be identical. This study contributes to clarify the similarities and differences of Lin28A and Lin28B in colon cancer progression. PMID:27793004

  3. Line-Editor Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

  4. A Syntax Directed Editor Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-05

    Much of his work was based on research by Bruce J. MacLennan of the Naval Postgraduate School (Ref 9) and two of Mister MacLennan’s former thesis...of Defense. Requirement for ADA Programming Suport | .:Environments - Stoneman. Washington, D.C. 1980. • .,6. Feiler , Peter H. and Raul Medina-Mora...1982. (AD-A053032). 9. MacLennan, Bruce J. The Automatic Generation of Syntax-Directed Editors. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA., 1981. 10

  5. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion

  6. Lin Piao and the Doctrine of Confucius and Mencius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    This article examines how Lin Piao used the teaching and ideology of Confucius and Mencius as the backbone of his attempted coup d'etat in 1970. The elitist nature of Confucian philosophy, and Lin Piao's attempt to use Confucius to reject historical materialism is emphasized. (DE)

  7. LIN28B Promotes Colon Cancer Migration and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Minghui; Wu, Gang; Hou, Xiaolin; Hou, Nengyi; Liang, Liqin; Jia, Guiqing; Shuai, Ping; Luo, Bin; Wang, Kang; Li, Guoxin

    2014-01-01

    LIN28B is involved in “stemness” and tumourigenesis by negatively regulating the maturation of let-7 microRNA family members. In this study, we showed that LIN28B expression promotes migration and recurrence of colon cancer. Immunohistochemistry and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions were performed to detect LIN28B expression in colon cancer tissue microarrays, paraffin-embedded surgical resected tissues and cancer cells. Loss-of-function, migration and proliferation analyses were performed to delineate the potential roles of LIN28B in colon cancer. LIN28B was upregulated in colon cancer tissue compared to normal mucosa, and its overexpression correlated with reduced patient survival and increased tumour recurrence. LIN28B suppression inhibited the migration of SW480 colon cancer cells and facilitated the cytotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin in SW480 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. In conclusion, LIN28B overexpression contributes to colon tumourigenesis, and LIN28B may serve as a diagnostic tool and therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:25360631

  8. Donald R. Nielsen New WRR Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    Bridging the gap between the disciplines of engineering and agriculture is a major goal for Water Resources Research (WRR), says Donald R. Nielsen, who was appointed to a 4-year term as WRR editor, effective January 1, 1985. Nielsen succeeds Stephen J. Burges as the WRR editor for hydrology, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Ronald G. Cummings, at the University of New Mexico, is the WRR editor for policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law.

  9. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support for ITER. Such political visibility is good news, of course, but it brings with it the obligation to perform. Fortunately, good performance was much in evidence in the papers presented at the conference, of which a significant proportion contain 'ITER' in the title. Given this importance of ITER and the undertaking by the Nuclear Fusion journal to publish papers associated with Fusion Energy Conference presentations, the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board has decided to adopt a simplified journal scope that encompasses technology papers more naturally. The scope is available from http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Journal%20information but is reproduced here for clarity: Nuclear Fusion publishes articles making significant advances to the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The journal scope includes: the production, heating and confinement of high temperature plasmas; the physical properties of such plasmas; the experimental or theoretical methods of exploring or explaining them; fusion reactor physics; reactor concepts; fusion technologies. The key to scope acceptability is now '....significant advances....' rather than any particular area of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is hoped that this will make scope decisions easier for the Nuclear Fusion office, the referees and the Editor.The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. This is underlined by the fact that Nuclear Fusion has received an impact factor of 4.270, as listed in ISI's 2009 Science Citation

  10. Examining Editor-Author Ethics: Real-World Scenarios from Interviews with Three Journal Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amare, Nicole; Manning, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Those who submit manuscripts to academic journals may benefit from a better understanding of how editors weigh ethics in their interactions with authors. In an attempt to ascertain and to understand editors' ethics, we interviewed 3 current academic journal editors of technical and/or business communication journals. We asked them about the…

  11. PROGRAMMABLE DISPLAY PUSHBUTTON LEGEND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is a pushbutton device available from Micro Switch which has a programmable 16 x 35 matrix of LEDs on the pushbutton surface. Any desired legends can be displayed on the PDPs, producing user-friendly applications which greatly reduce the need for dedicated manual controls. Because the PDP can interact with the operator, it can call for the correct response before transmitting its next message. It is both a simple manual control and a sophisticated programmable link between the operator and the host system. The Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor, PDPE, is used to create the LED displays for the pushbuttons. PDPE encodes PDP control commands and legend data into message byte strings sent to a Logic Refresh and Control Unit (LRCU). The LRCU serves as the driver for a set of four PDPs. The legend editor (PDPE) transmits to the LRCU user specified commands that control what is displayed on the LED face of the individual pushbuttons. Upon receiving a command, the LRCU transmits an acknowledgement that the message was received and executed successfully. The user then observes the effect of the command on the PDP displays and decides whether or not to send the byte code of the message to a data file so that it may be called by an applications program. The PDPE program is written in FORTRAN for interactive execution. It was developed on a DEC VAX 11/780 under VMS. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 12800 bytes. It requires four Micro Switch PDPs and two RS-232 VAX 11/780 terminal ports. The PDPE program was developed in 1985.

  12. [Report of the editors, 2011].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2012-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española (Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months (November 2010 to October 2011): (a) Objectives and attainments during 2011, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2012. In 2011 we have updated the editorial algorithm (revision by the responsible editor of all manuscripts sent to peer review and incorporated an «editorial coordinator»), we have renovated two advise facilities (editorial and scientific committees), we have created a new section called «monthly e-image», and we have promoted Rev Clin Esp annual prizes. From the first January 2010 to 31(st) October 2011 we handled 422 manuscripts (42,2 manuscripts per month, higher than the 2010 figure of 40,4 manuscript/month). Overall we have accepted 26% (originals, 16%). We asked for 343 revisions and obtained 231 (67%). Seventy two percent of the reviewers sent their comments in less than two weeks. The mean time taken to accept or reject a given manuscript has been 26 days. The mean time taken since a manuscript is received to publication (october, novembrer and december issues) has dropped from 334 days in 2010 to 254 in 2011 (24% decrease). The collaboration with the working groups has reported about 2 published manuscripts per issue. Our objectives for 2012 are: (a) to improve the editorial process; (b) main article translation into English; (c) improve some sections (i.e. clinical conference); (d) estimulate working groups collaboration; and (e) improve continued medical education. Revista Clínica Española is an open forum for all internal medicine specialists. We all have the responsibility to make our journal, each day, better.

  13. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Plasmaphysik, Germany) V. Philipps (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany) S. Zweben (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA) Y. Hirano (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan) Y. Takase (Tokyo University, Japan) In addition there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2008. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2007 award was Clemente Angioni for the paper entitled `Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade' (Nucl. Fusion 44 8277-845). The winner of the 2008 Nuclear Fusion award is Todd Evans et al for the paper `Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 45 595-607). The awards were presented by the IAEA Deputy Director General, Werner Burkart, and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, on 16 October 2008 at the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. Given the topicality of these papers for the ITER design, it is a matter of pride to the journal that the work should be published in Nuclear Fusion. Reviews Like many who have worked for a long time in the field, I still make use of Nuclear Fusion Reviews that go back 20 or 30 years. It is particularly useful, therefore, that the Board of Editors has been working to re-activate the review programme. The first fruits will appear in this issue, in the form of `A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa. The special procedures for Reviews should be noted: most specifically that they should normally be commissioned by the Board of Editors. However, not only is the Board of Editors working on a programme but I am sure that they would be pleased to consider suggestions for review subjects. Letters The reputation of Nuclear

  14. Editorial Commentary: Editor's Conflict of Interest.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-09-01

    The Editor-in-chief has recused himself from industry consulting, which he performed before assuming the position, and returned related royalties and divested related stock options, in order to mitigate against conflict-of-interest. The Editor discloses affiliation with an institution that receives support from diverse industry partners in support of research and education.

  15. Linguistic Prescriptivism in Letters to the Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukac, Morana

    2016-01-01

    The public's concern with the fate of the standard language has been well documented in the history of the complaint tradition. The print media have for centuries featured letters to the editor on questions of language use. This study examines a corpus of 258 language-related letters to the editor published in the English-speaking print media. By…

  16. The Lin28/let-7 axis regulates glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P.; Einhorn, William S.; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Engreitz, Jesse M.; Hagan, John P.; Kharas, Michael G; Urbach, Achia; Thornton, James E.; Triboulet, Robinson; Gregory, Richard I.; Altshuler, David; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The let-7 tumor suppressor microRNAs are known for their regulation of oncogenes, while the RNA-binding proteins Lin28a/b promote malignancy by blocking let-7 biogenesis. In studies of the Lin28/let-7 pathway, we discovered unexpected roles in regulating metabolism. When overexpressed in mice, both Lin28a and LIN28B promoted an insulin-sensitized state that resisted high fat diet-induced diabetes, whereas muscle-specific loss of Lin28a and overexpression of let-7 resulted in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. These phenomena occurred in part through let-7-mediated repression of multiple components of the insulin-PI3K-mTOR pathway, including IGF1R, INSR, and IRS2. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated the enhanced glucose uptake and insulin-sensitivity conferred by Lin28a in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that let-7 targets were enriched for genes that contain SNPs associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glucose in human genome-wide association studies. These data establish the Lin28/let-7 pathway as a central regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism. PMID:21962509

  17. RNA-binding protein Lin28 in cancer and immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Baltimore, David

    2016-05-28

    The highly conserved RNA-binding protein, Lin28, is involved in many biological processes, including development, reprogramming, pluripotency, and metabolism. Importantly, Lin28 functions as an oncogene, promoting tumor progression and metastasis in various human cancers. Lin28 can regulate gene expression either by directly binding to mRNAs or by blocking microRNA biogenesis, and the underlying mechanisms include Let-7-dependent and Let-7-independent modes of action. Recent evidence shows that Lin28 also plays a fundamental role in immunity. The roles of Lin28 in disease are complex and require characterization of its physiological functions in cancer and immunological contexts. Here we review emerging information on the role of Lin28 in cancer and immunity and the molecular mechanisms it uses. We discuss our present knowledge of the system and highlight remaining mysteries related to the functions of this small RNA-binding protein. This knowledge may lead to Lin28 becoming a diagnostic marker for cancer or immune-related diseases and a possible therapeutic target.

  18. On the low regularity of the Benney-Lin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wengu; Li, Junfeng

    2008-03-01

    We consider the low regularity of the Benney-Lin equation ut+uux+uxxx+[beta](uxx+uxxxx)+[eta]uxxxxx=0. We established the global well posedness for the initial value problem of Benney-Lin equation in the Sobolev spaces for 0[greater-or-equal, slanted]s>-2, improving the well-posedness result of Biagioni and Linares [H.A. Biaginoi, F. Linares, On the Benney-Lin and Kawahara equation, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 211 (1997) 131-152]. For s<-2 we also prove some ill-posedness issues.

  19. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  20. Using Lin's method to solve Bykov's problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Lamb, Jeroen S. W.; Webster, Kevin N.

    2014-10-01

    We consider nonwandering dynamics near heteroclinic cycles between two hyperbolic equilibria. The constituting heteroclinic connections are assumed to be such that one of them is transverse and isolated. Such heteroclinic cycles are associated with the termination of a branch of homoclinic solutions, and called T-points in this context. We study codimension-two T-points and their unfoldings in Rn. In our consideration we distinguish between cases with real and complex leading eigenvalues of the equilibria. In doing so we establish Lin's method as a unified approach to (re)gain and extend results of Bykov's seminal studies and related works. To a large extent our approach reduces the study to the discussion of intersections of lines and spirals in the plane. Case (RR): Under open conditions on the eigenvalues, there exist open sets in parameter space for which there exist periodic orbits close to the heteroclinic cycle. In addition, there exist two one-parameter families of homoclinic orbits to each of the saddle points p1 and p2.See Theorem 2.1 and Proposition 2.2 for precise statements and Fig. 2 for bifurcation diagrams. Cases (RC) and (CC): At the bifurcation point μ=0 and for each N≥2, there exists an invariant set S0N close to the heteroclinic cycle on which the first return map is topologically conjugated to a full shift on N symbols. For any fixed N≥2, the invariant set SμN persists for |μ| sufficiently small.In addition, there exist infinitely many transversal and non-transversal heteroclinic orbits connecting the saddle points p1 and p2 in a neighbourhood of μ=0, as well as infinitely many one-parameter families of homoclinic orbits to each of the saddle points.For full statements of the results see Theorem 2.3 and Propositions 2.4, 2.5 and Fig. 3 for bifurcation diagrams. The dynamics near T-points has been studied previously by Bykov [6-10], Glendinning and Sparrow [20], Kokubu [27,28] and Labouriau and Rodrigues [30,31,38]. See also the surveys

  1. How does Lin28 let-7 control development and disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, James E.; Gregory, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most ancient and highly conserved microRNAs (miRNAs), the let-7 family, has gained notoriety owing to its regulation of stem cell differentiation, essential role in normal development, as well as its tumor suppressor function. Mechanisms controlling let-7 expression have recently been uncovered, specifically the role of the RNA-binding protein Lin28 – a key developmental regulator - in blocking let-7 biogenesis. This review focuses on our current understanding of the Lin28-mediated control of let-7 maturation and highlights the central role of Lin28 in stem cell biology, development, control of glucose metabolism, and dysregulation in human disease. Manipulating the Lin28 pathway for the precise control of let-7 expression may therefore provide novel therapeutic opportunities for cancer and other diseases. PMID:22784697

  2. [2009 report from the editors].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2010-01-01

    The editors of the Rev Clin Esp present the editorial course of action of the journal over the past year. We have up-dated the design of the journal, its contents (sections) and computerized the editorial process. We processed 467 manuscripts and made an editorial decision on 402 of them between November 2008 and October 2009. A total of 92 manuscripts (23%) were accepted. Fifteen (13%) out of the 119 original articles for which the editorial process was completed were accepted. Our goal for the year 2010 is to make the journal available on the Internet for all those who are subscribers to the Rev Clin Esp as well as for internal medicine residents (for which they must be members of each regional society). Other objectives of the editorial team are to edit the E-cases, for the journal to be a continuing education tool and that the coordinators of the work groups develop a monographic number at least once every two years. These actions aim to increase the impact factor and the quality of the Rev Clin Esp, official publication of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and of Spanish-speaking internal medicine physicians.

  3. lin-8, which antagonizes Caenorhabditis elegans Ras-mediated vulval induction, encodes a novel nuclear protein that interacts with the LIN-35 Rb protein.

    PubMed

    Davison, Ewa M; Harrison, Melissa M; Walhout, Albertha J M; Vidal, Marc; Horvitz, H Robert

    2005-11-01

    Ras-mediated vulval development in C. elegans is inhibited by the functionally redundant sets of class A, B, and C synthetic Multivulva (synMuv) genes. Three of the class B synMuv genes encode an Rb/DP/E2F complex that, by analogy with its mammalian and Drosophila counterparts, has been proposed to silence genes required for vulval specification through chromatin modification and remodeling. Two class A synMuv genes, lin-15A and lin-56, encode novel nuclear proteins that appear to function as a complex. We show that a third class A synMuv gene, lin-8, is the defining member of a novel C. elegans gene family. The LIN-8 protein is nuclear and can interact physically with the product of the class B synMuv gene lin-35, the C. elegans homolog of mammalian Rb. LIN-8 likely acts with the synMuv A proteins LIN-15A and LIN-56 in the nucleus, possibly in a protein complex with the synMuv B protein LIN-35 Rb. Other LIN-8 family members may function in similar complexes in different cells or at different stages. The nuclear localization of LIN-15A, LIN-56, and LIN-8, as well as our observation of a direct physical interaction between class A and class B synMuv proteins, supports the hypothesis that the class A synMuv genes control vulval induction through the transcriptional regulation of gene expression.

  4. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.

    2013-01-01

    Dear readers, contributors, and members of the world laser physics community. It is a great honour for us to introduce to you our new publishing partner, IOP Publishing, a subsidiary of the Institute of Physics, United Kingdom. IOP Publishing is a world renowned authority in producing journals, magazines, websites and services that enable researchers and research organizations to present their work to a world-wide audience. Laser Physics, the first English-language scientific journal in Russia, was founded in 1990 on the initiative of Alexander M Prokhorov, a pioneer and leader in laser physics research. Professor Prokhorov served as the first Editor-in-Chief of the journal until 2002. We are proud that it is our 23rd year of publishing Laser Physics and our 10th year of publishing Laser Physics Letters. We would like to honour the memory of our friend, late Professor Igor Yevseyev, whose enthusiasm and unwavering dedication to our journals contributed most significantly to their success. It was initially his idea in 2011 to approach IOP with a partnership proposal. We deeply regret that he is no longer with us as we enter this productive alliance. Now, in partnership with IOP, we are turning a new page in providing world-wide access to the cutting-edge research results in our journals, serving our well established global audience. We see new horizons opening for our journals for years to come and hope that our readers share our enthusiasm and aspirations. Please accept our best wishes for all your new scientific endeavors in the exciting field of laser physics.

  5. The LIN28/let-7 Pathway in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balzeau, Julien; Menezes, Miriam R.; Cao, Siyu; Hagan, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Among all tumor suppressor microRNAs, reduced let-7 expression occurs most frequently in cancer and typically correlates with poor prognosis. Activation of either LIN28A or LIN28B, two highly related RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and proto-oncogenes, is responsible for the global post-transcriptional downregulation of the let-7 microRNA family observed in many cancers. Specifically, LIN28A binds the terminal loop of precursor let-7 and recruits the Terminal Uridylyl Transferase (TUTase) ZCCHC11 that polyuridylates pre-let-7, thereby blocking microRNA biogenesis and tumor suppressor function. For LIN28B, the precise mechanism responsible for let-7 inhibition remains controversial. Functionally, the decrease in let-7 microRNAs leads to overexpression of their oncogenic targets such as MYC, RAS, HMGA2, BLIMP1, among others. Furthermore, mouse models demonstrate that ectopic LIN28 expression is sufficient to drive and/or accelerate tumorigenesis via a let-7 dependent mechanism. In this review, the LIN28/let-7 pathway is discussed, emphasizing its role in tumorigenesis, cancer stem cell biology, metabolomics, metastasis, and resistance to ionizing radiation and several chemotherapies. Also, emerging evidence will be presented suggesting that molecular targeting of this pathway may provide therapeutic benefit in cancer.

  6. Lin-28 regulates oogenesis and muscle formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Stratoulias, Vassilis; Heino, Tapio I; Michon, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the control of stem cell (SC) differentiation is important to comprehend developmental processes as well as to develop clinical applications. Lin28 is a conserved molecule that is involved in SC maintenance and differentiation by regulating let-7 miRNA maturation. However, little is known about the in vivo function of Lin28. Here, we report critical roles for lin-28 during oogenesis. We found that let-7 maturation was increased in lin-28 null mutant fly ovaries. We showed that lin-28 null mutant female flies displayed reduced fecundity, due to defects in egg chamber formation. More specifically, we demonstrated that in mutant ovaries, the egg chambers fuse during early oogenesis resulting in abnormal late egg chambers. We also showed that this phenotype is the combined result of impaired germline SC differentiation and follicle SC differentiation. We suggest a model in which these multiple oogenesis defects result from a misregulation of the ecdysone signaling network, through the fine-tuning of Abrupt and Fasciclin2 expression. Our results give a better understanding of the evolutionarily conserved role of lin-28 on GSC maintenance and differentiation.

  7. Lin28 sustains early renal progenitors and induces Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Urbach, Achia; Yermalovich, Alena; Zhang, Jin; Spina, Catherine S; Zhu, Hao; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R; Shukrun, Rachel; Charlton, Jocelyn; Sebire, Neil; Mifsud, William; Dekel, Benjamin; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Daley, George Q

    2014-05-01

    Wilms Tumor, the most common pediatric kidney cancer, evolves from the failure of terminal differentiation of the embryonic kidney. Here we show that overexpression of the heterochronic regulator Lin28 during kidney development in mice markedly expands nephrogenic progenitors by blocking their final wave of differentiation, ultimately resulting in a pathology highly reminiscent of Wilms tumor. Using lineage-specific promoters to target Lin28 to specific cell types, we observed Wilms tumor only when Lin28 is aberrantly expressed in multiple derivatives of the intermediate mesoderm, implicating the cell of origin as a multipotential renal progenitor. We show that withdrawal of Lin28 expression reverts tumorigenesis and markedly expands the numbers of glomerulus-like structures and that tumor formation is suppressed by enforced expression of Let-7 microRNA. Finally, we demonstrate overexpression of the LIN28B paralog in a significant percentage of human Wilms tumor. Our data thus implicate the Lin28/Let-7 pathway in kidney development and tumorigenesis.

  8. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland.

  9. Richard Gilbert, Reporter and Assistant City Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Looks at the experiences of Richard Gilbert, reporter and assistant editor for "The Herald Telephone," a daily newspaper in Bloomington, Indiana, and discusses Gilbert's suggested guidelines for high school journalism advisers. (MS)

  10. Report of the editors, 2014.

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2015-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) Objectives and attainments in 2014, (b) Editorial activity, 2014, and (c) 2013 impact factor. In 2014 we achieved the 5 planned objectives. We have published the 9 programmed issues and 103% of the planned papers according to the usual fixed sections. We emphasize the publication of 29 editorials, 21 of which are signed by prestigious foreign authors. From the first January to the 30th September 2014 we received 421 manuscripts (46.8 manuscripts per month), a slight lower figure to that obtained in 2013 (50.9 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 404 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 32.3% (originals, 22.4%). We asked for 315 revisions to 240 reviewers and we received 53.3% revisions in less than two weeks (10.4 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 18,3 (less than half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56,6 days in 2009 to 26.6 days in 2014. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 103 days. In 2014 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation (FEMI) has reported 11 published manuscripts. In July 2014 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports gave Rev Clin Esp an Impact Factor of 1,314 (year 2013). This Impact Factor without self-citations would have been 0.705 (in 2009 the global impact factor was 0,584). With the Editorial Committee farewell we welcome the new editorial team and we sincerely thank the SEMI Steering Committee, our colleagues, journal officers, reviewers, readers and authors that since 2009 have trusted on our editorial work.

  11. [Report of the editors, 2010].

    PubMed

    García Puig, Juan; Alonso-Vega, Gabriel Gaspar; Blanco, Juan José Ríos

    2011-01-01

    The Editors of the Rev Clin Esp inform herein on their editorial activity in the last year (November 2009 to October 2010) according to three different sections: (a) Objectives and achievements during 2010, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2011. During 2010, we have updated the editorial algorithm (manuscript time lag). We have developed the "E-case reports" section and we have linked the abstracts of the Annual Congress of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) to a journal supplement (electronically available). Since 2010, the subscribers have been able to receive all of the contents of the Rev Clin Esp on-line and to perform self-evaluations in order to obtain 1.7 credits per each journal issue (continuing education). In 2010 we handled 402 manuscripts (7.2% more than in 2009), 35% of which were accepted for publication. We asked 186 reviewers for their expert opinion, 75% of whom sent their reports in less than two weeks. The mean time needed to reach an editorial decision concerning original manuscripts ("accepted / rejected") was 44.5 days and for papers not sent to external reviewers 19.5 days. Collaboration with the work groups produced good results (2.4 published manuscripts per issue), but this could be improved if all the groups collaborated in all the journal sections. Our objectives for 2011 are to complete the renewal of the Rev Clin Esp scientific committee, in accordance with the SEMI Council, and to continue to proceed with the actions initiated to increase the journal impact factor. Rev Clim Esp is an open forum for all internal medicine specialists. Responsibility falls on all of us to collaborate in order to make our journal a little better day by day.

  12. 2012 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  13. 2013 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  14. How are Editors Selected, Recruited and Approved?

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Al-Khatib, Aceil

    2016-11-28

    The editors of scholarly journals have a duty to uphold and promote the highest standards of ethical conduct of research. They also have a responsibility to maintain the integrity of the literature, and to promote transparency and honesty in reporting research findings. In the process of screening manuscripts they receive for possible publication, editors have the obligation to report infractions to the institutions of offending authors, and request an investigation. Since editors can reject a paper on ethical grounds, they can be considered to be the guardians of ethics who should express high ethical standards in conducting and publishing their own research. An examination of several publishers' websites reveals no such requirement or clear selection criteria for journal editors. Therefore, we aim to discuss the factors that publishers, in a broad sense, should consider when selecting editors for scholarly journals and believe that such criteria should be made public to ensure accountability. This would restore some of the eroding public trust in disseminated research, fortify confidence in the composition and qualification of members of an editorial board, and help to protect the reputations of publishers and editors.

  15. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  16. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA Cadarache, France Russell Doerner, University of California - San Diego, USA Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany Akihide Fujisawa, Kyushi University, Japan Gerardo Giruzzi, CEA Cadarache, France Grigory Kagan, LANL, USA Morten Lennholm, CCFE, UK Akinobu Matsuyama, NIFS, Japan Peter Stangeby, University of Toronto, Canada Leonid Zakharov, PPPL, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2011. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Award is H. Urano, for the paper 'Dimensionless parameter dependence of H-mode pedestal width using hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in JT-60U' (Nucl. Fusion 48 045008). The award was presented at the Plasma Conference 2011 (Joint meeting of 28th JSPF Annual Meeting, The 29th Symposium on Plasma Processing, and Division of Plasma Physics, 2011 Autumn Meeting of The Physical Society of Japan). This is the sixth year that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has awarded an annual prize to honour exceptional work published in Nuclear Fusion. IOP Publishing has generously made a contribution of $2500 to the award. The Nuclear Fusion Electronic Archive The journal's electronic archive has been online since the beginning of the year. The archive has been a roaring success and has contributed to the nearly 300 000 downloads of journal papers in 2011. The archive can be accessed via http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Archive. It has direct links to 16 landmark papers, from authors such as Artsimovich and Mercier. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also

  17. [Report of the editors, 2013].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) objectives and attainments, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2014. In 2013 the most relevant modification concerning the editorial activity has been the translation into English of the 5 manuscripts with abstract contained in each issue (http://www.revclinesp.es/). From the first January to the 30th September 2013 we received 458 manuscripts (50.9 manuscripts per month), a similar figure to that obtained in 2012 (51.1 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 443 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 23.7% (originals, 11.8%). We asked for 253 revisions to 186 reviewers and we received 74.4% revisions in less than 2 weeks (10.9 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 20,3 (half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56.6 days in 2009 to 22.5 days in 2013. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 94.8 days in 2013 (110.5 in 2012 and 155.8 in 2011). In 2013 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation has reported 17 published manuscripts. In 2013 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports excluded Rev Clin Esp from its impact factor journal list due to its elevated self-citations. We have taken a number of actions to reduce self-citations and we expect to be a minority in 2014. Some other data concerning the editorial policy are encouraging. In this sense, manuscript citation to Rev Clin Esp published articles has seen a substantial increase from 19% in 2008 to 29% in 2012. We work to achieve the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000). The continuous renewal of the journal sections and the working groups collaboration are necessary elements to make our journal, each day

  18. [The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors].

    PubMed

    Reyes, H

    2001-01-01

    On September 29th, 2000, The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors was founded, sponsored by the "Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT)" (the Governmental Agency promoting and funding scientific research and technological development in Chile) and the "Sociedad Médica de Santiago" (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine). The Association adopted the goals of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and therefore it will foster "cooperation and communication among Editors of Chilean biomedical journals; to improve editorial standards, to promote professionalism in medical editing through education, self-criticism and self-regulation; and to encourage research on the principles and practice of medical editing". Twenty nine journals covering a closely similar number of different biomedical sciences, medical specialties, veterinary, dentistry and nursing, became Founding Members of the Association. A Governing Board was elected: President: Humberto Reyes, M.D. (Editor, Revista Médica de Chile); Vice-President: Mariano del Sol, M.D. (Editor, Revista Chilena de Anatomía); Secretary: Anna María Prat (CONICYT); Councilors: Manuel Krauskopff, Ph.D. (Editor, Biological Research) and Maritza Rahal, M.D. (Editor, Revista de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello). The Association will organize a Symposium on Biomedical Journal Editing and will spread information stimulating Chilean biomedical journals to become indexed in international databases and in SciELO-Chile, the main Chilean scientific website (www.scielo.cl).

  19. AGU Publications Volunteers Feted At Elegant Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting Editors' Evening, held at the City Club of San Francisco, was hosted by the Publications Committee and is the premier social event for editors and associate editors attending the Fall Meeting. The evening commenced with a welcome from Carol Finn, incoming AGU president, in which she expressed her thanks to the editors and associate editors for volunteering their time to benefit AGU.

  20. A standard syntax-directed editor for hyperprogramming systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhogolev, E.A.; Kuz`menkova, E.A.; Mailingova, O.L.; Poprygaev, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The main operations of a syntax-directed editor are considered. The requirements to the standard syntax-directed editor are stated. The structure of the standard syntax-directed editor and the functions of its components are discussed. The language base properties needed for syntax-directed editor development are described. Methods for transforming the standard syntax-directed editor into a specialized one are carried out.

  1. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Marella de Angelis and her colleagues on precision gravimetry using atomic sensors and from Dr Peter Becker on determination of the Avogadro constant via enriched silicon-28. I recommend setting up a free e-mail alert so that you can read them as soon as they are published! As many of you are already aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen again to 1.297. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Of course the publication of high quality articles in the journal is dependent both on you the authors who trust us with the publication of your best work and on our referees and Editorial Board Members who we depend on to maintain the high standards you have grown to expect. I must also thank our referees for their rapid response when asked to review papers for Measurement Science and Technology. On average, authors receive a decision on their article in 45 days. Therefore I would like to end this message by saying thank you again to all those who have contributed to our success in the past year, and wish you all the best for a successful 2009!

  2. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. As many of you are no doubt aware, our latest impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen to 1.228. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. The popularity of the journal amongst authors and readers has prompted us to introduce a new subject classification for articles, to make it easier for readers to find articles of interest. The eight subject categories are: Measurement theory and practical developments (e.g. precision measurements, metrology, new measurement principles, signal processing techniques, theory of measurement, calibration); Sensors and sensing systems (based on physical, chemical or biological principles; micro- and nano-scale systems; sensors for physical, chemical and biological quantities); Optical and laser based techniques (e.g. fibre optics, interferometry, etc); Fluid mechanics measurements (e.g. fluid flow, velocimetry, particle sizing, etc); Imaging techniques (e.g. tomography, microscopy, holography, THz, etc); Spectroscopy (e.g. optical, acoustic, dielectric, MS, NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS, fluorescence, PCS, x-ray, etc); New and improved techniques for materials evaluation (e.g. non-destructive testing and evaluation, structural measurements); Novel instrumentation. We kindly ask you to assign your paper to a category when you send it to the journal. In order to maintain our rapid

  3. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2008-01-01

    To begin, I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors a successful and happy 2008 and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2007. I took over the editorship of Nuclear Fusion in January, and the year has been one in which the community as a whole has been busier than ever with a variety of duties associated with the ITER project. It was with pride that we published the Progress in the ITER Physics Basis in the June issue of the journal (stacks.iop.org/NF/47/i=6). The task undertaken by the coordinators, authors and referees was a daunting one but one which led to an outstandingly successful issue. The response from readers has been phenomenal and there were in the region of 10 000 downloads of papers in the first month following publication. Looking to 2008 and beyond, the journal will endeavour to continue to support the work of the fusion community. Refereeing As we have done since January 2005, we would like to thank our top ten most loyal referees who have helped the journal with its double-referee peer-review procedure in the past year. At the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office we are fully aware of the load we put on the shoulders of our referees. At the end of 2004 the Editorial Board decided that a gesture of gratitude should be made to our most loyal referees. We offer them a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least three different manuscripts during the period from summer 2006 to the end of 2007. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the top ten in the last two years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! H.L. Berk (Texas University, USA) J.S. DeGrassie (GAT, USA) C. Deutsch (Paris University, France) N. Hayashi (JAEA

  4. A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    appears and presents the hierarchy of CEMenuCells A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP 2 of 27 m arble Final Report for Contract # DAAHO1-93-C-R013 in the...icon, "Default" status, state list, textual description, tool sta- A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP 3 of 27 m arble Final Report for Contract... arble Final Report for Contract # DAAH01-93-C-R013 FIGURE 7 Configuration of a TAV 3.0.. Acietr O ev 3.1 luBman d aetn Cmoe a ConQ summw t. Paletta e

  5. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included

  6. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors and its effects on the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wang, Guangyu; Hao, Dapeng; Liu, Xi; Wang, Dong; Ning, Ning; Li, Xiaobo

    2015-06-30

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are two of the most important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and their aberrant expression contributes to the development of human malignancies. Let-7, one of the most well-known tumor suppressors, is frequently down-regulated in a variety of human cancers. The RBP LIN28A/LIN28B, a direct target of the let-7 family of miRNAs, is an inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis and is frequently up-regulated in cancers. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors is reportedly involved in cancer development, contributing to cellular proliferation, cell death resistance, angiogenesis, metastasis, metabolism reprogramming, tumor-associated inflammation, genome instability, acquiring immortality and evading immune destruction. In this review, we summarized the mechanisms of LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop aberrant regulation in human cancer and discussed the roles and potential mechanisms of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in regulating the hallmarks of cancer. The crosstalk between LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop and certain oncogenes (such as MYC, RAS, PI3K/AKT, NF-κB and β-catenin) in regulating hallmarks of cancer has also been discussed.

  7. Therapeutic Inhibitors of LIN28/let-7 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    quality RNA was isolated from multiple loss-of-function cell lines to perform global microRNA profiling to determine if LIN28B requires a TUTase(s...positive cell lines (TOV-112D). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ovarian Cancer, LIN28, LIN28A, LIN28B, let-7, TUTase, 3’ RNA uridylation, ZCCHC11, ZCCHC6, Proto...transcriptional gene regulation involving 3’ RNA uridylation mediated by Terminal Uridylyl Transferases (TUTases) as a critical driver of

  8. A Visual Editor in Java for View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansifer, Ryan

    2000-01-01

    In this project we continued the development of a visual editor in the Java programming language to create screens on which to display real-time data. The data comes from the numerous systems monitoring the operation of the space shuttle while on the ground and in space, and from the many tests of subsystems. The data can be displayed on any computer platform running a Java-enabled World Wide Web (WWW) browser and connected to the Internet. Previously a special-purpose program bad been written to display data on emulations of character-based display screens used for many years at NASA. The goal now is to display bit-mapped screens created by a visual editor. We report here on the visual editor that creates the display screens. This project continues the work we bad done previously. Previously we had followed the design of the 'beanbox,' a prototype visual editor created by Sun Microsystems. We abandoned this approach and implemented a prototype using a more direct approach. In addition, our prototype is based on newly released Java 2 graphical user interface (GUI) libraries. The result has been a visually more appealing appearance and a more robust application.

  9. Are Editors Out of the Tenure Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    University presses have complained for years that tenure committees unfairly expect their editors to be arbiters of what counts as tenure-worthy work. At the same time, the presses have been caught in a business-side squeeze between dwindling sales (and shrinking subsidies) and the ever-greater pressure on scholars to publish. In this article, the…

  10. Open Simulation Laboratories [Guest editors' introduction

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, Francis J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The introduction for the special issue on open simulation laboratories, the guest editors describe how OSLs will become more common as their potential is better understood and they begin providing access to valuable datasets to much larger segments of the scientific community. Moreover, new analysis tools and ways to do science will inevitably develop as a result.

  11. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Horrom, Travis; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2010-03-15

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with the current modulation at the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10{sup -11}{tau}{sup -1/2} for observation times 1 s{<=}{tau}{<=}20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  12. OPM Scheme Editor 2: A graphical editor for specifying object-protocol structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min A.; Markowitz, V.M.; Pang, F.; Ben-Shachar, O.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes an X-window based Schema Editor for the Object-Protocol Model (OPM). OPM is a data model that supports the specification of complex object and protocol classes. objects and protocols are qualified in OPM by attributes that are defined over (associated with) value classes. Connections of object and protocol classes are expressed in OPM via attributes. OPM supports the specification (expansion) of protocols in terms of alternative and sequences of component (sub) protocols. The OPM Schema Editor allows specifying, displaying, modifying, and browsing through OPM schemas. The OPM Schema Editor generates an output file that can be used as input to an OPM schema translation tool that maps OPM schemas into definitions for relational database management systems. The OPM Schema Editor was implemented using C++ and the X11 based Motif toolkit, on Sun SPARCstation under Sun Unix OS 4.1. This document consists of the following parts: (1) A tutorial consisting of seven introductory lessons for the OPM Schema Editor. (2) A reference manual describing all the windows and functions of the OPM Schema Editor. (3) An appendix with an overview of OPM.

  13. Editor and Student Views on the Censorship Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raburn, Josephine

    Out of 200 newspaper editors randomly selected from a directory, 64 responded to a questionnaire eliciting their opinions on the subject materials most often censored by groups in the United States. The editors' responses were compared to those of 121 freshmen at Cameron University (Oklahoma). A majority of the editors supported the First…

  14. Evolutionary theory in letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Orion; Lowe, Clayton Cory

    2015-05-01

    This research note presents the results of a content analysis of 234 letters to the editors that discuss evolutionary theory and were published in American newspapers. We find that letters to the editor both support and hinder the cause of teaching evolutionary theory in American secondary schools. On the one hand, anti-evolutionary theory messages are marginalized in the letters section. This marginalization signals a low level of legitimacy for creationism. It might also contribute to the sense of tension that sustains creationist identities. On the other hand, relatively few letters explicitly note the fact that scientists or the scientific community accept evolution. Interestingly, the obscuration of the scientific community's support for evolutionary theory occurs both in letters supporting and opposing evolutionary theory.

  15. Unified Meta-Component Model Specification Editor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-20

    relationship between the two major user interface modules, the editor and wizard, and their associated features. Functional to module mapping diagrams are...SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18 . NUMBER OF PAGES 148 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39- 18

  16. Developmental Test of the Honeywell Laser Inertial Navigation System (LINS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    navigation system. The system tested at the CIGTF contained an inertial sensor assembly which contained three ring laser gyros, arranged in an...alignment. The inertial sensor assembly is operated heaterless, thus elimininating the usual warm-up rc4uirement for conventional inertial system...continuous; 6900VA start up transient of 50 milli- seconds. LINS ENGINIEERING HARDWARE BASIC LtS FUN~CTIONiAL BlLOCK DIAGRAMl FIGURE 1. LIINS SYSTEM4 BLOCKt

  17. A Dynamic Attitude Measurement System Based on LINS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  18. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  19. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur

  20. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  1. Meet the Editor: Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    Meinrat Andreae was named the editor of the AGU's journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles last year.Andreae, director of the biogeochemistry department at the Max Plank Institute for Chemistry (MPIC), located in Mainz, Germany said that he plans to maintain the journal as a resource that highlights the broad spectrum of interdisciplinary themes that showcase the interactions between the biosphere and the geosphere. “Our special niche is in the field of larger-scale, more integrative studies that have global scope,” he explained.

  2. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content

  3. lin-28 controls the succession of cell fate choices via two distinct activities.

    PubMed

    Vadla, Bhaskar; Kemper, Kevin; Alaimo, Jennifer; Heine, Christian; Moss, Eric G

    2012-01-01

    lin-28 is a conserved regulator of cell fate succession in animals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, it is a component of the heterochronic gene pathway that governs larval developmental timing, while its vertebrate homologs promote pluripotency and control differentiation in diverse tissues. The RNA binding protein encoded by lin-28 can directly inhibit let-7 microRNA processing by a novel mechanism that is conserved from worms to humans. We found that C. elegans LIN-28 protein can interact with four distinct let-7 family pre-microRNAs, but in vivo inhibits the premature accumulation of only let-7. Surprisingly, however, lin-28 does not require let-7 or its relatives for its characteristic promotion of second larval stage cell fates. In other words, we find that the premature accumulation of mature let-7 does not account for lin-28's precocious phenotype. To explain let-7's role in lin-28 activity, we provide evidence that lin-28 acts in two steps: first, the let-7-independent positive regulation of hbl-1 through its 3'UTR to control L2 stage-specific cell fates; and second, a let-7-dependent step that controls subsequent fates via repression of lin-41. Our evidence also indicates that let-7 functions one stage earlier in C. elegans development than previously thought. Importantly, lin-28's two-step mechanism resembles that of the heterochronic gene lin-14, and the overlap of their activities suggests a clockwork mechanism for developmental timing. Furthermore, this model explains the previous observation that mammalian Lin28 has two genetically separable activities. Thus, lin-28's two-step mechanism may be an essential feature of its evolutionarily conserved role in cell fate succession.

  4. A Network of Genes Antagonistic to the LIN-35 Retinoblastoma Protein of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Stanley R. G.; Fay, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans pRb ortholog, LIN-35, functions in a wide range of cellular and developmental processes. This includes a role of LIN-35 in nutrient utilization by the intestine, which it carries out redundantly with SLR-2, a zinc-finger protein. This and other redundant functions of LIN-35 were identified in genetic screens for mutations that display synthetic phenotypes in conjunction with loss of lin-35. To explore the intestinal role of LIN-35, we conducted a genome-wide RNA-interference-feeding screen for suppressors of lin-35; slr-2 early larval arrest. Of the 26 suppressors identified, 17 fall into three functional classes: (1) ribosome biogenesis genes, (2) mitochondrial prohibitins, and (3) chromatin regulators. Further characterization indicates that different categories of suppressors act through distinct molecular mechanisms. We also tested lin-35; slr-2 suppressors, as well as suppressors of the synthetic multivulval phenotype, to determine the spectrum of lin-35-synthetic phenotypes that could be suppressed following inhibition of these genes. We identified 19 genes, most of which are evolutionarily conserved, that can suppress multiple unrelated lin-35-synthetic phenotypes. Our study reveals a network of genes broadly antagonistic to LIN-35 as well as genes specific to the role of LIN-35 in intestinal and vulval development. Suppressors of multiple lin-35 phenotypes may be candidate targets for anticancer therapies. Moreover, screening for suppressors of phenotypically distinct synthetic interactions, which share a common altered gene, may prove to be a novel and effective approach for identifying genes whose activities are most directly relevant to the core functions of the shared gene. PMID:22542970

  5. A Tisket, A Tasket--Out of the Editor's Basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2001-05-01

    In September 1940, the Journal introduced Out of the Editor's Basket for short items of interest: excerpts from letters, pamphlets, newspapers, and periodicals. By 1950, however, the Editor's Basket had evolved into a bulletin board for descriptions of new products and services, and it now contains almost exclusively press releases about recently marketed items. Now over 60 years old, the Editor's Basket still provides interesting tidbits for the Journal's broad readership.

  6. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  7. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  8. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance.

    PubMed

    Wilbert, Melissa L; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chen, Stella X; Yan, Bernice Y; Nathanson, Jason L; Hutt, Kasey R; Lovci, Michael T; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-10-26

    LIN28 is a conserved RNA-binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming, and oncogenesis. It was previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, but here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28-binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions.

  9. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance

    PubMed Central

    Wilbert, Melissa L.; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Chen, Stella X.; Yan, Bernice Y.; Nathanson, Jason L.; Hutt, Kasey R.; Lovci, Michael T.; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B.; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY LIN28 is a conserved RNA binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming and oncogenesis. Previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through cross-linking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28 binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions. PMID:22959275

  10. Web-Based Media Contents Editor for UCC Websites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seoksoo

    The purpose of this research is to "design web-based media contents editor for establishing UCC(User Created Contents)-based websites." The web-based editor features user-oriented interfaces and increased convenience, significantly different from previous off-line editors. It allows users to edit media contents online and can be effectively used for online promotion activities of enterprises and organizations. In addition to development of the editor, the research aims to support the entry of enterprises and public agencies to the online market by combining the technology with various UCC items.

  11. LIN28 cooperates with WNT signaling to drive invasive intestinal and colorectal adenocarcinoma in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ho-Chou; Schwitalla, Sarah; Qian, Zhirong; LaPier, Grace S.; Yermalovich, Alena; Ku, Yuan-Chieh; Chen, Shann-Ching; Viswanathan, Srinivas R.; Zhu, Hao; Nishihara, Reiko; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A.; Morikawa, Teppei; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Yang, Juhong; Meredith, Gavin; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major contributor to cancer-related mortality. LIN28A and LIN28B are highly related RNA-binding protein paralogs that regulate biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and influence development, metabolism, tissue regeneration, and oncogenesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of either LIN28 paralog cooperates with the Wnt pathway to promote invasive intestinal adenocarcinoma in murine models. When LIN28 alone is induced genetically, half of the resulting tumors harbor Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) mutation. When overexpressed in ApcMin/+ mice, LIN28 accelerates tumor formation and enhances proliferation and invasiveness. In conditional genetic models, enforced expression of a LIN28-resistant form of the let-7 microRNA reduces LIN28-induced tumor burden, while silencing of LIN28 expression reduces tumor volume and increases tumor differentiation, indicating that LIN28 contributes to tumor maintenance. We detected aberrant expression of LIN28A and/or LIN28B in 38% of a large series of human CRC samples (n = 595), where LIN28 expression levels were associated with invasive tumor growth. Our late-stage CRC murine models and analysis of primary human tumors demonstrate prominent roles for both LIN28 paralogs in promoting CRC growth and progression and implicate the LIN28/let-7 pathway as a therapeutic target. PMID:25956904

  12. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  13. A former Editor views the editorial process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    It was at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco in December 1976, shortly after my appointment as coeditor of Water Resources Research that I first began to realize the strong emotional ties that exist between a scientific community and its journals. Feelings run high, regardless of whether they come from readers, contributors, reviewers, active scientists, or scientific administrators. Opinions are often positive, sometimes negative, usually a mixture of the two; but regardless of their tenor they are delivered to the editor, in person, usually fortissimo. From that day until this, conference life has never been dull. When I meet a colleague in the halls there is never a loss for words, no need to search for a topic of mutual interest; WRR is always there at the ready.

  14. How Newspaper Editors Reacted to "Post's" Pulitzer Prize Hoax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Douglas A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the findings of a nationwide survey of newspaper editors, revealing that most thought that the Janet Cooke hoax had been poorly handled by the "Washington Post." Notes that most of the editors said their newspapers had systems of review for stories coming from anonymous sources. (FL)

  15. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  16. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  17. March 2017 Letters to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Letters to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Regarding 'Unraveling the Complexity of Low Back Pain'" with Authors' Response "Beall's List Has Vanished: What Next?" with Editor-in-Chief Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):219-223. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0202.

  18. 78 FR 30332 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Lin Zhi International, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Lin Zhi International... that on April 3, 2013, Lin Zhi International, Inc., 670 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94085... (9193) II Methadone (9250) II Dextropropoxyphene, bulk (non-dosage forms) II (9273). Morphine (9300)...

  19. 77 FR 64144 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Lin Zhi International, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Lin Zhi... 30326, Lin Zhi International, Inc., 670 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94085, made application by... Dextropropoxyphene, bulk (non-dosage forms) II (9273). Morphine (9300) II The company plans to manufacture the...

  20. 77 FR 30326 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Lin Zhi International Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Lin Zhi International... that on April 19, 2012, Lin Zhi International Inc., 670 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94085... (9193) II Methadone (9250) II Dextropropoxyphene, bulk (non-dosage forms) II (9273). Morphine (9300)...

  1. Important amino acid residues of hexachlorocyclohexane dehydrochlorinases (LinA) for enantioselective transformation of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Macwan, Ankit S; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-03-01

    LinA-type1 and LinA-type2 are two well-characterized variants of the enzyme 'hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-dehydrochlorinase'. They differ from each other at ten amino acid positions and exhibit differing enantioselectivity for the transformation of the (-) and (+) enantiomers of α-HCH. Amino acids responsible for this enantioselectivity, however, are not known. An in silico docking analysis identified four amino acids (K20, L96, A131, and T133) in LinA-type1 that could be involved in selective binding of the substrates. Experimental studies with constructed mutant enzymes revealed that a combined presence of three amino acid changes in LinA-type1, i.e. K20Q, L96C, and A131G, caused a reversal in its preference from the (-) to the (+) enantiomer of α-HCH. This preference was enhanced by the additional amino acid change T133 M. Presence of these four changes also caused the reversal of enantioselectivity of LinA-type1 for δ-HCH, and β-, γ-, and δ-pentachlorocyclohexens. Thus, the residues K20, L96, A131, and T133 in LinA-type1 and the residues Q20, C96, G131, and M133 in LinA-type 2 appear to be important determinants for the enantioselectivity of LinA enzymes.

  2. Fetal deficiency of lin28 programs life-long aberrations in growth and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Gen; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Soysa, T Yvanka de; Zhu, Hao; Seligson, Marc T; Shah, Samar P; Abo-Sido, Nora; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Hagan, John P; Gregory, Richard I; Asara, John M; Cantley, Lewis C; Moss, Eric G; Daley, George Q

    2013-08-01

    LIN28A/B are RNA binding proteins implicated by genetic association studies in human growth and glucose metabolism. Mice with ectopic over-expression of Lin28a have shown related phenotypes. Here, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of the physiologic consequences of Lin28a and Lin28b deficiency in knockout (KO) mice. Lin28a/b-deficiency led to dwarfism starting at different ages, and compound gene deletions showed a cumulative dosage effect on organismal growth. Conditional gene deletion at specific developmental stages revealed that fetal but neither neonatal nor adult deficiency resulted in growth defects and aberrations in glucose metabolism. Tissue-specific KO mice implicated skeletal muscle-deficiency in the abnormal programming of adult growth and metabolism. The effects of Lin28b KO could be rescued by Tsc1 haplo-insufficiency in skeletal muscles. Our data implicate fetal expression of Lin28a/b in the regulation of life-long effects on metabolism and growth, and demonstrate that fetal Lin28b acts at least in part via mTORC1 signaling.

  3. Fetal deficiency of Lin28 programs life-long aberrations in growth and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Gen; Shyh-Chang, Ng; de Soysa, T. Yvanka; Zhu, Hao; Seligson, Marc T.; Shah, Samar P.; Abo-Sido, Nora; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Hagan, John P.; Gregory, Richard I.; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Moss, Eric G.; Daley, George Q.

