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  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care.

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2009-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most important valvular heart disease affecting the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment, although a substantial number of patients are considered high risk for surgery. Many of these patients do not undergo surgery and have poor outcomes from medically treated symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provides a promising treatment option for some of these patients. Several devices are under investigation. The Edwards Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) and the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) have the largest human experience to date. Initial data suggest that these devices have an acceptable safety profile and provide excellent hemodynamic relief of aortic stenosis. The Edwards Sapien valve is currently under investigation in the United States in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) trial in high-risk surgical or inoperable patients; TAVI is available for clinical use in both Canada and Europe. TAVI is not used in low- or intermediate-risk surgical patients; however, future studies may prove its applicability in these subsets. The major complications of TAVI include access site-related problems and device malpositioning/migration. There are several new-generation prosthetic valves and delivery systems designed to be low profile and repositionable. Technical advances and refinement of the implantation methods may make TAVI even safer and ultimately a better treatment option, not only for patients with high surgical risk but also for those with moderate or low risk.

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  4. Late degeneration of transcatheter aortic valves: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Tamburino, Corrado

    2016-09-18

    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating the durability of current transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices up to 5 years. However, it is well known that transcatheter aortic valves can degenerate in a manner similar to surgical bioprostheses. In this review we briefly discuss the modes of failure of trans-catheter aortic valves and their potential management. PMID:27640028

  5. Reoperative transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement for central aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjia; Kapadia, Samir; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Svensson, Lars G; Mick, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Paravalvular leak-related aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a common complication and is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. However, the impact of isolated central aortic regurgitation is unknown. We report a case of transapical (TA) TAVR with postprocedural central aortic regurgitation, who returned after two years with progression of regurgitation. A reoperative valve-in-valve TA-TAVR was performed. PMID:27405799

  6. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Billings, Frederic T; Kodali, Susheel K; Shanewise, Jack S

    2009-05-01

    Aortic valvular stenosis remains the most common debilitating valvular heart lesion. Despite the benefit of aortic valve (AV) replacement, many high-risk patients cannot tolerate surgery. AV implantation treats aortic stenosis without subjecting patients to sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and aorta cross-clamping. This transcatheter procedure is performed via puncture of the left ventricular (LV) apex or percutaneously, via the femoral artery or vein. Patients undergo general anesthesia, intense hemodynamic manipulation, and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). To elucidate the role of the anesthesiologist in the management of transcatheter AV implantation, we review the literature and provide our experience, focusing on anesthetic care, intraoperative events, TEE, and perioperative complications. Two approaches to the aortic annulus are performed today: transfemoral retrograde and transapical antegrade. Iliac artery size and tortuosity, aortic arch atheroma, and pathology in the area of the (LV) apex help determine the preferred approach in each patient. A general anesthetic is tailored to achieve extubation after procedure completion, whereas IV access and pharmacological support allow for emergent sternotomy and initiation of CPB. Rapid ventricular pacing and cessation of mechanical ventilation interrupts cardiac ejection and minimizes heart translocation during valvuloplasty and prosthesis implantation. Although these maneuvers facilitate exact prosthesis positioning within the native annulus, they promote hypotension and arrhythmia. Vasopressor administration before pacing and cardioversion may restore adequate hemodynamics. TEE determines annulus size, aortic pathology, ventricular function, and mitral regurgitation. TEE and fluoroscopy are used for positioning the introducer catheter within the aortic annulus. The prosthesis, crimped on a valvuloplasty balloon catheter, is implanted by inflation. TEE immediately measures aortic regurgitation and

  8. Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Neal S.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming widely used for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. Data from The PARTNER Trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) and the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. Pivotal Investigational Device Exemption trial indicate that survival for extreme-risk patients is superior to best medical therapy and equivalent or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), although long-term durability remains unknown. Paravalvular leak remains higher in TAVR than SAVR, as does permanent pacemaker implantation in self-expanding valves. New-generation valves are addressing these issues, especially for paravalvular leak. There is strong evidence that TAVR is appropriate for both extreme-risk and high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, and the continued development of new valves are making implantation more reliable. This review discusses the studies supporting the use of TAVR and explores current advances in the field. PMID:27127560

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in bicuspid aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Gidon Y; Blanke, Philipp; Webb, John G

    2016-09-18

    Bicuspid aortic stenosis (AS) is not rare in patients treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Bicuspid valves have unique anatomy which could affect the results of TAVI; however, multiple recent reports have shown that TAVI is safe and effective in this population. Paravalvular aortic regurgitation was initially found to be more frequent in bicuspid patients, but newer-generation devices have shown superior results in this respect. Higher rates of pacemaker implantation after TAVI in bicuspid AS do require further investigation. Current data suggest that bicuspid valves should not be a contraindication for TAVI, but future specific trials are needed to support this assertion. PMID:27640030

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Wenaweser, Peter; Praz, Fabien; Stortecky, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in Western industrial countries (including Switzerland) with a prevalence of about 5% in the population aged 75 and over. If left untreated, symptomatic patients have a rate of death of more than 50% within 2 years. As a result of age and elevated surgical risk, an important proportion of elderly patients are not referred to surgery. Thus, the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in 2002 has initiated a paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. The early technical and procedural success of this minimal invasive treatment in high-risk patients has promoted further innovation and development of transcatheter heart valve (THV) systems during the last 13 years. Downsizing of the delivery catheters along with technical improvements aiming to reduce postprocedural paravalvular regurgitation have resulted in a significant reduction in mortality. As a consequence, TAVI is nowadays established as safe and effective treatment for selected inoperable and high-risk patients. Ongoing studies are investigating the outcome of intermediate risk patients allocated to either surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or TAVI. Despite these advancements, some specific areas of concern still require attention and need further investigations including conduction disturbances, valve degeneration and antithrombotic management. Although the off-label use of TAVI devices in the mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary position has recently developed, important limitations still apply and careful patient selection remains crucial. This review aims to summarise the available clinical evidence of transcatheter aortic valve treatment during the last 13 years and to provide a glimpse of future technologies.

  11. The future of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christian W; Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) into clinical practice, the treatment of aortic stenosis has changed dramatically. In the past, medical therapy with or without balloon aortic valvuloplasty was the only option for inoperable patients. More recently, TAVI has become the treatment of choice for these patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk operable patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) currently remains the gold standard for patients at low or intermediate operative risk. As randomized trials have demonstrated comparable results between TAVI and SAVR in the high-risk population, there is now a clear trend towards performing TAVI even in intermediate-risk patients while awaiting the results of randomized trials in that population. Nevertheless, there are still questions regarding TAVI involving paravalvular leak (PVL), stroke, pacemaker requirements, and durability that remain to be more definitively answered before TAVI can routinely be performed in a broader, lower risk population. Improvements in patient selection, imaging, and second and third generation devices have decreased the incidence of PVLs and vascular complications that followed the earliest TAVI procedures, but the rates of perioperative stroke and permanent pacemaker implantation must still be addressed. Furthermore, the long-term durability of TAVI devices and a role for post-procedure antithrombotic management remain unanswered. Until these questions are more clearly answered, it is the Heart Team's task to determine the optimal treatment for each patient based on risk scores, frailty metrics, comorbidities, patient preference, and potential for improvement in quality of life.

  12. Coronary Obstruction Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Henrique Barbosa; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Siqueira, Dimytri A. A.; Carvalho, Luiz Antônio; Mangione, José Armando; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Perin, Marco A.; de Brito, Fábio Sandoli

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was established as an important alternative for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, there are few data in the literature regarding coronary obstruction, that although rare, is a potentially fatal complication. Objective Evaluate this complication in Brazil. Methods We evaluated all patients presenting coronary obstruction from the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Main baseline and procedural characteristics, management of the complication, and clinical outcomes were collected from all patients. Results From 418 consecutive TAVI procedures, coronary obstruction occurred in 3 cases (incidence of 0.72%). All patients were women, without prior coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and with mean age of 85 ± 3 years, logistic EuroSCORE of 15 ± 6% and STS-PROM score of 9 ± 4%. All of the cases were performed with balloon-expandable Sapien XT prosthesis. In one patient, with pre-procedural computed tomography data, coronary arteries presented a low height and a narrow sinus of Valsalva. All patients presented with clinically significant severe maintained hypotension, immediately after valve implantation, and even though coronary angioplasty with stent implantation was successfully performed in all cases, patients died during hospitalization, being two periprocedurally. Conclusion Coronary obstruction following TAVI is a rare but potentially fatal complication, being more frequent in women and with the balloon-expandable prosthesis. Anatomical factors might be related with its increased occurrence, highlighting the importance of a good pre-procedural evaluation of the patients in order to avoid this severe complication. PMID:24652089

  13. Direct aortic transcatheter valve implantation in a porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Botta, Luca; De Marco, Federico; Colombo, Paola; Klugmann, Silvio; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis at high risk for surgery, and is generally performed retrogradely with vascular access. However, in certain patients, this access is either not possible or deemed to carry a high risk of vascular injury. We report our experience of a direct aortic approach in a 78-year old man with severe aortic stenosis, excluded from standard aortic valve replacement due to a porcelain aorta, and affected by severe aortic, iliac-femoral, and subclavian arteriopathy, rendering the transfemoral or subclavian approach unemployable.

  14. The Effects of Positioning of Transcatheter Aortic Valve on Fluid Dynamics of the Aortic Root

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a novel treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis. Due to the recent use of this technology and the procedural variability, there is very little data that quantifies the hemodynamic consequences of variations in valve placement. Changes in aortic wall stresses and fluid retention in the sinuses of Valsalva can have a significant effect on the clinical response a patient has to the procedure. By comprehensively characterizing complex flow in the sinuses of Valsalva using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry and an advanced heart flow simulator, various positions of a deployed transcatheter valve with respect to a bioprosthetic aortic valve (valve-in-valve) were tested in vitro. Displacements of the transcatheter valve were axial and directed below the simulated native valve annulus. It was determined that for both blood residence time and aortic Reynolds stresses, it is optimal to have the annulus of the transcatheter valve deployed as close to the aortic valve annulus as possible. PMID:25010918

  15. Carotid artery access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Thourani, Vinod H; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2013-10-01

    We report three patients who had successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) via carotid artery access. None were candidates for thoracotomy (including minimal access incisions) and had no other vascular access sites that would accommodate the transcatheter valve sheath. Antegrade carotid perfusion and retrograde insertion of the delivery sheath maintained cerebral blood flow without sequelae. Carotid access for TAVR is an option for unusual patients without other access.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in Jehovah's Witness patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Buz, Semih; Pasic, Miralem; Unbehaun, Axel; Hetzer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is currently reserved for high or prohibitive surgical-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. We report on successful TAVI in two Jehovah's witness patients. It offers a simple and effective treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis in high-risk patients who refuse the use of allogeneic blood and blood products. PMID:22753437

  17. Recently patented transcatheter aortic valves in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Salemi, Arash; Girardi, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used heart valve worldwide is the Edwards Sapien, which currently has 60% of the worldwide transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) market. The CoreValve is next in line in popularity, encompassing 35% of the worldwide TAVI market. Although these two valves dominate the TAVI market, a number of newer transcatheter valves have been introduced and others are in early clinical evaluation. The new valves are designed to reduce catheter delivery diameter, improve ease of positioning and sealing, and facilitate repositioning or removal. The most recent transcatheter valves for transapical use include Acurate TA (Symetis), Engager (Medtronic), and JenaValve the Portico (St Jude), Sadra Lotus Medical (Boston Scientific), and the Direct Flow Medical. These new inventions may introduce more effective treatment options for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Improvements in transcatheter valves and the developing variability among them may allow for more tailored approaches with respect to patient's anatomy, while giving operators the opportunity to choose devices they feel more comfortable with. Moreover, introducing new devices to the market will create a competitive environment among producers that will reduce high prices and expand availability. The present review article includes a discussion of recent patents related to Transcatheter Aortic Valves. PMID:24279506

  18. The expanding indications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Paul T L; Ewe, See Hooi

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), also known as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, is increasingly performed worldwide and is a technology that is here to stay. It has become the treatment of choice for inoperable patients and an alternative option for patients at high surgical risk with severe aortic stenosis. Early results of TAVI in intermediate-risk patients appear promising although larger randomized trial results are awaited before the widespread adoption of this technology in this big pool of patients. In patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis and degenerated surgical bioprostheses, TAVI has been shown to be feasible and relatively safe, though certain important considerations remain. Indications for TAVI are likely to grow as newer generation and improved devices and delivery systems become available.

  19. Left ventricular guidewire pacing for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Guérios, Enio E; Wenaweser, Peter; Meier, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Previous reports prove the safety and efficacy of cardiac pacing employing a guidewire in the left ventricle as unipolar pacing electrode. We describe the use of left ventricular guidewire pacing as an alternative to conventional transvenous temporary right ventricular pacing in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Freidoon; MacCarthy, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is one of the most significant technological advances in cardiovascular medicine. It offers a safe alternative in high risk cardiac patients with proven durability, economical viability and survival advantage. Current trials may expand its application in intermediate or low risk groups. PMID:26961440

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: current trends and future directions.

    PubMed

    Allahwala, Usaid K; Hansen, Peter S; Danson, Edward J; Straiton, Nicola; Sinhal, Ajay; Walters, Darren L; Bhindi, Ravinay

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been increasingly utilized for the treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in inoperable and high surgical risk patients. Recent advances in valve technology include repositionable scaffolds and smaller delivery systems, as well as improvement in periprocedural imaging. These advances have resulted in reduction of vascular complications, rates of paravalvular aortic regurgitation and periprocedural stroke and improved overall outcomes. Increasingly, TAVI is the preferred treatment for high-risk surgical patients with severe aortic stenosis. Consequently, there is growing interest for the use of TAVI in lower surgical risk patients. Furthermore, the role of TAVI has expanded to include valve-in-valve procedures for the treatment of degenerative bioprosthetic valves and bicuspid aortic valves. Questions remain in regard to the optimal management of concurrent coronary artery disease, strategies to minimize valve leaflet restriction and treatment of conduction abnormalities as well as identifying newer indications for its use.

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation despite challenging vascular access.

    PubMed

    Nascimbene, Angelo; Azpurua, Federico; Livesay, James J; Fish, R David; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-04-01

    We describe transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient who had severe peripheral artery disease. The patient's vascular condition required additional preliminary peripheral intervention to enable adequate vascular access. A 78-year-old man with severe aortic stenosis, substantial comorbidities, and severe heart failure symptoms was referred for aortic valve replacement. The patient's 20-mm aortic annulus necessitated the use of a 23-mm Edwards Sapien valve inserted through a 22F sheath, which itself needed a vessel diameter of at least 7 mm for percutaneous delivery. The left common femoral artery was selected for valve delivery. The left iliac artery and infrarenal aorta underwent extensive intervention to achieve an intraluminal diameter larger than 7 mm. After aortic valvuloplasty, valve deployment was successful, and the transaortic gradient decreased from 40 mmHg to less than 5 mmHg. The patient was discharged from the hospital 4 days postoperatively. We conclude that transcatheter aortic valve implantation can be successfully performed in patients with obstructed vascular access, including stenosis of the infrarenal aorta and the subclavian and coronary arteries.

  3. Use of extracorporeal membranous oxygenator in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The superiority of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) compared with medical therapy for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) who are not suitable candidates for surgery had been proven. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is rarely used in TAVR. Reports of early use of extracorporeal membranous oxygenator (ECMO) have promising outcomes. ECMO offers the option of cardiac support rescue in case of intraoperative hemodynamic instability and can be instituted in advance when hemodynamic instability is expected. Here we review the English literature about the use of ECMO in TAVR procedures, and discuss the indications and rationale for its use as well as its advantages. PMID:27668226

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Experience with SAPIEN 3.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Y; Tamburino, C; Barbanti, M

    2015-06-01

    Based on randomized trials with first generation devices, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) has been included into the treatment strategy for high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis. Procedural complications remain a concern with TAVI, including stroke, vascular complications, paravalvular leak (PVL) and conduction disturbances. Addressing these limitations will support TAVI use in lower risk populations. This review discussed features and most recent clinical evidence of the new balloon-expandable THV (SAPIEN 3, Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, CA, USA). PMID:25900559

  5. Computed tomography for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Apfaltrer, Paul; Henzler, Thomas; Blanke, Phillip; Krazinski, Aleksander W; Silverman, Justin R; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2013-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is rapidly becoming a widely used alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients with severe aortic stenosis at high surgical risk. In these patients, TAVR has been associated with markedly improved survival and relief from symptoms. Despite a very-high risk patient profile, recent multicenter registries have confirmed the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Moreover, the randomized, controlled PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valves) trial has confirmed both the superiority of TAVR over medical treatment in patients not considered to be candidates for standard SAVR and the noninferiority of TAVR compared with SAVR in high-risk patients. The TAVR procedure requires a comprehensive preinterventional diagnostic workup. Above all, detailed information on the anatomy of the aortic annulus (AA) and the relation of the AA to the coronary arteries is essential to avoid complications. So far, no imaging reference standard for AA sizing has been established. Echocardiography, catheter angiography, and computed tomography angiography are widely and often complementarily used imaging techniques for this purpose. Compared with 2-dimensional imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) has been proven to provide comprehensive information on AA anatomy and geometry, supporting appropriate patient selection and prosthesis sizing. In addition, CT is gaining an increasing role in evaluating the vascular access route before the procedure. This article describes the rapidly emerging role of CT in the context of pre-TAVR assessment.

  6. Descending aortic dissection injured by tip of the sheath during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Atsushi; Shirai, Shinichi; Hanyu, Michiya; Arai, Yoshio; Kamioka, Norihiko; Hayashi, Masaomi

    2016-04-01

    An 86-year-old woman was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) because of recurrent severe aortic stenosis after balloon aortic valvuloplasty in May 2014. We planned to implant a 23-mm Sapien XT valve by transfemoral approach. During procedure, aortic dissection was detected by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). The dissection limited to the descending aorta and did not include the ascending aorta. Therefore, our team decided to implant the 23-mm Sapien valve as planned. After the procedure, the dissection was treated conservatively without surgical repair. Three weeks later, she was discharged without any complications.

  7. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: a Kidney’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Kashani, Kianoush

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has now emerged as a viable treatment option for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are not suitable candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Despite encouraging published outcomes, acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and lowers the survival of patients after TAVR. The pathogenesis of AKI after TAVR is multifactorial including TAVR specific factors such as the use of contrast agents, hypotension during rapid pacing, and embolization; preventive measures may include pre-procedural hydration, limitation of contrast dye exposure, and avoidance of intraprocedural hypotension. In recent years, the number of TAVR performed worldwide has been increasing, as well as published data on renal perspectives of TAVR including AKI, chronic kidney disease, end-stage kidney disease, and kidney transplantation. This review aims to present the current literature on the nephrology aspects of TAVR, ultimately to improve the patients’ quality of care and outcomes. PMID:27069960

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and simultaneous closure of associated paravalvular leak.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, James; Charlton, Thomas; Gomes, Arri; Trivedi, Uday; Hildick-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR) following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a complication which is associated with increased late mortality. When PAR is severe and refractory to standard corrective measures, case reports have now described the successful use of vascular plugs to treat PAR as a follow-up procedure. We describe a case of vascular plug implantation to reduce PAR immediately after implantation of the transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis.

  9. A rare complication: an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir Serhat; Alihanoglu, Yusuf Izzettin; Alur, Ihsan; Evrengul, Harun; Kaya, Dayimi

    2015-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is preferred to treat high surgical risk patients with severe aort stenosis. Wrapping of a pig tail catheter with device struts during transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a very rare complication. In this report, we present the images and videos of an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a 71-year-old man.

  10. Myocardial injury associated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Keun; Liebetrau, Christoph; van Linden, Arnaud; Blumenstein, Johannes; Gaede, Luise; Hamm, Christian W; Walther, Thomas; Möllmann, Helge

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an important treatment option for elderly patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis whose risk is too high or prohibitive for conventional surgery. Despite notable progress during the past decade, continuous efforts directed at further improvement of procedural safety and performance are required, especially considering expanding indications for interventional treatment options among lower-risk populations. One issue that needs to be addressed is myocardial damage, which can frequently be observed after TAVI and has been linked to worse prognosis. Yet, knowledge concerning the underlying mechanisms and clinical impact remains scarce, and further investigation in this field is warranted. In this review, we provide a contemporary summary of the types of myocardial injury associated with TAVI, including access-related injury, mechanical trauma and ischemia, the role of myocardial biomarkers, and the impact on left ventricular function, with emphasis on potential mechanisms and clinical implications.

  11. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure.

  12. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure. PMID:27610250

  13. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Andrew K; Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Spaziano, Marco; Sawaya, Fadi J; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure. PMID:27610250

  14. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  15. The role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Wacławski, Jacek; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Pres, Damian; Krajewski, Adam; Poloński, Lech; Zembala, Marian; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2015-03-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended in patients not suitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation/aortic valve replacement (TAVI/AVR) or when such interventions are temporarily contraindicated. The number of performed balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedures has been increasing in recent years. Valvuloplasty enables the selection of individuals with severe left ventricular dysfunction or with symptoms of uncertain origin resulting from concomitant disorders (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) who can benefit from destination therapy (AVR/TAVI). Thanks to improved equipment, the number of adverse effects is now lower than it was in the first years after the advent of BAV. Valvuloplasty can be safely performed even in unstable patients, but long-term results remain poor. In view of the limited availability of TAVI in Poland, it is reasonable to qualify patients for BAV more often, as it is a relatively safe procedure improving the clinical condition of patients awaiting AVR/TAVI. PMID:26336471

  16. Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Transaortic Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Dellis, Sophia L; Akujuo, Adanna C; Bennett, Edward V; Britton, Lewis W

    2016-07-01

    We sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting and transcatheter aortic valve replacement in two patients with porcelain aortas and lesions that could not be optimally treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients with aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease who are too high-risk for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting due to comorbidities and porcelain aorta, and who do not have the appropriate anatomy for percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered for concomitant transcatheter aortic valve replacement and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12762 (J Card Surg 2016;31:435-438). PMID:27196956

  17. AKI after Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Srivali, Narat; Harrison, Andrew M; Gunderson, Tina M; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk of perioperative mortality. Previous studies showed increased risk of postoperative AKI with TAVR, but it is unclear whether differences in patient risk profiles confounded the results. To conduct a propensity-matched study, we identified all adult patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota from January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2014. Using propensity score matching on the basis of clinical characteristics and preoperative variables, we compared the postoperative incidence of AKI, defined by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, and major adverse kidney events in patients treated with TAVR with that in patients treated with SAVR. Major adverse kidney events were the composite of in-hospital mortality, use of RRT, and persistent elevated serum creatinine ≥200% from baseline at hospital discharge. Of 1563 eligible patients, 195 matched pairs (390 patients) were created. In the matched cohort, baseline characteristics, including Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score and eGFR, were comparable between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant differences existed between the TAVR and SAVR groups in postoperative AKI (24.1% versus 29.7%; P=0.21), major adverse kidney events (2.1% versus 1.5%; P=0.70), or mortality >6 months after surgery (6.0% versus 8.3%; P=0.51). Thus, TAVR did not affect postoperative AKI risk. Because it is less invasive than SAVR, TAVR may be preferred in high-risk individuals.

  18. Feature identification for image-guided transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Chu, Michael W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive alternative to open-heart surgery, and is critically dependent on imaging for accurate placement of the new valve. Augmented image-guidance for TAVI can be provided by registering together intra-operative transesophageal echo (TEE) ultrasound and a model derived from pre-operative CT. Automatic contour delineation on TEE images of the aortic root is required for real-time registration. This study develops an algorithm to automatically extract contours on simultaneous cross-plane short-axis and long-axis (XPlane) TEE views, and register these features to a 3D pre-operative model. A continuous max-flow approach is used to segment the aortic root, followed by analysis of curvature to select appropriate contours for use in registration. Results demonstrate a mean contour boundary distance error of 1.3 and 2.8mm for the short and long-axis views respectively, and a mean target registration error of 5.9mm. Real-time image guidance has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce complications in TAVI.

  19. Endovascular resection of the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation: state of the art and review.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Emiliano; Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Bollen, Xavier; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Raucent, Benoit; Astarci, Parla

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was introduced into clinical practice in 2002 as a rescue approach in patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis but not eligible for conventional aortic valve replacement. This technique allows implantation of a balloon expandable bioprosthesis without resection of the native aortic valve. Several complications are described as a consequence of the residual highly calcified valve being squeezed against the aortic wall by the stent of the implant. This can result in deformation of the metal stent and paravalvular leakage, risk of occlusion of the coronary ostia, or central and peripheral embolization of valvular debris. To avoid these complications, many authors suggest the possibility to resect and remove the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In this field, different authors have described possible techniques and different sources of energy to resect the calcified valve. In this article, we review the development of these experimental techniques and discuss future prospects in this field.

  20. Endovascular resection of the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation: state of the art and review.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Emiliano; Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Bollen, Xavier; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Raucent, Benoit; Astarci, Parla

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was introduced into clinical practice in 2002 as a rescue approach in patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis but not eligible for conventional aortic valve replacement. This technique allows implantation of a balloon expandable bioprosthesis without resection of the native aortic valve. Several complications are described as a consequence of the residual highly calcified valve being squeezed against the aortic wall by the stent of the implant. This can result in deformation of the metal stent and paravalvular leakage, risk of occlusion of the coronary ostia, or central and peripheral embolization of valvular debris. To avoid these complications, many authors suggest the possibility to resect and remove the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In this field, different authors have described possible techniques and different sources of energy to resect the calcified valve. In this article, we review the development of these experimental techniques and discuss future prospects in this field. PMID:27032472

  1. Periprocedural considerations of transcatheter aortic valve implantation for anesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Ata Hassani; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is rapidly gaining popularity as a viable option in the management of patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and high risk for open surgical intervention. TAVR soon expanding its indications from "high-risk" group of patients to those with "intermediate-risk". As an anesthesiologist; understanding the procedure and the challenges inherent to it is of utmost importance, in order to implement optimal care for this generally frail population undergoing a rather novel procedure. Cardiac anesthesiologists generally play a pivotal role in the perioperative care of the patients, and therefore they should be fully familiar with the circumstances occurring surrounding the procedure. Along with increasing experience and technical developments for TAVR, the procedure time becomes shorter. Due to this improvement in the procedure time, more and more anesthesiologists feel comfortable in using monitored anesthesia care with moderate sedation for patients undergoing TAVR. A number of complications could arise during the procedure needing rapid diagnoses and occasionally conversion to general anesthesia. This review focuses on the periprocedural anesthetic considerations for TAVR. PMID:27489596

  2. How to perform transcaval access and closure for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Greenbaum, Adam B

    2015-12-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications.

  3. How to perform transcaval access and closure for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Greenbaum, Adam B

    2015-12-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  4. How to Perform Transcaval Access and Closure for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Robert J.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  5. Combined Retrograde/Antegrade Approach to Transcatheter Closure of an Aortic Paravalvular Leak

    PubMed Central

    Damluji, Abdulla A.; Kaynak, Husnu E.

    2015-01-01

    New interventional techniques have made transcatheter closure of aortic paravalvular leaks a viable therapeutic option to treat the sequelae of these defects, including congestive heart failure and hemolysis. We report the transcatheter closure of an aortic paravalvular leak via a combined retrograde/antegrade approach. This was necessary because of difficulty in crossing the defect with a sheath from the retrograde approach. This technique might be useful in application to other difficult structural heart interventions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a treated paravalvular leak around a Mitroflow® Aortic Pericardial Heart Valve. PMID:26504437

  6. Comparison of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement to Improve Quality of Life in Patients >70 Years of Age with Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kocaaslan, Cemal; Ketenci, Bülend; Yılmaz, Mehmet; Kehlibar, Tamer; Memetoğlu, Mehmet Erdem; Ertaş, Gökhan; Eren, Mehmet; Demirtaş, Mahmut Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has recently been used in the treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis, particularly in patients with high mortality and morbidity rates for open surgery. The purpose of this study was to compare quality of life in patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical or transcatheter aortic valve implantation, before the procedure and in the early post-procedural period. Methods: Seventy-nine patients were included in the study, 38 (48.1%) male and 41 (51.9%) female. Mean age of patients was 74.3±5.2 (70-91) years. The surgical aortic valve replacement group consisted of 51 (64.6%) patients and the transcatheter aortic valve replacement group of 28 (35.4%). Quality of life data before the procedure and at the 3rd month postoperatively in patients aged 70 years and older undergoing surgical or transcatheter aortic valve implantation were assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey form. Results: Positive increases in physical task difficulty (13.2±9.8 vs. 5.1±7.3) (P=0.001), emotional task difficulty (14.4±11.9 vs. 8.5±6.4) (P=0.035), and mental health (0.4±10.4 vs. 9.6±15.1) (P=0.001; P<0.01) scores in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement were significantly higher compared to the surgical aortic valve replacement group. No statistically significant difference was determined between the groups in terms of pain, vitality, social function, physical function or general health scores in the preoperative and postoperative periods. Conclusion: The positive increase in quality of life parameters in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation group at the 3rd month postoperatively was significantly higher compared to the surgical aortic valve replacement group. PMID:27074268

  7. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging of aortic valve stenosis and aortic root to multimodality imaging for selection of transcatheter aortic valve implantation candidates.

    PubMed

    Paelinck, Bernard P; Van Herck, Paul L; Rodrigus, Inez; Claeys, Marc J; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Parizel, Paul M; Vrints, Christiaan J; Bosmans, Johan M

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the aortic valve area, aortic valve annulus, and aortic root dimensions measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with catheterization, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). An optimal prosthesis--aortic root match is an essential goal when evaluating patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Comparisons between MRI and the other imaging techniques are rare and need validation. In 24 consecutive, high-risk, symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve area was prospectively determined using MRI and direct planimetry using three-dimensional TTE and calculated by catheterization using the Gorlin equation and by Doppler echocardiography using the continuity equation. Aortic valve annulus and the aortic root dimensions were prospectively measured using MRI, 2-dimensional TTE, and invasive aortography. In addition, aortic valve annulus was measured using TEE. No differences in aortic valve area were found among MRI, Doppler echocardiography, and 3-dimensional TTE compared with catheterization (p = NS). Invasive angiography underestimated aortic valve annulus compared with MRI (p <0.001), TEE (p <0.001), and 2-dimensional TTE (p <0.001). Two-dimensional TTE tended to underestimate the aortic valve annulus diameters compared to TEE and MRI. In contrast to 2-dimensional TTE, 3 patients had aortic valve annulus beyond the transcatheter aortic valve implantation range using TEE and MRI. In conclusion, MRI planimetry, Doppler, and 3-dimensional TTE provided an accurate estimate of the aortic valve area compared to catheterization. MRI and TEE provided similar and essential assessment of the aortic valve annulus dimensions, especially at the limits of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation range.

  8. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Mayr, N Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to "intermediate-risk" patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; reduced procedure time, shorter intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, reduced need for intraprocedural vasopressor support, and the potential to perform the procedure without the direct presence of an anesthetist for cost-saving reasons. To date, no randomized trial data exists. We reviewed 13 non-randomized studies/registries reporting data from 6,718 patients undergoing TAVI (3,227 performed under sedation). Patient selection, study methods, and endpoints have differed considerably between published studies. Reported rates of in-hospital and longer-term mortality are similar for both groups. Up to 17% of patients undergoing TAVI-S require conversion to general anesthesia during the procedure, primarily due to vascular complications, and urgent intubation is frequently associated with hemodynamic instability. Procedure related factors, including hypotension, may compound preexisting age-specific renal impairment and enhance the risk of acute kidney injury. Hypotonia of the hypopharyngeal muscles in elderly patients, intraprocedural hypercarbia, and certain anesthetic drugs, may increase the aspiration risk in sedated patients. General anesthesia and conscious sedation have both been used successfully to treat patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI with similar reported short and long-term mortality outcomes. The authors believe that the significant incidence of complications and unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during TAVI-S mandates the start-to-finish presence

  9. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation - Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Gooley, R; Cameron, J D; Meredith, I T

    2015-12-01

    Since the first transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was performed by Alain Cribier and colleagues in 2002 [1], the technology has garnered global support with more than 200,000 devices implanted. The rapid adoption of this technology has been driven by the need for a less invasive treatment modality in a cohort of patients often denied conventional surgical valve replacement due to an unacceptably high perioperative risk, whether real or perceived [2]. This, together with evidence that the technology confers morbidity and mortality advantages compared to medical therapy [3,4] and at least equivalent outcomes to surgical valve replacement [5,6] in select cohorts, has seen clinical approval in more than 50 countries. The last 13 years has seen an evolution of practises and equipment affecting almost every aspect of the TAVI procedure from pre-procedural assessment to device design and post-procedural care. The almost exponential rate of change has both benefits and risks. Benefits, in that impactful changes are translated into clinical practice very rapidly, but risks, in that meaningful comparative research studies potentially lag behind and can be outmoded by the time they are published. This instability may in turn delay regulatory review and approval processes that are based on such studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the evolution of TAVI, its current clinical position and likely future directions.

  10. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation - Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Gooley, R; Cameron, J D; Meredith, I T

    2015-12-01

    Since the first transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was performed by Alain Cribier and colleagues in 2002 [1], the technology has garnered global support with more than 200,000 devices implanted. The rapid adoption of this technology has been driven by the need for a less invasive treatment modality in a cohort of patients often denied conventional surgical valve replacement due to an unacceptably high perioperative risk, whether real or perceived [2]. This, together with evidence that the technology confers morbidity and mortality advantages compared to medical therapy [3,4] and at least equivalent outcomes to surgical valve replacement [5,6] in select cohorts, has seen clinical approval in more than 50 countries. The last 13 years has seen an evolution of practises and equipment affecting almost every aspect of the TAVI procedure from pre-procedural assessment to device design and post-procedural care. The almost exponential rate of change has both benefits and risks. Benefits, in that impactful changes are translated into clinical practice very rapidly, but risks, in that meaningful comparative research studies potentially lag behind and can be outmoded by the time they are published. This instability may in turn delay regulatory review and approval processes that are based on such studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the evolution of TAVI, its current clinical position and likely future directions. PMID:26344347

  11. Contemporary Use of Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Dawn S.; Shavelle, David M.; Cunningham, Mark J.; Matthews, Ray V.; Starnes, Vaughn A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has increased the use of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in treating aortic stenosis. We evaluated our use of BAV in an academic tertiary referral center with a developing TAVI program. We reviewed 69 consecutive stand-alone BAV procedures that were performed in 62 patients (mean age, 77 ± 10 yr; 62% men; baseline mean New York Heart Association functional class, 3 ± 1) from January 2009 through December 2012. Enrollment for the CoreValve® clinical trial began in January 2011. We divided the study cohort into 2 distinct periods, defined as pre-TAVI (2009–2010) and TAVI (2011–2012). We reviewed clinical, hemodynamic, and follow-up data, calculating each BAV procedure as a separate case. Stand-alone BAV use increased 145% from the pre-TAVI period to the TAVI period. The mean aortic gradient reduction was 13 ± 10 mmHg. Patients were successfully bridged as intended to cardiac or noncardiac surgery in 100% of instances and to TAVI in 60%. Five patients stabilized with BAV subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement with no operative deaths. The overall in-hospital mortality rate (17.4%) was highest in emergent patients (61%). The implementation of a TAVI program was associated with a significant change in BAV volumes and indications. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty can successfully bridge patients to surgery or TAVI, although least successfully in patients nearer death. As TAVI expands to more centers and higher-risk patient groups, BAV might become integral to collaborative treatment decisions by surgeons and interventional cardiologists. PMID:25425977

  12. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication.

  13. An up-to-date overview of the most recent transcatheter implantable aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wiegerinck, Esther M A; Van Kesteren, Floortje; Van Mourik, Martijn S; Vis, Marije M; Baan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved towards the routine therapy for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Technical refinements in TAVI are rapidly evolving with a simultaneous expansion of the number of available devices. This review will present an overview of the current status of development of TAVI-prostheses; describes the technical features and applicability of each device and the clinical data available.

  14. Review of reported causes of device embolization following trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Ibebuogu, Uzoma N; Giri, Smith; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi; Tartara, Paolo; Kar, Saibal; Holmes, David; Alli, Oluseun

    2015-06-15

    Transcatheter heart valve (THV) embolization is a rare but serious complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Studies, including case reports, case series, and original reports published between 2002 and 2013, with regard to THV embolization were identified with a systemic electronic search using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. A total of 19 publications describing 71 patients were identified. Most patients (64%) were men, with a mean age of 80 ± 6 years and a mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score of 22.4 ± 9.3%. Balloon-expandable valves were used in 72% of the patients. The reported transcatheter aortic valve replacement access site was transfemoral in 80% of patients. Most cases (90%) occurred <1 hour after implantation, whereas 10% had late embolization (range 4 hours to 43 days). The most common site of embolization was the ascending aorta (38%), followed by the left ventricle (31%), descending aorta (23%), and aortic arch (8%). Open-heart surgery was required in 28% for valve retrieval and replacement. The 30-day stroke and mortality rates were 11% and 17%, respectively. Ventricular embolization and urgent conversion to open-heart surgery were significantly associated with death during hospitalization (p = 0.017 and p = 0.029, respectively). Likely causes of embolization were identified in 59 patients, with positioning error as the most commonly reported (47%), followed by pacing error (13%). In conclusion, THV embolization occurred early after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. The ascending aorta was the most common site of embolization. Higher 30-day stroke and mortality rates were associated with THV embolization compared with most published series of transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes. PMID:25882773

  15. Echocardiographic Imaging of Procedural Complications During Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca T.; Kodali, Susheel; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Leon, Martin B.; Kapadia, Samir; Gopal, Deepika; Lerakis, Stamatios; Lindman, Brian R.; Wang, Zuyue; Webb, John; Thourani, Vinod H.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a balloon-expandable valve is an accepted alternative to surgical replacement for severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis in high risk or inoperable patients. Intraprocedural transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) offers real-time imaging guidance throughout the procedure and allows for rapid and accurate assessment of complications and procedural results. The value of intraprocedural TEE for TAVR will likely increase in the future as this procedure is performed in lower surgical risk patients, who also have lower risk for general anesthesia, but a greater expectation of optimal results with lower morbidity and mortality. This imaging compendium from the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trials is intended to be a comprehensive compilation of intraprocedural complications imaged by intraprocedural TEE and diagnostic tools to anticipate and/or prevent their occurrence. PMID:25772835

  16. First trans-subclavian transcatheter aortic valve replacement using Lotus valve system.

    PubMed

    Baştuğ, Serdal; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Sarı, Cenk; Süygün, Hakan; Bozkurt, Engin

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), most commonly performed via retrograde femoral artery access, is a promising alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in elderly, high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). Approximately one-third of these patients suffer from severe iliofemoral arteriopathy, ruling out transfemoral approach. The case of a 74-year-old man with severe AS and bilateral iliofemoral arteriopathy treated with left trans-subclavian (TS) TAVI using the Lotus valve system is described in the present report. PMID:27665333

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a young heart transplant recipient crossing the traditional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Khalil; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Terp, Kim Allan; Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Andersen, Henning Rud; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established therapeutic alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in high-risk or inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Hitherto, TAVI is not recommended in young and low-intermediate risk patients. However, TAVI may also serve as an alternative to SAVR in selected young patients, e.g., patients who have previously undergone multiple cardiac surgery procedures. We report a case of trans-femoral TAVI in a 25-year-old heart transplant (HTx) recipient with prior surgery for congenital heart disease.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a young heart transplant recipient crossing the traditional boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Terp, Kim Allan; Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Andersen, Henning Rud; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established therapeutic alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in high-risk or inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Hitherto, TAVI is not recommended in young and low-intermediate risk patients. However, TAVI may also serve as an alternative to SAVR in selected young patients, e.g., patients who have previously undergone multiple cardiac surgery procedures. We report a case of trans-femoral TAVI in a 25-year-old heart transplant (HTx) recipient with prior surgery for congenital heart disease. PMID:27621906

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a young heart transplant recipient crossing the traditional boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Terp, Kim Allan; Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Andersen, Henning Rud; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established therapeutic alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in high-risk or inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Hitherto, TAVI is not recommended in young and low-intermediate risk patients. However, TAVI may also serve as an alternative to SAVR in selected young patients, e.g., patients who have previously undergone multiple cardiac surgery procedures. We report a case of trans-femoral TAVI in a 25-year-old heart transplant (HTx) recipient with prior surgery for congenital heart disease.

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a young heart transplant recipient crossing the traditional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Khalil; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Terp, Kim Allan; Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Andersen, Henning Rud; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established therapeutic alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in high-risk or inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Hitherto, TAVI is not recommended in young and low-intermediate risk patients. However, TAVI may also serve as an alternative to SAVR in selected young patients, e.g., patients who have previously undergone multiple cardiac surgery procedures. We report a case of trans-femoral TAVI in a 25-year-old heart transplant (HTx) recipient with prior surgery for congenital heart disease. PMID:27621906

  1. Combined venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for the treatment of acute aortic prosthesis dysfunction in a high-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Pontillo, Daniele; Musumeci, Francesco; Luzi, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with acute bioprosthesis dysfunction in cardiogenic shock, in whom hemodynamic support was provided by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  2. Combined venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for the treatment of acute aortic prosthesis dysfunction in a high-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Pontillo, Daniele; Musumeci, Francesco; Luzi, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with acute bioprosthesis dysfunction in cardiogenic shock, in whom hemodynamic support was provided by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:27402446

  3. Transfemoral Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) in a Patient With Previous Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Nathan, Anthony W; Ariff, Ben; Jaffer, Usman; Sutaria, Nilesh; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Mikhail, Ghada W; Malik, Iqbal S

    2016-07-01

    A 90-year-old man presented with increasing exertional breathlessness. He had previous implantation of a Perimount bioprosthetic aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Due to severe transvalvular bioprosthetic regurgitation with preserved left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction, the heart team decided on valve-in- valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral route in view of the patient's prohibitively high surgical and anesthetic risk. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery and was symptomatically much improved at 3-month follow-up. PMID:27342209

  4. Effect of aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ewe, See Hooi; Muratori, Manuela; van der Kley, Frank; Pepi, Mauro; Delgado, Victoria; Tamborini, Gloria; Fusini, Laura; de Weger, Arend; Gripari, Paola; Bartorelli, Antonio; Bax, Jeroen J; Marsan, Nina Ajmone

    2015-03-01

    The prognosis of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and the changes in AR grade over time remain unclear. This study evaluated the midterm survival associated with AR after TAVI and examined the evolution of AR over time and its effect on cardiac performance. Successful TAVI was performed in 314 patients (age 81 ± 7 years, 36% men). Serial transthoracic echocardiography and clinical assessment were available in 175 patients who survived >12 months. AR was assessed in terms of overall, paravalvular, and intravalvular severity. Significant post-TAVI AR (grade ≥2) was observed in 82 patients (26%), and these patients showed a trend toward reduced survival at 1- (93% vs 91%) and 2-year (89% vs 74%, log-rank p = 0.063) follow-up. Of the 175 patients who survived >12 months, grade ≥2 overall, paravalvular, and intravalvular AR were noted in 47 (27%), 32 (18%), and 8 patients (5%), respectively. Significant overall and paravalvular AR appeared to improve over time, particularly during the first 6 months (p <0.05), whereas intravalvular AR remained unchanged. Although improvements in the echocardiographic parameters were similar among patients with and without significant AR, patients who remained with grade ≥2 AR at 6 months had significantly worse survival than their counterparts at 2 years (80% vs 94%, log-rank p = 0.032). In conclusion, significant overall and paravalvular AR after TAVI appeared to improve over time. Although improvements in the echocardiographic parameters were similar, patients with grade ≥2 AR, both immediately after TAVI and at 6 months, were associated with worse survival. PMID:25591895

  5. Optimizing clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Wenaweser, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has revolutionized the management of high-risk or inoperable patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS). There are several factors to consider to optimize patient outcomes from TAVI. Before TAVI, patient selection is key and an understanding the effects of common comorbidities on outcomes after TAVI is critical. Some comorbidities share common risk factors with AS (e.g. coronary artery disease), others are directly or indirectly caused or exacerbated by severe AS (e.g. atrial fibrillation, pulmonary hypertension, mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation and right ventricular dysfunction), whereas others are not directly related to severe AS (e.g. chronic kidney disease and chronic lung disease). Choice of transcatheter heart valve prosthesis, vascular access route and mode of anesthesia are important considerations during TAVI. New onset conduction disturbances and arrhythmias remain a vexing issue after TAVI. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of these issues.