    2013-01-01

    LIN28A/B are RNA binding proteins implicated by genetic association studies in human growth and glucose metabolism. Mice with ectopic over-expression of Lin28a have shown related phenotypes. Here we describe the first comprehensive analysis of the physiologic consequences of Lin28a and Lin28b deficiency in knockout (KO) mice. Lin28a/b-deficiency led to dwarfism starting at different ages, and compound gene deletions showed a cumulative dosage effect on organismal growth. Conditional gene deletion at specific developmental stages revealed that fetal but neither neonatal nor adult deficiency resulted in growth defects and aberrations in glucose metabolism. Tissue-specific KO mice implicated skeletal muscle-deficiency in the abnormal programming of adult growth and metabolism. The effects of Lin28b KO can be rescued by Tsc1 haplo-insufficiency in skeletal muscles. Our data implicate fetal expression of Lin28a/b in the regulation of life-long effects on metabolism and growth, and demonstrate that fetal Lin28b acts at least in part via mTORC1 signaling. PMID:23666760

  4. Lin28A binds active promoters and recruits Tet1 to regulate gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yaxue; Yao, Bing; Shin, Jaehoon; Lin, Li; Kim, Namshik; Song, Qifeng; Liu, Shuang; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U.; Huang, Luoxiu; Wan, Jun; Wu, Hao; Qian, Jiang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Heng; Ming, Guo-li; Jin, Peng; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Lin28, a well-known RNA-binding protein, regulates diverse cellular properties. All physiological functions of Lin28A characterized so far have been attributed to its repression of let-7 miRNA biogenesis or modulation of mRNA translational efficiency. Here we show that Lin28A directly binds to a consensus DNA sequence in vitro and in mouse embryonic stem cells in vivo. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reveal enrichment of Lin28A binding around transcription start sites, and a positive correlation between its genomic occupancy and expression of many associated genes. Mechanistically, Lin28A recruits 5-methylcytosine-dioxygenase Tet1 to genomic binding sites to orchestrate 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine dynamics. Either Lin28A or Tet1 knockdown leads to dysregulated DNA methylation and expression of common target genes. These results reveal a surprising role for Lin28A in transcriptional regulation via epigenetic DNA modifications and have implications for understanding mechanisms underlying versatile functions of Lin28A in mammalian systems. PMID:26711009

  5. Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xun, Gong

    2007-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power…

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans period homolog lin-42 regulates the timing of heterochronic miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Katherine A; Rougvie, Ann E

    2014-10-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally via the 3' UTR of target mRNAs and were first identified in the Caenorhabditis elegans heterochronic pathway. miRNAs have since been found in many organisms and have broad functions, including control of differentiation and pluripotency in humans. lin-4 and let-7-family miRNAs regulate developmental timing in C. elegans, and their proper temporal expression ensures cell lineage patterns are correctly timed and sequentially executed. Although much is known about miRNA biogenesis, less is understood about how miRNA expression is timed and regulated. lin-42, the worm homolog of the circadian rhythm gene period of flies and mammals, is another core component of the heterochronic gene pathway. lin-42 mutants have a precocious phenotype, in which later-stage programs are executed too early, but the placement of lin-42 in the timing pathway is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that lin-42 negatively regulates heterochronic miRNA transcription. let-7 and the related miRNA miR-48 accumulate precociously in lin-42 mutants. This defect reflects transcriptional misregulation because enhanced expression of both primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) and a let-7 promoter::gfp fusion are observed. The pri-miRNA levels oscillate during larval development, in a pattern reminiscent of lin-42 expression. Importantly, we show that lin-42 is not required for this cycling; instead, peak amplitude is increased. Genetic analyses further confirm that lin-42 acts through let-7 family miRNAs. Taken together, these data show that a key function of lin-42 in developmental timing is to dampen pri-miRNAs levels, preventing their premature expression as mature miRNAs.

  7. LIN-42, the Caenorhabditis elegans PERIOD homolog, negatively regulates microRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Perales, Roberto; King, Dana M; Aguirre-Chen, Cristina; Hammell, Christopher M

    2014-07-01

    During C. elegans development, microRNAs (miRNAs) function as molecular switches that define temporal gene expression and cell lineage patterns in a dosage-dependent manner. It is critical, therefore, that the expression of miRNAs be tightly regulated so that target mRNA expression is properly controlled. The molecular mechanisms that function to optimize or control miRNA levels during development are unknown. Here we find that mutations in lin-42, the C. elegans homolog of the circadian-related period gene, suppress multiple dosage-dependent miRNA phenotypes including those involved in developmental timing and neuronal cell fate determination. Analysis of mature miRNA levels in lin-42 mutants indicates that lin-42 functions to attenuate miRNA expression. Through the analysis of transcriptional reporters, we show that the upstream cis-acting regulatory regions of several miRNA genes are sufficient to promote highly dynamic transcription that is coupled to the molting cycles of post-embryonic development. Immunoprecipitation of LIN-42 complexes indicates that LIN-42 binds the putative cis-regulatory regions of both non-coding and protein-coding genes and likely plays a role in regulating their transcription. Consistent with this hypothesis, analysis of miRNA transcriptional reporters in lin-42 mutants indicates that lin-42 regulates miRNA transcription. Surprisingly, strong loss-of-function mutations in lin-42 do not abolish the oscillatory expression patterns of lin-4 and let-7 transcription but lead to increased expression of these genes. We propose that lin-42 functions to negatively regulate the transcriptional output of multiple miRNAs and mRNAs and therefore coordinates the expression levels of genes that dictate temporal cell fate with other regulatory programs that promote rhythmic gene expression.

  8. The TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 controls the onset of developmental plasticity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Tocchini, Cristina; Keusch, Jeremy J; Miller, Sarah B; Finger, Susanne; Gut, Heinz; Stadler, Michael B; Ciosk, Rafal

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms controlling cell fate determination and reprogramming are fundamental for development. A profound reprogramming, allowing the production of pluripotent cells in early embryos, takes place during the oocyte-to-embryo transition. To understand how the oocyte reprogramming potential is controlled, we sought Caenorhabditis elegans mutants in which embryonic transcription is initiated precociously in germ cells. This screen identified LIN-41, a TRIM-NHL protein and a component of the somatic heterochronic pathway, as a temporal regulator of pluripotency in the germline. We found that LIN-41 is expressed in the cytoplasm of developing oocytes, which, in lin-41 mutants, acquire pluripotent characteristics of embryonic cells and form teratomas. To understand LIN-41 function in the germline, we conducted structure-function studies. In contrast to other TRIM-NHL proteins, we found that LIN-41 is unlikely to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Similar to other TRIM-NHL proteins, the somatic function of LIN-41 is thought to involve mRNA regulation. Surprisingly, we found that mutations predicted to disrupt the association of LIN-41 with mRNA, which otherwise compromise LIN-41 function in the heterochronic pathway in the soma, have only minor effects in the germline. Similarly, LIN-41-mediated repression of a key somatic mRNA target is dispensable for the germline function. Thus, LIN-41 appears to function in the germline and the soma via different molecular mechanisms. These studies provide the first insight into the mechanism inhibiting the onset of embryonic differentiation in developing oocytes, which is required to ensure a successful transition between generations.

  9. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  10. Lin28 Induces Resistance to Anti-Androgens Via Promotion of AR Splice Variant Generation

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Ramakumar; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou, Wei; Evans, Christopher P.; Gao, Allen C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen-dependent initially and progresses to a castration-resistant state after androgen deprivation therapy. Treatment options for castration-resistant PCa include the potent second-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide or CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone. Recent clinical observations point to the development of resistance to these therapies which may be mediated by constitutively active alternative splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR). METHODS Sensitivity of LNCaP cells overexpressing Lin28 (LN-Lin28) to enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was compared to that of control LN-neo cells using cell growth assays, proliferation assays using MTT, anchorage-dependent clonogenic ability assays and soft agar assays. Ability of LN-Lin28 cells to maintain AR activation after treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was tested using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, ChIP assays, and qRT-PCR. Importance of Lin28 in enzalutamide resistance was assessed by the downregulation of Lin28 expression in C4-2B and 22Rv1 cells chronically treated with enzalutamide. Requirement for sustained AR signaling in LN-Lin28 cells was examined by the downregulation of either full length AR or AR-V7 using siRNA. RESULTS We show that Lin28 promotes the development of resistance to currently used targeted therapeutics by enhancing the expression of AR splice variants such as AR-V7. PCa cells overexpressing Lin28 exhibit resistance to treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide. Downregulation of Lin28 resensitizes enzalutamide-resistant PCa cells to enzalutamide treatment. We also show that the upregulation of splicing factors such as hnRNPA1 by Lin28 may mediate the enhanced generation of AR splice variants in Lin28-expressing cells. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that Lin28 plays a key role in the acquisition of resistance to AR-targeted therapies by PCa cells and establish the importance of Lin28 in PCa

  11. Editors' message--Hydrogeology Journal in 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford; Olcott, Perry; Schneider, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeology Journal appeared in six issues containing a total of 710 pages and 48 major articles, including 31 Papers and 14 Reports, as well as some Technical Notes and Book Reviews. The number of submitted manuscripts continues to increase. The final issue of 2003 also contained the annual volume index. Hydrogeology Journal (HJ) is an international forum for hydrogeology and related disciplines and authors in 2003 were from about 28 countries. Articles advanced hydrogeologic science and described hydrogeologic systems in many regions worldwide. These articles focused on a variety of general topics and on studies of hydrogeology in 24 countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, France, India, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey, and U.S.A. The Guest Editor of the 2003 HJ theme issue on “Hydromechanics in Geology and Geotechnics”, Ove Stephansson, assembled a valuable collection of technical reviews and research papers from eminent authors on important aspects of the subject area.

  12. ESDAPT - APT PROGRAMMING EDITOR AND INTERPRETER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.

    1994-01-01

    ESDAPT is a graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. ESDAPT has a graphical user interface that provides the user with an APT syntax sensitive text editor and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statement can also be created using menus and screen picks. ESDAPT interprets APT geometry statements and displays the results in its view windows. Tool paths are generated by batching the APT source to an APT processor (COSMIC P-APT recommended). The tool paths are then displayed in the view windows. Hardcopy output of the view windows is in color PostScript format. ESDAPT is written in C-language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4 series computers running SunOS. ESDAPT requires 4Mb of disk space, 7Mb of RAM, and MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Release 4, or OpenWindows version 3 for execution. Program documentation in PostScript format and an executable for OpenWindows version 3 are provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ESDAPT is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. This program was developed in 1992.

  13. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  14. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  15. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  16. Starving for more: Nutrient sensing by LIN-28 in adult intestinal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In this Extra View, we extend our recent work on the protein LIN-28 and its role in adult stem cell divisions. LIN-28 is an mRNA- and microRNA-binding protein that is conserved from worms to humans. When expressed ectopically, it promotes the reprogramming of differentiated vertebrate cells into pluripotent stem cells as well as the regeneration of vertebrate tissues after injury. However, its endogenous function in stem cell populations is less clear. We recently reported that LIN-28 is specifically expressed in progenitor cells in the adult Drosophila intestine and enhances insulin signaling within this population. Loss of lin-28 alters the division patterns of these progenitor cells, limiting the growth of the intestinal epithelium that is ordinarily caused by feeding. Thus, LIN-28 is part of an uncharacterized circuit used to remodel a tissue in response to environmental cues like nutrition. Here, we extend this analysis by reporting that the levels of LIN-28 in progenitor cells are sensitive to nutrient availability. In addition, we speculate about the role of LIN-28 in the translational control of target mRNAs such as Insulin Receptor (InR) and how such translational control may be an important mechanism that underlies the stem cell dynamics needed for tissue homeostasis and growth.

  17. The C. elegans hox gene lin-39 controls cell cycle progression during vulval development.

    PubMed

    Roiz, Daniel; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan Miguel; Leu, Philipp; Hajnal, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Cell fate specification during organogenesis is usually followed by a phase of cell proliferation to produce the required number of differentiated cells. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva is an excellent model to study how cell fate specification and cell proliferation are coordinated. The six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) are born at the first larval stage, but they arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle until the beginning of the third larval stage, when their fates are specified and the three proximal VPCs proliferate to generate 22 vulval cells. An epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal from the gonadal anchor cell combined with lateral DELTA/NOTCH signaling between the VPCs determine the primary (1°) and secondary (2°) fates, respectively. The hox gene lin-39 plays a key role in integrating these spatial patterning signals and in maintaining the VPCs as polarized epithelial cells. Using a fusion-defective eff-1(lf) mutation to keep the VPCs polarized, we find that VPCs lacking lin-39 can neither activate lateral NOTCH signaling nor proliferate. LIN-39 promotes cell cycle progression through two distinct mechanisms. First, LIN-39 maintains the VPCs competent to proliferate by inducing cdk-4 cdk and cye-1 cyclinE expression via a non-canonical HOX binding motif. Second, LIN-39 activates in the adjacent VPCs the NOTCH signaling pathway, which promotes VPC proliferation independently of LIN-39. The hox gene lin-39 is therefore a central node in a regulatory network coordinating VPC differentiation and proliferation.

  18. The heterochronic gene Lin28 regulates amphibian metamorphosis through disturbance of thyroid hormone function.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Fernando; Gundermann, Daniel G; Muñoz, Rosana; Bruno, Renzo; Larraín, Juan

    2017-03-28

    Metamorphosis is a classic example of developmental transition, which involves important morphological and physiological changes that prepare the organism for the adult life. It has been very well established that amphibian metamorphosis is mainly controlled by Thyroid Hormone (TH). Here, we show that the heterochronic gene Lin28 is downregulated during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. Lin28 overexpression before activation of TH signaling delays metamorphosis and inhibits the expression of TH target genes. The delay in metamorphosis is rescued by incubation with exogenous TH, indicating that Lin28 works upstream or parallel to TH. High-throughput analyses performed before any delay on metamorphosis or change in TH signaling showed that overexpression of Lin28 reduces transcript levels of several hormones secreted by the pituitary, including the Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH), and regulates the expression of proteins involved in TH transport, metabolism and signaling, showing that Lin28 disrupts TH function at different levels. Our data demonstrates that the role of Lin28 in controlling developmental transitions is evolutionary conserved and establishes a functional interaction between Lin28 and thyroid hormone function introducing a new regulatory step in perinatal development with implications for our understanding of endocrine disorders.

  19. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leo D.; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Rowe, R. Grant; Nguyen, Phi T.; Sullivan, Jessica L.; Pearson, Daniel S.; Doulatov, Sergei; Wu, Linwei; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Zhu, Hao; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Daley, George Q.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Dysregulated mast cell development leads to systemic mastocytosis, a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused mast cell accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-mast cell progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced mast cell specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced mast cells appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of mast cell terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human mast cell leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal mast cells from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in mast cell disease. PMID:25655194

  20. Editorial independence and the editor-owner relationship: good editors never die, they just cross the line.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, J F

    2009-12-01

    The concept of editorial freedom or independence is examined in the light of the editor-owner relationship. Like individual and national freedom or independence, it is a rhetorical concept whose realisation flows from internal achievement as much as it depends on external validation. This freedom entails roles and responsibilities embodied in specific codes of practice for editors, such as the guidelines espoused by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Association of Medical Editors. The calling to embody these guidelines makes editing a vocation that demands isolation and distancing, separation and solitude. It involves bracketing one's biases, prejudgments and preconceptions. With such detachment comes real freedom; one that requires a moral fibre and trustworthiness that uphold truth and right, whether in full view of public scrutiny, or in the aloneness of private secrecy. The stereotypical tension between academic and commercial concerns highlights the editor-owner relationship, and bears directly on editorial independence. In practice, journal owners overstep their prerogatives. The absence of clear contracts defining editorial independence and the lack of established mechanisms governing the editor-owner relationship affect many small- to medium-sized journals in developing countries. Even large journals in developed and democratic nations or totalitarian states and societies are not spared. At the end of the day, editorial freedom exists only insofar as it is tolerated, or until editors cross the line.

  1. The Period protein homolog LIN-42 negatively regulates microRNA biogenesis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Van Wynsberghe, Priscilla M; Finnegan, Emily F; Stark, Thomas; Angelus, Evan P; Homan, Kathryn E; Yeo, Gene W; Pasquinelli, Amy E

    2014-06-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in many multicellular organisms. They are encoded in the genome and transcribed into primary (pri-) miRNAs before two processing steps that ultimately produce the mature miRNA. In order to generate the appropriate amount of a particular miRNA in the correct location at the correct time, proper regulation of miRNA biogenesis is essential. Here we identify the Period protein homolog LIN-42 as a new regulator of miRNA biogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. We mapped a spontaneous suppressor of the normally lethal let-7(n2853) allele to the lin-42 gene. Mutations in this allele (ap201) or a second lin-42 allele (n1089) caused increased mature let-7 miRNA levels at most time points when mature let-7 miRNA is normally expressed. Levels of pri-let-7 and a let-7 transcriptional reporter were also increased in lin-42(n1089) worms. These results indicate that LIN-42 normally represses pri-let-7 transcription and thus the accumulation of let-7 miRNA. This inhibition is not specific to let-7, as pri- and mature levels of lin-4 and miR-35 were also increased in lin-42 mutants. Furthermore, small RNA-seq analysis showed widespread increases in the levels of mature miRNAs in lin-42 mutants. Thus, we propose that the period protein homolog LIN-42 is a global regulator of miRNA biogenesis.

  2. LIN28A Modulates Splicing and Gene Expression Programs in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Bennett, Brian D; Luo, Shujun; Inoue, Kaoru; Grimm, Sara A; Schroth, Gary P; Bushel, Pierre R; Kinyamu, H Karimi; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-09-01

    LIN28 is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein with critical functions in developmental timing and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LIN28's oncogenic properties are yet to be described. RNA-protein immunoprecipitation coupled with genome-wide sequencing (RIP-Seq) analysis revealed significant LIN28 binding within 843 mRNAs in breast cancer cells. Many of the LIN28-bound mRNAs are implicated in the regulation of RNA and cell metabolism. We identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1), a protein with multiple roles in mRNA metabolism, as a LIN28-interacting partner. Subsequently, we used a custom computational method to identify differentially spliced gene isoforms in LIN28 and hnRNP A1 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-treated cells. The results reveal that these proteins regulate alternative splicing and steady-state mRNA expression of genes implicated in aspects of breast cancer biology. Notably, cells lacking LIN28 undergo significant isoform switching of the ENAH gene, resulting in a decrease in the expression of the ENAH exon 11a isoform. The expression of ENAH isoform 11a has been shown to be elevated in breast cancers that express HER2. Intriguingly, analysis of publicly available array data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that LIN28 expression in the HER2 subtype is significantly different from that in other breast cancer subtypes. Collectively, our data suggest that LIN28 may regulate splicing and gene expression programs that drive breast cancer subtype phenotypes.

  3. The Letters Not Sent by a Journal Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    In the late hours of the night, even the most conscientious of journal editors may slip into writing imaginary letters to cherished authors and reviewers. Here are some of the letters that I composed:

  4. Bibliography or Bust: The "Angst" of Scholarly Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Richard Hauer

    1980-01-01

    Provides evidence indicating not only that the market for articles on literature and language is saturated with submissions, but that the glut creates burgeoning problems for editors, including the problem of rejecting publishable items. (RL)

  5. ANNOUNCEMENT: Greetings from the Editor and Publisher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäppling, Roger; Williams, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Physica Scripta is an international physics journal published for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on behalf of the Nordic Science Academies and Physical Societies. This issue marks the beginning of the partnership between the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Institute of Physics Publishing (IOP). We look forward to a fruitful relationship in which Physica Scripta can profit from the international reach of IOP. Authors and readers will benefit from advance publication of articles on the web prior to receiving each month's journal issue. The peer-review system will continue to be managed by Professor Roger Wäppling who will assess each paper before assigning it to an external editor or sending it for refereeing. IOP will receive new article submissions and generate electronic documents suitable for use in the refereeing process. The editorial office in Sweden will then be responsible for these manuscripts up to the final publication decision. Accepted articles will be sent to IOP for copy-editing, typesetting, production and distribution. We aim to provide our authors, referees and readers with an enhanced service for this well-established journal. IOP will maintain and augment Physica Scripta's record in publishing a broad range of high-quality research papers and we will continue to publish Topical Issues as supplements to the regular 12 issues. The popular Comments articles will continue to be published in conjunction with regular papers under this new partnership. We hope that our subscribers will continue to enjoy reading Physica Scripta as a valuable resource for general physics research.

  6. LIN28 alters cell fate succession and acts independently of the let-7 microRNA during neurogliogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Erica; Heine, Christian; Jiang, Qiang; Lee, Vivian M; Moss, Eric G

    2010-03-01

    LIN28 is an RNA-binding protein that is expressed in many developing tissues. It can block let-7 (Mirlet7) microRNA processing and help promote pluripotency. We have observed LIN28 expression in the developing mouse neural tube, colocalizing with SOX2, suggesting a role in neural development. To better understand its normal developmental function, we investigated LIN28 activity during neurogliogenesis in vitro, where the succession of neuronal to glial cell fates occurs as it does in vivo. LIN28 expression was high in undifferentiated cells, and was downregulated rapidly upon differentiation. Constitutive LIN28 expression caused a complete block of gliogenesis and an increase in neurogenesis. LIN28 expression was compatible with neuronal differentiation and did not increase proliferation. LIN28 caused significant changes in gene expression prior to any effect on let-7, notably on Igf2. Furthermore, a mutant LIN28 that permitted let-7 accumulation was still able to completely block gliogenesis. Thus, at least two biological activities of LIN28 are genetically separable and might involve distinct mechanisms. LIN28 can differentially promote and inhibit specific fates and does not function exclusively by blocking let-7 family microRNAs. Importantly, the role of LIN28 in cell fate succession in vertebrate cells is analogous to its activity as a developmental timing regulator in C. elegans.

  7. Adapting a thesis to publication style: meeting editors' expectations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S H

    1996-01-01

    Every year hundreds of thesis reports are completed by graduate students. Many of these end up on nursing journal editors' desks, only to be rejected. What characteristics of a thesis lead to rejection? How can authors develop quality research manuscripts? How can faculty teach graduate students the difference between a thesis and manuscript. This article answers these questions by providing advice from 15 critical care and research journal editors.

  8. Substrate Utilization in the Critically Ill (Letter to the Editor)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    pen.sagepub.com/ Nutrition Journal of Parenteral and Enteral http://pen.sagepub.com/content/33/1/111 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI...Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: The American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition can be found at:Journal of...the Editor Dear Editor, Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Volume 33 Number 1 January/February 2009 111 © 2009 American Society for Parenteral

  9. ZED- A LINE EDITOR FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZED editor for the DEC VAX is a simple, yet powerful line editor for text, program source code, and non-binary data. Line editors can be superior to screen editors in some cases, such as executing complex multiple or conditional commands, or editing via slow modem lines. ZED excels in the area of text processing by using procedure files. For example, such procedures can reformat a file of addresses or remove all comment lines from a FORTRAN program. In addition to command files, ZED also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, on-line help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. The ZED editor was originally developed at Cambridge University in London and has been continuously enhanced since 1976. Users of the Cambridge implementation have devised such elaborate ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating Pi. This implementation of ZED strives to maintain the characteristics of the Cambridge editor. A complete ZED manual is included on the tape. ZED is written entirely in C for either batch or interactive execution on the DEC VAX under VMS 4.X and requires 80,896 bytes of memory. This program was released in 1988 and updated in 1989.

  10. Role of an adaptor protein Lin-7B in brain development: possible involvement in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ayumi; Hamada, Nanako; Ito, Hidenori; Miyauchi, Akihiko; Jimbo, Eriko F; Momoi, Mariko Y; Tabata, Hidenori; Yamagata, Takanori; Nagata, Koh-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Using comparative genomic hybridization analysis for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, a 73-Kb duplication at 19q13.33 (nt. 49 562 755-49 635 956) including LIN7B and 5 other genes was detected. We then identified a novel frameshift mutation in LIN7B in another ASD patient. Since LIN7B encodes a scaffold protein essential for neuronal function, we analyzed the role of Lin-7B in the development of cerebral cortex. Acute knockdown of Lin-7B with in utero electroporation caused a delay in neuronal migration during corticogenesis. When Lin-7B was knocked down in cortical neurons in one hemisphere, their axons failed to extend efficiently into the contralateral hemisphere after leaving the corpus callosum. Meanwhile, enhanced expression of Lin-7B had no effects on both cortical neuron migration and axon growth. Notably, silencing of Lin-7B did not affect the proliferation of neuronal progenitors and stem cells. Taken together, Lin-7B was found to play a pivotal role in corticogenesis through the regulation of excitatory neuron migration and interhemispheric axon growth, while further analyses are required to directly link functional defects of Lin-7B to ASD pathophysiology. Lin-7 plays a pivotal role as a scaffold protein in synaptic development and plasticity. Based on genetic analyses we identified mutations in LIN-7B gene in some ASD (autism-spectrum disorder) patients. Functional defects in Lin-7B caused abnormal neuronal migration and interhemispheric axon growth during mouse brain development. Thus, functional deficiency in Lin-7B could be implicated in clinical phenotypes in some ASD patients through bringing about abnormal cortical architecture.

  11. A role of uridylation pathway for blockade of let-7 microRNA biogenesis by Lin28B

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Katsura, Akihiro; Miyazono, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    The precise control of microRNA (miRNA) biosynthesis is crucial for gene regulation. Lin28A and Lin28B are selective inhibitors of biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs involved in development and tumorigenesis. Lin28A selectively inhibits let-7 biogenesis through cytoplasmic uridylation of precursor let-7 by TUT4 terminal uridyl transferase and subsequent degradation by Dis3l2 exonuclease. However, a role of this uridylation pathway remains unclear in let-7 blockade by Lin28B, a paralog of Lin28A, while Lin28B is reported to engage a distinct mechanism in the nucleus to suppress let-7. Here we revisit a functional link between Lin28B and the uridylation pathway with a focus on let-7 metabolism in cancer cells. Both Lin28A and Lin28B interacted with Dis3l2 in the cytoplasm, and silencing of Dis3l2 upregulated uridylated pre-let-7 in both Lin28A- and Lin28B-expressing cancer cell lines. In addition, we found that amounts of let-7 precursors influenced intracellular localization of Lin28B. Furthermore, we found that MCPIP1 (Zc3h12a) ribonuclease was also involved in degradation of both non-uridylated and uridylated pre-let-7. Cancer transcriptome analysis showed association of expression levels of Lin28B and uridylation pathway components, TUT4 and Dis3l2, in various human cancer cells and hepatocellular carcinoma. Collectively, these results suggest that cytoplasmic uridylation pathway actively participates in blockade of let-7 biogenesis by Lin28B. PMID:26080928

  12. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of the transplanted lin(-) hematopoietic cell migration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kašėta, Vytautas; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Liubavičiūtė, Aušra; Maciulevičienė, Rūta; Stirkė, Arūnas; Biziulevičienė, Genė

    2016-02-01

    Stem cells take part in organogenesis, cell maturation and injury repair. The migration is necessary for each of these functions to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of transplanted hematopoietic lin(-) cell population (which consists mainly of the stem and progenitor cells) in BALB/c mouse contact hypersensitivity model and quantify the migration to the site of inflammation in the affected foot and other healthy organs. Quantitative analysis was carried out with the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lung, liver, damaged and healthy foot tissue samples at different time points were collected for analysis. The quantitative data normalization was performed according to the comparative quantification method. The analysis of foot samples shows the significant migration of transplanted cells to the recipient mice affected foot. The quantity was more than 1000 times higher, as compared with that of the untreated foot. Due to the inflammation, the number of donor origin cells migrating to the lungs, liver, spleen and bone marrow was found to be decreased. Our data shows that transplanted cells selectively migrated into the inflammation areas of the foot edema. Also, the inflammation caused a secondary migration in ectopic spleen of hematopoietic stem cell niches and re-homing from the spleen to the bone marrow took place.

  14. Diabetes impairs mobilization of mouse bone marrow-derived Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Barthelmes, D; Irhimeh, M R; Gillies, M C; Karimipour, M; Zhou, M; Zhu, L; Shen, W Y

    2013-10-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells circulating in the peripheral blood (PB) contribute to vascular repair. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of a 'cocktail' consisting of erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and tetrahydrobiopterin to mobilize hematopoietic lineage negative/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 positive (Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+)) cells from the bone marrow (BM) to PB in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic mice were studied after 16weeks of hyperglycemia. Half the mice in each group (non-diabetic and diabetic) received daily intraperitoneal injections of the cocktail for 6 consecutive days while the other half received vehicle buffer. Mobilization of Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) cells, which were expanded in MCP301 medium, was evaluated after isolating them from BM and PB and their phenotypic and morphological properties were studied. We found that 16weeks of diabetes affected neither the total number of BM mononucleated cells nor the number of Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) cells in BM compared with non-diabetic controls. In non-diabetic mice, cocktail treatment resulted in a significant decrease in BM Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) cells, paralleled by a significant increase of these cells in PB. Such changes in the number of Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) cells in BM and PB after the cocktail treatment were less marked in diabetic mice. In vitro studies of BM Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) cells from diabetic and non-diabetic mice did not reveal any differences in either phenotypes or colony forming potential. These findings indicate that diabetes impairs the mobilization of Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) cells from BM to PB. Impaired mobilization of BM Lin(-)/VEGF-R2(+) cells soon after the onset of diabetes may contribute to complications such as diabetic retinopathy.

  15. LinA2, a HCH-converting bacterial enzyme that dehydrohalogenates HBCDs.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Wyss, Simon A; Geueke, Birgit; Fleischmann, Thomas; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Lienemann, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are lipophilic, polyhalogenated hydrocarbons with comparable stereochemistry. Bacterial evolution in HCH-contaminated soils resulted in the development of several Spingomonadaceae which express a series of HCH-converting enzymes. We showed that LinB, a haloalkane dehalogenase from Sphingobium indicum B90A, also transforms various HBCDs besides HCHs. Here we present evidence that LinA2, another dehalogenase from S. indicum also converts certain HBCDs to pentabromocyclododecenes (PBCDEs). Racemic mixtures of α-, β-, γ-HBCDs, a mixture of them, and δ-HBCD, a meso form, were exposed to LinA2. Substantial conversion of (-)β-HBCD was observed, but all other stereoisomers were not transformed significantly. The enantiomeric excess (EE) of β-HBCDs increased up to 60% in 32 h, whereas EE values of α- and γ-HBCDs were not affected. Substrate conversion and product formation were described with second-order kinetic models. One major (P1β) and possibly two minor (P2β, P3β) metabolites were detected. Respective mass spectra showed the characteristic isotope pattern of PBCDEs, the HBr elimination products of HBCDs. Michaelis-Menten parameters KM=0.47 ± 0.07 μM and vmax=0.17 ± 0.01 μmoll(-1)h(-1) were deduced from exposure data with varying enzyme/substrate ratios. LinA2 is more substrate specific than LinB, the latter converted all tested HBCDs, LinA2 only one. The widespread HCH pollution favored the selection and evolution of bacteria converting these compounds. We found that LinA2 and LinB, two of these HCH-converting enzymes expressed in S. indicum B90A, also dehalogenate HBCDs to lower brominated compounds, indicating that structural similarities of both classes of compounds are recognized at the level of substrate-protein interactions.

  16. Multisite Phosphorylation of NuMA-Related LIN-5 Controls Mitotic Spindle Positioning in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Portegijs, Vincent; van Mourik, Tim; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J. R.; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, the mitotic spindle segregates replicated chromosomes to opposite poles of the cell, while the position of the spindle determines the plane of cleavage. Spindle positioning and chromosome segregation depend on pulling forces on microtubules extending from the centrosomes to the cell cortex. Critical in pulling force generation is the cortical anchoring of cytoplasmic dynein by a conserved ternary complex of Gα, GPR-1/2, and LIN-5 proteins in C. elegans (Gα–LGN–NuMA in mammals). Previously, we showed that the polarity kinase PKC-3 phosphorylates LIN-5 to control spindle positioning in early C. elegans embryos. Here, we investigate whether additional LIN-5 phosphorylations regulate cortical pulling forces, making use of targeted alteration of in vivo phosphorylated residues by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic engineering. Four distinct in vivo phosphorylated LIN-5 residues were found to have critical functions in spindle positioning. Two of these residues form part of a 30 amino acid binding site for GPR-1, which we identified by reverse two-hybrid screening. We provide evidence for a dual-kinase mechanism, involving GSK3 phosphorylation of S659 followed by phosphorylation of S662 by casein kinase 1. These LIN-5 phosphorylations promote LIN-5–GPR-1/2 interaction and contribute to cortical pulling forces. The other two critical residues, T168 and T181, form part of a cyclin-dependent kinase consensus site and are phosphorylated by CDK1-cyclin B in vitro. We applied a novel strategy to characterize early embryonic defects in lethal T168,T181 knockin substitution mutants, and provide evidence for sequential LIN-5 N-terminal phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in dynein recruitment. Our data support that phosphorylation of multiple LIN-5 domains by different kinases contributes to a mechanism for spatiotemporal control of spindle positioning and chromosome segregation. PMID:27711157

  17. Another Security Improvement over the Lin et al.'s E-voting Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaar, Maryam Rajabzadeh; Mohajeri, Javad; Salmasizadeh, Mahmoud

    In 2003, Lin et al. have proposed an electronic voting scheme which can be utilized in large-scale elections, and claimed it detects double voting. But in this paper, by presenting an attack, we show that voters can successfully vote more than once without being detected. Hence, we propose a new modified scheme based on the Lin et al.'s scheme with the same efficiency to solve this weakness and analyze its security.

  18. RbAp46/48(LIN-53) Is Required for Holocentromere Assembly in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bernard Chi Hang; Lin, Zhongyang; Yuen, Karen Wing Yee

    2016-03-01

    Centromeres, the specialized chromosomal regions for recruiting kinetochores and directing chromosome segregation, are epigenetically marked by a centromeric histone H3 variant, CENP-A. To maintain centromere identity through cell cycles, CENP-A diluted during DNA replication is replenished. The licensing factor M18BP1(KNL-2) is known to recruit CENP-A to holocentromeres. Here, we show that RbAp46/48(LIN-53), a conserved histone chaperone, is required for CENP-A(HCP-3) localization in holocentric Caenorhabditis elegans. Indeed, RbAp46/48(LIN-53) and CENP-A(HCP-3) localizations are interdependent. RbAp46/48(LIN-53) localizes to the centromere during metaphase in a CENP-A(HCP-3)- and M18BP1(KNL-2)-dependent manner, suggesting CENP-A(HCP-3) loading may occur before anaphase. RbAp46/48(LIN-53) does not function at the centromere through histone acetylation, H3K27 trimethylation, or its known chromatin-modifying complexes. RbAp46/48(LIN-53) may function independently to escort CENP-A(HCP-3) for holocentromere assembly but is dispensable for other kinetochore protein recruitment. Nonetheless, depletion of RbAp46/48(LIN-53) leads to anaphase bridges and chromosome missegregation. This study unravels the holocentromere assembly hierarchy and its conservation with monocentromeres.

  19. Lin28b stimulates the reprogramming of rat Müller glia to retinal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Tao, Zui; Xue, Langyue; Zeng, Yuxiao; Wang, Yi; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-03-01

    In lower-order vertebrates, Müller glia exhibit characteristics of retinal progenitor cells, while in higher vertebrates, such as mammals, the regenerative capacity of Müller glia is limited. Recently, we reported that Lin28b promoted the trans-differentiation of Müller cells to rod photoreceptor and bipolar cells in the retina of retinitis pigmentosa rat model, whereas it is unclear whether Lin28b can stimulate the reprogramming of Müller glia in vitro for transplantation into a damaged retina. In the present study, Long-Evens rat Müller glia were infected with Adeno-Lin28b or Adeno-GFP. Over-expression of Lin28b in isolated rat Müller glia resulted in the suppression of GFAP expression, enhancement of cell proliferation and a significant increase of the expression of retinal progenitor markers 5 days after infection. Moreover, Lin28b caused a significant reduction of the Let-7 family of microRNAs. Following sub-retinal space transplantation, Müller glia-derived retinal progenitors improved b-wave amplification of 30d Royal College of Surgeons retinitis pigmentosa model (RCS-P+) rats, as detected by electroretinography (ERG) recordings. Taken together, these data suggest that the up-regulation of Lin28b expression facilitated the reprogramming of Müller cells toward characteristics of retinal progenitors.

  20. TRIM71 suppresses tumorigenesis via modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jinlong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Nayun; Shin, Daye; Choi, Hae In; Cho, Sungchan; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Jong Heon

    2016-01-01

    TRIM71 (tripartite motif-containing 71) belongs to the TRIM-NHL protein family, which plays a conserved role in regulating early development and differentiation. However, the molecular functions of TRIM71 have remained largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of TRIM71 together with modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 (high-mobility group AT-hook 2) signaling in tumorigenesis. TRIM71 overexpression opposed Lin28B-induced transformation in primary cells and inhibited tumor formation in a mouse model. Specific knockdown of TRIM71 expression increased cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type TRIM71 in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells in which Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling was conserved decreased both cancer cell phenotypes. More importantly, overexpression of an ubiquitin transfer activity-deficient TRIM71 mutant in NSCLC cells had no effect on proliferation or invasion, regardless of the conservation status of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling. The tumorigenic inhibitory action of TRIM71 was antagonized by overexpression of the TRIM71 downstream targets, Lin28B and HMGA2. Furthermore, a bioinformatics analysis revealed that TRIM71 expression was downregulated in various types of cancer tissue from patients. Taken together, these data indicate that TRIM71 acts through post-transcriptional repression of Lin28B and subsequent modulation of let-7-HMGA2 signaling during tumorigenesis to potentially function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:27821801

  1. Structure and Mechanism of the Lincosamide Antibiotic adenylyltransferase LinB

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, M.; Buhllar, K; Hughes, D; Junop, M; Wright, G

    2009-01-01

    Lincosamides make up an important class of antibiotics used against a wide range of pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Predictably, lincosamide-resistant microorganisms have emerged with antibiotic modification as one of their major resistance strategies. Inactivating enzymes LinB/A catalyze adenylylation of the drug; however, little is known about their mechanistic and structural properties. We determined two X-ray structures of LinB: ternary substrate and binary productbound complexes. Structural and kinetic characterization of LinB, mutagenesis, solvent isotope effect, and product inhibition studies are consistent with a mechanism involving direct in-line nucleotidyl transfer. The characterization of LinB enabled its classification as a member of a nucleotidyltransferase superfamily, along with nucleotide polymerases and aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, and this relationship offers further support for the LinB mechanism. The LinB structure provides an evolutionary link to ancient nucleotide polymerases and suggests that, like protein kinases and acetyltransferases, these are proto-resistance elements from which drug resistance can evolve.

  2. TRIM71 suppresses tumorigenesis via modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinlong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Nayun; Shin, Daye; Choi, Hae In; Cho, Sungchan; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Jong Heon

    2016-11-29

    TRIM71 (tripartite motif-containing 71) belongs to the TRIM-NHL protein family, which plays a conserved role in regulating early development and differentiation. However, the molecular functions of TRIM71 have remained largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of TRIM71 together with modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 (high-mobility group AT-hook 2) signaling in tumorigenesis. TRIM71 overexpression opposed Lin28B-induced transformation in primary cells and inhibited tumor formation in a mouse model. Specific knockdown of TRIM71 expression increased cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type TRIM71 in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells in which Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling was conserved decreased both cancer cell phenotypes. More importantly, overexpression of an ubiquitin transfer activity-deficient TRIM71 mutant in NSCLC cells had no effect on proliferation or invasion, regardless of the conservation status of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling. The tumorigenic inhibitory action of TRIM71 was antagonized by overexpression of the TRIM71 downstream targets, Lin28B and HMGA2. Furthermore, a bioinformatics analysis revealed that TRIM71 expression was downregulated in various types of cancer tissue from patients. Taken together, these data indicate that TRIM71 acts through post-transcriptional repression of Lin28B and subsequent modulation of let-7-HMGA2 signaling during tumorigenesis to potentially function as a tumor suppressor.

  3. Assessment of X Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Caenorhabditis elegans by Phenotypic Analysis of lin-14

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Leslie; Casson, Lawrence P.; Meyer, Barbara J.

    1987-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans compensates for the difference in X chromosome gene dose between males (XO) and hermaphrodites (XX) through a mechanism that equalizes the levels of X-specific mRNA transcripts between the two sexes. We have devised a sensitive and quantitative genetic assay to measure perturbations in X chromosome gene expression caused by mutations that affect this process of dosage compensation. The assay is based on quantitating the precocious alae phenotype caused by a mutation that reduces but does not eliminate the function of the X-linked gene lin-14. We demonstrate that in diploid animals the lin-14 gene is dosage compensated between XO and XX animals. In XXX diploid animals, however, lin-14 expression is not compensated, implying that the normal dosage compensation mechanism in C. elegans lacks the capacity to compensate completely for the additional X chromosome in triplo-X animals. Using the lin-14 assay we compare the effects of mutations in the genes dpy-21, dpy-26, dpy-27, dpy-28, and dpy-22 on X-linked gene expression. Additionally, in the case of dpy-21 we correlate the change in phenotypic expression of lin-14 with a corresponding change in the lin-14 mRNA transcript level. PMID:3428573

  4. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  5. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinases (ERKs) Phosphorylate Lin28a Protein to Modulate P19 Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyuan; Chen, Min; Li, Long; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Hu; Gao, Daming

    2017-03-10

    Lin28a, originally discovered in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and highly conserved across species, is a well characterized regulator of let-7 microRNA (miRNA) and is implicated in cell proliferation and pluripotency control. However, little is known about how Lin28a function is modulated at the post-translational level and thereby responds to major signaling pathways. Here we show that Lin28a is directly phosphorylated by ERK1/2 kinases at Ser-200. By editing lin28a gene with the CRISPR/Cas9-based method, we generated P19 mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells expressing Lin28a-S200A (phospho-deficient) and Lin28a-S200D (phospho-mimetic) mutants, respectively, to study the functional impact of Ser-200 phosphorylation. Lin28a-S200D-expressing cells, but not Lin28a-S200A-expressing or control P19 embryonic carcinoma cells, displayed impaired inhibition of let-7 miRNA and resulted in decreased cyclin D1, whereas Lin28a-S200A knock-in cells expressed less let-7 miRNA, proliferated faster, and exhibited differentiation defect upon retinoic acid induction. Therefore our results support that ERK kinase-mediated Lin28a phosphorylation may be an important mechanism for pluripotent cells to facilitate the escape from the self-renewal cycle and start the differentiation process.

  6. Lin41/Trim71 is essential for mouse development and specifically expressed in postnatal ependymal cells of the brain.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Elisa; Rybak-Wolf, Agnieszka; Rohde, Anna M; Nguyen, Duong T T; Wulczyn, F Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Lin41/Trim71 is a heterochronic gene encoding a member of the Trim-NHL protein family, and is the original, genetically defined target of the microRNA let-7 in C. elegans. Both the LIN41 protein and multiple regulatory microRNA binding sites in the 3' UTR of the mRNA are highly conserved from nematodes to humans. Functional studies have described essential roles for mouse LIN41 in embryonic stem cells, cellular reprogramming and the timing of embryonic neurogenesis. We have used a new gene trap mouse line deficient in Lin41 to characterize Lin41 expression during embryonic development and in the postnatal central nervous system (CNS). In the embryo, Lin41 is required for embryonic viability and neural tube closure. Nevertheless, neurosphere assays suggest that Lin41 is not required for adult neurogenesis. Instead, we show that Lin41 promoter activity and protein expression in the postnatal CNS is restricted to ependymal cells lining the walls of the four ventricles. We use ependymal cell culture to confirm reestablishment of Lin41 expression during differentiation of ependymal progenitors to post-mitotic cells possessing motile cilia. Our results reveal that terminally differentiated ependymal cells express Lin41, a gene to date associated with self-renewing stem cells.

  7. A potential regulatory loop between Lin28B:miR-212 in androgen-independent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    BORREGO-DIAZ, EMMA; POWERS, BENJAMIN C.; AZIZOV, VUGAR; LOVELL, SCOTT; REYES, RUBEN; CHAPMAN, BRADLEY; TAWFIK, OSSAMA; McGREGOR, DOUGLAS; DIAZ, FRANCISCO J.; WANG, XINKUN; VAN VELDHUIZEN, PETER

    2014-01-01

    Lin28 is a family of RNA binding proteins and microRNA regulators. Two members of this family have been identified: Lin28A and Lin28B, which are encoded by genes localized in different chromosomes but share a high degree of sequence identity. The role of Lin28B in androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) is not well understood. Lin28B is expressed in all grades of prostatic carcinomas and prostate cancer cell lines, but not in normal prostate tissue. In this study we found that Lin28B co-localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the DU145 AIPC. The expression of Lin28B protein positively correlated with the expression of the c-Myc protein in the prostate cancer cell lines and silencing of Lin28B also correlated with a lower expression of the c-Myc protein, but not with the downregulation of c-Myc messenger RNA (mRNA) in the DU145 AIPC cells. We hypothesized that Lin28B regulates the expression of c-Myc protein by altering intermediate c-Myc suppressors. Therefore, a microRNA profile of DU145 cells was performed after Lin28B siRNA silencing. Nineteen microRNAs were upregulated and eleven microRNAs were downregulated. The most upregulated microRNAs were miR-212 and miR-2278. Prior reports have found that miR-212 is suppressed in prostate cancer. We then ran TargetScan software to find potential target mRNAs of miR-212 and miR-2278, and it predicted Lin28B mRNA as a potential target of miR-212, but not miR-2278. TargetScan also predicted that c-Myc mRNA is not a potential target of miR-212 or miR-2278. These observations suggest that Lin28B:miR-212 may work as a regulatory loop in androgen-independent prostate cancer. Furthermore, we report a predictive 2-fold symmetric model generated by the superposition of the Lin28A structure onto the I-TASSER model of Lin28B. This structural model of Lin28B suggests that it shows unique microRNA binding characteristics. Thus, if Lin28B were to bind miRNAs in a manner similar to Lin28A, conformational changes would be necessary

  8. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  9. Writing filter processes for the SAGA editor, appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirslis, Peter A.

    1985-01-01

    The SAGA editor provides a mechanism by which separate processes can be invoked during an editing session to traverse portions of the parse tree being edited. These processes, termed filter processes, read, analyze, and possibly transform the parse tree, returning the result to the editor. By defining new commands with the editor's user defined command facility, which invoke filter processes, authors of filter can provide complex operations as simple commands. A tree plotter, pretty printer, and Pascal tree transformation program were already written using this facility. The filter processes are introduced, parse tree structure is described and the library interface made available to the programmer. Also discussed is how to compile and run filter processes. Examples are presented to illustrate aspect of each of these areas.

  10. Implementing a computerized text-management system: an editor's view

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of sophisticated function-key-driven programs for handling text on a video-display terminal enables the editorial staff of a publications department to take an active role on a computerized text-management team, along with compositors and other keyboard operators. Although there are still many things that editors cannot do on a computer terminal, the bulk of manipulating straight text can be speeded, and the problems of rekeyboarding and interpretation of editorial markings can be largely bypassed. The computer also gives editors new tools that open the way for greater control over both the editorial process and the quality of technical publishing. 5 figures.

  11. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  12. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  13. Lin28-let7 Modulates Radiosensitivity of Human Cancer Cells With Activation of K-Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jee-Sun.; Kim, Jae-Jin; Byun, Ju-Yeon; Kim, In-Ah

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of targeting Lin28-let7 microRNA regulatory network for overcoming the radioresistance of cancer cells having activated K-Ras signaling. Methods and Materials: A549 lung carcinoma cells and ASPC1 pancreatic cancer cells possessing K-RAS mutation were transfected with pre-let7a microRNA or Lin28 siRNA, respectively. Clonogenic assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western analysis were performed. The effects of Lin28 on SQ20B cells having wild-type K-RAS, and a normal fibroblast were also assessed. Results: The overexpression of let-7a decreased expression of K-Ras and radiosensitized A549 cells. Inhibition of Lin28, a repressor of let-7, attenuated K-Ras expression and radiosensitized A549 and ASPC1 cells. Neither SQ20B cells expressing wild-type K-RAS nor HDF, the normal human fibroblasts, were radiosensitized by this approach. Conclusions: The Lin28-let7 regulatory network may be a potentially useful therapeutic target for overcoming the radioresistance of human cancers having activated K-Ras signaling.

  14. νLIN6: An Integrated Mobility Protocol in IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banno, Ayumi; Teraoka, Fumio

    This paper proposes a protocol called νLIN6 which supports both network mobility and host mobility in IPv6. There are several proposals to support network mobility and host mobility. Network Mobility (NEMO) Basic Support Protocol has several problems such as pinball routing, large header overhead due to multiple levels of tunneling, and a single point of failure. Optimized NEMO (ONEMO) and Mobile IP with Address Translation (MAT) are solutions to provide route optimization, but they generate a lot of signaling messages at a handover. In νLIN6, packet relay is required only once regardless of the nested level in network mobility while optimal routing is always provided in host mobility. A fixedsized extension header is used in network mobility while there is no header overhead in host mobility. νLIN6 is more tolerant of network failure and mobility agent failure than NEMO Basic Support Protocol. It also allows ordinary IPv6 nodes to communicate with mobile nodes and nodes in the mobile network. We implemented νLIN6 on NetBSD 2.0 Release. Our measurement results showed νLIN6 can provide host mobility and network mobility with low overhead.

  15. Righting the Wrongs of Writing: Copy Editors Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jaclyn J.; Wall, Judy

    1975-01-01

    The major part of APGA Press production editors' jobs is copy editing manuscripts before they are set in type. Two APGA Press Staff members use specific examples to illustrate the grammatical and stylistic errors that cause problems for them and, if not corrected, for readers. (Author)

  16. Females' participation in psychopharmacology research as authors, editors, and subjects.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Durgin, Amy; Bradley, Kelly P; Porter, Lindsay K; Van Wagner, Karen; Weeden, Marc; Panos, John J

    2009-04-01

    This study determined the involvement of women as first authors and other authors for every article published in Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, and Psychopharmacology in 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006. Their involvement as editors also was determined. Women's participation as authors, but not as editors, slightly increased over time. In 2006, 43% of first authors, 38% of other authors, and 24% of editors were women. The gender of subjects was examined for the same years and journals, but could not be determined for 6% and 9% of articles employing nonhuman and human subjects, respectively. In 2006, when subjects' gender could be determined, 77% of articles involving nonhuman subjects used only males, 9% only females, and 14% both males and females. In articles using human subjects in that same year, 17% involved only males, 6% only females, and 77% both males and females. Women researchers clearly make substantial contributions to the psychopharmacology literature, but are nonetheless underrepresented as editors. Findings regarding subjects indicate that there is growing recognition of the importance of gender as a determinant of drug effects, although the vast majority of nonhuman studies continue to involve only male subjects.