  6. Quantification of biomechanical interaction of transcatheter aortic valve stent deployed in porcine and ovine hearts.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Joseph; Sirois, Eric; Sun, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Success of the deployment and function in transcatheter aortic valve replacement is heavily reliant on the tissue-stent interaction. The present study quantified important tissue-stent contact variables of self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve stents when deployed into ovine and porcine aortic roots, such as the stent radial expansion force, stent pullout force, the annulus deformation response and the coefficient of friction on the tissue-stent contact interface. Braided Nitinol stents were developed, tested to determine stent crimped diameter vs. stent radial force from a stent crimp experiment, and deployed in vitro to quantify stent pullout, aortic annulus deformation, and the coefficient of friction between the stent and the aortic tissue from an aortic root-stent interaction experiment. The results indicated that when crimped at body temperature from 26 mm to 19, 21 and 23 mm stent radial forces were approximately 30-40% higher than those crimped at room temperature. Coefficients of friction leveled to approximately 0.10 ± 0.01 as stent wire diameter increased and annulus size decreased from 23 to 19 mm. Regardless of aortic annulus size and species tested, it appeared that a minimum of about 2.5 mm in annular dilatation, caused by about 60 N of radial force from stent expansion, was needed to anchor the stent against a pullout into the left ventricle. The study of the contact biomechanics in animal aortic tissues may help us better understand characteristics of tissue-stent interactions and quantify the baseline responses of non-calcified aortic tissues.

  7. Access Options for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Unfavorable Aortoiliofemoral Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendrakumar S; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Mick, Stephanie; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-11-01

    In the current era, 10-15 % of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR)-eligible high and prohibitive risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis are not candidates for transfemoral arterial access. Knowledge of the various alternative access options can enable TAVR teams to provide improved quality of life and potentially life-saving treatment for a group of patients who otherwise have no viable options. In this article, we review approach to patients with unfavorable femoral arterial anatomy and provide an in-depth discussion on the various alternative routes for TAVR. PMID:27650782

  8. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described.

  9. Delirium after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral or apical route.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Katznelson, R; Horlick, E; Osten, M; Styra, R; Cusimano, R J; Carroll, J; Djaiani, G

    2016-08-01

    We thought that delirium might be less frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral artery compared with via the cardiac apex. We reviewed 210 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation between January 2009 and October 2014. The proportion (95% CI) of patients who suffered delirium in the 3 days after valve implantation were: 10 (3-16%) in 105 patients who had transfemoral implantation; and 35 (25-45%) in 105 patients who had transapical implantation, p = 0.0001. The variables that independently associated with postoperative delirium were age, male sex and the transapical approach. The median (IQR [range]) hospital stay was 7 (5-13 [2-41]) days and 10 (7-15 [2-64]) days, respectively, p = 0.004. Future trials should focus on different peri-operative management strategies to reduce delirium rates after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, particularly in older men having implantations via the cardiac apex.

  10. The TriGuard embolic deflection device for prevention of stroke and cerebral embolization during transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Andreas; Pietras, Cody; Lansky, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of embolic ischemic cerebral events during transcatheter aortic valve implantation remains high. The effects range from clinically silent embolic lesions in the brain to severe disabling stroke. Memory loss and other functional neurocognitive impairment are a direct result of embolic strokes. The TriGuard embolic deflection device is a nitinol frame filter that is placed across all three aortic cerebral vessel ostia to prevent particles from entering the brain circulation during the procedure. The results of clinical studies suggest that this procedure can lead to a reduction of embolic events, and an improvement of neurocognitive function when compared with unprotected transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:26364995

  11. Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Mixed Aortic Valve Disease in Child's Class C Liver Disease Prior to Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wilkey, Barbara J; Hanson, Ross; Reece, T Brett; Forman, Lisa; Burton, James R; Messenger, John C; Kim, Michael S; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fiegel, Matt J; Nydam, Trevor L; Mandell, M Susan

    2016-06-01

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases practice guidelines list severe cardiac disease as a contraindication to liver transplantation. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been shown to decrease all-cause mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not considered candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. We report our experience of liver transplantation in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and moderate aortic insufficiency who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with Child-Pugh Class C disease at a Model For End-Stage Liver Disease score of 29. The patient had a difficult post procedure course that was successfully medically managed. After liver transplantation the patient was discharged to home on postoperative day 11. The combination of cardiac disease and end stage liver disease is challenging but these patients can have a successful outcome despite very severe illness.

  12. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field.

  13. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field. PMID:27600519

  14. Preferential short cut or alternative route: the transaxillary access for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Deuschl, Florian; Conradi, Lenard; Lubos, Edith; Schirmer, Johannes; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Blankenberg, Stefan; Treede, Hendrik; Schäfer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has gained widespread acceptance as a treatment option for patients at high risk for conventional aortic valve replacement. The most commonly used access site for TAVI is the common femoral artery. Yet, in a significant number of patients the transfemoral access is not suitable due to peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremity. In these cases the transaxillary approach can serve as an alternative implantation route. By considering the anatomical requirements and providing an adequate endovascular “safety-net” during the procedure the transaxillary TAVI approach results in excellent procedural and clinical outcome. However, whether the transaxillary access for TAVI is superior to other non-transfemoral approaches (e.g., transapical or direct aortic) needs to be studied in the future in a prospective randomized trial. PMID:26543600

  15. Risk and Outcome of Aortic Valve Surgery in the Transcatheter Valve Era: The Gender Aspect

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Torsten; Leonards, Christopher O.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In 2009, a transcatheter valve intervention program was introduced at our centre. The aim of this single-centre retrospective study was to evaluate gender-specific risk profiles and outcome of patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement before and after 2009. Methods: We assessed the preoperative logistic EuroSCORE and age, gender and 30-day-survival of 357 patients diagnosed with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis that underwent primary isolated surgical aortic valve replacement in 2007–2008 (group I, n = 191, 47% female) and 2010–2011 (group II, n = 166, 40% female). Survival follow up data was 100% complete. Results: Women in group II were significantly younger (71.6 ± 9.0 years; p = 0.004) and showed significantly lower risk profiles (logistic EuroSCORE: 9.6 ± 9.9%; p = 0.04) than women in group I (age: 75.6 ± 8.5 years, logistic EuroSCORE: 13.9 ± 15.9). Men’s age and risk profiles remained similar in both groups. Observed survival at 30 days was 98.8% in group II and 95.8% in group I which represented a statistical trend (p = 0.09). Female survival in group I was 92.2% and significantly worse as compared to 99% male survival in group I (p = 0.03). This significant difference in gender ratio of mortality was not detected in group II (female survival 97%, male survival 100%; p = 0.2). Being female was a significant risk factor in group I (odds ratio; 8.4; p = 0.03) but not in group II any longer (odds ratio: 1.0; p = 0.2). Conclusions: The possibility of transcatheter aortic valve replacement for therapy of aortic stenosis has led to a lower risk and improved outcome of surgical aortic valve replacement especially for women. PMID:26004109

  16. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  17. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation versus reoperative conventional aortic valve replacement: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Zhao, Dong-Fang; Wang, Nelson; Huo, Ya Ruth; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation for degenerated aortic bioprostheses has emerged as a promising alternative to redo conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). However there are concerns surrounding the efficacy and safety of VIV. This systematic review aims to compare the outcomes and safety of transcatheter VIV implantation with redoes cAVR. Six databases were systematically searched. A total of 18 relevant studies (823 patients) were included. Pooled analysis demonstrated VIV achieved significant improvements in mean gradient (38 mmHg preoperatively to 15.2 mmHg postoperatively, P<0.001) and peak gradient (59.2 to 23.2 mmHg, P=0.0003). These improvements were similar to the outcomes achieved by cAVR. The incidence of moderate paravalvular leaks (PVL) were significantly higher for VIV compared to cAVR (3.3% vs. 0.4%, P=0.022). In terms of morbidity, VIV had a significantly lower incidence of stroke and bleeding compared to redo cAVR (1.9% vs. 8.8%, P=0.002 & 6.9% vs. 9.1%, P=0.014, respectively). Perioperative mortality rates were similar for VIV (7.9%) and redo cAVR (6.1%, P=0.35). In conclusion, transcatheter VIV implantation achieves similar haemodynamic outcomes, with lower risk of strokes and bleeding but higher PVL rates compared to redo cAVR. Future randomized studies and prospective registries are essential to compare the effectiveness of transcatheter VIV with cAVR, and clarify the rates of PVLs.

  18. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation versus reoperative conventional aortic valve replacement: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Fang; Wang, Nelson; Huo, Ya Ruth; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation for degenerated aortic bioprostheses has emerged as a promising alternative to redo conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). However there are concerns surrounding the efficacy and safety of VIV. This systematic review aims to compare the outcomes and safety of transcatheter VIV implantation with redoes cAVR. Six databases were systematically searched. A total of 18 relevant studies (823 patients) were included. Pooled analysis demonstrated VIV achieved significant improvements in mean gradient (38 mmHg preoperatively to 15.2 mmHg postoperatively, P<0.001) and peak gradient (59.2 to 23.2 mmHg, P=0.0003). These improvements were similar to the outcomes achieved by cAVR. The incidence of moderate paravalvular leaks (PVL) were significantly higher for VIV compared to cAVR (3.3% vs. 0.4%, P=0.022). In terms of morbidity, VIV had a significantly lower incidence of stroke and bleeding compared to redo cAVR (1.9% vs. 8.8%, P=0.002 & 6.9% vs. 9.1%, P=0.014, respectively). Perioperative mortality rates were similar for VIV (7.9%) and redo cAVR (6.1%, P=0.35). In conclusion, transcatheter VIV implantation achieves similar haemodynamic outcomes, with lower risk of strokes and bleeding but higher PVL rates compared to redo cAVR. Future randomized studies and prospective registries are essential to compare the effectiveness of transcatheter VIV with cAVR, and clarify the rates of PVLs. PMID:26904259

  19. Transition to palliative care when transcatheter aortic valve implantation is not an option: opportunities and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lauck, Sandra B.; Gibson, Jennifer A.; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Carroll, Sandra L.; Achtem, Leslie; Kimel, Gil; Nordquist, Cindy; Cheung, Anson; Boone, Robert H.; Ye, Jian; Wood, David A.; Webb, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the recommended treatment for most patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk. However, TAVI may be clinically futile for patients who have multiple comorbidities and excessive frailty. This group benefits from transition to palliative care to maximize quality of life, improve symptoms, and ensure continuity of health services. We discuss the clinical determination of utility and futility, explore the current evidence guiding the integration of palliative care in procedure-focused cardiac programs, and outline recommendations for TAVI programs. Recent findings The determination of futility of treatment in elderly patients with aortic stenosis is challenging. There is a paucity of research available to guide best practices when TAVI is not an option. Opportunities exist to build on the evidence gained in the management of end of life and heart failure. TAVI programs and primary care providers can facilitate improved communication and processes of care to provide decision support and transition to palliative care. Summary The increased availability of transcatheter options for the management of valvular heart disease will increase the assessment of people with life-limiting conditions for whom treatment may not be an option. It is pivotal to bridge cardiac innovation and palliation to optimize patient outcomes. PMID:26716394

  20. Prosthetic valve endocarditis with valvular obstruction after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Pabilona, Christine; Gitler, Bernard; Lederman, Jeffrey A; Miller, Donald; Keltz, Theodore N

    2015-04-01

    Patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for open-heart surgery might be candidates for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Streptococcus viridans endocarditis that caused prosthetic valve obstruction after TAVR. A 77-year-old man who had undergone TAVR 17 months earlier was admitted because of evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a substantial increase in the transvalvular peak gradient and mean gradient in comparison with an echocardiogram of 7 months earlier. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a 1.5-cm vegetation obstructing the valve. Blood cultures yielded penicillin-sensitive S. viridans. The patient was hemodynamically stable and was initially treated with vancomycin because of his previous penicillin allergy. Subsequent therapy with levofloxacin, oral penicillin (after a negative penicillin skin test), and intravenous penicillin eliminated the symptoms of the infection. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a relatively new procedure, and sequelae are still being discovered. We recommend that physicians consider obstructive endocarditis as one of these.

  1. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  2. Nursing leadership of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation Heart Team: Supporting innovation, excellence, and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lauck, Sandra B; McGladrey, Janis; Lawlor, Cindy; Webb, John G

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is an innovative and resource-intensive treatment of valvular heart disease. Growing evidence and excellent outcomes are contributing to increased patient demand. The Heart Team is foundational to TAVI programs to manage the complexities of case selection and other aspects of care. The competencies and expertise of nurses are well suited to provide administrative and clinical leadership within the TAVI Heart Team to promote efficient, effective, and sustainable program development. The contributions of nursing administrative and clinical leaders exemplify the leadership roles that nurses can assume in healthcare innovation.

  3. Nursing leadership of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation Heart Team: Supporting innovation, excellence, and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lauck, Sandra B; McGladrey, Janis; Lawlor, Cindy; Webb, John G

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is an innovative and resource-intensive treatment of valvular heart disease. Growing evidence and excellent outcomes are contributing to increased patient demand. The Heart Team is foundational to TAVI programs to manage the complexities of case selection and other aspects of care. The competencies and expertise of nurses are well suited to provide administrative and clinical leadership within the TAVI Heart Team to promote efficient, effective, and sustainable program development. The contributions of nursing administrative and clinical leaders exemplify the leadership roles that nurses can assume in healthcare innovation. PMID:27060802

  4. AANA Journal Course: Update for nurse anesthetists--part-4--transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Peggy; Cushing, Mary

    2013-10-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most frequently acquired heart disease, and the prevalence is rising because of the aging population. If the disease is left untreated, survival in symptomatic patients averages only 2 to 3 years. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the only definitive treatment, yet 30% of elderly patients are not considered candidates because the presence of comorbidities makes the risk of sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass prohibitively high. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an innovative, high-tech, less invasive alternative. The procedure is usually performed using general anesthesia and a multidisciplinary team from interventional cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery in a "hybrid" operating environment with advanced imaging capabilities. There are 2 major catheter-based approaches to the aortic valve: retrograde percutaneous through the femoral artery and aorta or direct antegrade through a thoracotomy and the left ventricular apex. Apnea and rapid ventricular pacing are used to interrupt cardiac ejection during balloon valvuloplasty and prosthesis implantation. The most significant complications include vascular damage, stroke, paravalvular aortic insufficiency, and heart block. Outcomes studies comparing TAVR with medical management demonstrate improved patient survival, functional status, and quality of life. Currently TAVR is considered the treatment of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates and is a proven alternative for high-risk surgical candidates. PMID:24354078

  5. Cardiovascular Collapse During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Diagnosis and Treatment of the “Perilous Pentad”

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamel, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has, without a doubt, brought an unprecedented excitement to the field of interventional cardiology. The avoidance of a sternotomy by transfemoral or transapical aortic-valve implantation appears to come at the price of some serious complications, including an increased risk of embolic stroke and paravalvular leakage. The technical challenges of the procedure and the complex nature of the high-risk patient cohort make the learning curve for this procedure a steep one, with the potential for unexpected complications always looming. Although most commonly relating to vascular access, these complications can also result from prosthesis-related trauma or malposition, or from unanticipated trauma from the pacing wire or the super stiff wire. Sudden and unexplained hypotension is often the earliest indicator of major complication and must prompt an immediate and detailed exclusion of five major pathologies: retroperitoneal bleeding from access site rupture, aortic dissection or rupture, pericardial tamponade, coronary ostial obstruction, or acute severe aortic regurgitation. In most cases, these can be dealt with quickly, and by percutaneous means, although open surgery may occasionally be necessary. Increased operator and team experience should make prevention and recognition of these catastrophic complications more complete. For this reason, the importance of specific training, such as that provided by the valve manufacturers through workshops and proctorship, cannot be overemphasized. It is essential that all operators, and indeed all members of the implant team, exert extreme vigilance to the development of intraprocedural complications, which could have rapid and potentially lethal consequences. Greater experience with an improved understanding of these risks, along with the development of better devices, deliverable through smaller and less traumatic sheath technology, will undoubtedly improve the safety and

  6. Recurrent angina from chronic coronary obstruction following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kabach, Mohamad; Alrifai, Abdulah; Furlan, Stefanie; Alahdab, Fares

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease often coexist. Coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be challenging in patients with prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Depending on the type and position of the implanted valve, the procedure can be challenging or even unfeasible due to interference of diagnostic catheters and valve parts. The correct positioning of the TAVI prosthesis during TAVI was identified as an important factor with regard to the feasibility of subsequent CA or PCI. TAVI has been also associated with vascular, cerebrovascular and conduction complication. One is rare but life-threatening complication, coronary ostial obstruction. Coronary ostial obstruction can develop, especially if a safety check of more than 10 mm of coronary ostial height is not taken into consideration during TAVI. This complication can cause recurrent episodes of angina and can severely worsen the patient's cardiac systolic function. PMID:27390671

  7. Cerebral protection devices for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: is better the enemy of good?

    PubMed

    Praz, Fabien; Nietlispach, Fabian

    2013-09-10

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a widely performed procedure for treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. According to the current literature, major stroke has been reported as occurring in 3-6% of patients during the first 30 days following valve implantation. Several pathological mechanisms may be involved in the development of periprocedural ischaemic stroke with the majority being due to thromboembolism and atheroembolism. One approach to reduce the incidence of procedural cerebral thromboembolic events is the use of cerebral protection devices, either deflecting (Embrella, TriGuard) or capturing (Claret, Embol-X) embolic material. We decided to review the current evidence on this important issue focusing on the four cerebral protection devices currently available.

  8. Recent advances in transcatheter aortic valve implantation: novel devices and potential shortcomings.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, J; Liebetrau, C; Van Linden, A; Moellmann, H; Walther, T; Kempfert, J

    2013-11-01

    During the past years transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved to a standard technique for the treatment of high risk patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. Worldwide the number of TAVI procedures is increasing exponentially. In this context both the transapical antegrade (TA) and the transfemoral retrograde (TF) approach are predominantly used and can be considered as safe and reproducible access sites for TAVI interventions. As a new technology TAVI is in a constant progress regarding the development of new devices. While in the first years only the Edwards SAPIEN(TM) and the Medtronic CoreValve(TM) prostheses were commercial available, recently additional devices obtained CE-mark approval and others have entered initial clinical trials. In addition to enhance the treatment options in general, the main driving factor to further develop new device iterations is to solve the drawbacks of the current TAVI systems: paravalvular leaks, occurrence of AV-blocks and the lack of full repositionability.

  9. Recent Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Novel Devices and Potential Shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Blumenstein, J.; Liebetrau, C.; Linden, A. Van; Moellmann, H.; Walther, T.; Kempfert, J.

    2013-01-01

    During the past years transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved to a standard technique for the treatment of high risk patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. Worldwide the number of TAVI procedures is increasing exponentially. In this context both the transapical antegrade (TA) and the transfemoral retrograde (TF) approach are predominantly used and can be considered as safe and reproducible access sites for TAVI interventions. As a new technology TAVI is in a constant progress regarding the development of new devices. While in the first years only the Edwards SAPIEN™ and the Medtronic CoreValve™ prostheses were commercial available, recently additional devices obtained CE-mark approval and others have entered initial clinical trials. In addition to enhance the treatment options in general, the main driving factor to further develop new device iterations is to solve the drawbacks of the current TAVI systems: paravalvular leaks, occurrence of AV-blocks and the lack of full repositionability. PMID:24313644

  10. Acquired Aorto-Right Ventricular Fistula following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Muhammad Tariq; Islam, Ashequl M; Ayub, Samia

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) techniques are rapidly evolving, and results of published trials suggest that TAVR is emerging as the standard of care in certain patient subsets and a viable alternative to surgery in others. As TAVR is a relatively new procedure and continues to gain its acceptance, rare procedural complications will continue to appear. Our case is about an 89-year-old male with extensive past medical history who presented with progressive exertional dyspnea and angina secondary to severe aortic stenosis. Patient got TAVR and his postoperative course was complicated by complete heart block, aorto-RV fistula, and ventricular septal defect (VSD) formation as a complication of TAVR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of aorto-RV fistula following TAVR as a procedural complication but the first one to show three complications all together in one patient. PMID:25883809

  11. Thrombembolic occlusion of crural arteries following transcatheter aortic valve implantation--successful endovascular recanalization using a thrombus aspiration device.

    PubMed

    Malyar, Nasser M; Kaleschke, Gerrit; Reinecke, Holger

    2012-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an increasingly used alternative to conventional surgical valve replacement in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) and high operative risk. We here describe a case of a TAVI performed in local anesthesia causing intraprocedural thromboembolic occlusion of non-stenotic crural arteries and its immediate successful therapeutic management by means of endovascular recanalization using a thrombus aspiration device. PMID:22565625

  12. Transcatheter Closure of Iatrogenic VSDs after Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery: 2 Case Reports and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    We report 2 new cases of transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects after aortic valve replacement surgery, together with our finding, in a literature review, of 9 additional patients who had undergone this procedure from 2004 through 2013. In all 11 cases, transcatheter device closure was indicated for a substantial intracardiac shunt with symptomatic heart failure, and such a device was successfully deployed across the iatrogenic ventricular septal defect, with clinical improvement. Our review suggests that transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects in patients with previous aortic valve replacement surgery is a safe and effective treatment option, providing anatomic defect closure and relief of symptoms in the short-to-medium term. PMID:27547145

  13. Transcatheter Closure of Iatrogenic VSDs after Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery: 2 Case Reports and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Taleyratne, John D S; Henderson, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We report 2 new cases of transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects after aortic valve replacement surgery, together with our finding, in a literature review, of 9 additional patients who had undergone this procedure from 2004 through 2013. In all 11 cases, transcatheter device closure was indicated for a substantial intracardiac shunt with symptomatic heart failure, and such a device was successfully deployed across the iatrogenic ventricular septal defect, with clinical improvement. Our review suggests that transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects in patients with previous aortic valve replacement surgery is a safe and effective treatment option, providing anatomic defect closure and relief of symptoms in the short-to-medium term. PMID:27547145

  14. Percutaneous transfemoral closure of a pseudoaneurysm at the left ventricular apical access site for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Beaver, Thomas M; Fudge, James C

    2015-02-01

    This case report illustrates a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm that developed at the transapical access site for transcatheter aortic valve implantation and was successfully excluded percutaneously through a femoral approach using an Amplatzer muscular VSD occluder (St. Jude Medical). We also discuss various currently available devices and technical pearls for percutaneous closure of left ventricular pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25661768

  15. Biomedical Impact in Implantable Devices-The Transcatheter Aortic Valve as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Alexandros; Saatsakis, George

    2015-09-01

    Objective: To update of the scientific community about the biomedical engineering involvement in the implantable devices chain. Moreover the transcatheter Aortic Valve (TAV) replacement, in the field of cardiac surgery, will be analyzed as an example of contemporary implantable technology. Methods: A detailed literature review regarding biomedical engineers participating in the implantable medical product chain, starting from the design of the product till the final implantation technique. Results: The scientific role of biomedical engineers has clearly been established. Certain parts of the product chain are implemented almost exclusively by experienced biomedical engineers such as the transcatheter aortic valve device. The successful professional should have a multidisciplinary knowledge, including medicine, in order to pursue the challenges for such intuitive technology. This clearly indicates that biomedical engineers are among the most appropriate scientists to accomplish such tasks. Conclusions: The biomedical engineering involvement in medical implantable devices has been widely accepted by the scientific community, worldwide. Its important contribution, starting from the design and extended to the development, clinical trials, scientific support, education of other scientists (surgeons, cardiologists, technicians etc.), and even to sales, makes biomedical engineers a valuable player in the scientific arena. Notably, the sector of implantable devices is constantly raising, as emerging technologies continuously set up new targets.

  16. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures - predictors and management.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients' state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His' bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach.

  17. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures - predictors and management.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients' state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His' bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  18. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures – predictors and management

    PubMed Central

    Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients’ state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His’ bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  19. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures – predictors and management

    PubMed Central

    Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients’ state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His’ bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach.

  20. Transcatheter valve implantation can alter fluid flow fields in aortic sinuses and ascending aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valves (TAVs) are valve replacements used to treat aortic stenosis. Currently, these have been used in elderly patients at high-risk for open-heart procedures. Since these devices are implanted under fluoroscopic guidance, the implantation position of the valve can vary with respect to the native aortic valve annulus. The current study characterizes the altered hemodynamics in the aortic sinus and ascending aorta under different implantation (high and low) and cardiac output (2.5 and 5.0 L/min) conditions. Two commonly used TAV designs are studied using 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). 200 phase locked images are obtained at every 25ms in the cardiac cycle, and the resulting vector fields are ensemble averaged. High implantation of the TAV with respect to the annulus causes weaker sinus washout and weaker sinus vortex formation. Additionally, the longer TAV leaflets can also result in a weaker sinus vortex. The level of turbulent fluctuations in the ascending aorta did not appear to be affected by axial positioning of the valve, but varied with cardiac output. The results of this study indicates that TAV positioning is important to be considered clinically, since this can affect coronary perfusion and potential flow stagnation near the valve.

  1. Characteristics of Inoperable Patients with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis —In the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Tatsuya; Sakakibara, Mamoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Katoh, Hiroki; Wakasa, Satoru; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a therapeutic option for severe aortic valvular stenosis (AS). To determine the indication for TAVR, it is mandatory to clarify the characteristics of the patients who were judged as inoperable for conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). Methods: Of 185 patients newly diagnosed as severe AS from March 2010 to April 2011, we studied the characteristics of 61 (33%) patients (mean age, 86 ± 8 years) who were judged as inoperable. Results: Younger patients (<85 years old, n = 22) had more major comorbidities and lower left ventricular ejection fraction than older patients (≥85 years old, n = 39). Mean estimated mortality for cAVR by Japan score was 7.0% ± 7.4%. Japan score did not correlate to age and was calculated relatively low in the older age group (6.2% ± 7.0%) than the younger age group (8.3% ± 8.1%). Conclusion: One thirds of severe AS patients were judged as inoperable. In advanced age patients, age itself and other factors, which are not included in the conventional scoring systems, might have contributed to the decision making not to perform cAVR by cardiologists. Further study is necessary to define risk factors except for age. PMID:25078548

  2. Transcatheter Aortic Valve-in-Valve Replacement Instead of a 4th Sternotomy in a 21-Year-Old Woman with Aortic Homograft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Díez, José G.; Schechter, Michael; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Preventza, Ourania

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a well-established method for replacing native aortic valves; however, it was conceived for elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis, and the lack of data on long-term durability has led practitioners to restrict the use of TAVR to patients who have short life expectancies. Here, we describe the case of a 21-year-old woman who had undergone 3 previous open aortic valve replacements and who presented with symptoms of recurrent valvular failure. Transthoracic echocardiograms and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a degenerating aortic root homograft with substantial calcification, moderate-to-severe aortic valve stenosis, and severe aortic valve regurgitation. Open surgical valve replacement posed substantial risk to our patient, so we decided to perform valve-in-valve TAVR with use of the Edwards Sapien XT Transcatheter Heart Valve. The patient's pulmonary artery pressure, valvular regurgitation, and symptoms improved substantially thereafter. We found that valve-in-valve TAVR into a failing aortic root homograft was less invasive than repeat surgical valve replacement in this young patient who had congenital vascular anomalies and a complex surgical history. PMID:27547146

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance for the assessment of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Before trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), assessment of cardiac function and accurate measurement of the aortic root are key to determine the correct size and type of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to compare cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) for the assessment of aortic valve measurements and left ventricular function in high-risk elderly patients submitted to TAVI. Methods Consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis and contraindications for surgical aortic valve replacement were screened from April 2009 to January 2011 and imaged with TTE and CMR. Results Patients who underwent both TTE and CMR (n = 49) had a mean age of 80.8 ± 4.8 years and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 14.9 ± 9.3%. There was a good correlation between TTE and CMR in terms of annulus size (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.001), left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) diameter (R2 = 0.62, p < 0.001) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (R2 = 0.47, p < 0.001) and a moderate correlation in terms of aortic valve area (AVA) (R2 = 0.24, p < 0.001). CMR generally tended to report larger values than TTE for all measurements. The Bland-Altman test indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between TTE and CMR ranged from -5.6 mm to + 1.0 mm for annulus size, from -0.45 mm to + 0.25 mm for LVOT, from -0.45 mm2 to + 0.25 mm2 for AVA and from -29.2% to 13.2% for LVEF. Conclusions In elderly patients candidates to TAVI, CMR represents a viable complement to transthoracic echocardiography. PMID:22202669

  4. Leaflet stress and strain distributions following incomplete transcatheter aortic valve expansion.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mostafa; Azadani, Ali N

    2015-10-15

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an established treatment alternative to surgical valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The current guidelines for TAVR are to upsize transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) relative to the native annulus to secure the device and minimize paravalvular leakage. Unlike surgical stented bioprosthetic valves where leaflets are attached to a rigid frame, TAVs must expand to fit within the native annulus. Fully-expanded circular TAVs have consistent leaflet kinematics; however, subtle variations in the degree of stent expansion may affect leaflet coaptation. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of incomplete TAV expansion on leaflet stress and strain distributions. In this study, we developed finite element models of a 23 mm homemade TAV expanded to diameters ranging from 18 to 23 mm in 1mm increments. Through dynamic finite element simulations, we found that leaflet stress and strain distributions were dependent on the diameter of the inflated TAV. After complete expansion of the TAV to 23 mm, high stress and strain regions were observed primarily in the commissures during diastole. However, 2-3mm incomplete TAV stent expansion induced localized high stress regions within the TAV commissures, while 4-5mm incomplete stent expansion induced localized high stress regions within the belly of the TAV leaflets during the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle. Increased mechanical stress and flexural deformation on TAV leaflets due to incomplete stent expansion may lead to accelerated tissue degeneration and diminished long-term valve durability.

  5. Echocardiographic vs Invasive Measurement of the Direct Flow Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Mean Gradient: Contradictory or Complementary?

    PubMed

    Panoulas, Vasileios F; Latib, Azeem; Agricola, Eustachio; Baumgartner, Helmut; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In this case report, we explain the reason behind observed differences in echocardiographic and invasively measured mean aortic valve gradient after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. A 25-mm Direct Flow valve (Direct Flow Medical Inc, Santa Rosa, CA) was successfully implanted in a patient with severe aortic stenosis via the transfemoral route. The discrepancy between invasive and echocardiographic measurements could be explained by the combination of a non-flat velocity profile inside the tubular structure of the Direct Flow valve, which can cause local low pressure fields that result in true high gradients detected using Doppler, and pressure recovery.

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: First Applications and Short Term Outcomes in Our Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Mehmet; Ince, Ilker; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Dogan, Nazim; Colak, Abdurrahim; Sevimli, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the first applications and short term outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in our clinic, which is a new technology for the patients with high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Materials and Methods: Between January 2010 and December 2012, twenty five patients (16 males, 9 females; mean age 74.04±8.86 years) diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, who were at high risk for surgery (EuroSCORE II: 5.58±4.20) and underwent TAVI in our clinic, were evaluated. The demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, anaesthetic management, complications during pre- and post-operative periods and the mortality rate in the first 30 days and six months were recorded. Results: Edwards SAPIEN Valve prostheses were implanted by transfemoral approach (percutaneously in 10 patients and surgically in 15 patients) in all patients. The TAVI procedure was performed under general anaesthesia. The success rate of the TAVI procedure was 100%. Three patients had limited dissection of the femoral artery; however, intervention was not needed due to good distal perfusion rate. Permanent pacemaker was implanted to four patients because of long-term atrioventricular blockage. After the procedure, all patients were transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and all patients were extubated in the ICU. The mean mechanical ventilation duration (minutes) was 166.20±39.32, the mean critical care unit stay (day) was 5.64±2.99 and the mean hospital stay (day) was 11.92±5.54. Acute renal failure was observed in one patient and stroke was observed in two patients on the first postoperative day. The mortality rate in the first 30 days and 6 months was found to be 4% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a great option for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for SAVR. In our institute, procedural success and short term outcomes for patients

  7. Comparison of transcatheter aortic valve and surgical bioprosthetic valve durability: a fatigue simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) intervention is now the standard-of-care treatment for inoperable patients and a viable alternative treatment option for high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis. While the procedure is associated with lower operative risk and shorter recovery times than traditional surgical aortic valve (SAV) replacement, TAV intervention is still not considered for lower-risk patients due in part to concerns about device durability. It is well known that bioprosthetic SAVs have limited durability, and TAVs are generally assumed to have even worse durability, yet there is little long-term data to confirm this suspicion. In this study, TAV and SAV leaflet fatigue due to cyclic loading was investigated through finite element analysis by implementing a computational soft tissue fatigue damage model to describe the behavior of the pericardial leaflets. Under identical loading conditions and with identical leaflet tissue properties, the TAV leaflets sustained higher stresses, strains, and fatigue damage compared to the SAV leaflets. The simulation results suggest that the durability of TAVs may be significantly reduced compared to SAVs to about 7.8 years. The developed computational framework may be useful in optimizing TAV design parameters to improve leaflet durability, and assessing the effects of underexpanded, elliptical, or non-uniformly expanded stent deployment on TAV durability. PMID:26294354

  8. Combined elective percutaneous coronary intervention and transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Unbehaun, Axel; Buz, Semih; Drews, Thorsten; Klein, Christoph; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Hetzer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    There is no established strategy of how and when to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Simultaneous, single-stage treatment of both pathologies is a possible solution. We report our initial results of simultaneously performed transapical TAVI and elective percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Between April 2008 and July 2011, a total of 419 patients underwent transapical TAVI. Combined elective PCI and TAVI were performed in 46 (11%) patients. Only the most significant coronary lesion or lesions were treated. Technical success of the combined approach was 100%. The mean count of implanted stents per patient was 1.6 ± 1.0 (range, 1–5 stents). The 30-day mortality rates in the PCI and TAVI group was 4.3%. Survival at 12, 24 and 36 months of the PCI and TAVI group 87.1 ± 5.5, 69.7 ± 10.3 and 69.7 ± 10.3%, respectively. The results showed that the single-stage approach with combined elective PCI and TAVI is feasible and safe. It has become our primary choice for treatment of high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and CAD. PMID:22232234

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the transfemoral access route is the default access.

    PubMed

    Stortecky, Stefan; O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Windecker, Stephan; Wenaweser, Peter

    2013-09-10

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a widely accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) among non-operable patients or selected high-risk patients with degenerative, severe aortic stenosis. TAVI is considered less invasive when compared with SAVR; however, there remain significant differences between different TAVI access routes. The transfemoral approach is considered the least invasive access route, and can be performed as a fully percutaneous procedure in a spontaneously breathing patient under local anaesthesia and mild sedation only. Moreover, transfemoral TAVI patients are typically transferred to coronary care rather than to an intensive care unit after the procedure, and benefit from early ambulation and a reduction in overall length of hospital stay. Considering these patient-specific and health-economic advantages, several TAVI centres follow the least invasive strategy for their patients and have implemented the transfemoral access route as the default access in their institutions. This article provides an overview on the prerequisites for a successful transfemoral TAVI procedure, describes the procedural advantages compared to alternative access routes, and highlights differences in clinical outcomes. PMID:24025952

  10. Catheter tracking via online learning for dynamic motion compensation in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic overlay of 3D models onto 2D X-ray images has important applications in image guided interventions. In this paper, we present a novel catheter tracking for motion compensation in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI). To address such challenges as catheter shape and appearance changes, occlusions, and distractions from cluttered backgrounds, we present an adaptive linear discriminant learning method to build a measurement model online to distinguish catheters from background. An analytic solution is developed to effectively and efficiently update the discriminant model and to minimize the classification errors between the tracking object and backgrounds. The online learned discriminant model is further combined with an offline learned detector and robust template matching in a Bayesian tracking framework. Quantitative evaluations demonstrate the advantages of this method over current state-of-the-art tracking methods in tracking catheters for clinical applications. PMID:23286027

  11. Vancouver Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Clinical Pathway: Minimalist Approach, Standardized Care, and Discharge Criteria to Reduce Length of Stay.

    PubMed

    Lauck, Sandra B; Wood, David A; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Kwon, Jae-Yung; Stub, Dion; Achtem, Leslie; Blanke, Philipp; Boone, Robert H; Cheung, Anson; Dvir, Danny; Gibson, Jennifer A; Lee, Bobby; Leipsic, Jonathan; Moss, Robert; Perlman, Gidon; Polderman, Jopie; Ramanathan, Krishnan; Ye, Jian; Webb, John G

    2016-05-01

    We describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a standardized clinical pathway to facilitate safe discharge home at the earliest time after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Between May 2012 and October 2014, the Heart Team developed a clinical pathway suited to the unique requirements of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement in contemporary practice. The components included risk-stratified minimalist periprocedure approach, standardized postprocedure care with early mobilization and reconditioning, and criteria-driven discharge home. Our aim was to reduce variation in care, identify a subgroup of patients suitable for early discharge (≤48 hours), and decrease length of stay for all patients. We addressed barriers related to historical practices, complex multidisciplinary stakeholder engagement, and adoption of length of stay as a quality indicator. We retrospectively reviewed the experiences of 393 consecutive patients; 150 (38.2%) were discharged early. At baseline, early discharge patients had experienced less previous balloon aortic valvuloplasty, had higher left ventricular ejection fraction, better cognitive function, and were less frail than the standard discharge group (>48 hours). Early discharge was associated with the use of local anesthesia, implantation of balloon expandable device, avoidance of urinary catheter, and early removal of temporary pacemaker. Median length of stay was 1 day for early discharge and 3 days for other patients; 97.7% were discharged home. There were no differences in 30-day mortality (1.3%), disabling stroke (0.8%), or readmission (10.7%). The implementation of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement clinical pathway shifted the program's approach to combine standardized processes and individual risk stratification. The Vancouver transcatheter aortic valve replacement clinical pathway requires a rigorous assessment to determine its efficacy, safety, and reproducibility. PMID

  12. Drivers of healthcare costs associated with the episode of care for surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Li, Lindsay; Braga, Vevien; Pazhaniappan, Nandhaa; Pardhan, Anar M; Lian, Dana; Leeksma, Aric; Peterson, Ben; Cohen, Eric A; Forsey, Anne; Kingsbury, Kori J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is generally more expensive than surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) due to the high cost of the device. Our objective was to understand the patient and procedural drivers of cumulative healthcare costs during the index hospitalisation for these procedures. Design All patients undergoing TAVI, isolated SAVR or combined SAVR+coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada were identified during the fiscal year 2012–2013. Data were obtained from a prospective registry. Cumulative healthcare costs during the episode of care were determined using microcosting. To identify drivers of healthcare costs, multivariable hierarchical generalised linear models with a logarithmic link and γ distribution were developed for TAVI, SAVR and SAVR+CABG separately. Results Our cohort consisted of 1310 patients with aortic stenosis, of whom 585 underwent isolated SAVR, 518 had SAVR+CABG and 207 underwent TAVI. The median costs for the index hospitalisation for isolated SAVR were $21 811 (IQR $18 148–$30 498), while those for SAVR+CABG were $27 256 (IQR $21 741–$39 000), compared with $42 742 (IQR $37 295–$56 196) for TAVI. For SAVR, the major patient-level drivers of costs were age >75 years, renal dysfunction and active endocarditis. For TAVI, chronic lung disease was a major patient-level driver. Procedural drivers of cost for TAVI included a non-transfemoral approach. A prolonged intensive care unit stay was associated with increased costs for all procedures. Conclusions We found wide variation in healthcare costs for SAVR compared with TAVI, with different patient-level drivers as well as potentially modifiable procedural factors. These highlight areas of further study to optimise healthcare delivery. PMID:27621832

  13. Drivers of healthcare costs associated with the episode of care for surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Li, Lindsay; Braga, Vevien; Pazhaniappan, Nandhaa; Pardhan, Anar M; Lian, Dana; Leeksma, Aric; Peterson, Ben; Cohen, Eric A; Forsey, Anne; Kingsbury, Kori J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is generally more expensive than surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) due to the high cost of the device. Our objective was to understand the patient and procedural drivers of cumulative healthcare costs during the index hospitalisation for these procedures. Design All patients undergoing TAVI, isolated SAVR or combined SAVR+coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada were identified during the fiscal year 2012–2013. Data were obtained from a prospective registry. Cumulative healthcare costs during the episode of care were determined using microcosting. To identify drivers of healthcare costs, multivariable hierarchical generalised linear models with a logarithmic link and γ distribution were developed for TAVI, SAVR and SAVR+CABG separately. Results Our cohort consisted of 1310 patients with aortic stenosis, of whom 585 underwent isolated SAVR, 518 had SAVR+CABG and 207 underwent TAVI. The median costs for the index hospitalisation for isolated SAVR were $21 811 (IQR $18 148–$30 498), while those for SAVR+CABG were $27 256 (IQR $21 741–$39 000), compared with $42 742 (IQR $37 295–$56 196) for TAVI. For SAVR, the major patient-level drivers of costs were age >75 years, renal dysfunction and active endocarditis. For TAVI, chronic lung disease was a major patient-level driver. Procedural drivers of cost for TAVI included a non-transfemoral approach. A prolonged intensive care unit stay was associated with increased costs for all procedures. Conclusions We found wide variation in healthcare costs for SAVR compared with TAVI, with different patient-level drivers as well as potentially modifiable procedural factors. These highlight areas of further study to optimise healthcare delivery.

  14. Left ventricular reverse remodeling after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In patients with severe aortic stenosis, left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with increased myocardial stiffness and dysfunction linked to cardiac morbidity and mortality. We aimed at systematically investigating the degree of left ventricular mass regression and changes in left ventricular function six months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area (LVMi), end diastolic volume indexed to body surface area (LVEDVi), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and stroke volume (SV) were investigated by CMR before and six months after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis and contraindications for surgical aortic valve replacement. Results Twenty-sevent patients had paired CMR at baseline and at 6-month follow-up (N=27), with a mean age of 80.7±5.2 years. LVMi decreased from 84.5±25.2 g/m2 at baseline to 69.4±18.4 g/m2 at six months follow-up (P<0.001). LVEDVi (87.2±30.1 ml /m2vs 86.4±22.3 ml/m2; P=0.84), LVEF (61.5±14.5% vs 65.1±7.2%, P=0.08) and SV (89.2±22 ml vs 94.7±26.5 ml; P=0.25) did not change significantly. Conclusions Based on CMR, significant left ventricular reverse remodeling occurs six months after TAVI. PMID:23692630

  15. Infective endocarditis in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement era: comprehensive review of a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Alon; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alex; Kornowski, Ran

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a revolutionary alternative for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for the treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in patients at high risk for surgery. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication after SAVR with high morbidity and mortality. Although numerous TAVR procedures have been performed worldwide, infective endocarditis (IE) after TAVR was reported in the literature in few cases only and in 0% to 2.3% of patients enrolled in large TAVR cohorts. Our aim was to review the literature for IE following TAVR and to discuss the diagnostic and management strategies of this rare complication. Ten case reports of IE after TAVR were identified, 8 of which were published as case reports and 2 of which were presented in congresses. Infective endocarditis occurred in a mean time period of 186 days (median, 90 days) after TAVR. Most cases were characterized by fever and elevated inflammatory markers. Infective endocarditis after TAVR shared some common characteristics with IE after SAVR, yet it has some unique features. Echocardiographic findings included leaflet vegetations, severe mitral regurgitation with rupture of the anterior leaflet, and left ventricle outflow tract to left atrium fistula. Bacteriologic findings included several atypical bacteria or fungi. Cases of IE were managed either conservatively by antibiotics and/or using surgery, and the overall prognosis was poor. Infective endocarditis after TAVR deserves prompt diagnosis and treatment. Until further evidence is present, IE after TAVR should be managed according to SAVR guidelines with modifications as needed on a case-by-case basis.

  16. Red cell distribution width in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Verde, Pablo E; Veulemanns, Verena; Kahlstadt, Lisa; Wolff, Georg; Erkens, Ralf; Westenfeld, Ralf; Navarese, Eliano P; Merx, Marc W; Rassaf, Tienush; Kelm, Malte

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of red blood cell distribution width on outcome in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: In a retrospective single center cohort study we determined the impact of baseline red cell distribution width (RDW) and anemia on outcome in 376 patients with aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI. All patients were discussed in the institutional heart team and declined for surgical aortic valve replacement due to high operative risk. Collected data included patient characteristics, imaging findings, periprocedural in hospital data, laboratory results and follow up data. Blood samples for hematology and biochemistry analysis were taken from every patient before and at fixed intervals up to 72 h after TAVI including blood count and creatinine. Descriptive statistics were used for patient’s characteristics. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for time to event outcomes. A recursive partitioning regression and classification was used to investigate the association between potential risk factors and outcome variables. RESULTS: Mean age in our study population was 81 ± 6.1 years. Anemia was prevalent in 63.6% (n = 239) of our patients. Age and creatinine were identified as risk factors for anemia. In our study population, anemia per se did influence 30-d mortality but did not predict longterm mortality. In contrast, a RDW > 14% showed to be highly predictable for a reduced short- and longterm survival in patients with aortic valve disease after TAVI procedure. CONCLUSION: Age and kidney function determine the degree of anemia. The anisocytosis of red blood cells in anemic patients supplements prognostic information in addition to that derived from the WHO-based definition of anemia. PMID:26981217

  17. Effect of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Badheka, Apurva O; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Patel, Samir V; Jhamnani, Sunny; Singh, Vikas; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Nish; Patel, Nilay; Arora, Shilpkumar; Thakkar, Badal; Manvar, Sohilkumar; Dhoble, Abhijeet; Patel, Achint; Savani, Chirag; Patel, Jay; Chothani, Ankit; Savani, Ghanshyambhai T; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Grines, Cindy L; Curtis, Jeptha; Mangi, Abeel A; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K

    2015-08-15

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with a significant learning curve. There is paucity of data regarding the effect of hospital volume on outcomes after TAVI. This is a cross-sectional study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample database of 2012. Subjects were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes, 35.05 (Trans-femoral/Trans-aortic Replacement of Aortic Valve) and 35.06 (Trans-apical Replacement of Aortic Valve). Annual hospital TAVI volumes were calculated using unique identification numbers and then divided into quartiles. Multivariate logistic regression models were created. The primary outcome was inhospital mortality; secondary outcome was a composite of inhospital mortality and periprocedural complications. Length of stay (LOS) and cost of hospitalization were assessed. The study included 1,481 TAVIs (weighted n = 7,405). Overall inhospital mortality rate was 5.1%, postprocedural complication rate was 43.4%, median LOS was 6 days, and median cost of hospitalization was $51,975. Inhospital mortality rates decreased with increasing hospital TAVI volume with a rate of 6.4% for lowest volume hospitals (first quartile), 5.9% (second quartile), 5.2% (third quartile), and 2.8% for the highest volume TAVI hospitals (fourth quartile). Complication rates were significantly higher in hospitals with the lowest volume quartile (48.5%) compared to hospitals in the second (44.2%), third (39.7%), and fourth (41.5%) quartiles (p <0.001). Increasing hospital volume was independently predictive of shorter LOS and lower hospitalization costs. In conclusion, higher annual hospital volumes are significantly predictive of reduced postprocedural mortality, complications, shorter LOS, and lower hospitalization costs after TAVI.

  18. Delayed-Onset Left Main Coronary Artery Obstruction More than 24 Hours after Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Norio; Ootomo, Tatsushi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary obstruction during or after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a rare and catastrophic sequela that occurs most frequently just after valve implantation. Even rarer is the delayed clinical presentation, in some few patients, of coronary obstruction on the day after self-expandable valve implantation. Here we describe a case of balloon-expandable (not self-expandable) transcatheter aortic valve replacement, followed by partial obstruction of the left main coronary artery on the day after that procedure in a 93-year-old man, despite normal left ventricular contraction just after valve implantation. Visual evaluation of the echocardiogram for left ventricular wall motion was not sufficient, by itself, to achieve early diagnosis of the obstruction. We performed emergency percutaneous coronary intervention. Ninety days after the procedure, the patient was in New York Heart Association functional class I. PMID:27777533

  19. A practical guide to multimodality imaging of transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Gillam, Linda D; Hahn, Rebecca T; Kapadia, Samir; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lerakis, Stamatios; Tuzcu, Murat; Douglas, Pamela S

    2012-04-01

    The advent of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is one of the most widely anticipated advances in the care of patients with severe aortic stenosis. This procedure is unique in many ways, one of which is the need for a multimodality imaging team-based approach throughout the continuum of the care of TAVR patients. Pre-procedural planning, intra-procedural implantation optimization, and long-term follow-up of patients undergoing TAVR require the expert use of various imaging modalities, each of which has its own strengths and limitations. Divided into 3 sections (pre-procedural, intraprocedural, and long-term follow-up), this review offers a single source for expert opinion and evidence-based guidance on how to incorporate the various modalities at each step in the care of a TAVR patient. Although much has been learned in the short span of time since TAVR was introduced, recommendations are offered for clinically relevant research that will lead to refinement of best practice strategies for incorporating multimodality imaging into TAVR patient care.

  20. Limitations and difficulties of echocardiographic short-axis assessment of paravalvular leakage after corevalve transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Geleijnse, Marcel L; Di Martino, Luigi F M; Vletter, Wim B; Ren, Ben; Galema, Tjebbe W; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; de Jaegere, Peter P T; Soliman, Osama I I

    2016-01-01

    To make assessment of paravalvular aortic leakage (PVL) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) more uniform the second Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) recently updated the echocardiographic criteria for mild, moderate and severe PVL. In the VARC recommendation the assessment of the circumferential extent of PVL in the short-axis view is considered critical. In this paper we will discuss our observational data on the limitations and difficulties of this particular view, that may potentially result in overestimation or underestimation of PVL severity. PMID:27600600

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  2. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Women Versus Men (from the US CoreValve Trials).

    PubMed

    Forrest, John K; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Reardon, Michael J; Deeb, G Michael; Yakubov, Steven J; Hermiller, James B; Huang, Jian; Skelding, Kimberly A; Lansky, Alexandra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has changed significantly in recent years due to advances in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Recent studies with the CoreValve prosthesis have demonstrated superior results compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in patients at increased risk for surgery, but there are limited data on gender-related differences in patient characteristics and outcomes with this device. We compared baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes in women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis. A total of 3,687 patients (1,708 women and 1,979 men) were included. At baseline, women tended to be slightly older and to have increased frailty, but they had fewer cardiac co-morbidities, higher left ventricular systolic function, less coronary artery disease, and fewer previous strokes. All-cause mortality was 5.9% for women and 5.8% for men at 30 days (p = 0.87) and 24.1% and 21.3%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.08). The incidence of stroke was 5.7% in women and 4.0% in men at 30 days (p = 0.02) and 9.3% and 7.7%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.05). Women had a higher incidence of bleeding, including more life-threatening bleeds, and a greater incidence of major vascular complications than men at 30 days. Device success was achieved in 86.9% of women and 86.1% of men (p = 0.50). In conclusion, although there were significant baseline differences and procedure-related complications between women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis, this analysis found no significant difference in 30-day or 1-year mortality. PMID:27346591

  3. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus and Hemoglobin A1C on Outcome After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Chorin, Ehud; Finkelstein, Ariel; Banai, Shmuel; Aviram, Galit; Barkagan, Michael; Barak, Leehee; Keren, Gad; Steinvil, Arie

    2015-12-15

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is associated with an increased mortality risk in elderly or high-risk patients. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative to surgery in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are inoperable or at high operative risk. The impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on patients referred to TAVI merits further investigation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and the impact of DM status on the updated Valve Academic Research Consortium 2-defined outcomes of TAVI and to stratify patient outcomes according to their initial glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. We enrolled and stratified patients who underwent TAVI at our institution according to DM status. A total of 586 patients were enrolled: 348 (59%) without DM and 238 (41%) with DM. There were no significant differences in 30-day mortality patients with diabetes compared to patients without diabetes (3.3% vs 2.9%, p = 0.974). Insulin-treated DM was not associated with adverse outcome in comparison to orally treated DM. To delineate the prognostic power of HbA1C in these patients, the cohort was divided into 3 groups according to HbA1C levels (<5.7%, 5.7% to 6.49%, and ≥6.5%). Patients with HbA1C ≥6.5% were at increased risk for mortality during follow-up (hazard ratio 2.571, 95% confidence interval 1.077 to 6.136, p = 0.033) compared to patients with HbA1C <5.7%. In conclusion, unlike SAVR, DM is not associated with an increased mortality risk after TAVI, nor is it associated with increased complications rates. A more poorly controlled disease, as manifested by elevated HbA1c levels, may be associated with increased mortality during long-term follow-up.

  4. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI. PMID:27296559

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Bicuspid Aortic Valves: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaochuan; Shi, Xiaohan; Xun, Xiaoshuang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the performance of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed by searching eligible articles in PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, Google Scholar and CNKI. Meta-analysis of included case-control/cohort studies was further conducted. Relative risks (RRs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare clinical outcomes of BAV patients and non-BAV patients. Results: A total of 17 articles including eight case reports, four case series and five case-control/cohort studies with 166 BAV patients were analyzed. Device success rate achieved for TAVI in this cohort of BAV patients was 95.2%. The 30-day mortality rate was 8.4%, and the medium-term (range from 6 months to 2 years) mortality rate reported was 17.9%. Overall, the performance of TAVI in BAV patients was comparable to that in non-BAV patients, as reported by the included case-control/cohort studies (30-day mortality rate: RR = 1.05, 95%CI 0.57–1.95, p = 0.87; Device success rate: RR = 1.00, 95%CI 0.95–1.05, p = 0.94; Incidence of moderate to severe paravalvular regurgitation: RR = 1.25, 95%CI 0.85–1.84, p = 0.25). Conclusion: The present study suggested that TAVI may be a feasible and safe treatment modality for BAV patients. PMID:27098769

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Self-Expanding Prosthesis Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine A.; Magnuson, Elizabeth A.; Galper, Benjamin Z.; Meduri, Christopher U.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Baron, Suzanne J.; Reardon, Michael J.; Adams, David H.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies of the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have been based primarily on a single balloon-expandable system. Objectives The goal of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. Methods We performed a formal economic analysis on the basis of individual, patient-level data from the CoreValve U.S. High Risk pivotal trial. Empirical data regarding survival and quality of life (QOL) over 2 years, and medical resource use and hospital costs through 12 months were used to project life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and lifetime medical costs in order to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of TAVR versus SAVR from a U.S. perspective. Results Relative to SAVR, TAVR reduced initial length of stay an average of 4.4 days, decreased the need for rehabilitation services at discharge, and resulted in superior 1-month QOL. Index admission and projected lifetime costs were higher with TAVR than with SAVR (differences $11,260 and $17,849 per patient, respectively), whereas TAVR was projected to provide a lifetime gain of 0.32 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; 0.41 life-years [LYs]) with 3% discounting. Lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were $55,090 per QALY gained and $43,114 per LY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated that a reduction in the initial cost of TAVR by ~$1,650 would lead to an ICER <$50,000/QALY gained. Conclusions In a high-risk clinical trial population, TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis provided meaningful clinical benefits compared with SAVR, with incremental costs considered acceptable by current U.S. standards. With expected modest reductions in the cost of index TAVR admissions, the value of TAVR compared with SAVR in this patient population would become high. PMID:26764063

  7. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Philipp; Huber, Andreas; Müller, Beat; Maisano, Francesco; Taramasso, Maurizio; Moarof, Igal; Obeid, Slayman; Stähli, Barbara E.; Cahenzly, Martin; Binder, Ronald K.; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Kim, Won-Keun; Hamm, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population. Objectives We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population. Methods We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%). Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l) had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0–26.0, P < 0.01), whereas patients with EuroSCORE II scores above the 75th percentile (> 6.8) only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8–5.6, P = 0.13). The Harrell’s C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45–0.82) for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71–0.92, P = 0.01). In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1–31.3), P <0.01) and improved the model’s net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28–1.59). These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort. Conclusions Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. PMID

  8. Improvements in quality of life in septuagenarians versus octogenarians undergoing trans-catheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Nuray Kahraman; Ay, Yasin; Sönmez, Osman; Vatankulu, Mehmet Akif; Göktekin, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    Background Very elderly patients represent a distinct patient group in clinical setting in terms of a decision for trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) when one considers the potential improvement in the quality of life (QoL) on one hand and the benefit to risk ratio on the other. This study aimed to compare functional and QoL outcomes of TAVR between octogenarians and septuagenarians. Methods This prospective cohort study included 136 elderly patients (70 to 89 years of age), who underwent transfemoral TAVR due to degenerative aortic stenosis. Patients were allocated into one of the following age groups: septuagenarians (n = 67) and octogenarians (n = 69). Preoperative and early postoperative clinical parameters were recorded. In addition, QoL of the patients was evaluated using SF-36 questionnaire preoperatively and six month postoperatively. Results Groups were similar in terms of early postoperative mortality and morbidity parameters. The mean New York Heart Association (NYHA) class improved after TAVR in both groups. In addition, all SF-36 norm-based scale and SF-36 summary scale scores improved significantly in both groups during the postoperative period. Postoperatively, physical functioning, general health and physical component summary scores were significantly better in the septuagenarian group (P = 0.02, 0.01, 0.03, respectively). Conclusion Although the improvement in the QoL in terms of physical health was more marked in septuagenarians than in octogenarians, substantial benefits on the QoL and particularly on mental health seem to justify re-consideration of TAVR indications in the very elderly. PMID:27594873

  9. Causes of Death Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Yan-Biao; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Xu, Yuan-Ning; Wei, Xin; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Li, Yi-Jian; Cao, Jia-Yu; Tang, Hong; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in patients at high surgical risk. However, there is little published literature on the exact causes of death. Methods and Results The PubMed database was systematically searched for studies reporting causes of death within and after 30 days following TAVR. Twenty-eight studies out of 3934 results retrieved were identified. In the overall analysis, 46.4% and 51.6% of deaths were related to noncardiovascular causes within and after the first 30 days, respectively. Within 30 days of TAVR, infection/sepsis (18.5%), heart failure (14.7%), and multiorgan failure (13.2%) were the top 3 causes of death. Beyond 30 days, infection/sepsis (14.3%), heart failure (14.1%), and sudden death (10.8%) were the most common causes. All possible subgroup analyses were made. No significant differences were seen for proportions of cardiovascular deaths except the comparison between moderate (mean STS score 4 to 8) and high (mean STS score >8) -risk patients after 30 days post-TAVR (56.0% versus 33.5%, P=0.005). Conclusions Cardiovascular and noncardiovascular causes of death are evenly balanced both in the perioperative period and at long-term follow-up after TAVR. Infection/sepsis and heart failure were the most frequent noncardiovascular and cardiovascular causes of death. This study highlights important areas of clinical focus that could further improve outcomes after TAVR. PMID:26391132

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in very elderly patients: immediate results and medium term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Isaac; Muñoz-García, Antonio J; López-Otero, Diego; Avanzas, Pablo; Jimenez-Navarro, Manuel F; Cid-Alvarez, Belén; del Valle, Raquel; Alonso-Briales, Juan H; Ocaranza-Sanchez, Raimundo; Hernández, José M; Trillo-Nouche, Ramiro; Morís, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate immediate transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) results and medium-term follow-up in very elderly patients with severe and symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Methods This multicenter, observational and prospective study was carried out in three hospitals. We included consecutive very elderly (> 85 years) patients with severe AS treated by TAVI. The primary endpoint was to evaluate death rates from any cause at two years. Results The study included 160 consecutive patients with a mean age of 87 ± 2.1 years (range from 85 to 94 years) and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 18.8% ± 11.2% with 57 (35.6%) patients scoring ≥ 20%. Procedural success rate was 97.5%, with 25 (15.6%) patients experiencing acute complications with major bleeding (the most frequent). Global mortality rate during hospitalization was 8.8% (n = 14) and 30-day mortality rate was 10% (n = 16). Median follow up period was 252.24 ± 232.17 days. During the follow-up period, 28 (17.5%) patients died (17 of them due to cardiac causes). The estimated two year overall and cardiac survival rates using the Kaplan-Meier method were 71% and 86.4%, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression showed that the variable EuroSCORE ≥ 20 was the unique variable associated with overall mortality. Conclusions TAVI is safe and effective in a selected population of very elderly patients. Our findings support the adoption of this new procedure in this complex group of patients. PMID:26345138

  11. Practical considerations for optimizing cardiac computed tomography protocols for comprehensive acquisition prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Khalique, Omar K; Pulerwitz, Todd C; Halliburton, Sandra S; Kodali, Susheel K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Nazif, Tamim M; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; D'Souza, Belinda; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is performed frequently in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high risk or inoperable for open surgical aortic valve replacement. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the gold standard imaging modality for pre-TAVR cardiac anatomic and vascular access assessment. Traditionally, cardiac CTA has been most frequently used for assessment of coronary artery stenosis, and scanning protocols have generally been tailored for this purpose. Pre-TAVR CTA has different goals than coronary CTA and the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the TAVR patient population creates a particular need to optimize protocols for a reduction in iodinated contrast volume. This document reviews details which allow the physician to tailor CTA examinations to maximize image quality and minimize harm, while factoring in multiple patient and scanner variables which must be considered in customizing a pre-TAVR protocol.

  12. Staged High-Risk Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Impella Support after On-Pump Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bahekar, Amol A.

    2016-01-01

    The management of concomitant obstructive coronary artery disease and severe aortic stenosis in poor surgical candidates is an evolving topic. Although the typical current practice is to perform percutaneous revascularization before transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), some data have emerged regarding revascularization after performing TAVR. We present the case of a 90-year-old man with multivessel coronary artery disease who was at prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. We first performed TAVR with use of hemodynamic support, then Impella-assisted multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention on the patient's unprotected left main coronary artery. We describe this complex case and review the medical literature on percutaneous coronary intervention after TAVR PMID:27777528

  13. Comparison of accuracy of aortic root annulus assessment with cardiac magnetic resonance versus echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Gripari, Paola; Loguercio, Monica; Cortinovis, Sarah; Baggiano, Andrea; Conte, Edoardo; Beltrama, Virginia; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Guaricci, Andrea; Alamanni, Francesco; Ballerini, Giovanni; Pepi, Mauro

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of the aortic root in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation is crucial. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) evaluation of the aortic annulus (AoA) with transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In 50 patients, maximum diameter, minimum diameter and AoA, length of the left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary aortic leaflets, degree (grades 1 to 4) of aortic leaflet calcification, and distance between AoA and coronary artery ostia were assessed. AoA maximum diameter, minimum diameter, and area by CMR were 26.4 ± 2.8 mm, 20.6 ± 2.3 mm, 449.8 ± 86.2 mm(2), respectively. The length of left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary leaflets by CMR were 13.9 ± 2.2, 13.3 ± 2.1, and 13.4 ± 1.8 mm, respectively, whereas the score of aortic leaflet calcifications was 2.9 ± 0.8. Finally, the distances between AoA and left main and right coronary artery ostia were 16.1 ± 2.8 and 16.1 ± 4.4 mm, respectively. Regarding AoA area, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography showed an underestimation (p <0.01), with a moderate agreement (r: 0.5 and 0.6, respectively, p <0.01) compared with CMR. No differences and excellent correlation were observed between CMR and MDCT for all parameters (r: 0.9, p <0.01), except for aortic leaflet calcifications that were underestimated by CMR. In conclusion, aortic root assessment with CMR including AoA size, aortic leaflet length, and coronary artery ostia height is accurate compared with MDCT. CMR may be a valid imaging alternative in patients unsuitable for MDCT. PMID:24045059

  14. Recovery from Anemia in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation – Prevalence, Predictors and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob; Brooks, Matthew; Biasco, Luigi; Jönsson, Anders; Franzen, Olaf W.; Søndergaard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome – including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI on baseline anemia. Methods A total of 253 patients who survived at least 1 year following TAVI were included in this study. The prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of hemoglobin (Hb)-recovery were assessed. Results The prevalence of baseline anemia was 49% (n = 124) – recovery from anemia occurred in 40% of the anemic patients (n = 49) at 1 year after TAVI with an increase in mean Hb-level of 1.35 g/dL from baseline. This increase was not related to an improvement in renal function. At multivariate analysis, a high peak gradient (OR 4.82, P = 0.003) was shown to be an independent predictor for Hb-recovery, while blood transfusion (OR 0.31, P = 0.038) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, OR 0.33, P = 0.043) were identified as negative predictors at, respectively, one and two years after TAVI. When compared to patients without baseline anemia, those anemic patients with Hb-recovery had a similar functional improvement (OR 0.98, P = 0.975), whereas those without Hb-recovery had a significantly lower likelihood of functional improvement with ≧2 NYHA classes (OR 0.49, P = 0.034) and a higher likelihood of re-hospitalization within the first year after TAVI (OR 1.91, P = 0.024). Conclusion Recovery from anemia occurs in 40% of anemic patients at 1 year after TAVI – mainly in those with a high gradient and without CKD. Blood transfusion was found to have a transient adverse effect on this Hb-recovery. Finally, anemic patients without Hb-recovery experience less functional improvement and have a higher re-hospitalization rate within the first year after TAVI. PMID:25437191

  15. A gender based analysis of predictors of all cause death after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Federico; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Salizzoni, Stefano; Presbitero, Patrizia; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Tamburino, Corrado; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Bedogni, Francesco; Nijhoff, Freek; Gasparetto, Valeria; Napodano, Massimo; Ferrante, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marco Luciano; Stella, Pieter; Brambilla, Nedy; Barbanti, Marco; Giordana, Francesca; Grasso, Costanza; Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe; Moretti, Claudio; D'Amico, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Marra, Sebastiano

    2014-10-15

    The impact of gender-related pathophysiologic features of severe aortic stenosis on transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) outcomes remains to be determined, as does the consistency of predictors of mortality between the genders. All consecutive patients who underwent TAVI at 6 institutions were enrolled in this study and stratified according to gender. Midterm all-cause mortality was the primary end point, with events at 30 days and at midterm as secondary end points. All events were adjudicated according to Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. Eight hundred thirty-six patients were enrolled, 464 (55.5%) of whom were female. At midterm follow-up (median 365 days, interquartile range 100 to 516) women had similar rates of all-cause mortality compared with men (18.1% vs 22.6%, p = 0.11) and similar incidence of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. Gender did not affect mortality also on multivariate analysis. Among clinical and procedural features, glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 2.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36 to 4.79) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure >50 mm Hg (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.26 to 4.02) independently predicted mortality in women, while insulin-treated diabetes (HR 3.45, 95% CI 1.47 to 8.09), previous stroke (HR 3.42, 95% CI 1.43 to 8.18), and an ejection fraction <30% (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41 to 10.37) were related to mortality in men. Postprocedural aortic regurgitation was independently related to midterm mortality in the 2 groups (HR 11.19, 95% CI 3.3 to 37.9). In conclusion, women and men had the same life expectancy after TAVI, but different predictors of adverse events stratified by gender were demonstrated. These findings underline the importance of a gender-tailored clinical risk assessment in TAVI patients. PMID:25159239

  16. Challenges after the first decade of transcatheter aortic valve replacement: focus on vascular complications, stroke, and paravalvular leak.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Christopher; Sophocles, Aris; Ramakrishna, Harish; Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Patel, Prakash A; Augoustides, John G T

    2013-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is entering its second decade. Three major clinical challenges have emerged from the first decade of experience: vascular complications, stroke, and paravalvular leak (PVL). Major vascular complications remain common and independently predict major bleeding, transfusion, renal failure, and mortality. Although women are more prone to vascular complications, overall they have better survival than men. Further predictors of major vascular complications include heavily diseased femoral arteries and operator experience. Strategies to minimize vascular complications include a multimodal approach and sleeker delivery systems. Although cerebral embolism is very common during TAVR, it mostly is asymptomatic. Major stroke independently predicts prolonged recovery and increased mortality. Identified stroke predictors include functional disability, previous stroke, a transapical approach, and atrial fibrillation. Embolic protection devices are in development to mitigate the risk of embolic stroke after TAVR. PVL is common and significantly decreases survival. Undersizing of the valve prosthesis can be minimized with 3-dimensional imaging by computed tomography or echocardiography to describe the elliptic aortic annulus accurately. The formal grading of PVL severity in TAVR is based on its percentage of the circumferential extent of the aortic valve annulus. Further emerging management strategies for PVL include a repositionable valve prosthesis and transcatheter plugging. The first decade of TAVR has ushered in a new paradigm for the multidisciplinary management of valvular heart disease. The second decade likely will build on this wave of initial success with further significant innovations.

  17. Valve-in-Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation to Treat a Degenerated Surgical Bioprosthesis in a Subaortic Position

    PubMed Central

    Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Benitez, Luis M.; Nader, Carlos A.; Perez, Sergio; de Marchena, Eduardo J.; Dager, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis has evolved as an alternative treatment for patients who are at high or excessive surgical risk. We report the case of an 84-year-old man with a degenerated surgically implanted valve in a subaortic position (9 mm below the native annulus) who underwent “valve-in-valve” transcatheter aortic valve implantation with use of a Medtronic CoreValve system. We planned to deploy the CoreValve at a conventional depth in the left ventricular outflow tract; we realized that this might result in paravalvular regurgitation, but it would also afford a “deep” landing site for a second valve, if necessary. Ultimately, we implanted a second CoreValve deep in the left ventricular outflow tract to seal a paravalvular leak. The frame of the first valve—positioned at the conventional depth—enabled secure anchoring of the second valve in a deeper position, which in turn effected successful treatment of the failing subaortic surgical prosthesis without paravalvular regurgitation. PMID:23914032

  18. Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation overcoming hostile anatomy: Evolut R for the treatment of Mitroflow bioprosthesis dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2016-10-01

    Redo surgery is regarded as the first-line treatment option for patients presenting with prosthetic valve degeneration. However, many patients have concomitant co-morbidities and this option is associated with significant risk. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation is an alternative strategy depending on the bioprosthetic valve that is being treated. The Sorin Mitroflow bioprosthetic aortic valve has been regarded as a contraindication to valve-in-valve treatment due to the high risk of coronary obstruction. We here present the case of a patient with small peripheral vasculature who underwent successful transfemoral valve-in-valve implantation and subsequently discuss the challenges and technical aspects that require consideration.

  19. Automatic aorta segmentation and valve landmark detection in C-arm CT for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Liao, Rui; Nöttling, Alois; Boese, Jan; Kempfert, Jörg; Walther, Thomas; Brockmann, Gernot; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a minimally invasive procedure to treat severe aortic valve stenosis. As an emerging imaging technique, C-arm computed tomography (CT) plays a more and more important role in TAVI on both pre-operative surgical planning (e.g., providing 3-D valve measurements) and intra-operative guidance (e.g., determining a proper C-arm angulation). Automatic aorta segmentation and aortic valve landmark detection in a C-arm CT volume facilitate the seamless integration of C-arm CT into the TAVI workflow and improve the patient care. In this paper, we present a part-based aorta segmentation approach, which can handle structural variation of the aorta in case that the aortic arch and descending aorta are missing in the volume. The whole aorta model is split into four parts: aortic root, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Discriminative learning is applied to train a detector for each part separately to exploit the rich domain knowledge embedded in an expert-annotated dataset. Eight important aortic valve landmarks (three hinges, three commissures, and two coronary ostia) are also detected automatically with an efficient hierarchical approach. Our approach is robust under all kinds of variations observed in a real clinical setting, including changes in the field-of-view, contrast agent injection, scan timing, and aortic valve regurgitation. Taking about 1.1 s to process a volume, it is also computationally efficient. Under the guidance of the automatically extracted patient-specific aorta model, the physicians can properly determine the C-arm angulation and deploy the prosthetic valve. Promising outcomes have been achieved in real clinical applications. PMID:22955891

  20. Annular sizing using real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography-guided trans-catheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Alejandro; Hamid, Tahir; Kanaganayagam, Gajen; Karunaratne, Devinda; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as an alternative therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are unfit for the surgical aortic valve replacements. Pre and periprocedural imaging for the TAVR procedure is the key to procedural success. Currently transesophageal echocardiography (TOE), including real-time three-dimensional (RT-3D) imaging TOE, has been used for peri-interventional monitoring and guidance for TAVR. We describe our initial experience with real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography (RT-3DICE), imaging technology for the use in the TAVR procedure. Methods We used RT-3DICE using an ACUSON SC2000 2.0v (Siemens Medical Solution), and a 10F AcuNav V catheter (Siemens-Acuson, Inc, Mountain View, California, USA) in addition to preoperative multislice CT (MSCT) in total of five patients undergoing TAVR procedure. Results Aortic annulus and sinus of valsalva diameters were measured using RT-3DICE. Aortic valve measurements obtained using RT-3DICE are comparable to those obtained using MSCT with no significant difference in our patients. Conclusions This small study of five patients shows the safe use of RT-3DICE in TAVR Procedure and may help the procedures performed under local anaesthesia without the need for TOE. PMID:27158522

  1. Clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: from learning curve to proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, Mattia; Pesarini, Gabriele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Piccoli, Anna; Geremia, Giulia; Ariotti, Sara; Rossi, Andrea; Gambaro, Alessia; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Objective The use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is growing rapidly in countries with a predominantly elderly population, posing a huge challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. The increment of human and economic resource consumption imposes a careful monitoring of clinical outcomes and cost-benefit balance, and this article is aimed at analysing clinical outcomes related to the TAVI learning curve. Methods Outcomes of 177 consecutive transfemoral TAVI procedures performed in 5 years by a single team were analysed by the Cumulative Sum of failures method (CUSUM) according to the clinical events comprised in the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) safety end point and the VARC-2 definition of device success. Margins for events acceptance were extrapolated from landmark trials that tested both balloon or self-expandable percutaneous valves. Results 30-day and 1-year survival rates were 97.2% and 89.9%, respectively. Achievement of the primary end point (number of cases needed to provide the acceptable margin of the composite end point of any death, stroke, myocardial infarction, life-threatening bleeding, major vascular complications, stage 2–3 acute kidney injury and valve-related dysfunction requiring a repeat procedure) required the performance of 54 cases, while the learning curve to achieve ‘device success’ identified 32 cases to reach the expected proficiency. In this experience, the baseline clinical risk as assessed by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score determined the long-term survival rather than the adverse events related to the learning curve. Conclusions A relatively large number of cases are required to achieve clinical outcomes comparable to those reported in high-volume centres and controlled trials. According to our national workload standards, this represents more than 2 years of continuous activity.

  2. Clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: from learning curve to proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, Mattia; Pesarini, Gabriele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Piccoli, Anna; Geremia, Giulia; Ariotti, Sara; Rossi, Andrea; Gambaro, Alessia; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Objective The use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is growing rapidly in countries with a predominantly elderly population, posing a huge challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. The increment of human and economic resource consumption imposes a careful monitoring of clinical outcomes and cost-benefit balance, and this article is aimed at analysing clinical outcomes related to the TAVI learning curve. Methods Outcomes of 177 consecutive transfemoral TAVI procedures performed in 5 years by a single team were analysed by the Cumulative Sum of failures method (CUSUM) according to the clinical events comprised in the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) safety end point and the VARC-2 definition of device success. Margins for events acceptance were extrapolated from landmark trials that tested both balloon or self-expandable percutaneous valves. Results 30-day and 1-year survival rates were 97.2% and 89.9%, respectively. Achievement of the primary end point (number of cases needed to provide the acceptable margin of the composite end point of any death, stroke, myocardial infarction, life-threatening bleeding, major vascular complications, stage 2–3 acute kidney injury and valve-related dysfunction requiring a repeat procedure) required the performance of 54 cases, while the learning curve to achieve ‘device success’ identified 32 cases to reach the expected proficiency. In this experience, the baseline clinical risk as assessed by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score determined the long-term survival rather than the adverse events related to the learning curve. Conclusions A relatively large number of cases are required to achieve clinical outcomes comparable to those reported in high-volume centres and controlled trials. According to our national workload standards, this represents more than 2 years of continuous activity. PMID:27621826

  3. Inhospital and Post-discharge Changes in Renal Function After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Blair, John E A; Brummel, Kent; Friedman, Julie L; Atri, Prashant; Sweis, Ranya N; Russell, Hyde; Ricciardi, Mark J; Malaisrie, S Chris; Davidson, Charles J; Flaherty, James D

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of inhospital and post-discharge worsening renal function (WRF) on prognosis after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Severe chronic kidney disease and inhospital WRF are both associated with poor outcomes after TAVR. There are no data available on post-discharge WRF and outcomes. This was a single-center study evaluating all TAVR from June 1, 2008, to June 31, 2014. WRF was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥0.3 mg/dl. Inhospital WRF was measured from day 0 until discharge or day 7 if the hospitalization was >7 days. Post-discharge WRF was measured at 30 days after discharge. Descriptive statistics, Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis, and multivariate logistic regression were used. In a series of 208 patients who underwent TAVR, 204 with complete renal function data were used in the inhospital analysis and 168 who returned for the 30-day follow-up were used in the post-discharge analysis. Inhospital WRF was seen in 28%, whereas post-discharge WRF in 12%. Inhospital and post-discharge WRF were associated with lower rates of survival; however, after multivariate analysis, only post-discharge WRF remained a predictor of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio 1.18, p = 0.030 for every 1 mg/dl increase in serum creatinine). In conclusion, the rate of inhospital WRF is higher than the rate of post-discharge WRF after TAVR, and post-discharge WRF is more predictive of mortality than inhospital WRF.

  4. Impact of clinical and procedural factors upon C reactive protein dynamics following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Ariff, Ben; Sutaria, Nilesh; Fertleman, Michael; Cousins, Jonathan; Anderson, Jon; Bicknell, Colin; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Sen, Sayan; Malik, Iqbal S; Colombo, Antonio; Mikhail, Ghada W

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of procedural and clinical factors upon C reactive protein (CRP) dynamics following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: Two hundred and eight consecutive patients that underwent transfemoral TAVI at two hospitals (Imperial, College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy) were included. Daily venous plasma CRP levels were measured for up to 7 d following the procedure (or up to discharge). Procedural factors and 30-d safety outcomes according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition were collected. RESULTS: Following TAVI, CRP significantly increased reaching a peak on day 3 of 87.6 ± 5.5 mg/dL, P < 0.001. Patients who developed clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis had significantly increased levels of CRP (P < 0.001). The presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with a significantly higher peak CRP level at day 3 (78.4 ± 3.2 vs 92.2 ± 4.4, P < 0.001). There was no difference in peak CRP release following balloon-expandable or self-expandable TAVI implantation (94.8 ± 9.1 vs 81.9 ± 6.9, P = 0.34) or if post-dilatation was required (86.9 ± 6.3 vs 96.6 ± 5.3, P = 0.42), however, when pre-TAVI balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed this resulted in a significant increase in the peak CRP (110.1 ± 8.9 vs 51.6 ± 3.7, P < 0.001). The development of a major vascular complication did result in a significantly increased maximal CRP release (153.7 ± 11.9 vs 83.3 ± 7.4, P = 0.02) and there was a trend toward a higher peak CRP following major/life-threatening bleeding (113.2 ± 9.3 vs 82.7 ± 7.5, P = 0.12) although this did not reach statistical significance. CRP was not found to be a predictor of 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Careful attention should be paid to baseline clinical characteristics and procedural factors when interpreting CRP following TAVI to determine their future management. PMID

  5. Early- and mid-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Data from a single-center registry

    PubMed Central

    Bagienski, Maciej; Dziewierz, Artur; Rzeszutko, Lukasz; Sorysz, Danuta; Trebacz, Jaroslaw; Sobczynski, Robert; Tomala, Marek; Stapor, Maciej; Gackowski, Andrzej; Dudek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive treatment option for elderly, high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) than aortic valve replacement. More importantly, TAVI improves survival and quality of life as compared to medical treatment in inoperable patients. Aim To assess early- and mid-term clinical outcomes after TAVI. Material and methods All consecutive high-risk patients with severe symptomatic AS undergoing TAVI from November 2008 to August 2014 were enrolled. The clinical and procedural characteristics, as well as clinical outcomes including mortality during 12-month follow-up, were assessed. Results A total of 101 consecutive patients underwent TAVI for native aortic valve stenosis (100%). Patients were elderly, with a median age of 81.0 (76.0–84.0) years, 60.4% were female and 83.2% presented with NYHA III/IV. Median baseline EuroSCORE I and STS scores were 14.0 (10.0–22.5)% and 12.0 (5.0–24.0)%, respectively. The main periprocedural and in-hospital complications were minor vascular complications, bleeding requiring blood transfusions, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. In-hospital, 30-day, 6-month and 12-month mortality rates were 6.9%, 10.9%, 15.8% and 17.8%, respectively. Conclusions A mortality rate of < 20% after 12 months seems acceptable given the high-risk population enrolled. PMID:27279871

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of the aortic valve and aortic root with computed tomography: new standards in an era of transcatheter valve repair/implantation.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Tuzcu, E Murat; Kapadia, Samir R; Desai, Milind Y; Svensson, Lars G

    2009-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a significant, global cause of morbidity and mortality. In the ageing population of industrialized nations, degenerative aortic stenosis has become the most common native valve disorder. Although surgical aortic valve replacement is associated with excellent clinical outcomes, a large number of patients with severe aortic stenosis are not considered surgical candidates. These patients have poor prognosis with continued medical therapy. In this population, catheter-based approaches for valve replacement/insertion show promising initial results. In an era of expanding catheter-based approaches to valve disease, the requirements for peri-operative imaging are evolving. Because of the lack of direct exposure during the procedure, the operator has to rely increasingly on imaging data rather than direct inspection. Novel three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities, including computed tomography, rapidly acquire volumetric data sets and allow subsequent 3D display and reconstruction in unlimited planes. Procedural planning based on 3D imaging has already become routine for other endovascular procedures including aortic stent grafts, but is in its infancy in the context of transcatheter valve insertion.

  7. Vascular Complications and Bleeding After Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Through Open Surgical Access.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Akodad, Mariama; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gandet, Thomas; Lattuca, Benoit; Schmutz, Laurent; Gervasoni, Richard; Nogue, Erika; Nagot, Nicolas; Levy, Gilles; Maupas, Eric; Robert, Gabriel; Targosz, Frederic; Vernhet, Hélène; Cayla, Guillaume; Albat, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Major vascular complications (VC) remain frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of VC after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive open surgical access strategy. From 2010 to 2014, we included in a monocentric registry all consecutive patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI. The procedures were performed with 16Fr to 20Fr sheath systems. VC were evaluated within 30 days and classified as major or minor according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. The study included 396 patients, 218 were women (55%), median age was 85 years (81 to 88), and the median logistic Euroscore was 15.2% (11 to 23). The balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT and the self-expandable Medtronic Core Valve prosthesis were used in 288 (72.7%) and 108 patients (27.3%), respectively. The total length of the procedure was 68 ± 15 minutes including 13 ± 5 minutes for the open surgical access. Major and minor VC were observed in 9 (2.3%) and 16 patients (4%), respectively, whereas life-threatening and major bleeding concerned 18 patients (4.6%). The median duration of hospitalization was 5 days (interquartile range 2 to 7), significantly higher in patients with VC (7 days [5 to 15], p <0.001). Mortality at 1-month and 1-year follow-up (n = 26, 6.6%; and n = 67, 17.2%, respectively) was not related to major or minor VC (p = 0.6). In multivariable analysis, only diabetes (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.1, p = 0.034) and chronic kidney failure (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 9.0, p = 0.046) were predictive of VC, whereas body mass index, gender, Euroscore, and lower limb arteriopathy were not. In conclusion, minimal rate of VC and bleeding can be obtained after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive surgical strategy, with a particular advantage observed in high-risk bleeding patients.

  8. Vascular Complications and Bleeding After Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Through Open Surgical Access.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Akodad, Mariama; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gandet, Thomas; Lattuca, Benoit; Schmutz, Laurent; Gervasoni, Richard; Nogue, Erika; Nagot, Nicolas; Levy, Gilles; Maupas, Eric; Robert, Gabriel; Targosz, Frederic; Vernhet, Hélène; Cayla, Guillaume; Albat, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Major vascular complications (VC) remain frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of VC after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive open surgical access strategy. From 2010 to 2014, we included in a monocentric registry all consecutive patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI. The procedures were performed with 16Fr to 20Fr sheath systems. VC were evaluated within 30 days and classified as major or minor according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. The study included 396 patients, 218 were women (55%), median age was 85 years (81 to 88), and the median logistic Euroscore was 15.2% (11 to 23). The balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT and the self-expandable Medtronic Core Valve prosthesis were used in 288 (72.7%) and 108 patients (27.3%), respectively. The total length of the procedure was 68 ± 15 minutes including 13 ± 5 minutes for the open surgical access. Major and minor VC were observed in 9 (2.3%) and 16 patients (4%), respectively, whereas life-threatening and major bleeding concerned 18 patients (4.6%). The median duration of hospitalization was 5 days (interquartile range 2 to 7), significantly higher in patients with VC (7 days [5 to 15], p <0.001). Mortality at 1-month and 1-year follow-up (n = 26, 6.6%; and n = 67, 17.2%, respectively) was not related to major or minor VC (p = 0.6). In multivariable analysis, only diabetes (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.1, p = 0.034) and chronic kidney failure (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 9.0, p = 0.046) were predictive of VC, whereas body mass index, gender, Euroscore, and lower limb arteriopathy were not. In conclusion, minimal rate of VC and bleeding can be obtained after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive surgical strategy, with a particular advantage observed in high-risk bleeding patients. PMID

  9. Feasibility and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Without Intensive Care Unit Admission.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Iemmi, Anais; Lattuca, Benoit; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gervasoni, Richard; Roubille, Francois; Gandet, Thomas; Schmutz, Laurent; Akodad, Mariama; Agullo, Audrey; Verges, Marine; Nogue, Erika; Marin, Gregory; Nagot, Nicolas; Rivalland, Francois; Durrleman, Nicolas; Robert, Gabriel; Delseny, Delphine; Albat, Bernard; Cayla, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) is a standard of care after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the improvement of the procedure and the need to minimize the unnecessary use of medical resources call into question this strategy. We evaluated prospectively 177 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI. Low-risk patients, admitted to conventional cardiology units, had stable clinical state, transfemoral access, no right bundle branch block, permanent pacing with a self-expandable valve, and no complication occurring during the procedure. High-risk patients included all the others transferred to ICU. In-hospital events were the primary end point (Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 criteria). The mean age of patients was 83.5 ± 6.5 years, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 14.6 ± 9.7%. The balloon-expandable SAPIEN 3 valve was mainly used (n = 148; 83.6%), mostly with transfemoral access (n = 167; 94.4%). Among the 61 patients (34.5%) included in the low-risk group, only 1 (1.6%) had a minor complication (negative predictive value 98.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91 to 0.99). Conversely, 31 patients (26.7%) from the high-risk group had clinical events (positive predictive value 26.7%, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.35), mainly conductive disorders requiring pacemaker (n = 26; 14.7%). In multivariate analysis, right bundle branch block (odds ratio [OR] 14.1, 95% CI 3.5 to 56.3), use of the self-expandable valve without a pacemaker (OR 5.5, 95% CI 2 to 16.3), vitamin K antagonist treatment (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6), and female gender (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.003 to 6.9) were preprocedural predictive factors of adverse events. In conclusion, our results suggested that TAVI can be performed safely without ICU admission in selected patients. This strategy may optimize efficiency and cost-effectiveness of procedures. PMID:27184173

  10. [From FRANCE 2 to FRANCE TAVI: are indications, technique and results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement the same?].

    PubMed

    Auffret, Vincent; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Verhoye, Jean Philippe; Ruggieri, Vito Giovanni; Koning, René; Laskar, Marc; Van Belle, Éric; Leprince, Pascal; Collet, Jean Philippe; Iung, Bernard; Lefèvre, Thierry; Eltchaninoff, Helene; Gilard, Martine; Le Breton, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is indicated in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not suitable for surgery or should be considered when there is a high surgical risk as assessed by a heart team. There is a decrease in mean logistic EuroSCORE since January 2010, which translates a gradual evolution in patients' selection. Expertise of geriatricians to further assess frailty is a key step in the risk stratification process of this elderly population (mean age: 83.4±7.3 years). Femoral access is used in 80% of cases with a procedural success rate higher than 95%. In-hospital mortality rate is 5.9%. The main complications of the procedure are aortic annulus rupture (0.9% in FRANCE TAVI), tamponade (2.3%), stroke (2.2%), severe paravalvular leak (1.3%) and permanent pacemaker implantation (15%). The awaited results of PARTNER II and SURTAVI may lead to expand the indications to lower-risk patients if it is shown that TAVI is non-inferior to surgery in this population which has been suggested by the recent randomized NOTION Trial while the CoreValve Pivotal Trial even points in the direction of a possible superiority of the percutaneous technique over surgery. PMID:26208911

  11. Comparison of outcomes in patients ≤85 versus >85 years of age undergoing transcatheter aortic-valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Havakuk, Ofer; Finkelstein, Ariel; Steinvil, Arie; Halkin, Amir; Arbel, Yaron; Abramowitz, Yigal; Ben Assa, Eyal; Konigstein, Maayan; Keren, Gad; Banai, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    The impact of age on baseline characteristics and outcomes in patients with severe aortic stenosis who undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has not been thoroughly investigated. To describe the baseline clinical profile of TAVI patients aged >85 and ≤85 years and to evaluate the influence of age differences on outcomes, we evaluated a consecutive cohort of 293 patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI at the Tel Aviv Medical Center. The cohort was divided into 2 groups: patients aged >85 years (n = 93) and patients aged ≤85 years (n = 200). Mean age was 83 ± 5.3 years (range 63 to 98) for the entire cohort. Women comprised 70% of the older group and 57.5% of the younger age group (p = 0.043). Baseline clinical profile, including EuroSCORE index and preprocedural aortic valve area were similar in both age groups. Thirty-day mortality, major vascular complications, need for permanent pacemaker implantation, length of hospital stay, and improvement in functional class after the procedure showed no differences between the 2 groups. Adjustment for baseline clinical differences between groups did not change the results. In conclusion, among patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI, older patients (>85 years) experience similar benefits and outcomes regarding functional status, complication rates, and 30-day mortality. PMID:24210675

  12. Extended contrast detection on fluoroscopy and angiography for image-guided trans-catheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yinxiao; Liao, Rui; Lv, Xudong

    2012-02-01

    Navigation and deployment of the prosthetic valve during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can be greatly facilitated with 3-D models showing detailed anatomical structures. Fast and robust automatic contrast detection at the aortic root on X-ray images is indispensable for automatically triggering a 2-D/3-D registration to align the 3-D model. Previously, we have proposed an automatic method for contrast detection at the aortic root on fluoroscopic and angiographic sequences [4]. In this paper, we extend that algorithm in several ways, making it more robust to handle more general and difficult cases. Specifically, the histogram likelihood ratio test is multiplied with the histogram portion computation to handle faint contrast cases. Histogram mapping corrects sudden changes in the global brightness, thus avoiding potential false positives. Respiration and heart beating check further reduces the false positive rate. In addition, a probe mask is introduced to enhance the contrast feature curve when the dark ultrasound probe partially occludes the aortic root. Lastly, a semi-global registration method for aligning the aorta shape model is implemented to improve the robustness of the algorithm with respect to the selection of region of interest (ROI) containing the aorta. The extended algorithm was evaluated on 100 sequences, and improved the detection accuracy from 94% to 100%, compared to the original method. Also, the robustness of the extended algorithm was tested with 20 different shifts of the ROI, and the error rate was as low as 0.2%, in comparison to 6.6% for the original method.