  17. Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

  18. Particle size fraction -Response: Letter to the Editors

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editors: We, the undersigned, would like to comment on the article by Cho et al. (Cho et al. 2009), which was published in the November 2009 issue (volume 11, number 11, page 1682-1689) of Environmental Health Perspectives. We read the paper with great interest as the dis...

  19. IN DEFENSE OF ECORISK ASSESSMENT (LETTER TO EDITOR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are writing to convey a more accurate portrayal of the status of ecological ("environmental" in Europe) risk assessment that was presented in the recent article by M. Power and L.S. McCarty (Fallacies in Ecological Risk Assessment Practices," August 1997, pp 370A-...

  20. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  1. LACE: A Web-Based, Structured Editor for PDS Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M.; Keller, R.; Sarram, P.

    2015-06-01

    PDS has moved to XML-based metadata, but many scientists are not familiar with XML and find its structure complicated. For these reasons, we have created LACE, an editor for PDS metadata that hides the complexity of XML from the user.

  2. Ethical dilemmas in scientific publication: pitfalls and solutions for editors.

    PubMed

    Gollogly, Laragh; Momen, Hooman

    2006-08-01

    Editors of scientific journals need to be conversant with the mechanisms by which scientific misconduct is amplified by publication practices. This paper provides definitions, ways to document the extent of the problem, and examples of editorial attempts to counter fraud. Fabrication, falsification, duplication, ghost authorship, gift authorship, lack of ethics approval, non-disclosure, 'salami' publication, conflicts of interest, auto-citation, duplicate submission, duplicate publications, and plagiarism are common problems. Editorial misconduct includes failure to observe due process, undue delay in reaching decisions and communicating these to authors, inappropriate review procedures, and confounding a journal's content with its advertising or promotional potential. Editors also can be admonished by their peers for failure to investigate suspected misconduct, failure to retract when indicated, and failure to abide voluntarily by the six main sources of relevant international guidelines on research, its reporting and editorial practice. Editors are in a good position to promulgate reasonable standards of practice, and can start by using consensus guidelines on publication ethics to state explicitly how their journals function. Reviewers, editors, authors and readers all then have a better chance to understand, and abide by, the rules of publishing.

  3. Similarity of the C. elegans developmental timing protein LIN-42 to circadian rhythm proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeon, M; Gardner, H F; Miller, E A; Deshler, J; Rougvie, A E

    1999-11-05

    The Caenorhabditis elegans heterochronic genes control the relative timing and sequence of many events during postembryonic development, including the terminal differentiation of the lateral hypodermis, which occurs during the final (fourth) molt. Inactivation of the heterochronic gene lin-42 causes hypodermal terminal differentiation to occur precociously, during the third molt. LIN-42 most closely resembles the Period family of proteins from Drosophila and other organisms, proteins that function in another type of biological timing mechanism: the timing of circadian rhythms. Per mRNA levels oscillate with an approximately 24-hour periodicity. lin-42 mRNA levels also oscillate, but with a faster rhythm; the oscillation occurs relative to the approximately 6-hour molting cycles of postembryonic development.

  4. GENII-LIN: a new object-oriented interface for the GENII code.

    PubMed

    Sumini, M; Teodori, F; Cantoro, N

    2005-01-01

    GENII-LIN is a new object-oriented interface for GENII, a well-known analysis tool for the health impact evaluation of accidental or chronic release of radionuclides to the environment. GENII-LIN has been developed under the Linux OS, chosen because it is a stable, reliable and open source. The suite codes that constitute the original GENII simulation kernel have been re-implemented and built, using the G77, the Fortran 77 module of the GCC collection. The code modules and the flow of data among them are at present fully controlled by a management interface written in C++, which is the core of the package. GENII-LIN comes with a new graphical user interface (GUI), built using the QT libraries by Trolltech. Through the wizard-like GUI, the user has full control over the code and can easily handle both the input and the output files.

  5. The Lin28/Let-7 system in early human embryonic tissue and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lozoya, Teresa; Domínguez, Francisco; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Steffani, Liliana; Martínez, Sebastián; Monterde, Mercedes; Ferri, Blanca; Núñez, Maria Jose; AinhoaRomero-Espinós; Zamora, Omar; Gurrea, Marta; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Vega, Olivia; Simón, Carlos; Pellicer, Antonio; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the expression of the elements of the Lin28/Let-7 system, and related microRNAs (miRNAs), in early stages of human placentation and ectopic pregnancy, as a means to assess the potential role of this molecular hub in the pathogenesis of ectopic gestation. Seventeen patients suffering from tubal ectopic pregnancy (cases) and forty-three women with normal on-going gestation that desired voluntary termination of pregnancy (VTOP; controls) were recruited for the study. Embryonic tissues were subjected to RNA extraction and quantitative PCR analyses for LIN28B, Let-7a, miR-132, miR-145 and mir-323-3p were performed. Our results demonstrate that the expression of LIN28B mRNA was barely detectable in embryonic tissue from early stages of gestation and sharply increased thereafter to plateau between gestational weeks 7-9. In contrast, expression levels of Let-7, mir-132 and mir-145 were high in embryonic tissue from early gestations (≤ 6-weeks) and abruptly declined thereafter, especially for Let-7. Opposite trends were detected for mir-323-3p. Embryonic expression of LIN28B mRNA was higher in early stages (≤ 6-weeks) of ectopic pregnancy than in normal gestation. In contrast, Let-7a expression was significantly lower in early ectopic pregnancies, while miR-132 and miR-145 levels were not altered. Expression of mir-323-3p was also suppressed in ectopic embryonic tissue. We are the first to document reciprocal changes in the expression profiles of the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein, LIN28B, and the related miRNAs, Let-7a, mir-132 and mir-145, in early stages of human placentation. This finding suggests the potential involvement of LIN28B/Let-7 (de)regulated pathways in the pathophysiology of ectopic pregnancy in humans.

  6. Editors-in-Chief of Medical Journals: Are They Experts, Authorities, Both, or Neither?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsindely, Sandor; Schubert, Andras

    1989-01-01

    Uses citation analysis to study the professional status and influence of the editors-in-chief of 769 medical journals. Finds that these editors-in-chief are, at least in their own specialties, not necessarily experts but authorities. (SR)

  7. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  8. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan Michael

    2011-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Paul Corkum will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2011. During my term as Editor-in-Chief atomic, molecular and optical science has continued to change rapidly: we have seen ultracold physics widening its original emphasis on Bose-Einstein condensates to the entanglement of light and matter in the most general sense towards a science of information. At the same time attosecond science and interaction of matter with short x-ray pulses develops rapidly. I am very happy that J. Phys. B with Paul Corkum as Editor-in-Chief will play a central role in publishing exciting results from this field. I would like to thank the publishing team at J. Phys. B for their fantastic job, in particular for the quality of the refereeing system the team has been able to maintain while at the same time bringing down the publication times considerably. I thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for the support of J. Phys. B.

  9. A complex of LIN-5 and GPR proteins regulates G protein signaling and spindle function in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G.; Fisk, Ridgely M.; Xu, Huihong; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2003-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans coiled-coil protein LIN-5 mediates several processes in cell division that depend on spindle forces, including alignment and segregation of chromosomes and positioning of the spindle. Here, we describe two closely related proteins, GPR-1 and GPR-2 (Gprotein regulator), which associate with LIN-5 in vivo and in vitro and depend on LIN-5 for localization to the spindle and cell cortex. GPR-1/GPR-2 contain a GoLoco/GPR motif that mediates interaction with GDP-bound Gαi/o. Inactivation of lin-5, gpr-1/gpr-2, or the Gαi/o genes goa-1 and gpa-16 all cause highly similar chromosome segregation and spindle positioning defects, indicating a positive role for the LIN-5 and GPR proteins in G protein signaling. The lin-5 and gpr-1/gpr-2 genes appear to act downstream of the par polarity genes in the one- and two-cell stages and downstream of the tyrosine kinase-related genes mes-1 and src-1 at the four-cell stage. Together, these results indicate that GPR-1/GPR-2 in association with LIN-5 activate G protein signaling to affect spindle force. Polarity determinants may regulate LIN-5/GPR/Gα locally to create the asymmetric forces that drive spindle movement. Results in C. elegans and other species are consistent with a novel model for receptor-independent activation of Gαi/o signaling. PMID:12730122

  10. FLAn: A Free Hypermedia Editor to Create Foreign Language Learning Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilickaya, Ferit, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Glossing words is done via special software called multimedia editors. Foreign Language Annotator (FLAn), created by Thibeault (2011), is one of these multimedia editors. FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor that works on both Macs and PCs, allows instructors to turn static texts into dynamic learning units by attaching…

  11. Preparing Students To Work on Newspaper Copy Desks: Are Educators Meeting Editors' Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auman, Ann E.; Cook, Betsy B.

    A study surveyed two groups in the fall of 1994, journalism educators and newspaper editors. Educators completed a survey regarding the course content and skill areas emphasized in beginning level copy editing courses, while editors were asked to respond to questions regarding the skills they expect entry-level copy editors to have. Respondents…

  12. Conversion of the LIN-1 ETS protein of Caenorhabditis elegans from a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor to a phosphorylated transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Leight, Elizabeth R; Murphy, John T; Fantz, Douglas A; Pepin, Danielle; Schneider, Daniel L; Ratliff, Thomas M; Mohammad, Duaa H; Herman, Michael A; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    The LIN-1 ETS transcription factor plays a pivotal role in controlling cell fate decisions during development of the Caenorhabditis elegans vulva. Prior to activation of the RTK/Ras/ERK-signaling pathway, LIN-1 functions as a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor that inhibits vulval cell fate. Here we demonstrate using the yeast two-hybrid system that SUMOylation of LIN-1 mediates interactions with a protein predicted to be involved in transcriptional repression: the RAD-26 Mi-2β/CHD4 component of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD) transcriptional repression complex. Genetic studies indicated that rad-26 functions to inhibit vulval cell fates in worms. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we showed that the EGL-27/MTA1 component of the NuRD complex binds the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 independently of LIN-1 SUMOylation. EGL-27 also binds UBC-9, an enzyme involved in SUMOylation, and MEP-1, a zinc-finger protein previously shown to bind LIN-1. Genetic studies indicate that egl-27 inhibits vulval cell fates in worms. These results suggest that LIN-1 recruits multiple proteins that repress transcription via both the SUMOylated amino-terminus and the unSUMOylated carboxy-terminus. Assays in cultured cells showed that the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 was converted to a potent transcriptional activator in response to active ERK. We propose a model in which LIN-1 recruits multiple transcriptional repressors to inhibit the 1° vulval cell fate, and phosphorylation by ERK converts LIN-1 to a transcriptional activator that promotes the 1° vulval cell fate.

  13. PREFACE: Introductory remarks from the Editors Introductory remarks from the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Meseguer, A.; Marques, F.

    2012-06-01

    The local organizers of the 4th BIFD (Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics) Symposium held in Barcelona on 18-21 July 2011 would like to thank the editors of Fluid Dynamics Research for offering us the opportunity of publishing a peer-reviewed special issue of the journal with a selection of the contributions presented at this conference. We thank both the authors and the referees for working with us on the rather tight schedule necessary to release the issue within one year of the date of the conference. We also thank the invited speakers, B Eckhardt, L Tuckerman, and J M Vega, for contributing keynote papers to this special issue. The series of BIFD symposia started as a small workshop in Madeira, Portugal, in 2004 with no more than 20 participants. This number increased rapidly during the second and third symposia held in 2006 (Denmark) and 2009 (United Kingdom), with 40 and 110 participants, respectively. The 4th BIFD symposium has consolidated this event as one of the leading conferences in hydrodynamic stability, with nearly 200 participants from around the world. The main goal of this conference is to bring together scientists and engineers from different disciplines directly or indirectly related to fluid dynamics, bifurcation theory and hydrodynamic stability theory. The conference covered many research areas within the aforementioned fields, ranging from thermal, shear and centrifugal flows to biofluids, films, drops, viscoelastic flows and magnetohydrodynamics. The structure of the conference, with invited plenary talks and focused sessions, helped the participants find their home in the conference and share state-of-the-art knowledge within the field of hydrodynamic instabilities. The financial support from MICINN (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Grant no FIS2009-08065-E) and UPC (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) is greatly appreciated. The local organizers would also like to thank ETSAB (Barcelona School of Architecture

  14. The Lin28/let-7 axis is critical for myelination in the peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gökbuget, Deniz; Pereira, Jorge A.; Bachofner, Sven; Marchais, Antonin; Ciaudo, Constance; Stoffel, Markus; Schulte, Johannes H.; Suter, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulators of myelination in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). However, the miRNAs species involved and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We found that let-7 miRNAs are highly abundant during PNS myelination and that their levels are inversely correlated to the expression of lin28 homolog B (Lin28B), an antagonist of let-7 accumulation. Sustained expression of Lin28B and consequently reduced levels of let-7 miRNAs results in a failure of Schwann cell myelination in transgenic mouse models and in cell culture. Subsequent analyses revealed that let-7 miRNAs promote expression of the myelination-driving master transcription factor Krox20 (also known as Egr2) through suppression of myelination inhibitory Notch signalling. We conclude that the Lin28B/let-7 axis acts as a critical driver of PNS myelination, in particular by regulating myelination onset, identifying this pathway also as a potential therapeutic target in demyelinating diseases. PMID:26466203

  15. Lin28b promotes fetal B lymphopoiesis through the transcription factor Arid3a.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Li, Yue-Sheng; Bandi, Srinivasa Rao; Tang, Lingjuan; Shinton, Susan A; Hayakawa, Kyoko; Hardy, Richard R

    2015-04-06

    Mouse B cell precursors from fetal liver and adult bone marrow (BM) generate distinctive B cell progeny when transplanted into immunodeficient recipients, supporting a two-pathway model for B lymphopoiesis, fetal "B-1" and adult "B-2." Recently, Lin28b was shown to be important for the switch between fetal and adult pathways; however, neither the mechanism of Lin28b action nor the importance of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling in this process was addressed. Here, we report key advances in our understanding of the regulation of B-1/B-2 development. First, modulation of Let-7 in fetal pro-B cells is sufficient to alter fetal B-1 development to produce B cells resembling the progeny of adult B-2 development. Second, intact BCR signaling is required for the generation of B1a B cells from Lin28b-transduced BM progenitors, supporting a requirement for ligand-dependent selection, as is the case for normal B1a B cells. Third, the VH repertoire of Lin28b-induced BM B1a B cells differs from that of normal B1a, suggesting persisting differences from fetal progenitors. Finally, we identify the Arid3a transcription factor as a key target of Let-7, whose ectopic expression is sufficient to induce B-1 development in adult pro-B cells and whose silencing by knockdown blocks B-1 development in fetal pro-B cells.

  16. The Value of SCMC in SLA: Comments on Lin, Huang & Liou (2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analytic methods are often used to determine the effectiveness of certain treatments across studies. However, we are often unaware of how a meta-analysis can provide value to researchers and practitioners. This paper offers a brief commentary on a meta-analysis conducted by Lin, Huang and Liou (2013) in LLT, providing further statistical…

  17. 77 FR 18862 - Zhiwei Lin, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Enforcement Administration Zhiwei Lin, M.D.; Decision and Order On September 19, 2011, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Timothy D. Wing issued the attached recommended decision (also ALJ). Therein, the ALJ found... 20034, 20036 (2011) (other citations omitted); Brenton D. Glisson, 72 FR 54296, 54297 n.2 (2007);...

  18. From the desk of the Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2015-07-01

    Life Sciences in Space Research had a prominent presence at the International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR) meeting held in Kyoto, Japan from May 25th-29th, with seven of the eleven editors attending the meeting. A journal booth was also put up at the pre-ICRR satellite meeting on Space Radiation and Heavy Ions in Therapy (SRHITS) held a few days earlier in Osaka. Since the inception of LSSR last year, the editors and publisher have promoted the journal at a number of major conferences including COSPAR 2014 in Moscow, the annual meeting of the Radiation Research Society and the NASA Space Radiation Investigators Meeting. These efforts have increased awareness of the journal among investigators in space life sciences and related fields. The number of monthly downloads of articles from the journal website averages 2000, a respectable number for a brand new journal.

  19. Wysession begins term as Eos Section Editor for Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael

    In mid-April, Michael Wysession, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University, embarked on a 3-year term as section editor of Eos for seismology. Wysession brings to the position a strong background in research and teaching. Below are a few remarks from Wysession.“I recently became the new seismology editor for Eos. I look forward to presenting the many exciting areas of seismological research to the entire geophysical community. I have taught at Washington University since obtaining my Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1991. My interest in seismology began during my undergraduate years at Brown University (Sc.B., 1984), but my experience as an educator began after I graduated and taught high school math and physics in Staten Island, N.Y.

  20. William E. Edmonston, Jr.: Editor, 1968-1976.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F; Frischholz, Edward J

    2010-10-01

    This article is part of an occasional series profiling editors of the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (AJCH). William E. Edmonston was the second editor, succeeding Milton H. Erickson. His research focused on the use of conditioning paradigms and psychophysiological measures to explore a wide variety of hypnotic phenomena, leading to a "neo-Pavlovian" theory of neutral hypnosis as physiological relaxation (anesis). A longtime professor of psychology at Colgate University, he created an interdisciplinary undergraduate major in neuroscience, and was named New York State College Professor of the Year in 1988. He gave the Journal a new look, and a greater balance of clinical and experimental papers. The article also provides background on George Barton Cutten, George H. Estabrooks, and Frank A. Pattie, pioneers of hypnosis who were linked to Edmonston.

  1. Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

  2. Incremental Expression Parsing for Syntax-Directed Editors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-27

    Cretsna*refr a+b+cde ftth I / \\ ,:I \\ I’\\ / , I \\ b- ’ I I € d Figure 4-3: Correct syntax tree for"a + (b + c" d" e) ftgth" The tokens between, the...Schwartz. The Design of a Language-Directed Editor for Block-Structured Languages. In Proceedings of the ACM SIGPLAN SIGOA Symposium on Text Manipulation

  3. Reference Accuracy: Authors', Reviewers', Editors', and Publishers' Contributions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Scientific authors are responsible for the accuracy of their writings and references to others' works. However, relying on authors is not enough when it comes to processing their manuscripts. Joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers, editors, and publishers throughout the publishing process may prevent most reference errors. This article analyzes essential aspects of bibliographic management and focuses on the importance of validating references by all stakeholders of scholarly publishing. PMID:25469055

  4. JGR-Solid Earth and Planets GP editor appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ken Hoffman (Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo) has been appointed GP editor for papers submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth and Planets. His tenure will be from January 1987 to December 1988. Hoffman holds a Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of California, Berkeley, and has published extensively in the areas of rock magnetism, paleomagnetism, lunar paleointensity, and most recently, geomagnetic dipole field reversal modeling.

  5. A perspective on computer documentation: System developer vs. technical editor

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, E.T.; Truett, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    Between the computer-knowledgeable {open_quotes}techie{close_quotes} and the technical writer is a chasm created by differences in knowledge bases and skills. Although this gap is widened by misunderstandings and misconceptions of system development roles, it is bridged by mutual need and dual appreciation. Often the editor/writer is {open_quotes}behind{close_quotes} from beginning to end. The writer normally joins the team after the programmers are well into system development and do not want to {open_quotes}waste time{close_quotes} discussing fundamentals. The writer is usually excluded from technical discussions because it is assumed that he/she would not understand anyway. Later in the system development cycle, the writer has no time to polish the documentation before a new version of the software is issued which implies that the documentation must be revised. Nevertheless, the editor/writer`s product is critical for the end-user`s appreciation of the software, a fact which promotes unity to complete the comprehensive package of software and documentation. This paper explores the planks in the bridge that spans the chasm between developers and their fundamental PR agents, the technical editors/writers. This paper defines approaches (e.g., The Circling Theory) and techniques (Bold Thrust!) employed for effective communication -- between software developer and technical writer as well as between the software and the end-user.

  6. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  7. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Gorin, Sergey V; Koroleva, Anna M; Kitas, George D

    2016-09-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions.

  8. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Keith

    2005-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Jan-Michael Rost will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2005. As Editor-in-Chief I have seen the journal respond to the rapid and exciting developments in atomic, molecular and optical physics of recent years. There will, I am sure, be a great deal of new and important science in our field in the years ahead. I am also sure that Jan-Michael will do a fantastic job in guiding the journal through these times. The publishing team at J. Phys. B is a superbly responsive and effective one that does a great job in publishing the science we do. I want to thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for making J. Phys. B such a great journal to have been a part of.

  9. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions. PMID:27510376

  10. Lin-28 homologue A (LIN28A) promotes cell cycle progression via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A) expression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-05-18

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1-17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent).

  11. Dynamic localization of LIN-5 and GPR-1/2 to cortical force generation domains during spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Hwi; Rose, Lesilee S.

    2008-01-01

    G protein signaling pathways regulate mitotic spindle positioning during cell division in many systems. In C. elegans embryos, Gα subunits act with the positive regulators GPR-1/2 and LIN-5 to generate cortical pulling forces for posterior spindle displacement during the first asymmetric division. GPR-1/2 are asymmetrically localized at the posterior cortex by PAR polarity cues at this time. Here we show that LIN-5 colocalizes with GPR-1/2 in one-cell embryos during spindle displacement. Significantly, we also find that LIN-5 and GPR-1/2 are localized to the opposite, anterior cortex in a polarity dependent manner during the nuclear centration and rotation movements that orient the forming spindle onto the polarity axis. The depletion of LIN-5 or GPR-1/2 results in decreased centration and rotation rates, indicating a role in force generation at this stage. The localization of LIN- 5 and GPR-1/2 is largely interdependent and requires Gα. Further, LIN-5 immunoprecipitates with Gα in vivo, and association is GPR-1/2 dependent. These results suggest that a complex of Gα /GPR- 1/2/LIN-5 is asymmetrically localized in response to polarity cues, and this may be the active signaling complex that transmits asymmetries to the force generation machinery during both nuclear rotation and spindle displacement. PMID:18234174

  12. Intron-specific patterns of divergence of lin-11 regulatory function in the C. elegans nervous system.

    PubMed

    Amon, Siavash; Gupta, Bhagwati P

    2017-04-01

    The diversity of neurons in the nervous system is specified by many genes, including those that encode transcription factors (TFs) and play crucial roles in coordinating gene transcription. To understand how the spatiotemporal expression of TF genes is regulated to generate neuronal diversity, we used one member of the LIM-Hox family, lin-11, as a model that is necessary for the differentiation of amphid neurons in the nematode C. elegans and a related species C. briggsae. We characterized transcriptional regulation of lin-11 and uncovered regulatory roles of two of the largest introns, intron 3 and intron 7. These introns promote lin-11 expression in non-overlapping sets of neurons. Phenotypic rescue experiments in C. elegans revealed that intron 3 is capable of restoring lin-11 function based on gene expression patterns and behavioral assays. Interestingly, intron 3-driven reporter expression showed differences in neuronal cell types between C. briggsae and C. elegans, indicating evolutionary changes in lin-11 regulation between the two species. Reciprocal transformation experiments provided further evidence consistent with functional changes in both cis and trans regulation of lin-11. To further investigate transcriptional regulation of lin-11, we dissected the intronic regions in C. elegans and identified cell-specific enhancers. These enhancers possess multiple sequence blocks that are conserved among Caenorhabditis species and possess TF binding sites. We tested the role of a subset of predicted TFs and discovered that while three of them (SKN-1, CEH-6, and CRH-1) act via the intron 3 enhancer to negatively regulate lin-11 expression in neurons, another TF (CES-1) acts positively via the intron 7 enhancer. Overall, our findings demonstrate that neuronal expression of lin-11 involves multiple TF regulators and regulatory modules some of which have diverged in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

  13. Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    I am very pleased to join the outstanding leadership team for the journal Nuclear Fusion as Scientific Editor. The journal's high position in the field of fusion energy research derives in no small measure from the efforts of the IAEA team in Vienna, the production and marketing of IOP Publishing, the Board of Editors led by its chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, the Associate Editor for Inertial Confinement Max Tabak and the outgoing Scientific Editor, Paul Thomas. During Paul's five year tenure submissions have grown by over 40%. The usage of the electronic journal has grown year by year with about 300 000 full text downloads of Nuclear Fusion articles in 2011, an impressive figure due in part to the launch of the full 50 year archive. High quality has been maintained while times for peer review and publishing have been reduced and the journal achieved some of the highest impact factors ever (as high as 4.27). The journal has contributed greatly to building the international scientific basis for fusion. I was privileged to serve from 2003 to 2010 as chairman of the Coordinating Committee for the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) which published in Nuclear Fusion the first ITER Physics Basis (1999) and its later update (2007). The scientific basis that has been developed to date for fusion has led to the construction of major facilities to demonstrate the production of power-plant relevant levels of fusion reactions. We look forward to the journal continuing to play a key role in the international effort toward fusion energy as these exciting major facilities and the various approaches to fusion continue to be developed. It is clear that Nuclear Fusion maintains its position in the field because of the perceived high quality of the submissions, the refereeing and the editorial processes, and the availability and utility of the online journal. The creation of the Nuclear Fusion Prize, led by the Board of Editors chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, for the most outstanding

  14. Testicular expression of the Lin28/let-7 system: Hormonal regulation and changes during postnatal maturation and after manipulations of puberty

    PubMed Central

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, S.; Manfredi-Lozano, M.; Ruiz-Pino, F.; León, S.; Morales, C.; Cordido, F.; Gaytán, F.; Pinilla, L.; Tena-Sempere, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lin28/let-7 system, which includes the RNA-binding proteins, Lin28a/Lin28b, and let-7 miRNAs, has emerged as putative regulator of puberty and male gametogenesis; yet, its expression pattern and regulation in postnatal testis remain ill defined. We report herein expression profiles of Lin28 and let-7 members, and related mir-145 and mir-132, in rat testis during postnatal maturation and in models of altered puberty and hormonal deregulation. Neonatal expression of Lin28a and Lin28b was low and rose markedly during the infantile period; yet, expression patterns diverged thereafter, with persistently elevated levels only for Lin28b, which peaked at puberty. Let-7a, let-7b, mir-132 and mir-145 showed profiles opposite to Lin28b. In fact, let-7b and mir-145 were abundant in pachytene spermatocytes, but absent in elongating spermatids, where high expression of Lin28b was previously reported. Perturbation of puberty by neonatal estrogenization reverted the Lin28/let-7 expression ratio; expression changes were also detected in other models of delayed puberty, due to early photoperiod or nutritional manipulations. In addition, hypophysectomy or growth hormone (GH) deficiency revealed regulation of this system by gonadotropins and GH. Our data document the expression profiles of the Lin28/let-7 system in rat testis along postnatal/pubertal maturation, and their perturbation in models of pubertal and hormonal manipulation. PMID:26494358

  15. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    On 1 January, 2004, I assumed the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics. I will start by saying that I will do my best to justify the confidence of the journal management and publishing staff in my abilities. I was fortunate to have been able to work, as an Editorial Board member, with my predecessor, the previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Allister Ferguson. Allister has provided a high degree of intellectual stewardship for the journal in the last five years. He has made the job appear a worthy challenge for me. I therefore take this opportunity to thank Allister on behalf of the Editorial Board and publishing staff of the journal. Several other factors contributed to my decision to accept this position. The first is the group of people who actually go about the business of publishing. The Senior Publisher, Nicola Gulley (and her predecessor Sophy Le Masurier); the Managing Editor, Jill Membrey; the Publishing Administrators, Nina Blakesley and Sarah Towell; the Production Editor, Katie Gerrard and their office staff form an amazing group and have managed to make the operation of the journal incredibly efficient. An index of this is the speed with which incoming manuscripts are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and its web publication, if accepted, is 130 days. This is three to five times shorter than for most other journals. A factor that contributes to this success is a responsive pool of referees that the publishing staff have as a valuable resource. Ultimately, the standard bearers of any journal are the referees. Therefore, a grateful `thank you' is due from all of us at J. Phys. D to all our referees, who diligently perform this honourable task. The Associate Editors of the journal, Professors Lawler, Margaritondo and O'Grady, also provide immense scientific leadership. They help in defining new directions for the journal and in the publishing process. Last, but not least, a remarkable asset of

  16. Influence of laser sources with different spectral properties on the performance of vapor cell atomic clocks based on lin||lin CPT.

    PubMed

    Breschi, Evelina; Kazakov, George; Lammegger, Roland; Matisov, Boris; Windholz, Laurentius; Mileti, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    We evaluate the influence of 2 types of laser sources with different spectral profiles on the performance of vapor cell atomic clocks based on lin||lin coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances. We show that a short-term stability of 1-2 x 10(-11) tau(-1/2) may be reached in a compact system using a modulated vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. Here the stability is limited by the detection noise level and can be improved up to a factor of 4 by increasing the lock-in detection frequency to several tens of kilohertz, which is not possible in standard double resonance atomic clocks. We compare these results with CPT prepared under the same experimental conditions, using 2 phase-locked extended cavity diode lasers, with which we predict a challenging short-term stability of 1-3 x 10(-13) tau(-1/2), comparable to the state-of-the-art laser-pumped Rb-clocks.

  17. Problems faced by editors of peer reviewed medical journals.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Shaukat A

    2004-01-01

    Forty-six medical and dental journals are published from Pakistan of which only 29 are currently recognized by the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council. Only a few are peer reviewed. Six are indexed in Medline while EMBASE Excerpta Medica and World Health Organization Index Medicus for Eastern Mediterranean Region cover others. Editors of the peer reviewed medical journals are faced with numerous problems, which relate to the authors. Some of these are: shortage of quality of manuscripts, poor quality of reviewers, problems with indexation in international indexing services particularly Medline, duplicate submission and authorship and lastly, financial problems. Patronage from the Pharma industry is the major source of revenue which itself has serious implications. Editing a medical journal is a very stressful job and the editors have to work under too many pressures. A lot of useful data is presented at medical conferences, but a vast majority of it remains unpublished for various reasons, which adversely affects the citation rate from scientists from the developing third world countries in the world of medical literature. A few lectures on medical writing and research methodology to final year medical students will expose them to the art of medical writing. Specialty organizations can be persuaded to have a session on medical writing at their conferences, which will be extremely helpful not only to the potential new authors but also others, thereby improving the quality of their manuscripts. In addition to regular seminars, workshops for authors, reviewers and training courses for editors, subscribing to local medical journals by healthcare professionals and libraries are some of the measures that will help improve the situation to a great extent.

  18. Manipulation quantique de la lumière par un amplificateur non linéaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symul, T.; Bencheikh, K.; Levenson, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    Nous proposons un dispositif original, appelé Amplificateur Non Linéaire (ANL), permettant la génération et la manipulation d'états quantiques de la lumière. Ce dispositif permet une compression du bruit quantique de la lumière en dessous de la limite quantique standard plus efficace que celle obtenue par interactions non linéaires du second ordre ou du troisième ordre. Il permet également d'inverser les fluctuations quantiques en intensité de la lumière, et de produire des photons jumeaux ayant des corrélations quantiques plus élevées et plus robustes que ceux produits par un amplificateur paramétrique seul.

  19. Lin28A activates androgen receptor via regulation of c-myc and promotes malignancy of ER−/Her2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Honghong; Zhao, Lin; Feng, Xiaolong; Xu, Cong; Li, Congying; Niu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Having previously demonstrated the co-expression status of the Lin28A and androgen receptor (AR) in ER−/Her2+ breast cancer, we tested the hypothesis that Lin28A can activate AR and promotes growth of ER−/Her2+ breast cancer. The expression of Lin28A and AR were examined after Lin28A siRNA and Lin28A plasmid were transfected into ER−/Her2+ breast cancer cells. Chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis and Luciferase Assays were used to evaluate the effect of Lin28A and c-myc on AR promoter activity. MTT assays, Boyden chamber invasion assays, colony formation assays and flow cytometry analysis were performed. ER−/Her2+ breast cancer cells which transfected with Lin28A siRNAs and Lin28A plasmid were injected into nude mice, and tumorigenesis was monitored. Our data showed that Lin28A can induced AR expression in ER−/Her2+ breast cancer cells. ChIP analysis showed that Lin28A stimulates the recruitment of c-Myc to the promoter of the AR gene. Lin28A enhanced growth ability, colonies ability, cells proliferation activities, invasive ability and inhibited cells apoptosis of ER−/Her2+ breast cancer cells. Lin28A high expression cells exhibited significantly higher tumorigenic ability in vivo. Our study demonstrates that Lin28A can activates androgen receptor via regulation of c-myc and promotes malignancy of ER−/Her2+ breast cancer. Our findings underline a novel role for Lin28A in breast cancer development and activation of the AR axis. PMID:27494865

  20. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  1. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  2. Response to Niklasson's comment on Lin, et al. (2012) : "the relation between postural movement and bilateral motor integration".

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Kai; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Wu, Huey-Min

    2014-10-01

    In the study of Lin, Wu, Lin, Wu, Wu, Kuo, and Yeung (2012 ), the relationship between the validity of postural movement and bilateral motor integration in terms of sensory integration theory was examined. Postural movement is the ability to use the antigravity postures required for stabilization of the neck, trunk and upper extremities via muscle co-contractions in the neck and upper extremities, and balance. Niklasson's (2013 ) comment argued that postural movement should include primitive reflexes in terms of the general abilities approach. Niklasson (2013 ) focused on the efficacy of the treatment rather than the theoretical frameworks implied in the therapeutic activities. For that purpose Lin, et al. (2012 ) used sensory integration as the theoretical foundation, and the relationship between postural movement and bilateral motor integration was assessed via empirical data. The result of Lin, et al. (2012 ) was offered as a theoretical reference for therapeutic activities.

  3. Structural basis for LIN54 recognition of CHR elements in cell cycle-regulated promoters

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Aimee H.; Felthousen, Jessica G.; Goetsch, Paul D.; Iness, Audra N.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Tripathi, Sarvind M.; Strome, Susan; Litovchick, Larisa; Rubin, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    The MuvB complex recruits transcription factors to activate or repress genes with cell cycle-dependent expression patterns. MuvB contains the DNA-binding protein LIN54, which directs the complex to promoter cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) elements. Here we characterize the DNA-binding properties of LIN54 and describe the structural basis for recognition of a CHR sequence. We biochemically define the CHR consensus as TTYRAA and determine that two tandem cysteine rich regions are required for high-affinity DNA association. A crystal structure of the LIN54 DNA-binding domain in complex with a CHR sequence reveals that sequence specificity is conferred by two tyrosine residues, which insert into the minor groove of the DNA duplex. We demonstrate that this unique tyrosine-mediated DNA binding is necessary for MuvB recruitment to target promoters. Our results suggest a model in which MuvB binds near transcription start sites and plays a role in positioning downstream nucleosomes. PMID:27465258

  4. Primordial dwarfism gene maintains Lin28 expression to safeguard embryonic stem cells from premature differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qian; Luan, Guangxin; Deng, Li; Lei, Tingjun; Kang, Han; Song, Xu; Zhang, Yujun; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong; Li, Qintong

    2014-05-08

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is characterized by global growth failure, both during embryogenesis and postnatally. Loss-of-function germline mutations in La ribonucleoprotein domain family, member 7 (LAPR7) have recently been linked to PD. Paradoxically, LARP7 deficiency was previously assumed to be associated with increased cell growth and proliferation via activation of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Here, we show that Larp7 deficiency likely does not significantly increase P-TEFb activity. We further discover that Larp7 knockdown does not affect pluripotency but instead primes embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for differentiation via downregulation of Lin28, a positive regulator of organismal growth. Mechanistically, we show that Larp7 interacts with a poly(A) polymerase Star-PAP to maintain Lin28 mRNA stability. We propose that proper regulation of Lin28 and PTEFb is essential for embryonic cells to achieve a sufficient number of cell divisions prior to differentiation and ultimately to maintain proper organismal size.

  5. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  6. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  7. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  8. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  9. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  10. Makorin ortholog LEP-2 regulates LIN-28 stability to promote the juvenile-to-adult transition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Herrera, R Antonio; Kiontke, Karin; Fitch, David H A

    2016-03-01

    The heterochronic genes lin-28, let-7 and lin-41 regulate fundamental developmental transitions in animals, such as stemness versus differentiation and juvenile versus adult states. We identify a new heterochronic gene, lep-2, in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in lep-2 cause a delay in the juvenile-to-adult transition, with adult males retaining pointed, juvenile tail tips, and displaying defective sexual behaviors. In both sexes, lep-2 mutants fail to cease molting or produce an adult cuticle. We find that LEP-2 post-translationally regulates LIN-28 by promoting LIN-28 protein degradation. lep-2 encodes the sole C. elegans ortholog of the Makorin (Mkrn) family of proteins. Like lin-28 and other heterochronic pathway members, vertebrate Mkrns are involved in developmental switches, including the timing of pubertal onset in humans. Based on shared roles, conservation and the interaction between lep-2 and lin-28 shown here, we propose that Mkrns, together with other heterochronic genes, constitute an evolutionarily ancient conserved module regulating switches in development.

  11. Makorin ortholog LEP-2 regulates LIN-28 stability to promote the juvenile-to-adult transition in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, R. Antonio; Kiontke, Karin; Fitch, David H. A.

    2016-01-01

    The heterochronic genes lin-28, let-7 and lin-41 regulate fundamental developmental transitions in animals, such as stemness versus differentiation and juvenile versus adult states. We identify a new heterochronic gene, lep-2, in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in lep-2 cause a delay in the juvenile-to-adult transition, with adult males retaining pointed, juvenile tail tips, and displaying defective sexual behaviors. In both sexes, lep-2 mutants fail to cease molting or produce an adult cuticle. We find that LEP-2 post-translationally regulates LIN-28 by promoting LIN-28 protein degradation. lep-2 encodes the sole C. elegans ortholog of the Makorin (Mkrn) family of proteins. Like lin-28 and other heterochronic pathway members, vertebrate Mkrns are involved in developmental switches, including the timing of pubertal onset in humans. Based on shared roles, conservation and the interaction between lep-2 and lin-28 shown here, we propose that Mkrns, together with other heterochronic genes, constitute an evolutionarily ancient conserved module regulating switches in development. PMID:26811380

  12. Novel localisation and possible function of LIN7 and IRSp53 in mitochondria of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Ilaria; Crespi, Arianna; Fornasari, Diego; Pietrini, Grazia

    2016-08-01

    By means of immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation experiments, we here demonstrate mitochondrial distribution of LIN7 and IRSp53 in HeLa cells. These peripheral proteins displayed a tight association with mitochondria and coimmunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fractions. In line with a role for LIN7 in the regulation of IRSp53 activity on actin dynamics, the morphology of mitochondria was similarly altered by changing the expression levels of either each protein or both, whereas mitochondrial morphology was preserved in cells overexpressing IRSp53 deleted of its binding domains for LIN7 (IRSp53Δ5) or for actin polymerisation modulators (IRSp53ΔSH3). In particular, the overexpression of full length LIN7 and/or IRSp53 increased the percentage of cells with short mitochondria, while downregulation of the endogenous proteins by shRNAs increased the amount of cells with elongated and perinuclear clustered mitochondria. These mitochondria were only partially resistant to fragmentation induced by dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (i.e. treatment with sodium azide), whereas mitochondria were fully protected by the fission defective mutant Drp1 K38A. Overexpression of LIN7 or IRSp53 did not prevent the formation of hyperfused mitochondria in cells coexpressing the Drp1 K38A mutant, thus suggesting that LIN7-IRSp53 complex requires functional Drp1 to regulate mitochondrial morphology.

  13. An editor for the generation and customization of geometry restraints

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Adams, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical restraints for use in macromolecular structure refinement are produced by a variety of methods, including a number of programs that use chemical information to generate the required bond, angle, dihedral, chiral and planar restraints. These programs help to automate the process and therefore minimize the errors that could otherwise occur if it were performed manually. Furthermore, restraint-dictionary generation programs can incorporate chemical and other prior knowledge to provide reasonable choices of types and values. However, the use of restraints to define the geometry of a molecule is an approximation introduced with efficiency in mind. The representation of a bond as a parabolic function is a convenience and does not reflect the true variability in even the simplest of molecules. Another complicating factor is the interplay of the molecule with other parts of the macromolecular model. Finally, difficult situations arise from molecules with rare or unusual moieties that may not have their conformational space fully explored. These factors give rise to the need for an interactive editor for WYSIWYG interactions with the restraints and molecule. Restraints Editor, Especially Ligands (REEL) is a graphical user interface for simple and error-free editing along with additional features to provide greater control of the restraint dictionaries in macromolecular refinement. PMID:28177308

  14. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting.

  15. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartin, Samantha N.; Hudson, Martin L.; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The C. elegans proteins PTP-3/LAR-RPTP and SDN-1/Syndecan are conserved cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in either ptp-3 or sdn-1 result in low penetrance embryonic developmental defects. Work from other systems has shown that syndecans can function as ligands for LAR receptors in vivo. We used double mutant analysis to test whether ptp-3 and sdn-1 function in a linear genetic pathway during C. elegans embryogenesis. Results We found animals with LOF in both sdn-1 and ptp-3 exhibited a highly penetrant synthetic lethality (SynLet), with only a small percentage of animals surviving to adulthood. Analysis of the survivors demonstrated that these animals had a synergistic increase in the penetrance of embryonic developmental defects. Together, these data strongly suggested PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in parallel during embryogenesis. We subsequently used RNAi to knockdown ~3,600 genes predicted to encode secreted and/or transmembrane molecules to identify genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin-44 caused defects in the polarization and migration of endodermal precursors during gastrulation, a previously undescribed role for lin-44 that is strongly enhanced by the loss of sdn-1. Conclusions PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in compensatory pathways during C. elegans embryonic and larval development, as simultaneous loss of both genes has dire consequences for organismal survival. The Wnt ligand lin-44 contributes to the early stages of gastrulation in parallel to sdn-1, but in a genetic pathway with ptp-3. Overall, the SynLet phenotype provides a robust platform to identify ptp-3 and sdn-1 interacting genes, as well as other genes that function in development, yet might be missed in traditional forward genetic screens. PMID:25938228

  16. A Generic Metadata Editor Supporting System Using Drupal CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Banks, N. G.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    Metadata handling is a key factor in preserving and reusing scientific data. In recent years, standardized structural metadata has become widely used in Geoscience communities. However, there exist many different standards in Geosciences, such as the current version of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC CSDGM), the Ecological Markup Language (EML), the Geography Markup Language (GML), and the emerging ISO 19115 and related standards. In addition, there are many different subsets within the Geoscience subdomain such as the Biological Profile of the FGDC (CSDGM), or for geopolitical regions, such as the European Profile or the North American Profile in the ISO standards. It is therefore desirable to have a software foundation to support metadata creation and editing for multiple standards and profiles, without re-inventing the wheels. We have developed a software module as a generic, flexible software system to do just that: to facilitate the support for multiple metadata standards and profiles. The software consists of a set of modules for the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), with minimal inter-dependencies to other Drupal modules. There are two steps in using the system's metadata functions. First, an administrator can use the system to design a user form, based on an XML schema and its instances. The form definition is named and stored in the Drupal database as a XML blob content. Second, users in an editor role can then use the persisted XML definition to render an actual metadata entry form, for creating or editing a metadata record. Behind the scenes, the form definition XML is transformed into a PHP array, which is then rendered via Drupal Form API. When the form is submitted the posted values are used to modify a metadata record. Drupal hooks can be used to perform custom processing on metadata record before and after submission. It is trivial to store the metadata record as an actual XML file

  17. Cloning and expression of a member of a new cytochrome P-450 family: cytochrome P-450lin (CYP111) from Pseudomonas incognita.

    PubMed Central

    Ropp, J D; Gunsalus, I C; Sligar, S G

    1993-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450lin catalyzes the 8-methyl hydroxylation of linalool as the first committed step of its utilization by Pseudomonas incognita as the sole carbon source. By using a polymerase chain reaction-based cloning strategy, a 2.1-kb DNA fragment containing the cytochrome P-450lin gene (linC) was isolated. An open reading frame of 406 amino acids has been identified as that of P-450lin on the basis of amino acid sequence data from peptides of the native protein. Heterologous expression of functional holoprotein is exhibited by Escherichia coli transformed with pUC18 containing the subcloned linC gene under constitutive transcriptional control of the lac promoter. The G+C content of linC was found to be 55% overall and 58% in the third codon position. An optimized amino acid sequence alignment of P-450lin with cytochrome P-450cam shows that the two enzymes have only 25% identity. P-450lin was found to exhibit the expected conservation in the axial cysteine heme ligand-containing peptide and the threonine region postulated to form an O2-binding pocket (T. L. Poulos, B. C. Finzel, and A. J. Howard, J. Mol. Biol. 195:687-700, 1987). The low amino acid sequence identity between P-450lin and all other P-450 sequences has shown that P-450lin is the first member of the CYP111 P-450 gene family. PMID:8376348

  18. Lin28a promotes self-renewal and proliferation of dairy goat spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) through regulation of mTOR and PI3K/AKT

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fanglin; Zhou, Zhe; Li, Na; Zheng, Liming; Wu, Chongyang; Niu, Bowen; Tang, Furong; He, Xin; Li, Guangpeng; Hua, Jinlian

    2016-01-01

    Lin28a is a conserved RNA-binding protein that plays an important role in development, pluripotency, stemness maintenance, proliferation and self-renewal. Early studies showed that Lin28a serves as a marker of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and promotes the proliferation capacity of mouse SSCs. However, there is little information about Lin28a in livestock SSCs. In this study, we cloned Capra hircus Lin28a CDS and found that it is evolutionarily conserved. Lin28a is widely expressed in different tissues of Capra hircus, but is expressed at a high level in the testis. Lin28a is specifically located in the cytoplasm of Capra hircus spermatogonial stem cells and may also be a marker of dairy goat spermatogonial stem cells. Lin28a promoted proliferation and maintained the self-renewal of GmGSCs-I-SB in vivo and in vitro. Lin28a-overexpressing GmGSCs-I-SB showed an enhanced proliferation rate, which might be due to increased PCNA expression. Moreover, Lin28a maintained the self-renewal of GmGSCs-I-SB by up-regulating the expression of OCT4, SOX2, GFRA1, PLZF and ETV5. Furthermore, we found that Lin28a may activate the AKT, ERK, and mTOR signaling pathways to promote the proliferation and maintain the self-renewal of GmGSCs-I-SB. PMID:27941834

  19. Regulation of lin-4 miRNA Expression, Organismal Growth and Development by a Conserved RNA Binding Protein in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bracht, John R.; Van Wynsberghe, Priscilla M.; Mondol, Vanessa; Pasquinelli, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription and multiple processing steps are required to produce specific 22 nucleotide microRNAs (miRNAs) that can regulate the expression of target genes. In C. elegans, mature lin-4 miRNA accumulates at the end of the first larval stage to repress its direct targets lin-14 and lin-28, allowing the progression of several somatic cell types to later larval fates. In this study, we characterized the expression of endogenous lin-4 and found that temporally regulated independent transcripts, but not constitutive lin-4 containing RNAs derived from an overlapping gene, are processed to mature lin-4 miRNA. Through an RNAi screen, we identified a conserved RNA binding protein gene rbm-28 (R05H10.2), homologous to the human RBM28 and yeast Nop4p proteins, that is important for lin-4 expression in C. elegans. We also demonstrate that rbm-28 genetically interacts with the lin-4 developmental timing pathway and uncover a previously unrecognized role for lin-14 and lin-28 in coordinating organismal growth. PMID:20937268

  20. Intestinal Lin- c-Kit+ NKp46- CD4- population strongly produces IL-22 upon IL-1β stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngae; Kumagai, Yutaro; Jang, Min Seong; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Yang, Bo-Gie; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, You-Me; Akira, Shizuo; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2013-05-15

    Small intestinal innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) regulate intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and help to prevent pathogenic bacterial infections by producing IL-22. In a global gene-expression analysis comparing small intestinal ILCs (Lin(-)c-Kit(+)Sca-1(-) cells) with non-ILCs (Lin(-)c-Kit(-)Sca-1(-) cells), we found that Lin(-)c-Kit(+)Sca-1(-) cells highly expressed the mRNAs for Il22, antimicrobial peptides, Csf2rb2 (Il3r), mast cell proteases, and Rorc. We then subdivided the Lin(-)c-Kit(+)Sca-1(-) cells into three groups--Lin(-)c-Kit(+)NKp46(-)CD4(-), Lin(-)c-Kit(+)NKp46(-)CD4(+) (CD4(+) LTi-like cells), and Lin(-)c-Kit(+)NKp46(+) (NKp46(+) ILC22 cells)--and showed that the Lin(-)c-Kit(+)NKp46(-)CD4(-) cells produced the highest level of IL-22 protein after IL-1β, IL-23, or IL-1β and IL-23 stimulation. In addition, we showed that the majority of the Lin(-)c-Kit(+)NKp46(-)CD4(-) population was IL-7Rα(+)CD34(-)β7(int) cells, and IL-7Rα(-) cells could be divided into three subsets (CD34(+)β7(int), CD34(-)β7(int), and CD34(int)β7(hi) cells). The IL-7Rα(+)CD34(-)β7(int) cells strongly expressed the transcripts for Il17f and Il22 after costimulation with IL-1β and IL-23. The IL-7Rα(-)CD34(+)β7(int) and IL-7Rα(-)CD34(int)β7(hi) cells predominantly expressed the transcripts for mast cell proteases and differentiated almost entirely into mast cells after 1 wk in culture medium supplemented with a cytokine mixture, whereas the IL-7Rα(-)CD34(-)β7(int) cells highly expressed α-defensins and showed no differentiation. Taken together, these findings indicate that the IL-7Rα(-)CD34(+)β7(int) and IL-7Rα(-)CD34(int)β7(hi) populations are mast cell progenitors, and the IL-7Rα(+)CD34(-)β7(int) (CD4(-) LTi-like cells) and IL-7Rα(-)CD34(-)β7(int) populations within Lin(-)c-Kit(+)NKp46(-)CD4(-) cells may control intestinal homeostasis and provide intestinal protection by producing high levels of IL-22 and α-defensins, respectively.