  13. Early, intermediate and late infectious complications after transcatheter or surgical aortic-valve replacement: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Falcone, M; Russo, A; Mancone, M; Carriero, G; Mazzesi, G; Miraldi, F; Pennacchi, M; Pugliese, F; Tritapepe, L; Vullo, V; Fedele, F; Sardella, G; Venditti, M

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been proposed to treat older surgical high-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. There are no data regarding short-term and long-term infectious complications in these patients. The objective of this study was to define the incidence, aetiology and outcome of early and late infectious complications following TAVI compared with patients >65 years old undergoing traditional surgical aortic replacement (SAR). This was a prospective observational study evaluating all consecutive patients who underwent TAVI or SAR. Follow up was performed up to 1 year after the procedure of valve implantation. Fifty-one patients underwent TAVI and were compared with 102 patients who underwent SAR. Compared with SAR patients, those who underwent TAVI had lower incidence of early post-operative (11.7% vs 26.4%, p 0.04), intermediate (5.9% vs 17.6%, p 0.01) and late (7.8% vs 11.7%, p 0.03) infections. Among SAR patients the most common infections were bloodstream infections, pneumonias, urinary tract infections and sternal wound infections. Patients who underwent TAVI had a longer survival without infection (358 days vs 312.9, p 0.006). There were no significant differences in 12-month crude survival between the two study populations. Despite a high frequency of coexisting illnesses, patients undergoing TAVI develop few infectious complications. TAVI appears to be a reasonable and safe option in high-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis.

  14. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Versus Surgery in Women at High Risk for Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement (from the CoreValve US High Risk Pivotal Trial).

    PubMed

    Skelding, Kimberly A; Yakubov, Steven J; Kleiman, Neal S; Reardon, Michael J; Adams, David H; Huang, Jian; Forrest, John K; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in women after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a self-expanding prosthesis in patients with severe aortic stenosis who were at high risk for SAVR. Although registries and meta-analyses have suggested that TAVR is of considerable benefit in women, perhaps even more so than in men, a rigorous evaluation of TAVR with a self-expanding valve versus SAVR in women from a randomized trial has not been performed. Patients with severe aortic stenosis were randomized 1:1 to either TAVR or SAVR. Outcomes at 1 year are reported. Treatment was attempted in a total of 353 women (183 TAVR and 170 SAVR). Baseline characteristics and predicted risk of the 2 groups were comparable, although the frequency of diabetes mellitus was lower in patients undergoing TAVR (33.3% vs 45.3%; p = 0.02). TAVR-treated patients experienced a statistically significant 1-year survival advantage compared with SAVR patients (12.7% vs 21.8%; p = 0.03). The composite all-cause mortality or major stroke rate also favored TAVR (14.9% vs 24.2%; p = 0.04). Quality of life, as measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire summary score, for both the TAVR and SAVR groups increased significantly from baseline to 1 year. In conclusion, female TAVR patients had lower 1-year mortality and lower 1-year all-cause mortality or major stroke compared with women undergoing SAVR, with both cohorts experiencing improved quality of life. Further studies specifically in women are warranted to validate these findings. PMID:27381665

  15. Feasibility and safety of early discharge after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Edwards SAPIEN-XT prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Durand, Eric; Eltchaninoff, Hélène; Canville, Alexandre; Bouhzam, Najime; Godin, Matthieu; Tron, Christophe; Rodriguez, Carlos; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Bauer, Fabrice; Cribier, Alain

    2015-04-15

    There is currently no consensus on the duration of hospitalization required after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We report the feasibility and safety of early discharge after TAVI with the Edwards SAPIEN-XT prosthesis. From 2009 to 2013, 337 patients underwent transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards SAPIEN-XT prosthesis using local anesthesia and were discharged home either early (≤3 days, Early Discharge group, n = 121) or after 3 days (Late Discharge group, n = 216). The primary end point of the study combined death and rehospitalization from discharge to 30-day follow-up. Patients in the Early Discharge group were less symptomatic (New York Heart Association class ≥III: 64.5% vs 75.5%, p = 0.01) and had less renal failure (creatinine: 102.1 ± 41.0 vs 113.3 ± 58.9 μmol/L, p = 0.04), atrial fibrillation (33.1% vs 46.3%, p = 0.02), and previous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (11.6% vs 23.1%, p = 0.01) and were more likely to have a pacemaker before TAVI (16.5% vs 8.3%, p = 0.02). Pre-existing pacemaker (p = 0.05) and the absence of acute kidney injury (p = 0.02) were independent predictors of an early discharge, whereas previous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (p = 0.03) and post-TAVI blood transfusions (p = 0.002) were independent predictors of late discharge. The primary end point occurred in 4 patients (3.3%) in the Early Discharge group and in 11 patients (5.1%) in the Late Discharge group (p = 0.58). In conclusion, the results of our study suggest that early discharge after transfemoral TAVI using the Edwards SAPIEN-XT prosthesis is feasible and safe in selected patients. PMID:25726383

  16. Long-Term Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation from a Single High-Volume Center (The Milan Experience).

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Latib, Azeem; Buzzatti, Nicola; Giannini, Francesco; Figini, Filippo; Mangieri, Antonio; Regazzoli, Damiano; Stella, Stefano; Sticchi, Alessandro; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Akihito; Agricola, Eustachio; Monaco, Fabrizio; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Ancona, Marco; Cioni, Micaela; Spagnolo, Pietro; Chieffo, Alaide; Montorfano, Matteo; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is now the treatment of choice for patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis who are inoperable or with high surgical risk. Data with regards to contemporary clinical practice and long-term outcomes are sparse. To evaluate temporal changes in TAVI practice and explore procedural and long-term clinical outcomes of patients in a contemporary "real-world" population, outcomes of 829 patients treated from November 2007 to May 2015, at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up was 568 days, with the longest follow-up of 2,677 days. Overall inhospital mortality was 3.5%. During the study period, there was a trend toward treating younger, lower risk patients. Overall mortality rates were 3.5% (30 days), 14% (1 year), 22% (2 years), 29% (3 years), 37% (4 years), 47% (5 years), 53% (6 years), and 72% (7 years). The survival probability at 5 years was significantly higher in patients treated through the transfemoral (TF) route compared to other vascular access sites (log rank p <0.001). Non-TF vascular access and residual paravalvular leak ≥2 (after TAVI) were identified as independent predictors for both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. No patient required further aortic valve intervention for TAVI prosthesis degeneration. In conclusion, there is a trend toward treating younger, lower-risk patients. Non-TF vascular access approach and ≥2 PVL after TAVI were identified as independent predictors for both overall and cardiovascular mortality with no cases of prosthesis degeneration suggesting acceptable durability.

  17. Transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis at low and intermediate risk: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Agoritsas, Thomas; Manja, Veena; Devji, Tahira; Chang, Yaping; Bala, Malgorzata M; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) versus surgical replacement of an aortic valve (SAVR) in patients with severe aortic stenosis at low and intermediate risk of perioperative death. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Data sources Medline, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL. Study selection Randomized trials of TAVI compared with SAVR in patients with a mean perioperative risk of death <8%. Review methods Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias for outcomes important to patients that were selected a priori by a parallel guideline committee, including patient advisors. We used the GRADE system was used to quantify absolute effects and quality of evidence. Results 4 trials with 3179 patients and a median follow-up of two years were included. Compared with SAVR, transfemoral TAVI was associated with reduced mortality (risk difference per 1000 patients: −30, 95% confidence interval −49 to −8, moderate certainty), stroke (−20, −37 to 1, moderate certainty), life threatening bleeding (−252, −293 to −190, high certainty), atrial fibrillation (−178, −150 to −203, moderate certainty), and acute kidney injury (−53, −39 to −62, high certainty) but increased short term aortic valve reintervention (7, 1 to 21, moderate certainty), permanent pacemaker insertion (134, 16 to 382, moderate certainty), and moderate or severe symptoms of heart failure (18, 5 to 34, moderate certainty). Compared with SAVR, transapical TAVI was associated higher mortality (57, −16 to 153, moderate certainty, P=0.015 for interaction between transfemoral versus transapical TAVI) and stroke (45, −2 to 125, moderate certainty, interaction P=0.012). No study reported long term follow-up, which is particularly important for structural valve deterioration. Conclusions Many patients, particularly those who have a shorter life expectancy or place a lower value on the risk of long term valve

  18. Impact of Preprocedural B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels on the Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Yigal; Chakravarty, Tarun; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Lee, Chin; Cox, Justin; Sharma, Rahul P; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2015-12-15

    There are limited data on the effect of baseline B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on the outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We investigated the influence of baseline BNP levels on the short-term and midterm clinical outcomes after TAVI. During a 3-year period, 780 patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent TAVI at our institute and had baseline BNP levels. We compared the high, mid, and low tertiles of BNP levels. TAVI end points, device success, and adverse events were considered according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definitions. Device success was significantly lower for patients with high BNP (98.1% vs 96.2% vs 91.9% for the low, mid, and high BNP tertiles, respectively; p = 0.003). All-cause mortality up to 30 days was 1.2% (3 of 260) versus 2.3% (6 of 260) versus 5% (13 of 260), respectively (p = 0.03). Six-month mortality rate was 4.1% (10 of 241) for the low BNP tertile, 5% (12 of 239) for the mid BNP tertile, and 17.1% (40 of 234) for the high BNP tertile (p <0.001). In the multivariate model, high tertile of baseline BNP was found to be significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.64 to 6.48; p = 0.001). In conclusion, elevated BNP levels are associated with increased short-term and midterm mortality after TAVI. We recommend measurement of baseline BNP as part of risk stratification models for TAVI. PMID:26602075

  19. Aortic Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Self-Expanding CoreValve Versus the Balloon-Expandable SAPIEN XT Valve.

    PubMed

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Magalhaes, Marco A; Koifman, Edward; Didier, Romain; Escarcega, Ricardo O; Baker, Nevin C; Negi, Smita I; Minha, Sa'ar; Torguson, Rebecca; Jiaxiang, Gai; Asch, Federico M; Wang, Zuyue; Okubagzi, Petros; Gaglia, Michael A; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in a self-expanding and a balloon-expandable system is controversial. This study aimed to examine the incidence and severity of post-TAVR AR with the CoreValve (CV) versus the Edwards XT Valve (XT). Baseline, procedural, and postprocedural inhospital outcomes were compared. The primary end point was the incidence of post-TAVR AR of any severity, assessed with a transthoracic echocardiogram, in the CV versus XT groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was completed to evaluate for correlates of the primary end point. The secondary end points included the change in severity of AR at 30-day and 1-year follow-up. A total of 223 consecutive patients (53% men, mean age 82 years) who had transfemoral TAVR with either a CV (n = 119) or XT (n = 104) were evaluated. The rates of post-TAVR AR in the groups were similar, and there was no evidence of more-than-moderate AR in either group. There were significant differences in the rates of intraprocedural balloon postdilation with the CV (17.1%) versus XT valve (5.8%; p = 0.009) and in the rates of intraprocedural implantation of a second valve-in-valve prosthesis with the CV (9.9%) versus XT valve (2.2%; p = 0.036). There were no significant differences in inhospital safety outcomes between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the incidence of post-TAVR AR is similar between the CV and the XT valve when performed by experienced operators using optimal intraprocedural strategies, as deemed appropriate, to mitigate the severity of AR. PMID:26996768

  20. Association of blood transfusion with acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Gillaspie, Erin A; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess red blood cell (RBC) transfusion effects on acute kidney injury (AKI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). METHODS A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and clinicaltrials.gov from the inception of the databases through December 2015. Studies that reported relative risk, odds ratio or hazard ratio comparing the risks of AKI following TAVR in patients who received periprocedural RBC transfusion were included. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95%CI were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. RESULTS Sixteen cohort studies with 4690 patients were included in the analyses to assess the risk of AKI after TAVR in patients who received a periprocedural RBC transfusion. The pooled RR of AKI after TAVR in patients who received a periprocedural RBC transfusion was 1.95 (95%CI: 1.56-2.43) when compared with the patients who did not receive a RBC transfusion. The meta-analysis was then limited to only studies with adjusted analysis for confounders assessing the risk of AKI after TAVR; the pooled RR of AKI in patients who received periprocedural RBC transfusion was 1.85 (95%CI: 1.29-2.67). CONCLUSION Our meta-analysis demonstrates an association between periprocedural RBC transfusion and a higher risk of AKI after TAVR. Future studies are required to assess the risks of severe AKI after TAVR requiring renal replacement therapy and mortality in the patients who received periprocedural RBC transfusion.

  1. Association of blood transfusion with acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Gillaspie, Erin A; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess red blood cell (RBC) transfusion effects on acute kidney injury (AKI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). METHODS A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and clinicaltrials.gov from the inception of the databases through December 2015. Studies that reported relative risk, odds ratio or hazard ratio comparing the risks of AKI following TAVR in patients who received periprocedural RBC transfusion were included. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95%CI were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. RESULTS Sixteen cohort studies with 4690 patients were included in the analyses to assess the risk of AKI after TAVR in patients who received a periprocedural RBC transfusion. The pooled RR of AKI after TAVR in patients who received a periprocedural RBC transfusion was 1.95 (95%CI: 1.56-2.43) when compared with the patients who did not receive a RBC transfusion. The meta-analysis was then limited to only studies with adjusted analysis for confounders assessing the risk of AKI after TAVR; the pooled RR of AKI in patients who received periprocedural RBC transfusion was 1.85 (95%CI: 1.29-2.67). CONCLUSION Our meta-analysis demonstrates an association between periprocedural RBC transfusion and a higher risk of AKI after TAVR. Future studies are required to assess the risks of severe AKI after TAVR requiring renal replacement therapy and mortality in the patients who received periprocedural RBC transfusion. PMID:27648412

  2. Bivalirudin anticoagulation for minimal invasive transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Andreas; Ensminger, Stephan; Vlachojannis, Marios; Birschmann, Ingvild

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of lupus anticoagulant is associated with the hazard of developing an antiphospholipid syndrome, a severe prothrombotic condition which may particularly occur after major surgical trauma. This disease requires certain considerations regarding surgical strategy and anticoagulation management. We describe the perioperative management of a patient scheduled for elective aortic valve replacement and diagnosed for having antiphospholipid antibodies. The procedure was successfully performed using a minimally invasive approach via transapical aortic valve replacement and anticoagulation with the nonreversible short-acting direct thrombin Inhibitor bivalirudin.

  3. Bivalirudin anticoagulation for minimal invasive transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Andreas; Ensminger, Stephan; Vlachojannis, Marios; Birschmann, Ingvild

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of lupus anticoagulant is associated with the hazard of developing an antiphospholipid syndrome, a severe prothrombotic condition which may particularly occur after major surgical trauma. This disease requires certain considerations regarding surgical strategy and anticoagulation management. We describe the perioperative management of a patient scheduled for elective aortic valve replacement and diagnosed for having antiphospholipid antibodies. The procedure was successfully performed using a minimally invasive approach via transapical aortic valve replacement and anticoagulation with the nonreversible short-acting direct thrombin Inhibitor bivalirudin. PMID:27555195

  4. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa Riestra, Adriana; Rubio Caballero, José Amador; Freites Estévez, Alfonso; Alonso Belló, Javier; Botas Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27134443

  5. Comparison of Preoperative and Postoperative Characteristics in Octogenarians Having Isolated Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement Before Versus After Introduction of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Khounlaboud, Moukda; Donal, Erwan; Auffret, Vincent; Anselmi, Amedeo; Ingels, Anne; Flécher, Erwan; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Daubert, Claude; Le Breton, Hervé; Mabo, Philippe; Leguerrier, Alain

    2015-09-15

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent heart valve disease. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is the reference treatment. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative treatment. New strategies for treating the AS are upcoming. The aim of the study was to assess if the clinical profile of octogenarian patients treated surgically before and after the TAVI program initiation has changed. We retrospectively included consecutive octogenarian patients, who underwent isolated SAVR, from January 2006 to December 2011 in a single high-volume center. We compared preoperative and postoperative characteristics before and after the initiation of TAVI (February 2009). Five hundred seventeen patients were included: 229 in the "pre-TAVI" group (2006 to 2008), 288 in the "post-TAVI" group (2009 to 2011). The mean age was 83.2 ± 2.0 in the "pre-TAVI" group, 83.5 ± 2.1 in the "post-TAVI" group (p = 0.106). There were no significant differences in preoperative characteristics: New York Heart Association class (p = 0.374), history of heart failure (p = 0.680), left ventricular ejection fraction (59.8 ± 12.2% in the "pre-TAVI" group, 59.9 ± 11.3% in the "post-TAVI" group, p = 0.922), coronary artery disease (p = 0.431), chronic pulmonary disease (p = 0.363), and previous cardiac surgery (p = 0.085). The logistic EuroSCORE was 7.78 ± 4.60% in the "pre-TAVI" group and 7.33 ± 3.96% in the "post-TAVI" group (p = 0.236). The operative mortality (30-day) was comparable: 5.2% in the "pre-TAVI" group, 6.9% in the "post-TAVI" group (p = 0.424). Thus, with the emergence of TAVI, the number of octogenarian patients operated on, their preoperative characteristics, and the operative mortality remained comparable. PMID:26187675

  6. Comparison of Inhospital Outcomes of Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Hospitals With and Without Availability of a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Program (from a Nationally Representative Database).

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Badheka, Apurva O; Patel, Samir V; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Nilay; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nish; Patel, Achint; Savani, Chirag; Ghatak, Abhijit; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Jhamnani, Sunny; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Chothani, Ankit; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Bhatt, Parth; Dave, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Mohamad, Tamam; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K; Mangi, Abeel

    2015-10-15

    We hypothesized that the availability of a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) program in hospitals impacts the overall management of patients with aortic valve disease and hence may also improve postprocedural outcomes of conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). The aim of the present study was to compare the inhospital outcomes of SAVR in centers with versus without availability of a TAVI program in an unrestricted large nationwide patient population >50 years of age. SAVRs performed on patients aged >50 years were identified from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for the years 2011 and 2012 using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. SAVR cases were divided into 2 categories: those performed at hospitals with a TAVI program (SAVR-TAVI) and those without (SAVR-non-TAVI). A total of 9,674 SAVR procedures were identified: 4,526 (46.79%) in the SAVR-TAVI group and 5,148 (53.21%) in SAVR-non-TAVI group. The mean age of the study population was 70.2 ± 0.1 years with majority (53%) of the patients aged >70 years. The mean Charlson's co-morbidity score for patients in SAVR-TAVI group was greater (greater percentage of patients were aged >80 years, had hypertension, congestive heart failure, renal failure, and peripheral arterial disease) than that of patients in SAVR-non-TAVI group (1.6 vs 1.4, p <0.001). The propensity score matching analysis showed a statistically significant lower inhospital mortality (1.25% vs 1.72%, p = 0.001) and complications rate (35.6% vs 37.3%, p = 0.004) in SAVR-TAVI group compared to SAVR-non-TAVI group. The mean length of hospital stay was similar in the 2 groups the cost of hospitalization was higher in the SAVR-TAVI group ($43,894 ± 483 vs $41,032 ± 473, p <0.0001). Having a TAVI program was a significant predictor of reduced mortality and complications rate after SAVR in multivariate analysis. In conclusion, this largest direct

  7. Determinants of image quality of rotational angiography for on-line assessment of frame geometry after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Olivares, Ramón; El Faquir, Nahid; Rahhab, Zouhair; Maugenest, Anne-Marie; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Schultz, Carl; Lauritsch, Guenter; de Jaegere, Peter P T

    2016-07-01

    To study the determinants of image quality of rotational angiography using dedicated research prototype software for motion compensation without rapid ventricular pacing after the implantation of four commercially available catheter-based valves. Prospective observational study including 179 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with either the Medtronic CoreValve (MCS), Edward-SAPIEN Valve (ESV), Boston Sadra Lotus (BSL) or Saint-Jude Portico Valve (SJP) in whom rotational angiography (R-angio) with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction was performed. Image quality was evaluated from grade 1 (excellent image quality) to grade 5 (strongly degraded). Distinction was made between good (grades 1, 2) and poor image quality (grades 3-5). Clinical (gender, body mass index, Agatston score, heart rate and rhythm, artifacts), procedural (valve type) and technical variables (isocentricity) were related with the image quality assessment. Image quality was good in 128 (72 %) and poor in 51 (28 %) patients. By univariable analysis only valve type (BSL) and the presence of an artefact negatively affected image quality. By multivariate analysis (in which BMI was forced into the model) BSL valve (Odds 3.5, 95 % CI [1.3-9.6], p = 0.02), presence of an artifact (Odds 2.5, 95 % CI [1.2-5.4], p = 0.02) and BMI (Odds 1.1, 95 % CI [1.0-1.2], p = 0.04) were independent predictors of poor image quality. Rotational angiography with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction using a dedicated research prototype software offers good image quality for the evaluation of frame geometry after TAVI in the majority of patients. Valve type, presence of artifacts and higher BMI negatively affect image quality.

  8. Determinants of image quality of rotational angiography for on-line assessment of frame geometry after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Olivares, Ramón; El Faquir, Nahid; Rahhab, Zouhair; Maugenest, Anne-Marie; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Schultz, Carl; Lauritsch, Guenter; de Jaegere, Peter P T

    2016-07-01

    To study the determinants of image quality of rotational angiography using dedicated research prototype software for motion compensation without rapid ventricular pacing after the implantation of four commercially available catheter-based valves. Prospective observational study including 179 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with either the Medtronic CoreValve (MCS), Edward-SAPIEN Valve (ESV), Boston Sadra Lotus (BSL) or Saint-Jude Portico Valve (SJP) in whom rotational angiography (R-angio) with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction was performed. Image quality was evaluated from grade 1 (excellent image quality) to grade 5 (strongly degraded). Distinction was made between good (grades 1, 2) and poor image quality (grades 3-5). Clinical (gender, body mass index, Agatston score, heart rate and rhythm, artifacts), procedural (valve type) and technical variables (isocentricity) were related with the image quality assessment. Image quality was good in 128 (72 %) and poor in 51 (28 %) patients. By univariable analysis only valve type (BSL) and the presence of an artefact negatively affected image quality. By multivariate analysis (in which BMI was forced into the model) BSL valve (Odds 3.5, 95 % CI [1.3-9.6], p = 0.02), presence of an artifact (Odds 2.5, 95 % CI [1.2-5.4], p = 0.02) and BMI (Odds 1.1, 95 % CI [1.0-1.2], p = 0.04) were independent predictors of poor image quality. Rotational angiography with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction using a dedicated research prototype software offers good image quality for the evaluation of frame geometry after TAVI in the majority of patients. Valve type, presence of artifacts and higher BMI negatively affect image quality. PMID:27139459

  9. Lethal Aorto-Right Ventricular Defect After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in a Patient With Radiation-Induced Porcelain Aorta: Notes of Caution.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Lionel; Dijos, Marina; Peltan, Julien; Casassus, Frederic; Seguy, Benjamin; Natsumeda, Makoto; Lafitte, Stephane; Labrousse, Louis; Dos Santos, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with severe radiation-induced aortic stenosis was rejected for cardiac surgery because of porcelain aorta. We successfully implanted an Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA), but the patient was readmitted 3 weeks later for heart failure with a continuous murmur on auscultation. Echocardiography showed a small defect between the aorta and the infundibulum of the right ventricle, which was also confirmed with aortography and computed tomography. Medical therapy was optimized; however, he died unexpectedly a few weeks later. We concluded that irradiated tissues are particularly fragile and require specific attention during transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Furthermore, this case suggests that a more aggressive closure should have been applied.

  10. Phantom study of an ultrasound guidance system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    McLeod, A Jonathan; Currie, Maria E; Moore, John T; Bainbridge, Daniel; Kiaii, Bob B; Chu, Michael W A; Peters, Terry M

    2016-06-01

    A guidance system using transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic tracking is presented which avoids the use of nephrotoxic contrast agents and ionizing radiation required for traditional fluoroscopically guided procedures. The aortic valve is identified in tracked biplane transesophageal echocardiography and used to guide stent deployment in a mixed reality environment. Additionally, a transapical delivery tool with intracardiac echocardiography capable of monitoring stent deployment was created. This system resulted in a deployment depth error of 3.4mm in a phantom. This was further improved to 2.3mm with the custom-made delivery tool. In comparison, the variability in deployment depth for traditional fluoroscopic guidance was estimated at 3.4mm.

  11. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation for degenerated surgical bioprostheses: the first case series in Asia with one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Paul Toon Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Soon, Jia Lin; Ho, Kay Woon; Sin, Yong Koong; Tan, Swee Yaw; Lim, Soo Teik; Koh, Tian Hai; Chua, Yeow Leng

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established therapy for inoperable and high-surgical-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although TAVI in patients with degenerated surgical aortic bioprostheses (i.e. valve-in-valve TAVI) is increasingly reported in Western studies, such data is lacking in Asian patients. We describe the initial experience of valve-in-valve TAVI in Asia. METHODS Eight patients who underwent valve-in-valve TAVI due to degenerated aortic bioprostheses were enrolled. The mechanism of bioprosthetic valve failure was stenotic, regurgitation or mixed. All procedures were performed via transfemoral arterial access, using the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis or balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT prosthesis. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 71.6 ± 13.2 years and five were male. Mean duration to surgical bioprosthesis degeneration was 10.2 ± 4.1 years. Valve-in-valve TAVI was successfully performed in all patients. CoreValve and SAPIEN XT prostheses were used in six and two patients, respectively. There were no deaths, strokes or permanent pacemaker requirement at 30 days, with one noncardiac mortality at one year. All patients experienced New York Heart Association functional class improvement. Post-procedure mean pressure gradients were 20 ± 11 mmHg and 22 ± 8 mmHg at 30 days and one year, respectively. Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) of more than mild severity occurred in one patient at 30 days. At one year, only one patient had mild residual AR. CONCLUSION In our experience of valve-in-valve TAVI, procedural success was achieved in all patients without adverse events at 30 days. Good clinical and haemodynamic outcomes were sustained at one year. PMID:27193081

  12. Thoracic Malignancies and Pulmonary Nodules in Patients under Evaluation for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): Incidence, Follow Up and Possible Impact on Treatment Decision

    PubMed Central

    Kaleschke, Gerrit; Schülke, Christoph; Görlich, Dennis; Schliemann, Christoph; Kessler, Torsten; Schulze, Arik Bernard; Buerke, Boris; Kuemmel, Andreas; Thrull, Michael; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Baumgartner, Helmut; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Mohr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become the treatment of choice in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis who are not eligible for operative replacement and an alternative for those with high surgical risk. Due to high age and smoking history in a high proportion of TAVI patients, suspicious findings are frequently observed in pre-procedural chest computer tomography (CCT). Methods CCT scans of 484 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI were evaluated for incidentally discovered solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN). Results In the entire study population, SPN ≥ 5 mm were found in 87 patients (18%). These patients were compared to 150 patients who were incidentally collected from the 397 patients without SPN or with SPN < 5 mm (control group). After a median follow-up of 455 days, lung cancer was diagnosed in only two patients. Neither SPN ≥ 5 mm (p = 0.579) nor SPN > 8 mm (p = 0.328) were significant predictors of overall survival. Conclusions Despite the high prevalence of SPNs in this single center TAVI cohort lung cancer incidence at midterm follow-up seems to be low. Thus, aggressive diagnostic approaches for incidentally discovered SPN during TAVI evaluation should not delay the treatment of aortic stenosis. Unless advanced thoracic malignancy is obvious, the well documented reduction of morbidity and mortality by TAVI outweighs potentially harmful delays regarding further diagnostics. Standard guideline-approved procedure for SPN can be safely performed after TAVI. PMID:27171441

  13. Advanced 3-D analysis, client-server systems, and cloud computing—Integration of cardiovascular imaging data into clinical workflows of transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Mathis; Falkner, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is highly prevalent in the aging populations of industrialized countries and is associated with poor prognosis. Surgical valve replacement has been the only established treatment with documented improvement of long-term outcome. However, many of the older patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are high-risk or ineligible for surgery. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a treatment alternative. The TAVR procedure is characterized by a lack of visualization of the operative field. Therefore, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for patient selection, pre-procedural planning, and intra-operative decision-making. Incremental to conventional angiography and 2-D echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role before TAVR. The analysis of 3-D CT data requires extensive post-processing during direct interaction with the dataset, using advance analysis software. Organization and storage of the data according to complex clinical workflows and sharing of image information have become a critical part of these novel treatment approaches. Optimally, the data are integrated into a comprehensive image data file accessible to multiple groups of practitioners across the hospital. This creates new challenges for data management requiring a complex IT infrastructure, spanning across multiple locations, but is increasingly achieved with client-server solutions and private cloud technology. This article describes the challenges and opportunities created by the increased amount of patient-specific imaging data in the context of TAVR. PMID:24282750

  14. Feasibility and outcomes of combined transcatheter aortic valve replacement with other structural heart interventions in a single session: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ahmed A; Gloekler, Steffen; Sprecher, Beate; Shakir, Samera; Guerios, Ênio; Stortecky, Stefan; O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Nietlispach, Fabian; Moschovitis, Aris; Pilgrim, Thomas; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Wenaweser, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Meier, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Background Concurrent cardiac diseases are frequent among elderly patients and invite simultaneous treatment to ensure an overall favourable patient outcome. Aim To investigate the feasibility of combined single-session percutaneous cardiac interventions in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods This prospective, case–control study included 10 consecutive patients treated with TAVI, left atrial appendage occlusion and percutaneous coronary interventions. Some in addition had patent foramen ovale or atrial septal defect closure in the same session. The patients were matched in a 1:10 manner with TAVI-only cases treated within the same time period at the same institution regarding their baseline factors. The outcome was validated according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) criteria. Results Procedural time (126±42 vs 83±40 min, p=0.0016), radiation time (34±8 vs 22±12 min, p=0.0001) and contrast dye (397±89 vs 250±105 mL, p<0.0001) were higher in the combined intervention group than in the TAVI-only group. Despite these drawbacks, no difference in the VARC endpoints was evident during the in-hospital period and after 30 days (VARC combined safety endpoint 32% for TAVI only and 20% for combined intervention, p=1.0). Conclusions Transcatheter treatment of combined cardiac diseases is feasible even in a single session in a high-volume centre with experienced operators. PMID:25332781

  15. CT-Angiography–Based Evaluation of the Aortic Annulus for Prosthesis Sizing in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI)–Predictive Value and Optimal Thresholds for Major Anatomic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Florian; Lange, Philipp; Zinsser, Dominik; Greif, Martin; Boekstegers, Peter; Schmitz, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives To evaluate the predictive value of CT-derived measurements of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and to calculate optimal cutoff values for the selection of various prosthesis sizes. Methods The local IRB waived approval for this single-center retrospective analysis. Of 441 consecutive TAVI-patients, 90 were excluded (death within 30 days: 13; more than mild aortic regurgitation: 10; other reasons: 67). In the remaining 351 patients, the CoreValve (Medtronic) and the Edwards Sapien XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences) were implanted in 235 and 116 patients. Optimal prosthesis size was determined during TAVI by inflation of a balloon catheter at the aortic annulus. All patients had undergone CT-angiography of the heart or body trunk prior to TAVI. Using these datasets, the diameter of the long and short axis as well as the circumference and the area of the aortic annulus were measured. Multi-Class Receiver-Operator-Curve analyses were used to determine the predictive value of all variables and to define optimal cutoff-values. Results Differences between patients who underwent implantation of the small, medium or large prosthesis were significant for all except the large vs. medium CoreValve (all p’s<0.05). Furthermore, mean diameter, annulus area and circumference had equally high predictive value for prosthesis size for both manufacturers (multi-class AUC’s: 0.80, 0.88, 0.91, 0.88, 0.88, 0.89). Using the calculated optimal cutoff-values, prosthesis size is predicted correctly in 85% of cases. Conclusion CT-based aortic root measurements permit excellent prediction of the prosthesis size considered optimal during TAVI. PMID:25084451

  16. Using Clinical Decision Support and Dashboard Technology to Improve Heart Team Efficiency and Accuracy in a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) Program.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sarah; Wilson, Marisa L; Terhaar, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Heart Team meetings are becoming the model of care for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) worldwide. While Heart Teams have potential to improve the quality of patient care, the volume of patient data processed during the meeting is large, variable, and comes from different sources. Thus, consolidation is difficult. Also, meetings impose substantial time constraints on the members and financial pressure on the institution. We describe a clinical decision support system (CDSS) designed to assist the experts in treatment selection decisions in the Heart Team. Development of the algorithms and visualization strategy required a multifaceted approach and end-user involvement. An innovative feature is its ability to utilize algorithms to consolidate data and provide clinically useful information to inform the treatment decision. The data are integrated using algorithms and rule-based alert systems to improve efficiency, accuracy, and usability. Future research should focus on determining if this CDSS improves patient selection and patient outcomes. PMID:27332170

  17. Integrating a palliative approach in a transcatheter heart valve program: bridging innovations in the management of severe aortic stenosis and best end-of-life practice.

    PubMed

    Lauck, Sandra; Garland, Ella; Achtem, Leslie; Forman, Jacqueline; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Boone, Robert; Cheung, Anson; Ye, Jian; Wood, David A; Webb, John G

    2014-04-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is the most prevalent structural heart disease and affects primarily older adults in their last decade of life. If the risk for surgery is high, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the treatment of choice for many patients with suitable anatomy who are likely to derive significant benefit from this innovative and minimally invasive approach. In a large transcatheter heart valve (THV) centre that offers TAVI as one of the treatment options, of 565 consecutive referrals for the assessment of eligibility for TAVI over 18 months, 78 (14%) were deemed unsuitable candidates for TAVI or higher risk surgery by the interdisciplinary Heart Team because of their advanced disease, excessive frailty or comorbid burden. Concerns were raised for patients for whom TAVI is not an option. The integration of a palliative approach in a THV program offers opportunities to adopt best end-of-life practices while promoting innovative approaches for treatment. An integrated palliative approach to care focuses on meeting a patient's full range of physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs at all stages of a life-limiting illness, and is well suited for the severe AS and TAVI population. A series of interventions that reflect best practices and current evidence were adopted in collaboration with the Palliative Care Team and are currently under evaluation in a large TAVI centre. Changes include the introduction of a palliative approach in patient assessment and education, the measurement of symptoms, improved clarity about responsibility for communication and follow-up, and triggering referrals to palliative care services.

  18. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p <0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (19.0 vs 30.2, p <0.01) than the STS >7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p <0.01). Conversely, the severity of AR at discharge did not affect 3-year mortality in patients with STS >7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk.

  19. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p <0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (19.0 vs 30.2, p <0.01) than the STS >7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p <0.01). Conversely, the severity of AR at discharge did not affect 3-year mortality in patients with STS >7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk. PMID:26762727

  20. Inter-individual variance and cardiac cycle dependency of aortic root dimensions and shape as assessed by ECG-gated multi-slice computed tomography in patients with severe aortic stenosis prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation: is it crucial for correct sizing?

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Foldyna, Borek; Von Aspern, Konstantin; Lücke, Christian; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Kempfert, Jörg; Haensig, Martin; Rastan, Ardawan; Walther, Thomas; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Gutberlet, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the inter-individual variance and the variability of the aortic root dimensions during the cardiac cycle by computed tomography (CT) in patients with severe aortic stenosis prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Fifty-six patients (m/w = 16/40, 81 ± 6.8 years), scheduled for a transapical aortic valve implantation with available preprocedural ECG-gated CT were retrospectively included. The evaluation included sizing of the aortic annulus and the aortic sinus, measurements of the coronary topography, aortic valve planimetry and scoring of calcification. The new defined aortic annulus sphericity ratio revealed a mostly elliptical shape with increasing diastolic deformation. The calculated effective diameter (ED), determined from the annulus' lumen area, turned out to be the parameter least affected from cardiac cycle changes while systolic and diastolic annulus dimensions and shape (diameter and area) differed significantly (p < 0.001). In about 70 % of the patients with relevant paravalvular leaks the finally implanted prosthesis was too small according to the CT based calculated ED. The ostial height of the coronaries showed a high variability with a critical minimum range <5 mm. The degree of the aortic calcification did not have an influence on the aortic annulus deformation during the cardiac cycle, but on the occurrence of paravalvular leaks. The aortic root anatomy demonstrated a high inter-individual variability and cardiac cycle dependency. These results must be strongly considered during the patient evaluation prior to TAVI to avoid complications. The systolic effective diameter, as measured by ECG-gated CT, represents an appropriate parameter for sizing the aortic annulus.

  1. Prognostic value of the ratio between prosthesis area and indexed annulus area measured by MultiSlice-CT for transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures

    PubMed Central

    Debry, Nicolas; Sudre, Arnaud; Elquodeimat, Ibrahim; Delhaye, Cédric; Schurtz, Guillaume; Bical, Antoine; Koussa, Mohamad; Fattouch, Khalil; Modine, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprocedural aortic regurgitations following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures remain an issue. Benefit of oversizing strategies to prevent them isn't well established. We compared different level of oversizing in our cohort of consecutive patients to address if severe oversizing compared to normal sizing had an impact on post-procedural outcomes. Methods From January 2010 to August 2013, consecutive patients were referred for TAVI with preoperative Multislice-CT (MSCT) and the procedures were achieved using Edwards Sapien® or Corevalve devices®. Retrospectively, according to pre-procedural MSCT and the valve size, patients were classified into three groups: normal, moderate and severe oversizing; depending on the ratio between the prosthesis area and the annulus area indexed and measured on MSCT. Main endpoint was mid-term mortality and secondary endpoints were the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) endpoints. Results Two hundred and sixty eight patients had a MSCT and underwent TAVI procedure, with mainly Corevalve®. While all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were similar in all groups, post-procedural new pacemaker (PM) implantation rate was significantly higher in the severe oversizing group (P = 0.03), while we observed more in-hospital congestive heart-failure (P = 0.02) in the normal sizing group. There was a trend toward more moderate to severe aortic regurgitation (AR) in the normal sizing group (P = 0.07). Conclusions Despite a higher rate of PM implantation, oversizing based on this ratio reduces aortic leak with lower rates of post-procedural complications and a similar mid-term survival. PMID:27582762

  2. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    PubMed

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. PMID:27239021

  3. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    PubMed

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies.

  4. Prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: impact of 2D-transthoracic echocardiography versus 3D-transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cristina; Sahlen, Anders; Winter, Reidar; Bäck, Magnus; Rück, Andreas; Settergren, Magnus; Manouras, Aristomenis; Shahgaldi, Kambiz

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the role of 2D-transthoracic echocardiography (2D-TTE) and 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE) in the determination of aortic annulus size prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and its' impact on the prevalence of patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM). Echocardiography plays an important role in measuring aortic annulus dimension in patients undergoing TAVI. This has great importance since it determines both eligibility for TAVI and selection of prosthesis type and size, and can be potentially important in preventing an inadequate ratio between the prosthetic valvular orifice and the patient's body surface area, concept known as prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM). A total of 45 patients were studied pre-TAVI: 20 underwent 3D-TEE (men/women 12/8, age 84.8 ± 5.6) and 25 2D-TTE (men/women 9/16, age 84.4 ± 5.4) in order to measure aortic annulus diameter. The presence of PPM was assessed before hospital discharge and after a mean period of 3 months. Moderate PPM was defined as indexed aortic valve area (AVAi) ≤ 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and severe PPM as AVAi < 0.65 cm(2)/m(2). Immediately post-TAVI, moderate PPM was present in 25 and 28 % of patients worked up using 3D-TEE and 2D-TTE respectively p value = n.s) and severe PPM occurred in 10 % of the patients who underwent 3D-TEE and in 20 % in those with 2D-TTE (p value = n.s). The echocardiographic evaluation 3 months post-TAVI showed 25 % moderate PPM in the 3D-TEE group compared with 24 % in the 2D-TTE group (p value = n.s) and no cases of severe PPM in the 3DTEE group comparing to 20 % in the 2D-TTE group (p = 0.032). Our results indicate a higher incidence of severe PPM in patients who performed 2DTTE compared to those performing 3DTEE prior TAVI. This suggests that the 3D technique should replace the 2DTTE analysis when investigating the aortic annulus diameter in patients undergoing TAVI. PMID:25102782

  5. A pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT registration framework for trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongning; Sun, Ying; Liao, Rui; Ong, Sim Heng

    2014-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced C-arm CT is routinely used for intra-operative guidance during the trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the requirement for contrast agent injection is not preferable, especially for patients with renal insufficiencies. To address this problem, we present a novel framework for fully automatic registration of pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT. The proposed framework provides an improved workflow and minimizes the usage of contrast agent in the TAVI procedure. Our framework consists of three steps: coarse rigid-body alignment, anatomical knowledge-based prior deformation field generation, and fine deformable registration. We validated the proposed framework on 20 real patient data sets. Based on the 20 data sets, the mesh-to-mesh errors at the aortic root from different methods are measured. Our proposed method significantly outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, we achieve the registration accuracy at 1.76±0.43 mm which is clinically plausible. Quantitative evaluation on real non-contrast enhanced C-arm CT data sets confirms the applicability in the clinical usage. The proposed heart registration method is generic and hence can be easily applied to other cardiac applications.

  6. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  7. A pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT registration framework for trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongning; Sun, Ying; Liao, Rui; Ong, Sim Heng

    2014-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced C-arm CT is routinely used for intra-operative guidance during the trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the requirement for contrast agent injection is not preferable, especially for patients with renal insufficiencies. To address this problem, we present a novel framework for fully automatic registration of pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT. The proposed framework provides an improved workflow and minimizes the usage of contrast agent in the TAVI procedure. Our framework consists of three steps: coarse rigid-body alignment, anatomical knowledge-based prior deformation field generation, and fine deformable registration. We validated the proposed framework on 20 real patient data sets. Based on the 20 data sets, the mesh-to-mesh errors at the aortic root from different methods are measured. Our proposed method significantly outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, we achieve the registration accuracy at 1.76±0.43 mm which is clinically plausible. Quantitative evaluation on real non-contrast enhanced C-arm CT data sets confirms the applicability in the clinical usage. The proposed heart registration method is generic and hence can be easily applied to other cardiac applications. PMID:25158997

  8. Comparison of Manual and Automated Preprocedural Segmentation Tools to Predict the Annulus Plane Angulation and C-Arm Positioning for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleinebrecht, Laura; Balzer, Jan; Hellhammer, Katharina; Polzin, Amin; Horn, Patrick; Blehm, Alexander; Minol, Jan-Philipp; Kröpil, Patric; Westenfeld, Ralf; Rassaf, Tienush; Lichtenberg, Artur; Kelm, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Background Preprocedural manual multi-slice-CT-segmentation tools (MSCT-ST) define the gold standard for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). They are able to predict the perpendicular line of the aortic annulus (PPL) and to indicate the corresponding C-arm angulation (CAA). Fully automated planning-tools and their clinical relevance have not been systematically evaluated in a real world setting so far. Methods and Results The study population consists of an all-comers cohort of 160 consecutive TAVR patients with a drop out of 35 patients for technical and anatomical reasons. 125 TAVR patients underwent preprocedural analysis by manual (M-MSCT) and fully automated MSCT-ST (A-MSCT). Method-comparison was performed for 105 patients (Cohort A). In Cohort A, CAA was defined for each patient, and accordance within 10° between M-MSCT and A-MSCT was considered adequate for concept-proof (95% in LAO/RAO; 94% in CRAN/CAUD). Intraprocedural CAA was defined by repetitive angiograms without utilizing the preprocedural measurements. In Cohort B, intraprocedural CAA was established with the use of A-MSCT (20 patients). Using preprocedural A-MSCT to indicate the corresponding CAA, the levels of contrast medium (ml) and radiation exposure (cine runs) were reduced in Cohort B compared to Cohort A significantly (23.3±10.3 vs. 35.3 ±21.1 ml, p = 0.02; 1.6±0.7 vs. 2.4±1.4 cine runs; p = 0.02) and trends towards more safety in valve-positioning could be demonstrated. Conclusions A-MSCT-analysis provides precise preprocedural information on CAA for optimal visualization of the aortic annulus compared to the M-MSCT gold standard. Intraprocedural application of this information during TAVR significantly reduces the levels of contrast and radiation exposure. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01805739 PMID:27073910

  9. [Commentary by the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery on the positions statement by the German Cardiology Society on quality criteria for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)].