  1. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  2. Highlighting impact: Do editors' selections identify influential papers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    A recent trend in scientific publishing is that journal editors highlight each week a select set among the papers published (usually) in their respective journals. The highlighted papers are deemed of higher quality, importance, or interest than the 'average' paper and feature prominently in the publishers' websites. We perform a citation analysis of the highlighted papers for a number of journals from various publishers in physics. By comparing the performance of highlighted papers relative to (a) typical papers and (b) highly cited papers in their source journals and in other journals in the field, we explore whether, and to what extent, the selection process at the time of publication identifies papers that will turn out to be influential. We discuss the broader implications for research assessment.

  3. Upcoming IJTMB Initiatives from the Interim Executive Editor

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2016-01-01

    It is an honor and a privilege to be appointed the Interim Executive Editor for the IJTMB; I am lucky to have some initiatives that were already in development by the previous editorial team that I hope to bring to fruition over the next few months. First, I hope to increase the Journal’s Internet presence through social media to expand readership and encourage new submitters. The second initiative is a mentoring program to assist writers with their submissions to the Journal. Finally, I, and the rest of the editorial staff, will continue to evaluate the process, procedures, and forms used in peer review. I hope to move these initiatives forward and by doing so, bring in new readers, submitters, and reviewers to the Journal. PMID:27974945

  4. Automatic adverse drug events detection using letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research.

  5. Andreae is New Editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2004-10-01

    As the incoming editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles, I would like to introduce myself and my ideas for the journal to Eos readers and to current and potential GBC authors. I've had a somewhat ``roaming'' scientific evolution, coming from ``straight'' chemistry through hard-rock geochemistry to chemical oceanography, the field in which I did my Ph.D. I taught marine chemistry at Florida State University for a number of years, and developed an interest in ocean/atmosphere interactions and atmospheric chemistry. In 1987 I took on my present job at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Mainz, Germany, and, after leaving the seacoast, my interests shifted to interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere, including the role of vegetation fires. My present focus is on the role of biogenic aerosols and biomass smoke in regulating cloud properties and influencing climate.

  6. The X-windows interactive navigation data editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    A new computer program called the X-Windows Interactive Data Editor (XIDE) was developed and demonstrated as a prototype application for editing radio metric data in the orbit-determination process. The program runs on a variety of workstations and employs pull-down menus and graphical displays, which allow users to easily inspect and edit radio metric data in the orbit data files received from the Deep Space Network (DSN). The XIDE program is based on the Open Software Foundation OSF/Motif Graphical User Interface (GUI) and has proven to be an efficient tool for editing radio metric data in the navigation operations environment. It was adopted by the Magellan Navigation Team as their primary data-editing tool. Because the software was designed from the beginning to be portable, the prototype was successfully moved to new workstation environments. It was also itegrated into the design of the next-generation software tool for DSN multimission navigation interactive launch support.

  7. The Editor and Publisher as Public Official: The Ultimate Conflict of Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    A fifteen-item Likert scale and indepth personal interviews were used to collect data in a study that examined whether five individuals who held both the role of editor and public official were perceived as able to perform in a socially responsible manner as editors of their community newspapers in their estimation and in the estimation of a…

  8. A Coorientational Study of Food Public Relations Practitioners, Editors and Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knodell, Joyce Elaine

    Survey data on newspaper food editors and newspaper readers were collected through a title-rating technique. Analysis of responses to 40 food titles and leads indicated three newspaper food-editor types: transitional, traditional, and "new guard." Food-page readers fell into two types: information oriented (nutritionists) and cooking…

  9. A "Situational" and "Coorientational" Measure of Specialized Magazine Editors' Perceptions of Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Dennis W.

    A study was undertaken of specialized magazine editors' perceptions of audience characteristics as well as the perceived role of their publications. Specifically, the study examines the relationship between the editors' perceptions of reader problem recognition, level of involvement, constraint recognition, and possession of reference criteria and…

  10. Adolescent Sexual Initiation through the Lens of Letters to the Editor Published in Polish Teenage Magazines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacz, Marek S.; Bajka-Kopacz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called "advice columns," often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published…

  11. A survey of orthopaedic journal editors determining the criteria of manuscript selection for publication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the characteristics of editors and criteria used by orthopaedic journal editors in assessing submitted manuscripts. Methods Between 2008 to 2009 all 70 editors of Medline listed orthopaedic journals were approached prospectively with a questionnaire to determine the criteria used in assessing manuscripts for publication. Results There was a 42% response rate. There was 1 female editor and the rest were male with 57% greater than 60 years of age. 67% of the editors worked in university teaching hospitals and 90% of publications were in English. The review process differed between journals with 59% using a review proforma, 52% reviewing an anonymised manuscript, 76% using a routine statistical review and 59% of journals used 2 reviewers routinely. In 89% of the editors surveyed, the editor was able to overrule the final decision of the reviewers. Important design factors considered for manuscript acceptance were that the study conclusions were justified (80%), that the statistical analysis was appropriate (76%), that the findings could change practice (72%). The level of evidence (70%) and type of study (62%) were deemed less important. When asked what factors were important in the manuscript influencing acceptance, 73% cited an understandable manuscript, 53% cited a well written manuscript and 50% a thorough literature review as very important factors. Conclusions The editorial and review process in orthopaedic journals uses different approaches. There may be a risk of language bias among editors of orthopaedic journals with under-representation of non-English publications in the orthopaedic literature. PMID:21527007

  12. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  13. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  14. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  15. Editorial Page Editors and Endorsements: Chain-owned vs. Independent Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Dizier, Byron

    Questionnaires were sent to 114 of the 228 editorial page editors at newspapers in the United States with daily circulations greater than 50,000 for a study that compared (1) the editor-publisher relationship existing at chains to that found at independent papers, and (2) the 1984 presidential endorsements made by chains to those by independent…

  16. "Clones," Codes, and Conflicts of Interest in Cartooning: Cartoonists and Editors Look at Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel; And Others

    A study examined differences between political cartoonists and op-ed page editors on both traditional ethical issues (such as conflicts of interest) and the special, style-related concerns of editorial cartoonists. Hypotheses proposed were that editors and cartoonists (1) would condemn "cloning" or copying, reflecting an ethical…

  17. Letter to the editor of TAAP, in response to letter from Anders et al.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology: We would like to address the letter to the editor submitted by Anders et al. regarding the substantive issues raised regarding our paper "Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physi...

  18. Debunking the Mutilated Boy: A Study of Newspaper Editors and an Inflammatory Rumor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lee

    A study examined how newspaper editors resolve issues relating to rumors--that is whether to cover stories which may turn out to be false. The "mutilated boy" rumor was chosen for its antiquity and endurance, its powerful theme, and its ability to create intense anxiety in a community. Thirty-three of the 86 editors who responded to the…

  19. Dr. Bruce Squires witnessed vast changes during tenure as CMAJ editor

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Bruce Squires retired in September after spending 10 years as editor of CMAJ. During his tenure the editor's responsibilities expanded greatly because of the CMA's foray into the publishing of medical books and additional journals and other publications. In this article, people who have worked with Squires reflect on his term with CMAJ. Imagesp570-a

  20. EDITORIAL: A word from the new Editor-in-Chief A word from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    TIn the autumn of 2010 I became the Editor-in Chief of European Journal of Physics (EJP). EJP is a place for teachers, instructors and professors to exchange their views on teaching physics at university level and share their experience. It is general opinion that no good research is possible without connection with good, high-quality teaching, at the university level in particular. Therefore excellence in physics teaching is important to the physics community. European Journal of Physics is proud of its contribution to achieving this goal. As Editor-in-Chief, I will continue to work to this general objective of the journal. We will publish articles on specific topics in physics, stressing originality of presentation and suitability for use in students'laboratories, lectures and physics teaching in general. We will also publish more pedagogical papers presenting the achievements of particular teaching methods. In addition, we will continue to publish special sections on particular areas of physics, as well as the annual special section on physics competitions. European Journal of Physics is in good shape. Due to the work of the previous editors and the publisher, the readership is high and growing steadily, and many excellent papers are being submitted and published. I hope that this positive trend for the journal will continue, and I will do my best to keep to this high standard. A few words about myself. I work in the Institute of Physics in Warsaw, Poland. My main research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and I have published about 80 research papers on this topic. For many years I was involved in teaching physics at university and in high school. I am a co-author of a textbook on physics for high-school students and of a problem book in quantum mechanics. For the last ten years, I have been involved in the International Physics Olympiad and over the last few years I have been a member of the Editorial Board of European Journal of Physics.

  1. [Lin Xue-Jian's experience on treatment of a part of cerebral diseases with scalp acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Li; Wu, Jiu-Wei

    2005-10-01

    LIN Xue-Jian adopts Chinese traditional acupuncture and moxibustion manipulation methods to stimulate the special area of scalp to treat a part of brain-derived diseases, such as infantile cerebral palsy, nerve deafness, cerebellar ataxia, lacunar cerebral infarction, senile dementia, Parkinson's disease, anxiety, insomnia and central constipation, and so on. Scalp acupuncture can improve ability of blood and oxygen supply for general blood vessels; stimulation of corresponding acupoint area according to symptoms and signs can control condition of disease; and can repair, activate and regenerate the injured, dormancy and aging neurons, so as to dredge nerve network in the brain, hence better therapeutic effect.

  2. Single-tube linear DNA amplification (LinDA) for robust ChIP-seq.

    PubMed

    Shankaranarayanan, Pattabhiraman; Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Walia, Mannu; Wang, Li; Li, Ning; Trindade, Luisa M; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2011-06-05

    Genome-wide profiling of transcription factors based on massive parallel sequencing of immunoprecipitated chromatin (ChIP-seq) requires nanogram amounts of DNA. Here we describe a high-fidelity, single-tube linear DNA amplification method (LinDA) for ChIP-seq and reChIP-seq with picogram DNA amounts obtained from a few thousand cells. This amplification technology will facilitate global analyses of transcription-factor binding and chromatin with very small cell populations, such as stem or cancer-initiating cells.

  3. The ceilometer inter-comparison campaign CeiLinEx2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattis, Ina; Begbie, Robert; Boyouk, Neda; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Brettle, Mike; Cermak, Jan; Drouin, Marc-Antoine; Geiß, Alexander; Görsdorf, Ulrich; Haefele, Alexander; Haeffelin, Martial; Hervo, Maxime; Komínková, Kateřina; Leinweber, Ronny; Müller, Gerhard; Münkel, Christoph; Pattantyús-Ábrahám, Margit; Pönitz, Kornelia; Wagner, Frank; Wiegner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Ceilometers are well established instruments for the detection of cloud base heights. Since about 2000, modern ceilometer types (mainly CHM15k, CL51, and CL31) are used also for investigations of the top height of the planetary boundary layer and for quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of backscatter coefficients. In the framework of the European projects E-PROFILE and TOPROF, tools for the exchange of ceilometer data among European meteorological services, as well as calibration and visualization procedures are developed and established. Unfortunately, the national networks are equipped with instruments of different generations and different manufacturers. In order to quantify and reduce those inhomogeneities, the ceilometer inter-comparison experiment CeiLinEx2015 was performed between June and September 2015 at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany. We tested six different instrument types: LD40, CL31, CL51, CHM15k, CHM15kx, and CS135. Each instrument type was represented by two instruments to estimate the instrument-to-instrument variability and the influence of different firmware versions. Two Raman lidars (RAMSES and RALPH), operated by German Meteorological Service (DWD) are used as reference instruments. Further ancillary data are available, e.g., hourly eye observations, four radio soundings per day, and AERONET sun photometer observations. Beside the typical vertically pointing measurement scheme, we performed special measurements with horizontal pointing direction or blocked receiver telescope. During the experiment, we could collect measurements under very different meteorological situations: Several clear nights allow for Rayleigh-Calibration (see Hervo and CeiLinEx2015 team [EGU2016-4785]), a strong event of Sahara dust intrusion can be used to study the behaviour of the instruments in presence of large, non-spherical particles (like volcanic ash). Further investigations focus, e.g., on the detection of very low cloud base

  4. Common variation at 6q16 within HACE1 and LIN28B influences susceptibility to neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Diskin, Sharon J; Capasso, Mario; Schnepp, Robert W; Cole, Kristina A; Attiyeh, Edward F; Hou, Cuiping; Diamond, Maura; Carpenter, Erica L; Winter, Cynthia; Lee, Hanna; Jagannathan, Jayanti; Latorre, Valeria; Iolascon, Achille; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2012-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is a cancer of the sympathetic nervous system that accounts for approximately 10% of all pediatric oncology deaths. Here, we report a genome-wide association study of 2,817 neuroblastoma cases and 7,473 controls. We identified two new associations at 6q16, the first within HACE1 (rs4336470; combined P=2.7×10(-11); odds ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-1.35) and the second within LIN28B (rs17065417; combined P=1.2×10(-8); odds ratio 1.38, 95% CI 1.23-1.54). Expression of LIN28B and let-7 miRNA correlated with rs17065417 genotype in neuroblastoma cell lines, and we observed significant growth inhibition upon depletion of LIN28B, specifically in neuroblastoma cells that were homozygous for the risk allele. Low HACE1 and high LIN28B expression in diagnostic primary neuroblastomas were associated with worse overall survival (P=0.008 and 0.014, respectively). Taken together, these data show that common variants in HACE1 and LIN28B influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and indicate that both genes likely have a role in disease progression.

  5. miR-203 enhances let-7 biogenesis by targeting LIN28B to suppress tumor growth in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hongwei; Liao, Zhicong; Wang, Yanbo; Hu, Xiuting; Chen, Xi; Xu, Lin; Hu, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    Human cancers often exhibit increased microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and global aberrant expression of miRNAs; thus, targeting the miRNA biogenesis pathway represents a novel strategy for cancer therapy. Here, we report that miR-203 enhances the biogenesis of tumor suppressor let-7 in lung cancer by directly targeting LIN28B. Specially, we found that the LIN28B protein levels were dramatically increased in lung cancer tissues, but its mRNA levels did not differ significantly, suggesting that a post-transcriptional mechanism is involved in LIN28B regulation. Interestingly, miR-203 overexpression was accompanied by massive upregulation of a group of miRNAs, especially let-7, and the let-7 expression level was concordant with the miR-203 expression in lung cancer tissues, implying its biological relevance. Furthermore, we showed that miR-203 played a critical role in inhibiting the proliferation and promoting the apoptosis of lung cancer cells by suppressing LIN28B and enhancing let-7 biogenesis. In summary, our results establish a novel mechanism by which miR-203, LIN28B and let-7 are tightly linked to form a regulatory network in lung cancer cells. The findings shed light on the role of a specific miRNA as a modulator of miRNA biogenesis and provide basis for developing new strategies for lung cancer therapy. PMID:28218277

  6. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-03-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3'-5' exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing.

  7. LIN-28 balances longevity and germline stem cell number in Caenorhabditis elegans through let-7/AKT/DAF-16 axis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Hou, Lei; Nakamura, Shuhei; Su, Ming; Li, Fang; Chen, Weiyang; Yan, Yizhen; Green, Christopher D; Chen, Di; Zhang, Hong; Antebi, Adam; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2017-02-01

    The RNA-binding protein LIN-28 was first found to control developmental timing in Caenorhabditis elegans. Later, it was found to play important roles in pluripotency, metabolism, and cancer in mammals. Here we report that a low dosage of lin-28 enhanced stress tolerance and longevity, and reduced germline stem/progenitor cell number in C. elegans. The germline LIN-28-regulated microRNA let-7 was required for these effects by targeting akt-1/2 and decreasing their protein levels. AKT-1/2 and the downstream DAF-16 transcription factor were both required for the lifespan and germline stem cell effects of lin-28. The pathway also mediated dietary restriction induced lifespan extension and reduction in germline stem cell number. Thus, the LIN-28/let-7/AKT/DAF-16 axis we delineated here is a program that plays an important role in balancing reproduction and somatic maintenance and their response to the environmental energy level-a central dogma of the 'evolutionary optimization' of resource allocation that modulates aging.

  8. Suppression of metastasis by mirtazapine via restoration of the Lin-7C/β-catenin pathway in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Saito, Yasuhiro; Baba, Takao; Sakuma, Kentaro; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2014-06-25

    No definitive therapy exists to treat human metastatic tumors. We reported previously that down-regulation of Lin-7C is essential for metastasis of human squamous cell carcinomas (hSCCs). In this study, we investigated the chemical restoration of Lin-7C expression and demonstrated its effectiveness for suppressing the metastatic potential in human cancer cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified candidate chemical agents, i.e., apomorphine, caffeine, risperidone, quetiapine, and mirtazapine. Among them, mirtazapine, an antagonist of HTR2C, an upstream molecule of Lin-7C, caused substantial up-regulation of the Lin-7C/β-catenin pathway in a metastatic hSCC cell line and human melanoma-derived cell line in vitro, and up-regulation did not contribute to cellular proliferation. Moreover, the antimetastatic effect of mirtazapine in these metastatic cell lines in vivo also was evident in multiple organs of immunodeficient mice with no marked side effects. The current data offer novel information for further study of antimetastatic activity in association with enhanced Lin-7C/β-catenin pathway activation with mirtazapine.

  9. Genome packaging in EL and Lin68, two giant phiKZ-like bacteriophages of P. aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolova, O.S.; Shaburova, O.V.; Pechnikova, E.V.; Shaytan, A.K.; Krylov, S.V.; Kiselev, N.A.; Krylov, V.N.

    2014-11-15

    A unique feature of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa giant phage phiKZ is its way of genome packaging onto a spool-like protein structure, the inner body. Until recently, no similar structures have been detected in other phages. We have studied DNA packaging in P. aeruginosa phages EL and Lin68 using cryo-electron microscopy and revealed the presence of inner bodies. The shape and positioning of the inner body and the density of the DNA packaging in EL are different from those found in phiKZ and Lin68. This internal organization explains how the shorter EL genome is packed into a large EL capsid, which has the same external dimensions as the capsids of phiKZ and Lin68. The similarity in the structural organization in EL and other phiKZ-like phages indicates that EL is phylogenetically related to other phiKZ-like phages, and, despite the lack of detectable DNA homology, EL, phiKZ, and Lin68 descend from a common ancestor. - Highlights: • We performed a comparative structural study of giant P. aeruginosa phages: EL, Lin68 and phiKZ. • We revealed that the inner body is a common feature in giant phages. • The phage genome size correlates with the overall dimensions of the inner body.

  10. Genetic variants in let-7/Lin28 modulate the risk of oral cavity cancer in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; zhu, Longbiao; Wang, Ruixia; Miao, Limin; Jiang, Hongbing; Yuan, Hua; Ma, Hongxia; Chen, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Let-7 and Lin28 establish a double-negative feedback loop to affect several biological processes, such as differentiation of stem cell, invasion and metastasis, and tumorigenesis. In this study, we systematically investigated the associations between 6 potentially functional SNPs of let7 and Lin28 genes and the risk of oral cavity cancer with a case-control study including 384 oral cavity cancer cases and 731 controls. We found that the variant allele (T) of rs221636 of Lin28B was significantly associated with a reduced risk of oral cavity cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58–0.92, P = 7.55 × 10−3 in additive model]. Bioinformatics prediction indicated that rs221636 was located at the binding site of hsa-miR-548p in the 3′ UTR of Lin28B. Luciferase activity assay also showed a lower expression level for rs221636 T allele compared with A allele. These findings indicated that rs221236 located at Lin28B may contribute to the risk of oral cavity cancer through the interruption of miRNA binding. PMID:25503985

  11. miR-203 enhances let-7 biogenesis by targeting LIN28B to suppress tumor growth in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hongwei; Liao, Zhicong; Wang, Yanbo; Hu, Xiuting; Chen, Xi; Xu, Lin; Hu, Zhibin

    2017-02-20

    Human cancers often exhibit increased microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and global aberrant expression of miRNAs; thus, targeting the miRNA biogenesis pathway represents a novel strategy for cancer therapy. Here, we report that miR-203 enhances the biogenesis of tumor suppressor let-7 in lung cancer by directly targeting LIN28B. Specially, we found that the LIN28B protein levels were dramatically increased in lung cancer tissues, but its mRNA levels did not differ significantly, suggesting that a post-transcriptional mechanism is involved in LIN28B regulation. Interestingly, miR-203 overexpression was accompanied by massive upregulation of a group of miRNAs, especially let-7, and the let-7 expression level was concordant with the miR-203 expression in lung cancer tissues, implying its biological relevance. Furthermore, we showed that miR-203 played a critical role in inhibiting the proliferation and promoting the apoptosis of lung cancer cells by suppressing LIN28B and enhancing let-7 biogenesis. In summary, our results establish a novel mechanism by which miR-203, LIN28B and let-7 are tightly linked to form a regulatory network in lung cancer cells. The findings shed light on the role of a specific miRNA as a modulator of miRNA biogenesis and provide basis for developing new strategies for lung cancer therapy.

  12. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-01-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3′-5′ exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing. PMID:27881476

  13. THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Shrestha, Biva; Palanisamy, Giri; Hook, Leslie A; Killeffer, Terri S; Boden, Thomas A; Cook, Robert B; Zolly, Lisa; Hutchison, Viv; Frame, Mike; Cialella, Alice; Lazer, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register

  14. Adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of Lin(-)CD271(+)Sca-1(+) adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jingang; Yang, Xiaojuan; Jing, Wei; Guo, Weihua; Sun, Qince; Lin, Yunfeng; Liu, Lei; Meng, Wentong; Tian, Weidong

    2013-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been defined as cells that undergo sustained in vitro growth and have multilineage differentiation potential. However, the identity and purification of ASCs has proved elusive due to the lack of specific markers and poor understanding of their physiological roles. Here, we prospectively isolated and identified a restricted homogeneous subpopulation of ASCs (Lin(-)CD271(+)Sca-1(+)) from mouse adipose tissues on the basis of cell-surface markers. Individual ASCs generated colony-forming unit-fibroblast at a high frequency and could differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes in vitro. Expansion of ASCs in a large quantity was feasible in medium supplemented with fibroblast growth factor-2 and leukemia inhibitory factor, without loss of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. Moreover, we found that the transplanted ASCs can differentiate into adipocytes in adipogenic microenvironment in vivo and osteoblasts in osteogenic microenvironment in vivo. Thus we proved that Lin, CD271, and Sca-1 could be used as the specific markers to purify ASCs from adipose tissue. The method we established to identify ASCs as defined in vivo entities will help develop ASCs transplantation as a new therapeutic strategy for bone regeneration and adipose tissue regeneration in clinic.

  15. A Lin28 homologue reprograms differentiated cells to stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Sako, Yusuke; Imai, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Thompson, Kari; Kubo, Minoru; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Kabeya, Yukiko; Karlson, Dale; Wu, Shu-Hsing; Ishikawa, Masaki; Murata, Takashi; Benfey, Philip N.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Tamada, Yosuke; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2017-01-01

    Both land plants and metazoa have the capacity to reprogram differentiated cells to stem cells. Here we show that the moss Physcomitrella patens Cold-Shock Domain Protein 1 (PpCSP1) regulates reprogramming of differentiated leaf cells to chloronema apical stem cells and shares conserved domains with the induced pluripotent stem cell factor Lin28 in mammals. PpCSP1 accumulates in the reprogramming cells and is maintained throughout the reprogramming process and in the resultant stem cells. Expression of PpCSP1 is negatively regulated by its 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Removal of the 3′-UTR stabilizes PpCSP1 transcripts, results in accumulation of PpCSP1 protein and enhances reprogramming. A quadruple deletion mutant of PpCSP1 and three closely related PpCSP genes exhibits attenuated reprogramming indicating that the PpCSP genes function redundantly in cellular reprogramming. Taken together, these data demonstrate a positive role of PpCSP1 in reprogramming, which is similar to the function of mammalian Lin28. PMID:28128346

  16. Genetic variation in LIN28B is associated with the timing of puberty.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ken K; Elks, Cathy E; Li, Shengxu; Zhao, Jing Hua; Luan, Jian'an; Andersen, Lars B; Bingham, Sheila A; Brage, Soren; Smith, George Davey; Ekelund, Ulf; Gillson, Christopher J; Glaser, Beate; Golding, Jean; Hardy, Rebecca; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kuh, Diana; Luben, Robert; Marcus, Michele; McGeehin, Michael A; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M; Rubin, Carol; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Strachan, David P; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wong, Andrew; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Barroso, Inês; Mooser, Vincent; Loos, Ruth J; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2009-06-01

    The timing of puberty is highly variable. We carried out a genome-wide association study for age at menarche in 4,714 women and report an association in LIN28B on chromosome 6 (rs314276, minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.33, P = 1.5 × 10(-8)). In independent replication studies in 16,373 women, each major allele was associated with 0.12 years earlier menarche (95% CI = 0.08-0.16; P = 2.8 × 10(-10); combined P = 3.6 × 10(-16)). This allele was also associated with earlier breast development in girls (P = 0.001; N = 4,271); earlier voice breaking (P = 0.006, N = 1,026) and more advanced pubic hair development in boys (P = 0.01; N = 4,588); a faster tempo of height growth in girls (P = 0.00008; N = 4,271) and boys (P = 0.03; N = 4,588); and shorter adult height in women (P = 3.6 × 10(-7); N = 17,274) and men (P = 0.006; N = 9,840) in keeping with earlier growth cessation. These studies identify variation in LIN28B, a potent and specific regulator of microRNA processing, as the first genetic determinant regulating the timing of human pubertal growth and development.

  17. The New Online Metadata Editor for Generating Structured Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, R.; Shrestha, B.; Palanisamy, G.; Hook, L.; Killeffer, T.; Boden, T.; Cook, R. B.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Frame, M. T.; Cialella, A. T.; Lazer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nobody is better suited to "describe" data than the scientist who created it. This "description" about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [1] [2]. Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. How is OME helping Big Data Centers like ORNL DAAC? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the ESDIS Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and

  18. [Knockdown of Larp4b in Lin(-) cells does not affect the colony forming ability of mouse hematopoietic cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Pang, Ya-Kun; Cheng, Hui; Dong, Fang; Liang, Hao-Yue; Zhang, Ying-Chi; Wang, Xiao-Min; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping

    2013-06-01

    Larp4b is a member of the LARP family, which can interact with RNA and generally stimulate the translation of mRNA. Abnormal expression of Larp4b can be found in leukemia patients in our previous study. This study was purposed to detect the relative expression of Larp4b mRNA in different subpopulations of mouse hematopoietic cells, to construct lentivirus vector containing shLarp4b targeting mouse gene Larp4b and to explore its effects on mouse Lin(-) cells infected with shLarp4b by lentivirus. SF-LV-shLarP4b-EGFP and control vectors were constructed and two-plasmid lentivirus packing system was used to transfect 293T cells. After 48 h and 72 h, lentivirus SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was harvested and was used to infect Lin(-) cells. After 48 h, EGFP(+) cells was sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). Meanwhile, semi-quantitative real time-PCR, AnnexinV-PE/7-AAD staining, PI staining and colony forming cell assay (CFC) were performed to determine the expression of Larp4b and its effect on the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The results showed that Larp4b was highly expressed in myeloid cells. SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was successfully constructed according to the restriction endonuclease digestion assay. RT-PCR confirmed that Larp4b was efficiently knockdown in mouse Lin(-) cells. The low expression of Larp4b did not affect the colony forming number, the apoptosis and cell cycle of Lin(-) cells. It is concluded that knockdown of Larp4b in mouse Lin(-) cells do not contribute to the colony forming ability and the growth of Lin(-) cells in vitro. This useful knockdown system will be used to study in vivo Larp4b in future.

  19. Training the unseasoned technical writer-editor: From the trainee's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Many unseasoned technical writer-editors who are not adequately trained may become seasoned inadequately trained technical writer-editors. This problem can occur when a trainee is involved in an ineffective training program, but it can be alleviated by the trainer's assessing the unseasoned writer's talents, becoming involved with the trainee's growth in writing and editing skills, and helping him to visualize his potential as a technical writer-editor. Assessment, support, mentoring, and nurturing are important elements in the trainee's growth process and in any good training or internship program. 1 ref.

  20. LIN-3/EGF promotes the programmed cell death of specific cells in Caenorhabditis elegans by transcriptional activation of the pro-apoptotic gene egl-1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hang-Shiang; Wu, Yi-Chun

    2014-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the physiological death of a cell mediated by an intracellular suicide program. Although key components of the PCD execution pathway have been identified, how PCD is regulated during development is poorly understood. Here, we report that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligand LIN-3 acts as an extrinsic signal to promote the death of specific cells in Caenorhabditis elegans. The loss of LIN-3 or its receptor, LET-23, reduced the death of these cells, while excess LIN-3 or LET-23 signaling resulted in an increase in cell deaths. Our molecular and genetic data support the model that the LIN-3 signal is transduced through LET-23 to activate the LET-60/RAS-MPK-1/ERK MAPK pathway and the downstream ETS domain-containing transcription factor LIN-1. LIN-1 binds to, and activates transcription of, the key pro-apoptotic gene egl-1, which leads to the death of specific cells. Our results provide the first evidence that EGF induces PCD at the whole organism level and reveal the molecular basis for the death-promoting function of LIN-3/EGF. In addition, the level of LIN-3/EGF signaling is important for the precise fine-tuning of the life-versus-death fate. Our data and the previous cell culture studies that say EGF triggers apoptosis in some cell lines suggest that the EGF-mediated modulation of PCD is likely conserved in C. elegans and humans.

  1. Disturbance of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop is associated with radio- and chemo-resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Weimin; Yang, Guangping; Yu, Hui; Wang, Ruihao; Wang, Linjing; Zhang, Guoqian; Fu, Wenfan; Dai, Lu; Li, Wanzhen; Liao, Boyu; Zhang, Shuxu

    2017-01-01

    Radio- and chemo-resistance represent major obstacles in the therapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. In the present study, during induction of radio- or chemo-resistance in NSCLC cells, dynamic analyses revealed that decreased expression of let-7 induced by irradiation or cisplatin resulted in increased expression of its target gene LIN28, and increased expression of LIN28 then contributed to further decreased expression of let-7 by inhibiting its maturation and biogenesis. Moreover, we showed that down-regulation of let-7 and up-regulation of LIN28 expression promoted resistance to irradiation or cisplatin by regulating the single-cell proliferative capability of NSCLC cells. Consequently, in NSCLC cells, let-7 and LIN28 can form a double-negative feedback loop through mutual inhibition, and disturbance of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop induced by irradiation or chemotherapeutic drugs can result in radio- and chemo-resistance. In addition, low expression of let-7 and high expression of LIN28 in NSCLC patients was associated significantly with resistance to radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Therefore, our study demonstrated that disturbance of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop is involved in the regulation of radio- and chemo-resistance, and that let-7 and LIN28 could be employed as predictive biomarkers of response to radiotherapy or chemotherapy in NSCLC patients. PMID:28235063

  2. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    2011-12-01

    At the end of 2011 I will retire as Editor-in-Chief of Semiconductor Science and Technology, and I am very pleased to announce that the job will be taken over by Professor Kornelius Nielsch. In the ten years I have held this position, I have seen many new topics entering the journal: spintronics, organic semiconductors, and Dirac fermion physics, to name just a few. The journal has also witnessed a strong internationalization of the authorship, with an especially strong increase in contributions from the Far East—a growth that is likely to continue in the coming years. I am certain that Kornelius will do an excellent job in guiding the journal through the developments of the coming decade. I would like to thank the publishing team of SST, or rather the three consecutive teams I witnessed during my tenure at the journal, for the help and support they have given me. The people at IOP Publishing are doing a great job in running the journal, and have made it possible to considerably reduce the time to publication for our submissions. I much enjoyed the collaboration with the other members of the Editorial Board; our annual meetings have always been a source of inspiration. Last, but certainly not least, I would like to thank you, the scientific community, authors, referees and readers, for your continuing support of the journal.

  3. Writing Science Effectively: Biology and English Students in an Author-Editor Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkala, Irene; Gessell, Donna A.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the design of a collaborative learning community linking students in biology and English courses in author-editor relationships. Delineates the steps of the project and provides sample evaluations for both groups. (Contains 19 references.) (DDR)

  4. Issues in Communication Education: An Interview with Joe Ayers (Editor 1999-2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, Heather; Hazel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Joe Ayres, editor of this journal from 1999 to 2002. Addresses issues such as curriculum content, competencies for undergraduate students, graduate students, student retention, and the role of mentoring in higher education. (SG)

  5. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the amendment... television stations. It is known at the time of such debate that these stations employ only a small number...

  6. Overexpression of Lin28 inhibits the proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis of BGC-823 gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hu; Xu, Wei; Song, Jun; Liang, Yong; Fu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Cheng; Li, Chao; Peng, Jun-Sheng; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-02-01

    Lin28 plays important roles in the development, maintenance of pluripotency and progression of various types of cancers. Lin28 represses the biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and is implicated in both development and tumorigenesis. Oncogenic regulation of let-7 microRNAs has been demonstrated in several human malignancies, yet their correlation with Lin28 has not yet been studied in gastric cancer. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the possible mechanisms involved in the effects by Lin28 on the proliferation, migration, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via alteration of let-7 miRNA. The expression levels of Lin28 and let-7 were detected by real-time PCR in gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. Lin28 was overexpressed in the BGC-823 cells via lentiviral transfection, and let-7 expression was assessed. Cell proliferation and migration capabilities were investigated by MTT and Transwell assays, while cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis rate were detected using flow cytometry. The expression of Lin28 was moderately expressed in the GES cells while underexpressed in the BGC-823, SGC-7901 and HGC-27 cells. Let-7a miRNA was highly expressed in the GES, BGC-823, SGC-7901 and HGC-27 cells. Overexpression of Lin28 was inversely correlated with the downregulated expression of let-7a, and markedly suppressed the proliferation, migration, cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in the BGC-823 cells. These findings demonstrated that overexpression of Lin28 can suppress the biological behavior of gastric cancer in vitro, and let-7 miRNA may play an important role in the process. We suggest that Lin28 may be a candidate predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for gastric cancer patients.

  7. Evaluation of LIN∥LIN CPT for Compact and High Performance Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breschi, E.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Matisov, B.; Lammegger, R.; Windholz, L.

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the lin∥lin CPT signal in the 87Rb D1 manifold when the atoms are contained in low pressure buffer gas cells. We predict the achievable clock frequency stability, basing our considerations on the signal-to-noise measurements. We show that a short-term stability of about 2 · 10-11 τ1/2 may be reached in a compact system using a modulated VCSEL, this value is mainly limited by the detection noise level and can be improved up to a factor 4 by using high frequency phase sensitive detection. Under the same experimental condition a challenging short-term stability of 1-3 · 10-13 τ1/2 can be achieved by using the PL ECDLs.

  8. [Two cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum due to Xiao-lin Temple boxing vocal exercise].

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, H; Matsushima, T; Nakamura, J; Yano, T; Adachi, M; Tano, Y

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema were reported. The first cases was a 21-year-old man who had a past history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. The second was a healthy 20-year-old man. They were admitted to our hospital because of dyspnea and chest pain, which occurred at or after vocal exercise for Xiao-lin Temple boxing. Physically, a mediastinal crunch on auscultation heard over the cardiac apex and the left sternal border (Hamman's sign) was recognized in the first case, and subcutaneous emphysema was palpated in both cases. The chest X-ray films revealed intramediastinal air and subcutaneous emphysema in both cases. We diagnosed these patients as spontaneous pneumomediastinum because of no underlying disease. This is a report of rare cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum occurring at the same time, and one of the mechanism causing them was considered to be a sudden increase in intrathoracic pressure due to the vocal exercise of chinese boxing.

  9. Genome packaging in EL and Lin68, two giant phiKZ-like bacteriophages of P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O S; Shaburova, O V; Pechnikova, E V; Shaytan, A K; Krylov, S V; Kiselev, N A; Krylov, V N

    2014-11-01

    A unique feature of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa giant phage phiKZ is its way of genome packaging onto a spool-like protein structure, the inner body. Until recently, no similar structures have been detected in other phages. We have studied DNA packaging in P. aeruginosa phages EL and Lin68 using cryo-electron microscopy and revealed the presence of inner bodies. The shape and positioning of the inner body and the density of the DNA packaging in EL are different from those found in phiKZ and Lin68. This internal organization explains how the shorter EL genome is packed into a large EL capsid, which has the same external dimensions as the capsids of phiKZ and Lin68. The similarity in the structural organization in EL and other phiKZ-like phages indicates that EL is phylogenetically related to other phiKZ-like phages, and, despite the lack of detectable DNA homology, EL, phiKZ, and Lin68 descend from a common ancestor.

  10. Lin28B promotes Müller glial cell de-differentiation and proliferation in the regenerative rat retinas

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zui; Zhao, Chen; Jian, Qian; Gillies, Mark; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal regeneration and repair are severely impeded in higher mammalian animals. Although Müller cells can be activated and show some characteristics of progenitor cells when injured or under pathological conditions, they quickly form gliosis scars. Unfortunately, the basic mechanisms that impede retinal regeneration remain unknown. We studied retinas from Royal College of Surgeon (RCS) rats and found that let-7 family molecules, let-7e and let-7i, were significantly overexpressed in Müller cells of degenerative retinas. It demonstrated that down-regulation of the RNA binding protein Lin28B was one of the key factors leading to the overexpression of let-7e and let-7i. Lin28B ectopic expression in the Müller cells suppressed overexpression of let-7e and let-7i, stimulated and mobilized Müller glia de-differentiation, proliferation, promoted neuronal commitment, and inhibited glial fate acquisition of de-differentiated Müller cells. ERG recordings revealed that the amplitudes of a-wave and b-wave were improved significantly after Lin28B was delivered into the subretinal space of RCS rats. In summary, down-regulation of Lin28B as well as up-regulation of let-7e and let-7i may be the main factors that impede Müller cell de-differentiation and proliferation in the retina of RCS rats. PMID:27384999

  11. Strategies Used in "Fermilab LInC Online" To Develop Leadership Teams That Integrate Technology To Support Constructivist Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mengel, Laura; Gatz, Sharon; Meehan, Stephen

    Fermilab is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory for research exploring the fundamental nature of matter and energy. This paper describes the Fermilab LInC (Leadership Institute Integrating Internet, Instruction and Curriculum) Online program and the strategies used over the past six years to develop leadership teams that can: (1)…

  12. Special Article: Ronald D. Miller: tribute to a past editor-in-chief.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Kenneth J

    2012-12-01

    For anesthesiologists around the world who have practiced or trained in the past 4 decades, the name Ronald Miller, MD, has been synonymous with a commitment to excellence that has been evident in all aspects of his remarkable career as a distinguished clinician-scientist, editor, writer, and educator. Dr. Miller's contributions as Editor-in-Chief of Anesthesia & Analgesia (1991-2006) have stimulated this salutation of his career and of his influence on transforming the Journal.

  13. Exploring why and how journal editors retract articles: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Peter; Wager, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Editors have a responsibility to retract seriously flawed articles from their journals. However, there appears to be little consistency in journals' policies or procedures for this. In a qualitative study, we therefore interviewed editors of science journals using semi-structured interviews to investigate their experience of retracting articles. We identified potential barriers to retraction, difficulties in the process and also sources of support and encouragement. Our findings have been used as the basis for guidelines developed by the Committee on Publication Ethics.

  14. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the 13 years since it was first published the "Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals" (the Vancouver style), developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, has been widely accepted by both authors and editors; over 400 journals have stated that they will consider manuscripts that conform to its requirements. This is the fourth edition of the "Uniform requirements." PMID:8287338

  15. XSHOOTER spectroscopy of the enigmatic planetary nebula Lin49 in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Kemper, F.; Leal-Ferreira, M. L.; Aleman, I.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Cami, J.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Peeters, E.; Scicluna, P.

    2016-10-01

    We performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the fullerene C60-containing planetary nebula (PN) Lin49 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using XSHOOTER at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope and the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph instruments. We derived nebular abundances for nine elements. We used TLUSTY to derive photospheric parameters for the central star. Lin49 is C-rich and metal-deficient PN (Z ˜ 0.0006). The nebular abundances are in good agreement with asymptotic giant branch nucleosynthesis models for stars with initial mass 1.25 M⊙ and metallicity Z = 0.001. Using the TLUSTY synthetic spectrum of the central star to define the heating and ionizing source, we constructed the photoionization model with CLOUDY that matches the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) and the line fluxes in the UV to far-IR wavelength ranges simultaneously. We could not fit the ˜1-5 μm SED using a model with 0.005-0.1-μm-sized graphite grains and a constant hydrogen density shell owing to the prominent near-IR excess, while at other wavelengths the model fits the observed values reasonably well. We argue that the near-IR excess might indicate either (1) the presence of very small particles in the form of small carbon clusters, small graphite sheets, or fullerene precursors, or (2) the presence of a high-density structure surrounding the central star. We found that SMC C60 PNe show a near-IR excess component to lesser or greater degree. This suggests that these C60 PNe might maintain a structure nearby their central star.

  16. [Analysis of acid rain characteristics of Lin'an Regional Background Station using long-term observation data].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Quan; Ma, Hao; Mao, Yu-Ding; Feng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Using long-term observation data of acid rain at Lin'an Regional Background Station (Lin'an RBS), this paper studied the interannual and monthly variations of acid rain, the reasons for the variations, and the relationships between acid rain and meteorological factors. The results showed that interannual variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS had a general increasing trend in which there were two obvious intensifying processes and two distinct weakening processes, during the period ranging from 1985 to 2012. In last two decades, the monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS indicated that rain acidity and frequency of severe acid rain were increasing but the frequency of weak acid rain was decreasing when moving towards bilateral side months of July. Acid rain occurrence was affected by rainfall intensity, wind speed and wind direction. High frequency of severe acid rain and low frequency of weak acid rain were on days with drizzle, but high frequency of weak acid rain and low frequency of severe acid rain occurred on rainstorm days. With wind speed upgrading, the frequency of acid rain and the proportion of severe acid rain were declining, the pH value of precipitation was reducing too. Another character is that daily dominant wind direction of weak acid rain majorly converged in S-W section ,however that of severe acid rain was more likely distributed in N-E section. The monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS was mainly attributed to precipitation variation, the increasing and decreasing of monthly incoming wind from SSE-WSW and NWN-ENE sections of wind direction. The interannual variation of acid rain could be due to the effects of energy consumption raising and significant green policies conducted in Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Shanghai.

  17. LIN28A enhances the therapeutic potential of cultured neural stem cells in a Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jo, A-Young; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Mi; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Sang-Min; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Ho; You, Bo-Hyun; Nam, Jin-Wu; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-10-01

    The original properties of tissue-specific stem cells, regardless of their tissue origins, are inevitably altered during in vitro culturing, lessening the clinical and research utility of stem cell cultures. Specifically, neural stem cells derived from the ventral midbrain lose their dopamine neurogenic potential, ventral midbrain-specific phenotypes, and repair capacity during in vitro cell expansion, all of which are critical concerns in using the cultured neural stem cells in therapeutic approaches for Parkinson's disease. In this study, we observed that the culture-dependent changes of neural stem cells derived from the ventral midbrain coincided with loss of RNA-binding protein LIN28A expression. When LIN28A expression was forced and sustained during neural stem cell expansion using an inducible expression-vector system, loss of dopamine neurogenic potential and midbrain phenotypes after long-term culturing was blocked. Furthermore, dopamine neurons that differentiated from neural stem cells exhibited remarkable survival and resistance against toxic insults. The observed effects were not due to a direct action of LIN28A on the differentiated dopamine neurons, but rather its action on precursor neural stem cells as exogene expression was switched off in the differentiating/differentiated cultures. Remarkable and reproducible behavioural recovery was shown in all Parkinson's disease rats grafted with neural stem cells expanded with LIN28A expression, along with extensive engraftment of dopamine neurons expressing mature neuronal and midbrain-specific markers. These findings suggest that LIN28A expression during stem cell expansion could be used to prepare therapeutically competent donor cells.

  18. Changes in Hypothalamic Expression of the Lin28/let-7 System and Related MicroRNAs During Postnatal Maturation and After Experimental Manipulations of Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi-Lozano, M.; Ruiz-Pino, F.; Navarro, V.M.; Sánchez-Garrido, M.A.; Leon, S.; Dieguez, C.; Cordido, F.; Matagne, V.; Dissen, G.A.; Ojeda, S.R.; Pinilla, L.

    2013-01-01

    Lin28 and Lin28b are related RNA-binding proteins that inhibit the maturation of miRNAs of the let-7 family and participate in the control of cellular stemness and early embryonic development. Considerable interest has arisen recently concerning other physiological roles of the Lin28/let-7 axis, including its potential involvement in the control of puberty, as suggested by genome-wide association studies and functional genomics. We report herein the expression profiles of Lin28 and let-7 members in the rat hypothalamus during postnatal maturation and in selected models of altered puberty. The expression patterns of c-Myc (upstream positive regulator of Lin28), mir-145 (negative regulator of c-Myc), and mir-132 and mir-9 (putative miRNA repressors of Lin28, predicted by bioinformatic algorithms) were also explored. In male and female rats, Lin28, Lin28b, and c-Myc mRNAs displayed very high hypothalamic expression during the neonatal period, markedly decreased during the infantile-to-juvenile transition and reached minimal levels before/around puberty. A similar puberty-related decline was observed for Lin28b in monkey hypothalamus but not in the rat cortex, suggesting species conservation and tissue specificity. Conversely, let-7a, let-7b, mir-132, and mir-145, but not mir-9, showed opposite expression profiles. Perturbation of brain sex differentiation and puberty, by neonatal treatment with estrogen or androgen, altered the expression ratios of Lin28/let-7 at the time of puberty. Changes in the c-Myc/Lin28b/let-7 pathway were also detected in models of delayed puberty linked to early photoperiod manipulation and, to a lesser extent, postnatal underfeeding or chronic subnutrition. Altogether, our data are the first to document dramatic changes in the expression of the Lin28/let-7 axis in the rat hypothalamus during the postnatal maturation and after different manipulations that disturb puberty, thus suggesting the potential involvement of developmental changes in

  19. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    As I begin my tenure as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM), I look upon this opportunity as both an honour and a real challenge. The journal is in great shape thanks to the work of my predecessors, Marshall Stoneham and David Ferry. The journal's solid reputation is based largely on the work these gentlemen have done over the past decade. The other main reason for the success of JPCM is the amazing staff in Bristol; keep up the good work, please. When discussing the journal with scientists from all corners of the globe, one thing is always mentioned—JPCM is a very reliable journal with well-written, high-quality papers, and a fast but rigorous peer-review process that provides fair, detailed and constructive referee reports for the benefit of authors. This is due almost entirely to our great authors and referees; we rely on them every day—thank you. As the new Editor-in-Chief I hope to continue to improve still further the journal's status in condensed matter science. As mentioned above, our reputation is excellent, but the reality is that we live in a world of bibliometrics and rankings. Over the past few years JPCM has been repositioned as a journal at the forefront of condensed matter physics, and the impact of the journal should increase further as a result of continued emphasis on commissioning in cutting-edge areas identified by the Editorial Board and the journal team. In addition to regular papers, JPCM has a number of other content streams that authors and readers can benefit from. Fast track communications (FTCs) offer exceptionally fast publication for work of the highest impact and urgency. By their select nature, FTCs benefit from personal treatment by the Editorial Board and the average receipt-to-first-decision time is just 11 days (the average receipt-to-publication time is just 45 days). Topical reviews in JPCM make the journal one of the most authoritative sources of review content for condensed matter physics

  20. EDITORIAL: Thank you and farewell from the Founding Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskes, Mike

    2005-07-01

    I have been involved with Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering (MSMSE) from the very beginning when it was merely an idea, over 14 years ago, to the current journal that is well supported by the community. During my time as Editor there have been many changes in the journal, including the introduction of electronic submissions, web-based services and free printed colour where it is essential to the article, as well as completely free colour online. The journal has seen excellent growth in the number and quality of submissions and the number of articles published continues to rise, enabling us to expand the journal to eight issues in 2005. Web accesses and downloads have greatly surpassed even my wildest dreams. In my opinion, the emergence of MSMSE as a top materials modelling journal has confirmed the vision of Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) and the Executive Board that this area of science and engineering was ripe for a specialized journal. I feel that, having seen the journal through the early years and watched it grow into a successful arena for multidisciplinary materials research, it is now an appropriate time for me to hand over the reins. The journal has a great foundation for future growth and development and is supported by an excellent Editorial Board, who have given me a great deal of help and advice over the years. I feel sure that they will continue to support the journal when Bill Curtin, Brown University, takes over on 1 July 2005. Bill has the diverse experience in modelling at the atomic, dislocation, and continuum levels to lead the journal to new heights. Finally I would like to thank all of the readers, authors and referees who have greatly contributed to MSMSE over the years. Thank you for your support and help, and I hope you will continue to support the journal. Last, but not least, I would like to thank the staff at IOPP. Without their expert assistance, the journal could not have been as successful as it is

  1. Avogadro: an advanced semantic chemical editor, visualization, and analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Avogadro project has developed an advanced molecule editor and visualizer designed for cross-platform use in computational chemistry, molecular modeling, bioinformatics, materials science, and related areas. It offers flexible, high quality rendering, and a powerful plugin architecture. Typical uses include building molecular structures, formatting input files, and analyzing output of a wide variety of computational chemistry packages. By using the CML file format as its native document type, Avogadro seeks to enhance the semantic accessibility of chemical data types. Results The work presented here details the Avogadro library, which is a framework providing a code library and application programming interface (API) with three-dimensional visualization capabilities; and has direct applications to research and education in the fields of chemistry, physics, materials science, and biology. The Avogadro application provides a rich graphical interface using dynamically loaded plugins through the library itself. The application and library can each be extended by implementing a plugin module in C++ or Python to explore different visualization techniques, build/manipulate molecular structures, and interact with other programs. We describe some example extensions, one which uses a genetic algorithm to find stable crystal structures, and one which interfaces with the PackMol program to create packed, solvated structures for molecular dynamics simulations. The 1.0 release series of Avogadro is the main focus of the results discussed here. Conclusions Avogadro offers a semantic chemical builder and platform for visualization and analysis. For users, it offers an easy-to-use builder, integrated support for downloading from common databases such as PubChem and the Protein Data Bank, extracting chemical data from a wide variety of formats, including computational chemistry output, and native, semantic support for the CML file format. For developers, it can be

  2. The Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway patterns the atonal ortholog lin-32 to diversify cell fate in a C. elegans sensory lineage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Renee M.; Portman, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Each sensory ray of the C. elegans male tail comprises three distinct neuroglial cell types. These three cells descend from a single progenitor, the ray precursor cell, through several rounds of asymmetric division called the ray sublineage. Ray development requires the conserved atonal-family bHLH gene lin-32, which specifies the ray neuroblast and promotes the differentiation of its progeny. However, the mechanisms that allocate specific cell fates among these progeny is unknown. Here we show that the distribution of LIN-32 during the ray sublineage is markedly asymmetric, localizing to anterior daughter cells in two successive cell divisions. The anterior-posterior patterning of LIN-32 expression and of differentiated ray neuroglial fates is brought about by the Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway, including the Wnt ligand LIN-44, its receptor LIN-17, and downstream components LIT-1 (NLK), SYS-1 (β-catenin) and POP-1 (TCF). LIN-32 asymmetry itself has an important role in patterning ray cell fates, as the failure to silence lin-32 expression in posterior cells disrupts development of this branch of the ray sublineage. Together, our results illustrate a mechanism whereby the regulated function of a proneural-class gene in a single neural lineage can both specify a neural precursor and actively pattern the fates of its progeny. Moreover, they reveal a central role for the Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway in patterning neural and glial fates in a simple sensory lineage. PMID:21917811

  3. A novel mechanism of LIN-28 regulation of let-7 microRNA expression revealed by in vivo HITS-CLIP in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Giovanni; Chen, Xiaowei; Zhao, Hongyu; Slack, Frank J

    2015-05-01

    The evolutionarily conserved gene lin-28 encodes an RNA-binding protein and is an important regulator of the proper temporal succession of several developmental events in both invertebrates and vertebrates. At the cellular level, LIN-28 promotes stemness and proliferation, and inhibits differentiation, a feature best illustrated by its ability to induce pluripotency when ectopically expressed in human fibroblasts in combination with NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2. Mammalian LIN28 functions in part by regulating processing of the let-7 microRNA through a GGAG binding site in the pre-let-7's distal loop region. However, many human and animal let-7 precursors lack the GGAG binding motif. In order to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying its biological functions in a living animal, we identified a map of LIN-28 interactions with the transcriptome by in vivo HITS-CLIP in Caenorhabditis elegans. LIN-28 binds a large pool of messenger RNAs, and a substantial fraction of the bona fide LIN-28 targets are involved in aspects of animal development. Furthermore, our data show that LIN-28 regulates the expression of the let-7 microRNA by binding its primary transcript in a previously unknown region, revealing a novel regulatory mechanism.

  4. Analysis of a lin-42/period Null Allele Implicates All Three Isoforms in Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans Molting and Developmental Timing

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Theresa L. B.; McCulloch, Katherine A.; Barr, Angela; Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Rougvie, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans heterochronic gene pathway regulates the relative timing of events during postembryonic development. lin-42, the worm homolog of the circadian clock gene, period, is a critical element of this pathway. lin-42 function has been defined by a set of hypomorphic alleles that cause precocious phenotypes, in which later developmental events, such as the terminal differentiation of hypodermal cells, occur too early. A subset of alleles also reveals a significant role for lin-42 in molting; larval stages are lengthened and ecdysis often fails in these mutant animals. lin-42 is a complex locus, encoding overlapping and nonoverlapping isoforms. Although existing alleles that affect subsets of isoforms have illuminated important and distinct roles for this gene in developmental timing, molting, and the decision to enter the alternative dauer state, it is essential to have a null allele to understand all of the roles of lin-42 and its individual isoforms. To remedy this problem and discover the null phenotype, we engineered an allele that deletes the entire lin-42 protein-coding region. lin-42 null mutants are homozygously viable, but have more severe phenotypes than observed in previously characterized hypomorphic alleles. We also provide additional evidence for this conclusion by using the null allele as a base for reintroducing different isoforms, showing that each isoform can provide heterochronic and molting pathway activities. Transcript levels of the nonoverlapping isoforms appear to be under coordinate temporal regulation, despite being driven by independent promoters. The lin-42 null allele will continue to be an important tool for dissecting the functions of lin-42 in molting and developmental timing. PMID:27729432

  5. Analysis of a lin-42/period Null Allele Implicates All Three Isoforms in Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans Molting and Developmental Timing.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Theresa L B; McCulloch, Katherine A; Barr, Angela; Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M; Rougvie, Ann E

    2016-12-07

    The Caenorhabditis elegans heterochronic gene pathway regulates the relative timing of events during postembryonic development. lin-42, the worm homolog of the circadian clock gene, period, is a critical element of this pathway. lin-42 function has been defined by a set of hypomorphic alleles that cause precocious phenotypes, in which later developmental events, such as the terminal differentiation of hypodermal cells, occur too early. A subset of alleles also reveals a significant role for lin-42 in molting; larval stages are lengthened and ecdysis often fails in these mutant animals. lin-42 is a complex locus, encoding overlapping and nonoverlapping isoforms. Although existing alleles that affect subsets of isoforms have illuminated important and distinct roles for this gene in developmental timing, molting, and the decision to enter the alternative dauer state, it is essential to have a null allele to understand all of the roles of lin-42 and its individual isoforms. To remedy this problem and discover the null phenotype, we engineered an allele that deletes the entire lin-42 protein-coding region. lin-42 null mutants are homozygously viable, but have more severe phenotypes than observed in previously characterized hypomorphic alleles. We also provide additional evidence for this conclusion by using the null allele as a base for reintroducing different isoforms, showing that each isoform can provide heterochronic and molting pathway activities. Transcript levels of the nonoverlapping isoforms appear to be under coordinate temporal regulation, despite being driven by independent promoters. The lin-42 null allele will continue to be an important tool for dissecting the functions of lin-42 in molting and developmental timing.

  6. CNS-PNETs with C19MC amplification and/or LIN28 expression comprise a distinct histogenetic diagnostic and therapeutic entity.

    PubMed

    Spence, Tara; Sin-Chan, Patrick; Picard, Daniel; Barszczyk, Mark; Hoss, Katharina; Lu, Mei; Kim, Seung-Ki; Ra, Young-Shin; Nakamura, Hideo; Fangusaro, Jason; Hwang, Eugene; Kiehna, Erin; Toledano, Helen; Wang, Yin; Shi, Qing; Johnston, Donna; Michaud, Jean; La Spina, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Adamek, Dariusz; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Peter Collins, V; Jones, Chris; Kabbara, Nabil; Jurdi, Nawaf; Varlet, Pascale; Perry, Arie; Scharnhorst, David; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; Eberhart, Charles G; Ng, Ho-Keung; Gururangan, Sridharan; Van Meter, Timothy; Remke, Marc; Lafay-Cousin, Lucie; Chan, Jennifer A; Sirachainan, Nongnuch; Pomeroy, Scott L; Clifford, Steven C; Gajjar, Amar; Shago, Mary; Halliday, William; Taylor, Michael D; Grundy, Richard; Lau, Ching C; Phillips, Joanna; Bouffet, Eric; Dirks, Peter B; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Huang, Annie

    2014-08-01

    Amplification of the C19MC oncogenic miRNA cluster and high LIN28 expression has been linked to a distinctly aggressive group of cerebral CNS-PNETs (group 1 CNS-PNETs) arising in young children. In this study, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic specificity of C19MC and LIN28, and the clinical and biological spectra of C19MC amplified and/or LIN28+ CNS-PNETs. We interrogated 450 pediatric brain tumors using FISH and IHC analyses and demonstrate that C19MC alteration is restricted to a sub-group of CNS-PNETs with high LIN28 expression; however, LIN28 immunopositivity was not exclusive to CNS-PNETs but was also detected in a proportion of other malignant pediatric brain tumors including rhabdoid brain tumors and malignant gliomas. C19MC amplified/LIN28+ group 1 CNS-PNETs arose predominantly in children <4 years old; a majority arose in the cerebrum but 24 % (13/54) of tumors had extra-cerebral origins. Notably, group 1 CNS-PNETs encompassed several histologic classes including embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes (ETANTR), medulloepithelioma, ependymoblastoma and CNS-PNETs with variable differentiation. Strikingly, gene expression and methylation profiling analyses revealed a common molecular signature enriched for primitive neural features, high LIN28/LIN28B and DNMT3B expression for all group 1 CNS-PNETs regardless of location or tumor histology. Our collective findings suggest that current known histologic categories of CNS-PNETs which include ETANTRs, medulloepitheliomas, ependymoblastomas in various CNS locations, comprise a common molecular and diagnostic entity and identify inhibitors of the LIN28/let7/PI3K/mTOR axis and DNMT3B as promising therapeutics for this distinct histogenetic entity.

  7. CHAIRMEN'S PREFACE AND EDITORS' NOTE: Unification of Fundamental Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Lars; Nilsson, Jan S.; Salomonson, Per; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

    1987-01-01

    Vainshtein. We had hoped that the Nobel Symposium should be a signal for improved relations between East and West, but in this respect we failed. The Symposium was held in the small town of Marstrand, a summer resort on an island outside Göteborg. The idea was to have it relatively close to home and to show the participants perhaps the best part of the local nature. Another motive was to keep the participants semi-isolated to provide ample time for discussions. With the somewhat heavy programme we found that even so, the days were not long enough. This Symposium was the second Nobel Symposium on elementary particle physics. The first one, also organized by our group, was held in 1968. We hope and believe that the next one need not be awaited another 18 years! The Symposium was made possible by a generous grant from the Nobel Foundation. An additional grant from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences was also essential. A grant from Nordita made it possible to invite some ten Nordic observers. We also gratefully acknowledge help with the organization of the Symposium from the city of Goteborg, the city of Kungälv, Volvo, Skandinaviska Enskilda banken, Ericsson AB and IBM Sweden. We thank all the participants for all their efforts, to come to our remote part of the world, to give excellent talks, to write up their talks astonishingly quickly and to share with us so much of their knowledge and expertise. Last but not least we are indebted to the members of the organizing committee, members of the group and the secretarial staff. Goteborg, August 1986 Editors' NoteIn these Proceedings the lectures are given in the order of their oral presentation at the Symposium. Regrettably, a few contributors could not participate (V. Gribov, A. Linde, V. Ogievetsky, M. Shifman and A. M. Polyakov). Their contributions have been placed close to the end of the Proceedings. As these authors did not have the opportunity of correcting the proofs, responsibility for printing errors must rest with

  8. G. K. Batchelor. Founding editor of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, D. G.

    1999-05-01

    Although developments in fluid mechanics continue at a heady pace, and are reported in JFM at about 800 pages per month, things in the editorial management of JFM change only slowly. There is a continuity among the JFM Editorial Team and among the policies they espouse and implement that appears to be appreciated by the fluid mechanics community. A major change has, however, occurred from January 1999, in that George Batchelor has, after 43 years as Editor, stepped down from the day-to-day handling of papers and from the formulation of policies and practices, and allowed himself to be named on our masthead as Founding Editor. I say ‘allowed’ because George's initial wish was not to be so named, feeling that this might be seen as an immodest and presumptuous title. But Founding Editor is exactly what George was and is. He launched JFM in May 1956, having persuaded Taylor & Francis to be the publisher and printer, and having enlisted the help of G. F. Carrier, W. C. Griffith and M. J. Lighthill as Associate Editors, and T. Brooke Benjamin and I. Proudman as Assistant Editors. Then, as now, all members of the JFM Editorial Team were to work autonomously in the handling of papers, with complete delegated authority and similar workloads, but all following similar procedures and with similar philosophies, and all under the watchful eye of G. K. B.

  9. [The relevance of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) for medical publishing and research].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Humberto B

    2014-01-01

    The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors is a leading independent institution providing guidance for the report of biomedical research and health related topics in medical journals. Established in 1978, it is currently constituted by editors of fourteen general medical journals from different countries, plus one representative for the US National Library of Medicine and one representative for the World Association of Biomedical Journal Editors. Since 1978 the Committee provides a document, originally named "Uniform Requirements…", "to help authors, editors, and others involved in peer review and biomedical publishing create and distribute accurate, clear, unbiased medical journal articles". This document has been updated several times and the last version was released in August 2013, now renamed "Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals", available in www.icmje.org and citable as "ICMJE Recommendations". A vast proportion of medical journals, worldwide, have adopted these recommendations as rules. The ICMJE discusses and provides guidance on several relevant aspects including criteria on authorship, peer review, scientific misconduct, conflicts of interest, clinical trials registration, good editorial practices, the relations between editors and journal owners, the protection of individuals subject to medical research, the solvency of electronic publications, among others. The 2013 ICMJE Annual Meeting took place in Santiago, Chile, in November 4 and 5. The photograph shows attendants to the final session.

  10. STK Integrated Message Production List Editor (SIMPLE) for CEO Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, Mike; Heydorn, James

    2014-01-01

    Late in fiscal year 2011, the Crew Earth Observations (CEO) team was tasked to upgrade and replace its mission planning and mission operations software systems, which were developed in the Space Shuttle era of the 1980s and 1990s. The impetuses for this change were the planned transition of all workstations to the Windows 7 64-bit operating system and the desire for more efficient and effective use of Satellite Tool Kit (STK) software required for reliable International Space Station (ISS) Earth location tracking. An additional requirement of this new system was the use of the same SQL database of CEO science sites from the SMMS, which was also being developed. STK Integrated Message Production List Editor (SIMPLE) is the essential, all-in-one tool now used by CEO staff to perform daily ISS mission planning to meet its requirement to acquire astronaut photography of specific sites on Earth. The sites are part of a managed, long-term database that has been defined and developed for scientific, educational, and public interest. SIMPLE's end product is a set of basic time and location data computed for an operator-selected set of targets that the ISS crew will be asked to photograph (photography is typically planned 12 to 36 hours out). The CEO operator uses SIMPLE to (a) specify a payload operations planning period; (b) acquire and validate the best available ephemeris data (vectors) for the ISS during the planning period; (c) ingest and display mission-specific site information from the CEO database; (d) identify and display potential current dynamic event targets as map features; (e) compute and display time and location information for each target; (f) screen and select targets based on known crew availability constraints, obliquity constraints, and real-time evaluated constraints to target visibility due to illumination (sun elevation) and atmospheric conditions (weather); and finally (g) incorporate basic, computed time and location information for each selected

  11. Rhodamine123 reveals heterogeneity within murine Lin-, Sca-1+ hemopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Murine bone marrow Lin-, Ly6A/E+ cells have been fractionated on the basis of rhodamine123 retention into Rh123med/hi and Rh123lo subpopulations. These populations have different responses to hemopoietic growth factors with respect to in vitro colony formation. Cells from either fraction were not stimulated by only granulocyte- colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage colony- stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M- CSF), interleukins 1 and 6 (IL-1 and -6), or leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) alone. The Rh123med/hi, but not the Rh123lo fraction, contained cells that could be stimulated by either stem cell factor (SCF) or IL-3 alone. When combinations of growth factors were added, the Rh123med/hi fraction produced more colonies, and responded to a wider range of factor combinations than the Rh123lo population. When tested in vivo, both populations contained no detectable day 8 colony-forming unit- spleen (CFU-S), and similar frequencies of day 13 CFU-S. When transplanted into lethally irradiated recipients (100 cells/recipient), significant numbers of donor cells (67-73%) were found in the peripheral blood of Rh123lo recipients. Both myeloid and lymphoid cells were of donor origin. By comparison, the Rh123med/hi population produced recipients with 1-2% donor cells in peripheral blood, the majority of which were lymphoid. PMID:1375260

  12. Metabolic Rescue of Obese Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Lin28/Let7 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Laura M.; Bernal, Aurora; San Martín, Nuria; Lorenzo, Margarita; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Gálvez, Beatriz G.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are promising candidates for autologous cell-based regeneration therapies by virtue of their multilineage differentiation potential and immunogenicity; however, relatively little is known about their role in adipose tissue physiology and dysfunction. Here we evaluated whether ASCs isolated from nonobese and obese tissue differed in their metabolic characteristics and differentiation potential. During differentiation to mature adipocytes, mouse and human ASCs derived from nonobese tissues both increased their insulin sensitivity and inhibition of lipolysis, whereas obese-derived ASCs were insulin-resistant, showing impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and resistance to the antilipolytic effect of insulin. Furthermore, obese-derived ASCs showed enhanced release of proinflammatory cytokines and impaired production of adiponectin. Interestingly, the delivery of cytosol from control ASCs into obese-derived ASCs using a lipid-based, protein-capture methodology restored insulin sensitivity on glucose and lipid metabolism and reversed the proinflammatory cytokine profile, in part due to the restoration of Lin28 protein levels. In conclusion, glucose and lipid metabolism as well as maturation of ASCs is truncated in an obese environment. The reversal of the altered pathways in obese cells by delivery of normal subcellular fractions offers a potential new tool for cell therapy. PMID:23423565

  13. Fitting the Lin-Shu-type density-wave theory for our own Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2013-08-01

    The presence of spiral structure in rapidly and differentially rotating disc galaxies is currently attributed to the phenomenon of unstable (that is to say, growing) Lin-Shu compression-type waves, or density waves, rotating at a constant angular velocity around the system's centre. It is important that when a density-wave structure is present in a galaxy, the gravitational field of the spiral arms will systematically deflect the motion of gas and young stars away from their mean circular rotation, and point masses in such a model react by streaming motions that are of spiral shape too. We examine the kinematics of Milky Way's 233 Cepheid stars on the assumption that the system is subject to moderately growing spiral density waves by taking into account small-amplitude perturbations of the Galactic gravitational potential. Using Cepheid line-of-sight velocities, we propose new estimates of the parameters of solar motion and Galactic rotation corrected for the effects of density waves, the radial and azimuthal components of systematic stellar motion due to the spiral arms as well as the dynamical parameters of the waves. A basis is given for preferring the dominant one-armed spiral structure in the solar neighbourhood of the Galaxy.

  14. Nucleotide sequence and taxonomical distribution of the bacteriocin gene lin cloned from Brevibacterium linens M18.

    PubMed

    Valdes-Stauber, N; Scherer, S

    1996-04-01

    Linocin M18 is an antilisterial bacteriocin produced by the red smear cheese bacterium Brevibacterium linens M18. Oligonucleotide probes based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence were used to locate its single copy gene, lin, on the chromosomal DNA. The amino acid composition, N-terminal sequence, and molecular mass derived from the nucleotide sequence of an open reading frame of 798 nucleotides coding for 266 amino acids found on a 3-kb BamHI restriction fragment correspond closely to those obtained from the purified protein (N. Valdés-Stauber and S. Scherer, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:3809-3814, 1994). No sequence homology to any protein or nucleotide sequences deposited in databases was found. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence and the N-terminal amino acid sequence derived from the protein suggests that B. linens M18 produces an N-formyl-methionyl-CAC tRNA. A wide taxonomical distribution of the gene within coryneform bacteria has been demonstrated by PCR amplification. The structural gene from linocin M18 is present at least in three Brevibacterium species, five Arthrobacter species, and five Corynebacterium species.

  15. Minerals detection for hyperspectral images using adapted linear unmixing: LinMin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Legendre, Maxime; Le Mouëlic, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Minerals detection over large volume of spectra is the challenge addressed by current hyperspectral imaging spectrometer in Planetary Science. Instruments such OMEGA (Mars Express), CRISM (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter), M3 (Chandrayaan-1), VIRTIS (Rosetta) and many more, have been producing very large datasets since one decade. We propose here a fast supervised detection algorithm called LinMin, in the framework of linear unmixing, with innovative arrangement in order to treat non-linear cases due to radiative transfer in both atmosphere and surface. We use reference laboratory and synthetic spectral library. Additional spectra are used in order to mimic the effect of Martian aerosols, grain size, and observation geometry discrepancies between reference and observed spectra. The proposed algorithm estimates the uncertainty on “mixing coefficient” from the uncertainty of observed spectra. Both numerical and observational tests validate the approach. Fast parallel implementation of the best algorithm (IPLS) on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) allows to significantly reduce the computation cost by a factor of ∼40.

  16. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

  17. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas M; Lemmens, Bennie B L G; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR) for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  18. Properties of the fullerene C60-containing PN Lin49 in the SMC; Explanations of strong near-IR excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Kemper, Francisca; Leal-Ferreira, Marcelo L.; Aleman, Isabel; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Cami, Jan; Ochsendorf, Bram; Peeters, Els

    2016-07-01

    We performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the fullerene C6o-containing planetary nebula (PN) Lin49 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Lin49 is a C-rich and metal- deficient PN (Z∼⃒0.0006) and its nebular abundances are in agreement with the AGB model for the initially 1.25Mʘ stars with the metallicity Z = 0.001 of Fishlock et al. (2014, [1]). By stellar absorption fitting with TLUSTY, we derived stellar abundances, effective temperature, and surface gravity. We constructed the photo-ionization model with CLOUDY in order to investigate physical conditions of Lin49. The model with the 0.005-0.1 μm radius graphite and a constant hydrogen density shell could not fit the ∼⃒1-5 μm SED owing to the strong near-IR excess. We propose that the near-IR excess indicates (1) the presence of extremely small carbon molecules or (2) the presence of high-density structure surrounding the central star.

  19. LIN28B Activation by PRL-3 Promotes Leukemogenesis and a Stem Cell-like Transcriptional Program in AML.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Chan, Zit-Liang; Bi, Chonglei; Lu, Xiao; Chong, Phyllis S Y; Chooi, Jing-Yuan; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Ching, Ying Qing; Zhou, Yafeng; Osato, Motomi; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ng, Chin Hin; Ng, Siok-Bian; Wang, Shi; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2017-03-01

    PRL-3 (PTP4A3), a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is also upregulated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, constitutive expression of PRL-3 in human AML cells sustains leukemogenesis in vitro and in vivo Furthermore, PRL-3 phosphatase activity dependently upregulates LIN28B, a stem cell reprogramming factor, which in turn represses the let-7 mRNA family, inducing a stem cell-like transcriptional program. Notably, elevated levels of LIN28B protein independently associate with worse survival in AML patients. Thus, these results establish a novel signaling axis involving PRL-3/LIN28B/let-7, which confers stem cell-like properties to leukemia cells that is important for leukemogenesis.Implications: The current study offers a rationale for targeting PRL-3 as a therapeutic approach for a subset of AML patients with poor prognosis. Mol Cancer Res; 15(3); 294-303. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Lin28B/Let-7 Regulates Expression of Oct4 and Sox2 and Reprograms Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells to a Stem-like State.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chian-Shiu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Liu, Wei-Hsiu; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Huang, Pin-I; Lee, Yi-Yen; Chen, Yi-Wei; Lo, Wen-Liang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2015-06-15

    Lin28, a key factor for cellular reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), makes a critical contribution to tumorigenicity by suppressing Let-7. However, it is unclear whether Lin28 is involved in regulating cancer stem-like cells (CSC), including in oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC). In this study, we demonstrate a correlation between high levels of Lin28B, Oct4, and Sox2, and a high percentage of CD44(+)ALDH1(+) CSC in OSCC. Ectopic Lin28B expression in CD44(-)ALDH1(-)/OSCC cells was sufficient to enhance Oct4/Sox2 expression and CSC properties, whereas Let7 co-overexpression effectively reversed these phenomena. We identified ARID3B and HMGA2 as downstream effectors of Lin28B/Let7 signaling in regulating endogenous Oct4 and Sox2 expression. Let7 targeted the 3' untranslated region of ARID3B and HMGA2 and suppressed their expression, whereas ARID3B and HMGA2 increased the transcription of Oct4 and Sox2, respectively, through promoter binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed a direct association between ARID3B and a specific ARID3B-binding sequence in the Oct4 promoter. Notably, by modulating Oct4/Sox2 expression, the Lin28B-Let7 pathway not only regulated stemness properties in OSCC but also determined the efficiency by which normal human oral keratinocytes could be reprogrammed to iPSC. Clinically, a Lin28B(high)-Let7(low) expression pattern was highly correlated with high levels of ARID3B, HMGA2, OCT4, and SOX2 expression in OSCC specimens. Taken together, our results show how Lin28B/Let7 regulates key cancer stem-like properties in oral squamous cancers.

  1. Conflicts of interest for medical publishers and editors: protecting the integrity of scientific scholarship.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2011-09-01

    Competition of interest may exist at all levels in the medical publication process. Ensuring the integrity of scientific scholarship involves protecting editorial independence, promoting the use of scientific arbitration boards, promoting transparency throughout all stages of publication, and protecting the relationship between the publisher and its editors through an effective legal framework. It is incumbent upon the publisher, editors, authors, and readers to ensure that the highest standards of scientific scholarship are upheld. Doing so will help reduce fraud and misrepresentation in medical research and increase the trustworthiness of landmark findings in science.

  2. A Java chemical structure editor supporting the Modular Chemical Descriptor Language (MCDL).

    PubMed

    Trepalin, Sergei V; Yarkov, Alexander V; Pletnev, Igor V; Gakh, Andrei A

    2006-03-29

    A compact Modular Chemical Descriptor Language (MCDL) chemical structure editor (Java applet) is described. The small size (approximately 200 KB) of the applet allows its use to display and edit chemical structures in various Internet applications. The editor supports the MCDL format, in which structures are presented in compact canonical form and is capable of restoring bond orders as well as of managing atom and bond drawing overlap. A small database of cage and large cyclic fragment is used for optimal representation of difficult-to-draw molecules. The improved algorithm of the structure diagram generation can be used for other chemical notations that lack atomic coordinates (SMILES, InChI).

  3. An interactive editor for definition of touch-sensitive zones for a graphic display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Burt L., III; Jones, Denise R.

    1987-01-01

    In the continuing effort to develop more efficient man-machine communications methods, touch displays have shown potential as straightforward input systems. The development of software necessary to handle such systems, however, can become tedious. In order to reduce the need for redundant programming, a touch editor has been developed which allows a programmer to interactively define touch-sensitive areas for a graphic display. The information produced during the editing process is written to a data file, which can be accessed easily when needed by an application program. This paper outlines the structure, logic, and use of the editor, as well as the hardware with which it is presently compatible.

  4. Magazine or journal--what is the difference? The role of the monitoring editor.

    PubMed

    Bretscher, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Scientific communication, career advancement, and funding decisions are all dependent on research publications. The way manuscripts are handled by high-visibility, professionally edited magazines differs from the way academic journals evaluate manuscripts, using active scientists as monitoring editors. In this essay, I discuss the benefits that come with the involvement of active scientists. I enumerate the decisions a monitoring editor has to make, and how he or she goes about making them. Finally, I indicate ways in which authors can help to make the process a smoother and more positive experience.

  5. Promotion of oogenesis and embryogenesis in the C. elegans gonad by EFL-1/DPL-1 (E2F) does not require LIN-35 (pRB).

    PubMed

    Chi, Woo; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-08-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, EFL-1 (E2F), DPL-1 (DP) and LIN-35 (pRb) act coordinately in somatic tissues to inhibit ectopic cell division, probably by repressing the expression of target genes. EFL-1, DPL-1 and LIN-35 are also present in the germline, but do not always act together. Strong loss-of-function mutations in either efl-1 or dpl-1 cause defects in oogenesis that result in sterility, while lin-35 mutants are fertile with reduced broods. Microarray-based expression profiling of dissected gonads from efl-1, dpl-1 and lin-35 mutants reveals that EFL-1 and DPL-1 promote expression of an extensively overlapping set of target genes, consistent with the expectation that these two proteins function as a heterodimer. Regulatory regions upstream of many of these target genes have a canonical E2F-binding site, suggesting that their regulation by EFL-1/DPL-1 is direct. Many EFL-1/DPL-1 responsive genes encode proteins required for oogenesis and early embryogenesis, rather than cell cycle components. By contrast, LIN-35 appears to function primarily as a repressor of gene expression in the germline, and the genes that it acts on are for the most part distinct from those regulated by EFL-1 and/or DPL-1. Thus, in vivo, C. elegans E2F directly promotes oogenesis and embryogenesis through the activation of a tissue-specific transcriptional program that does not require LIN-35.

  6. Human Lin28 Forms a High-Affinity 1:1 Complex with the 106~363 Cluster miRNA miR-363

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lin28A is a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression that interacts with and negatively regulates the biogenesis of let-7 family miRNAs. Recent data suggested that Lin28A also binds the putative tumor suppressor miR-363, a member of the 106~363 cluster of miRNAs. Affinity for this miRNA and the stoichiometry of the protein–RNA complex are unknown. Characterization of human Lin28’s interaction with RNA has been complicated by difficulties in producing stable RNA-free protein. We have engineered a maltose binding protein fusion with Lin28, which binds let-7 miRNA with a Kd of 54.1 ± 4.2 nM, in agreement with previous data on a murine homologue. We show that human Lin28A binds miR-363 with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with a similar, if not higher, affinity (Kd = 16.6 ± 1.9 nM). Further analysis suggests that the interaction of the N-terminal cold shock domain of Lin28A with RNA is salt-dependent, supporting a model in which the cold shock domain allows the protein to sample RNA substrates through transient electrostatic interactions. PMID:27559824

  7. The lin-35/Rb and RNAi pathways cooperate to regulate a key cell cycle transition in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Jimmy; Roy, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background The Retinoblastoma gene product (Rb) has been shown to regulate the transcription of key genes involved in cell growth and proliferation. Consistent with this, mutations in Rb are associated with numerous types of cancer making it a critical tumour suppressor gene. Its function is conferred through a large multiprotein complex that exhibits a dual function in both activation and repression of gene targets. In C. elegans, the Rb orthologue lin-35 functions redundantly with other transcriptional regulators to appropriately specify both vulval and pharyngeal cell fates. Results In C. elegans the intestinal cells must alter their cell cycle from the mitotic cell divisions typical of embryogenesis to karyokinesis and then endoreplication, which facilitates growth during larval development. While screening for genes that affect the ability of the intestinal cells to appropriately make this cell cycle transition during post-embryonic development, we isolated mutants that either compromise this switch and remain mononucleate, or cause these cells to undergo multiple rounds of nuclear division. Among these mutants we identified a novel allele of lin-35/Rb, while we also found that the components of the synMuv B complex, which are involved in vulval specification, are also required to properly regulate the developmentally-controlled cell cycle transition typical of these intestinal cells during larval development. More importantly, our work uncovered a role for certain members of the pathways involved in RNAi in mediating the efficient transition between these cell cycle programs, suggesting that lin-35/Rb cooperates with these RNAi components. Furthermore, our findings suggest that met-2, a methyltransferase as well as hpl-1 and hpl-2, two C. elegans homologues of the heterochromatin protein HP1 are also required for this transition. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with lin-35/Rb, synMuv and RNAi components cooperating, probably through their additive

  8. DPL-1 DP, LIN-35 Rb and EFL-1 E2F act with the MCD-1 zinc-finger protein to promote programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Reddien, Peter W; Andersen, Erik C; Huang, Michael C; Horvitz, H Robert

    2007-04-01

    The genes egl-1, ced-9, ced-4, and ced-3 play major roles in programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans. To identify genes that have more subtle activities, we sought mutations that confer strong cell-death defects in a genetically sensitized mutant background. Specifically, we screened for mutations that enhance the cell-death defects caused by a partial loss-of-function allele of the ced-3 caspase gene. We identified mutations in two genes not previously known to affect cell death, dpl-1 and mcd-1 (modifier of cell death). dpl-1 encodes the C. elegans homolog of DP, the human E2F-heterodimerization partner. By testing genes known to interact with dpl-1, we identified roles in cell death for four additional genes: efl-1 E2F, lin-35 Rb, lin-37 Mip40, and lin-52 dLin52. mcd-1 encodes a novel protein that contains one zinc finger and that is synthetically required with lin-35 Rb for animal viability. dpl-1 and mcd-1 act with efl-1 E2F and lin-35 Rb to promote programmed cell death and do so by regulating the killing process rather than by affecting the decision between survival and death. We propose that the DPL-1 DP, MCD-1 zinc finger, EFL-1 E2F, LIN-35 Rb, LIN-37 Mip40, and LIN-52 dLin52 proteins act together in transcriptional regulation to promote programmed cell death.

  9. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    I am honoured to take on the leadership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) as the successor to Professor Mark J Kushner, with whom I have had the pleasure to work on the journal for many years. Under Mark's insightful and energetic leadership over the last six years, PSST has cemented its position as the journal of choice within its subject area and is now one of the most successful journals in the field. In this first issue of 2014, I would like to reflect on some of the events and achievements of 2013. At the start of the year the PSST Editorial Board, recognizing the vital importance of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) data to low-temperature plasma physics, agreed that PSST would accept papers reporting such new data, generated through both experiment and theory. Jonathan Tennyson joined the Editorial Board to represent this area. In March Anne Bourdon joined the Associate Editor team and has since then played a key part in the journal's review process alongside our other Editors. During the autumn, PSST moved to a new editorial management system. In December Deborah O'Connell was awarded the 2013 Hershkowitz Early Career Award and Review and joins the Editorial Board as of 2014. I would also like to thank Miles Turner for his work in leading the drafting of a guide on the details necessary in the reporting of the results of computer simulations; the main conclusions of this report have been incorporated into the journal policy. Overall 2013 has been another successful year for PSST; paper submissions were up by 8% on the previous year and there was the highest ever number of downloads of PSST papers in one year. Another noteworthy feature of 2013 was the continuing improvement in publication times while maintaining our high standards for acceptance and providing expert feedback coupled with encouragement particularly to younger researchers and groups. Largely as a result of the hard work of our referees and Associate Editors, the average time

  10. Guidelines for Reviewers and the Editor at the Nuclear Safety Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetsel, H. B.

    The main purpose of this report is to help novice reviewers accelerate their apprenticeship at the Nuclear Safety Information Center, a computerized information service sponsored by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Guidelines for reviewers are presented in Part 1; Part 2 contains guidelines for the novice editor. The goal of the reviewers and…

  11. The Newspaper Editor As Graphic Strategist. ANPA News Research Report No. 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Mario R.

    This report discusses the graphic strategies available to editors for positioning the day's news. The purposes of the report are: (1) to introduce those in charge of designing the newspaper page to the structural approach to design (the structural approach is defined as incorporating horizontal and vertical structures in the available spaces,…

  12. Persnickety editor, Founding Father, Mentor and Friend: The Legacy of Fred Mumpton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a tribute to Dr Fred Munpton, the founder of the International Committee on Natural Zeolites (ICNZ), by one of his students, who later succeed him as president of the ICNZ. The tribute reflects on Dr. Mumpton's skills as an editor and his zeal for the study of natural zeolites.

  13. Parting messages from current and former editors of the Journal of Andrology.

    PubMed

    Bartke, Andrzej; Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; Desjardins, Claude; Lewis, Ron; Tindall, Don; Hamilton, David W; Pryor, Jon L; Schlegel, Peter N; Hardy, Matthew P; Burnett, Arthur L Bud; Darney, Sally P; Sandlow, Jay

    2012-01-01

    The proposal to produce this final commemorative issue for the Journal of Andrology arose during our regular discussions as current editors soon after it was announced that the Journal would complete its own life course and merge into a new publication (to be named Andrology) with the International Journal of Andrology. We considered the momentous occasion to be one that should be celebrated with an enduring tribute in recognition of the Journal's exceptional 33-year existence. Among the various contributions sought for inclusion in this issue, we envisioned an article assembling collected short essays from all living former editors drawing on notable events and highlights, if not less well-known challenges and successes arising during their editorship eras. We thought that any such production of musings, viewpoints, and most of all words of wisdom from those who have had major roles in the direction and accomplishments of the Journal would offer an illuminating read for the society's members and friends and provide all readers another venue to share in and enjoy the Journal's great history. We are enthralled to have gathered these collections, all personal compositions of the former editors-in-chief, and for their effort that has helped us complete this special endeavor we express to them our tremendous gratitude. Serving as the Journal's last editors, we are also grateful to contribute our essay at the very end as part of this joyous chronicle.

  14. Book Selection Criteria of Children's Book Editors and Elementary Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Helen M.

    This paper describes a study of the criteria children's book editors and elementary classroom teachers use to select fiction books for children in grades four, five, and six. A questionnaire was sent to all members of the Children's Book Council and to elementary classroom teachers of grades four, five, and six in each elementary school in…

  15. University-government relationships in the training of technical writers-editors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohrer, Freda F.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional and nontraditional methods of training technical writers-editors are reviewed. Combining work experience with classroom instruction in the form of cooperative education provides a method of strengthening the Federal career service in professional occupations. The NASA Langley experience that successfully introduced students to the special demands of technical writing and editing is described.

  16. Improving the Yield of Rural Education Research: An Editor's Swan Song

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coladarci, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    In my 15th and final year as JRRE editor, I identify methodological and substantive shortcomings in the rural education research literature and, in turn, suggest strategies for improvement. I structure my observations around the following considerations: describing the rural context of research, making the rural argument, framing the research…

  17. Editorial: Conflict of interest policy for Editors of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrity in the publication process requires impartiality at all levels of review. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) adheres to the policy of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals: Writin...

  18. Professional Wisdom and Writing for Publication: Qualitative Interviews with Editors and Authors in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2013-01-01

    College and university faculty members specializing in early childhood education face some unique challenges in scholarly writing. The purpose of this research was to use open-ended interviews as a way to gather the collective wisdom of a group of key informants about academic writing and publishing in the field. Twenty-two editors and/or authors,…

  19. Learning the Attachment Theory with the CM-ED Concept Map Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueda, U.; Arruarte, A.; Elorriaga, J. A.; Herran, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU with the aim of evaluating the CM-ED (concept map editor) with social education students. Concept mapping is a widely accepted technique that promotes meaningful learning. Graphically representing concepts of the learning domain and relationships between them…

  20. Interview with the editor: David L. Turpin by Robert P. Scholz.

    PubMed

    Turpin, David L

    2010-04-01

    David L. Turpin has worked on dental journals for over 30 years--from his early days on the Pacific Coast Society of Orthodontists Bulletin, to the Angle Orthodontist, and to the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. He will retire as editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics at the end of 2010.

  1. Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These three papers are from a symposium on professional journals that was facilitated by Wim J. Nijhoff at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership" (Gary N. McLean) describes the purpose and operation of the "Human Resource…

  2. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... television stations. It is known at the time of such debate that these stations employ only a small number of employees and that, at times, an employee of such a station may perform a variety of duties in connection... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the...

  3. The CZMIL manual editor (CME): a new tool for analyzing bathymetric lidar waveforms and editing point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Gary Q.; Depner, Jan; Hilderbrand, Ronnie; Ramnath, Vinod

    2010-04-01

    The University of Southern Mississippi's Center of Higher Learning has developed a Waveform Viewer, Attribute Viewer, and a 3D Editor for use in the CZMIL Point Cloud Manual Editor (CME). The Waveform Viewer displays various channels of CZMIL waveforms within the 2D/3D editor interface of CME. This module provides the user an interactive tool set consisting of a cross sectioning mechanism for the intensity time-bin relationship, waveform file output, and zooming capabilities. The Attribute Viewer provides the data analyst with information to analyze various environmental and spatial parameters that might contribute to errors in the measured points. The 3D Editor offers the benefits of capturing depth outliers; an intuitive visual connectivity with the 2D editor; and the implementation of volumetric directional slice isolation of data outliers.

  4. Guidelines, editors, pharma and the biological paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajai R; Singh, Shakuntala A

    2007-01-01

    relatively recent survey of 2002, it was found that about 60% of 192 authors of clinical practice guidelines reported they had financial connections with the companies whose drugs were under consideration. There is a strong case for making CPGs based not just on effectivity but cost effectivity. The various ramifications of this need to be spelt out. Work of bodies like the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration and Guidelines Advisory Committee (GAC) are also worth a close look.Even the actions of Foundations that work for disease amelioration have come under scrutiny. The process of setting up 'Best Practices' Guidelines for interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and clinicians has already begun and can have important consequences for patient care. Similarly, Good Publication Practice (GPP) for pharmaceutical companies have also been set up aimed at improving the behaviour of drug companies while reporting drug trialsThe rapidly increasing trend toward influence and control by industry has become a concern for many. It is of such importance that the Association of American Medical Colleges has issued two relatively new documents - one, in 2001, on how to deal with individual conflicts of interest; and the other, in 2002, on how to deal with institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), as also medical education and research institutions at other places, have to adopt means that minimize their conflicts of interest.Both medical associations and research journal editors are getting concerned with individual and institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research and documents are now available which address these issues. The 2001 ICMJE revision calls for full disclosure of the sponsor's role in research, as well as assurance that the investigators are independent of the sponsor, are fully accountable for the design and conduct of the trial, have

  5. The Lipocalin LPR-1 Cooperates with LIN-3/EGF Signaling To Maintain Narrow Tube Integrity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Pu, Pu; Stone, Craig E; Burdick, Joshua T; Murray, John I; Sundaram, Meera V

    2016-12-30

    Lipocalins are secreted cup-shaped glycoproteins that bind sterols, fatty acids, and other lipophilic molecules. Lipocalins have been implicated in a wide array of processes related to lipophilic cargo transport, sequestration and signaling, and several are used as biomarkers for human disease, but the functions of most lipocalins remain poorly understood. Here we show that the C. elegans lipocalin LPR-1 is required to maintain apical membrane integrity and a continuous lumen in two narrow, unicellular tubes, the excretory duct and pore, during a period of rapid lumen elongation. LPR-1 fusion protein is expressed by the duct and pore and accumulates both intracellularly and in apical extracellular compartments, but it can also function cell non-autonomously when provided from outside of the excretory system. lpr-1 mutant defects can be rescued by increased signaling through the Epidermal growth factor (EGF) - Ras - Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which promotes the more elongated duct vs. less elongated pore tube fate. Spatial and temporal rescue experiments indicate that Ras signaling acts within the duct and pore tubes during or prior to cell fate determination to bypass the requirement for LPR-1. lpr-1 mutations did not disrupt LIN-3/EGF-dependent duct fate specification, prevent functioning of any specific LIN-3/EGF isoform, or alter LET-23/EGFR localization, and reduced signaling did not phenocopy or enhance lpr-1 mutant defects. These data suggest that LPR-1 protects lumen integrity through a LIN-3/EGF-independent mechanism, but that increased signaling upregulates some target(s) that can compensate for lpr-1 absence.

  6. Relevance of the Lin's and Host hydropedological models to predict grape yield and wine quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Pellegrini, S.; Bucelli, P.; Storchi, P.; Vignozzi, N.; Barbetti, R.; Campagnolo, S.

    2009-09-01

    The adoption of precision agriculture in viticulture could be greatly enhanced by the diffusion of straightforward and easy to be applied hydropedological models, able to predict the spatial variability of available soil water. The Lin's and Host hydropedological models were applied to standard soil series descriptions and hillslope position, to predict the distribution of hydrological functional units in two vineyard and their relevance for grape yield and wine quality. A three-years trial was carried out in Chianti (Central Italy) on Sangiovese. The soils of the vineyards differentiated in structure, porosity and related hydropedological characteristics, as well as in salinity. Soil spatial variability was deeply affected by earth movement carried out before vine plantation. Six plots were selected in the different hydrological functional units of the two vineyards, that is, at summit, backslope and footslope morphological positions, to monitor soil hydrology, grape production and wine quality. Plot selection was based upon a cluster analysis of local slope, topographic wetness index (TWI), and cumulative moisture up to the root limiting layer, appreciated by means of a detailed combined geophysical survey. Water content, redox processes and temperature were monitored, as well as yield, phenological phases, and chemical analysis of grapes. The isotopic ratio δ13C was measured in the wine ethanol upon harvesting to evaluate the degree of stress suffered by vines. The grapes in each plot were collected for wine making in small barrels. The wines obtained were analysed and submitted to a blind organoleptic testing. The results demonstrated that the combined application of the two hydropedological models can be used for the prevision of the moisture status of soils cultivated with grape during summertime in Mediterranean climate. As correctly foreseen by the models, the amount of mean daily transpirable soil water (TSW) during the growing season differed

  7. Short loop-targeting oligoribonucleotides antagonize Lin28 and enable pre-let-7 processing and suppression of cell growth in let-7-deficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Martina; Rebhan, Mario A. E.; Lucic, Matije; Pavlicek, David; Pradere, Ugo; Towbin, Harry; Civenni, Gianluca; Catapano, Carlo V.; Hall, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) originate from stem-loop-containing precursors (pre-miRNAs, pri-miRNAs) and mature by means of the Drosha and Dicer endonucleases and their associated factors. The let-7 miRNAs have prominent roles in developmental differentiation and in regulating cell proliferation. In cancer, the tumor suppressor function of let-7 is abrogated by overexpression of Lin28, one of several RNA-binding proteins that regulate let-7 biogenesis by interacting with conserved motifs in let-7 precursors close to the Dicer cleavage site. Using in vitro assays, we have identified a binding site for short modified oligoribonucleotides (‘looptomirs’) overlapping that of Lin28 in pre-let-7a-2. These looptomirs selectively antagonize the docking of Lin28, but still permit processing of pre-let-7a-2 by Dicer. Looptomirs restored synthesis of mature let-7 and inhibited growth and clonogenic potential in Lin28 overexpressing hepatocarcinoma cells, thereby demonstrating a promising new means to rescue defective miRNA biogenesis in Lin28-dependent cancers. PMID:25378324

  8. LIN-23, an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Component, Is Required for the Repression of CDC-25.2 Activity during Intestinal Development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Son, Miseol; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2016-11-30

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) utilizes two different cell-cycle modes, binucleations during the L1 larval stage and endoreduplications at four larval moltings, for its postembryonic intestinal development. Previous genetic studies indicated that CDC-25.2 is specifically required for binucleations at the L1 larval stage and is repressed before endoreduplications. Furthermore, LIN-23, the C. elegans β-TrCP ortholog, appears to function as a repressor of CDC-25.2 to prevent excess intestinal divisions. We previously reported that intestinal hyperplasia in lin-23(e1883) mutants was effectively suppressed by the RNAi depletion of cdc-25.2. Nevertheless, LIN-23 targeting CDC-25.2 for ubiquitination as a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase has not yet been tested. In this study, LIN-23 is shown to be the major E3 ubiquitin ligase component, recognizing CDC-25.2 to repress their activities for proper transition of cell-cycle modes during the C. elegans postembryonic intestinal development. In addition, for the first time that LIN-23 physically interacts with both CDC-25.1 and CDC-25.2 and facilitates ubiquitination for timely regulation of their activities during the intestinal development.

  9. A genetic screen for neurite outgrowth mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans reveals a new function for the F-box ubiquitin ligase component LIN-23.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nehal; Loria, Paula M; Hobert, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    Axon pathfinding and target recognition are highly dynamic and tightly regulated cellular processes. One of the mechanisms involved in regulating protein activity levels during axonal and synaptic development is protein ubiquitination. We describe here the isolation of several Caenorhabditis elegans mutants, termed eno (ectopic/erratic neurite outgrowth) mutants, that display defects in axon outgrowth of specific neuron classes. One retrieved mutant is characterized by abnormal termination of axon outgrowth in a subset of several distinct neuron classes, including ventral nerve cord motor neurons, head motor neurons, and mechanosensory neurons. This mutant is allelic to lin-23, which codes for an F-box-containing component of an SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that was previously shown to negatively regulate postembryonic cell divisions. We demonstrate that LIN-23 is a broadly expressed cytoplasmically localized protein that is required autonomously in neurons to affect axon outgrowth. Our newly isolated allele of lin-23, a point mutation in the C-terminal tail of the protein, displays axonal outgrowth defects similar to those observed in null alleles of this gene, but does not display defects in cell cycle regulation. We have thus defined separable activities of LIN-23 in two distinct processes, cell cycle control and axon patterning. We propose that LIN-23 targets distinct substrates for ubiquitination within each process. PMID:15082545

  10. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K.

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  11. LIN-23, an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Component, Is Required for the Repression of CDC-25.2 Activity during Intestinal Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Son, Miseol; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) utilizes two different cell-cycle modes, binucleations during the L1 larval stage and endoreduplications at four larval moltings, for its postembryonic intestinal development. Previous genetic studies indicated that CDC-25.2 is specifically required for binucleations at the L1 larval stage and is repressed before endoreduplications. Furthermore, LIN-23, the C. elegans β-TrCP ortholog, appears to function as a repressor of CDC-25.2 to prevent excess intestinal divisions. We previously reported that intestinal hyperplasia in lin-23(e1883) mutants was effectively suppressed by the RNAi depletion of cdc-25.2. Nevertheless, LIN-23 targeting CDC-25.2 for ubiquitination as a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase has not yet been tested. In this study, LIN-23 is shown to be the major E3 ubiquitin ligase component, recognizing CDC-25.2 to repress their activities for proper transition of cell-cycle modes during the C. elegans postembryonic intestinal development. In addition, for the first time that LIN-23 physically interacts with both CDC-25.1 and CDC-25.2 and facilitates ubiquitination for timely regulation of their activities during the intestinal development. PMID:27871172

  12. [Co-editors and editors with Jewish origins of the first German journals for anaesthesia. Their fate under National Socialism and an attempt at a biographical appreciation].

    PubMed

    Goerig, M; Goetz, A E

    2010-09-01

    The decision to publish the journals Der Schmerz and Narkose und Anaesthesie in 1928 was an important step towards the professionalization of anaesthesiology in Germany. The appearance of both journals, which for economic reasons merged into Schmerz - Narkose - Anaesthesie 1 year later, was initiated and vehemently supported by Jewish physicians. As editors and co-editors they were deeply involved with the editorial tasks of the journals for years from the early beginnings. When the National Socialistic Party took over the government in Germany many of the Jewish colleagues were forced to quit their editorial tasks, were eliminated and replaced by "Arians", they were persecuted and often arrested, forced to emigrate or decided to commit suicide due to inhumane personal circumstances. It is our intention to recall the biography and the terrible fate of the nearly unknown Jewish members of the editorial board of the first German anaesthesia journals. Moreover the biographic sketches promote a continuous discussion about the victims of an inhumane and barbarous ideology.

  13. Influencing health debates through letters to the editor: the case of male circumcision.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Laura M

    2009-04-01

    In this article I use the case of male circumcision (MC) to examine how grassroots activists, medical professionals, other stakeholders, and ordinary people employ letters to the editor (LTEs) to influence public health debates. I also show how journalistic practices affect the use of LTEs. Seventy LTEs about MC from U.S. newspapers between 1985 and 2006 are analyzed using qualitative methods. Pro-MC, anti-MC, and neutral LTE writers supported their stances on similar grounds, described adversaries as biased, and stressed medical and scientific authority. Yet only MC advocates and neutralists trivialized MC and declined to justify their stances, suggesting distinctive dynamics for LTEs about widely accepted practices. The prevalence of debated practices and activists' efforts to piggyback on related issues also affect LTE content. Editors chose LTEs to address readers' critiques, enact news values like balance and controversy, and showcase writers with strong claims to legitimacy, thereby mediating public health debates.