    PubMed

    Cremer, Jochen; Heinemann, Markus K; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Diegeler, Anno; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Niehaus, Heidi; Ensminger, Stephan; Schlensak, Christian; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Rastan, Ardawan; Trummer, Georg; Walther, Thomas; Lange, Rüdiger; Falk, Volkmar; Beckmann, Andreas; Welz, Armin

    2014-12-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is still considered the first-line treatment for patients suffering from severe aortic valve stenosis. In recent years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative for selected high-risk patients. According to the latest results of the German external quality assurance program, mandatory by law, the initially very high mortality and procedural morbidity have now decreased to approximately 6 and 12%, respectively. Especially in Germany, the number of patients treated by TAVI has increased exponentially. In 2013, a total of 10.602 TAVI procedures were performed. TAVI is claimed to be minimally invasive. This is true concerning the access, but it does not describe the genuine complexity of the procedure, defined by the close neighborhood of the aortic valve to delicate intracardiac structures. Hence, significant numbers of life-threatening complications may occur and have been reported. Owing to the complexity of TAVI, there is a unanimous concordance between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons in the Western world demanding a close heart team approach for patient selection, intervention, handling of complications, and pre- as well as postprocedural care, respectively. The prerequisite is that TAVI should not be performed in centers with no cardiac surgery on site. This is emphasized in all international joint guidelines and expert consensus statements. Today, a small number of patients undergo TAVI procedures in German hospitals without a department of cardiac surgery on site. To be noted, most of these hospitals perform less than 20 cases per year. Recently, the German Cardiac Society (DGK) published a position paper supporting this practice pattern. Contrary to this statement and concerned about the safety of patients treated this way, the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (DGTHG) still fully endorses the European (ESC/EACTS) and other actual international guidelines and

  10. Use of short roll C-arm computed tomography and fully automated 3D analysis tools to guide transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael S; Bracken, John; Eshuis, Peter; Chen, S Y James; Fullerton, David; Cleveland, Joseph; Messenger, John C; Carroll, John D

    2016-07-01

    Determination of the coplanar view is a critical component of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The safety and accuracy of a novel reduced angular range C-arm computed tomography (CACT) approach coupled with a fully automated 3D analysis tool package to predict the coplanar view in TAVR was evaluated. Fifty-seven patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis deemed prohibitive-risk for surgery and who underwent TAVR were enrolled. Patients were randomized 2:1 to CACT vs. angiography (control) in estimating the coplanar view. These approaches to determine the coplanar view were compared quantitatively. Radiation doses needed to determine the coplanar view were recorded for both the CACT and control patients. Use of CACT offered good agreement with the actual angiographic view utilized during TAVR in 34 out of 41 cases in which a CACT scan was performed (83 %). For these 34 cases, the mean angular magnitude difference, taking into account both oblique and cranial/caudal angulation, was 1.3° ± 0.4°, while the maximum difference was 7.3°. There were no significant differences in the mean total radiation dose delivered to patients between the CACT and control groups as measured by either dose area product (207.8 ± 15.2 Gy cm(2) vs. 186.1 ± 25.3 Gy cm(2), P = 0.47) or air kerma (1287.6 ± 117.7 mGy vs. 1098.9 ± 143.8 mGy, P = 0.32). Use of reduced-angular range CACT coupled with fully automated 3D analysis tools is a safe, practical, and feasible method by which to determine the optimal angiographic deployment view for guiding TAVR procedures.

  11. Is Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation of Living Tissue-Engineered Valves Feasible? An In Vitro Evaluation Utilizing a Decellularized and Reseeded Biohybrid Valve.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Fabian; Lee, Jang-Sun; Akra, Bassil; Hollweck, Trixi; Wintermantel, Erich; Hagl, Christian; Thierfelder, Nikolaus

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a fast-growing, exciting field of invasive therapy. During the last years many innovations significantly improved this technique. However, the prostheses are still associated with drawbacks. The aim of this study was to create cell-seeded biohybrid aortic valves (BAVs) as an ideal implant by combination of assets of biological and artificial materials. Furthermore, the influence of TAVI procedure on tissue-engineered BAV was investigated. BAV (n=6) were designed with decellularized homograft cusps and polyurethane walls. They were seeded with fibroblasts and endothelial cells isolated from saphenous veins. Consecutively, BAV were conditioned under low pulsatile flow (500 mL/min) for 5 days in a specialized bioreactor. After conditioning, TAVI-simulation was performed. The procedure was concluded with re-perfusion of the BAV for 2 days at an increased pulsatile flow (1100 mL/min). Functionality was assessed by video-documentation. Samples were taken after each processing step and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunohistochemical staining (IHC), and Live/Dead-assays. The designed BAV were fully functioning and displayed physiologic behavior. After cell seeding, static cultivation and first conditioning, confluent cell layers were observed in SEM. Additionally, IHC indicated the presence of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. A significant construction of extracellular matrix was detected after the conditioning phase. However, a large number of lethal cells were observed after crimping by Live/Dead staining. Analysis revealed that the cells while still being present directly after crimping were removed in subsequent perfusion. Extensive regions of damaged cell-layers were detected by SEM-analysis substantiating these findings. Furthermore, increased ICAM expression was detected after re-perfusion as manifestation of inflammatory reaction. The approach to generate biohybrid valves is promising. However

  12. Is Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation of Living Tissue-Engineered Valves Feasible? An In Vitro Evaluation Utilizing a Decellularized and Reseeded Biohybrid Valve.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Fabian; Lee, Jang-Sun; Akra, Bassil; Hollweck, Trixi; Wintermantel, Erich; Hagl, Christian; Thierfelder, Nikolaus

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a fast-growing, exciting field of invasive therapy. During the last years many innovations significantly improved this technique. However, the prostheses are still associated with drawbacks. The aim of this study was to create cell-seeded biohybrid aortic valves (BAVs) as an ideal implant by combination of assets of biological and artificial materials. Furthermore, the influence of TAVI procedure on tissue-engineered BAV was investigated. BAV (n=6) were designed with decellularized homograft cusps and polyurethane walls. They were seeded with fibroblasts and endothelial cells isolated from saphenous veins. Consecutively, BAV were conditioned under low pulsatile flow (500 mL/min) for 5 days in a specialized bioreactor. After conditioning, TAVI-simulation was performed. The procedure was concluded with re-perfusion of the BAV for 2 days at an increased pulsatile flow (1100 mL/min). Functionality was assessed by video-documentation. Samples were taken after each processing step and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunohistochemical staining (IHC), and Live/Dead-assays. The designed BAV were fully functioning and displayed physiologic behavior. After cell seeding, static cultivation and first conditioning, confluent cell layers were observed in SEM. Additionally, IHC indicated the presence of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. A significant construction of extracellular matrix was detected after the conditioning phase. However, a large number of lethal cells were observed after crimping by Live/Dead staining. Analysis revealed that the cells while still being present directly after crimping were removed in subsequent perfusion. Extensive regions of damaged cell-layers were detected by SEM-analysis substantiating these findings. Furthermore, increased ICAM expression was detected after re-perfusion as manifestation of inflammatory reaction. The approach to generate biohybrid valves is promising. However

  13. Transfusion of small amounts of leucocyte-depleted red blood cells and mortality in patients undergoing transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Koster, Andreas; Zittermann, Armin; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2016-08-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about the impact of the transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) on clinical outcomes in cardiac surgical patients. Compared with non-transfused patients, a recent retrospective analysis in patients undergoing transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) indicates a dramatic increase in 30-day mortality in transfused patients, but no difference in 1-year mortality. We assessed the effect of the transfusion of 1-2 RBCs on early and late mortality in patients undergoing transapical (TA) TAVI. There were 430 patients who were not transfused (RBC-) and 209 patients who have received transfusions (RBC+). In the RBC- and RBC+ group, 30-day mortality rates were 2.8 and 1.4%, respectively. The propensity score-adjusted odds ratio of 30-day mortality was for the RBC+ group (reference: RBC- group) 0.44 (95% CI 0.11; 1.79; P = 0.252). One-year mortality rates were 12.1 and 17.6%, respectively. The propensity score-adjusted hazard ratio of 1-year mortality was higher in the RBC+ group than in the RBC- group (1.75 [95% CI 1.08;2.82]; P = 0.023). We conclude that in the group of very high-risk patients undergoing TA-TAVI, transfusion of 1-2 RBCs is not associated with an increased early mortality. However, adverse effects of transfusions on long-term survival cannot be definitely ruled out.

  14. Impact of age on transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes: a comparison of patients aged ≤ 80 years versus patients > 80 years

    PubMed Central

    van der Kley, Frank; van Rosendael, Philippe J; Katsanos, Spyridon; Kamperidis, Vasileios; Marsan, Nina A; Karalis, Ioannis; de Weger, Arend; Palmen, Meindert; Bax, Jeroen J; Schalij, Martin J; Delgado, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the procedural outcomes and the long-term survival of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and compare study results of patients ≤ 80 years and patients > 80 years old. Methods A total of 240 patients treated with TAVI were divided into two groups according to age ≤ 80 years (n = 105; 43.8%) and > 80 years (n = 135; 56.2%). The baseline characteristics and the procedural outcomes were compared between these two groups of patients. Results With the exception of peripheral artery disease and hypercholesterolemia, which were more frequently observed in the older age group, baseline characteristics were comparable between groups. Complication rates did not differ significantly between patients ≤ 80 years and patients > 80 years. There were no differences in 30-day mortality rates between patients aged ≤ 80 years and patients > 80 years old (9.5% vs. 7.4%, respectively; P = 0.557). After a median follow-up of 28 months (interquartile range: 16–42 months), 50 (47.6%) patients aged ≤ 80 years died compared to 57 (42%) deaths in the group of patients > 80 years old (P = 0.404). Conclusion The results of the present single center study showed that age did not significantly impact the outcomes of TAVI. PMID:26918010

  15. Impact of Mean Platelet Volume on Combined Safety Endpoint and Vascular and Bleeding Complications following Percutaneous Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Caroline J.; Chieffo, Alaide; Durante, Alessandro; Latib, Azeem; Maisano, Francesco; Cioni, Michela; Agricola, Eustachio; Covello, Remo Daniel; Gerli, Chiara; Franco, Annalisa; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background. Vascular and bleeding complications remain important complications in patients undergoing percutaneous transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI). Platelets play an important role in bleeding events. Mean platelet volume (MPV) is an indicator of platelet activation. The objective of this study was to assess whether low MPV is an indicator of major vascular and bleeding complications following TF-TAVI. Methods. A retrospective cohort study of 330 subjects undergoing TF-TAVI implantation was performed. The primary study endpoint was the occurrence of combined safety endpoint (CSEP); secondary endpoints included major vascular complications and life-threatening bleeding. Endpoints were defined according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2. Results. The CSEP at 30 days was reached in 30.9%; major vascular complications were observed in 14.9% while life-threatening bleeding occurred in 20.6%. Logistic Euroscore and MPV were independent predictors of CSEP. Predictors of vascular complications were female sex, previous myocardial infarction, red blood cell distribution width (RDW), and MPV while predictors of life-threatening bleeding were peripheral arterial disease, RDW, and MPV. Conclusion. A low baseline MPV was shown for the first time to be a significant predictor of CSEP, major vascular complications, and life-threatening bleeding following TF-TAVI. PMID:24455712

  16. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav; Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  17. Impact on Left Ventricular Function and Remodeling and on 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Left Bundle Branch Block After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Carrabba, Nazario; Valenti, Renato; Migliorini, Angela; Marrani, Marco; Cantini, Giulia; Parodi, Guido; Dovellini, Emilio Vincenzo; Antoniucci, David

    2015-07-01

    Conflicting results have been reported about the prognostic impact of left bundle branch block (LBBB) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of LBBB after TAVI on left ventricular (LV) function and remodeling and on 1-year outcomes. Of 101 TAVI patients, 9 were excluded. All complications were evaluated according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. Of 92 patients, 34 developed LBBB without more advanced myocardial damage or inflammation biomarkers in comparison with patients without LBBB. The only predictor of new LBBB was larger baseline LV end-diastolic volume. LBBB plus advanced atrioventricular block was strongly correlated with permanent pacemaker implantation (p <0.0001). Patients with LBBB had a higher rate of permanent pacemaker implantation at 30 days (59% vs 19%, p <0.0001) and less recovery of LV systolic function and a trend toward a lower rate of LV reverse remodeling at 1 year. The development of acute kidney injury and the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score were associated with poor outcomes (all-cause mortality and heart failure) (hazard ratio 6.86, 95% confidence interval 2.51 to 18.74, p <0.0001, and hazard ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.08, p = 0.021, respectively), but not LBBB. In conclusion, after TAVI, 37% of patients developed new LBBB without more advanced myocardial damage or inflammation biomarkers. LBBB was associated with a higher rate of permanent pacemaker implantation, which negatively affected the recovery of LV systolic function. The development of acute kidney injury, rather than LBBB, increases the 1-year risk for mortality and hospitalization for heart failure. PMID:25937352

  18. The risk of acute kidney injury following transapical versus transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Gillaspie, Erin A.; Greason, Kevin L.; Kashani, Kianoush B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review is to examine the literature for the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) based on transapical (TA) versus transfemoral (TF) approaches. Methods A literature search was conducted utilizing Embase, Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception through December 2015. Studies that reported relative risk, odds ratio or hazard ratio comparing the AKI risk in patients who underwent TA-TAVR versus TF-TAVR were included. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random effect, generic inverse variance method. Results Seventeen cohort studies with 5085 patients were enrolled in the analysis to assess the risk of AKI in patients undergoing TA-TAVR versus TF-TAVR. The pooled RR of AKI in patients who underwent TA-TAVR was 2.26 (95% CI 1.79–2.86) when compared with TF-TAVR. When meta-analysis was confined to the studies with adjusted analysis for confounders evaluating the risk of AKI following TAVR, the pooled RR of TA-TAVR was 2.89 (95% CI 2.12–3.94). The risk for moderate to severe AKI [RR 1.02 (95% CI 0.57–1.80)] in patients who underwent TA-TAVR compared with TF-TAVR was not significantly higher. Conclusions Our meta-analysis demonstrates an association between TA-TAVR and a higher risk of AKI. Future studies are required to assess the risks of moderate to severe AKI and mortality following TA-TAVR versus TF-TAVR. PMID:27478597

  19. Age-Related Differences in 1- and 12-Month Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (from a Large Multicenter Data Repository).

    PubMed

    Attizzani, Guilherme F; Ohno, Yohei; Latib, Azeem; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Giannini, Cristina; Ettori, Federica; Fiorina, Claudia; Bedogni, Francesco; Brambilla, Nedy; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Presbitero, Patrizia; Fiorilli, Rosario; Poli, Arnaldo; Barbanti, Marco; Colombo, Antonio; Tamburino, Corrado

    2016-10-01

    Scarce data are available on the impact of age on transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) outcomes. We therefore, analyzed 1,845 consecutive patients from 9 Italian centers who underwent TAVI with the Corevalve Revalving System from September 2007 to March 2014; patients were dichotomized according to their age in the date of the procedure, as follows: 75 to 85 years old and >85 years old. End points were defined according to Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. In-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year clinical and echocardiographic data were available for 100% of the patients included. Propensity matching was performed. Procedural success rates were high (>94%) and comparable between groups. Although worse baseline renal function was observed in the older group, the incidence of acute kidney injury after procedure was comparable (17.1% and 17.4%, respectively for the 75- to 85- and >85-year-old group, p = 0.877); importantly, >99% of acute kidney injury episodes in both groups were grades 1 and 2. Procedural complications rates were low without between-group differences. In-hospital death (3.7% and 4.6%, p = 0.379) and stroke/transient ischemic attack (1.9% and 1.9%, respectively, p = 0.960) were comparable. The 1-year death rates were 14.9% and 17.2% (p = 0.197) in the 75- to 85- and >85-year-old group, respectively. Cardiovascular death was observed in 7.8% and 7% (p = 0.542), while stroke/transient ischemic attack was demonstrated in 5.2% and 4.4% (p = 0.496), respectively. Results were sustained after propensity matching. In conclusion, advanced age did not negatively impact the outcomes of TAVI through 1-year after procedure.

  20. Prognostic Value of Fat Mass and Skeletal Muscle Mass Determined by Computed Tomography in Patients Who Underwent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mok, Michael; Allende, Ricardo; Leipsic, Jonathon; Altisent, Omar Abdul-Jawad; Del Trigo, Maria; Campelo-Parada, Francisco; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric; Doyle, Daniel; Côté, Mélanie; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    Body composition (fat mass [FM] and skeletal muscle mass [SMM]) predicts clinical outcomes. In particular, loss of SMM (sarcopenia) is associated with frailty and mortality. There are no data on the prevalence and impact of FM and SMM in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The objective of this study is to determine body composition from pre-TAVI computed tomography (CT) and evaluate its association with clinical outcomes in patients who underwent TAVI. A total of 460 patients (mean age 81 ± 8 years, men: 51%) were included. Pre-TAVI CTs of the aorto-ilio-femoral axis were analyzed for FM and SMM cross-sectional area at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae (L3). Regression equations correlating cross-sectional area at L3 to total body FM and SMM were used to determine prevalence of sarcopenia, obesity, and sarcopenic obesity in patients (64%, 65%, and 46%, respectively). Most TAVI procedures were performed through a transfemoral approach (59%) using a balloon-expandable valve (94%). The 30-day and mid-term (median 12 months [interquartile range 6 to 27]) mortality rates were 6.1% and 29.6%, respectively. FM had no association with clinical outcomes, but sarcopenia predicted cumulative mortality (hazard ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 2.36, p = 0.04). In conclusion, body composition analysis from pre-TAVI CT is feasible. Sarcopenia, obesity, and sarcopenic obesity are prevalent in the TAVI population, with sarcopenia predictive of cumulative mortality. PMID:26754122

  1. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Altiok, Ertunc; Frick, Michael; Meyer, Christian G; Al Ateah, Ghazi; Napp, Andreas; Kirschfink, Annemarie; Almalla, Mohammad; Lotfi, Shahran; Becker, Michael; Herich, Lena; Lehmacher, Walter; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated 2-dimensional (2D) transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 (VARC-2) criteria and 3-dimensional (3D) TTE for assessment of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. In 71 patients, 2D TTE, 3D TTE, and CMR imaging were performed to assess AR severity after TAVI. Using 2D TTE, AR severity was graded according to VARC-2 criteria and regurgitant volume (RVol) was determined. Three-dimensional color Doppler TTE allowed direct planimetry of the vena contracta area of the paravalvular regurgitation jet and calculation of the RVol as product with the velocity-time integral. RVol by CMR imaging was measured by phase-contrast velocity mapping in the ascending aorta. After TAVI, mean RVol determined by CMR imaging was 9.2 ± 9.6 ml/beat and mean regurgitant fraction was 13.3 ± 10.3%. AR was assessed as none or mild in 58 patients (82%) by CMR imaging. Correlation of 3D TTE and CMR imaging on RVol was better than correlation of 2D TTE and CMR imaging (r = 0.895 vs 0.558, p <0.001). There was good agreement between RVol by CMR imaging and by 3D TTE (mean bias = 2.4 ml/beat). Kappa on grading of AR severity was 0.357 between VARC-2 and CMR imaging versus 0.446 between 3D TTE and CMR imaging. Intraobserver variability for analysis of RVol of AR after TAVI was 73.5 ± 52.2% by 2D TTE, 16.7 ± 21.9% by 3D TTE, and 2.2 ± 2.0% by CMR imaging. In conclusion, 2D TTE considering VARC-2 criteria has limitations in the grading of AR severity after TAVI when CMR imaging is used for comparison. Three-dimensional TTE allows quantification of AR with greater accuracy than 2D TTE. Observer variability on RVol after TAVI is considerable using 2D TTE, significantly less using 3D TTE, and very low using CMR imaging. PMID:24837265

  2. Value of the "TAVI2-SCORe" versus surgical risk scores for prediction of one year mortality in 511 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Debonnaire, Philippe; Fusini, Laura; Wolterbeek, Ron; Kamperidis, Vasileios; van Rosendael, Philippe; van der Kley, Frank; Katsanos, Spyridon; Joyce, Emer; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Gripari, Paola; Bax, Jeroen J; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Pepi, Mauro; Delgado, Victoria

    2015-01-15

    A bedside-available transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)-dedicated prognostic risk score is an unmet clinical need. We aimed to develop such a risk score predicting 1-year mortality post-TAVI and to compare it with the performance of the logistic EuroSCORE (LES) I and LES-II and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' (STS) score. Baseline variables of 511 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI that were independently associated with 1-year mortality post-TAVI were included in the "TAVI2-SCORe." Discrimination and calibration abilities of the novel score were assessed and compared with surgical risk scores. One-year mortality was 17.0% (n = 80 of 471). Porcelain thoracic aorta (hazard ratio [HR] 2.56), anemia (HR 2.03), left ventricular dysfunction (HR 1.98), recent myocardial infarction (HR 3.78), male sex (HR 1.81), critical aortic valve stenosis (HR 2.46), old age (HR 1.68), and renal dysfunction (HR 1.76) formed the TAVI2-SCORe (all p <0.05). According to the number of points assigned (1 for each variable and 2 for infarction), patients were stratified into 5 risk categories: 0, 1 (HR 2.6), 2 (HR 3.6), 3 (HR 10.5), and ≥4 (HR 17.6). TAVI2-SCORe showed better discrimination ability (Harrells' C statistic 0.715) compared with LES-I, LES-II, and STS score (0.609, 0.633, and 0.50, respectively). Cumulative 1-year survival rate was 54% versus 88% for patients with TAVI2-SCORE ≥3 versus <3 points, respectively (p <0.001). Contrary to surgical risk scores, there was no significant difference between observed and expected 1-year mortality for all TAVI2-SCORe risk strata (all p >0.05, Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic 0.304), suggesting superior calibration performance. In conclusion, the TAVI2-SCORe is an accurate, simple, and bedside-available score predicting 1-year mortality post-TAVI, outperforming conventional surgical risk scores for this end point. PMID:25432413

  3. Severe symptomatic aortic stenosis: medical therapy and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)—a real-world retrospective cohort analysis of outcomes and cost-effectiveness using national data

    PubMed Central

    Aldalati, Omar; Lacey, Arron; King, William; Anderson, Richard A; Smith, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Determine the real-world difference between 2 groups of patients with severe aortic stenosis and similar baseline comorbidities: surgical turn down (STD) patients, who were managed medically prior to the availability of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) following formal surgical outpatient assessment, and patients managed with a TAVI implant. Design Retrospective cohort study from real-world data. Setting Electronic patient letters were searched for patients with a diagnosis of severe aortic stenosis and a formal outpatient STD prior to the availability of TAVI (1999–2009). The second group comprised the first 90 cases of TAVI in South Wales (2009 onwards). 2 years prior to and 5 years following TAVI/STD were assessed. Patient data were pseudoanonymised, using the Secure Anonymized Information Linkage (SAIL) databank, and extracted from Office National Statistics (ONS), Patient-Episode Database for Wales (PEDW) and general practitioner databases. Population 90 patients who had undergone TAVI in South Wales, and 65 STD patients who were medically managed. Main outcome measures Survival, hospital admission frequency and length of stay, primary care visits, and cost-effectiveness. Results TAVI patients were significantly older (81.8 vs 79.2), more likely to be male (59.1% vs 49.3%), baseline comorbidities were balanced. Mortality in TAVI versus STD was 28% vs 70% at 1000 days follow-up. There were significantly more hospital admissions per year in the TAVI group prior to TAVI/STD (1.5 (IQR 1.0–2.4) vs 1.0 IQR (0.5–1.5)). Post TAVI/STD, the TAVI group had significantly lower hospital admissions (0.3 (IQR 0.0–1.0) vs 1.2 (IQR 0.7–3.0)) and lengths of stay (0.4 (IQR 0.0–13.8) vs 11.0 (IQR 2.5–28.5), p<0.05). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for TAVI was £10 533 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Conclusions TAVI patients were more likely to survive and avoid hospital admissions compared with the medically

  4. Automatic detection of contrast injection on fluoroscopy and angiography for image guided trans-catheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Rui; You, Wei; Yan, Michelle; John, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Presentation of detailed anatomical structures via 3-D models helps navigation and deployment of the prosthetic valve in TAVI procedures. Fast and automatic contrast detection in the aortic root on X-ray images facilitates a seamless workflow to utilize the 3-D models by triggering 2-D/3-D registration automatically when motion compensation is needed. In this paper, we propose a novel method for automatic detection of contrast injection in the aortic root on fluoroscopic and angiographic sequences. The proposed method is based on histogram analysis and likelihood ratio test, and is robust to variations in the background, the density and volume of the injected contrast, and the size of the aorta. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on 26 sequences from 5 patients and 3 clinical sites, with 16 out of 17 contrast injections correctly detected and zero false detections. The proposed method is of general form and can be extended for detection of contrast injection in other organs and/or applications.

  5. Incidence and Sequelae of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch in Transcatheter Vs Surgical Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis – A PARTNER Trial Cohort A Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pibarot, Philippe; Weissman, Neil J.; Stewart, William J.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Lindman, Brian R.; McAndrew, Thomas; Kodali, Susheel K.; Mack, Michael J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Miller, D. Craig; Svensson, Lars G.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Smith, Craig R.; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Webb, John; Lim, Scott; Xu, Ke; Hueter, Irene; Douglas, Pamela S.; Leon, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its impact on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the incidence of PPM in the transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) randomized (RCT) arms of the PARTNER-I trial Cohort A; and 2) to assess the impact of PPM on regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and mortality in these 2 arms and in the TAVR nonrandomized continued access (NRCA) Registry cohort. METHODS The PARTNER trial Cohort A randomized patients 1:1 to TAVR or bioprosthetic SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined as absent if indexed effective orifice area >0.85, moderate ≥0.65 but ≤0.85, or severe <0.65 cm2/m2. LV mass regression and mortality were analyzed using the SAVR-RCT (n = 270), TAVR-RCT (n = 304) and TAVR-NRCA (n = 1637) cohorts. RESULTS Incidence of PPM was 60.0% (severe: 28.1%) in SAVR-RCT versus 46.4% (severe: 19.7%) in TAVR-RCT (p < 0.001) and 43.8% (severe: 13.6%) in TAVR-NRCA. In patients with aortic annulus diameter < 20 mm, severe PPM developed in 33.7% undergoing SAVR compared to 19.0% undergoing TAVR (p = 0.002). PPM was an independent predictor of less LV mass regression at 1 year in SAVR-RCT (p = 0.017) and TAVR-NRCA (p = 0.012) but not in TAVRRCT (p = 0.35). Severe PPM was an independent predictor of 2-year mortality in SAVR-RCT (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.78; p = 0.041) but not in TAVR-RCT (HR: 0.58; p = 0.11). In the TAVRNRCA, severe PPM was not a predictor of 1-year mortality in the whole cohort (HR: 1.05; p = 0.60) but did independently predict mortality in the subset of patients with no post-procedural aortic regurgitation (HR: 1.88; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS In patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, PPM is more frequent and more often severe following SAVR than TAVR. Patients with PPM after SAVR have worse survival and less LV mass regression than those without PPM

  6. Valve-in-valve implantation with a 23-mm balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve for the treatment of a 19-mm stentless bioprosthesis severe aortic regurgitation using a strategy of "extreme" underfilling.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Florent; Leipsic, Jonathon; Généreux, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of valve-in-valve (ViV) implantation by transfemoral approach with a 23-mm balloon-expandable prosthesis inside a stentless 19-mm acutely degenerated bioprosthesis, using a strategy of "extreme" underfilling. A 74-year-old patient presented to our institution in cardiogenic shock. An initial transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) showed severe central aortic regurgitation (AR) due to a torn leaflet. She was deemed inoperable and considered for urgent transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Given the fairly small true internal diameter, a strategy of 3-cc underfilling of a 23-mm transcatheter heart valve (THV) was planned. However, the final implantation was performed with 5-cc underfilling due to the incapacity to deliver the entire amount of fluid contained in the inflation syringe. TEE guidance confirmed the successful positioning and deployment of the prosthesis, with no AR and a mean gradient of 25 mm Hg. While implantation of a smaller prosthesis (20 mm) was debated during the Heart Team discussion, the risk of valve embolization due to inadequate anchoring inside the stentless prosthesis led to the selection of a 23-mm THV. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was in NYHA class I, with no AR and a mean gradient of 28 mm Hg. We report for the first time the use of in vivo THV with 5-cc underfilling with no acute or short-term structural failure, and the first ViV implantation by transfemoral approach with a 23-mm balloon-expandable prosthesis inside a stentless 19-mm bioprosthesis. The current report presents the challenges related to ViV implantation inside a small stentless bioprosthesis and offers practical ways to overcome them. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ventricular tachycardia following trans-apical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Beinart, Roy; Danik, Stephan; Palacios, Igor; Barrett, Conor; Inglessis, Ignacio; Agnihotri, Arvind; Passeri, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a relatively new procedure for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. We report a case of a new left ventricular outflow tract ventricular tachycardia following TAVR. PMID:22016303

  8. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  9. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  10. Computer Vision Techniques for Transcatheter Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Roach, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive transcatheter technologies have demonstrated substantial promise for the diagnosis and the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. For example, transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an alternative to aortic valve replacement for the treatment of severe aortic stenosis, and transcatheter atrial fibrillation ablation is widely used for the treatment and the cure of atrial fibrillation. In addition, catheter-based intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging of coronary arteries provides important information about the coronary lumen, wall, and plaque characteristics. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of these cross-sectional image data will be beneficial to the evaluation and the treatment of coronary artery diseases such as atherosclerosis. In all the phases (preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative) during the transcatheter intervention procedure, computer vision techniques (e.g., image segmentation and motion tracking) have been largely applied in the field to accomplish tasks like annulus measurement, valve selection, catheter placement control, and vessel centerline extraction. This provides beneficial guidance for the clinicians in surgical planning, disease diagnosis, and treatment assessment. In this paper, we present a systematical review on these state-of-the-art methods. We aim to give a comprehensive overview for researchers in the area of computer vision on the subject of transcatheter intervention. Research in medical computing is multi-disciplinary due to its nature, and hence, it is important to understand the application domain, clinical background, and imaging modality, so that methods and quantitative measurements derived from analyzing the imaging data are appropriate and meaningful. We thus provide an overview on the background information of the transcatheter intervention procedures, as well as a review of the computer vision techniques and methodologies applied in this area. PMID:27170893

  11. Transcatheter mitral valve implantation (TMVI) using the Edwards FORTIS device.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Vinayak; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Peterson, Mark D; Hancock, Jane; Reineke, David; Buller, Chris; Carrel, Thierry; Praz, Fabien; Rajani, Ronal; Fam, Neil; Kim, Han; Redwood, Simon; Young, Christopher; Munns, Christopher; Windecker, Stephan; Thomas, Martyn

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has demonstrated the feasibility of treating valvular heart disease with transcatheter therapy. On the back of this success, various transcatheter concepts are being evaluated to treat other valvular disease, especially mitral regurgitation (MR). The concepts currently approved to treat MR replicate surgical mitral valve repair. However, most of them cannot eliminate MR completely. Similar to TAVI, a transcatheter mitral valve implantation may provide a valuable alternative. The FORTIS transcatheter mitral valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) is a self-expanding device implanted via a transapical approach. We describe our experience and early results in the first five patients treated on compassionate grounds. We also describe the details of the device, selection criteria and technical details of implantation. PMID:25256325

  12. Valve-in-valve-in-valve: Treating endocarditis of a transcatheter heart valve.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Caroline; Cheong, Adrian P; Himbert, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Transcatheter heart valve endocarditis is a rare, but life threatening complication. We describe the case of a patient who was successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve-in-valve replacement with a favorable 1-year outcome, despite severe early complications.

  13. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Chainani, Vinod; Hanno, Ram; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  14. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Vinod; Perez, Osman; Hanno, Ram; Hourani, Patrick; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  15. Recent advances in aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is no longer an operation that is approached solely through a median sternotomy. Recent advances in the fields of transcatheter valves have expanded the proportion of patients eligible for intervention. Comparisons between transcatheter valves and conventional surgery have shown non-inferiority of transcatheter valve implants in patients with a high or intermediate pre-operative predictive risk. With advances in our understanding of sutureless valves and their applicability to minimally invasive surgery, the invasiveness and trauma of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome. The strategy of care has radically changed over the last decade. PMID:27803800

  16. New Method for Performing Aortic Valve Replacement Proves Successful in High-Risk Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Monday, October 31, 2016 New method for performing aortic valve replacement proves successful ... the National Institutes of Health have developed a new, less invasive way to perform transcatheter aortic valve ...

  17. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation in severe aortic stenosis patients with prior mitral valve prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Cenk; Baştuğ, Serdal; Kasapkara, Hacı Ahmet; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Akçay, Murat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bozkurt, Engin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in patients with a previous mitral valve prosthesis is technically challenging, and pre-procedural comprehensive assessment of these patients before transcatheter aortic valve implantation is vital for an uncomplicated and successful procedure. Aim We want to share our experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with a preexisting functional mitral valve prosthesis and describe a series of important technical and pre-procedural details. Material and methods At our center, 135 patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis were treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Six of them with a preexisting mitral valve prosthesis received an Edwards SAPIEN XT valve through the transfemoral route. Results Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed successfully in all 6 patients without any deformation of the cobalt-chromium/steel stents of the aortic valve bioprosthesis. Also no distortion or malfunction in the mitral valve prosthesis was observed after the procedure. There were no complications during the hospitalization period. Post-procedural echocardiography revealed no or mild aortic paravalvular regurgitation and normal valve function in all the patients. In addition, serial echocardiographic examination demonstrated that both the stability and function of the aortic and mitral prosthetic valves were normal without any deterioration in the gradients and the degree of the regurgitation at long-term follow-ups. Conclusions Our experience confirms that transcatheter aortic valve implantation is technically feasible in patients with previous mitral valve replacement but comprehensive evaluation of patients by multimodal imaging techniques such as transesophageal echocardiography and multislice computed tomography is mandatory for a successful and safe procedure. PMID:26677380

  18. Almanac 2014: aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Otto, Catherine M

    2015-06-01

    The past few years have seen major advances in the diagnosis of aortic valve disease and in our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In addition, transcatheter aortic valve implantation has transformed our clinical management options. This article summarises new aortic valve disease research published in Heart in 2013 and 2014, within the context of other major studies published in general medical journals, including a discussion of the potential impact of these new research findings on the clinical approach to management of adults with aortic valve disease.

  19. Aortic Valve Surgery: Minimally Invasive Options

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Bedeir, Kareem; Lamelas, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery has not been adopted by a significant proportion of cardiac surgeons despite proven benefits. This may be related to a high learning curve and technical issues requiring retraining. In this review, we discuss the data for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and describe our operative technique for both ministernotomy and anterior thoracotomy approaches. We also discuss the advent of novel sutureless valves and how these techniques compare to available transcatheter aortic valve procedures. PMID:27127559

  20. Modern management of adult coarctation: transcatheter and surgical options.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Heiko; Uebing, Anselm; Shore, Darryl F

    2016-08-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA), a juxtaductal obstructive lesion in the descending aorta and commonly associated with hypoplasia of the aortic arch occurs in 5-8% of patients with congenital heart disease. Since the initial surgical corrections in the 1950, surgical and transcatheter options have constantly evolved. Nowadays, transcatheter options are widely accepted as the initial treatment of choice in adults presenting with native or recurrent CoA. Surgical techniques are mainly reserved for patients with complex aortic arch anatomy such as extended arch hypoplasia or stenosis or para-CoA aneurysm formation. Extended aneurysms can be covered by conformable stents but stent implantation may require preparative vascular surgery. Complex re-CoA my best be treated by an ascending to descending bypass conduit. The following review aims to describe current endovascular and surgical practice pointing out modern developments and their limitations.

  1. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  2. Transcatheter closure of small ductus arteriosus with amplatzer vascular plug

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Hyun; Kang, I-Seok; Huh, June; Lee, Sang Yoon; Choi, Eun Young; Kim, Soo Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to share our experience of transcatheter closure of small patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) by using an Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP). Methods We reviewed the medical records of 20 patients who underwent transcatheter closure at Samsung Medical Center and Sejong General Hospital from January 2008 to August 2012. The size and shape of the PDAs were evaluated by performing angiograms, and the PDA size and the AVP devices size were compared. Results The mean age of the patients was 54.9±45.7 months old. The PDAs were of type C (n=5), type D (n=12), and type E (n=3). The mean pulmonary end diameter of the PDA was 1.7±0.6 mm, and the aortic end diameter was 3.6±1.4 mm. The mean length was 7.3±1.8 mm. We used 3 types of AVP devices: AVP I (n=5), AVP II (n=7), and AVP IV (n=8). The ratio of AVP size to the pulmonary end diameter was 3.37±1.64, and AVP size/aortic end ratio was 1.72±0.97. The aortic end diameter was significantly larger in those cases repaired with AVP II than in the others (P=0.002). The AVP size did not significantly correlate with the PDA size, but did correlate with smaller ratio of AVP size to aortic end diameter (1.10±0.31, P=0.032). Conclusion Transcatheter closure of small PDA with AVP devices yielded satisfactory outcome. AVP II was equally effective with smaller size of device, compared to others. PMID:24223601

  3. Transcatheter Valve-in-Valve: A Cautionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Luc, Jessica G Y; Shanks, Miriam; Tyrrell, Benjamin D; Welsh, Robert C; Butler, Craig R; Meyer, Steven R

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) by valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation is an alternative treatment for high-risk patients with a degenerating aortic bioprosthesis. We present a case of transapical TAVR VIV with a 29-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT (ESV) (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) into a 29-mm Medtronic Freestyle stentless bioprosthesis (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) in which unanticipated dilatation of the Freestyle bioprosthesis resulted in intraprocedural embolization of the TAVR valve, necessitating urgent conversion to a conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Our experience suggests that TAVR VIV with the 29-mm ESV in the setting of a degenerated 29-mm Freestyle stentless bioprosthesis must be undertaken with caution. PMID:27549545

  4. Multimodality Imaging in the Context of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement: Establishing Consensus Among Modalities and Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Blanke, Philipp; Naoum, Christopher; Webb, John; Dvir, Danny; Hahn, Rebecca T; Grayburn, Paul; Moss, Robert R; Reisman, Mark; Piazza, Nicolo; Leipsic, Jonathon

    2015-10-01

    Transcatheter mitral valve implantation (TMVI) represents a promising approach to treating mitral valve regurgitation in patients at increased risk of perioperative mortality. Similar to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), TMVI relies on pre- and periprocedural noninvasive imaging. Although these imaging modalities, namely echocardiography, computed tomography, and fluoroscopy, are well established in TAVR, TMVI has entirely different requirements. Approaches and nomenclature need to be standardized given the multiple disciplines involved. Herein we provide an overview of anatomical principles and definitions, a methodology for anatomical quantification, and perioperative guidance. PMID:26481845

  5. Computer-aided design of the human aortic root.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E A; Klyshnikov, K U; Vlad, A R; Sizova, I N; Kokov, A N; Nushtaev, D V; Yuzhalin, A E; Zhuravleva, I U

    2014-11-01

    The development of computer-based 3D models of the aortic root is one of the most important problems in constructing the prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In the current study, we analyzed data from 117 patients with and without aortic valve disease and computed tomography data from 20 patients without aortic valvular diseases in order to estimate the average values of the diameter of the aortic annulus and other aortic root parameters. Based on these data, we developed a 3D model of human aortic root with unique geometry. Furthermore, in this study we show that by applying different material properties to the aortic annulus zone in our model, we can significantly improve the quality of the results of finite element analysis. To summarize, here we present four 3D models of human aortic root with unique geometry based on computational analysis of ECHO and CT data. We suggest that our models can be utilized for the development of better prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  6. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc Long Hung; Garreau, Mireille; Auffret, Vincent; Le Breton, Hervé; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Haigron, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels ≈ 2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  7. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve surgery for severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nwaejike, Nnamdi; Mills, Keith; Stables, Rod; Field, Mark

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was, in patients with severe aortic stenosis, can balloon valvuloplasty be used as a bridge to aortic valve replacement? Altogether 463 papers were found using the reported search, of which 11 papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended as a bridge to aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Institutional practices, local and logistic factors can affect patient selection and management approaches to severe aortic stenosis, but having the facility to offer balloon aortic valvuloplasty (especially in the TAVI era) provides another management option for patients who would otherwise have been considered unacceptably high risk for aortic valve surgery. The increased incidence of balloon aortic valvuloplasty mirrors the increase in the use of TAVI with a sharp increase in activity from 2006. Success rates for bridging from balloon aortic valvuloplasty to definite surgical intervention are in the range 26.3-74%, with AVR or TAVI occurring within 8 weeks to 7 months. Complications from balloon aortic valvuloplasty such as aortic regurgitation (AR) can be managed successfully. Up to 40% of patients selected by balloon aortic valvuloplasty to have TAVI or AVR do not have these procedures within 2 years. While most of these patients are excluded for objective clinical reasons such as terminal disease/malignancy or other persistent contraindication, some patients refuse definitive treatment and others die while on the waiting list. Outcomes in patients bridged to AVR/TAVI are better than in patients treated with balloon aortic valvuloplasty

  8. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-02-15

    An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR.