  14. PriorsEditor: a tool for the creation and use of positional priors in motif discovery

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Kjetil; Drabløs, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Computational methods designed to discover transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequences often have a tendency to make a lot of false predictions. One way to improve accuracy in motif discovery is to rely on positional priors to focus the search to parts of a sequence that are considered more likely to contain functional binding sites. We present here a program called PriorsEditor that can be used to create such positional priors tracks based on a combination of several features, including phylogenetic conservation, nucleosome occupancy, histone modifications, physical properties of the DNA helix and many more. Availability: PriorsEditor is available as a web start application and downloadable archive from http://tare.medisin.ntnu.no/priorseditor (requires Java 1.6). The web site also provides tutorials, screenshots and example protocol scripts. Contact: kjetil.klepper@ntnu.no PMID:20628076

  15. Editor's perspective on the ECSS dedicated issue on green tides in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiela, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Most of us learned about the extraordinary macroalgal bloom in the Yellow Sea through press reports previous to the 2008 Olympic competition in China. I was made aware of the extensive research efforts on this remarkable case of human-prompted, large-scale environmental change by discussions with Dr. Dongyan Liu during the 2012 ECSA conference in Venice. It soon became evident that it would be of great interest to the international audience to bring together results from the many different research projects on different aspects of this topic, taking place in different institutions and agencies. I therefore suggested that a committee of guest editors for the Issue be organized. The guest editors were charged with inviting the many researchers involved in work on the different aspects of the "green tide" phenomenon to contribute articles, request reviews of the submissions, and with helping me in editing the submissions.

  16. Writing a narrative biomedical review: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Blackmore, Heather; Kitas, George D

    2011-11-01

    Review articles comprehensively covering a specific topic are crucial for successful research and academic projects. Most editors consider review articles for special and regular issues of journals. Writing a review requires deep knowledge and understanding of a field. The aim of this review is to analyze the main steps in writing a narrative biomedical review and to consider points that may increase the chances of success. We performed a comprehensive search through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science using the following keywords: review of the literature, narrative review, title, abstract, authorship, ethics, peer review, research methods, medical writing, scientific writing, and writing standards. Opinions expressed in the review are also based on personal experience as authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

  17. Programming the Navier-Stokes computer: An abstract machine model and a visual editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David; Crockett, Tom; Tomboulian, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes computer is a parallel computer designed to solve Computational Fluid Dynamics problems. Each processor contains several floating point units which can be configured under program control to implement a vector pipeline with several inputs and outputs. Since the development of an effective compiler for this computer appears to be very difficult, machine level programming seems necessary and support tools for this process have been studied. These support tools are organized into a graphical program editor. A programming process is described by which appropriate computations may be efficiently implemented on the Navier-Stokes computer. The graphical editor would support this programming process, verifying various programmer choices for correctness and deducing values such as pipeline delays and network configurations. Step by step details are provided and demonstrated with two example programs.

  18. Red`s natural editor: A program designed to edit FORTRAN programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    This program allows the user to edit files using a completely natural method. You don`t need a lot of time to learn how to use this program; it`s as simple as using a typewriter. Even while you are reading this report you can start editing files. Although it is as simple as using a typewriter, this is a full screen editor, so that you can overwrite (replace) anything, delete or insert characters or lines, copy or move lines, find or change anything. All of this can be done without using any complicated combinations of key strokes (as you are forced to memorize with other editors). This program is written in standard FORTRAN. Although it was designed and implemented on an IBM-PC, it can be easily adapted for use on virtually any graphics terminal.

  19. Ensuring the Quality, Fairness, and Integrity of Journal Peer Review: A Possible Role of Editors.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Elmore, Susan A

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of literature has identified potential problems that can compromise the quality, fairness, and integrity of journal peer review, including inadequate review, inconsistent reviewer reports, reviewer biases, and ethical transgressions by reviewers. We examine the evidence concerning these problems and discuss proposed reforms, including double-blind and open review. Regardless of the outcome of additional research or attempts at reforming the system, it is clear that editors are the linchpin of peer review, since they make decisions that have a significant impact on the process and its outcome. We consider some of the steps editors should take to promote quality, fairness and integrity in different stages of the peer review process and make some recommendations for editorial conduct and decision-making.

  20. How the public responded to the Schiavo controversy: evidence from letters to editors.

    PubMed

    Racine, Eric; Karczewska, Marta; Seidler, Matthew; Amaram, Rakesh; Illes, Judy

    2010-09-01

    The history and genesis of major public clinical ethics controversies is intimately related to the publication of opinions and responses in media coverage. To provide a sample of public response in the media, this paper reports the results of a content analysis of letters to editors published in the four most prolific American newspapers for the Schiavo controversy. Opinions expressed in the letters sampled strongly supported the use of living wills and strongly condemned public attention to the case as well as political interventions. Letters tended to be against withdrawal of life support, proxy consent and associated procedures as well as against court decisions and legal procedures. In comparison with reports written by journalists, letters to editors contained fewer controversial claims about Schiavo''s neurological condition and behavioural repertoire but similar loaded language to describe withdrawal of life support. Distinct public discourses can be encountered in different stakeholders suggesting complex and extensive pluralism even within the media.

  1. Generating induced pluripotent stem cells from common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) fetal liver cells using defined factors, including Lin28.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Ikuo; Maeda, Takuji; Shimada, Hiroko; Kawai, Kenji; Okada, Yohei; Igarashi, Hiroshi; Oiwa, Ryo; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Mikio; Kimura, Toru; Shiozawa, Seiji; Shinohara, Haruka; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Although embryonic stem (ES) cell-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have potential therapeutic applications in humans, they are also useful for creating genetically modified human disease models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we generated common marmoset iPS cells from fetal liver cells via the retrovirus-mediated introduction of six human transcription factors: Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, Nanog, and Lin28. Four to five weeks after introduction, several colonies resembling marmoset ES cells were observed and picked for further expansion in ES cell medium. Eight cell lines were established, and validation analyses of the marmoset iPS cells followed. We detected the expression of ES cell-specific surface markers. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that these iPS cells expressed endogenous Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, Nanog and Lin28 genes, whereas all of the transgenes were silenced. Karyotype analysis showed that two of three iPS cell lines retained a normal karyotype after a 2-month culture. Both embryoid body and teratoma formation showed that marmoset iPS cells had the developmental potential to give rise to differentiated derivatives of all three primary germ layers. In summary, we generated marmoset iPS cells via the transduction of six transcription factors; this provides a powerful preclinical model for studies in regenerative medicine.

  2. Inactivation of ribosomal protein L22 promotes transformation by induction of the stemness factor, Lin28B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuyun; Lee, Sang-Yun; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Perrigoue, Jacqueline; Thapa, Roshan J.; Tu, Zhigang; Jeffers, John R.; Rhodes, Michele; Anderson, Stephen; Oravecz, Tamas; Hunger, Stephen P.; Timakhov, Roman A.; Zhang, Rugang; Balachandran, Siddharth; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Testa, Joseph R.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal protein (RP) mutations in diseases such as 5q− syndrome both disrupt hematopoiesis and increase the risk of developing hematologic malignancy. However, the mechanism by which RP mutations increase cancer risk has remained an important unanswered question. We show here that monoallelic, germline inactivation of the ribosomal protein L22 (Rpl22) predisposes T-lineage progenitors to transformation. Indeed, RPL22 was found to be inactivated in ∼ 10% of human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Moreover, monoallelic loss of Rpl22 accelerates development of thymic lymphoma in both a mouse model of T-cell malignancy and in acute transformation assays in vitro. We show that Rpl22 inactivation enhances transformation potential through induction of the stemness factor, Lin28B. Our finding that Rpl22 inactivation promotes transformation by inducing expression of Lin28B provides the first insight into the mechanistic basis by which mutations in Rpl22, and perhaps some other RP genes, increases cancer risk. PMID:22976955

  3. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α.

    PubMed

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement T Y; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours.

  4. OGLE-SMC-LPV-00861 (LIN 9): the first proven Z And outburst in a Magellanic symbiotic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, Brent; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Udalski, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    We report on the discovery of a new Small Magellanic Cloud symbiotic star, OGLE-SMC-LPV-00861, previously catalogued as Hα emission line source LIN 9. The OGLE light curve shows multiple-maxima outburst behaviour over ˜1200 d with a maximum outburst of ΔV = 1.5 mag. An optical spectrum of LIN 9 taken with the Southern African Large Telescope at quiescence reveals a K5 red giant with emission lines confirming its symbiotic star nature, demonstrating the potential use of ongoing large time-domain surveys to identify strong symbiotic star candidates. It is the first Magellanic symbiotic star proven to show poorly understood Z And outbursts. At outburst the estimated hot component luminosity is L ˜ 3165 L⊙, compared to L ˜ 225 L⊙ at quiescence. Further observations are needed, especially at outburst, to better understand this unique Z And-like system at a known distance, and to provide essential input to physical models of the Z And phenomenon.

  5. Spectrum of Lin-Shu-type density waves in the Galaxy: a number of discrete spiral modes of collective oscillations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Kharchenko, Nina V.; Piskunov, Anatoly E.; Hou, Li-Gang; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of great importance of photometric/trigonometric distances and velocities have recently done for 2859 open clusters and 103 masers associated with young high-mass stars in the disc of our Galaxy by Kharchenko et al. and Reid et al. We use these new high-precision data to determine the spectrum of Lin-Shu-type density waves in the system. The kinematics of 472 clusters and 65 masers selected within 4 kpc from the Sun is analysed on the assumption that the Galaxy is subject to moderately unstable, tightly-wound, small-amplitude density waves. For a given number of spiral arms, several minima of a least-squares estimator S of measured and predicted line-of-sight velocities of both clusters and masers with respect to the pitch angle p and the phase of the wave at the Sun's location are apparent from our calculation as |p| increases from 1° to 20°. The appearance of the minima of S is explained in terms of a number of discrete spiral modes of collective oscillations developing in the solar vicinity as suggested analytically by Lau, Lin & Mark, Bertin & Mark, Lau & Bertin and others in the late 1970s.

  6. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement TY; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours. PMID:23381944

  7. [Hendrik Burger, editor-in-chief of the Dutch Journal of Medicine 1904- 1913].

    PubMed

    van't Hof, S E

    2007-07-28

    Hendrik Burger (1864-1957) became the sixth editor-in-chief of the Journal before gaining international fame as a professor of otorhinolaryngology. He was more a teacher than researcher, and his clinic in Amsterdam became an internationally renowned training centre. He advocated better public healthcare for children who were deaf/mute or had impaired hearing and founded schools for these children. A prolific writer, Burger contributed more than 400 papers to the Journal.

  8. [Stanisława Adamowiczowa--first editor in-chief of Journal "Przeglad Epidemiologiczny"].

    PubMed

    Gromulska, Marta

    2010-01-01

    First issue of Epidemiological Review was published in 1920. First editor in chief was Stanisława Adamowiczowa, PhD (1888-1965), who had worked in National Central Epidemiological Institute since 1919, and later, for period of 45 years, interrupted by breaks resulting from political situation, worked in National Institute of Hygiene. In this jubilee article, we present scientific resume of S. Adamowiczowa which focuses on her achievements in infectious diseases epidemiology, and particularly in analysis and evaluation of current epidemiological data distribution in Poland and worldwide in the period. She was the pioneer in systemic organization of registries of new cases of diseases in the highly populated Polish cities; she initiated use of statistical methods in this field. As editor in chief of Epidemiological Review, she started publishing Epidemiological Chronicle, which is continuously added as a supplement to every second issue, each year. Name of S. Adamowiczowa is associated with Ludwik Rajchman--director of Hygiene Section in League of Nations, with Witold Chodźko PhD--she led courses in National School of Hygiene in Warsaw, with prof. Marcin Kacprzak--as co-author and co-editor of books on hygiene and epidemiology. A brief list of scientific publications of S. Adamowiczowa is also presented.

  9. Conflicts of interest in biomedical publications: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Akazhanov, Nurbek A; Kitas, George D

    2013-12-01

    This article overviews evidence on common instances of conflict of interest (COI) in research publications from general and specialized fields of biomedicine. Financial COIs are viewed as the most powerful source of bias, which may even distort citation outcomes of sponsored publications. The urge to boost journal citation indicators by stakeholders of science communication is viewed as a new secondary interest, which may compromize the interaction between authors, peer reviewers and editors. Comprehensive policies on disclosure of financial and non-financial COIs in scholarly journals are presented as proxies of their indexing in evidence-based databases, and examples of successful medical journals are discussed in detail. Reports on clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and clinical practice guidelines may be unduly influenced by author-pharmaceutical industry relations, but these publications do not always contain explicit disclosures to allow the readers to judge the reliability of the published conclusions and practice-changing recommendations. The article emphasizes the importance of adhering to the guidance on COI from learned associations such as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). It also considers joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers and editors as a foundation for appropriately defining and disclosing potential COIs.

  10. How is research publishing going to progress in the next 20 years? Transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Seattle on Wednesday, 20 March 2013.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Holland, G R; Giannobile, W V; Hancocks, S; Robinson, P G; Lynch, C D

    2014-05-01

    On March 20th 2013, a one-hour session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing was held at the IADR International Session in Seattle. Organised by Kenneth Eaton and Chris Lynch (Chair and Secretary, respectively, of the British Dental Editors Forum), the meeting sought to bring together leading international experts in dental publishing, as well as authors, reviewers and students engaged in research. The meeting was an overwhelming success, with more than 100 attendees. A panel involving four leading dental editors led a discussion on anticipated developments in publishing dental research with much involvement and contribution from audience members. This was the third such meeting held at the IADR for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. A follow up session will take place in Cape Town on 25 June 2014 as part of the annual IADR meeting. The transcript of the meeting is reproduced in this article. Where possible speakers are identified by name. At the first time of mention their role/ position is also stated, thereafter only their name appears. We are grateful to Stephen Hancocks Ltd for their generous sponsorship of this event. For those who were not able to attend the authors hope this article gives a flavour of the discussions and will encourage colleagues to attend future events. Involvement is open to Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. It is a very open group and all those with an interest will be welcome to join in.

  11. How is research publishing going to progress in the next 20 years?: transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Seattle on Wednesday, 20 March 2013.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Rex Holland, G; Giannobile, William V; Hancocks, Stephen; Robinson, Peter G; Lynch, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    On March 20th 2013, a one-hour session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing was held at the IADR International Session in Seattle. Organised by Kenneth Eaton and Christopher Lynch (Chair and Secretary, respectively, of the British Dental Editors Forum), the meeting sought to bring together leading international experts in dental publishing, as well as authors, reviewers and students engaged in research. The meeting was an overwhelming success, with more than 100 attendees. A panel involving four leading dental editors led a discussion on anticipated developments in publishing dental research with much involvement and contribution from audience members. This was the third such meeting held at the IADR for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. A follow-up session will take place in Cape Town on 25 June 2014 as part of the annual IADR meeting. The transcript of the Seattle meeting is reproduced in this article. Where possible speakers are identified by name. At the first time of mention their role/position is also stated, thereafter only their name appears. We are grateful to Stephen Hancocks Ltd. for their generous sponsorship of this event. For those who were not able to attend the authors hope this article gives a flavour of the discussions and will encourage colleagues to attend future events. Involvement is open to Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. It is a very open group and all those with an interest will be welcome to join in.

  12. A Mechanistic Basis for the Coordinated Regulation of Pharyngeal Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans by LIN-35/Rb and UBC-18–ARI-1

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Kumaran; Fay, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic redundancy, whereby two genes carry out seemingly overlapping functions, may in large part be attributable to the intricacy and robustness of genetic networks that control many developmental processes. We have previously described a complex set of genetic interactions underlying foregut development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Specifically, LIN-35/Rb, a tumor suppressor ortholog, in conjunction with UBC-18–ARI-1, a conserved E2/E3 complex, and PHA-1, a novel protein, coordinately regulates an early step of pharyngeal morphogenesis involving cellular re-orientation. Functional redundancy is indicated by the observation that lin-35; ubc-18 double mutants, as well as certain allelic combinations of pha-1 with either lin-35 or ubc-18, display defects in pharyngeal development, whereas single mutants do not. Using a combination of genetic and molecular analyses, we show that sup-35, a strong recessive suppressor of pha-1–associated lethality, also reverts the synthetic lethality of lin-35; ubc-18, lin-35; pha-1, and ubc-18 pha-1 double mutants. SUP-35, which contains C2H2-type Zn-finger domains as well as a conserved RMD-like motif, showed a dynamic pattern of subcellular localization during embryogenesis. We find that mutations in sup-35 specifically suppress hypomorphic alleles of pha-1 and that SUP-35, acting genetically upstream of SUP-36 and SUP-37, negatively regulates pha-1 transcription. We further demonstrate that LIN-35, a transcriptional repressor, and UBC-18–ARI-1, a complex involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, negatively regulate SUP-35 abundance through distinct mechanisms. We also show that HCF-1, a C. elegans homolog of host cell factor 1, functionally antagonizes LIN-35 in the regulation of sup-35. Our cumulative findings piece together the components of a novel regulatory network that includes LIN-35/Rb, which functions to control organ morphogenesis. Our results also shed light on general mechanisms that may underlie

  13. [Heavy metal pollution characteristics and ecological risk analysis for soil in Phyllostachys praecox stands of Lin'an].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-bo; Shi, Han; Liao, Xin-feng; Lou, Zhong; Zhou, Lyu-yan; Yu, Hai-xia; Yao, Lin; Sun, Li-ping

    2015-06-01

    An investigation was carried out in an attempt to reveal the characteristics of heavy metals contamination in the soils of Phyllostachys praecox forest in Lin' an. Based on the concentrations of Hg, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Ni, Co and Mn in 160 topsoil samples, the pollution status and ecological risks of heavy metals in the soils were assessed by single factor pollution index, Nemerow integrated pollution index and Hankanson potential ecological risk index. The spatial variability of heavy metal concentrations in the soils closely related to the distribution of traffic, industrial and livestock pollution sources. The average concentrations of Hg, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Ni, Co and Mn in the soils were 0.16, 7.41, 34.36, 87.98, 103.98, 0.26, 59.12, 29.56, 11.44 and 350.26 mg · kg(-1), respectively. Pb, Cd, Zn and Cu concentrations were as 2.89, 1.70, 1.12 and 1.12 times as the background values of soil in Zhejiang Province, respectively. But their concentrations were all lower than the threshold values of the National Environmental Quality Standard for Soil (GB 15618-1995). The average single factor pollution index revealed that the level of heavy metal pollution in the soils was in order of Pb>Cd>Cu= Zn>Hg>As>Ni>Co>Cr>Mn. Pb pollution was of moderate level while Cd, Cu and Zn pollutions were slight. There was no soil pollution caused by the other heavy metals. However, the Nemerow integrated pollution index showed that all the 160 soil samples were contaminated by heavy metals to a certain extent. Among total 160 soil samples, slight pollution level, moderate pollution level and heavy pollution level accounted for 55.6%, 29.4% and 15.0%, respectively. The average single factor potential ecological risk index (Er(i)) implied that the potential ecological risk related to Cd reached moderate level, while the others were of slight level. Furthermore, Cd and Hg showed higher potential ecological risk indices which reached up to 256.82 and 187.33 respectively

  14. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Progress in marine sciences often follows the development of new methods. The Invited Feature Article "New Insight into Particulate Mineral and Organic Matter in Coastal Ocean Waters through Optical Inversion" by Xiaodong Zhang, Robert Hans Stavn, Alexander U. Falster, Deric J. Gray, and Richard W. Gould demonstrates a new method that uses scattering and transmissometer data to differentiate between particle size distribution of suspended mineral and that of suspended organic matter. The method helps define the particular groups of phytoplankton that may be dominant, whether organic detritus may be more significant in suspended organic matter, add insight on the dominant size classes of mineral aggregates, and helps differentiate between organic detritus-dominated systems and biogenic-dominated systems.

  15. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, was founded in 1957 by Niels Bohr and Torsten Gustafsson at Blegdamsvej in Copenhagen, joint to Bohr's legendary Institute. Today, memories of Bohr and his famous visitors -- Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Lev Landau and many others -- strongly contribute to Nordita's genius loci and inspire next generations of her visitors. Nordita awards ``Nordic Project'' grants to individual Nordic physicists to help conduct a world-class research in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Island, Norway, and Sweden). Research reported here was generously supported by the Nordic Project "Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Black Hole and Neutron Star sources" awarded in 2005 to Marek Abramowicz. The Project supported the ``Nordita Workdays on QPO" (March 25 -- April 1, 2005) organized by Marek Abramowicz, Axel Brandenburg and Juri Poutanen with help of Hanne Bergen, Helle http://www.nordita.dk/positions/norproject.html

  16. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    In the Invited Feature Article in this issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Ruben Kosyan and Violeta Velikova describe the disastrous anthropogenic impact on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, and Ukraine over the last 100 years and its inverse correlation with economic development as exemplified by improving water quality during a downturn in the economy. This degradation is now accelerating from the renovation and construction of ports and terminals, the development of resorts, hazardous industrial development, oil and gas exploration, and unsustainable agricultural and fishing practices. There appears to be no enforcement of protected areas. In the absence of scientific research on these issues, coastal zone management appears to be based on 'learning after seeing disastrous effects'. Without recognition of the need for Integrated Coastal Zone Management, the Black Sea coast and the coastal waters will deteriorate, as was observed between the 1970s and the 1990s.

  17. Editor's Note.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Bruce

    2011-05-27

    The Research Article "A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus" by F. Wolfe-Simon et al., published online 2 December 2010, was the subject of extensive discussion and criticism following its online publication. Science received a wide range of correspondence that raised specific concerns about the Research Article's methods and interpretations. Eight Technical Comments that represent the main concerns, as well as a Technical Response by Wolfe-Simon et al., are published online in Science Express at the addresses listed in this note. They have been peer-reviewed and revised according to Science's standard procedure.

  18. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    The widespread eutrophication of coastal waters clearly involves increased nitrogen loads, in most cases with nitrogen derived from human activities on contributing watersheds. This has prompted regulators, managers, and other stakeholders to set standards for water quality that involve lowering nitrogen loads to estuaries and other coastal waters. To carry out the proscribed lowering of nitrogen loads there are a number of options. In many instances and sites with high human density and intense activity, advanced wastewater treatment plants are unavoidable, but such environmental engineering approaches are costly. There are many coastal zones with lower population densities where other, less costly alternative strategies might be less expensive and more attuned to "green" approaches.

  19. Editor's Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozzens, Susan E.

    1986-01-01

    Offers perspectives and ideas on a range of issues related to policy-relevant research in science studies. Identifies and discusses major challenges and problems involved in science policy studies. Presents an overview of articles that address the theme of funding and knowledge growth. (ML)

  20. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Carsten; Feller, Alex; Schmidt, Wolfgang; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2012-11-01

    This topical issue of Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes is a collection of reference articles covering the GREGOR solar telescope, its science capabilities, its subsystems, and its dedicated suite of instruments for high-resolution observations of the Sun. Because ground-based telescopes have life spans of several decades, it is only natural that they continuously reinvent themselves. Literally, the GREGOR telescope builds on the foundations of the venerable Gregory-Coudé Telescope (GCT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. Acknowledging the fact that new discoveries in observational solar physics are driven by larger apertures to collect more photons and to scrutinize the Sun in finer detail, the GCT was decommissioned and the building was made available to the GREGOR project.

  1. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    This issue of Astronomische Nachrichten is a collection of original papers on local helioseismology, which covers topics discussed at the first HELAS local helioseismology workshop held on 2006 September 25-27 at Nice Observatory, France.

  2. Editor's Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-10-01

    In the article "Indian summer monsoon rainfall: Dancing with the tunes of the sun", published in New Astronomy 35 (2015) 8, it was omitted to state that at the time this article was submitted the author Dr. Willie Soon received funding from the Southern Company Services under agreement for SAO Proposal PS0182-9-11. We have no indication that this funding has influenced the results presented in the article.

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of the non-stoichiometric LinI (n = 3 and 5) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Đustebek, Jasmina; Milovanović, Milan; Jerosimić, Stanka; Veljković, Miomir; Veličković, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    The neutrals of the LinI (n = 2-6) clusters were detected using Knudsen-cell which was placed into ionization chamber of the magnetic sector mass spectrometer. The first theoretical and experimental data on the Li3I and Li5I clusters were presented in this Letter. The ionization energies of the neutral of Li3I and Li5I clusters, obtained by the electron impact ionization mass spectrometry, were (5.14 ± 0.25) and (4.62 ± 0.25) eV, respectively. We report the geometry, ionization energies and thermodynamical stability of these clusters, calculated at the restricted coupled cluster RHF-RCCSD/cc-pVTZ(Li), cc-pVTZ-PP(I) level of theory.

  4. Influences of LIN-12/Notch and POP-1/TCF on the Robustness of Ventral Uterine Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans Gonadogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sallee, Maria D; Aydin, Taner; Greenwald, Iva

    2015-10-19

    The prospective ventral uterus of the hermaphrodite gonad primordium consists of two pairs of sister cells, with each pair consisting of a proximal "α" cell and a distal "β" cell. All four cells initially are competent to become the anchor cell (AC), a unique cell type that acts as the organizer of subsequent uterine and vulval development. However, the β cells soon lose this competence and always become ventral uterine precursor cells (VUs), whereas the α cells maintain their AC competence longer, until lin-12/Notch-mediated interactions between them specify one as the AC and the other as a VU. Here, we investigate this asymmetry in developmental potential and VU fate specification between the α and β sister cells. We find evidence that lin-12 activity contributes to the robustness of βVU fate at elevated temperature, that the Caenorhabditis elegans Notch paralog glp-1 is not functionally redundant with lin-12 in specifying βVU fate, and that the activity of POP-1, the sole C. elegans TCF ortholog, influences βVU fate. We propose a model for how Wnt and LIN-12/Notch signaling together lead to robust specification of the βVU fate.

  5. dpl-1 DP and efl-1 E2F act with lin-35 Rb to antagonize Ras signaling in C. elegans vulval development.

    PubMed

    Ceol, C J; Horvitz, H R

    2001-03-01

    The synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes define two functionally redundant pathways that antagonize RTK/Ras signaling during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval induction. The synMuv gene lin-35 encodes a protein similar to the mammalian tumor suppressor pRB and has been proposed to act as a transcriptional repressor. Studies using mammalian cells have shown that pRB can prevent cell cycle progression by inhibiting DP/E2F-mediated transcriptional activation. We identified C. elegans genes that encode proteins similar to DP or E2F. Loss-of-function mutations in two of these genes, dpl-1 DP and efl-1 E2F, caused the same vulval abnormalities as do lin-35 Rb loss-of-function mutations. We propose that rather than being inhibited by lin-35 Rb, dpl-1 DP and efl-1 E2F act with lin-35 Rb in transcriptional repression to antagonize RTK/Ras signaling during vulval development.

  6. The Lin28b-let-7-Hmga2 axis determines the higher self-renewal potential of fetal haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Copley, Michael R; Babovic, Sonja; Benz, Claudia; Knapp, David J H F; Beer, Philip A; Kent, David G; Wohrer, Stefan; Treloar, David Q; Day, Christopher; Rowe, Keegan; Mader, Heidi; Kuchenbauer, Florian; Humphries, R Keith; Eaves, Connie J

    2013-08-01

    Mouse haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a postnatal transition in several properties, including a marked reduction in their self-renewal activity. We now show that the developmentally timed change in this key function of HSCs is associated with their decreased expression of Lin28b and an accompanying increase in their let-7 microRNA levels. Lentivirus-mediated overexpression of Lin28 in adult HSCs elevates their self-renewal activity in transplanted irradiated hosts, as does overexpression of Hmga2, a well-established let-7 target that is upregulated in fetal HSCs. Conversely, HSCs from fetal Hmga2(-/-) mice do not exhibit the heightened self-renewal activity that is characteristic of wild-type fetal HSCs. Interestingly, overexpression of Hmga2 in adult HSCs does not mimic the ability of elevated Lin28 to activate a fetal lymphoid differentiation program. Thus, Lin28b may act as a master regulator of developmentally timed changes in HSC programs with Hmga2 serving as its specific downstream modulator of HSC self-renewal potential.

  7. Mosaic Analysis Using a Ncl-1 (+) Extrachromosomal Array Reveals That Lin-31 Acts in the Pn.p Cells during Caenorhabditis Elegans Vulval Development

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L. M.; Waring, D. A.; Kim, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a genetic mosaic analysis procedure in which Caenorhabditis elegans mosaics are generated by spontaneous loss of an extrachromosomal array. This technique allows almost any C. elegans gene that can be used in germline transformation experiments to be used in mosaic analysis experiments. We identified a cosmid clone that rescues the mutant phenotype of ncl-1, so that this cell-autonomous marker could be used to analyze mosaic animals. To determine the sites of action for unc-29 and lin-31, an extrachromosomal array was constructed containing the ncl-1(+) cosmid linked to lin-31(+) and unc-29(+) cosmids. This array is mitotically unstable and can be lost to produce a clone of mutant cells. The specific cell division at which the extrachromosomal array had been lost was deduced by scoring the Ncl phenotypes of individual cells in genetic mosaics. The Unc-29 and Lin-31 phenotypes were then scored in these animals to determine in which cells these genes are required. This analysis showed that unc-29, which encodes a subunit of the acetylcholine receptor, acts in the body muscle cells. Furthermore, lin-31, which specifies cell fates during vulval induction and encodes a putative transcription factor similar to HNF-3/fork head, acts in the Pn.p cells. PMID:8807292

  8. Influences of LIN-12/Notch and POP-1/TCF on the Robustness of Ventral Uterine Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans Gonadogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sallee, Maria D.; Aydin, Taner; Greenwald, Iva

    2015-01-01

    The prospective ventral uterus of the hermaphrodite gonad primordium consists of two pairs of sister cells, with each pair consisting of a proximal “α” cell and a distal “β” cell. All four cells initially are competent to become the anchor cell (AC), a unique cell type that acts as the organizer of subsequent uterine and vulval development. However, the β cells soon lose this competence and always become ventral uterine precursor cells (VUs), whereas the α cells maintain their AC competence longer, until lin-12/Notch-mediated interactions between them specify one as the AC and the other as a VU. Here, we investigate this asymmetry in developmental potential and VU fate specification between the α and β sister cells. We find evidence that lin-12 activity contributes to the robustness of βVU fate at elevated temperature, that the Caenorhabditis elegans Notch paralog glp-1 is not functionally redundant with lin-12 in specifying βVU fate, and that the activity of POP-1, the sole C. elegans TCF ortholog, influences βVU fate. We propose a model for how Wnt and LIN-12/Notch signaling together lead to robust specification of the βVU fate. PMID:26483009

  9. Cord blood Lin(-)CD45(-) embryonic-like stem cells are a heterogeneous population that lack self-renewal capacity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Gonzalez, Cesar; Duggleby, Richard; Vagaska, Barbora; Querol, Sergio; Gomez, Susana G; Ferretti, Patrizia; Madrigal, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) has been proposed to contain not only haematopoietic stem cells, but also a rare pluripotent embryonic-like stem cell (ELSc) population that is negative for hematopoietic markers (Lin(-)CD45(-)) and expresses markers typical of pluripotent cells. The aim of this work was to isolate, characterise and expand this ELSc fraction from hUCB, as it may provide a valuable cell source for regenerative medicine applications. We found that we could indeed isolate a Lin(-)CD45(-) population of small cells (3-10 µm diameter) with a high nucleus to cytoplasm ratio that expressed the stem cell markers CD34 and CXCR4. However, in contrast to some previous reports, this fraction was not positive for CD133. Furthermore, although these cells expressed transcripts typical of pluripotent cells, such as SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG, they were not able to proliferate in any of the culture media known to support stem cell growth that we tested. Further analysis of the Lin(-)CD45(-) population by flow cytometry showed the presence of a Lin(-)CD45(-)Nestin(+) population that were also positive for CD34 (20%) but negative for CXCR4. These data suggest that the Lin(-)CD45(-) stem cell fraction present in the cord blood represents a small heterogeneous population with phenotypic characteristics of stem cells, including a Lin(-)CD45(-)Nestin(+) population not previously described. This study also suggests that heterogeneity within the Lin(-)CD45(-) cell fraction is the likely explanation for differences in the hUCB cell populations described by different groups that were isolated using different methods. These populations have been widely called "embryonic-like stem cell" on the basis of their phenotypical similarity to embryonic stem cells. However, the fact they do not seem to be able to self-renew casts some doubt on their identity, and warns against defining them as "embryonic-like stem cell" at this stage.

  10. Deregulation of MYCN, LIN28B and LET7 in a Molecular Subtype of Aggressive High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cowin, Prue A.; Johnstone, Cameron N.; House, Colin M.; Sheppard, Karen E.; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Melnyk, Nataliya; Rustgi, Anil K.; Phillips, Wayne A.; Johnsen, Hilde; Holm, Ruth; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Birrer, Michael J.; Pearson, Richard B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Huntsman, David G.; deFazio, Anna; Creighton, Chad J.; Smyth, Gordon K.; Bowtell, David D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular subtypes of serous ovarian cancer have been recently described. Using data from independent datasets including over 900 primary tumour samples, we show that deregulation of the Let-7 pathway is specifically associated with the C5 molecular subtype of serous ovarian cancer. DNA copy number and gene expression of HMGA2, alleles of Let-7, LIN28, LIN28B, MYC, MYCN, DICER1, and RNASEN were measured using microarray and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 127 samples using tissue microarrays and anti-HMGA2 antibodies. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation of bacterial artificial chromosomes hybridized to 239 ovarian tumours was used to measure translocation at the LIN28B locus. Short interfering RNA knockdown in ovarian cell lines was used to test the functionality of associations observed. Four molecular subtypes (C1, C2, C4, C5) of high-grade serous ovarian cancers were robustly represented in each dataset and showed similar pattern of patient survival. We found highly specific activation of a pathway involving MYCN, LIN28B, Let-7 and HMGA2 in the C5 molecular subtype defined by MYCN amplification and over-expression, over-expression of MYCN targets including the Let-7 repressor LIN28B, loss of Let-7 expression and HMGA2 amplification and over-expression. DICER1, a known Let-7 target, and RNASEN were over-expressed in C5 tumours. We saw no evidence of translocation at the LIN28B locus in C5 tumours. The reported interaction between LIN28B and Let-7 was recapitulated by siRNA knockdown in ovarian cancer cell lines. Our results associate deregulation of MYCN and downstream targets, including Let-7 and oncofetal genes, with serous ovarian cancer. We define for the first time how elements of an oncogenic pathway, involving multiple genes that contribute to stem cell renewal, is specifically altered in a molecular subtype of serous ovarian cancer. By defining the drivers of a molecular subtype of serous ovarian cancers we

  11. New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, Rebecca

    2014-04-01

    We are delighted to announce that Professor Martin Evans of University of Edinburgh has been appointed as the new Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. Martin Evans has been Editor of the Statistical Physics section of the journal since 2009. Prior to this, he served as a Board Member for the journal. His areas of research include statistical mechanics of nonequilibrium systems, phase transitions and scaling regimes in nonequilibrium statistical physics, glassy dynamics, phase transitions and ordering in driven diffusive systems, mass transport models, condensation models, zero range processes and exclusion processes. We very much look forward to working with Martin to continue to improve the journal's quality and interest to the readership. We would like to thank our outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Professor Murray Batchelor. Murray has worked hard and provided excellent guidance in improving the quality of the journal and the service that the journal provides to authors, referees and readers. During the last five years, we have raised the quality threshold for acceptance in the journal and currently reject over 70% of submissions. As a result, papers published in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical are amongst the best in the field. We have also maintained and improved on our excellent receipt-to-first-decision times, which now average under 40 days for papers. With the help of Martin Evans and our distinguished Editorial Board, we will be working to further improve the quality of the journal whilst continuing to offer excellent services to our readers, authors and referees. We hope that you benefit from reading the journal. If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at jphysa@iop.org. Rebecca Gillan Publisher

  12. The TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 and the OMA RNA-binding proteins antagonistically control the prophase-to-metaphase transition and growth of Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes.

    PubMed

    Spike, Caroline A; Coetzee, Donna; Eichten, Carly; Wang, Xin; Hansen, Dave; Greenstein, David

    2014-12-01

    In many animals, oocytes enter meiosis early in their development but arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this arrest period, enables the acquisition of meiotic competence and the capacity to produce healthy progeny. Meiotic resumption, or meiotic maturation, involves the transition to metaphase I (M phase) and is regulated by intercellular signaling and cyclin-dependent kinase activation. Premature meiotic maturation would be predicted to diminish fertility as the timing of this event, which normally occurs after oocyte growth is complete, is crucial. In the accompanying article in this issue, we identify the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 as a translational repressor that copurifies with OMA-1 and OMA-2, RNA-binding proteins redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. In this article, we show that LIN-41 enables the production of high-quality oocytes and plays an essential role in controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. lin-41 null mutants display a striking defect that is specific to oogenesis: pachytene-stage cells cellularize prematurely and fail to progress to diplotene. Instead, these cells activate CDK-1, enter M phase, assemble spindles, and attempt to segregate chromosomes. Translational derepression of the CDK-1 activator CDC-25.3 appears to contribute to premature M-phase entry in lin-41 mutant oocytes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 exhibit an antagonistic relationship, and we suggest that translational regulation by these proteins could be important for controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation.

  13. Stereochemistry of LinB-catalyzed biotransformation of δ-HBCD to 1R,2R,5S,6R,9R,10S-pentabromocyclododecanol.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Zindel, Daniel; Graf, Heidi; Azara, Valeria; Schweizer, W Bernd; Geueke, Birgit; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Lienemann, Peter

    2013-02-01

    The haloalkane dehalogenase LinB from Sphingobium indicum B90A converts β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH), the most persistent HCH stereoisomer, to mono- and dihydroxylated metabolites. Recently, we reported that LinB also transforms α-, β- and γ-hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), which are structurally related to HCHs. Here, we show that LinB catalyzes the hydroxylation of δ-HBCD to two pentabromocyclododecanols (PBCDOHs) and two tetrabromocyclododecadiols (TBCDDOHs). The stereochemistry of this enzymatic transformation was deduced from XRD crystal structure data of the substrate δ-HBCD and α(2)-PBCDOH, one of the biotransformation products. Five stereocenters of δ-HBCD are unchanged but the one at C6 is converted to an alcohol with inversion from S- to R-configuration in a nucleophilic, S(N)2-like substitution reaction. Only α(2)-PBCDOH with the 1R,2R,5S,6R,9R,10S-configuration is obtained but not its enantiomer. With only two of the 64 PBCDOHs formed, these transformations indeed are regio- and stereoselective. A conformational analysis revealed that the triple-turn motive, which is predominant in δ-HBCD and in several other HBCD stereoisomers, is also found in the product. This shows that LinB preferentially converted reactive bromine atoms but not those in the conserved triple-turn motive. The widespread contamination with HCHs triggered the bacterial evolution of dehalogenases which acquired the ability to convert these pollutants and their metabolites. We here demonstrate that LinB of S. indicum also transforms HBCDs regio- and stereoselectively following a similar mechanism.

  14. Stereochemistry of enzymatic transformations of (+)β- and (-)β-HBCD with LinA2--a HCH-degrading bacterial enzyme of Sphingobium indicum B90A.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Wyss, Simon A; Geueke, Birgit; Fleischmann, Thomas; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Bernd Schweizer, W; Moor, Heidi; Lienemann, Peter

    2015-03-01

    LinA2, a bacterial enzyme expressed in various Sphingomonadaceae, catalyzes the elimination of HCl from hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and, as discussed here, the release of HBr from certain hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs). Both classes of compounds are persistent organic pollutants now regulated under the Stockholm Convention. LinA2 selectively catalyzes the transformation of β-HBCDs; other stereoisomers like α-, γ-, and δ-HBCDs are not converted. The transformation of (-)β-HBCD is considerably faster than that of its enantiomer. Here, we present the XRD crystal structure of 1E,5S,6S,9R,10S-pentabromocyclododecene (PBCDE) and demonstrate that its enantiomer with the 1E,5R,6R,9S,10R-configuration is the only metabolite formed during LinA2-catalyzed dehydrobromination of (-)β-HBCD. Formation of this product can be rationalized by HBr elimination at C5 and C6. A reasonable enzyme-substrate complex with the catalytic dyad His-73 and Asp-25 approaching the hydrogen at C6 and a cationic pocket of Lys-20, Try-42 and Arg-129 binding the leaving bromine at C5 was found from in silico docking experiments. A second PBCDE of yet unknown configuration was obtained from (+)β-HBCD. We predicted its stereochemistry to be 1E,5S,6S,9S,10R-PBCDE from docking experiments. The enzyme-substrate complex obtained from LinA2 and an activated conformation of (+)β-HBCD allows the HBr elimination at C9 and C10 leading to the predicted product. Both modeled enzyme-substrate complexes are in line with 1,2-diaxial HBr eliminations. In conclusion, LinA2, a bacterial enzyme of the HCH-degrading strain Sphingobium indicum B90A was able to stereoselectively convert β-HBCDs. Configurations of both PBCDE metabolites were predicted by molecular docking experiments and confirmed in one case by XRD data.

  15. The oncogenic triangle of HMGA2, LIN28B and IGF2BP1 antagonizes tumor-suppressive actions of the let-7 family

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Bianca; Bley, Nadine; Müller, Simon; Glaß, Markus; Misiak, Danny; Lederer, Marcell; Vetter, Martina; Strauß, Hans-Georg; Thomssen, Christoph; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-suppressive let-7 microRNA family targets various oncogene-encoding mRNAs. We identify the let-7 targets HMGA2, LIN28B and IGF2BP1 to form a let-7 antagonizing self-promoting oncogenic triangle. Surprisingly, 3′-end processing of IGF2BP1 mRNAs is unaltered in aggressive cancers and tumor-derived cells although IGF2BP1 synthesis was proposed to escape let-7 attack by APA-dependent (alternative polyadenylation) 3′ UTR shortening. However, the expression of the triangle factors is inversely correlated with let-7 levels and promoted by LIN28B impairing let-7 biogenesis. Moreover, IGF2BP1 enhances the expression of all triangle factors by recruiting the respective mRNAs in mRNPs lacking AGO proteins and let-7 miRNAs. This indicates that the downregulation of let-7, largely facilitated by LIN28B upregulation, and the protection of let-7 target mRNAs by IGF2BP1-directed shielding in mRNPs synergize in enhancing the expression of triangle factors. The oncogenic potential of this triangle was confirmed in ovarian cancer (OC)-derived ES-2 cells transduced with let-7 targeting decoys. In these, the depletion of HMGA2 only diminishes tumor cell growth under permissive conditions. The depletion of LIN28B and more prominently IGF2BP1 severely impairs tumor cell viability, self-renewal and 2D as well as 3D migration. In conclusion, this suggests the targeting of the HMGA2-LIN28B-IGF2BP1 triangle as a promising strategy in cancer treatment. PMID:26917013

  16. Advanced software development workstation. Engineering scripting language graphical editor: DRAFT design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Engineering Scripting Language (ESL) is a language designed to allow nonprogramming users to write Higher Order Language (HOL) programs by drawing directed graphs to represent the program and having the system generate the corresponding program in HOL. The ESL system supports user generation of HOL programs through the manipulation of directed graphs. The components of this graphs (nodes, ports, and connectors) are objects each of which has its own properties and property values. The purpose of the ESL graphical editor is to allow the user to create or edit graph objects which represent programs.

  17. Quality and peer review of research: an adjudicating role for editors.

    PubMed

    Newton, Douglas P

    2010-05-01

    Peer review gives research a stamp of approval, but the reviews themselves can be flawed. This is potentially serious for the writer, the journal, and journal user. This study describes shortcomings of the peer review process and condenses them into an explanatory framework involving situational, personal, social, and ethical factors. Some proposals to improve matters are impractical and may make them worse. Some data is offered which illustrates the problem and suggests a potential solution. Informed editors who avoid mechanical approaches engage cautiously and critically with reviews and guard against bias, even in themselves, could make a significant difference.

  18. Correcting the record of structural publications requires joint effort of the community and journal editors.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Bernhard; Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Helliwell, John R; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Seriously flawed and even fictional models of biomolecular crystal structures, although rare, still persist in the record of structural repositories and databases. The ensuing problems of database contamination and persistence of publications based on incorrect structure models must be effectively addressed. The burden cannot be simply left to the critical voices who take the effort to contribute dissenting comments that are mostly ignored. The entire structural biology community, and particularly the journal editors who exercise significant power in this respect, must engage in a constructive dialog lest structural biology lose its credibility as an evidence-based empirical science.

  19. Parallel public spheres: distance and discourse in letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Andrew J; Vaisey, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    This article examines letters to the editor as one of the ways citizens seek to enact a public sphere using technological mediation. Using a sample of all letters received by a metropolitan newspaper during a three-month period (N = 1,113), the authors demonstrate that the tone and argumentative styles of letters differ with the scope of the issues the letters address. Local issues evoke more reasoned, conciliatory tones, while issues beyond the local context evoke more emotional, confrontational tones, even after controlling for individual writers' characteristics and anger as a motivation to write.

  20. [Revista Médica de Chile: A new member in the "International Committee of Medical Journal Editors"].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Humberto

    2010-06-01

    After a worldwide call for applications that took place in 2009, two medical journals were selected to become new members of the "International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)": Chinese Medical Journal and Revista Médica de Chile. Both Editors: Getu Zhaori, MD, and Humberto Reyes, MD, respectively, attended the ICMJE Meeting, 12-14 April 2010, in Queenstown, New Zealand. The meeting agenda included several topics that had been studied in advance by the attendants: editors or deputy editors of the 14 journals integrating this Committee plus a representative for the U.S. National Library of Medicine and another one for the World Association of Medical Journal Editors (WAME). The Committee agreed in new recommendations tending to safeguard the integrity and transparency of every manuscript published in all journals that adhere to the "Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals (URM)". These recommendations will be published shortly in ICMJE member journals. An important issue discussed refers to improvements in the "ICMJE Uniform Disclosure Form for Potential Conflicts of Interest"' that had some changes, a glossary of terms will be attached to it and the Instructions will be accompanied by translations into the official WHO languages as well as other languages used by ICMJE member journals. For our journal it is an honor and a great responsibility to become a member of this highly qualified Committee, the only journal published in Spanish and the first one from Latin America.

  1. Ontology-Based Controlled Natural Language Editor Using CFG with Lexical Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgoong, Hyun; Kim, Hong-Gee

    In recent years, CNL (Controlled Natural Language) has received much attention with regard to ontology-based knowledge acquisition systems. CNLs, as subsets of natural languages, can be useful for both humans and computers by eliminating ambiguity of natural languages. Our previous work, OntoPath [10], proposed to edit natural language-like narratives that are structured in RDF (Resource Description Framework) triples, using a domain-specific ontology as their language constituents. However, our previous work and other systems employing CFG for grammar definition have difficulties in enlarging the expression capacity. A newly developed editor, which we propose in this paper, permits grammar definitions through CFG-LD (Context-Free Grammar with Lexical Dependency) that includes sequential and semantic structures of the grammars. With CFG describing the sequential structure of grammar, lexical dependencies between sentence elements can be designated in the definition system. Through the defined grammars, the implemented editor guides users' narratives in more familiar expressions with a domain-specific ontology and translates the content into RDF triples.

  2. Semi-automated XML markup of biosystematic legacy literature with the GoldenGATE editor.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Guido; Böhm, Klemens; Agosti, Donat

    2007-01-01

    Today, digitization of legacy literature is a big issue. This also applies to the domain of biosystematics, where this process has just started. Digitized biosystematics literature requires a very precise and fine grained markup in order to be useful for detailed search, data linkage and mining. However, manual markup on sentence level and below is cumbersome and time consuming. In this paper, we present and evaluate the GoldenGATE editor, which is designed for the special needs of marking up OCR output with XML. It is built in order to support the user in this process as far as possible: Its functionality ranges from easy, intuitive tagging through markup conversion to dynamic binding of configurable plug-ins provided by third parties. Our evaluation shows that marking up an OCR document using GoldenGATE is three to four times faster than with an off-the-shelf XML editor like XML-Spy. Using domain-specific NLP-based plug-ins, these numbers are even higher.

  3. Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold

    SciTech Connect

    Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-08-28

    To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures

  4. A Human Lin(-) CD123(+) CD127(low) Population Endowed with ILC Features and Migratory Capabilities Contributes to Immunopathological Hallmarks of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Castro-Escamilla, Octavio; Méndez, Andrés González; Aguilar-Flores, Cristina; Velázquez-Avila, Martha; Tussié-Luna, María Isabel; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Maldonado-García, César; Jurado-Santacruz, Fermín; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesus; Pelayo, Rosana; Bonifaz, Laura C

    2017-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are members of a heterogeneous family with a lymphoid origin that mimics the T helper (Th) cytokine profile. ILC are involved in early effector cytokine-mediated responses during infections in peripheral tissues. ILC also play an important role in chronic skin inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis. Although classical ILC express CD127, it has been recently reported that the presence of non-classical CD127(-) ILC populations and an early ILC precursor (EILP) CD127(low). ILC development has predominately been investigated in mouse models. However, in humans, different transcription factors have been described for ILC identification. NFIL3 (nuclear factor, IL-3 regulated) is crucial for ILC development in response to IL-7. CD123 (IL-3Rα) is usually used to exclude basophils during ILC identification, however, it is unknown if in response to IL-3, NFIL3 could be relevant to induce ILC features in Lin(-) CD123(+) populations in addition, is also unknown whether peripheral blood (PB) population with ILC features may have skin-homing potential to participate in skin inflammatory chronic diseases. Here, we report a Lin(-) CD123(+) CD127(low) CD7(+) CLA(+) population that share some phenotypic properties with basophils, but expresses several transcription factors for ILC commitment such as inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2), NFIL3, promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), thymocyte selection-associated high-mobility group box protein (TOX), and T cell factor-1 (TCF-1). In addition, this population expresses different ILC markers: CD132, CD90, CD161, α4 integrin, c-Kit, CRTH2, AhR, and IL-23R. IL-3 prevents apoptosis and increases their NFIL3, TOX, and PLZF expression. In PB, the CD123(+) CD127(low) population is predominantly a conspicuous population that expresses T-bet and RORγt. The Lin(-) CD123(+) CD127(low) population in PB has a limited Th type cytokine expression and highly expresses IL-8. The Lin(-) CD123(+) CD127(low) population

  5. The Editors' Recollections on the Occasion of the 60th Anniversary of The American Journal of Human Genetics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Volume 1, Number 1 of The American Journal of Human Genetics was published in September 1949. The first paper was an 18-page preface to the journal by H. J. Muller, president of The American Society of Human Genetics, entitled “Progress and Prospects in Human Genetics.” Charles W. Cotterman served as the first editor, and since that time a dozen other human geneticists have shared that distinction. In recognition of the 60th anniversary of AJHG, recollections of five editors are recorded here.