  9. CT Angiography Analysis of Axillary Artery Diameter versus Common Femoral Artery Diameter: Implications for Axillary Approach for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Hostile Aortoiliac Segment and Advanced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tayal, Rajiv; Iftikhar, Humayun; LeSar, Benjamin; Patel, Rahul; Tyagi, Naveen; Cohen, Marc; Wasty, Najam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The use of the axillary artery as an access site has lost favor in percutaneous intervention due to the success of these procedures from a radial or brachial alternative. However, these distal access points are unable to safely accommodate anything larger than a 7-French sheath. To date no studies exist describing the size of the axillary artery in relation to the common femoral artery in a patient population. We hypothesized that the axillary artery is of comparable size to the CFA in most patients and less frequently diseased. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 110 CT scans of the thoracic and abdominal aorta done at our institution to rule out aortic dissection in which the right axillary artery, right CFA, left axillary artery, and left CFA were visualized. Images were then reconstructed using commercially available TeraRecon software and comparative measurements made of the axillary and femoral arteries. Results. In 96 patients with complete data, the mean sizes of the right and left axillary artery were slightly smaller than the left and right CFA. A direct comparison of the sizes of the axillary artery and CFA in the same patient yielded a mean difference of 1.69 mm ± 1.74. In all patients combined, the mean difference between the axillary artery and CFA was 1.88 mm on the right and 1.68 mm on the left. In 19 patients (19.8%), the axillary artery was of the same caliber as the associated CFA. In 8 of 96 patients (8.3%), the axillary artery was larger compared to the CFA. Conclusions. Although typically smaller, the axillary artery is often of comparable size to the CFA, significantly less frequently calcified or diseased, and in almost all observed cases large enough to accommodate a sheath with up to 18 French. PMID:27110403

  10. Mitral Valve Surgery: Current Minimally Invasive and Transcatheter Options

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Gammie, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure, the competency and function of which relies on the harmonious action of its component parts. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) for mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR/r) has been performed successfully with incremental improvements in techniques over the past decade. These minimally invasive procedures, while attractive to patients and referring physicians, should meet the same high bar for optimal clinical outcomes and long-term durability of valve repair as traditional sternotomy procedures. The majority of MICS MVR/r procedures are performed via a right minithoracotomy approach with direct or camera-assisted visualization, with a minority of centers performing robotic MVR/r. Outcomes with MICS MVR/r have been shown to have similar morbidity and mortality rates as traditional sternotomy MV procedures but with the advantage of reduced transfusions, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and time to recovery. More recently, transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement (TMVR/r) has become a reality. Percutaneous MV repair technology is currently FDA approved for patients with nonsurgical high-risk degenerative mitral regurgitation. Other TMVR/r technology is at various levels of preclinical and clinical investigation, although these devices are proving to be more challenging compared to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) due to the significantly more complex mitral anatomy and the greater heterogeneity of mitral disease requiring treatment. In this article, we review current techniques for MICS MVR/r and upcoming catheter-based therapies for the mitral valve. PMID:27127558

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Valvular Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Matthew J; Resar, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Valvular aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive disease that affects 2% of the population aged 65 years or older. The major cause of valvular AS in adults is calcification and fibrosis of a previously normal tricuspid valve or a congenital bicuspid valve, with rheumatic AS being rare in the United States. Once established, the rate of progression of valvular AS is quite variable and impossible to predict for any particular patient. Symptoms of AS are generally insidious at onset, though development of any of the three cardinal symptoms of angina, syncope, or heart failure portends a poor prognosis. Management of symptomatic AS remains primarily surgical, though transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients at high or prohibitive operative risk. PMID:25368539

  12. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Arora, Ramesh; Trehan, Vijay; Rangasetty, Uma Mahesh C; Mukhopadhyay, Saibal; Thakur, Ashish K; Kalra, G S

    2004-02-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm was attempted in eight patients between January 1995 and March 2003 as an alternative strategy to surgery as this technique at present is an accepted therapeutic modality for various intracardiac defects. The age range was 14-35 years, all were male, seven in symptomatic class III and one in class IV on medical treatment. Two-dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography revealed rupture of an aneurysm of right coronary sinus into right ventricle in five and noncoronary sinus into right atrium in three and none had associated ventricular septal defect. The echo estimated size of the defect was 7-12 mm. On cardiac catheterization left ventricular end-diastolic pressure ranged from 20 to 40 mmHg and the calculated Qp/Qs ratio was 2-3.5. In all patients the defect was crossed retrogradely from the aortic side and over an arterio-venous wire loop after balloon sizing, devices were successfully deployed by antegrade venous approach (Rashkind umbrella device in two and Amplatzer occluders in six, which included Amplatzer duct occluder in five and Amplatzer septal occluder in one). One patient who had residual shunt developed hemolysis on the next day and was taken up for reintervention. That patient continued to have intermittent hemolysis and was sent for surgical repair. On follow-up (2-96 months), there was no device embolization, infective endocarditis, and aortic regurgitation. One patient died of progressive congestive heart failure while other six are asymptomatic. These data highlight that transcatheter closure is feasible and effective, especially safe with the available Amplatzer devices. Definitely, it has the advantage of obviating open heart surgery but complete occlusion is mandatory to prevent hemolysis and infective endocarditis. PMID:15009772

  13. Coarctation of the Aorta - The Current State of Surgical and Transcatheter Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Vergales, Jeffrey E; Gangemi, James J; Rhueban, Karen S; Lim, D Scott

    2013-01-01

    Aortic coarctation represents a distinct anatomic obstruction as blood moves from the ascending to the descending aorta and can present in a range of ages from infancy to adulthood. While it is often an isolated and discrete narrowing, it can also be seen in the more extreme scenario of severe arch hypoplasia as seen in the hypoplastic left heart syndrome or in conjunction with numerous other congenital heart defects. Since the first description of an anatomic surgical repair over sixty years ago, an evolution of both surgical and transcatheter therapies has occurred allowing clinicians to manage and treat this disease with excellent results and low morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on the current state of both transcatheter and surgical therapies, paying special attention to recent data on long-term follow-up of both approaches. Further, current thoughts will be explored about future therapeutic options that attempt to improve upon historical long-term outcomes. PMID:23909637

  14. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  15. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve. PMID:27393846

  16. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  17. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  18. Aortic valvular heart disease: Is there a place for angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Elder, Douglas H J; McAlpine-Scott, Victoria; Choy, Anna Maria; Struthers, Allan D; Lang, Chim C

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve disease (AVD) is the most common form of valvular heart disease in the western world. The only proven therapy for severe AVD is open aortic valve replacement, with trans-catheter aortic valve implantation emerging as a promising modality to treat severe aortic stenosis in a selected group of patients. AVD has a long asymptomatic phase with symptoms occurring late in the disease and once symptoms develop, prognosis is poor. There is a growing appreciation that aortic valvular heart disease incorporates a disease process that extends beyond the valve itself leading to an aortic valvular 'heart' disease. The renin-angiotensin system is known to modulate adverse left ventricular remodeling and myocardial fibrosis, which could be caused by increased load caused by the AVD. In this review, the authors explore evidence that suggest that drugs that target the renin-angiotensin system may have a potential therapeutic role in AVD.

  19. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm(2)) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS.

  20. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus.

    PubMed

    Good, Richard I S; Morgan, Kenneth P; Brydie, Alan; Beydoun, Hussein K; Nadeem, S Najaf

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVR) has grown rapidly over the past 10 years. Device and delivery catheter systems have evolved to facilitate the procedure and reduce the risk of associated complications, including those related to vascular access. It is important to understand the utility of the TAVR equipment in patients with more challenging anatomy to select the most appropriate technique for this complex procedure. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus and previous coronary artery bypass grafting who underwent TAVR from the femoral route using the Edwards SAPIEN XT Novaflex+ Transfemoral System (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA).

  1. Apical access and closure devices for transapical transcatheter heart valve procedures.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The majority of transcatheter aortic valve implantations, structural heart procedures and the newly developed transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement are traditionally performed either through a transfemoral or a transapical access site, depending on the presence of severe peripheral vascular disease or anatomic limitations. The transapical approach, which carries specific advantages related to its antegrade nature and the short distance between the introduction site and the cardiac target, is traditionally performed through a left anterolateral mini-thoracotomy and requires rib retractors, soft tissue retractors and reinforced apical sutures to secure, at first, the left ventricular apex for the introduction of the stent-valve delivery systems and then to seal the access site at the end of the procedure. However, despite the advent of low-profile apical sheaths and newly designed delivery systems, the apical approach represents a challenge for the surgeon, as it has the risk of apical tear, life-threatening apical bleeding, myocardial damage, coronary damage and infections. Last but not least, the use of large-calibre stent-valve delivery systems and devices through standard mini-thoracotomies compromises any attempt to perform transapical transcatheter structural heart procedures entirely percutaneously, as happens with the transfemoral access site, or via a thoracoscopic or a miniaturised video-assisted percutaneous technique. During the past few years, prototypes of apical access and closure devices for transapical heart valve procedures have been developed and tested to make this standardised successful procedure easier. Some of them represent an important step towards the development of truly percutaneous transcatheter transapical heart valve procedures in the clinical setting. PMID:26900765

  2. Apical access and closure devices for transapical transcatheter heart valve procedures.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The majority of transcatheter aortic valve implantations, structural heart procedures and the newly developed transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement are traditionally performed either through a transfemoral or a transapical access site, depending on the presence of severe peripheral vascular disease or anatomic limitations. The transapical approach, which carries specific advantages related to its antegrade nature and the short distance between the introduction site and the cardiac target, is traditionally performed through a left anterolateral mini-thoracotomy and requires rib retractors, soft tissue retractors and reinforced apical sutures to secure, at first, the left ventricular apex for the introduction of the stent-valve delivery systems and then to seal the access site at the end of the procedure. However, despite the advent of low-profile apical sheaths and newly designed delivery systems, the apical approach represents a challenge for the surgeon, as it has the risk of apical tear, life-threatening apical bleeding, myocardial damage, coronary damage and infections. Last but not least, the use of large-calibre stent-valve delivery systems and devices through standard mini-thoracotomies compromises any attempt to perform transapical transcatheter structural heart procedures entirely percutaneously, as happens with the transfemoral access site, or via a thoracoscopic or a miniaturised video-assisted percutaneous technique. During the past few years, prototypes of apical access and closure devices for transapical heart valve procedures have been developed and tested to make this standardised successful procedure easier. Some of them represent an important step towards the development of truly percutaneous transcatheter transapical heart valve procedures in the clinical setting.

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  5. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic arch anomaly; Double arch; Congenital heart defect - double aortic arch; Birth defect heart - double aortic arch ... aorta is a single arch that leaves the heart and moves leftward. In double aortic arch, some ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  7. Outcomes and safety of percutaneous aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Zajarias, Alan; Cribier, Alain G

    2009-05-19

    The concept of transcatheter aortic valve replacement was developed with the goal of offering a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not considered good candidates for surgical valve replacement. Initial attempts were complicated by vascular access problems and lack of appropriate tools. With time and experience, early problems were solved and the concepts of valve sizing, valve positioning, and patient selection were defined. Technological improvements allowed the use of smaller arterial sheaths to decrease vascular trauma, special catheters to facilitate valve delivery, and treatments on the valve prostheses that would ensure longer durability. After 5 years, the number of transcatheter aortic valve replacements has grown significantly, and will likely continue as this technology becomes increasingly available. Currently, 2 valve models, the Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, California) and the CoreValve ReValving system (CoreValve Inc., Irvine, California), have been used in over 4,000 cases worldwide for the treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Midterm follow-up shows no evidence of restenosis or prosthetic valve dysfunction. Transfemoral and transapical delivery routes can be selected depending on the quality of vascular access and the type of prosthesis used. Randomized trials that are currently underway will confirm procedural safety and guide the applicability of this technology.

  8. Aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A; Clough, Rachel E; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Suzuki, Toru; Gibbs, Richard; Mussa, Firas; Jenkins, Michael T; Thompson, Matt M; Evangelista, Arturo; Yeh, James S M; Cheshire, Nicholas; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition caused by a tear in the intimal layer of the aorta or bleeding within the aortic wall, resulting in the separation (dissection) of the layers of the aortic wall. Aortic dissection is most common in those 65-75 years of age, with an incidence of 35 cases per 100,000 people per year in this population. Other risk factors include hypertension, dyslipidaemia and genetic disorders that involve the connective tissue, such as Marfan syndrome. Swift diagnostic confirmation and adequate treatment are crucial in managing affected patients. Contemporary management is multidisciplinary and includes serial non-invasive imaging, biomarker testing and genetic risk profiling for aortopathy. The choice of approach for repairing or replacing the damaged region of the aorta depends on the severity and the location of the dissection and the risks of complication from surgery. Open surgical repair is most commonly used for dissections involving the ascending aorta and the aortic arch, whereas minimally invasive endovascular intervention is appropriate for descending aorta dissections that are complicated by rupture, malperfusion, ongoing pain, hypotension or imaging features of high risk. Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of aortic dissection have led to more patients being considered at substantial risk of complications and, therefore, in need of endovascular intervention rather than only medical or surgical intervention. PMID:27440162

  9. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  10. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  11. Delayed coronary ischemia after transfemoral aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Jategaonkar, Smita R; Dimitriadis, Zisis; Hakim-Meibodi, Kavous; Gummert, Jan; Horstkotte, Dieter; Scholtz, Werner

    2013-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) offers a less invasive treatment alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for high-risk patients. Although the procedure can be performed at low risk, life-threatening complications may arise in single cases during or even months after the procedure. Here, the details are presented of two patients who underwent TAVI by a transfemoral approach with Medtronic CoreValve prostheses and suffered myocardial ischemia months later. The patients' anatomy with small aortic root, narrow sinus of Valsalva and small distance between the annulus base and coronary arteries and/or the relative oversizing of the CoreValve prosthesis with a high positioning may have contributed to this late complication. Hence, caution is mandatory in this type of patient, with exact pre-procedural planning and close follow up required. PMID:24597395

  12. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. PMID:24238836

  13. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  14. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  15. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  16. Techniques and outcomes of transcatheter closure of complex atrial septal defects – Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Satheesh, Santhosh; Pakkirisamy, Gobu; Selvaraj, Raja; Jayaraman, Balachander

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively study the techniques and outcomes of transcatheter closure of complex Atrial septal defects (ASD). Study design and settings Prospective single center study with experience in catheter closure of ASD. All patients with complex ASD suitable for device closure. Objective Analysis of outcomes of transcatheter closure of complex ASD in JIPMER Hospital over the past 5-year period. Methods Complex ASD was predefined and patients satisfying inclusion and exclusion criteria are included. All the patients had meticulous Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) imaging beforehand. Modifications of the conventional techniques were allowed on a case per case basis according to operator preference. Successfully intervened patients were followed up clinically. Results Out of the 75 patients enrolled, 69 patients had successful device closure (success rate 92%) despite challenging anatomy. Fifty-six (74%) patients had ASD ≥25 mm. Fifteen patients (20%) had defect size ≥35 mm and 20 patients (26.6%) had devices implanted with ≥35 mm waist size. Fifty percent of patients had complete absence of aortic rim and 25% had deficient posterior rim. Twenty percent of patients had malaligned septum. Mean follow up period was 3.2 years. Conclusions Trans catheter closure is feasible in anatomically complex substrates of Secundum ASD. Careful case selection, scrupulous imaging protocol, and expertise in modified techniques are mandatory for successful outcomes. PMID:24581094

  17. [Transcatheter treatment of patent ductus arteriosus].

    PubMed

    Chessa, Massimo; Mohamed, Bamoshmoosh; Giusti, Sandra; Butera, Gianfranco; Bini, Roberta Margherita; Carano, Nicola; Agnetti, Aldo; Squarcia, Umberto; Di Gregorio, Giovanna; Carminati, Mario

    2002-11-01

    Isolated patent ductus arteriosus accounts for 10 to 18% of all cardiovascular malformations. Transcatheter closure of the patent ductus arteriosus has now become established practice with a high success rate and a low incidence of complications. Many devices have been proposed during the last 20 years. The use of some of these devices has largely been abandoned for different reasons: high costs, the need of large transvenous sheaths and the high incidence of late residual shunts. The devices currently available (Amplatzer duct occluder, buttoned device, DuctOcclud coil, Gianturco-Grifka vascular occlusion device, detachable coils) render the embolization of a patent ductus arteriosus relatively easy, with a short hospital stay. We feel that this is the treatment of choice for the majority of patients with a patent ductus arteriosus. The aim of this article was to review our experience and report the state-of-the-art in transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus therapy.

  18. 78 FR 12330 - Determination of Regulatory Review Period for Purposes of Patent Extension; SAPIEN TRANSCATHETER...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Patent Extension; SAPIEN TRANSCATHETER HEART VALVE AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... SAPIEN TRANSCATHETER HEART VALVE and is publishing this notice of that determination as required by law... device, SAPIEN TRANSCATHETER HEART VALVE. SAPIEN TRANSCATHETER HEART VALVE is indicated for...

  19. Successful implantation of a second-generation aortic valve in severe aortic regurgitation secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion.

    PubMed

    Mangieri, Antonio; Latib, Azeem; Aurelio, Andrea; Figini, Filippo; Agricola, Eustachio; Rosa, Isabella; Stella, Stefano; Spagnolo, Pietro; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Colombo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion was referred to our institution because of progressive worsening of dyspnea. After formal discussion in the heart team, the patient was scheduled for TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The pre procedural computed tomography scan revealed a minimum amount of calcium on the aortic valve and low position of coronary ostia. The TAVI procedure was performed with the implantation of a fully retrievable and repositionable aortic valve prosthesis (Direct Flow 29 mm, Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) with an excellent result and no paravalvular leak. The TAVI devices designed for the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis have numerous limitations for the treatment of pure AR such as the risk of residual AR, the lack of repositionability and retrievability, and the need for valve- in-valve implantation. We believe that treatment of selected cases of pure AR with the Direct Flow valve is feasible and takes advantage of the retrievability of the prosthesis.

  20. Intracardiac Echocardiography Evaluation in Secundum Atrial Septal Defect Transcatheter Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario; Pedon, Luigi; Rigatelli, Gianluca; Carrozza, Antonio; Zennaro, Marco; Di Martino, Roberta; Onorato, Eustaquio; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the balloon sizing maneuvers and deployment of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder (ASO). In addition, intraprocedural balloon sizing was compared with off-line intracardiac echocardiographic measurements. Methods: The intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) measurements were: maximum transverse and longitudinal atrial septal defect (ASD) diameters in the aortic valve and four-chamber planes;area of the ASD and its equivalent circle diameter. Thirteen consecutive patients underwent transcatheter implantation of an ASO device using ICE guidance under local anesthesia. The device matching the balloon sizing diameter of the defect was implanted. Qualitative ICE assessment of the ASO devices implanted was performed off line. Results: The mean equivalent circle diameter predicted by ICE was 24.40 {+-} 5.61 mm and was significantly higher(p 0.027) than the ASD measured by balloonsizing (21.38 {+-} 5.28 mm). Unlike previous studies we did not find any correlation between the two measurements (correlation coefficient = 0.47). Only four of the 13 patients had optimal device positioning as shown by the qualitative ICE evaluation, whereas the remaining nine patients had inadequate device placement. This resulted in a waist diameter that was an average 26.1% undersized in seven patients and 12.7% oversized in two patients. Five of the seven patients with an undersized device had ASO-atrial septum misalignment with leftward device deviation. Conclusion: The ICE images allowed careful measurement of the dimensions of the ASD and accurately displayed the spatial relations of the ASO astride the ASD.Moreover, use of the ICE measurement led to selection of a different size of device in comparison with those of balloon sizing. The clinical benefit of this new approach needs to be rigorously tested.

  1. Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of atrial tissue using a suction catheter.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, T; Prunier, L; Cuize, L; Bruneval, P; Von Euw, D; Le Heuzey, J Y; Peronneau, P

    1989-01-01

    Closed chest ablative technique that avoid barotrauma would be attractive for ablation at thin walled cardiac structures, such as the atrial free wall or coronary sinus. Transcatheter radiofrequency (RF) currents produce tissue necrosis the size of which is dependent on the contact between the tissue and the electrode. In order to assess the effects of transvenous RF ablation of atrial free wall using a suction electrode catheter, we delivered in ten dogs, one single unmodulated RF pulse 1.2 MHz, in a unipolar mode, through the distal electrode of a lumen catheter (USCI 8F) (USCI, Billerica, MA USA) located in the right appendage. During the pulse an 80 KPa vacuum depression was applied to the lumen of the catheter. Each pulse had a 10 seconds duration and the mean delivered power was 4.3 +/- 1.4 W. Aortic pressure and electrocardiogram were monitored during the procedure. A right atrial electrophysiological study was performed at the ablated site, at control, after suction application and after RF pulse delivery. The animals were sacrificed after 14 or 21 days. Atrial pacing threshold values decreased after suction application in comparison to control values after the pulse (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs 0.60 +/- 0.23 mA, P less than O.05) but increased after the pulse delivery (2.60 +/- 1.85 mA, P less than 0.01). In contrast, the atrial effective refractory period did not significantly change after suction, nor after RF pulse delivery. Aortic pressure remained unchanged throughout the procedure. Complex arrhythmias were not observed during or after RF pulse delivery. One dog died suddenly at the first day after ablation, but this death was most probably unrelated to RF ablation. Anatomic lesions had a length of 8.8 +/- 3.3 mm, a width of 4.6 +/- 2.5 mm and a depth of 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm. They were transmural in nine of the ten dogs but without atrial wall perforation in any case. Lesions suggesting tissue volatilization were present in four dogs. These results demonstrate that

  2. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis—Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wöhrle, Jochen; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Seeger, Julia; Scharnbeck, Dominik; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California) system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications. Methods and Results 235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77), 26mm (N = 91) or 29mm (N = 67) valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6%) and stroke (2.1%) were low. Conclusions In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069 PMID:27003573

  3. Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Hascoët, Sébastien; Baruteau, Julien; Boudjemline, Younes; Lambert, Virginie; Angel, Claude-Yves; Belli, Emre; Petit, Jérôme; Pass, Robert

    2014-02-01

    This review aims to describe the past history, present techniques and future directions in transcatheter treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Transcatheter PDA closure is the standard of care in most cases and PDA closure is indicated in any patient with signs of left ventricular volume overload due to a ductus. In cases of left-to-right PDA with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, closure may be performed under specific conditions. The management of clinically silent or very tiny PDAs remains highly controversial. Techniques have evolved and the transcatheter approach to PDA closure is now feasible and safe with current devices. Coils and the Amplatzer Duct Occluder are used most frequently for PDA closure worldwide, with a high occlusion rate and few complications. Transcatheter PDA closure in preterm or low-bodyweight infants remains a highly challenging procedure and further device and catheter design development is indicated before transcatheter closure is the treatment of choice in this delicate patient population. The evolution of transcatheter PDA closure from just 40 years ago with 18F sheaths to device delivery via a 3F sheath is remarkable and it is anticipated that further improvements will result in better safety and efficacy of transcatheter PDA closure techniques.

  4. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge-to-decision in high risk patients with aortic stenosis: a new paradigm for the heart team decision making

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Francesco; Moretti, Carolina; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Ciuca, Cristina; Taglieri, Nevio; Berardini, Alessandra; Gallo, Pamela; Cannizzo, Marina; Chiarabelli, Matteo; Ramponi, Niccolò; Taffani, Linda; Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Rapezzi, Claudio; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Whilst the majority of the patients with severe aortic stenosis can be directly addressed to surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), in some instances additional information may be needed to complete the diagnostic workout. We evaluated the role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as a bridge-to-decision (BTD) in selected high-risk patients. Methods Between 2007 and 2012, the heart team in our Institution required BTD BAV in 202 patients. Very low left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral regurgitation grade ≥ 3, frailty, hemodynamic instability, serious comorbidity, or a combination of these factors were the main drivers for this strategy. We evaluated how BAV influenced the final treatment strategy in the whole patient group and in each specific subgroup. Results Mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 23.5% ± 15.3%, age 81 ± 7 years. In-hospital mortality was 4.5%, cerebrovascular accident 1% and overall vascular complications 4% (0.5% major; 3.5% minor). Of the 193 patients with BTD BAV who survived and received a second heart team evaluation, 72.6% were finally deemed eligible for definitive treatment (25.4% for AVR; 47.2% for TAVI): 96.7% of patients with left ventricular ejection fraction recovery; 70.5% of patients with mitral regurgitation reduction; 75.7% of patients who underwent BAV in clinical hemodynamic instability; 69.2% of frail patients and 68% of patients who presented serious comorbidities. Conclusions Balloon aortic valvuloplasty can be considered as bridge-to-decision in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who cannot be immediate candidates for definitive transcatheter or surgical treatment. PMID:27582761

  5. Transcatheter intervention for the treatment of congenital cardiac defects.

    PubMed Central

    Grifka, R G

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization has an illustrious history, originating in 1929 when Werner Forsmann, a surgical resident, performed a heart catheterization on himself. Transcatheter interventional procedures have been performed since the 1960s. The 1st intracardiac procedure to become standard therapy was a balloon atrial septostomy. Skeptics attacked this innovative procedure. However, the balloon septostomy procedure soon became the standard emergency procedure for certain congenital heart defects, and was the impetus for other investigators in the field of transcatheter intervention. We will discuss transcatheter treatment for congenital vascular stenoses and vascular occlusion. Images PMID:9456482

  6. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Harrison, J K; Bashore, T M

    1997-01-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty is a percutaneous, therapeutic option for patients with severe aortic stenosis, yet the effectiveness of this procedure is dependent on the morphology of the stenotic aortic valve and the respective mechanism of dilation. In younger patients with congenital aortic stenosis, acute and intermediate-term results are good. However, in adult patients, in whom degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common cause, the acute clinical and hemodynamic benefits of balloon aortic valvuloplasty are not lasting, as restenosis occurs in most patients within 6 months. Sympatomatic relief for adults undergoing balloon aortic valvuloplasty is only apparent in patients with normal left ventricular function, who generally are also candidates for aortic valve replacement. Furthermore, the long-term survival for adults after balloon aortic valvuloplasty is similar to the natural history of untreated severe aortic stenosis. In this article, the mechanism of balloon aortic valvuloplasty, as well as its clinical and hemodynamic effects, are reviewed in the context of the different morphological types of aortic stenosis. In addition, two large registries of adult patients treated with balloon aortic valvuloplasty provide important information regarding the acute and long-term results of this procedure and are reviewed.

  7. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Dibra, Laureta; Llazo, Stavri; Refatllari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery. PMID:27703574

  8. The hemodynamic effects of acute aortic regurgitation into a stiffened left ventricle resulting from chronic aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Midha, Prem; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) post-chronic aortic stenosis is a prevalent phenomenon occurring in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of left ventricular diastolic stiffness (LVDS) and AR severity on LV performance. Three LVDS models were inserted into a physiological left heart simulator. AR severity was parametrically varied through four levels (ranging from trace to moderate) and compared with a competent aortic valve. Hemodynamic metrics such as average diastolic pressures (DP) and reduction in transmitral flow were measured. AR index was calculated as a function of AR severity and LVDS, and the work required to make up for lost volume due to AR was estimated. In the presence of trace AR, higher LVDS had up to a threefold reduction in transmitral flow (13% compared with 3.5%) and a significant increase in DP (2-fold). The AR index ranged from ∼42 to 16 (no AR to moderate AR), with stiffer LVs having lower values. To compensate for lost volume due to AR, the low, medium, and high LVDS models were found to require 5.1, 5.5, and 6.6 times more work, respectively. This work shows that the LVDS has a significant effect on the LV performance in the presence of AR. Therefore, the LVDS of potential TAVR patients should be assessed to gain an initial indication of their ability to tolerate post-procedural AR. PMID:27106040

  9. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infective Endocarditis Following Aortic Valve Implantation: A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Dapás, Juan Ignacio; Rivero, Cynthia; Burgos, Pablo; Vila, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) in patients with prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a rare complication of this relatively novel procedure and current guidelines do not include specific recommendations for its treatment. We report a case of PVE due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after TAVI that required SAVR, with successful outcome. PVE usually occurs during the first year after TAVI and entails a high mortality risk because patients eligible for this min-imally invasive procedure are fragile (i.e. advanced age and/or severe comorbidities). Additionally, clinical presentation may be atypical or subtle and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) may not be conclusive, which delays diagnosis and treatment worsening the prognosis. This case highlights that open SAVR might be ultimately indicated as part of treatment for TAVI-PVE despite a high-risk surgery score. PMID:27014375

  11. Transcatheter coil embolization of a traumatic intrahepatic arterioportal fistula.

    PubMed

    Bapuraj, J R; Kalra, N; Rao, K L; Suri, S; Khandelwal, N

    2001-07-01

    Traumatic arterioportal fistulas are rare lesions in the pediatric age group. This case highlights the safe and effective management of intrahepatic arterioportal fistulas by transcatheter coil embolization. PMID:11519293

  12. Automatic aortic root segmentation in CTA whole-body dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinpei; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Scholte, Arthur J. H. A.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an evolving technique for patients with serious aortic stenosis disease. Typically, in this application a CTA data set is obtained of the patient's arterial system from the subclavian artery to the femoral arteries, to evaluate the quality of the vascular access route and analyze the aortic root to determine if and which prosthesis should be used. In this paper, we concentrate on the automated segmentation of the aortic root. The purpose of this study was to automatically segment the aortic root in computed tomography angiography (CTA) datasets to support TAVR procedures. The method in this study includes 4 major steps. First, the patient's cardiac CTA image was resampled to reduce the computation time. Next, the cardiac CTA image was segmented using an atlas-based approach. The most similar atlas was selected from a total of 8 atlases based on its image similarity to the input CTA image. Third, the aortic root segmentation from the previous step was transferred to the patient's whole-body CTA image by affine registration and refined in the fourth step using a deformable subdivision surface model fitting procedure based on image intensity. The pipeline was applied to 20 patients. The ground truth was created by an analyst who semi-automatically corrected the contours of the automatic method, where necessary. The average Dice similarity index between the segmentations of the automatic method and the ground truth was found to be 0.965±0.024. In conclusion, the current results are very promising.

  13. Transcatheter closure of paravalvular leaks using a paravalvular leak device – a prospective Polish registry

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Piotr; Kozłowski, Michał; Jasiński, Marek; Gocoł, Radosław; Roleder, Tomasz; Kargul, Agnieszka; Ochała, Andrzej; Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter paravalvular leak closure (TPVLC) has become an established treatment option but is mostly performed with off-label use of different non-dedicated occluders. The first one specifically designed for TPVLC is the paravalvular leak device (PLD – Occlutech). Aim We present initial short-term results of a prospective registry intended to assess the safety and efficacy of TPVLC with PLD. Material and methods We screened patients with paravalvular leak (PVL) after surgical valve replacement (SVR). Heart failure symptoms and/or hemolytic anemia were indications for TPVLC. Patients were selected according to PVL anatomy by RT 3D TEE. Only those considered appropriate for closure with a single PLD were enrolled. The procedures were performed via transvascular or transapical access using type W (waist) PLDs only. Results Thirty patients with 34 PVLs (18 aortic, 16 mitral) were included. We implanted 35 PLDs with a total device success rate of 94.3% (100% for aortic, 88.2% for mitral). The procedural success rate, encompassing device success without in-hospital complications, was 94.1% (100% for aortic, 93.8% for mitral). During the follow-up period we recorded an increase of hemoglobin concentration (3.9 to 4.1 g/dl), red blood count (11.6 to 12.2 M/mm3) and functional improvement by NYHA class. Conclusions Paravalvular leak device type W is a promising TPVLC device, but meticulous preselection of patients based on imaging of PVL anatomy is a prerequisite. A PLD should only be chosen for channels shorter than 5 mm. Size of the device should match the PVL cross-sectional area without any oversizing. Such an approach facilitates high device and procedural success rates. PMID:27279872

  14. Transcatheter implantation of SAPIEN 3 valve in native right ventricular outflow tract for severe pulmonary regurgitation following tetralogy of fallot repair.

    PubMed

    Rockefeller, Toby; Shahanavaz, Shabana; Zajarias, Alan; Balzer, David

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) is indicated in patients with significant pulmonary regurgitation (PR), stenosis (PS), or mixed pulmonary valve disease. While once an exclusively surgical procedure, many patients can undergo transcatheter PVR (TPVR) with excellent early outcomes (Haas et al. 2013, Clin. Res. Cardiol. Off. J. German Cardiac Soc. 102:119-128; Kenny et al. 2011, J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 58:2248-2256; Cheatham et al. Circulation 2015, 131:1960-1970). The available transcatheter options continue to expand, but the majority of cases performed in the United States involve the use of FDA approved Melody valve (Medtronic; Minneapolis, MN) or the SAPIEN (Edwards Lifesciences; Irvine, CA) family of valves. The SAPIEN 3 valve (S3) recently received FDA approval for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We report the first S3 implantation in the pulmonary position for treatment of chronic pulmonary regurgitation and progressive right ventricular dilation in an 18 year old male with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Flow Behavior in the Left Heart Ventricle Following Apico-Aortic Bypass Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Shahrokh; Jeyhani, Morteza; Labrosse, Michel; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-11-01

    Apico-aortic bypass (AAB) surgery is an alternative for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) to reduce left ventricle (LV) overload in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). It consists in connecting the apex of the LV to the descending thoracic aorta with a valved conduit. Postoperative flow assessments show that two thirds of the outflow is conducted from the LV apex to the conduit, while only one third crosses the native aortic valve. In this study, we performed high speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow pattern within an in vitro elastic model of LV in the presence of a very severe AS, before and after AAB. Results indicate that AAB effectively relieves the LV outflow obstruction; however, it also leads to abnormal ventricular flow patterns. Normal LV flow dynamics is characterized by an emerging mitral jet flow followed by the development of a vortical flow with velocities directed towards the aortic valve, while measurements in the presence of AAB show systolic flow bifurcating to the apical conduit and to the aortic valve outflow tract. This study provides the first insight into the LV flow structure after AAB including outflow jets and disturbed stagnation regions.

  16. Insights from the early experience of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry.

    PubMed

    Rumsfeld, John S; Holmes, David R; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Edwards, Fred H; Jacques, Louis B; Mack, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The current system for postmarket surveillance of medical devices in the United States is limited. To help change this paradigm for transcatheter valve therapies (TVTs), starting with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American College of Cardiology partnered to form the TVT Registry program in close collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The goal of the TVT Registry is to measure and improve quality of care and patient outcomes in clinical practice and to have a pivotal role in the scientific evidence and surveillance for medical devices. Challenges were faced in the early experience of the registry included developing multistakeholder partnerships, data collection requirements, and the use of the registry for pre- and post-market device evaluations. In addressing these challenges, the TVT Registry demonstrates that it is feasible for professional societies to assume a pivotal role in pre- and/or post-market studies, leveraging a clinical registry infrastructure. Sharing the TVT Registry experience may help other professional societies and stakeholders better anticipate and plan for these challenges. PMID:25703888

  17. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  18. Para-aortic lymphocyst.

    PubMed

    Helmkamp, B F; Krebs, H B; Isikoff, M B; Poliakoff, S R; Averette, H E

    1980-10-15

    Although numerous articles regarding the etiology, incidence, complications, and management of pelvic lymphocysts have been published in the American literature since 1958, there has been no mention of para-aortic lymphocyst as a complication of para-aortic node dissection. Two recent cases of symptomatic para-aortic lymphocyst have prompted a review of our para-aortic node dissection technique when this procedure is not combined with a more extensive pelvic lymphadenectomy. Our modification in technique is to use retroperitoneal para-aortic drainage by constant pressure-controlled suction following closure of the posterior parietal peritoneum, and the results in our first 15 patients are presented. There were no complications related to the drainage technique. Abdominal ultrasound and intravenous urography have proved to be excellent diagnostic tools in the initial evaluation and subsequent follow-up of para-aortic lymphocytes.

  19. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  20. Current Clinical Evidence on Rapid Deployment Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Glenn R.; Shrestha, Malakh Lal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the Western world. It is caused primarily by age-related degeneration and progressive calcification typically detected in patients 65 years and older. In patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, the average survival rate is only 2 years without appropriate treatment. Approximately one half of all patients die within the first 2 to 3 years of symptom onset. In addition, the age of the patients presenting for aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increased along with the demographic changes. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) database shows that the number of patients older than 80 years has increased from 12% to 24% during the past 20 years. At the same time, the percentage of candidates requiring AVR as well as concomitant coronary bypass surgery has increased from 5% to 25%. Surgical AVR continues to be the criterion standard for treatment of aortic stenosis, improving survival and quality of life. Recent advances in prosthetic valve technology, such as transcatheter AVR, have expanded the indication for AVR to the extreme high-risk population, and the most recent surgical innovation, rapid deployment AVR, provides an additional tool to the surgeons’ armamentarium. PMID:26918310

  1. Incomplete RV Remodeling After Transcatheter ASD Closure in Pediatric Age.

    PubMed

    Agha, Hala M; El-Saiedi, Sonia A; Shaltout, Mohamed F; Hamza, Hala S; Nassar, Hayat H; Abdel-Aziz, Doaa M; Tantawy, Amira Esmat El

    2015-10-01

    Published data showing the intermediate effect of transcatheter device closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) in the pediatric age-group are scarce. The objective of the study was to assess the effects of transcatheter ASD closure on right and left ventricular functions by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). The study included 37 consecutive patients diagnosed as ASD secundum by transthoracic echocardiography and TEE and referred for transcatheter closure at Cairo University Specialized Pediatric Hospital, Egypt, from October 2010 to July 2013. Thirty-seven age- and sex-matched controls were selected. TDI was obtained using the pulsed Doppler mode, interrogating the right cardiac border (the tricuspid annulus) and lateral mitral annulus, and myocardial performance index (MPI) was calculated at 1-, 3-, 6- and 12-month post-device closure. Transcatheter closure of ASD and echocardiographic examinations were successfully performed in all patients. There were no significant differences between two groups as regards the age, gender, weight or BSA. TDI showed that patients with ASD had significantly prolonged isovolumetric contraction, relaxation time and MPI compared with control group. Decreased tissue Doppler velocities of RV and LV began at one-month post-closure compared with the controls. Improvement in RVMPI and LVMPI began at 1-month post-closure, but they are still prolonged till 1 year. Reverse remodeling of right and left ventricles began 1 month after transcatheter ASD closure, but did not completely normalize even after 1 year of follow-up by tissue Doppler imaging.

  2. Transcatheter Closure of Patent Ductus Arteriosus: The Penang Hospital's Experience.

    PubMed

    Amir Hamzah, A R; Tiow, C A; Koh, G T; Sharifah, A M

    2011-03-01

    Transcatheter closure of small and moderate sizes of Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) is a standard and well accepted form of treatment. The aim of this study is to describe the experience of transcatheter closure of PDA in Penang Hospital. All patients who underwent transcatheter closure of PDA at our institution between 20th January 2006 and 27th June 2008 were retrospectively identified and studied. There were a total of 66 patients who had undergone transcatheter closure of PDA during this period which comprised of 24 male and 42 female. The PDA was closed by Amplatzer Duct Occluder (ADO) in 31 patients, Gianturco coil in 29 patients and other types of devices in 6 patients. There were 4 patients (6%) who had developed acute complication during the procedure (3 of them developed coil embolization and 1 had bleeding from puncture site). The PDA was successfully close in 95.5% of the study population without any residual PDA shunting. All the patients were alive but 5 of them (4.5%) have some abnormalities (2 has mild left pulmonary stenosis, 3 has small residual). Comparison between ADO and Gianturco coil revealed no significant difference in the outcome. Transcatheter closure of PDA has proven to be safe and effective with good midterm outcome. There was no significant difference between Amplatzer Ductal Occluder and Gianturco coil in term of the outcome.

  3. Transcatheter and ablative therapeutic approaches for solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liapi, Eleni; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H

    2007-03-10

    The purpose of this article is to present in a concise manner an overview of the most widely used locoregional transcatheter and ablative therapies for solid malignancies. An extensive MEDLINE search was performed for this review. Therapies used for liver cancer were emphasized because these therapies are used most commonly in the liver. Applications in pulmonary, renal, and bone tumors were also discussed. These approaches were divided into catheter-based therapies (such as transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, bland embolization, and the most recent transcatheter arterial approach with drug-eluting microspheres), ablative therapies (such as chemical [ethanol or acetic acid injection]), and thermal ablative therapies (such as radiofrequency ablation, laser induced thermotherapy, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation). A brief description of each technique and analysis of available data was reported for all therapies. Locoregional transcatheter and ablative therapies continue to be used mostly for palliation, but have also been used with curative intent. A growing body of evidence suggests clear survival benefit, excellent results regarding local tumor control, and improved quality of life. Clinical trials are underway to validate these results. Image-guided transcatheter and ablative approaches currently play an important role in the management of patients with various types of cancer-a role that is likely to grow even more given the technological advances in imaging, image-guidance systems, catheters, ablative tools, and drug delivery systems. As a result, the outcomes of patients with cancer undoubtedly will improve.

  4. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  5. Transcatheter therapies for resistant hypertension: Clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Lokhandwala, Adil; Dhoble, Abhijeet

    2014-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) is a commonly encountered clinical problem and its management remains a challenging task for healthcare providers. The prevalence of true RHTN has been difficult to assess due to pseudoresistance and secondary hypertension. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) has been associated as a secondary cause of RHTN. Initial studies had shown that angioplasty and stenting for RAS were a promising therapeutic option when added to optimal medical management. However, recent randomized controlled trials in larger populations have failed to show any such benefit. Sympathetic autonomic nervous system dysfunction is commonly noted in individuals with resistant hypertension. Surgical sympathectomy was the treatment of choice for malignant hypertension and it significantly improved mortality. However, post-surgical complications and the advent of antihypertensive drugs made this approach less desirable and it was eventually abandoned. Increasing prevalence of RHTN in recent decades has led to the emergence of minimally invasive interventions such as transcatheter renal denervation for better control of blood pressure. It is a minimally invasive procedure which uses radiofrequency energy for selective ablation of renal sympathetic nerves located in the adventitia of the renal artery. It is a quick procedure and has a short recovery time. Early studies in small population showed significant reduction in blood pressure. The most recent Symplicity HTN-3 study, which is the largest randomized control trial and the only one to use a sham procedure in controls, failed to show significant BP reduction at 6 mo. PMID:25228950

  6. Transjugular approach for transcatheter closure of mitral paraprosthetic leak.

    PubMed

    Joseph, George; Thomson, Viji Samuel

    2009-11-15

    Transcatheter closure of mitral paraprosthetic leak (PPL) using femoral antegrade transseptal or retrograde approach is often unsuccessful when the involved part of the mitral annulus is difficult to access or when the left atrium is large. We report the successful use of jugular venous approach to perform transseptal antegrade PPL closure in a 49-year-old male with mitral PPL located in the anteromedial part of the annulus. This technique could serve as a useful alternative in patients in whom transcatheter closure of mitral PPL is technically difficult. PMID:19626688

  7. Overlay Technique for Transcatheter Left Atrial Appendage Closure.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Zhu, Mengyun; Lu, Yunlan; Tang, Kai; Zhao, Dongdong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yawei

    2015-08-01

    The Overlay technique is popular in peripheral artery interventions, but not in coronary or cardiac structural procedures. We present an initial experience using three-episode overlays during a transcatheter left atrial appendage closure. The first overlay was applied to facilitate advancement of the delivery sheath into left atrium. The second overlay was used to navigate the advancement of prepped delivery system containing the compressed occluder into its optimal position in the left atrium. The third overlay facilitated the real-time deployment of the closure device. This case report demonstrates the effectiveness of the overlay technique in facilitating each step of the transcatheter left atrial appendage closure.

  8. Peri-procedural imaging for transcatheter mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Navin; Patel, Parag; Bartel, Thomas; Kapadia, Samir; Navia, Jose; Stewart, William; Tuzcu, E Murat; Schoenhagen, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) has a high prevalence in older patient populations of industrialized nations. Common etiologies are structural, degenerative MR and functional MR secondary to myocardial remodeling. Because of co-morbidities and associated high surgical risk, open surgical mitral repair/replacement is deferred in a significant percentage of patients. For these patients transcatheter repair/replacement are emerging as treatment options. Because of the lack of direct visualization, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for these procedures. In this review, we summarize mitral valve anatomy, trans-catheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) options, and imaging in the context of TMVR. PMID:27054104

  9. Peri-procedural imaging for transcatheter mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Navin; Patel, Parag; Bartel, Thomas; Kapadia, Samir; Navia, Jose; Stewart, William; Tuzcu, E. Murat

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) has a high prevalence in older patient populations of industrialized nations. Common etiologies are structural, degenerative MR and functional MR secondary to myocardial remodeling. Because of co-morbidities and associated high surgical risk, open surgical mitral repair/replacement is deferred in a significant percentage of patients. For these patients transcatheter repair/replacement are emerging as treatment options. Because of the lack of direct visualization, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for these procedures. In this review, we summarize mitral valve anatomy, trans-catheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) options, and imaging in the context of TMVR. PMID:27054104

  10. Conservative Management of Chronic Aortic Dissection with Underlying Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf Beebeejaun, Mohammad; Malec, Aleksandra; Gupta, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Aortic dissection is one of the most common aortic emergencies affecting around 2000 Americans each year. It usually presents in the acute state but in a small percentage of patients aortic dissections go unnoticed and these patients survive without any adequate therapy. With recent advances in medical care and diagnostic technologies, aortic dissection can be successfully managed through surgical or medical options, consequently increasing the related survival rate. However, little is known about the optimal long-term management of patients suffering from chronic aortic dissection. The purpose of the present report is to review aortic dissection, namely its pathology and the current diagnostic tools available, and to discuss the management options for chronic aortic dissection. We report a patient in which chronic aortic dissection presented with recurring episodes of vomiting and also discuss the management plan of our patient who had a chronic aortic dissection as well as an underlying aortic aneurysm. PMID:24179638

  11. Model-based fusion of multi-modal volumetric images: application to transcatheter valve procedures.

    PubMed

    Grbić, Sasa; Ionasec, Razvan; Wang, Yang; Mansi, Tommaso; Georgescu, Bogdan; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Zheng, Yefeng; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-01-01

    Minimal invasive procedures such as transcatheter valve interventions are substituting conventional surgical techniques. Thus, novel operating rooms have been designed to augment traditional surgical equipment with advanced imaging systems to guide the procedures. We propose a novel method to fuse pre-operative and intra-operative information by jointly estimating anatomical models from multiple image modalities. Thereby high-quality patient-specific models are integrated into the imaging environment of operating rooms to guide cardiac interventions. Robust and fast machine learning techniques are utilized to guide the estimation process. Our method integrates both the redundant and complementary multimodal information to achieve a comprehensive modeling and simultaneously reduce the estimation uncertainty. Experiments performed on 28 patients with pairs of multimodal volumetric data are used to demonstrate high quality intra-operative patient-specific modeling of the aortic valve with a precision of 1.09mm in TEE and 1.73mm in 3D C-arm CT. Within a processing time of 10 seconds we additionally obtain model sensitive mapping between the pre- and intraoperative images.

  12. Aortic sutureless bioprosthesis implantation following degeneration of a SOLO stentless valve.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Gerbay, Antoine; Campisi, Salvatore; Thulane, Claire; Fuzellier, François

    2015-03-01

    A case is presented of the early degeneration of a 21 mm SOLO stentless valve concomitant with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation was considered in this high-risk case (logistic EuroSCORE 29.3%), but was dismissed because of the risk of coronary occlusion, an absence of visual landmarks, and the impossibility to treat the MR. Following the implantation of a 27 mm Medtronic Hancock II mitral bioprosthesis, the leaflets of the SOLO valve were removed, and a 19 mm 3f Enable sutureless bioprosthesis delivered into the remaining sewing belt of the stentless valve. The total cross-clamp time was 64 min. No aortic paravalvular leakage was detected at discharge and early follow up (four months); the mean and peak transvalvular aortic gradients were 13 and 23 mmHg, respectively, and the left ventricular ejection fraction 60%. A sutureless strategy simplified the management of this high-risk case.

  13. Native Mitral Stenosis Treated With Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Jain, Renuka; Algahim, Mohamed F; Bajwa, Tanvir K; Khandheria, Bijoy K; O'Hair, Daniel P

    2016-03-01

    Surgical treatment of mitral stenosis with extreme calcification remains a challenge. Recently, the balloon-expandable valve prosthesis, anchored by radial force, offers a new option for these patients. We present 2 cases of transcatheter mitral valve replacement in patients with severe native mitral valve stenosis and annular calcification deemed too extensive for conventional surgical techniques. PMID:26897235

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  15. Blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI compared to surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Löbe, Ulrike; Barker, Alex J; Gelsinger, Carmen; Butter, Christian; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Ascending aortic blood flow characteristics are altered after aortic valve surgery, but the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Abnormal flow may be associated with aortic and cardiac remodeling. We analyzed blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI in comparison to conventional stented aortic bioprostheses (AVR) and healthy subjects using time-resolved three-dimensional flow-sensitive cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow MRI). Seventeen patients with TAVI (Edwards Sapien XT), 12 with AVR and 9 healthy controls underwent 4D-flow MRI of the ascending aorta. Target parameters were: severity of vortical and helical flow pattern (semiquantitative grading from 0 = none to 3 = severe) and the local distribution of systolic wall shear stress (WSSsystole). AVR revealed significantly more extensive vortical and helical flow pattern than TAVI (p = 0.042 and p = 0.002) and controls (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001). TAVI showed significantly more extensive vortical flow than controls (p < 0.001). Both TAVI and AVR revealed marked blood flow eccentricity (64.7 and 66.7%, respectively), whereas controls showed central blood flow (88.9%). TAVI and AVR exhibited an asymmetric distribution of WSSsystole in the mid-ascending aorta with local maxima at the right anterior aortic wall and local minima at the left posterior wall. In contrast, controls showed a symmetric distribution of WSSsystole along the aortic circumference. Blood flow was significantly altered in the ascending aorta after TAVI and AVR. Changes were similar regarding WSSsystole distribution, while TAVI resulted in less helical and vortical blood flow. PMID:26493195

  16. Comparison of Outcomes of Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Using a Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Strategy.

    PubMed

    Attizzani, Guilherme F; Alkhalil, Ahmad; Padaliya, Bimal; Tam, Chor-Cheung; Lopes, Joao Pedro; Fares, Anas; Bezerra, Hiram G; Medallion, Benjamin; Park, Soon; Deo, Salil; Sareyyupoglu, Basar; Parikh, Sahil; Zidar, David; Elgudin, Yakov; Popovich, Kehllee; Davis, Angela; Staunton, Elizabeth; Tomic, Ana; Mazzurco, Stacey; Avery, Edward; Markowitz, Alan; Simon, Daniel I; Costa, Marco A

    2015-12-01

    Some centers, mostly in Europe, have demonstrated the feasibility of a minimally invasive strategy (MIS; i.e., local anesthesia and conscious sedation, performed in the cath laboratory without transesophageal echocardiography guidance). Nonetheless, the experience of MIS for TAVI using both commercially available valves is lacking in the United States. We, therefore, retrospectively studied all transfemoral TAVI cases performed at our institution between March 2011 and November 2014 to assess the safety and efficacy of MIS. Patients were dichotomized according to the strategy (MIS vs conventional strategy [CS]) used for the procedure. One hundred sixteen patients were included in the MIS group and 91 patients were included in the CS group. Baseline characteristics were similar, and procedural success was comparable (99.1% in MIS and 98.9% in CS, p = 1). One intraprocedural death occurred in each group, whereas conversion rates to general anesthesia were low (3.4%). Comparable device success was obtained. Rates of complications and >mild paravalvular leak before discharge were low and comparable. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in the MIS (median, 3.0 [2.0 to 5.0] days) compared with than that in CS group (median 6.0 days [3.5, 8.0]). At a median follow-up of 230 days, no significant difference in survival rate was detected (89% vs 88%, p = 0.9). On average, MIS was associated with remarkable cost saving compared with CS ($16,000/case). In conclusion, TAVI through MIS was associated with a shorter postprocedural hospital stay, lower costs, and similar safety profile while keeping procedural efficacy compared with CS. PMID:26433275

  17. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Two Symptomatic Giant Cavernous Hemangiomas of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, Sandra; Ashdown, Boyd; Coldwell, Douglas; Helton, W. Scott; Freeny, Patrick C.

    1996-09-15

    Cavernous hemangiomas are usually asymptomatic; however, a small percentage may cause symptoms. This case report discusses palliation by transcatheter arterial embolization with polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  19. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  20. Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Chisato

    2016-08-01

    Optimal management for asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains controversial. Considering the increase in elderly patients, improved surgical outcomes and the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, we must reconsider the optimal management of asymptomatic severe AS. In this article, previous studies regarding the natural history of asymptomatic severe AS were reviewed to obtain a clinical perspective of AS in the growing elderly patient population. The incidence of sudden death in asymptomatic severe AS varies among studies from 0.25% to 1.7% per year, with differences related to study design and patient background. Except for very severe AS, sudden death or AS-related cardiac death without preceding symptoms is uncommon if 'watchful' waiting strategy is possible. Therefore, early operation is reasonable in very severe AS, but it is not recommended for all patients with severe AS. Using exercise tests, plasma levels of natriuretic peptides and other parameters, risk stratification of asymptomatic severe AS is needed to select patients who may have greater benefit following early operation. On the other hand, 'watchful' waiting is not always possible in real world of our practice. Patient education and periodic echocardiography are essential in 'watchful' waiting, which is not simply waiting strategy without careful monitoring. Individualised discussion regarding the indication for early operation is necessary, considering age, clinical background, predicted natural history and operative risk in each patient. PMID:27091844

  1. In Vitro Investigation of the Hemodynamics of Transcatheter Heterotopic Valves Implantation in the Cavo-Atrial Junction.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Munirah; Kabinejadian, Foad; Nguyen, Yen Ngoc; Tay, Edgar; Kim, Sangho; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-09-01

    Severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is life-threatening but is often undertreated. Many patients with severe TR are denied heart valve replacement surgery because their old age or comorbidities predispose them to a higher risk of surgical complications associated with open-heart surgery. With the advent of transcatheter technology, it is now possible to deliver the valve to the desired location without the need for open-heart surgery. However, presently, there is no commercially available transcatheter tricuspid valve. This may be due to the complex tricuspid valve anatomy, which lacks an anchorage zone for the percutaneous valves. In view of this drawback, we have recently developed and tested two percutaneous caval heart valves that are designed to deploy at the vena cava and atrium junction. The hemodynamic characteristics of these valves are tested in a mock circulatory system with patient-specific silicone atrium and vena cava, which emulates the physiological pressure and flow conditions at the right side of the human heart. Particle imaging velocimetry results showed that flow velocity and the associated Reynolds shear stress (RSS) and the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) downstream of the valves increased after the implantation of the valves. A maximum flow velocity of 0.94 m/s was observed at the region downstream of the percutaneous valve at the superior vena cava (SVC). Maximum RSS value of 2076.1 dynes/cm(2) was observed downstream of the valve at the inferior vena cava during the deceleration phase while maximum TKE measured was 572.6 J/m(3) at the upstream of the valve in the SVC during the peak flow phase. While these values appear high, they are significantly lower than those reported in prosthetic mitral and aortic valves. Hence, caval stented valves can be potentially considered as a minimally invasive option to treat TR.

  2. Effect of Transcatheter Mitral Annuloplasty With the Cardioband Device on 3-Dimensional Geometry of the Mitral Annulus.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Mani; Agricola, Eustachio; Alfieri, Ottavio; Baldus, Stephan; Colombo, Antonio; Filardo, Giovanni; Hammerstingl, Christophe; Huntgeburth, Michael; Kreidel, Felix; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; LaCanna, Giovanni; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Maisano, Francesco; Nickenig, Georg; Pollock, Benjamin D; Roberts, Bradley J; Vahanian, Alec; Grayburn, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to assess the acute intraprocedural effects of transcatheter direct mitral annuloplasty using the Cardioband device on 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the mitral annulus. Of 45 patients with functional mitral regurgitation (MR) enrolled in a single arm, multicenter, prospective trial, 22 had complete pre- and post-implant 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) images stored in native data format that allowed off-line 3D reconstruction. Images with the highest volume rate and best image quality were selected for analysis. Multiple measurements of annular geometry were compared from baseline to post-implant using paired t tests with Bonferroni correction to account for multiple comparisons. The device was successfully implanted in all patients, and MR was reduced to moderate in 2 patients, mild in 17 patients, and trace in 3 patients after final device cinching. Compared with preprocedural TEE, postprocedural TEE showed statistically significantly reductions in annular circumference (137 ± 15 vs 128 ± 17 mm; p = 0.042), intercommissural distance (42.4 ± 4.3 vs 38.6 ± 4.4 mm; p = 0.029), anteroposterior distance (40.0 ± 5.4 vs 37.0 ± 5.7 mm; p = 0.025), and aortic-mitral angle (117 ± 8° vs 112 ± 8°; p = 0.032). This study demonstrates that transcatheter direct mitral annuloplasty with the Cardioband device results in acute remodeling of the mitral annulus with successful reduction of functional MR.

  3. Surgical Aortic Valvuloplasty Versus Balloon Aortic Valve Dilatation in Children.

    PubMed

    Donald, Julia S; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2016-09-01

    Balloon aortic valve dilatation (BAD : is assumed to provide the same outcomes as surgical aortic valvuloplasty (SAV). However, the development of precise modern surgical valvuloplasty techniques may result in better long-term durability of the aortic valve repair. This review of the recent literature suggests that current SAV provides a safe and durable repair. Furthermore, primary SAV appears to have greater freedom from reintervention and aortic valve replacement when compared to BAD. PMID:27587493

  4. Feature-based US to CT registration of the aortic root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Doug L.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Chu, Michael W.; Drangova, Maria; Hata, Noby; Jain, Ameet; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    A feature-based registration was developed to align biplane and tracked ultrasound images of the aortic root with a preoperative CT volume. In transcatheter aortic valve replacement, a prosthetic valve is inserted into the aortic annulus via a catheter. Poor anatomical visualization of the aortic root region can result in incorrect positioning, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Registration of pre-operative CT to transesophageal ultrasound and fluoroscopy images is a major step towards providing augmented image guidance for this procedure. The proposed registration approach uses an iterative closest point algorithm to register a surface mesh generated from CT to 3D US points reconstructed from a single biplane US acquisition, or multiple tracked US images. The use of a single simultaneous acquisition biplane image eliminates reconstruction error introduced by cardiac gating and TEE probe tracking, creating potential for real-time intra-operative registration. A simple initialization procedure is used to minimize changes to operating room workflow. The algorithm is tested on images acquired from excised porcine hearts. Results demonstrate a clinically acceptable accuracy of 2.6mm and 5mm for tracked US to CT and biplane US to CT registration respectively.

  5. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  6. Transcatheter vessel occlusion: angiographic results versus clinical success

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, L.; Greenfield, A.J.; Waltman, A.C.; Novelline, R.A.; Van Breda, A.; Luers, P.; Athanasoulis, C.A.

    1983-04-01

    A review was made of 219 transcatheter vessel occlusion procedures performed over a ten-year period for control of hemorrhage, tumor palliation, or blood supply redistribution prior to intra-arterial chemotherapy. Complete angiographic success was obtained in 85% of the procedures, with partial success in 8%; complete clinical success was achieved in 53% of patients, with partial success in 23%. the most satisfactory clinical results were obtained with hemorrhagic gastritis and pelvic trauma. Embolizations for duodenal ulcer hemorrhage and transhepatic variceal occlusion were the least clinically successful, although isobutyl-cyanoacrylate appeared to be a significant improvement in angiographic therapy for duodenal ulcer. The overall complication rate was 13%, with one third of the complications clinically silent. These results indicate that transcatheter vessel occlusion is a relatively safe and effective method for control of hemorrhage or tumor infarction.

  7. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  8. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  9. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  10. Quadricuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Timperley, Jonathan; Milner, Robert; Marshall, Andrew J; Gilbert, Timothy J

    2002-12-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) are a rare but well recognized cause of significant aortic regurgitation. The first case was found reported in 1862. Since then there have been 110 reported cases of QAV and we report 4 more. Previously, these were diagnosed at the time of surgery or postmortem examination. With advances in echocardiography, including harmonic imaging, and also the advent of transesophageal echocardiography, more cases are being diagnosed prior to surgery. We describe four more cases, three diagnosed preoperatively and one at the time of surgery, and then review the previously reported cases. Of the 114 cases reported, 46 had the aortic valve replaced, most commonly in the 5th and 6th decade of life. Hurwitz and Roberts classified quadricuspid valves according to the size of the leaflets. It has previously been believed that QAVs with four equal sized leaflets were less likely to develop significant aortic regurgitation; however, on review of the available cases, this would not appear to be the case. The preoperative diagnosis of QAVs is important as they can be associated with abnormally placed coronary ostium. Of the 114 cases reported, there are 10 reports of abnormally placed ostia. There has been at least one reported case of death occurring because of obstruction of an abnormally placed right coronary ostium by a prosthetic aortic valve.

  11. Transcatheter closure of coronary artery fistula using Guglielmi detachable coil

    PubMed Central

    Munawar, Muhammad; Siswanto, Bambang B.; Harimurti, Ganesha M.; Nguyen, Thach N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Coronary artery fistula (CAF) is a rare anomaly. Transcatheter CAF closure has been introduced using various materials, but only few data are available on the Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC). The advantage of using GDC for transcatheter CAF closure is more controllable, therefore much safer when compared to other coils. This report is about our experience in transcatheter closure of CAF using fibered GDC in our hospital. Methods & Results From 2002 to 2007, there were 10 patients with CAFs (age range: 28 to 56 year-old, 7 males) who underwent transcatheter CAF closure. There were a total of 19 CAFs which originated from right coronary (n = 5), left circumflex (n = 3), left anterior descending artery (n = 10) and left main trunk (n = 1). Median number of coil deployment for each fistula was 3 (range: 1 to 6). The pulmonary artery was the most common site of the distal communication of CAFs (n = 14), followed by right atrium (n = 3), left atrium (n = 1) and left ventricle (n = 1). Immediate coronary angiography after GDC deployment revealed no residual shunt in 12 (63.2%) CAFs, significant reduction of the flow in 5 (26.3%), while 2 (10.5%) could not be closed due to small size. Nine (90%) patients underwent a repeated angiography within 3 to 8 months. Among 12 CAFs that were occluded immediately post-deployment, there were 2 CAFs with insignificant residual flow. Among 6 CAFs with significantly decreased flow immediately post-deployment, 2 were occluded totally in the follow-up angiography. In total, 12 (70.5%) CAFs were occluded completely and 5 (29.5%) CAFs still had insignificant residual flow, which did not need any additional coil deployment. During a mean follow up of 4.3 ± 0.7 year, all patients remained symptom and complication free. Conclusions The fibered GDC is a safe and effective method for percutaneous closure of the CAFs. PMID:22783318

  12. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Francesco Dimitri; Savini, Carlo; Castelli, Andrea; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is being employed as a less invasive alternative to open heart surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Here we report the case of an awake transapical aortic valve implantation in a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Does the aortic annulus undergo conformational change throughout the cardiac cycle? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Suchá, Dominika; Tuncay, Volkan; Prakken, Niek H J; Leiner, Tim; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-12-01

    Accurate annular sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) planning is essential. It is now widely recognized that the annulus is an oval structure in most patients, but it remains unclear if the annulus undergoes change in size and shape during the cardiac cycle that may impact prosthesis size selection. Our aim was to assess whether the aortic annulus undergoes dynamic conformational change during the cardiac cycle and to evaluate possible implications for prosthesis size selection. We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Embase databases and reviewed all available literature on aortic annulus measurements in at least two cardiac phases. Twenty-nine articles published from 2001 to 2014 were included. In total, 2021 subjects with and without aortic stenosis were evaluated with a mean age ranging from 11 ± 3.6 to 84.9 ± 7.2 years. Two- and three-dimensional echocardiography was performed in six studies each, magnetic resonance imaging was used in one and computed tomography in 17 studies. In general, the aortic annulus was more circular in systole and predominantly oval in diastole. Whereas the annular long-axis diameter showed insignificant change throughout the cycle, the short-axis diameter, area, and perimeter were significantly larger in systole compared with diastole. Hence, the aortic annulus does undergo dynamic changes during the cardiac cycle. In patients with large conformational changes, diastolic compared with systolic measurements can result in undersizing TAVI prostheses. Due to the complex annular anatomy and dynamic change, three-dimensional assessment in multiple phases has utmost importance in TAVI planning to improve prosthesis sizing.

  14. Transcatheter coil embolization of multiple bilateral congenital coronary artery fistulae.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan F; Thai, Hoa Tran; Kabir, Tito; Roguelov, Christan; Eeckhout, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Coronary artery fistulae represent the most frequent congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries, but remain a relatively uncommon clinical problem. Moreover, multiple fistulae originating from both the left and the right coronary arteries and draining into the left ventricular chamber are a rare condition. Due to the low prevalence of these anomalies, the appropriate management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery fistulae is controversial. Transcatheter closure approaches have emerged as a less invasive strategy and are nowadays considered a valuable alternative to surgical correction with similar effectiveness, morbidity and mortality. The percutaneous management, however, is mainly limited by the individual anatomic features of the fistula and an appropriate patient's selection is considered as a key determining factor to achieve complete occlusion. Thus, success rates of transcatheter closure techniques reported in the literature are extremely variable and highly dependent upon the nature of the follow up, which, at present, is not standardized. The optimal management of symptomatic patients with multiple coronary artery fistulae still remains a challenging problem and has been traditionally considered as an indication for cardiac surgery. We report here the case of a patient with double bilateral congenital coronary artery fistulae arising from both the left and right coronary arteries and draining individually into the left ventricular chamber. This patient underwent successful transcatheter anterograde closure of both fistulae using a microcoil embolization technique.

  15. Proximal aortic dissection (dissecting aortic aneurysm) in a mature ostrich.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, M C; González, J; Pérez, V; Reyes, L E; Gómez, N; Pérez, C; Corpa, J M; García-Marín, J F

    2001-01-01

    The gross and histopathologic lesions observed in a case of spontaneous proximal aortic dissection (dissecting aortic aneurysm) in a mature ostrich are reported. At necropsy, a dissecting intramural hematoma was seen in the proximal aorta, extended about 12 cm distally from the aortic valves. Histopathologic changes in aortic dissection included fragmentation and disruption of elastic laminae, presence of cystic extracellular spaces, and pooling of ground substance in the tunica media. Hepatic copper levels were measured, and the low concentration found suggested that a copper deficiency together with other risk factors such as the elevation of blood pressure may have been implicated in the development of the aortic dissection seen in this ostrich.

  16. Transcatheter device closure of pseudoaneurysms of the left ventricular wall: An emerging therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Madan, Tarun; Juneja, Manish; Raval, Abhishek; Thakkar, Bhavesh

    2016-02-01

    Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is a rare but serious complication of acute myocardial infarction and cardiac surgery. While surgical intervention is the conventional therapeutic option, transcatheter closure can be considered in selected patients with suitable morphology of the pseudoaneurysm. We report a case of successful transcatheter closure of a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm orifice and isolation of the sac using an Amplatzer septal occluder.

  17. Endovascular aortic aneurysm operations.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Sasan; Terramani, Thomas T; Weiss, Victor J; Smith, Robert B; Salam, Atef A; Dodson, Thomas F; Chaikof, Elliot L; Lumsden, Alan B

    2002-02-01

    Options for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms are in a state of evolutionary change. The development and continued refinement of the endoluminal approaches has decreased the need for open aortic aneurysm surgery. Endovascular stent graft technology is an area of active research in which both the delivery systems and the endografts are undergoing continued improvement so that patients with what was previously thought to be unfavorable anatomy may be treated by these means. The design and deployment techniques of the currently available endografts, as well as those in clinical trials, are presented. PMID:11822962

  18. Aortic wraps a modification to aortic grafting.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J A

    1989-09-01

    Aortic wrapping has been attempted on occasion when the standard replacement of a diseased lower third of the aorta by a trouser graft is not feasible. Cellophane has been the most common agent employed, but these wraps have met with minimal success and on occasion has even been passed rectally. Kartchner and Lovett have reviewed the techniques and results of the later procedures replacing the cellophane wraps. In most instances a Dacron sheet was utilized. Six cases are reviewed from a solo private practice in which a standard trouser graft replacement was varied by using an alternative form of wrapping.

  19. The Melody® valve and Ensemble® delivery system for transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    McElhinney, Doff B; Hennesen, Jill T

    2013-01-01

    The Melody® transcatheter pulmonary valve (TPV) is a percutaneous valve system designed for the treatment of obstruction and/or regurgitation of prosthetic conduits placed between the right ventricle and pulmonary arteries in patients with congenital heart disease. In 2000, Melody TPV became the first transcatheter valve implanted in a human; in 2006 it became the first transcatheter valve commercially available anywhere in the world; and in 2010 it was launched as the first commercially available transcatheter valve in the United States. In this review, we present the clinical background against which the Melody valve was developed and implemented, introduce the rationale for and challenges of transcatheter valve technology for this population, outline the history and technical details of its development and use, and summarize currently available data concerning the performance of the device. PMID:23834411

  20. The future of transcatheter mitral valve interventions: competitive or complementary role of repair vs. replacement?

    PubMed

    Maisano, Francesco; Alfieri, Ottavio; Banai, Shmuel; Buchbinder, Maurice; Colombo, Antonio; Falk, Volkmar; Feldman, Ted; Franzen, Olaf; Herrmann, Howard; Kar, Saibal; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lutter, Georg; Mack, Michael; Nickenig, Georg; Piazza, Nicolo; Reisman, Mark; Ruiz, Carlos E; Schofer, Joachim; Søndergaard, Lars; Stone, Gregg W; Taramasso, Maurizio; Thomas, Martyn; Vahanian, Alec; Webb, John; Windecker, Stephan; Leon, Martin B

    2015-07-01

    Transcatheter mitral interventions has been developed to address an unmet clinical need and may be an alternative therapeutic option to surgery with the intent to provide symptomatic and prognostic benefit. Beyond MitraClip therapy, alternative repair technologies are being developed to expand the transcatheter intervention armamentarium. Recently, the feasibility of transcatheter mitral valve implantation in native non-calcified valves has been reported in very high-risk patients. Acknowledging the lack of scientific evidence to date, it is difficult to predict what the ultimate future role of transcatheter mitral valve interventions will be. The purpose of the present report is to review the current state-of-the-art of mitral valve intervention, and to identify the potential future scenarios, which might benefit most from the transcatheter repair and replacement devices under development.

  1. Ascending-to-descending aortic bypass and aortic valve replacement for concomitant severe aortic coarctation and aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W A; Adams, Corey; Torres, Pedro

    2011-04-01

    We present a 33-year-old male with severe, symptomatic aortic coarctation and aortic stenosis assessed on a humanitarian medical mission to a developing country. Contemplating limited time and available resources, we performed a simultaneous single-stage approach with ascending-to-descending aortic bypass with a reinforced gortex graft and concomitant aortic valve replacement through a median sternotomy. The patient had an uneventful postoperative convalescence and was discharged on postoperative day 5. At 1-year follow-up, he was asymptomatic and doing well with good blood pressure control and complete equalization of upper and lower limb blood pressure measurements. Computed tomography and transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a widely patent ascending-to-descending aortic bypass graft and a normally functioning prosthetic aortic valve, respectively. In developing countries where health care resources are limited, a combined approach with an extra-anatomic, thoracic aortic bypass, and aortic valve replacement resulted in good early and 1-year outcomes. This procedure may represent the most effective surgical option for patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and aortic stenosis.

  2. Genetics, Pregnancy, and Aortic Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Hsieh, Cindy M; Schenning, Ryan C; Slater, Matthew S; Landry, Gregory J; Moneta, Gregory L; Mitchell, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (FTAAD) in a pregnant female. FTAAD is an inherited, nonsyndromic aortopathy resulting from several genetic mutations critical to aortic wall integrity have been identified. One such mutation is the myosin heavy chain gene (MYH11) which is responsible for 1-2% of all FTAAD cases. This mutation results in aortic medial degeneration, loss of elastin, and reticulin fiber fragmentation predisposing to TAAD. Aortic disease is more aggressive during pregnancy as a result of increased wall stress from hyperdynamic cardiovascular changes and estrogen-induced aortic media degeneration. Our patient was a 29-year-old G2P1 woman at 26 weeks gestation presenting with abdominal and back pain. Work-up revealed a 6.4-cm ascending aortic aneurysm with a type A dissection extending into all arch vessels, aortic coarctation at the isthmus, and a separate focal type B aortic dissection with visceral involvement. Surgical management included concomitant cesarean section with delivery of a live premature infant, tubal ligation, ascending aortic replacement with reconstruction of the arch vessels, and aortic valve resuspension. The type B dissection was managed medically without complication. This is the first reported case of aortic dissection in a patient with FTAAD/MYH11 mutation and pregnancy. This case highlights that FTAAD and pregnancy cause aortic degeneration via distinct mechanisms and that hyperdynamics of pregnancy increase aortic wall stress. Management of pregnancy associated with aortopathy requires early transfer to a tertiary center, careful investigation to identify familial aortopathy, fetal monitoring, and a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:26381327

  3. Transcatheter Embolotherapy with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate for Ectopic Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun Jung, Hyun-Seok; Hur, Saebeom; Lee, Myungsu; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo address technical feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter embolotherapy with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for bleeding ectopic varices.MethodsThe institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. From January 2004 to June 2013, a total of 12 consecutive patients received transcatheter embolotherapy using NBCA for bleeding ectopic varices in our institute. Clinical and radiologic features of the endovascular procedures were comprehensively reviewed.ResultsPreprocedural computed tomography images revealed ectopic varices in the jejunum (n = 7), stoma (n = 2), rectum (n = 2), and duodenum (n = 1). The 12 procedures consisted of solitary embolotherapy (n = 8) and embolotherapy with portal decompression (main portal vein stenting in 3, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in 1). With regard to vascular access, percutaneous transhepatic access (n = 7), transsplenic access (n = 4), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (n = 1) were used. There was no failure in either the embolotherapy or the vascular accesses (technical success rate, 100 %). Two patients died within 1 month from the procedure from preexisting fatal medical conditions. Only one patient, with a large varix that had been partially embolized by using coils and NBCA, underwent rebleeding 5.5 months after the procedure. The patient was retreated with NBCA and did not undergo any bleeding afterward for a follow-up period of 2.5 months. The remaining nine patients did not experience rebleeding during the follow-up periods (range 1.5–33.2 months).ConclusionTranscatheter embolotherapy using NBCA can be a useful option for bleeding ectopic varices.

  4. Cost comparison of transcatheter and operative closures of ostium secundum atrial septal defects

    PubMed Central

    O’Byrne, Michael L.; Gillespie, Matthew J.; Shinohara, Russell T.; Dori, Yoav; Rome, Jonathan J.; Glatz, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcomes for transcatheter and operative closures of atrial septal defects (ASDs) are similar. Economic cost for each method has not been well described. Methods A single-center retrospective cohort study of children and adults <30 years of age undergoing closure for single secundum ASD from January 1, 2007, to April 1, 2012, was performed to measure differences in inflation-adjusted cost of operative and transcatheter closures of ASD. A propensity score weight-adjusted multivariate regression model was used in an intention-to-treat analysis. Costs for reintervention and crossover admissions were included in primary analysis. Results A total of 244 subjects were included in the study (64% transcatheter and 36% operative), of which 2% (n = 5) were ≥18 years. Crossover rate from transcatheter to operative group was 3%. Risk of reintervention (P = .66) and 30-day mortality (P = .37) were not significantly different. In a multivariate model, adjusted cost of operative closure was 2012 US $60,992 versus 2012 US $55,841 for transcatheter closure (P < .001). Components of total cost favoring transcatheter closure were length of stay, medications, and follow-up radiologic and laboratory testing, overcoming higher costs of procedure and echocardiography. Professional costs did not differ. The rate of 30-day readmission was greater in the operative cohort, further increasing the cost advantage of transcatheter closure. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that costs of follow-up visits influenced relative cost but that device closure remained favorable over a broad range of crossover and reintervention rates. Conclusion For single secundum ASD, cost comparison analysis favors transcatheter closure over the short term. The cost of follow-up regimens influences the cost advantage of transcatheter closure. PMID:25965721

  5. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  6. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm with retrograde approach.

    PubMed

    Narin, Nazmi; Ozyurt, Abdullah; Baykan, Ali; Uzüm, Kazım

    2014-04-01

    A three-year-old girl with multiple heart malformations admitted to the pediatric cardiology unit because of excessive sweating and fatigue. Abnormal color Doppler flow was detected into the right atrium from the dilated coronary sinus on the echocardiographic examination, and ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) was diagnosed. Although in most such cases, an antegrade transcatheter approach has been used, a retrograde approach can be used as a cost-effective treatment modality in those cases with selective high-risk surgery. In this report, we present a patient with ruptured SVA, which was closed via Amplatzer vascular plug-4 by retrograde approach. PMID:24769826

  7. Transcatheter Renal Interventions: A Review of Established and Emerging Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Jeet; Parvinian, Ahmad; Bui, James T; Knuttinen, Martha Grace; Ray, Charles E; Gaba, Ron C

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-based interventions play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of renal pathology. The array of procedures available to interventional radiologists (IRs) includes established techniques such as angioplasty, stenting, embolization, thrombolysis, and thrombectomy for treatment of renovascular disease, as well as embolization of renal neoplasms and emerging therapies such as transcatheter renal artery sympathectomy for treatment of resistant hypertension. Here, we present an overview of these minimally invasive therapies, with an emphasis on interventional technique and clinical outcomes of the procedure. PMID:25806140

  8. Renoduodenal Fistula After Transcatheter Embolization of Renal Angiomyolipoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, Rahul A.; Feldman, Adam S.; Walker, T. Gregory

    2015-02-15

    Transcatheter embolization of renal angiomyolipomas is a routinely performed, nephron-sparing procedure with a favorable safety profile. Complications from this procedure are typically minor in severity, with postembolization syndrome the most common minor complication. Abscess formation is a recognized but uncommon major complication of this procedure and is presumably due to superinfection of the infarcted tissue after arterial embolization. In this case report, we describe the formation of a renoduodenal fistula after embolization of an angiomyolipoma, complicated by intracranial abscess formation and requiring multiple percutaneous drainage procedures and eventual partial nephrectomy.

  9. A New Cone-Shaped Aortic Valve Prosthesis for Orthotopic Position: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan; Peregrin, Jan H.; Pulda, Zdenek; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Roesch, Josef

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate a newly designed cone-shaped aortic valve prosthesis (CAVP) for one-step transcatheter placement in an orthotopic position. The study was conducted in 15 swine using either the transcarotid (11 animals) or the transfemoral (4 animals) artery approach. A 12- or 13-Fr sheath was inserted via arterial cutdown. The CAVP was deployed under fluoroscopic control and its struts, by design, induced significant native valve insufficiency. CAVP function was evaluated by aortography and aortic pressure curve tracing. In 11 of 15 swine the CAVP was properly deployed and functioned well throughout the scheduled period of 2-3 h. In three swine the CAVPs were placed lower than intended, however, they were functional even in the left ventricular outflow tract position. One swine expired due to inadvertent low CAVP placement that caused both aortic regurgitation and immobilization of the anterior mitral valve leaflet by the valve struts. We conclude that this design of CAVP is relatively easy to deploy, works well throughout a short time period (2-3 h), and, moreover, seems to be reliable even in a lower-than-orthotopic position (e.g., infra-annulary space). Longer-term studies are needed for its further evaluation.

  10. Transcatheter device occlusion of a large pulmonary arteriovenous fistula by exit closure: the road less travelled.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Bhavesh M; Shah, Jayal; Shukla, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Large pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (PAVF) manifests as cyanosis and predisposes to serious complications of right-to-left shunt, and therefore necessitates early treatment. The emergence of antegrade transcatheter closure of feeding arteries as treatment of choice is limited by inherent risk of either recanalization or reappearance of new feeders and potential risk of systemic embolization. Additional closure of the draining vessel by transcatheter device occlusion should overcome the limitations of conventional antegrade technique. We describe two cases of successful transcatheter closure of a large PAVF by antegrade device closure of feeders as well as transseptal retrograde closure of the exiting channel. PMID:24402810

  11. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26118429

  13. Infrarenal Aortic Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, L. W.; Baker, J. D.; Dainko, E. A.; Machleder, H. I.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta have been seen at the UCLA Hospitals in the past 11 years. Claudication was the presenting complaint in all but one patient, with one-third having ischemic rest pain. The average age of these patients was 54 years, and their histories revealed a surprising absence of myocardial infarction, stroke, or diabetes, although 40% had essential hypertension. Heavy tobacco use, however, was characteristic of the entire group. Arteriography proved valuable in identifying and characterizing the vascular abnormalities, but posed problems in technique and interpretation. Significant distal arterial disease was detected radiographically in only 21% of these patients. Operative correction of the aortic occlusion was performed on 26 patients, 18 by aortic bypass grafts and eight by aorto-iliac endarterectomy, with one early postoperative death. Although the thrombus extended to the renal artery origins in 77% of the cases, a well-designed technical approach did not require renal artery occlusion. Using serial creatinine determinations, one case of renal insufficiency was detected which was associated with prolonged postoperative hypotension. Although the extent of distal disease was more severe in those who underwent bypass, symptoms of claudication returned earlier and were more prominent in the endarterectomy group. This recurrence of systems was not favorably altered by sympathectomy performed concomitantly with the initial procedure. Even though this condition seems to pose difficult technical obstacles and has a poor prognosis, infrarenal aortic occlusion can be successfully treated by aortic bypass, with favorable long-term results, if particular attention is paid to elements of the preoperative evaluation and the intraoperative technical requirements peculiar to this relatively uncommon disease entity. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:646479

  14. Neuroprotection during aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Helen; Srinivas, Coimbatore; Djaiani, George

    2016-09-01

    Neurological injury is a major limitation of aortic surgery, whether it involves spinal cord injury following intervention to the thoracoabdominal aorta, or stroke following surgery on the arch and ascending aorta. Despite an extensive body of literature and various proposals, a completely effective strategy to prevent or treat neurological injury remains elusive. In this article, we summarise the evidence for established and emerging strategies, and review current concepts in pathophysiology and risk assessment as they relate to neurological injury. PMID:27650340

  15. Commercial versus PARTNER study experience with the transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Minha, Sa'ar; Barbash, Israel M; Torguson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Marco A; Okubagzi, Petros; Loh, Joshua P; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-01-15

    In patients with aortic stenosis who cannot have surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards SAPIEN valve has been shown to improve survival rate and is approved for commercial use in the United States. This study aims to assess the clinical profile, procedural characteristics, and in-hospital complications in patients treated with a commercial SAPIEN valve outside the clinical trial context. We retrospectively analyzed 69 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a commercial SAPIEN valve compared with 55 Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valves (PARTNER) trial patients from cohort B enrolled in the same institution by the same Heart Team. Compared with the commercial group, patients in the PARTNER cohort B had higher mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 4, p = 0.04) and a lower rate of peripheral arterial disease (19% vs 44%, p = 0.004). Most patients in the commercial group had the procedure under conscious sedation (83% vs 66%, p = 0.03). Planned surgical cut down for vascular access was rare in the commercial group (1.4% vs 46%, p <0.001). The overall rates of major vascular complications, life-threatening or major bleeding, and blood transfusions were lower in commercial group (7.2% vs 27%, p = 0.003; 2.9% vs 16%, p = 0.01; and 28% vs 60%, p <0.001, respectively). In-hospital all-cause mortality (5.8% vs 9.1%, p = 0.51) and stroke rates (7.2% vs 14.5%, p = 0.19) were not statistically different between groups. The median length of hospitalization (p <0.001) and postprocedural length of stay (p = 0.01) was shorter in the commercial group. In conclusion, transfemoral commercial use of the Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients shows similar in-hospital mortality and stroke rates compared with PARTNER cohort B. The refinements in the procedure such as more conscious sedation, experience of the operators, and careful vascular planning in the commercial group led to lesser

  16. Treatment of Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Salam, Basit; Beg, Madiha; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% postembolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention. PMID:23844289

  17. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Rare Congenital Cause of Aortic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Shah, Priyank; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly causing aortic regurgitation usually in the fifth to sixth decade of life. Earlier, the diagnosis was mostly during postmortem or intraoperative, but now with the advent of better imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, more cases are being diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have QAV, with the help of TEE, while undergoing evaluation for a diastolic murmur. The patient was found to have Type B QAV with moderate aortic regurgitation. We also present a brief review of classification, pathophysiology, and embryological basis of this rare congenital anomaly. The importance of diagnosing QAV lies in the fact that majority of these patients will require surgery for aortic regurgitation and close follow-up so that aortic valve replacement/repair is done before the left ventricular decompensation occurs. PMID:27195176

  19. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  20. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  1. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy.

  2. New Insights Into Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Lederle, Frank A.; Jones, Gregory T.; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Labropoulos, Nicos; Legrand, Victor; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Nienaber, Christoph; Radermecker, Marc A.; Elefteriades, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The current state of research and treatment on aortic diseases was discussed in the “3rd International Meeting on Aortic Diseases” (IMAD3) held on October 4–6, 2012, in Liège, Belgium. The 3-day meeting covered a wide range of topics related to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and valvular diseases. It brought together clinicians and basic scientists and provided an excellent opportunity to discuss future collaborative research projects for genetic, genomics, and biomarker studies, as well as clinical trials. Although great progress has been made in the past few years, there are still a large number of unsolved questions about aortic diseases. Obtaining answers to the key questions will require innovative, interdisciplinary approaches that integrate information from epidemiological, genetic, molecular biology, and bioengineering studies on humans and animal models. It is more evident than ever that multicenter collaborations are needed to accomplish these goals. PMID:26798669

  3. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  4. Intraoperative aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Mehta, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection is a rare but fatal complication of open heart surgery. By recognizing the population at risk and by using a gentle operative technique in such patients, the surgeon can usually avoid iatrogenic injury to the aorta. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and epiaortic scanning are invaluable for prompt diagnosis and determination of the extent of the injury. Prevention lies in the strict control of blood pressure during cannulation/decannulation, construction of proximal anastomosis, or in avoiding manipulation of the aorta in high-risk patients. Immediate repair using interposition graft or Dacron patch graft is warranted to reduce the high mortality associated with this complication. PMID:26440240

  5. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies.

  6. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  7. Abdominal aortic grafting for spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Hiroto; Shibuya, Takashi; Shintani, Takashi; Uenaka, Hisazumi; Suehiro, Shigefumi; Satoh, Hisashi

    2010-02-01

    This case report concerns a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection, which developed into claudication and rest pain in the lower extremity. Multi-row detector computed tomography showed the entry site of the abdominal aortic dissection at the second lumbar artery, while the reentry site was found intraoperatively at the median sacral artery, indicating that the false lumen had progressed and compressed the true lumen. A direct approach involving grafting appears to be an effective procedure for resolving mesenteric and lower extremity hypoperfusion due to aortic dissection with a dilated false channel, even during the acute period. PMID:19879731

  8. Patients With Small Left Ventricular Size Undergoing Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty Have Worse Intraprocedural Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Don, Creighton; Gupta, Pritha P.; Witzke, Christian; Kesarwani, Manoj; Cubeddu, Roberto J.; Inglessis, Ignacio; Palacios, Igor F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of left ventricular (LV) chamber size on procedural and hospital outcomes of patients undergoing aortic valvuloplasty. Background Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) is used as an integral step during transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Patients with small, thickened ventricles are thought to have more complications during and following BAV. Methods Retrospective study of consecutive patients with severe, symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis who underwent retrograde BAV at Massachusetts General Hospital. We compared patients with left ventricular end-diastolic diameters (LVEDD) <4.0 cm (n = 31) to those with LVEDD ≥4.0 cm (n = 78). Baseline and procedural characteristics as well as clinical outcomes were compared. Multivariate logistic regression was used for the adjusted analysis. Results Patients with smaller LV chamber size were mostly women (80.7% vs. 19.4%, P < 0.01) and had a smaller body surface area (BSA), (1.61 ± 0.20 m2 vs. 1.79 ± 0.25 m2, P < 0.01). Patients with smaller LV chamber size had higher ejection fractions and thicker ventricles. Otherwise, baseline characteristics were similar. The intraprocedural composite of death, cardiopulmonary arrest, intubation, hemodynamic collapse, and tamponade was higher for patients with LVEDD < 4.0 cm (32.3% v. 11.5%, P = 0.01). Adjusting for age, gender, BSA, LV pressure, and New York Heart Association class, LVEDD < 4.0 cm remained an independent predictor of procedural (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.4– 18.2) and in-hospital complications (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.2–11.6). Conclusions Compared to patients undergoing BAV with LVEDD ≥4.0 cm, those with smaller LV chambers had worse procedural and in-hospital outcomes. PMID:22926957

  9. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  10. Gallbladder infarction following hepatic transcatheter arterial embolization: angiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, C.; Iwasaki, M.; Tanaka, T.; Tokunaga, K.; Hori, S.; Yoshioka, H.; Nakamura, H.; Sakurai, M.; Okamura, J.

    1983-10-01

    Gallbladder infarction developing after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with malignant hepatic tumors was studied by comparing preoperative angiographic and postoperative macroscopic and histological findings. Eight patients demonstrated occlusion of the cystic artery or its branches by embolic materials on post-TAE angiograms. Surgery revealed infarction of the gallbladder in 6 patients; no infarction was noted in the other 2, although branches of the cystic artery were occluded on the post-TAE angiogram. Due to recanalization of the occluded artery, the infarcted area could be assessed only by follow-up angiography. No patient experienced perforation of the gallbladder as a result of infarction. The authors suggest that patients with post-TAE infarction of the gallbladder can be treated consevatively if they are kept under close observation.

  11. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  12. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  13. A New Soluble Gelatin Sponge for Transcatheter Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sahara, Shinya; Minamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Motoki; Ikoma, Akira; Nakata, Kouhei; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2010-12-15

    To prepare a soluble gelatin sponge (GS) and to explore the GS particles (GSPs) that inhibit development of collateral pathways when transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization is performed. The approval of the Institutional Committee on Research Animal Care of our institution was obtained. By means of 50 and 100 kDa of regenerative medicine-gelatin (RM-G), RM-G sponges were prepared by freeze-drying and heating to temperatures of 110-150{sup o}C for cross-linkage. The soluble times of RM-GSPs were measured in vitro. Eight swine for transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization were assigned into two groups: six received 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSPs, and 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, with soluble time of 48 h or more in vitro; two swine received Gelpart GSPs (G-GSPs) with insoluble time of 14 days as a control. Transarterial chemoembolization was performed on two branches of the hepatic artery per swine. RM-GSPs heated at temperatures of 110-138{sup o}C were soluble. Mean soluble times of the RM-GSPs increased with higher temperature. Hepatic branches embolized with G-GSP remained occluded after 6 days, and development of collateral pathways was observed after 3 days. Hepatic branches embolized with 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSP and 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSP remained occluded for 4 h, and recanalization was observed after 1 day. Hepatic branches embolized with 138{sup o}C/50RM-GS remained occluded for 1 day, and recanalization was observed after 2 days with no development of collateral pathways. In RM-GSs with various soluble times that were prepared by modulating the heating temperature, 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSP was the soluble GSP with the longest occlusion time without inducing development of collateral pathways.

  14. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Byung Kwon; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Joon Bum

    2016-01-01

    Background Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV) and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years) who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29). Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12), pseudoaneurysm (n=1), or dissection (n=6) of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%), native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%), structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%), and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%). There were 3 early deaths (4.5%). During follow-up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months), there were 14 late deaths (21.2%), and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients. PMID:27525233

  15. [ENDOVASCULAR ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURISM REPAIR].