  6. Korean association of medical journal editors at the forefront of improving the quality and indexing chances of its member journals.

    PubMed

    Suh, Chang-Ok; Oh, Se Jeong; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2013-05-01

    The article overviews some achievements and problems of Korean medical journals published in the highly competitive journal environment. Activities of Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors (KAMJE) are viewed as instrumental for improving the quality of Korean articles, indexing large number of local journals in prestigious bibliographic databases and launching new abstract and citation tracking databases or platforms (eg KoreaMed, KoreaMed Synapse, the Western Pacific Regional Index Medicus [WPRIM]). KAMJE encourages its member journals to upgrade science editing standards and to legitimately increase citation rates, primarily by publishing more great articles with global influence. Experience gained by KAMJE and problems faced by Korean editors may have global implications.

  7. René Marcelle (December 30, 1931-December 18, 2011), the first editor-in-chief of Photosynthesis Research.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Marcelle, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    This tribute honors the first editor-in-chief of Photosynthesis Research, René Marcelle the Belgian plant physiologist who, with publishers in The Netherlands, launched the journal in 1980. Here, we present a glimpse of René Marcelle's early life, his education and research, as well as his editorial work for the journal and other conferences in plant physiology. He worked on control of photosynthesis, both the biological and environmental aspects, as well as on crassulacean acid metabolism. He is best remembered as a kind-hearted and humane editor.

  8. Wikipedia and Medicine: Quantifying Readership, Editors, and the Significance of Natural Language

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Background Wikipedia is a collaboratively edited encyclopedia. One of the most popular websites on the Internet, it is known to be a frequently used source of health care information by both professionals and the lay public. Objective This paper quantifies the production and consumption of Wikipedia’s medical content along 4 dimensions. First, we measured the amount of medical content in both articles and bytes and, second, the citations that supported that content. Third, we analyzed the medical readership against that of other health care websites between Wikipedia’s natural language editions and its relationship with disease prevalence. Fourth, we surveyed the quantity/characteristics of Wikipedia’s medical contributors, including year-over-year participation trends and editor demographics. Methods Using a well-defined categorization infrastructure, we identified medically pertinent English-language Wikipedia articles and links to their foreign language equivalents. With these, Wikipedia can be queried to produce metadata and full texts for entire article histories. Wikipedia also makes available hourly reports that aggregate reader traffic at per-article granularity. An online survey was used to determine the background of contributors. Standard mining and visualization techniques (eg, aggregation queries, cumulative distribution functions, and/or correlation metrics) were applied to each of these datasets. Analysis focused on year-end 2013, but historical data permitted some longitudinal analysis. Results Wikipedia’s medical content (at the end of 2013) was made up of more than 155,000 articles and 1 billion bytes of text across more than 255 languages. This content was supported by more than 950,000 references. Content was viewed more than 4.88 billion times in 2013. This makes it one of if not the most viewed medical resource(s) globally. The core editor community numbered less than 300 and declined over the past 5 years. The members of this

  9. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even

  10. Origin of the Galactic Center S-Stars: Gravitational Torques from Lin-Shu-Type Spiral Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny

    2010-02-01

    The supermassive ~4 × 106 M sun black hole at the Galactic center is surrounded by a parsec-scale star disk, with several thousands of dynamically relaxed, evolved, late-type CO absorption line stars and a small ~100 population of luminous O and Wolf-Rayet stars which move in approximately circular Keplerian orbits. These bluish in color massive O and Wolf-Rayet stars are very young with an estimated age of 6 ± 2 Myr. Another small group of roughly 20 young (<10 Myr) blue B stars with the orbital periods as short as 15 years ("S-stars") follow eccentric, randomly oriented orbits well inside the disk stars. A model is proposed to explain the S-stars. Accordingly, the stars formed originally in the parsec-scale disk through Jeans' gravitational fragmentation of gas. The newly formed S-stars then migrated inward to the Galactic center via the torques exerted by Lin-Shu-type spiral density waves on the stars at an inner Lindblad resonance. The model explains both the number of observed S-stars orbiting the Galactic black hole within the nuclear (<0.05 pc) star cluster and the key property of the S-star orbits, namely, their high eccentricities.

  11. ORIGIN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER S-STARS: GRAVITATIONAL TORQUES FROM LIN-SHU-TYPE SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Griv, Evgeny

    2010-02-01

    The supermassive approx4 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} black hole at the Galactic center is surrounded by a parsec-scale star disk, with several thousands of dynamically relaxed, evolved, late-type CO absorption line stars and a small approx100 population of luminous O and Wolf-Rayet stars which move in approximately circular Keplerian orbits. These bluish in color massive O and Wolf-Rayet stars are very young with an estimated age of 6 +- 2 Myr. Another small group of roughly 20 young (<10 Myr) blue B stars with the orbital periods as short as 15 years ('S-stars') follow eccentric, randomly oriented orbits well inside the disk stars. A model is proposed to explain the S-stars. Accordingly, the stars formed originally in the parsec-scale disk through Jeans' gravitational fragmentation of gas. The newly formed S-stars then migrated inward to the Galactic center via the torques exerted by Lin-Shu-type spiral density waves on the stars at an inner Lindblad resonance. The model explains both the number of observed S-stars orbiting the Galactic black hole within the nuclear (<0.05 pc) star cluster and the key property of the S-star orbits, namely, their high eccentricities.

  12. Electrostatic guidelines and molecular tailoring for density functional investigation of structures and energetics of (Li)n clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K. V., Jovan Jose; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2008-10-01

    A molecular electrostatic potential (MESP)-guided method for building metal aggregates is proposed and tested on prototype lithium (Li)n clusters from n =4 to 58. The smaller clusters are subsequently subjected to direct density functional theory based geometry optimization, while the larger ones are optimized via molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The calculations are performed using PW91-PW91 as well as B3LYP functionals, and the trends in the interaction energies are found to be similar. The MESP-guided model for building metal clusters is validated by comparing the resulting cluster geometries with the ones reported in the literature up to n =20. A comparison of the ionization potential and polarizability (up to n =22) with their experimental counterparts shows a fairly good agreement. A new MTA-based scheme for calculating the ionization potential and polarizability values of large metal clusters is proposed and tested on Li40 and Li58 clusters. Further, the existence of "magic numbered clusters" up to n =22 is justified in terms of "maximum hardness principle" as well based on molecular electron density topography and distance descriptors.

  13. The Lin-Shu type density wave structure of our Galaxy: line-of-sight velocities of 396 HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, E.; Hou, L.-G.; Jiang, I.-G.

    2015-11-01

    In this fifth paper in a series, we check again the Lin-Shu idea of small-amplitude density waves in our Galaxy. The updated catalogue of Galactic objects of Hou and Han (Hou and Han in Astron Astrophys 569:125-146, 2014), available in the literature, is used. The line-of-sight velocity field of 396 HII regions with known trigonometric or photometric distances and their uncertainties within 4 kpc from the Sun is investigated in terms of a wave perturbation. Our previous study is enlarged by examining the secondary minima of the residual sum of squares of the predicted and measured velocities of a sample of objects in a considerable region surrounding the Sun. Both the geometrical and physical parameters of the wave pattern are evaluated. Here we show, for the first time, that the local Cygnus-Orion spiral arm, where the Sun is located, does form a part of the major density wave structure of the system under the question but is not a spur originating at the inner Carina-Sagittarius arm or at the outer Perseus arm.

  14. Grammar, Punctuation, and Capitalization: a Handbook for Technical Writers and Editors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaskill, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Writing problems are addressed which are often encountered in technical documents and preferences are indicated (Langley's) when authorities do not agree. It is directed toward professional writers, editors, and proofreaders. Those whose profession lies in other areas (for example, research or management), but who have occasion to write or review others' writing will also find this information useful. A functional attitude toward grammar and punctuation is presented. Chapter 1 on grammar presents grammatical problems related to each part of speech. Chapter 2 on sentence structure concerns syntax, that is, effective arrangement of words, with emphasis on methods of revision to improve writing effectiveness. Chapter 3 addresses punctuation marks, presenting their function, situations when they are required or incorrect, and situations when they are appropriate but optional. Chapter 4 presents capitalization, which is mostly a matter of editorial style and preference rather than a matter of generally accepted rules. An index and glossary are included.

  15. Interview with Future Medicinal Chemistry's US Senior Editor, Iwao Ojima. Interview by Issac Bruce.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Iwao

    2012-10-01

    Professor Iwao Ojima studied at the University of Tokyo (Japan) before being appointed as a Senior Research Fellow and Group Leader at the Sagami Institute of Chemical Research. He is now Director of the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery at State University of New York (USA) and has been a visiting professor in European, North American and Asian academic institutions. Professor Ojima agreed to serve as the US Senior Editor of Future Medicinal Chemistry when it launched in 2009 and continues to provide his expertise to the journal. Professor Ojima spoke to Future Medicinal Chemistry about why medicinal chemistry is such an exciting field to work in, the state of the pharmaceutical industry, and what features and issues make this journal unique.

  16. Publishing bioethics and bioethics--reflections on academic publishing by a journal editor.

    PubMed

    Schüklenk, Udo

    2011-02-01

    This article by one of the Editors of Bioethics, published in the 25th anniversary issue of the journal, describes some of the revolutionary changes academic publishing has undergone during the last decades. Many humanities journals went from typically small print-runs, counting by the hundreds, to on-line availability in thousands of university libraries worldwide. Article up-take by our subscribers can be measured efficiently. The implications of this and other changes to academic publishing are discussed. Important ethical challenges need to be addressed in areas such as the enforcement of plagiarism-related policies, the so-called 'impact factor' and its impact on academic integrity, and the question of whether on-line only publishing can currently guarantee the integrity of academic publishing histories.

  17. JOSPT Experiences Tremendous Growth, Change in 14 Years With Editor-in-Chief Simoneau in Charge.

    PubMed

    Nyland, John A

    2015-12-01

    As Editor-in-Chief, Dr Guy G. Simoneau and his editorial board have taken JOSPT from an acceptable US-based journal to a highly influential worldwide force behind contemporary orthopaedic and sports physical therapy research and practice. Today, the bridge Dr Simoneau constructed spans the orthopaedic and sports physical therapy globe for the betterment of clinical practice and research. His work fully supports JOSPT's latest strategic plan to provide value-added knowledge translation, develop a broader authorship and readership, increase global marketing of the JOSPT brand, and expand current relationships to new partners and stakeholders. The bridge places JOSPT on very firm footing, tying its rich history to the promise of an exciting and successful future.

  18. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  19. Targeting the miR-200c/LIN28B axis in acquired EGFR-TKI resistance non-small cell lung cancer cells harboring EMT features

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Shien, Kazuhiko; Tomida, Shuta; Okayasu, Kazuhiro; Suzawa, Ken; Hashida, Shinsuke; Torigoe, Hidejiro; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-200 family members (miR-200s) are frequently silenced in advanced cancer and have been implicated in the process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We previously reported that miR-200s were silenced through promoter methylation in acquired EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells harboring EMT features. In this study, we examined the functional role of miR-200s in NSCLC cells and investigated a novel approach to overcoming acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. In the analysis of NSCLC cell lines, each of the miR-200s expression-silenced cell lines showed promoter methylation. Significant correlations between miR-200c silencing and several oncogenic pathway alterations, including EMT-changes and LIN28B overexpression, were observed in the database analysis. In addition, EGFR-wild type cell lines had lower miR-200s expression levels than EGFR-mutant cell lines. The introduction of miR-200c using pre-miR-200c caused LIN28B suppression in cells with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance that harbored EMT features. Interestingly, both the introduction of miR-200c and the knockdown of LIN28B produced an antitumor effect in acquired EGFR-TKI resistance cells, whereas these manipulations were not effective in parental cells. The miR-200c/LIN28B axis plays an important role in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI that harbor EMT features and might be a useful therapeutic target for overcoming resistance. PMID:28084458

  20. Lin- CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ cells in human blood constitute a rare population of mast cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Malinovschi, Andrei; Öhrvik, Helena; Sandelin, Martin; Janson, Christer; Alving, Kjell; Hallgren, Jenny

    2016-01-28

    Mast cells are rare tissue-resident immune cells that are involved in allergic reactions, and their numbers are increased in the lungs of asthmatics. Murine lung mast cells arise from committed bone marrow-derived progenitors that enter the blood circulation, migrate through the pulmonary endothelium, and mature in the tissue. In humans, mast cells can be cultured from multipotent CD34(+) progenitor cells. However, a population of distinct precursor cells that give rise to mast cells has remained undiscovered. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) progenitor cells, which represented only 0.0053% of the isolated blood cells in healthy individuals. These cells expressed integrin β7 and developed a mast cell-like phenotype, although with a slow cell division capacity in vitro. Isolated Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells had an immature mast cell-like appearance and expressed high levels of many mast cell-related genes as compared with human blood basophils in whole-transcriptome microarray analyses. Furthermore, serglycin, tryptase, and carboxypeptidase A messenger RNA transcripts were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Altogether, we propose that the Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells are closely related to human tissue mast cells and likely constitute an immediate precursor population, which can give rise to predominantly mast cells. Furthermore, asthmatics with reduced lung function had a higher frequency of Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood mast cell progenitors than asthmatics with normal lung function.

  1. Discovery of second new species of the genus Spiniphilus Lin & Bi, and female of Heterophilus scabricollis Pu with its biological notes (Coleoptera: Vesperidae: Philinae: Philini).

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenxuan; Lin, Meiying

    2015-04-29

    A new philine species of the genus Spiniphilus Lin & Bi, 2011, S. xiaodongi sp. nov. is described from Yunnan, China. The female of Heterophilus scabricollis Pu, 1988 is described for the first time with its biological and ecological data.

  2. Prior Publication and Redundancy in Contemporary Science: Are Authors and Editors at the Crossroads?

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Sonia Maria Ramos; Roig, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    We discuss prior publication and redundancy in contemporary science in the context of changing perceptions of originality in the communication of research results. These perceptions have been changing in the publication realm, particularly in the last 15 years. Presenting a brief overview of the literature, we address some of the conflicts that are likely to arise between authors and editors. We illustrate our approach with conference presentations that are later published as journal articles and focus on a recent retraction of an article that had been previously published as a conference proceedings. Although we do not make definitive pronouncements on the matter-as many concepts are evolving-we do argue that conference papers that contain sufficient details for others to attempt a replication and are indexed in scientific databases such as PubMed, challenge some currently held assumptions of prior publication and originality in the sciences. Our view is that these important issues are in need of further clarification and harmonization within the science publishing community. This need is more evident when we consider current notions of research integrity when it comes to communication to peers. Revisiting long-standing views about what constitutes prior publication and developing a clearer set of guidelines for authors and editors to follow should reduce conflicts in the research environment, which already exerts considerable pressure, especially on newcomers in academia. However, while clearer guidelines are timely, developing them is only part of the challenge. The present times seem to call for deeper changes in the research and publication systems.

  3. Initial results on computational performance of Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture: implementation of the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) Purdue-Lin microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2014-10-01

    Purdue-Lin scheme is a relatively sophisticated microphysics scheme in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The scheme includes six classes of hydro meteors: water vapor, cloud water, raid, cloud ice, snow and graupel. The scheme is very suitable for massively parallel computation as there are no interactions among horizontal grid points. In this paper, we accelerate the Purdue Lin scheme using Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi is a high performance coprocessor consists of up to 61 cores. The Xeon Phi is connected to a CPU via the PCI Express (PICe) bus. In this paper, we will discuss in detail the code optimization issues encountered while tuning the Purdue-Lin microphysics Fortran code for Xeon Phi. In particularly, getting a good performance required utilizing multiple cores, the wide vector operations and make efficient use of memory. The results show that the optimizations improved performance of the original code on Xeon Phi 5110P by a factor of 4.2x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved performance on Intel Xeon E5-2603 CPU by a factor of 1.2x compared to the original code.

  4. A lin-45 raf enhancer screen identifies eor-1, eor-2 and unusual alleles of Ras pathway genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Christian E; Howard, Robyn M; Goldman, Alissa P; Volk, Mandy L; Girard, Laura J; Sundaram, Meera V

    2002-05-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway controls multiple processes including excretory system development, P12 fate specification, and vulval cell fate specification. To identify positive regulators of Ras signaling, we conducted a genetic screen for mutations that enhance the excretory system and egg-laying defects of hypomorphic lin-45 raf mutants. This screen identified unusual alleles of several known Ras pathway genes, including a mutation removing the second SH3 domain of the sem-5/Grb2 adaptor, a temperature-sensitive mutation in the helical hairpin of let-341/Sos, a gain-of-function mutation affecting a potential phosphorylation site of the lin-1 Ets domain transcription factor, a dominant-negative allele of ksr-1, and hypomorphic alleles of sur-6/PP2A-B, sur-2/Mediator, and lin-25. In addition, this screen identified multiple alleles of two newly identified genes, eor-1 and eor-2, that play a relatively weak role in vulval fate specification but positively regulate Ras signaling during excretory system development and P12 fate specification. The spectrum of identified mutations argues strongly for the specificity of the enhancer screen and for a close involvement of eor-1 and eor-2 in Ras signaling.

  5. C. elegans EOR-1/PLZF and EOR-2 positively regulate Ras and Wnt signaling and function redundantly with LIN-25 and the SUR-2 Mediator component.

    PubMed

    Howard, Robyn M; Sundaram, Meera V

    2002-07-15

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, Ras/ERK and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways cooperate to induce P12 and vulval cell fates in a Hox-dependent manner. Here we describe eor-1 and eor-2, two new positively acting nuclear components of the Ras and Wnt pathways. eor-1 and eor-2 act downstream or in parallel to ERK and function redundantly with the Mediator complex gene sur-2 and the functionally related gene lin-25, such that removal of both eor-1/eor-2 and sur-2/lin-25 mimics the removal of a main Ras pathway component. Furthermore, the eor-1 and eor-2 mutant backgrounds reveal an essential role for the Elk1-related gene lin-1. eor-1 and eor-2 also act downstream or in parallel to pry-1 Axin and therefore act at the convergence of the Ras and Wnt pathways. eor-1 encodes the ortholog of human PLZF, a BTB/zinc-finger transcription factor that is fused to RARalpha in acute promyelocytic leukemia. eor-2 encodes a novel protein. EOR-1/PLZF and EOR-2 appear to function closely together and cooperate with Hox genes to promote the expression of Ras- and Wnt-responsive genes. Further studies of eor-1 and eor-2 may provide insight into the roles of PLZF in normal development and leukemogenesis.

  6. Publication Criteria and Recommended Areas of Improvement within School Psychology Journals as Reported by Editors, Journal Board Members, and Manuscript Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Craig A.; Floyd, Randy G.; Fuhrmann, Melanie J.; Martinez, Rebecca S.

    2011-01-01

    Two online surveys were completed by editors, associate editors, editorial board members, and members or fellows of the Division 16 of the American Psychological Association. These surveys targeted (a) the criteria for a manuscript to be published in school psychology journals, and (b) the components of the peer-review process that should be…

  7. On-Line Student Publications: Do Student Editors at Public Universities Shed Their First Amendment Rights in Cyberspace?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senat, Joey

    The First Amendment rights of students at public universities and colleges are well established by federal and state courts. Where a publication has been created as a forum for student expression, college authorities may not exercise anything but advisory control over editorial decisions of student editors. On-line student newspapers and literary…

  8. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process.

    PubMed

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,747 were sent for peer review. This subset of 2747 papers was then analysed in detail.   Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and five days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). Moreover, editors acting as reviewers had no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife's peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach.

  9. A TV Reporter, an Adviser's Internship, a TV Anchor/Reporter, an Assignment Editor, a TV Photojournalist's Bag of Tricks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrow, Kris; Youngblood, Steve; Madden, Tracy; Hamburger, Jeff; Johnson, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Intends to help high school journalism students understand the field they are preparing for by presenting brief descriptions of a day in the work life of a television news reporter, a TV anchor/reporter, and a television news assignment editor. Describes the five-week internship at a local television news station of a journalism instructor. (SR)

  10. 77 FR 74175 - Solicitation of Review Editors for the Draft Report of the National Climate Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Report of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC). AGENCY: Office of... editors of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) National Climate... Research Program at email@usgcrp.gov . More information on the National Climate Assessment can be found...

  11. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process

    PubMed Central

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M.; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,747 were sent for peer review. This subset of 2747 papers was then analysed in detail.   Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and five days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). Moreover, editors acting as reviewers had no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife’s peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach. PMID:27508056

  12. The ACPA Journal and Its Editors, 1959-1984: History, Perspectives, Issues, and Visions regarding our Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, David A., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the history of the "Journal of College Student Personnel" from the perspectives of its current and past editors. Presents a framework for understanding student affairs work in which models and knowledge from selected disciplines can be synthesized. Includes responses from additional authors. (JAC)

  13. Serials Management in the Electronic Era: Papers in Honor of Peter Gellatly, Founding Editor of "The Serials Librarian."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jim, Ed.; Williams, James W., Ed.

    This book assesses progress and technical changes in the field of serials management and anticipates future directions and challenges for librarians. The book consists of 18 chapters: (1) "Introduction" (Jim Cole and James W. Williams); (2) "Peter Gellatly--Editor with a Deft Touch" (Ruth C. Carter); (3) "The "Deseret…

  14. A role of the LIN-12/Notch signaling pathway in diversifying the non-striated egg-laying muscles in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jared J; Amin, Nirav M; George, Carolyn; Via, Zachary; Shi, Herong; Liu, Jun

    2014-05-15

    The proper formation and function of an organ is dependent on the specification and integration of multiple cell types and tissues. An example of this is the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite egg-laying system, which requires coordination between the vulva, uterus, neurons, and musculature. While the genetic constituents of the first three components have been well studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the specification of the egg-laying musculature. The egg-laying muscles are non-striated in nature and consist of sixteen cells, four each of type I and type II vulval muscles and uterine muscles. These 16 non-striated muscles exhibit distinct morphology, location, synaptic connectivity and function. Using an RNAi screen targeting the putative transcription factors in the C. elegans genome, we identified a number of novel factors important for the diversification of these different types of egg-laying muscles. In particular, we found that RNAi knockdown of lag-1, which encodes the sole C. elegans ortholog of the transcription factor CSL (CBF1, Suppressor of Hairless, LAG-1), an effector of the LIN-12/Notch pathway, led to the production of extra type I vulval muscles. Similar phenotypes were also observed in animals with down-regulation of the Notch receptor LIN-12 and its DSL (Delta, Serrate, LAG-2) ligand LAG-2. The extra type I vulval muscles in animals with reduced LIN-12/Notch signaling resulted from a cell fate transformation of type II vulval muscles to type I vulval muscles. We showed that LIN-12/Notch was activated in the undifferentiated type II vulval muscle cells by LAG-2/DSL that is likely produced by the anchor cell (AC). Our findings provide additional evidence highlighting the roles of LIN-12/Notch signaling in coordinating the formation of various components of the functional C. elegans egg-laying system. We also identify multiple new factors that play critical roles in the proper specification of the different types

  15. New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The Institute of Physics is delighted to announce that the new Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics will be Professor Giorgio Margaritondo of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. Giorgio will, with the help of his world-class Editorial Board, maintain standards of scientific rigour whilst ensuring that research published is of the highest quality. 'I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth.' said Professor Margaritondo. 'Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging!' Professor Margaritondo received the Laurea Summa cum Laude from the University of Rome in 1969. He has been a full professor of Applied Physics at the EPFL since 1990. In 2001, he became Dean of the EPFL Faculty of Basic Sciences. In 2004, he was nominated Provost and he served until 2010, when he became Dean of Continuing Education. He previously worked at the Italian National Research Council, at Bell Laboratories and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research activity concerns the physics of semiconductors and superconductors (electronic states, surfaces and interfaces) and of biological systems; his main experimental techniques are electron spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy, x-ray imaging and scanning near-field microscopy, including experiments with synchrotron light and with free electron lasers. Author of more than 650 scientific publications and 9 books, he was also coordinator in 1995-98 of the scientific division of the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste. In 1997-2003 he was coordinator of the European Commission Round Table on synchrotron radiation. He is the president of the Council of the European Commission Integrated Initiative on Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser Science (IA-SFS and then ELISA), the largest network in the world in this domain. He is Fellow of the American Physical

  16. The human fetal lymphocyte lineage: identification by CD27 and LIN28B expression in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Laurie; Su, Kuei-Ying; Liang, Xiaoe; Liao, Dongmei; Floyd, Serina; Amos, Joshua; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Kuraoka, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    CD27, a member of the TNFR superfamily, is used to identify human memory B cells. Nonetheless, CD27+ B cells are present in patients with HIGM1 syndrome who are unable to generate GCs or memory B cells. CD27+IgD+ fetal B cells are present in umbilical cord blood, and CD27 may also be a marker of the human B1-like B cells. To define the origin of naïve CD27+IgD+ human B cells, we studied B cell development in both fetal and adult tissues. In human FL, most CD19+ cells coexpressed CD10, a marker of human developing B cells. Some CD19+CD10+ B cells expressed CD27, and these fetal CD27+ cells were present in the pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cell compartments. Lower frequencies of phenotypically identical cells were also identified in adult BM. CD27+ pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cells expressed recombination activating gene-1, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and Vpre-B mRNA comparably to their CD27− counterparts. CD27+ and CD27− developing B cells showed similar Ig heavy chain gene usage with low levels of mutations, suggesting that CD27+ developing B cells are distinct from mutated memory B cells. Despite these similarities, CD27+ developing B cells differed from CD27− developing B cells by their increased expression of LIN28B, a transcription factor associated with the fetal lymphoid lineages of mice. Furthermore, CD27+ pro-B cells efficiently generated IgM+IgD+ immature/transitional B cells in vitro. Our observations suggest that CD27 expression during B cell development identifies a physiologic state or lineage for human B cell development distinct from the memory B cell compartment. PMID:23901121

  17. Cell fates and fusion in the C. elegans vulval primordium are regulated by the EGL-18 and ELT-6 GATA factors -- apparent direct targets of the LIN-39 Hox protein.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyunghee; Peyrot, Sara M; Wood, Cricket G; Wagmaister, Javier A; Maduro, Morris F; Eisenmann, David M; Rothman, Joel H

    2002-11-01

    Development of the vulva in C. elegans is mediated by the combinatorial action of several convergent regulatory inputs, three of which, the Ras, Wnt and Rb-related pathways, act by regulating expression of the lin-39 Hox gene. LIN-39 specifies cell fates and regulates cell fusion in the mid-body region, leading to formation of the vulva. In the lateral seam epidermis, differentiation and cell fusion have been shown to be regulated by two GATA-type transcription factors, ELT-5 and -6. We report that ELT-5 is encoded by the egl-18 gene, which was previously shown to promote formation of a functional vulva. Furthermore, we find that EGL-18 (ELT-5), and its paralogue ELT-6, are redundantly required to regulate cell fates and fusion in the vulval primordium and are essential to form a vulva. Elimination of egl-18 and elt-6 activity results in arrest by the first larval stage; however, in animals rescued for this larval lethality by expression of ELT-6 in non-vulval cells, the post-embryonic cells (P3.p-P8.p) that normally become vulval precursor cells often fuse with the surrounding epidermal syncytium or undergo fewer than normal cell divisions, reminiscent of lin-39 mutants. Moreover, egl-18/elt-6 reporter gene expression in the developing vulva is attenuated in lin-39(rf) mutants, and overexpression of egl-18 can partially rescue the vulval defects caused by reduced lin-39 activity. LIN-39/CEH-20 heterodimers bind two consensus HOX/PBC sites in a vulval enhancer region of egl-18/elt-6, one of which is essential for vulval expression of egl-18/elt-6 reporter constructs. These findings demonstrate that the EGL-18 and ELT-6 GATA factors are essential, genetically redundant regulators of cell fates and fusion in the developing vulva and are apparent direct transcriptional targets of the LIN-39 Hox protein.

  18. Macedonian journal of chemistry and chemical engineering: open journal systems--editor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Zdravkovski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The development and availability of personal computers and software as well as printing techniques in the last twenty years have made a profound change in the publication of scientific journals. Additionally, the Internet in the last decade has revolutionized the publication process to the point of changing the basic paradigm of printed journals. The Macedonian Journal of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering in its 40-year history has adopted and adapted to all these transformations. In order to keep up with the inevitable changes, as editor-in-chief I felt my responsibility was to introduce an electronic editorial managing of the journal. The choice was between commercial and open source platforms, and because of the limited funding of the journal we chose the latter. We decided on Open Journal Systems, which provided online submission and management of all content, had flexible configuration--requirements, sections, review process, etc., had options for comprehensive indexing, offered various reading tools, had email notification and commenting ability for readers, had an option for thesis abstracts and was installed locally. However, since there is limited support it requires a moderate computer knowledge/skills and effort in order to set up. Overall, it is an excellent editorial platform and a convenient solution for journals with a low budget or journals that do not want to spend their resources on commercial platforms or simply support the idea of open source software.

  19. [Medical Officer Ellerman, lecturer in pharmacology and editor of the Nederlandsch Lancet].

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Patrick P A M; Bolk, Jan H

    2011-01-01

    George Lievin Henri Ellerman (1817-1849) followed his medical-military training at the Military Medical Training College (RKMG) in Utrecht, the Netherlands, from 1835 to 1839, and gained his PhD from Leiden University in 1841. From 1843 to 1849 he was a lecturer in pharmacology at the RKMG. He was one of the first editors of the Nederlandsch Lancet. Together with his fellow board members Donders and Jansen he set this journal on a new course. Due to the new mix of scientific and practice-oriented articles the journal developed into the most important medical scientific journal in the Netherlands; it was however not among the journals that merged to become the Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde [Dutch Journal of Medicine]. In 1846 Ellerman published a Dutch translation of Friedrich Oesterlen's textbook of pharmacology 'Handbuch der Heilmittellehre'. This book was considered to be a complete and lucid survey of pharmacology and a major step towards a more scientific pharmacology. After his death at the age of 32, he was remembered as a good scientist and dedicated, hardworking lecturer.

  20. Getting published well requires fulfilling editors' and reviewers' needs and desires.

    PubMed

    Schoenwolf, Gary C

    2013-12-01

    Publication in international scientific journals provides an unparalleled opportunity for authors to showcase their work. Where authors publish affects how the community values the work. This value directly determines the impact of the work on the field-papers must be read and cited to advance the field, and because the scientific literature is vast, only a subset of the literature is widely read and cited. Moreover, the value placed on the work also affects the authors' scientific reputation and career advancement. Consequently, it is essential that manuscripts receive the recognition they deserve by being published in one of the "best" journals that the scientific findings allow. Several factors determine where a paper is published: how well the topic of the paper fits the scope of the journal, the quality of the study and the manuscript describing it, the advance the paper makes in its field, the importance of the advance, and the extent to which the paper impacts the broader community of science. As scientists, we assume that our papers will be assessed objectively using only well defined scientific standards, but editors and reviewers also view papers subjectively, having biases of what defines a high-quality publication based on Western standards. Therefore, scientists trained in other parts of the world can be significantly disadvantaged in getting their papers published in the best journals. Here, I present concrete suggestions for improving the perception of a paper in the reader's minds, increasing the likelihood that it will get published well.

  1. Seven decades of history of science: I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), second editor of Isis.

    PubMed

    Dauben, Joseph W; Gleason, Mary Louise; Smith, George E

    2009-03-01

    I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), the first American to receive a Ph.D. in history of science, was a Harvard undergraduate ('37) and then a Ph.D. student and protégé of George Sarton, founder of Isis and the History of Science Society. He went on to succeed Sarton as editor of Isis (1952-1958) and, later, president of the Society (1961-1962); he was also a president of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. Cohen was an internationally recognized Newton scholar; his interests were encyclopedic, ranging from science and public policy to the history of computers, with several decades as a special consultant for history of computing with IBM. Among his hundreds of publications were such major books as Franklin and Newton (1956), The Birth of a New Physics (1959; rpt., 1985), The Newtonian Revolution (1980), Revolution in Science (1985), Science and the Founding Fathers (1995), Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer (1999), and his last book, The Triumph of Numbers (2005), not to mention two jointly authored contributions, the variorum edition and new English translation of Newton's Principia, which will surely still be read a century from now.

  2. [Letters to the editor published in Peruvian biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru 2006-2013].

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Mejía-Dolores, Jhon William; Chalco-Huamán, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    This bibliometric study describes the characteristics of letters to the editor published between 2006-2013 in biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru.253 letters (10.3% of total publications) were collected. Most letters (139) were in the Peruvian Journal of Experimental Medicine and Public Health, with marked increase throughout those years. 25% of letters submitted included medical student participation. 14% of authors presented with international affiliations and 27% with endogenous affiliation - common in university journals (Anales de la Facultad de Medicina, Revista Médica Herediana).The usual criteria justifying the publication of letters were: opinion of medical fact or public domain (35.6%) and discussion of results, methodological flaws or interpretation (22.9%). In biomedical journals indexed in SciELO Peru the letters to the editor comprise a percentage of publications that has increased in recent years, with low publication of letters of findings or primary data, compared with opinion or criticism.

  3. [Luis Hidalgo y Carpio, Editor of Gaceta Médica de México (1818-1879)].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Martha Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Luis Hidalgo y Carpio (1818-1879) was a notable physician who made important contributions to the field of medicine during his time. Nevertheless, reference sources on the aspect from Hidalgo y Carpio that we would like to emphasize (i.e. as an editor of a medical journal) are scarce since precisely when Hidalgo y Carpio was named President of the Medical Society (later the Academia Nacional de Medicina), in 1987, the publication of the Gaceta Médica de México was temporarily interrupted. Hidalgo y Carpio played a key role as an editor at a time when the medical community of Mexico required a means whereby the scientific achievements could be published and discussed among peers and colleagues. Under Hidalgo y Carpio, the Gaceta Médica de México soon reached a wide audience, not only as a periodical publication but also for the prestige of the Academy that represented.

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F and other synthetic multivulva genes negatively regulate the anaphase-promoting complex gene mat-3/APC8.

    PubMed

    Garbe, David; Doto, Jeffrey B; Sundaram, Meera V

    2004-06-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F complexes repress expression of many genes important for G(1)-to-S transition, but also appear to regulate gene expression at other stages of the cell cycle. In C. elegans, lin-35/Rb and other synthetic Multivulva (SynMuv) group B genes function redundantly with other sets of genes to regulate G(1)/S progression, vulval and pharyngeal differentiation, and other unknown processes required for viability. Here we show that lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F, and other SynMuv B genes negatively regulate a component of the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). The APC/C is a multisubunit complex that promotes metaphase-to-anaphase progression and G(1) arrest by targeting different substrates for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated destruction. The C. elegans APC/C gene mat-3/APC8 has been defined by temperature-sensitive embryonic lethal alleles that strongly affect germline meiosis and mitosis but only weakly affect somatic development. We describe severe nonconditional mat-3 alleles and a hypomorphic viable allele (ku233), all of which affect postembryonic cell divisions including those of the vulval lineage. The ku233 lesion is located outside of the mat-3 coding region and reduces mat-3 mRNA expression. Loss-of-function alleles of lin-35/Rb and other SynMuv B genes suppress mat-3(ku233) defects by restoring mat-3 mRNA to wild-type levels. Therefore, Rb/E2F complexes appear to repress mat-3 expression.

  5. A cardiac myocyte-restricted Lin28/let7 regulatory axis promotes hypoxia-mediated apoptosis by inducing the AKT signaling suppressor PIK3IP1

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shaurya; Wei, Jianqin; Bishopric, Nanette H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The let-7 family of microRNAs (miRs) regulates critical cell functions, including survival signaling, differentiation, metabolic control and glucose utilization. These functions may be important during myocardial ischemia. MiR-let-7 expression is under tight temporal and spatial control through multiple redundant mechanisms that may be stage-, isoform- and tissue-specific. Objective To determine the mechanisms and functional consequences of miR-let-7 regulation by hypoxia in the heart. Methods and Results MiR-let-7a, -7c and -7g were downregulated in the adult mouse heart early after coronary occlusion, and in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes subjected to hypoxia. Let-7 repression did not require glucose depletion, and occurred at a post-transcriptional level. Hypoxia also induced the RNA binding protein Lin28, a negative regulator of let-7. Hypoxia induced neither Lin28 induction nor miR-let-7 repression in cardiac fibroblasts. Both changes were abrogated by treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. Restoration of let-7g to hypoxic myocytes and to ischemia-reperfused mouse hearts in vivo via lentiviral transduction potentiated the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation and activation of Akt, and prevented hypoxia-dependent caspase activation and death. Mechanistically, phosphotidyl inositol 3’kinase interacting protein 1 (PIK3IP1), a negative regulator of PI3K, was identified as a novel target of miR-let-7 by a crosslinking technique showing that miR-let-7g specifically targets PI3KIP1 to the cardiac myocyte Argonaute complex RISC. Finally, in non-failing and failing human myocardium, we found specific inverse relationships between Lin28 and miR-let-7g, and between miR-let-7g and PIK3IP1. Conclusion A conserved hypoxia-responsive Lin28-miR-let-7-PIK3IP1 regulatory axis is specific to cardiac myocytes and promotes apoptosis during myocardial ischemic injury. PMID:26655604

  6. GENII-LIN-2.1: an open source software system for calculating radiation dose and risk from radionuclides released to the environment.

    PubMed

    Teodori, Francesco; Sumini, Marco

    2008-12-01

    GENII-LIN is an open source radiation protection environmental software system running on the Linux operating system. It has capabilities for calculating radiation dose and risk to individuals or populations from radionuclides released to the environment and from pre-existing environmental contamination. It can handle exposure pathways that include ingestion, inhalation and direct exposure to air, water and soil. The package is available for free and is completely open source, i.e., transparent to the users, who have full access to the source code of the software.

  7. MindEdit: A P300-based text editor for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Amr S; Eldawlatly, Seif; Taher, Mohamed; Aly, Gamal M

    2017-01-01

    Practical application of Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) requires that the whole BCI system be portable. The mobility of BCI systems involves two aspects: making the electroencephalography (EEG) recording devices portable, and developing software applications with low computational complexity to be able to run on low computational-power devices such as tablets and smartphones. This paper addresses the development of MindEdit; a P300-based text editor for Android-based devices. Given the limited resources of mobile devices and their limited computational power, a novel ensemble classifier is utilized that uses Principal Component Analysis (PCA) features to identify P300 evoked potentials from EEG recordings. PCA computations in the proposed method are channel-based as opposed to concatenating all channels as in traditional feature extraction methods; thus, this method has less computational complexity compared to traditional P300 detection methods. The performance of the method is demonstrated on data recorded from MindEdit on an Android tablet using the Emotiv wireless neuroheadset. Results demonstrate the capability of the introduced PCA ensemble classifier to classify P300 data with maximum average accuracy of 78.37±16.09% for cross-validation data and 77.5±19.69% for online test data using only 10 trials per symbol and a 33-character training dataset. Our analysis indicates that the introduced method outperforms traditional feature extraction methods. For a faster operation of MindEdit, a variable number of trials scheme is introduced that resulted in an online average accuracy of 64.17±19.6% and a maximum bitrate of 6.25bit/min. These results demonstrate the efficacy of using the developed BCI application with mobile devices.

  8. Representing the nature of science in a science textbook: Exploring author-editor-publisher interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiuseppe, Maurizio

    Current reforms in elementary and secondary science education call for students and teachers to develop more informed views of the nature of science---a process in which learning materials like science textbooks play a significant role. This dissertation reports on a case study of the development of representations of the nature of science in one unit of a senior high school chemistry textbook by the book's author, editor, and publisher. The study examines the multiple discourses that arose as the developers reflected on their personal and shared understandings of the nature of science; squared these understandings with mandated curricula, the educational needs of chemistry students and teachers, and the exigencies of large-scale commercial textbook publishing; and developed and incorporated into the textbook representations of the nature of science they believed were the most suitable. Analyses of the data in this study indicate that a number of factors significantly influenced the development of representations of the nature of science, including representational accuracy (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science conformed to what the developers believed were contemporary understandings of the nature of science), representational consistency (the degree to which similar representations of the nature of science in different parts of the textbook conveyed the same meaning), representational appropriateness (the age-, grade-, and reading-level suitability of the suggested nature of science representations), representational alignment (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science addressed the requirements of mandated curricula), representational marketability (the degree to which textbook developers believed suggested representations of the nature of science would affect sales of the textbook in the marketplace), and a number of "Workplace Resources" factors such as the availability of time, relevant expertise

  9. The relation of seasonal pattern in stable carbon compositions to meteorological variables in the leaves of Sabina przewalskii Kom. and Sabina chinensis (Lin.) Ant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youbin; Chen, Tuo; Zhang, Youfu; An, Lizhe

    2007-02-01

    The seasonal variation of foliar δ13C values in Sabina przewalskii Kom. and Sabina chinensis (Lin.) Ant. was measured. The relationships between foliar δ13C values and branch δ13C values as well as environmental factors (monthly total precipitation, monthly average air temperature, monthly average soil temperature, monthly total solar duration, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, vapor pressure, wind speed and potential evaporation) were investigated. The results showed that the foliar δ13C values were negatively correlated with air pressure, and positively correlated with air temperature, precipitation, vapor pressure, potential evaporation, solar duration, wind speed and soil temperature. No significant relationship between δ13C values and relative humidity was detected. This demonstrates that the foliar δ13C of Sabina is a successful empirical indictor of these meteorological factors within the usual range of C3 whole-leaf δ13C values. Furthermore, the δ13C signature of leaf tissue is similar to that of wood tissue and the responses of δ13C values in S. przewalskii Kom. to environmental factors are also relatively stronger than that of S. chinensis (Lin.) Ant. These results provided strong evidence that it is feasible to extract climatic information from tree-ring δ13C series and S. przewalskii Kom. is a dendroclimatologically promising tree species.

  10. Expression of TAT recombinant Oct4, Sox2, Lin28, and Nanog proteins from baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chuanying; Jia, Wenchao; Lu, Baisong; Bishop, Colin E

    2015-02-10

    Somatic cell reprogramming has generated enormous interest, following the first report of generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts, but the integration of viral transgenes into the genome is unlikely to be accepted. Given these safety considerations, a method for virus-free transient gene expression from suspension-adapted Sf9 insect cells was developed. Here, we expressed transactivator of transcription (TAT)-fused proteins, Sox2, Oct4, Lin28, and Nanog in Sf9 cells using the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). The molecular weights of the TAT-Sox2, TAT-Oct4, TAT-Lin28, and TAT-Nanog fusion proteins were 36kD, 40kD, 24kD, and 36kD, respectively. Further investigation indicated that most of the recombinant proteins remained in the nuclei of the Sf9 insect cells and were therefore unavailable for purification and cellular reprogramming. Once this problem has been solved, it seems likely that protein expressed from baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells will be the method of choice for cellular reprogramming.

  11. NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2008-10-01

    The Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods are now standard routines in various data analyses, irrespective of ones own preference to the more conventional approach based on so-called frequentists understanding of the notion of the probability. It is not the purpose of the Editor to show all achievements of these methods in various branches of science, technology and medicine. In the case of condensed matter physics most of the oldest examples of Bayesian analysis can be found in the excellent tutorial textbooks by Sivia and Skilling [1], and Bretthorst [2], while the application of the Maximum Entropy Methods were described in `Maximum Entropy in Action' [3]. On the list of questions addressed one finds such problems as deconvolution and reconstruction of the complicated spectra, e.g. counting the number of lines hidden within the spectrum observed with always finite resolution, reconstruction of charge, spin and momentum density distribution from an incomplete sets of data, etc. On the theoretical side one might find problems like estimation of interatomic potentials [4], application of the MEM to quantum Monte Carlo data [5], Bayesian approach to inverse quantum statistics [6], very general to statistical mechanics [7] etc. Obviously, in spite of the power of the Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods, it is not possible for everything to be solved in a unique way by application of these particular methods of analysis, and one of the problems which is often raised is connected not only with a uniqueness of a reconstruction of a given distribution (map) but also with its accuracy (error maps). In this `Comments' section we present a few papers showing more recent advances and views, and highlighting some of the aforementioned problems. References [1] Sivia D S and Skilling J 2006 Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial 2nd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press) [2] Bretthorst G L 1988 Bayesian Spectruim Analysis and Parameter Estimation (Berlin: Springer) [3] Buck B and

  12. A survey of the awareness, knowledge, policies and views of veterinary journal Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines for publication of research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wider adoption of reporting guidelines by veterinary journals could improve the quality of published veterinary research. The aims of this study were to assess the knowledge and views of veterinary Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines, identify the policies of their journals, and determine their information needs. Editors-in-Chief of 185 journals on the contact list for the International Association of Veterinary Editors (IAVE) were surveyed in April 2012 using an online questionnaire which contained both closed and open questions. Results The response rate was 36.8% (68/185). Thirty-six of 68 editors (52.9%) stated they knew what a reporting guideline was before receiving the questionnaire. Editors said they had found out about reporting guidelines primarily through articles in other journals, via the Internet and through their own journal. Twenty of 57 respondents (35.1%) said their journal referred to reporting guidelines in its instructions to authors. CONSORT, REFLECT, and ARRIVE were the most frequently cited. Forty-four of 68 respondents (68.2%) believed that reporting guidelines should be adopted by all refereed veterinary journals. Qualitative analysis of the open questions revealed that lack of knowledge, fear, resistance to change, and difficulty in implementation were perceived as barriers to the adoption of reporting guidelines by journals. Editors suggested that reporting guidelines be promoted through communication and education of the veterinary community, with roles for the IAVE and universities. Many respondents believed a consensus policy on guideline implementation was needed for veterinary journals. Conclusions Further communication and education about reporting guidelines for editors, authors and reviewers has the potential to increase their adoption by veterinary journals in the future. PMID:24410882

  13. Highly efficient lentiviral gene transfer in CD34+ and CD34+/38-/lin- cells from mobilized peripheral blood after cytokine prestimulation.

    PubMed

    Géronimi, Fabien; Richard, Emmanuel; Redonnet-Vernhet, Isabelle; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Moreau-Gaudry, François; De Verneuil, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    Because mobilized peripheral blood (mPB) represents an attractive source of cells for gene therapy, we investigated lentiviral gene transfer in CD34(+) cells and the stem/progenitor-cell-enriched CD34(+)/38(-)/lin(-) cell subset isolated from mPB. In this study, we used an optimized third-generation self-inactivating lentiviral vector containing both the central polypurine tract and the woodchuck hepatitis posttranscriptional regulatory element sequences and encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the elongation factor lalpha promoter. This lentivector was first used to compare multiplicity of infection (MOI)-dependent gene transfer efficiency in cord blood (CB) versus mPB CD34(+)-derived cells, colony-forming cells (CFCs), and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs). Results showed a difference in the percentage of transduced cells particularly significant at low MOIs. A plateau was reached where 15% and 25% of CB and mPB cells, respectively, remained refractory to lentiviral trans-duction. Effects of a cytokine prestimulation period (18 hours) with interleukin-3, stem cell factor, Flt-3 ligand, and thrombopoietin were then analyzed in total cells, CFCs, and LTC-ICs derived from mPB CD34(+) cells. Transduction levels in those conditions demonstrated a two- and fourfold increase in CFCs and LTC-ICs, respectively, compared with unstimulated (<3 hours) control cells. Moreover, using the same transduction protocol, we were able to efficiently transduce CD34(+)/38(-)/lin(-) cells isolated from mPB, with up to >85% of colonies derived from LTC-ICs expressing EGFP and gene transfer levels remaining stable for 10 weeks in liquid culture. We therefore demonstrate a highly efficient gene transfer in this therapeutically relevant target cell population.

  14. The editor, the publisher, and his mother: the representation of lesbians and gays in the New York Times.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Daniel; Barclay, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The attention and prominence given to issues in media outlets may affect the importance citizens attribute to them, so the actors who influence mass media coverage decisions may have political power in society generally. This article seeks to measure the relative influence of journalists, social trends, events, government officials, editors, and owners on the New York Times coverage of lesbians and gays from 1960 to 1995. Although many factors affected the nature and frequency of such coverage, the findings of this article show that the owners of the Times exerted decisive influence. Documentary evidence reveals that the Times' owners actively intervened to suppress coverage of lesbians and gays until 1987, even as reporters and editors recognized that increased social visibility made them newsworthy. Statistical analysis confirms that, although some actual events and statements of officials attracted attention from the newspaper throughout the period, they were more likely to generate prominent coverage after 1987 when the stories were consistent with the enthusiasms of the owners.

  15. Historical model for editor and Office of Research Integrity cooperation in handling allegations, investigation, and retraction in a contentious (Abbs) case of research misconduct.

    PubMed

    Price, Alan R; Daroff, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation between a journal editor and the federal Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in addressing investigations of research misconduct, each performing their own responsibilities while keeping each other informed of events and evidence, can be critical to the professional and regulatory resolution of a case. This paper describes the history of one of ORI's most contentious investigations that involved falsification of research on Parkinson's disease patients by James Abbs, Professor of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, published in the journal Neurology, which was handled cooperatively by the authors, who were the chief ORI investigator and the Editor-in-Chief of Neurology, respectively.

  16. Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet: Letter to the Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Thomas P; Wenzel, Thomas P; Ross, Marc

    2008-05-01

    Letter to the Editors from Leonard Evans, Bloomfield Hills, MI: Single-vehicle crashes, which account for half of occupant fatalities, are not mentioned in 'Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet', by Thomas P. Wenzel and Marc Ross (March-April). Simple physics shows that in such crashes risk declines as vehicle mass increases. The authors write 'driving imported luxury cars carries extremely low risk, for reasons that are not obvious'. The reasons are obvious--the cars are purchased by low-risk drivers. If they swapped vehicles with drivers of sports cars (which have high risk), the risks would stick with the drivers, not the vehicles. The article reflects the American belief that death on our roads can be substantially reduced by making vehicles in which it is safer to crash. From 1979 through 2002, Great Britain, Canada and Australia reduced fatalities by an average of 49 percent, compared with 16 percent in the U.S. Accumulating the differences over this time shows that by merely matching the safety performance of these other countries, about 200,000 fewer Americans would have died. These trends continue. In 2006 the U.S. recorded 42,642 traffic deaths, a modest 22 percent decline from our all-time high. Sweden recorded 445, a reduction of 66 percent from their all-time high. The obsessive focus on vehicles rather than on countermeasures that scientific research shows substantially reduce risk is at the core of our dramatic safety failure. The only way to substantially reduce deaths is to reduce the risk of crashing, not to make it safer to crash. The response from Drs. Wenzel and Ross: Of course Dr. Evans is correct in stating that driver behavior influences crash risk. In our article we made clear that our estimates of risk include how well a vehicle/driver combination avoids a crash, as well as how crash-worthy a vehicle (and robust a driver) is once a crash occurs. We also analyzed two variables that can account for driver behavior: the fraction of all

  17. Rika-Shoshi, the First Physics Experiment Textbook Published in Japanese and its Editor, Jun'ichi Udagawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Akabane, Akira; Shozawa, Jun; Tamaki, Toyomi

    The aim of this study is to examine the teaching of physics experiment at elementary and secondary school levels at the time when Japanese science education commenced. In this report, we focused on the first Japanese textbook of physics experiment, Rika-Shoshi, published in 1882 and the editor of the book, Udagawa Jun'ichi. Many experiments in Rika-Shoshi can be performed using low-cost everyday materials. We compare Rika-Shoshi with the original English textbooks and describe Udagawa's physics teaching in the Gunma Normal School based on the documents in the Gunma University archives. We discuss how we can learn from physics education as taught about 130 years ago.

  18. Survey of editors and reviewers of high-impact psychology journals: statistical and research design problems in submitted manuscripts.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alex; Reeder, Rachelle; Hyun, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed 21 editors and reviewers from major psychology journals to identify and describe the statistical and design errors they encounter most often and to get their advice regarding prevention of these problems. Content analysis of the text responses revealed themes in 3 major areas: (a) problems with research design and reporting (e.g., lack of an a priori power analysis, lack of congruence between research questions and study design/analysis, failure to adequately describe statistical procedures); (b) inappropriate data analysis (e.g., improper use of analysis of variance, too many statistical tests without adjustments, inadequate strategy for addressing missing data); and (c) misinterpretation of results. If researchers attended to these common methodological and analytic issues, the scientific quality of manuscripts submitted to high-impact psychology journals might be significantly improved.

  19. [Book review] Ecological Scale - Theory and Applications by D.L. Peterson and V. Thomas Parker, editors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    Covering the complexity of the scale topic, this volume represents an important compilation of information on a topic that is often misunderstood, and one for which little attention is paid (although, thankfully, this seems to be on the decline). Although technical, this book provides full exposure to the scale issue in ecology and is an important reference for researchers and resource managers who are working to understand and preserve ecological function in parks. The authors and editors have combined to provide a needed examination of a very important topic. In summary, why purchase all those books on scale when just one will do? The mountain of information alone stuffed into this one book should prompt all parks to get a copy and have it on hand as a quick and ready reference.

  20. Integrative genomic analyses identify LIN28 and OLIG2 as markers of survival and metastatic potential in childhood central nervous system primitive neuro-ectodermal brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Daniel; Miller, Suzanne; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Bouffet, Eric; Rogers, Hazel A; Chan, Tiffany SY; Kim, Seung-Ki; Ra, Young-Shin; Fangusaro, Jason; Korshunov, Andrey; Toledano, Helen; Nakamura, Hideo; Hayden, James T; Chan, Jennifer; Lafay-Cousin, Lucie; Hu, Ping X; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; Pomeroy, Scott L; Lau, Ching C; Ng, Ho-Keung; Jones, Chris; Meter, Timothy Van; Clifford, Steven C; Eberhart, Charles; Gajjar, Amar; Pfister, Stefan M; Grundy, Richard G; Huang, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood Central Nervous System Primitive Neuro-Ectodermal brain Tumours (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive brain tumours for which molecular features and best therapeutic strategy remains unknown. We interrogated a large cohort of these rare tumours in order to identify molecular markers that will enhance clinical management of CNS-PNET. Methods Transcriptional and copy number profiles from primary hemispheric CNS-PNETs were examined using clustering, gene and pathways enrichment analyses to discover tumour sub-groups and group-specific molecular markers. Immuno-histochemical and/or gene expression analyses were used to validate and examine the clinical significance of novel sub-group markers in 123 primary CNS-PNETs. Findings Three molecular sub-groups of CNS-PNETs distinguished by primitive neural (Group 1), oligo-neural (Group 2) and mesenchymal lineage (Group 3) gene expression signature were identified. Tumour sub-groups exhibited differential expression of cell lineage markers, LIN28 and OLIG2, and correlated with distinct demographics, survival and metastatic incidence. Group 1 tumours affected primarily younger females; male: female ratios were respectively 0.61 (median age 2.9 years; 95% CI: 2.4–5.2; p≤ 0.005), 1.25 (median age 7.9 years; 95% CI: 6–9.7) and 1.63 (median age 5.9 years; 95% CI: 4.9–7.8) for group 1, 2 and 3 patients. Overall outcome was poorest in group 1 patients which had a median survival of 0.8 years (95% CI: 0.47–1.2; p=0.019) as compared to 1.8 years (95% CI: 1.4–2.3) and 4.3 years; (95% CI: 0.82–7.8) respectively for group 2 and 3 patients. Group 3 tumours had the highest incidence of metastases at diagnosis; M0: M+ ratio were respectively 0.9 and 3.9 for group 3, versus group 1 and 2 tumours combined (p=0.037). Interpretation LIN28 and OLIG2 represent highly promising, novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers for CNS PNET that warrants further evaluation in prospective clinical trials. PMID:22691720

  1. Sylvia Taylor Johnson, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of "The Journal of Negro Education" (1994-2001): A World-Class Champion Runner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Gerunda B.; Wallace, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    With characteristic crystal clarity and advanced, sharply honed research skills, Dr. Sylvia T. Johnson was able to take full advantage of holding the position of Editor-in-Chief of "The Journal of Negro Education" from 1994 to 2001. This article summarizes her accomplishments through the many hats she wore.

  2. Response to the Letter to the Editor of Crop Science from Donald R. Davis regarding our research article published in Crop Science (2011: 51:2721-2727)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This letter serves as a response to the Letter to the Editor submitted by Donald R. Davis regarding our research article entitled “Mineral Concentration of Broccoli Florets in Relation to Year of Cultivar Release” published in Crop Science (2011, 51:2721-2727). In our manuscript, we clearly stated ...

  3. Erratum: Letter to the Editor: Exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma (buphthalmos) from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} is the reprint of a corrected table from a previous paper about the exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11.

  4. Letter to the editor for the article "Auto-injector needle length may be inadequate to deliver epinephrine intramuscularly in women with confirmed food allergy".

    PubMed

    Song, T Ted

    2014-01-01

    Letter to the Editor for "Auto-injector needle length may be inadequate to deliver epinephrine intramuscularly in women with confirmed food allergy" by Tsai et al. There are limitations of this study note mentioning such as method of compression, role of propulsion, defining those patients who are at risk of prophylaxis and future studies.

  5. On Paper or Hypermedia? The Effect of Procedural Information in Digital Video Format in the Learning of a Music Score Editor Program by Novice Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gimenez, Jesus Tejada; Saenz de Jubera, Magdalena

    This study, by means of an experimental design, examines whether the use of an electronic manual is more effective and efficient than a print manual for the training of novice users with a music score editor program. Differences in access to the two types of manuals were looked for, and information on users' perceptions regarding the materials…

  6. Problems of Journalism; Proceedings of the 1975 Annual Convention of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (Washington, D.C., April 16-18, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society of Newspaper Editors, Easton, PA.

    This document reports the 1975 proceedings of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) convention held in Washington, D.C., April 16-18. The contents include a list of officers and directors, past presidents of the society, and a copy of the ASNE Code of Ethics. Also contained in the document are reports on such individual sessions as…

  7. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation of the critical organizational/business processes. In particular, this paper examines the issues of execution atomicity and failure atomicity, differentiating between correctness requirements of system failures and logical failures, and surveys techniques that can be used to ensure data consistency in workflow management systems. While the first paper is concerned with correctness assuming transactional workflows in which selective transactional properties are associated with individual tasks or the entire workflow, the second paper, `Scheduling workflows by enforcing intertask dependencies' by Attie et al, assumes that the tasks can be either transactions or other activities involving legacy systems. This second paper describes the modelling and specification of conditions involving events and dependencies among tasks within a workflow using temporal logic and finite state automata. It also presents a scheduling algorithm that enforces all stated dependencies by executing at any given time only those events that are allowed by all the dependency automata and in an order as specified by the dependencies. In any system with decentralized control, there is a need to effectively cope with the tension that exists between autonomy and consistency requirements. In `A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems', Ben-Shaul and Heineman focus on the specific requirement of enforcing failure atomicity in decentralized, autonomous and interacting workflow management systems. Their paper describes a model in which each workflow manager must be able to specify the sequence of tasks that comprise an atomic unit for the purposes of correctness, and the degrees of local and global atomicity for the purpose of cooperation with other workflow managers. The paper also discusses a realization of this model in which treaties and summits provide an agreement mechanism, while underlying transaction managers are responsible for maintaining failure atomicity. The fourth and fifth papers are experience papers describing a workflow management system and a large scale workflow application, respectively. Schill and Mittasch, in `Workflow management systems on top of OSF DCE and OMG CORBA', describe a decentralized workflow management system and discuss its implementation using two standardized middleware platforms, namely, OSF DCE and OMG CORBA. The system supports a new approach to workflow management, introducing several new concepts such as data type management for integrating various types of data and quality of service for various services provided by servers. A problem common to both database applications and workflows is the handling of missing and incomplete information. This is particularly pervasive in an `electronic market' with a huge number of retail outlets producing and exchanging volumes of data, the application discussed in `Information flow in the DAMA project beyond database managers: information flow managers'. Motivated by the need for a method that allows a task to proceed in a timely manner if not all data produced by other tasks are available by its deadline, Russell et al propose an architectural framework and a language that can be used to detect, approximate and, later on, to adjust missing data if necessary. The final paper, `The evolution towards flexible workflow systems' by Nutt, is complementary to the other papers and is a survey of issues and of work related to both workflow and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) areas. In particular, the paper provides a model and a categorization of the dimensions which workflow management and CSCW systems share. Besides summarizing the recent advancements towards efficient workflow management, the papers in this special issue suggest areas open to investigation and it is our hope that they will also provide the stimulus for further research and development in the area of workflow management systems.

  8. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    The organization of a distributed system can have a tremendous impact on its capabilities, its performance, and its ability to evolve to meet changing requirements. For example, the client - server organization model has proven to be adequate for organizing a distributed system as a number of distributed servers that offer various functions to client processes across the network. However, it lacks peer-to-peer capabilities, and experience with the model has been predominantly in the context of local networks. To achieve peer-to-peer cooperation in a more global context, systems issues of scale, heterogeneity, configuration management, accounting and sharing are crucial, and the complexity of migrating from locally distributed to more global systems demands new tools and techniques. An emphasis on interfaces and modules leads to the modelling of a complex distributed system as a collection of interacting objects that communicate with each other only using requests sent to well defined interfaces. Although object granularity typically varies at different levels of a system architecture, the same object abstraction can be applied to various levels of a computing architecture. Since 1989, the Object Management Group (OMG), an international software consortium, has been defining an architecture for distributed object systems called the Object Management Architecture (OMA). At the core of the OMA is a `software bus' called an Object Request Broker (ORB), which is specified by the OMG Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification. The OMA distributed object model fits the structure of heterogeneous distributed applications, and is applied in all layers of the OMA. For example, each of the OMG Object Services, such as the OMG Naming Service, is structured as a set of distributed objects that communicate using the ORB. Similarly, higher-level OMA components such as Common Facilities and Domain Interfaces are also organized as distributed objects that can be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S Rahkila and S Stenberg, discusses the application of CORBA to telecommunication management networks. In the second paper, P Narasimhan, L E Moser and P M Melliar-Smith present a fault-tolerant extension of an ORB. The third paper, by J Liang, S Sédillot and B Traverson, provides an overview of the CORBA Transaction Service and its integration with the ISO Distributed Transaction Processing protocol. In the fourth paper, D Sherer, T Murer and A Würtz discuss the evolution of a cooperative software engineering infrastructure to a CORBA-based framework. The fifth paper, by R Fatoohi, evaluates the communication performance of a commercially-available Object Request Broker (Orbix from IONA Technologies) on several networks, and compares the performance with that of more traditional communication primitives (e.g., BSD UNIX sockets and PVM). We wish to thank both the referees and the authors of these papers, as their cooperation was fundamental in ensuring timely publication.

  9. Cloning of a CACTA transposon-like insertion in intron I of tomato invertase Lin5 gene and identification of transposase-like sequences of Solanaceae species.

    PubMed

    Proels, Reinhard K; Roitsch, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Very few CACTA transposon-like sequences have been described in Solanaceae species. Sequence information has been restricted to partial transposase (TPase)-like fragments, and no target gene of CACTA-like transposon insertion has been described in tomato to date. In this manuscript, we report on a CACTA transposon-like insertion in intron I of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) invertase gene Lin5 and TPase-like sequences of several Solanaceae species. Consensus primers deduced from the TPase region of the tomato CACTA transposon-like element allowed the amplification of similar sequences from various Solanaceae species of different subfamilies including Solaneae (Solanum tuberosum), Cestreae (Nicotiana tabacum) and Datureae (Datura stramonium). This demonstrates the ubiquitous presence of CACTA-like elements in Solanaceae genomes. The obtained partial sequences are highly conserved, and allow further detection and detailed analysis of CACTA-like transposons throughout Solanaceae species. CACTA-like transposon sequences make possible the evaluation of their use for genome analysis, functional studies of genes and the evolutionary relationships between plant species.

  10. Détermination du champ électromagnétique dans un résonateur linéaire supraconducteur à HTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotel, A.; Sautrot, S.; Pyee, M.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper, the electromagnetic field configuration in a linear SHTC resonator is described. Two areas are considered : 1) the superconducting strip, 2) the dielectric around the strip. The calculation is based on the current density given by Bowers [1, 2] for an infinite superconducting line. The current density in the resonator is defined by these relations and the resonance conditions. Cet article décrit la configuration du champ électromagnétique dans un résonateur linéaire SHTC. Deux domaines sont considérés : 1) dans le ruban supraconducteur, 2) dans le milieu diélectrique entourant le ruban. Ce calcul s'appuie sur la densité de courant donnée par Bowers [1, 2] pour une ligne infinie supraconductrice. La densité de courant dans le résonateur est définie par ces relations et les conditions de résonance.

  11. FORMATION OF MOONLETS IN SATURN'S RINGS: THE ROLE OF THE CONSTRUCTIVE INTERFERENCE OF LIN-SHU-TYPE CIRCULAR AND SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Griv, Evgeny

    2011-05-20

    Localized kilometer-sized propeller features, recently detected in CASSINI images of Saturn's A ring, may be interpreted as signatures of small hundred-meter-sized moonlets embedded within the broad ring. We propose that these moonlets are formed due to the constructive interference of the gravitationally unstable axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations of the self-gravitating Saturnian ring disk. The hydrodynamical slab model of the disk is studied to determine its instability against low-frequency compression-type, or Lin-Shu-type, oscillations whose propagation vector is perpendicular to the axis of the disk's rotation. The linear instability analysis is performed in the following way. First, we derive the general dispersion relation for the gravity perturbations inside the slab within the standard local short-wavelength approach. Next, we match the solutions to the solutions of the Poisson equation outside the slab to arrive at the particular dispersion relation. The particular dispersion relation describes the development of symmetric Jeans' perturbations which cause density enhancements. From this dispersion relation, the growth rate of Jeans-unstable oscillations developing in the spatially homogeneous slab model is obtained. The dispersion relation shows that perturbations of both types, axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric, are excited simultaneously due to the Jeans' gravitational instability. As a result, circular and spiral patterns develop. We suggest that clumping occurs due to the enhanced density increase at the intersections of the patterns. We also speculate that these clumps further develop into propeller moonlets.

  12. Human Cord Blood-Derived CD133(+)/C-Kit(+)/Lin(-) Cells Have Bipotential Ability to Differentiate into Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Outgrowth Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos; Kwon, Ja-Young; Maeng, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from bone marrow and cord blood can differentiate into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs). However, controversy exists as to whether MNCs have the pluripotent capacity to differentiate into MSCs or OECs or are a mixture of cell lineage-determined progenitors of MSCs or OECs. Here, using CD133(+)/C-kit(+)/Lin(-) mononuclear cells (CKL- cells) isolated from human umbilical cord blood using magnetic cell sorting, we characterized the potency of MNC differentiation. We first found that CKL- cells cultured with conditioned medium of OECs or MSCs differentiated into OECs or MSCs and this differentiation was also induced by cell-to-cell contact. When we cultured single CKL- cells on OEC- or MSC-conditioned medium, the cells differentiated morphologically and genetically into OEC- or MSC-like cells, respectively. Moreover, we confirmed that OECs or MSCs differentiated from CKL- cells had the ability to form capillary-like structures in Matrigel and differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Finally, using microarray analysis, we identified specific factors of OECs or MSCs that could potentially be involved in the differentiation fate of CKL- cells. Together, these results suggest that cord blood-derived CKL- cells possess at least bipotential differentiation capacity toward MSCs or OECs.

  13. [A tribute to Germán Schneider, MD, first editor of Revista Médica de Chile].

    PubMed

    Reyes, H; Kauffmann, R; Andresen, M

    1997-07-01

    Germán Schneider was born in 1820 in Magdeburg, Germany, and graduated as M.D. at the University of Bonn. In 1848, caught by the political and intellectual reformist movement in Europe, he was exiled in Paris. As part of a large group of German immigrants, he arrived in Valdivia, Chile, in 1851. Later on he moved to Santiago and in 1871 he was nominated Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of Chile school of Medicine. An active participant in the academic activities organized by Sociedad Médica de Santiago (a scientific society that evolved into the chilean Society of Internal Medicine) he was the leader of a six-men team who founded Revista Médica de Chile, in 1872. As first Editor of this medical journal, he established the basis for its continuous success and devotion to medical progress and education. Dr. Schneider died in 1884, leaving several distinguished pupils who followed his path, and a medical journal that now stands as one of the oldest in the world.

  14. Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease.

  15. Advances in the Science, Treatment, and Prevention of the Disease of Obesity: Reflections From a Diabetes Care Editors' Expert Forum.

    PubMed

    Cefalu, William T; Bray, George A; Home, Philip D; Garvey, W Timothy; Klein, Samuel; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier; Hu, Frank B; Raz, Itamar; Van Gaal, Luc; Wolfe, Bruce M; Ryan, Donna H

    2015-08-01

    As obesity rates increase, so too do the risks of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and numerous other detrimental conditions. The prevalence of obesity in U.S. adults more than doubled between 1980 and 2010, from 15.0 to 36.1%. Although this trend may be leveling off, obesity and its individual, societal, and economic costs remain of grave concern. In June 2014, a Diabetes Care Editors' Expert Forum convened to review the state of obesity research and discuss the latest prevention initiatives and behavioral, medical, and surgical therapies. This article, an outgrowth of the forum, offers an expansive view of the obesity epidemic, beginning with a discussion of its root causes. Recent insights into the genetic and physiological factors that influence body weight are reviewed, as are the pathophysiology of obesity-related metabolic dysfunction and the concept of metabolically healthy obesity. The authors address the crucial question of how much weight loss is necessary to yield meaningful benefits. They describe the challenges of behavioral modification and predictors of its success. The effects of diabetes pharmacotherapies on body weight are reviewed, including potential weight-neutral combination therapies. The authors also summarize the evidence for safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapeutic and surgical obesity treatments. The article concludes with an impassioned call for researchers, clinicians, governmental agencies, health policymakers, and health-related industries to collectively embrace the urgent mandate to improve prevention and treatment and for society at large to acknowledge and manage obesity as a serious disease.

  16. [Pollution characteristics and ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in surface sediments of Qingshan Reservoir in Lin' an City, Zhejiang Province of East China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fen; Yang, Chang-Ming; Pan, Rui-Jie

    2013-09-01

    A total of 8 representative surface sediment sampling sites were collected from the Qingshan Reservoir in Lin'an City of Zhejiang Province to investigate the differences in the total concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, and Zn among the sampling sites. The different forms of the heavy metals, i. e., acid soluble, easily reducible, easily oxidizable, and residual, were determined by BCR sequential extraction method, and the pollution degrees and potential ecological risk, of the heavy metals in the surface sediments at different sampling sites of the Reservoir were assessed by using geo-accumulation index (I(geo)) and Hakanson potential ecological risk index. There existed obvious spatial differences in the total concentrations of the heavy metals in the surface sediments of the Reservoir. The sampling sites nearby the estuaries of the tributaries flowing through downtowns and heavy industrial parks to the Reservoir had obviously higher heavy metals concentrations in surface sediments, as compared to the other sampling sites. In the sediments, Mn was mainly in acid extractable form, Cu and Pb were mainly in reducible form, and As was mainly in residual form. The surface sediments at the sampling sites nearby the estuaries of the tributaries flowing through downtowns to the Reservoir had higher proportions of acid extractable and reducibles forms of the heavy metals, which would have definite potential toxic risk to aquatic organisms. Among the 7 heavy metals in the surface sediments, As showed the highest pollution degree, followed by Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, and Zn, which were at moderate pollution degree, while Cr was at non-pollution degree, with relatively low potential ecological risk. Through the comparison of the sampling sites, it was observed that the surface sediments at the sites nearby the estuaries of Jinxi River and Hengxi River flowing through downtowns and heavy industrial parks to the Reservoir showed obviously higher heavy metals pollution degree and

  17. Gamow shell model description of radiative capture reactions 6Li(p, γ)7Be and 6Li(n, γ)7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, G. X.; Michel, N.; Fossez, K.; Płoszajczak, M.; Jaganathen, Y.; Betan, R. M. Id

    2017-04-01

    Background. According to standard stellar evolution, lithium abundance is believed to be a useful indicator of the stellar age. However, many evolved stars like red giants show huge fluctuations around expected theoretical abundances that are not yet fully understood. The better knowledge of nuclear reactions that contribute to the creation and destruction of lithium can help to solve this puzzle. Purpose. In this work we apply the Gamow shell model formulated in the coupled-channel representation to investigate the mirror radiative capture reactions 6Li(p, γ)7Be and 6Li(n, γ)7Li. Method. The cross-sections are calculated using a translationally invariant Hamiltonian with the finite-range interaction which is adjusted to reproduce spectra, binding energies and one-nucleon separation energies in 6–7Li, 7Be. The reaction channels are built by coupling the wave functions of ground state {1}1+ and excited states {3}1+, {0}1+, {2}1+ of 6Li with the projectile wave function in different partial waves. Results. We include all relevant E1, M1, and E2 transitions from the initial continuum states to the final bound states J=3/{2}1- and J=1/{2}- of 7Li and 7Be. Our microscopic astrophysical factor for the 6Li(p, γ)7Be reaction follows the average trend of the experimental value as a function of the center of mass energy. For {}6{Li}(n,γ ){}7{Li}, the calculated cross section agrees well with the data from the direct measurement of this reaction at stellar energies. Conclusion. We demonstrate that the s-wave radiative capture of proton (neutron) to the first excited state {J}π =1/{2}1+ of 7Be (7Li) is crucial and increases the total astrophysical S-factor by about 40%.

  18. [52th Commemoration of French Journal of Plastic Aesthetic Surgery (1956-2007). Fifty-four years of editorial; five Editors-in-chief].

    PubMed

    Cariou, J-L

    2007-08-01

    The french Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery (SOF.CPRE) is born December 3th 1952. Initially without "aesthetic", this "key-word" is agreed in 1983 and the symbols are advanced since: SFCPR, SFCPRE, SOF.CPRE. Its official organ, formerly included in Annales de chirurgie (1954-1955), become Annales de chirurgie plastique in 1956, Annales de chirurgie plastique et esthétique in 1983 and finally Annales de chirurgie plastique esthétique (ACPE) in 1992. Since the origin, five Editors-in-chief succeded: Claude Dufourmentel, Raymond Vilain, Jean-Pierre Lalardrie, Claude Lê-Quang, Jean-Luc Cariou. Four of them are alive, Raymond Vilain is dead. The author relate here the natural story of these five editors who had all a triple route: personnal, surgical and editorial.

  19. [Two editors in dialog. The example of Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) and Johann Bartholomäus Trommsdorff (1770-1837) and their letters].

    PubMed

    Staiger, C; Friedrich, C

    2003-04-01

    Today, scientists willing to publish results face a wide range of requirements (instructions for authors, peer review procedure). During the 18th and 19th century manuscripts were treated in a less formal way. However, the scientific discussion was vital and implemented intensely via various means, especially by letters. This study analyses the dialog of two distinguished contributors to chemical and pharmaceutical sciences, both experienced journal editors, from January 1828 to February 1837.

  20. One Size Doesn't Fit All - RefEditor: Building Personalized Diploid Reference Genome to Improve Read Mapping and Genotype Calling in Next Generation Sequencing Studies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Johnston, H Richard; Zhang, Guosheng; Li, Yun; Hu, Yi-Juan; Qin, Zhaohui S

    2015-08-01

    With rapid decline of the sequencing cost, researchers today rush to embrace whole genome sequencing (WGS), or whole exome sequencing (WES) approach as the next powerful tool for relating genetic variants to human diseases and phenotypes. A fundamental step in analyzing WGS and WES data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. This is an important issue because incorrectly mapped reads affect the downstream variant discovery, genotype calling and association analysis. Although many read mapping algorithms have been developed, the majority of them uses the universal reference genome and do not take sequence variants into consideration. Given that genetic variants are ubiquitous, it is highly desirable if they can be factored into the read mapping procedure. In this work, we developed a novel strategy that utilizes genotypes obtained a priori to customize the universal haploid reference genome into a personalized diploid reference genome. The new strategy is implemented in a program named RefEditor. When applying RefEditor to real data, we achieved encouraging improvements in read mapping, variant discovery and genotype calling. Compared to standard approaches, RefEditor can significantly increase genotype calling consistency (from 43% to 61% at 4X coverage; from 82% to 92% at 20X coverage) and reduce Mendelian inconsistency across various sequencing depths. Because many WGS and WES studies are conducted on cohorts that have been genotyped using array-based genotyping platforms previously or concurrently, we believe the proposed strategy will be of high value in practice, which can also be applied to the scenario where multiple NGS experiments are conducted on the same cohort. The RefEditor sources are available at https://github.com/superyuan/refeditor.

  1. Specific and non-specific effects of potassium cations on substrate-protein interactions in cytochromes P450cam and P450lin.

    PubMed

    Deprez, Eric; Gill, Edward; Helms, Volkhard; Wade, Rebecca C; Hui Bon Hoa, Gaston

    2002-09-20

    Substrate binding to cytochrome P450cam is generally considered to be a two-step process. The first step corresponds to the entrance of the substrate, camphor, into the heme pocket. The second step corresponds to a spin transition (low spin-->high spin) of the iron in the protein-substrate complex. This spin transition is related to the mobility of the substrate inside the active site [Biochim Biophys Acta 1338 (1997) 77]. Potassium cations (K(+)) have a specific effect on the spin equilibrium. This is generally attributed to the K(+) ion-induced conformational change of tyrosine 96, the hydroxyl group of which is hydrogen bonded to the keto group of camphor and results in optimum substrate orientation and reduced mobility of this substrate in the active site. In the present paper, we show that K(+) not only affects the substrate-Tyr 96 couple, but acts more globally since K(+) effects are also observed in the Tyr96Phe mutant as well as in complexes with camphor-analogues. Large compounds, that fit well in the heme pocket and bind with higher affinity than camphor, display high spin contents that are less dependent on the presence of K(+). In contrast, K(+) has a significant effect on the high spin content of substrate-cytochrome P450cam complexes with looser interactions. We conclude that large compounds with higher affinities than camphor have more van der Waals contacts with the active site residues. Their mobilities are then reduced and less dependent on the presence of K(+). In this study, we also explored, for comparison, the K(+) effect on the spin transition state of another member of the P450 superfamily, cytochrome P450lin. This effect is not as strong as those observed for cytochrome P450cam. Even though the spin equilibrium does not change dramatically in the presence of K(+) or Na(+), the value of the dissociation constant (K(d)) for linalool binding is significantly affected by ionic strength. Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters for the linalool

  2. Cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase from denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain 22Lin, a novel member of the thiamine diphosphate enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Alma K; Fraas, Sonja; Harder, Jens; Tabbert, Anja; Brinkmann, Henner; Meyer, Axel; Ermler, Ulrich; Kroneck, Peter M H

    2011-12-01

    Alicyclic compounds with hydroxyl groups represent common structures in numerous natural compounds, such as terpenes and steroids. Their degradation by microorganisms in the absence of dioxygen may involve a C-C bond ring cleavage to form an aliphatic intermediate that can be further oxidized. The cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase (CDH) (EC 3.7.1.11) from denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain 22Lin, grown on cyclohexane-1,2-diol as a sole electron donor and carbon source, is the first thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme characterized to date that cleaves a cyclic aliphatic compound. The degradation of cyclohexane-1,2-dione (CDO) to 6-oxohexanoate comprises the cleavage of a C-C bond adjacent to a carbonyl group, a typical feature of reactions catalyzed by ThDP-dependent enzymes. In the subsequent NAD(+)-dependent reaction, 6-oxohexanoate is oxidized to adipate. CDH has been purified to homogeneity by the criteria of gel electrophoresis (a single band at ∼59 kDa; calculated molecular mass, 64.5 kDa); in solution, the enzyme is a homodimer (∼105 kDa; gel filtration). As isolated, CDH contains 0.8 ± 0.05 ThDP, 1.0 ± 0.02 Mg(2+), and 1.0 ± 0.015 flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) per monomer as a second organic cofactor, the role of which remains unclear. Strong reductants, Ti(III)-citrate, Na(+)-dithionite, and the photochemical 5-deazaflavin/oxalate system, led to a partial reduction of the FAD chromophore. The cleavage product of CDO, 6-oxohexanoate, was also a substrate; the corresponding cyclic 1,3- and 1,4-diones did not react with CDH, nor did the cis- and trans-cyclohexane diols. The enzymes acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida, and pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis were identified as the closest relatives of CDH by comparative amino acid sequence analysis, and a ThDP binding motif and a 2-fold Rossmann fold

  3. Cyclohexane-1,2-Dione Hydrolase from Denitrifying Azoarcus sp. Strain 22Lin, a Novel Member of the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Family▿†

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Alma K.; Fraas, Sonja; Harder, Jens; Tabbert, Anja; Brinkmann, Henner; Meyer, Axel; Ermler, Ulrich; Kroneck, Peter M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Alicyclic compounds with hydroxyl groups represent common structures in numerous natural compounds, such as terpenes and steroids. Their degradation by microorganisms in the absence of dioxygen may involve a C—C bond ring cleavage to form an aliphatic intermediate that can be further oxidized. The cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase (CDH) (EC 3.7.1.11) from denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain 22Lin, grown on cyclohexane-1,2-diol as a sole electron donor and carbon source, is the first thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme characterized to date that cleaves a cyclic aliphatic compound. The degradation of cyclohexane-1,2-dione (CDO) to 6-oxohexanoate comprises the cleavage of a C—C bond adjacent to a carbonyl group, a typical feature of reactions catalyzed by ThDP-dependent enzymes. In the subsequent NAD+-dependent reaction, 6-oxohexanoate is oxidized to adipate. CDH has been purified to homogeneity by the criteria of gel electrophoresis (a single band at ∼59 kDa; calculated molecular mass, 64.5 kDa); in solution, the enzyme is a homodimer (∼105 kDa; gel filtration). As isolated, CDH contains 0.8 ± 0.05 ThDP, 1.0 ± 0.02 Mg2+, and 1.0 ± 0.015 flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) per monomer as a second organic cofactor, the role of which remains unclear. Strong reductants, Ti(III)-citrate, Na+-dithionite, and the photochemical 5-deazaflavin/oxalate system, led to a partial reduction of the FAD chromophore. The cleavage product of CDO, 6-oxohexanoate, was also a substrate; the corresponding cyclic 1,3- and 1,4-diones did not react with CDH, nor did the cis- and trans-cyclohexane diols. The enzymes acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida, and pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis were identified as the closest relatives of CDH by comparative amino acid sequence analysis, and a ThDP binding motif and a 2-fold Rossmann fold for

  4. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    A Local Physics Teachers Day: an amateur model for INSET Philip Britton Head of Physics, Leeds Grammar School Secretary, loP Education Group Determining a Slinky's spring constant Eric Kincanon Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA 99258-0051, USA Word Juxtapoz: an interesting tool for promoting physics education R Subramaniam, N K Goh and L S Chia Singapore Science Centre, Science Centre Road, Singapore 609081 Division of Chemistry, Nanyang Technological University, 469 Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259756

  5. Guest editor's note

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment transport processes in rivers are of great concern in many practical studies ranging from large-scale problems such as reservoir management, dam removal, and design of restoration works to small-scale problems such as local bed scour around intakes, outfalls and piers. Within the discipline...

  6. From the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Yevseyev, Igor V.

    2011-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, First of all, we would like to inform you on our main achievement over the past year: The impact factor of Laser Physics Letters reached 5.502 in 2009. This has promoted the journal to one of the leading journals in the world in the field of laser physics. We are very grateful to all friends of the journal who have sent us their congratulations with this success. Of course, we understand that this success is caused by several reasons. One of them is a high quality of papers submitted by our authors. Thanks are due to all of the authors for their contributions to this success of the journal. The second reason is the hard work of our referees who have the highest qualification, and, moreover, who are capable of providing their reports within just a few days. We acknowledge the important role of the annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) attracting the authors for writing articles for LPL. The last, though not the least, we are very grateful to our distinguished publisher Wiley for its valuable contribution and endless efforts to make things better and, especially, to Wiley's V-P Steven Miron for his useful counsels. The location of the annual Workshop LPHYS varies each year, which makes it possible to attract scientists from different countries. In 2010, the annual international Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'10) was held in Brazil. Using the occasion, we stress the great work done by Prof. Bagnato for organizing this conference. In 2011, the conference LPHYS'11 will be held from July 11 to July 15 in the city of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in the Congress Center of the Hotel Hollywood. We plan the participation of about 600 scientists from more than 30 countries. Concluding, we hope that Laser Physics Letters, with the help of our authors, will support and further strengthen the status of a leading journal in the field of laser physics. Sincerely Yours,

  7. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    Teachers' input to the physics syllabusRoy DansonMacclesfield College of Further Education, Cheshire, UK A new measure for ellipsesP GlaisterDepartment of Mathematics, University of Reading, UK Problems with vectorsP S TaylorTheoretical Physics Department, Imperial College, London, UK On an analogy for Ohm's lawPaulo Murilo Castro de OliveiraInstituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Nirerói, Brazil The equations of PhysicsA T JacksonBelfast Institute of Further and Higher Education An impossible observation?Bob KibblePurley Sixth Form College, London, UK

  8. Guest Editor's Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Patrick Alan

    2000-01-01

    Examines the field of international traveler and nomadic education research and argues for the need to extend the boundaries of this "field" significantly. Research on the education of travelers and nomads is mobile and fluid, but the approach used in this collection, the mapping and celebration of international diversity, is needed to…

  9. From the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Yevseyev, Igor V.

    2010-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, This preface opens the seventh volume of the journal Laser Physics Letters. We are happy to inform you that the first six years have been quite successful for the journal. In the years 2004-2009, Laser Physics Letters published around 700 original articles written by scientists from 55 countries. During these years, in addition to original articles, Laser Physics Letters published about 40 brief review invited articles written by top scientists from different countries. These review articles provide readers a unique possibility of being timely informed on the current research in different fields of laser physics and on the most fresh and important results in these fields. The brief review articles, published in Laser Physics Letters, have attracted high attention of readers and are extensively cited. Some of these review articles have been cited more than 60 times in the main journals covered by ISI Web of Science. This shows the great importance and attractiveness of the published brief review invited articles for the laser physics community. We certainly understand that such a success is due to the following reasons. First of all, the authors of Laser Physics Letters are the top scientists in the field of laser physics from all over the world. And, second, all 28 members of the Editorial Board, representing 13 countries, are strongly committed to do all their best for making the journal an excellent forum for the laser physics community. Laser Physics Letters publishes pioneering articles in different fields of laser physics. In order to be accessible to a wide auditorium, the papers should clearly point out the main contributions of the article to the field of research and their relation to other articles treating the topic. A well-written introduction is a prerequisite for a good paper. This allows the readers to better judge on the contribution of the article and to objectively evaluate the presented results. We are proud to announce that the 2008 impact factor of Laser Physics Letters reached 3.779. This is a rather good achievement for a journal published only six years. It is important to stress that each year Laser Physics Letters publishes about 150 articles. Therefore, the high impact factor is due not to the meager amount of published papers but really to the high quality of them. It is also very important that the accepted articles are displayed on the website in the section Early View just in two weeks after their acceptance. The early-view articles are already given their publication date and DOI. It makes them immediately accessible for readers and, respectively, for citation. The procedure of refereeing the submitted manuscripts is known to be of paramount importance for any journal. The refereeing process on Laser Physics Letters is unique in two points. First, it is very fast, with the standard time of reviewing about one week after the manuscript submission. Second, the refereeing is done exclusively by the top scientists in the respective fields of laser physics. Therefore, we hope that Laser Physics Letters has produced no biased or unjustified referee reports, which are so common for many journals. The Laser Physics Letters Editorial Board expresses deep gratitude to all referees of the journal. A well-organized and qualified work of the technical department of the journal is also of great importance. We are happy that this department always guarantees the highest quality of the manuscripts camera-ready copies and their figures, which has been noticed by many authors. It is worth mentioning the close collaboration of Laser Physics Letters with the annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS). The sequel of these Workshops was launched in 1992 by the Nobel Prize winner A.M. Prokhorov. There have already been 18 of these Workshops, whose history can be traced on the website www.lasphys.com. The eighteenth Workshop was held from July 13 to July 17 in Barcelona, Spain. About 580 participants from 37 countries took part in the Workshop. We hope that the next Workshop LPHYS'10, which will be held from July 5 to July 9, 2010, in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil, will also be as successful as the previous workshops. More detailed information on LPHYS'10 is given in the next page. Once again, the Editorial Board of Laser Physics Letters thanks the authors, readers, and referees of Laser Physics Letters. We do hope that our joint work will be beneficial for the development of the laser physics science. Sincerely Yours,

  10. [From the editor].

    PubMed

    Dudek, Dominika; Sobański, Jerzy A; Klasa, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Dear Readers We are happy and proud to announce that we managed to achieve intention announced in the last issue: for the first time in PubMed there is a possibility of direct and free access to the full texts published in Polish Psychiatry (Polish and English language versions are available)!!! For the issue 6/2014 they have been downloaded by Medline users already 500 times. Owing to this, papers by Polish scientists-psychiatrists are more readily available to colleagues from around the world interested in them, and Polish Psychiatry actually becomes journal of international scope. We hope that it will result in a marked improvement in the bibliometric indicators (which, however, is unrealistic to expect in the current or next year) in the following years. Spring issue of Polish Psychiatry touches several important problems. We pay attention to the texts on addiction - behavioural (Internet addiction) and alcohol. Two papers by prof. M. Wojnar's team summarize the issues related to the coexistence of alcohol dependence with other psychiatric disorders. The issue of dual diagnosis has already appeared in our magazine (for example [1]). This is an extremely difficult problem, and patients are a real challenge, both therapeutic and diagnostic. They often require a comprehensive approach: pharmacotherapy of comorbid mental illness, psychoeducation, addiction treatment programmes. For these patients the maintenance of abstinence is particularly difficult, especially in a situation of exacerbation of psychopathological symptoms. An important direction is searching for additional pharmacotherapeutic methods which help to reduce the degree of alcohol abuse and the resulting damage. These include: acamprosate, drugs which are opioid receptor antagonists [2], and in the current issue the authors from the University of Cagliari focused on baclofen. (...).

  11. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-07-01

    Mistaken determination of absorption and scattering coefficientsAlun M RobertsDepartment of Biotechnology, South Bank Polytechnic, London SE1 0AA, UK Mistaken determination of absorption and scattering coefficientsK TurveyDepartment of Applied Chemical and Physical Sciences, Napier Polytechnic, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK The heresy of absolute motionJames D Edmonds JrPhysics Department, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA 70609, USA Direction of motion of a travelling waveN GauthierDepartment of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario K7K 5L0, Canada Rayleigh scattering by a Bohr atomG P Sastry and Kapeeleshwar KrishanaDepartment of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India

  12. Letter to the Editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We would like to express several concerns regarding the article “Efficacy of vaccination of cattle with the Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo type hardjoprajitno component of a pentavalent Leptospira bacterin against experimental challenge with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo type hardj...

  13. Letter from the Editors

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Roberto; Sforza, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We are happy to publish this special issue dedicated to Prof. Rosangela Marchelli. This issue not only celebrates her long-standing scientific activity on occasion of her significant anniversary, but it is meant to recognize her contribution to Bioorganic Chemistry in the field of Artificial DNA, and in particular of Peptide Nucleic Acids. PMID:22777061

  14. Letter to the Editor

    PubMed Central

    Tuchin, Peter; Perle, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In reviewing Melikyan et al., we discuss what we think are weaknesses in the case report. The authors did not report on known risk factors for cerebrovascular accident and vertebral artery dissection. Known symptoms that appear early in vertebral artery dissection were not reported or denied, specifically related to changes in the patient's pattern of neck pain. Causality was assumed when only a weak temporal relation was involved. Finally, the case report makes it appear that the manipulation was performed by someone other than a chiropractor but therefore erroneously uses chiropractic in the title. PMID:27413722

  15. From the guest editors.

    PubMed

    Chowell, Gerardo; Feng, Zhilan; Song, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Carlos Castilo-Chavez is a Regents Professor, a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, and a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at Arizona State University. His research program is at the interface of the mathematical and natural and social sciences with emphasis on (i) the role of dynamic social landscapes on disease dispersal; (ii) the role of environmental and social structures on the dynamics of addiction and disease evolution, and (iii) Dynamics of complex systems at the interphase of ecology, epidemiology and the social sciences. Castillo-Chavez has co-authored over two hundred publications (see goggle scholar citations) that include journal articles and edited research volumes. Specifically, he co-authored a textbook in Mathematical Biology in 2001 (second edition in 2012); a volume (with Harvey Thomas Banks) on the use of mathematical models in homeland security published in SIAM's Frontiers in Applied Mathematics Series (2003); and co-edited volumes in the Series Contemporary Mathematics entitled '' Mathematical Studies on Human Disease Dynamics: Emerging Paradigms and Challenges'' (American Mathematical Society, 2006) and Mathematical and Statistical Estimation Approaches in Epidemiology (Springer-Verlag, 2009) highlighting his interests in the applications of mathematics in emerging and re-emerging diseases. Castillo-Chavez is a member of the Santa Fe Institute's external faculty, adjunct professor at Cornell University, and contributor, as a member of the Steering Committee of the '' Committee for the Review of the Evaluation Data on the Effectiveness of NSF-Supported and Commercially Generated Mathematics Curriculum Materials,'' to a 2004 NRC report. The CBMS workshop '' Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications'' lectures delivered by C. Castillo-Chavez and F. Brauer in 2011 have been published by SIAM in 2013.

  16. Letter to the Editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elementary chemistry errors are contained in: Adsorption sequence of toxic inorganic anions on a soil by S. Saeki published in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology (2008) 81:508-512. In the article, the author asserts emphatically that he is studying As(V) not As(III) adsorpt...

  17. Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Jeff; Moffett, Jonathan

    1996-06-01

    Special Issue on Management This special issue contains seven papers originally presented at an International Workshop on Services for Managing Distributed Systems (SMDS'95), held in September 1995 in Karslruhe, Germany. The workshop was organized to present the results of two ESPRIT III funded projects, Sysman and IDSM, and more generally to bring together work in the area of distributed systems management. The workshop focused on the tools and techniques necessary for managing future large-scale, multi-organizational distributed systems. The open call for papers attracted a large number of submissions and the subsequent attendance at the workshop, which was larger than expected, clearly indicated that the topics addressed by the workshop were of considerable interest both to industry and academia. The papers selected for this special issue represent an excellent coverage of the issues addressed by the workshop. A particular focus of the workshop was the need to help managers deal with the size and complexity of modern distributed systems by the provision of automated support. This automation must have two prime characteristics: it must provide a flexible management system which responds rapidly to changing organizational needs, and it must provide both human managers and automated management components with the information that they need, in a form which can be used for decision-making. These two characteristics define the two main themes of this special issue. To satisfy the requirement for a flexible management system, workers in both industry and universities have turned to architectures which support policy directed management. In these architectures policy is explicitly represented and can be readily modified to meet changing requirements. The paper `Towards implementing policy-based systems management' by Meyer, Anstötz and Popien describes an approach whereby policy is enforced by event-triggered rules. Krause and Zimmermann in their paper `Implementing configuration management policies for distributed applications' present a system in which the configuration of the system in terms of its constituent components and their interconnections can be controlled by reconfiguration rules. Neumair and Wies in the paper `Case study: applying management policies to manage distributed queuing systems' examine how high-level policies can be transformed into practical and efficient implementations for the case of distributed job queuing systems. Koch and Krämer in `Rules and agents for automated management of distributed systems' describe the results of an experiment in using the software development environment Marvel to provide a rule based implementation of management policy. The paper by Jardin, `Supporting scalability and flexibility in a distributed management platform' reports on the experience of using a policy directed approach in the industrial strength TeMIP management platform. Both human managers and automated management components rely on a comprehensive monitoring system to provide accurate and timely information on which decisions are made to modify the operation of a system. The monitoring service must deal with condensing and summarizing the vast amount of data available to produce the events of interest to the controlling components of the overall management system. The paper `Distributed intelligent monitoring and reporting facilities' by Pavlou, Mykoniatis and Sanchez describes a flexible monitoring system in which the monitoring agents themselves are policy directed. Their monitoring system has been implemented in the context of the OSIMIS management platform. Debski and Janas in `The SysMan monitoring service and its management environment' describe the overall SysMan management system architecture and then concentrate on how event processing and distribution is supported in that architecture. The collection of papers gives a good overview of the current state of the art in distributed system management. It has reached a point at which a first generation of systems, based on policy representation within systems and automated monitoring systems, are coming into practical use. The papers also serve to identify many of the issues which are open research questions. In particular, as management systems increase in complexity, how far can we automate the refinement of high-level policies into implementations? How can we detect and resolve conflicts between policies? And how can monitoring services deal efficiently with ever-growing complexity and volume? We wish to acknowledge the many contributors, besides the authors, who have made this issue possible: the anonymous reviewers who have done much to assure the quality of these papers, Morris Sloman and his Programme Committee who convened the Workshop, and Thomas Usländer and his team at the Fraunhofer Institute in Karlsruhe who acted as hosts.

  18. From the editors.

    PubMed

    Kuhse, Helga; Singer, Peter

    1993-10-01

    [T]here had been theories that homosexuality might have a genetic basis. In June this year, these theories received a somewhat firmer basis. Researchers at the United States National Cancer Institute reported new evidence which suggests that some gay men may have a genetic predisposition to homosexuality. The research team led by molecular biologist Dean Hamer tested 40 pairs of homosexual brothers and found that 33 of the pairs shared genetic markers on a particular area of the X chromosome (called Xq28), indicating a link between homosexuality and a gene in that area. If followed-up research were to confirm the findings, then, it has been claimed, this would be the first example of a behavioral trait that has been found to have a genetic basis. The study does, however, leave some central questions unanswered. Some revolve around the link between genetics and the nature of sexuality itself. The others concern the ethical and social implications of the research....

  19. Personalized Medicine Across Disciplines and without Borders. Vural Özdemir speaks to Hannah Wilson, Commissioning Editor.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Vural

    also a Visiting Professor (Global Health & Technology Foresight) at Amrita University in Kerala, India, and cofounder of the Data-Enabled Life Sciences Alliance (DELSA Global), an open innovation and knowledge translation platform in Seattle (WA, USA). Özdemir was named as coinventor of 12 World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) indexed patents in personalized medicine and has authored more than 130 peer reviewed articles and chapters on the translation of omics technologies into public health action, global technology governance, diagnostics innovation strategy, history of bioethics and the ethics-of-bioethics. 'Science Peace Corps' and 'Microgrants for Big Data' are two new knowledge translation and science communication concepts developed by Özdemir for the global governance of biotechnology. He is Editor-in-Chief of OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (NY, USA).

  20. [Deciphering the argots of the names of materia medica and its dosage in the Yi lin kou pu liu zhi mi shu (A Secret Medical Book of Six Therapies in Rhymes of Medical Professionals)].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Lin, Shiyi; Liu, Shijue

    2014-11-01

    Yi lin kou pu liu zhi mi shu (A Secret Medical Book of Six Therapies in Rhymes of Medical Professionals) was additionally compiled, supplemented and annotated by Zhou Sheng, a famous doctor of the Qing Dynasty, based on Yi lin kou pu (Rhymes of Medical Professionals) which was composed by Lu Qi. The book contains four volumes in total, dealing mainly with the miscellaneous diseases of internal medicine, as well as external medicine, gynecology, and pediatrics etc. The syndrome differentiation and treatment, prescriptions and medications in this book has its own characteristic with rather high academic value and practical significance. There were 20 drug names were deciphered by the argots, for instance, "you che" was the argot of golden thread, and "wu yue (May)" was the argot of medicinal evodia fruit, etc. In addition, the argots were often used to decipher numerals and quantifiers, for example, "su, qi, zi, qi, man" referring to 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 respectively, and "huo, pu, xiang, feng, lai" referring to 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 respectively, and "qing","zhong","xi" referring to qian, liang and fen respectively. Hence, deciphering of these argots could help to understand and apply these prescriptions correctly.