    PubMed

    Maĭstrenko, D N; Generalov, M I; Tarazov, P G; Zherebtsov, F K; Osovskikh, V V; Ivanov, A S; Oleshchuk, A N; Granov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed the single-center experience of treatment of 72 patients with abdominal aortic aneurisms and severe accompanied pathology. The aneurisms were repaired by stent-grafts. All the patients had abdominal aortic aneurisms with the diameters from 41 to 84 mm against the background of severe somatic pathology. It was a contraindication to planned open surgery. An installation of stent-graft was successful in all 72 follow-ups. It wasn't necessary to use a conversion to open surgery. The follow-up period consisted of 44,6?2,1 months. Control ultrasound and computer tomography studies hadn't revealed an increase of aneurism sack sizes or "eakages". A reduction of abdominal aortic aneurism sizes was noted in 37 patients on 4-5% during first year after operation. The stent-graft implantation extends the possibilities of abdominal aortic aneurism treatment for patients from a high surgical risk group. PMID:26234059

  16. Aortic dissection--an update.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata; Eagle, Kim A

    2005-06-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality requiring emergent diagnosis and therapy. Rapid advances in noninvasive imaging technology have facilitated the early diagnosis of this condition and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with chest, back, or abdominal pain. Emergent surgery is the treatment for patients with type A dissection while optimal medical therapy is appropriate in patients with uncomplicated type B dissection. Adequate beta-blockade is the cornerstone of medical therapy. Patients who survive acute aortic dissection need long-term medical therapy with beta-blockers and statins and appropriate serial imaging follow-up. Future advances in this field include biomarkers in the early diagnosis of acute aortic dissection and presymptomatic diagnosis with genetic screening. Overall patients with aortic dissection are at high risk for an adverse outcome and need to be managed aggressively in hospital and long term with frequent follow-up. PMID:15973249

  17. Comparison of SAPIEN 3 and SAPIEN XT transcatheter heart valve stent-frame expansion: evaluation using multi-slice computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kazuno, Yoshio; Maeno, Yoshio; Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Abramowitz, Yigal; Babak, Hariri; Kashif, Mohammad; Chakravarty, Tarun; Nakamura, Mamoo; Cheng, Wen; Friedman, John; Berman, Daniel; Makkar, Raj R.; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Aims Stent-frame morphology of the newer-generation, balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve (THV), the SAPIEN 3 (S3), after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. We evaluated the THV stent-frame morphology post TAVI of the S3 using multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) compared with the prior-generation THV, SAPIEN XT (S-XT). Methods and results A total of 94 consecutive participants of RESOLVE registry (NCT02318342) had MSCT after balloon-expandable TAVI (S3 = 39 and S-XT = 55). The morphology of the THV stent-frame was evaluated for expansion area and eccentricity at the THV-inflow, native annulus, mid-THV and THV-outflow levels. Mean %-expansion area for the S3 and the S-XT was 100.9 ± 5.7 and 96.1 ± 5.5%, respectively (P < 0.001). In the S3 group, the THV-inflow level had the largest value of %-expansion area, which decreased from THV-inflow to mid-THV level (105.2 ± 6.4 to 96.5 ± 5.9%, P < 0.001). However, in the S-XT group, %-expansion area increased from THV-inflow level to mid-THV level (93.2 ± 6.2 to 95.1 ± 6.1%, P = 0.0058). On nominal delivery balloon volume, the S3 in 88.5% of cases had overexpansion at the THV-inflow level. The observed degree of THV oversizing of the S3 was significantly lower than the S-XT (6.3 ± 8.6 vs. 11.8 ± 8.5%, P = 0.0027). Nonetheless, the incidence of post-procedural paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PVR) ≥ mild following the S3 TAVI was also significantly lower than the S-XT TAVI (17.9 vs. 43.6%, P = 0.014). Conclusion The newer-generation, balloon-expandable device, the S3, has a flared inflow morphology, whereas the prior-generation device, the S-XT, has relatively constrained inflow morphology post TAVI. This may contribute to a lesser degree of PVR with the S3. PMID:27002141

  18. Iterative Learning of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement in Mitral Valve Annulus Calcification: Management and Prevention of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Hulman, Michal; Bena, Martin; Artemiou, Panagiotis; Gasparovic, Ivo; Hudec, Vladan; Rajani, Ronak; Bapat, Vinayak

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter mitral valve replacement using balloon-expandable valves is an emerging technique for the treatment of patients with significant mitral regurgitation who have been judged to be inoperable owing to significant mitral valve annulus calcification. Although initial reports have been promising, there remains a lack of consensus as to how to plan for transcatheter mitral valve replacement deployment in terms of appropriateness, sizing, and positioning to mitigate the risks of valve displacement and paravalvular regurgitation. We describe two cases of transcatheter mitral valve replacement in patients with significant mitral valve annulus calcification. The first was complicated by valve displacement into the left atrium, which was successfully managed by surgical redeployment and fixation. The second case was thereafter performed successfully using iterative learning and the application of specific preprocedural planning techniques acquired from a root cause analysis of the first case. We describe our experience with both cases and the specific planning principles required to prevent transcatheter mitral valve replacement displacement in patients with mitral valve annulus calcification. PMID:27645964

  19. Dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs in circulating osteogenic progenitor cells obtained from patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kan; Takahashi, Yuji; Osaki, Takuya; Nasu, Takahito; Tamada, Makiko; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Morino, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    CAVD (calcific aortic valve disease) is the defining feature of AS (aortic stenosis). The present study aimed to determine whether expression of ossification-related miRNAs is related to differentiation intro COPCs (circulating osteogenic progenitor cells) in patients with CAVD. The present study included 46 patients with AS and 46 controls. Twenty-nine patients underwent surgical AVR (aortic valve replacement) and 17 underwent TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The number of COPCs was higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). Levels of miR-30c were higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01), whereas levels of miR-106a, miR-148a, miR-204, miR-211, miR-31 and miR-424 were lower in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). The number of COPCs and levels of osteocalcin protein in COPCs were positively correlated with levels of miR-30a and negatively correlated with levels of the remaining miRNAs (all P<0.05). The degree of aortic valve calcification was weakly positively correlated with the number of COPCs and miR-30c levels. The number of COPCs and miR-30c levels were decreased after surgery, whereas levels of the remaining miRNAs were increased (all P<0.05). Changes in these levels were greater after AVR than after TAVI (all P<0.05). In vitro study using cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells transfected with each ossification-related miRNA showed that these miRNAs controlled levels of osteocalcin protein. In conclusion, dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs may be related to the differentiation into COPCs and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of CAVD. PMID:27129184

  20. Transcatheter Closure of Patent Foramen Ovale in Patients with Platypnea-Orthodeoxia: Results of a Multicentric French Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P. Lambert, V.; Godart, F.; Legendre, A.; Petit, J.; Bourlon, F.; Geeter, B. de; Petit, A.; Monrozier, B.; Rossignol, A.M.; Jimenez, M.; Crochet, D.; Choussat, A.; Rey, C.; Losay, J.

    2005-04-15

    Background. Dyspnea and the decrease in arterial saturation in the upright position in elderly subjects is described as platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome (POS). POS is secondary to the occurrence of an atrial right-to-left shunt through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Methods. This French multicentric study reports on 78 patients (mean age 67 {+-} 11.3 years) with POS who had transcatheter closure of the PFO; frequently associated diseases were pneumonectomy (n = 36) and an ascending aortic aneurysm (n = 11). In all patients, the diagnosis was confirmed by transthoracic or/and transesophageal echocardiography. Five different closure devices were used: Amplatz (n = 45), Cardioseal (n = 13), Sideris (n = 11), Das Angel Wings (n = 8) and Starflex (n = 1). Closure was successful in 76 patients (97%). Results. Oxygen saturation increased immediately after occlusion from 84.6 {+-} 10.7% to 95.1 {+-} 6.4% (p < 0.001) and dyspnea improved from grade 2.7 {+-} 0.7 to grade 1 {+-} 1 (p < 0.001). A small residual shunt was immediately observed in 5 patients (3 with the Cardioseal device, 1 with the Sideris and 1 with the Amplatz) leading to the implantation of a second device in one case (Cardioseal). Two early deaths occurred unrelated to the procedure (one due to sepsis probably related to pneumonectomy, another due to respiratory insufficiency). Other complications were: a small shunt between the aorta and the left atrium, two atrial fibrillations and a left-sided thrombus which disappeared with anticoagulant therapy. At a mean follow-up of 15 {+-} 12 months, there were 7 late deaths related to the underlying disease. Conclusion. Percutaneous occlusion of the foramen ovale is safe and gives excellent results thanks to continuing improvement in available devices. This technique enables some patients in an unstable condition to avoid a surgical closure.

  1. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  2. Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Ruptured Occipital Arterial Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Tsuge, Yusuke; Kojima, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Haruo

    2011-02-15

    Two cases of ruptured aneurysms in the posterior cervical regions associated with type-1 neurofibromatosis treated by transcatheter embolization are reported. Patients presented with acute onset of swelling and pain in the affected areas. Emergently performed contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated aneurysms and large hematomas widespread in the posterior cervical regions. Angiography revealed aneurysms and extravasations of the occipital artery. Patients were successfully treated by percutaneous transcatheter arterial microcoil embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization therapy was found to be an effective method for treating aneurysmal rupture in the posterior cervical regions occurring in association with type-1 neurofibromatosis. A literature review revealed that rupture of an occipital arterial aneurysm, in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1, has not been reported previously.

  3. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  4. Ascending Aortic Slide for Interrupted Aortic Arch Repair.

    PubMed

    Urencio, Miguel; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Greenleaf, Chris E; Aru, Giorgio; Salazar, Jorge D

    2016-09-01

    For repair of interrupted aortic arch, unfavorable anatomy challenges a tension-free anastomosis. We describe a useful alternative surgical technique used in five neonates/infants, involving splitting the ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the arch origin, leftward and posterior "sliding" of the flap with anastomosis to the distal arch creating a native tissue bridge, and reconstruction with a patch. With wide interruption gaps between proximal and distal aortic portions, the ascending aortic slide is a safe and reproducible technique, providing a tension-free native tissue bridge with potential for growth, and a scaffold for patch augmentation in biventricular hearts, or for Norwood stage I in univentricular palliation. PMID:27587504

  5. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  6. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  7. Pancreatic tissue damage by transcatheter arterial embolization for hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Khan, K N; Nakata, K; Shima, M; Kusumoto, Y; Ishii, N; Koji, T; Nagataki, S

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the serial changes in serum pancreatic enzyme activities by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in 20 hepatoma patients with liver cirrhosis in an attempt to evaluate the incidence of the pancreatic tissue damage by TAE. Serum amylase activities increased in two (10%) cases, elastase 1 levels in six (30%) cases, and trypsin and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) levels in each of five (25%) cases. Consequently, TAE resulted in the elevation of at least more than one serum pancreatic enzyme in eight (40%) of 20 cases, although none had clinical symptoms related to pancreatitis. When the adverse effect on the pancreatic tissue was compared among 6 cases of the superselective TAE and 14 cases of the nonsuperselective TAE, which were performed from the segmental and the nonsegmental hepatic arteries, respectively, the elevation of serum pancreatic enzymes was caused only by nonsuperselective TAE, not by superselective TAE. The volumes of Spongel and Lipiodol used or the injected doses of the anticancer agent mitomycin C were not different between the two groups. These results indicate that TAE for the treatment of hepatoma frequently causes pancreatic tissue damage, and the position of the inserted catheter tip is very important to avoid the pancreatic tissue damage by TAE.

  8. Comparison of methods for transcatheter fragmentation of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J P; Oz, M C; Chuck, R S; Treat, M R

    1989-01-01

    Alternative methods have been considered for treating cholelithiasis. Compared to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), a percutaneous endoscopic approach would be more invasive, but would offer the advantage of immediate stone removal without the need for subsequent drug therapy. We performed an in vitro comparison of three methods of transcatheter cholecystolithotripsy with regard to effectiveness of stone fragmentation, damage to the gallbladder mucosa, and compatibility with percutaneous delivery systems. The three devices used for cholecystolithotripsy were the ultrasonic lithotriptor (UL), the electrohydraulic lithotriptor (EHL), and the thulium-holmium-chromium: YAG laser (THC:YAG). The UL effectively fragmented all types of stones studied, although it is necessary to hold the stone against the tip of the probe. The EHL quickly fragmented noncalcified and pigment stones simply by placing the tip in the vicinity of the stone, but calcified stones had to be held in position near the electrode. The THC:YAG was effective at fragmenting each type of stone, but the number of pulses required was quite large, corresponding to 7 min for some stones. The EHL had the most capacity for mucosal damage, followed by the THC:YAG laser. The UL produced no mucosal damage at the exposure times tested. The UL is not compatible with flexible endoscopes while the EHL and the THC:YAG are. Because of the specific advantages and disadvantages of each device, a combination of devices may be required for successful clinical cholecystolithotripsy.

  9. Clinicopathologic Features and Results of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Jianping; Chen Wei; Li Jiaping; Zhuang Wenquan; Huang Yonghui; Huang Zhaomin; Yang Jianyong

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for osteosarcoma and to describe the clinicopathologic features produced by TACE as well as the effect of different embolic materials. Methods. From January 1998 to December 2003, preoperative TACE was carried out in 32 patients. The preoperative and postoperative clinical response, levels of alkaline phosphatase (AKP), leukocyte count, and clinicopathologic features were recorded. We also compared the effect of different embolic materials: adriblastine gelatin microspheres, anhydrous alcohol, common bletilla tuber, and gelatin sponge particles. Results. The levels of AKP were significantly decreased after treatment (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference in the leukocyte count. Large areas of necrosis were found histologically within 85.5% tumors after TACE. Embolic agents such as adriblastine microspheres, anhydrous alcohol, and common bletilla tuber have better clinical effects than gelatin sponge particles, but there was no significant difference among the first three embolic materials. After treatment, no serious complications were noted. During successful follow-up for 86 months, the survival rate after TACE at 1, 2, and 5 years was 95.5%, 72%, and 42% respectively. Conclusion. TACE accelerated tumor necrosis and shrank the tumor volume, thus making adequate tumor resection possible. The optimal time to operate is 10-14 days after TACE. TACE in combination with limb salvage surgery and postoperative periodical chemotherapy may be beneficial for increasing local control rates.

  10. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies.

  11. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Tumor Seeding in the Chest Wall After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Shibata, Toyomichi; Maetani, Yoji; Kubo, Takeshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Itoh, Kyo

    2006-06-15

    Tumor seeding in the chest wall was depicted at follow-up CT obtained 9 months after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed, injecting emulsion of 10 mg of epirubicin and 1 ml of iodized oil followed by gelatin sponge particles via the microcatheter placed in the right eleventh intercostal artery. The patient died of tumor growth in the liver one year after the embolization, but no progression of the tumor seeding was noted during the follow-up period. We conclude that transcatheter arterial embolization was effective for the control of tumor seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. Transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale using the internal jugular venous approach.

    PubMed

    Węglarz, Przemysław; Konarska-Kuszewska, Ewa; Zębik, Tadeusz; Kuszewski, Piotr; Drzewiecka-Gerber, Agnieszka; Motyka, Marek; Ludyga, Tomasz; Bajor, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale is routinely performed using the transfemoral approach, which is safe and technically easy. Our case represents the rare situation where the procedure needs to be performed using the right internal jugular venous approach. According to our best knowledge this is the first report of a patent foramen ovale closure procedure with access through the internal jugular with necessity to advance the guide wire and transseptal sheath into the left ventricle. Developing alternative techniques of transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure seems to be especially important in rare cases where transfemoral access is unavailable.

  13. Transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale using the internal jugular venous approach

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Przemysław; Konarska-Kuszewska, Ewa; Zębik, Tadeusz; Drzewiecka-Gerber, Agnieszka; Motyka, Marek; Ludyga, Tomasz; Bajor, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale is routinely performed using the transfemoral approach, which is safe and technically easy. Our case represents the rare situation where the procedure needs to be performed using the right internal jugular venous approach. According to our best knowledge this is the first report of a patent foramen ovale closure procedure with access through the internal jugular with necessity to advance the guide wire and transseptal sheath into the left ventricle. Developing alternative techniques of transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure seems to be especially important in rare cases where transfemoral access is unavailable. PMID:25061460

  14. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Large Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm with Mechanically Detachable Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Fujimoto, Yukinori; Jin, Myeong Jun; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2004-03-15

    Large aneurysms (5.5 and 3.6 cm in diameter) arising from the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery located just near the main superior mesenteric artery were incidentally diagnosed in two patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization, packing mechanically detachable coils and microcoils into the aneurysms, was performed while the inflated balloon catheter was placed near the neck of the aneurysms. The procedures were successfully performed and no aneurysmal rupture or bowel ischemia was noted during follow-up. Balloon-assisted transcatheter arterial embolization with mechanically detachable coils seems to be an effective and safe treatment for large inferior pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms.

  15. Aortic regurgitation caused by rupture of the abnormal fibrous band between the aortic valve and aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Yamada, Akitoshi; Sato, Masanobu

    2011-07-01

    This report documents the sudden onset of aortic regurgitation (AR) by an exceptional cause. A 68-year-old woman suddenly experienced general fatigue, and AR was diagnosed. One year later, we performed aortic valve replacement. At surgery, three aortic cusps with a larger noncoronary cusp had prolapsed along with a free-floating fibrous band that had previously anchored the cusp to the aortic wall. Its rupture had induced the sudden onset of AR. There was no sign of infectious endocarditis. We performed successful aortic valve replacement. PMID:21751110

  16. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  17. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  18. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  19. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved. Images Fig. 11. Fig. 13. PMID:1130881

  20. [Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Ryugo, Masahiro; Takasaki, Taiichi

    2016-02-01

    A 69-year-old woman with general fatigue was admitted to our hospital for further examination of mediastinal lymph node swelling. Mediastinal lymph node sampling was planned. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed severe aortic regurgitation, and aortic valve replacement combined with mediastinal lymph node sampling was performed. Following lymph node sampling, the ascending aorta was opened, and the aortic valve was found to be quadricuspid. An accessory cusp was existed between the left coronary cusp and the non coronary cusp. Aortic valve replacement was successfully performed. A quadricuspid aortic valve is a very rare anomaly. PMID:27075156

  1. [Remote results of reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm accompanied by aortic insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Al'sov, S A; Sirota, D A; Khvan, D S; Liashenko, M M; Ponomarev, D N; Kadyrbaev, D Zh

    2015-01-01

    Valve-sparing operations on the aorta has recently been gaining ever increasing popularity due to more detailed study of physiology of the aortic root, as well as promising mid- and long-term results. The world practice uses various techniques making it possible to remove both ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic valve insufficiency. The authors herein describe and analyse their experience in performing reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and concomitant aortic insufficiency. Specialists of the clinic of the Novosibirsk Scientific Research Institute for Circulatory Pathology during the period from 2003 to 2013 performed a total of 77 operations of reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and pronounced aortic valve insufficiency. The majority of patients were men (57 males and 20 females), mean age 53.1±12.2 years (range 21-72). 80% of cases had NYHA functional class II-III circulatory insufficiency (degree 2.3±0.7). Preoperative examination revealed in the majority of patients (97.4%) moderate-to-severe aortic valve insufficiency and ascending aortic aneurysm. All patients underwent reimplantation of the aortic valve. The duration of artificial circulation amounted to 202.4±33 minutes, with the average time of aortic occlusion being 164±28 min. Accompanying procedures (annuloplasty of the mitral valve and/or coronary aortic bypass grafting) were performed in 12 (15.6%) cases. Additional plasty of valvular cusps was carried out in 9 (11.7%) patients, with rethoracotomy required in 5 (6.4%) cases due to haemorrhage. The average period of follow up amounted to 53.3±8.5 (3-115) months. During this time total survival amounted to 91%, with freedom from aortic valve prosthetic repair equalling 93%. The obtained findings suggest that aortic valve reimplantation into the prosthesis is a safe intervention and associated with a comparatively low level of operative lethality. Moderate aortic

  2. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  3. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  4. Antegrade transcatheter closure of coronary artery fistulae using vascular occlusion devices.

    PubMed

    Pedra, C A; Pihkala, J; Nykanen, D G; Benson, L N

    2000-01-01

    Two children (a 9 year old boy and a 2.5 year old girl) with coronary artery fistulae communicating with the right ventricle underwent successful transcatheter occlusion using an antegrade technique. A Rashkind double umbrella device was used in one case and an Amplatzer duct occluder in the other. PMID:10618344

  5. Transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure and radiofrequency ablation of right atrial tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Manola, Šime; Bernat, Robert; Pavlović, Nikola; Radeljić, Vjekoslav; Bulj, Nikola; Trbušić, Matias

    2014-12-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) can be found in approximately 25% of adult population. Transcatheter closure of PFO is a potential option in selected patients with PFO. We report a case of a female patient that underwent mapping and catheter ablation of atrial tachycardia and PFO closure in the same procedure.

  6. Transcatheter Embolization of a Large Symptomatic Pelvic Arteriovenous Malformation with Glubran 2 Acrylic Glue

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, R.; Angelopoulos, G. Konda, D.; Messina, M.; Chiocchi, M.; Perretta, T.; Simonetti, G.

    2008-09-15

    A young patient affected by a pelvic arteriovenous malformation (pAVM) with recurrent episodes of hematuria following exercise, underwent transcatheter embolization using Glubran 2 acrylic glue (GEM, Viareggio, Italy). All branches of the pAVM were successfully occluded. The patient showed prompt resolution of symptoms and persistent occlusion of the pAVM at the 6 month follow-up.

  7. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  8. Surgical repair for aortic dissection accompanying a right-sided aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Obitsu, Yukio; Koizumi, Nobusato; Iwahashi, Toru; Saiki, Naozumi; Shigematsu, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Aortic anomaly in which a right-sided aortic arch associated with Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery is rare. The present report describes a patient with type-B aortic dissection accompanying aortic anomalies consisting of right-sided aortic arch and the left common carotid and left subclavian artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. As dissecting aortic aneurysm diameter increased rapidly, Single-stage surgical repair of extensive thoracic aorta was performed through median sternotomy and right posterolateral fifth intercostal thoracotomy, yielding favorable results. Our surgical procedures are discussed.

  9. Surgical repair for aortic dissection accompanying a right-sided aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aortic anomaly in which a right-sided aortic arch associated with Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery is rare. The present report describes a patient with type-B aortic dissection accompanying aortic anomalies consisting of right-sided aortic arch and the left common carotid and left subclavian artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. As dissecting aortic aneurysm diameter increased rapidly, Single-stage surgical repair of extensive thoracic aorta was performed through median sternotomy and right posterolateral fifth intercostal thoracotomy, yielding favorable results. Our surgical procedures are discussed. PMID:20459743

  10. Traumatic aortic regurgitation combined with descending aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siho; Park, Joon Suk; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Kyung Ho; Yang, Woo-In; Sung, Jung-Hoon; Kim, In Jai; Lim, Sang-Wook; Cha, Dong-Hun; Moon, Jae-Youn

    2014-09-23

    Rupture of the aorta is a relatively rare complication of blunt chest trauma, and traumatic rupture of the aortic valve is even rarer. Even though both result from blunt chest trauma, the causative mechanisms of aortic valve injury differ from those of descending aortic rupture. There are no previous reports in the literature of simultaneous injuries to both the descending aorta and the aortic valve. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with traumatic aortic regurgitation combined with traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the aortic isthmus following blunt chest trauma, and its successful repair with a hybrid surgical strategy.

  11. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Conor F.; Greenberg, Michael D.; Sarin, Shawn; Trachiotis, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Stanford Type A aortic dissection is a rapidly progressing disease process that is often fatal without emergent surgical repair. A small proportion of Type A dissections go undiagnosed in the acute phase and are found upon delayed presentation of symptoms or incidentally. These chronic lesions may have a distinct natural history that may have a better prognosis and could potentially be managed differently then those presenting acutely. The method of repair depends on location and extent of the false lumen, as well as involvement of critical structures and branch arteries. Surgical repair techniques similar to those employed for acute dissection management are currently first-line therapy for chronic cases that involve the aortic valve, sinuses of Valsalva, coronary arteries, and supra-aortic branch arteries. In patients with high-risk for surgery, endovascular repairs have been successful, and active development of delivery systems and grafts will continue to enhance outcomes. We present two cases of chronic Type A aortic dissection and review the current literature.

  12. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.

  13. Meta-analysis: therapeutic effect of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with compound kushen injection in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qizhe; Ma, Wenli; Gao, Yuan; Zheng, Wenling; Zhang, Bao; Peng, Yifei

    2012-01-01

    Compound Kushen Injection (CKI) is Sophora Flavescens and Heterosmilacis Japonicae extract. Meta-analysis confirmed that CKI plus transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is more superior to TACE alone for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (UHCC) patients. PMID:23983333

  14. Transcatheter Embolization of a Coronary Fistula Originating from the Left Anterior Descending Artery by Using N-Butyl 2-Cyanoacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Karagoz, Tevfik; Celiker, Alpay E-mail: tkaraqoz@hacettepe.edu.tr; Cil, Barbaros; Cekirge, Saruhan

    2004-11-15

    In this report, we describe a successful percutaneous transcatheter n-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate embolization of a coronary fistula originating from the left anterior descending artery in an adolescent with unexpected recurrent attacks of myocardial ischemia.

  15. Decellularized aortic homografts for aortic valve and aorta ascendens replacement†

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Igor; Horke, Alexander; Cebotari, Serghei; Sarikouch, Samir; Boethig, Dietmar; Breymann, Thomas; Beerbaum, Philipp; Bertram, Harald; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Theodoridis, Karolina; Bobylev, Dmitry; Cheptanaru, Eduard; Ciubotaru, Anatol; Haverich, Axel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The choice of valve prosthesis for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young patients is challenging. Decellularized pulmonary homografts (DPHs) have shown excellent results in pulmonary position. Here, we report our early clinical results using decellularized aortic valve homografts (DAHs) for AVR in children and mainly young adults. METHODS This prospective observational study included all 69 patients (44 males) operated from February 2008 to September 2015, with a mean age of 19.7 ± 14.6 years (range 0.2–65.3 years). In 18 patients, a long DAH was used for simultaneous replacement of a dilated ascending aorta as an extended aortic root replacement (EARR). Four patients received simultaneous pulmonary valve replacement with DPH. RESULTS Thirty-nine patients (57%) had a total of 62 previous operations. The mean aortic cross-clamp time in isolated cases was 129 ± 41 min. There was 1 conduit-unrelated death. The mean DAH diameter was 22.4 ± 3.7 mm (range, 10–29 mm), the average peak gradient was 14 ± 15 mmHg and the mean aortic regurgitation grade (0.5 = trace, 1 = mild) was 0.6 ± 0.5. The mean effective orifice area (EOA) of 25 mm diameter DAH was 3.07 ± 0.7 cm2. DAH annulus z-values were 1.1 ± 1.1 at implantation and 0.7 ± 1.3 at the last follow-up. The last mean left ventricle ejection fraction and left ventricle end diastolic volume index was 63 ± 7% and 78 ± 16 ml/m2 body surface area, respectively. To date, no dilatation has been observed at any level of the graft during follow-up; however, the observational time is short (140.4 years in total, mean 2.0 ± 1.8 years, maximum 7.6 years). One small DAH (10 mm at implantation) had to be explanted due to subvalvular stenosis and developing regurgitation after 4.5 years and was replaced with a 17 mm DAH without complication. No calcification of the explanted graft was noticed intraoperatively and after histological analysis, which revealed extensive recellularization without inflammation

  16. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  17. Subtle-discrete aortic dissection without bulging of the aortic wall. A rare but lethal lesion.

    PubMed

    Kalogerakos, Paris Dimitrios; Kampitakis, Emmanouil; Pavlopoulos, Dionisios; Chalkiadakis, George; Lazopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    We report a subtle-discrete aortic dissection, without bulging of the aortic wall or aneurysm or valve pathology or periaortic effusion, which resulted in a lethal cardiac tamponade to a 35-year-old male. PMID:27357491

  18. Spring retractor: a new adjunct for aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Izzat, Mohammad Bashar

    2011-07-01

    We describe a new aortic retractor that is effective in maintaining aortic root geometry and providing for adequate intraoperative visual valve assessment, and therefore enables the surgeon to perform precise aortic valve repair or replacement procedures.

  19. Transcatheter Heart Valves: Specific Characteristics and Potential Shortcomings.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, J; Van Linden, A; Moellmann, H; Walther, T; Kempfert, J

    2013-12-01

    During the past years TAVI has evolved to a standard technique for the treatment of high risk patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. Worldwide the number of TAVI procedures is increasing exponentially. In this context both the transapical antegrade (TA) and the transfemoral retrograde (TF) approach are predominantly used and can be considered as safe and reproducible access sites for TAVI interventions. As a new technology TAVI is in a constant progress regarding the development of new devices. While in the first years only the Edwards SAPIEN™ and the Medtronic CoreValve™ prostheses were commercial available, recently additional devices obtained CE-mark approval and others have entered initial clinical trials. In addition to enhance the treatment options in general, the main driving factor to further develop new device iterations is to solve the drawbacks of the current TAVI systems: paravalvular leaks, occurrence of AV-blocks and the lack of full repositionability.

  20. Type B Aortic Dissection Repair Using a Thoraflex Hybrid Prosthesis in a Complex Aortic Arch Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Moussa Abi; Gomez-Sanchez, Mario; Chaufour, Xavier; Marcheix, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is recognized as an attractive option to treat complicated Type B aortic dissection. Nevertheless, TEVAR is not always technically possible. We report the case of a 53-year-old male with complicated Type B aortic dissection, in the setting of a complex anomalous aortic arch anatomy with an aneurysmal aberrant right subclavian artery. He was successfully treated by the frozen elephant trunk technique using the Thoraflex hybrid graft.

  1. Severe Aortic Stenosis Associated with Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kim, Song Soo; Sun, Byung Joo; Jin, Sun Ah; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Siwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is an extremely rare form of congenital aortic valvular abnormality. Although UAV shows similar clinical characteristics to bicuspid aortic valve, the clinical symptoms develop at earlier age and progress at a faster pace in UAV. In this report, we are presenting a 42-year-old male with severe aortic stenosis associated with unicommissural UAV. The patients underwent a successful Bentall operation. PMID:27721957

  2. Contemporary management of aortic stenosis: surgical aortic valve replacement remains the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Walther, Thomas; Blumenstein, Johannes; van Linden, Arnaud; Kempfert, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    Aortic valve disease is the most frequent acquired heart valve lesion in humans. In western communities, approximately 90% of patients present with aortic stenosis (AS), predominantly of a calcific degenerative aetiology. The remaining approximately 10% of patients predominantly present with aortic valve incompetence.

  3. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-01-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches. PMID:971387

  4. Aortic root dilatation in young men with normally functioning bicuspid aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, S; Sorbo, M; Marin, M; Palisi, M; Scognamiglio, R; Thiene, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the dimensions of the aortic root in a selected population of young males with isolated normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve.
DESIGN AND SETTING—Echocardiographic and Doppler evaluation of conscripts with bicuspid aortic valve at the time of military pre-enrolment screening in two military hospitals.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—66 consecutive young men with a normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve were studied to assess aortic size at four aortic levels: annulus, sinuses of Valsalva, supra-aortic ridge, and proximal ascending aorta; 70 consecutive normal young subjects, matched for age and body surface area, were used as controls.
RESULTS—In men with a bicuspid aortic valve, the diameter of the aortic root was significantly larger than in controls at the sinuses (3.16 (0.37) v 2.87 (0.31) cm, p < 0.001), at the supra-aortic ridge (2.64 (0.46) v 2.47 (0.28) cm, p = 0.01), and at the level of the proximal ascending aorta (3.12 (0.48) v 2.69 (0.28) cm, p < 0.001). The prevalence of aortic root dilatation was 7.5% at the annulus (5/66), 19.6% at the sinuses (13/66), 15% at the supra-aortic ridge (10/66), and 43.9% at the ascending aorta (29/66); 32 subjects (48%) had aortic root dimensions comparable with controls, while 34 (52%) had definitely abnormal aortic root dimensions.
CONCLUSIONS—Aortic root enlargement in people with a bicuspid aortic valve occurs independently of haemodynamic abnormalities, age, and body size. However, there appear to be different subgroups of young adults with bicuspid aortic valves, one of which is characterised by aortic dilatation, possibly caused by a congenital abnormality of the aortic wall.


Keywords: bicuspid aortic valve; aortic root dilatation PMID:10377302

  5. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romêo, Daniela de Araújo; Escudero, Carlos Caparrós; Vázquez, Rosa María Lepe; Falcón, María Del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease.

  6. Aortic root disease in athletes: aortic root dilation, anomalous coronary artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yim, Eugene Sun

    2013-08-01

    Two professional athletes in the U.S. National Basketball Association required surgery for aortic root dilation in 2012. These cases have attracted attention in sports medicine to the importance of aortic root disease in athletes. In addition to aortic root dilation, other forms of aortic disease include anomalous coronary artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and Marfan's syndrome. In this review, electronic database literature searches were performed using the terms "aortic root" and "athletes." The literature search produced 122 manuscripts. Of these, 22 were on aortic root dilation, 21 on anomalous coronary arteries, 12 on bicuspid aortic valves, and 8 on Marfan's syndrome. Aortic root dilation is a condition involving pathologic dilation of the aortic root, which can lead to life-threatening sequelae. Prevalence of the condition among athletes and higher risk athletes in particular sports needs to be better delineated. Normative parameters for aortic root diameter in the general population are proportionate to anthropomorphic variables, but this has not been validated for athletes at the extremes of anthropomorphic indices. Although echocardiography is the favored screening modality, computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also used for diagnosis and surgical planning. Medical management has utilized beta-blockers, with more recent use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and statins. Indications for surgery are based on comorbidities, degree of dilation, and rate of progression. Management decisions for aortic root dilation in athletes are nuanced and will benefit from the development of evidence-based guidelines. Anomalous coronary artery is another form of aortic disease with relevance in athletes. Diagnosis has traditionally been through cardiac catheterization, but more recently has included evaluation with echocardiography, multislice CT, and MRI. Athletes with this

  7. WUnicuspid Aortic Valve- An Uncommon Anomaly With a Common Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sitwala, Puja; Abusara, Ashraf; Ladia, Vatsal; Ladia, Vatsal; Panchal, Hemang B; Raudat, Charles; Paul, Timir K

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV), which is a rare congenital anomaly, usually presents as aortic stenosis and/or aortic regurgitation. Here we present a case of UAV co-existent with an ascending aortic aneurysm. A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the hospital after two episodes of syncope. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed an ejection fraction of 62%, severely stenotic aortic valve, and moderate aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed calcification of the aortic valve, compatible with aortic stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 4.3 cm in diameter. He underwent successful aortic valve replacement and repair of ascending aortic aneurysm. He recovered well without any complications. This case suggests that any young patient who presents with syncope, aortic stenosis would be a differential and further workup by any available non-invasive modality needs to be performed.

  8. The role of transesophageal echocardiography in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Machen, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Aortic disease, when left untreated, is still associated with major morbidity and mortality. Aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm are the main reasons for performing aortic surgery procedures in the adult. Imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a key role in the preoperative evaluation. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has become a safe and invaluable perioperative imaging tool for aortic disease over the past decade with high sensitivity and specificity. TEE can increase patient safety and improve overall patient outcome in aortic surgery. Especially during endovascular aortic repair, TEE is more sensitive than other imaging modalities in diagnosing complications such as graft endoleaks. Newer echocardiographic techniques such as three-dimensional (3D) TEE and contrast-enhanced TEE are emerging and seem to have a valuable role especially in aortic dissection repair and endovascular aortic stent procedures. In the absence of contraindications, TEE should generally be performed during aortic surgery and endovascular aortic procedures. PMID:27650342

  9. [Surgical aspects of acute aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Laas, J; Heinemann, M; Jurmann, M; Borst, H G

    1992-12-01

    This paper highlights some of the surgical aspects of acute aortic dissections such as: emergency diagnosis, indications for surgery, reconstructive operative techniques, malperfusion phenomena and necessity for follow-up. Aortic dissection is caused by an intimal tear, called the "entry", and subsequent splitting of the media by the stream of blood. Two lumina are thus created, which may communicate through "re-entries". As this creates severe weakness of the aortic wall, rupture and/or dilatation are the imminent dangers of acute aortic dissection. Acute aortic dissection type A, by definition involving the ascending aorta (Figures 1 and 2), is an absolute indication for emergency surgical treatment, because its natural history shows an extremely poor outcome (Figure 3). Due to impending (intrapericardial) aortic rupture, it may be necessary to limit diagnostic procedures to a minimum. Transesophageal echocardiography is the method of choice for establishing a quick, precise and reliable diagnosis (Figure 4). In stable patients, computed tomography gives additional information about aortic diameters or sites of extrapericardial perforation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) shows perfusion of the lumina and dependent organs. The surgical strategy in acute aortic dissection type A aims at replacement of the ascending aorta. Reconstructive techniques have to be considered, especially in aortic valve regurgitation without annuloectasia (Figures 5 and 6). In recent times, the use of GRF tissue glue has reduced the need for teflon felt. Involvement of the aortic arch should be treated aggressively up to the point of total arch replacement in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest as part of the primary procedure (Figure 7). Malperfusion phenomena of aortic branches remain risk-factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Aortic Stiffness, Cerebrovascular Dysfunction, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and cognitive decline. This mini-review focuses on relations of aortic stiffness with microvascular dysfunction and discusses the contribution of abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics to cerebrovascular damage and cognitive decline. We also provide a rationale for considering aortic stiffness as a putative and important contributor to memory impairment in older individuals. Summary Aging is associated with stiffening of the aorta but not the muscular arteries, which reduces wave reflection and increases the transmission of pulsatility into the periphery. Aortic stiffening thereby impairs a protective mechanism that shields the peripheral microcirculation from excessive pulsatility within downstream target organs. Beyond midlife, aortic stiffness increases rapidly and exposes the cerebral microcirculation to abnormal pulsatile mechanical forces that are associated with microvascular damage and remodeling in the brain. Aortic stiffening and high-flow pulsatility are associated with alterations in the microvasculature of the brain; however, a mechanistic link between aortic stiffness and memory has not been established. We showed that in a community-based sample of older individuals, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities - markers of cerebrovascular remodeling and damage - mediated the relation between higher aortic stiffness and lower performance on memory function tests. These data suggest that microvascular and white matter damage associated with excessive aortic stiffness contribute to impaired memory function with advancing age. Key Messages Increasing evidence suggests that vascular etiologies - including aortic stiffness and microvascular damage - contribute to memory impairment and the pathogenesis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Interventions that reduce aortic stiffness may delay memory decline among older individuals. PMID:27752478

  11. Recanalization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm After Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Using N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Keiji; Ushijima, Yasuhiro Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Yamaji, Yukiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-02-15

    A 65-year-old woman who had been diagnosed as having microscopic polyangiitis developed sudden abdominal pain and entered a state of shock. Abdominal CT showed massive hemoperitoneum, and emergent angiography revealed a ruptured splenic artery aneurysm. After direct catheterization attempts failed due to tortuous vessels and angiospasm, transcatheter arterial embolization using an n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-lipiodol mixture was successfully performed. Fifty days later, the patient developed sudden abdominal pain again. Repeated angiography demonstrated recanalization of the splenic artery and splenic artery aneurysm. This time, the recanalized aneurysm was embolized using metallic coils with the isolation method. Physicians should keep in mind that recanalization can occur after transcatheter arterial embolization using N-butyl cyanoacrylate, which has been used as a permanent embolic agent.

  12. Percutaneous Transcatheter Embolization of a Large Pulmonary Arteriovenous Fistula with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Seitun, Sara; Rossi, Giovanni A.

    2007-04-15

    Percutaneous transcatheter embolization has become the treatment of choice for pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas (PAVFs), in most cases replacing surgical intervention. However, while 'classic' devices, such as intravascular coils and detachable balloons, have proved to be successful for interventional occlusions of small or medium-sized PAVFs, they are not ideal in larger fistulas because of the risk for embolization to the systemic circulation. We describe the case of a 61-year-old woman with a symptomatic huge solitary pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (4.5 cm in diameter), occupying part of the lung in the lower right lobe with two feeding arteries (10 and 4 mm in diameter, respectively), who underwent successful transcatheter closure with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug, a new device designed for the occlusion of vascular abnormalities.

  13. Transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Cercueil, J P; Krausé, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, transcatheter arterial embolization has become the first-line therapy for the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic hemostasis. Advances in catheter-based techniques and newer embolic agents, as well as recognition of the effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment options, have expanded the role of interventional radiology in the treatment of bleeding for a variety of indications. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a fast, safe, and effective minimally invasive alternative to surgery, when endoscopic treatment fails to control acute bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the role of arterial embolization in the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and summarizes the literature evidence on the outcomes of endovascular therapy in such a setting.

  14. Spontaneous Bleeding in Pancreatitis Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Coil Embolization: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Veit; Rasch, Sebastian; Gaa, Jochen; Schmid, Roland M.; Algül, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives A rare, but life-threatening complication in pancreatitis is a spontaneous bleeding from intestinal vessels with or without previous formation of (pseudo-) aneurysms. And yet, the optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies remain unclear. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients with pancreatitis and intraabdominal bleeding at a German tertiary referral center between January 2002 and December 2012. Results Bleeding occurred in <1% (14/3,421) of patients with pancreatitis. Most involved vessels were arteria lienalis, arteria gastroduodenalis, and arteria pancreaticoduodenalis. All bleedings could be stopped by transcatheter arterial coil embolization. Recurrent bleeding after coil embolization occurred in 2/14 (14%) patients. Conclusions In cases of intraabdominal hemorrhage in patients with pancreatitis, transcatheter arterial coil embolization should be considered as the first interventional procedure. PMID:23977371

  15. Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve associated with aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac anomaly. More than half of the patients with this abnormality will develop aortic insufficiency in adulthood. It is vital that patients with quadricuspid aortic valve who present with progressive aortic regurgitation undergo valve replacement or repair at appropriate time. Here, we present two cases of quadricuspid aortic valve. We first describe a 58-year-old man who had mitral regurgitation and ascending aorta dilatation with quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve plasty and recovered well. The second patient is a 20-year-old asymptomatic boy who has been closely followed up and has not received any surgical treatment. PMID:23587156

  16. Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve associated with aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiaquan; Zhang, Junwen; Wu, Shubin; Zhang, Yunjiao; Ding, Fangbao; Mei, Ju

    2013-01-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac anomaly. More than half of the patients with this abnormality will develop aortic insufficiency in adulthood. It is vital that patients with quadricuspid aortic valve who present with progressive aortic regurgitation undergo valve replacement or repair at appropriate time. Here, we present two cases of quadricuspid aortic valve. We first describe a 58-year-old man who had mitral regurgitation and ascending aorta dilatation with quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve plasty and recovered well. The second patient is a 20-year-old asymptomatic boy who has been closely followed up and has not received any surgical treatment. PMID:23587156

  17. Defining the clinical need and indications: who are the right patients for transcatheter mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Heike; Squiers, John J; Arsalan, Mani; John, M; Dimaio, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) can be divided into two major etiologies, primary and secondary MR. Primary MR, also termed degenerative or organic MR, is a disease of the valve itself and is treated routinely by surgical repair in all but prohibitive risk patients. In these patients, transcatheter repair techniques, including edge to edge repair with the MitraClip device have been largely successful and widely adopted. Transcatheter placement of artificial chords has also been performed. The potential role for transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) in primary MR will likely be quite limited. Secondary or functional MR is due to a disease of the left ventricle and not the valve itself. The MR is a result of dilation of the left ventricle causing distraction of the papillary muscles with tethering of the mitral leaflets and lack of leaflet coaptation. Medical therapy is the mainstay treatment, with resynchronization used in appropriate patients. Surgical repair, usually with an undersized annuloplasty, is used in a limited number of patients. Transcatheter edge to edge repair is used extensively outside the US in secondary MR and is the subject of a pivotal trial in the US. However, it is in this group of patients with secondary MR that there is the largest clinical unmet need and, hence, the greatest potential opportunity for TMVR. At least ten TMVR platforms are in early feasibility, first in human, or preclinical trial stages. Four devices have cumulative early human experience in <100 patients. In this article, we discuss those patients most likely to benefit from TMVR and detail lessons learned from the first human studies regarding patient selection. PMID:27028332

  18. Transcatheter interventions for multiple lesions in adults with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Tahir; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnosis, surgery and interventional management have significantly changed the quality of life of patients with congenital heart disease. Historically, congenital heart disease patients with multiple cardiac lesions have been referred for surgery; however, with the advent of newer technologies and expertise, transcatheter treatment has evolved as an alternative option. A series of patients who underwent interventional procedures for multiple congenital heart disease lesions with excellent procedural and medium-term outcomes is reported. PMID:22826648

  19. Multiple Intrahepatic Artery Aneurysms in a Patient with Behcet's Disease: Use of Transcatheter Embolization for Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Irfan; Fotiadis, Nikolas I. Dilks, Phil; Kocher, Hemant M.; Fotheringham, Tim; Matson, Matthew

    2010-04-15

    Intrahepatic artery aneuryms are a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. We present the first case in the English literature of multiple intrahepatic artery aneuryms in a patient with Behcet's disease who presented acutely with rupture. The ruptured aneurysm was treated successfully with transcatheter arterial coil embolization-CT and clinical follow-up confirming a good result. We discuss the management dilemma with regard to prophylactic embolization of the numerous other small asymptomatic intrahepatic aneurysms in this same patient.

  20. Transcatheter embolization of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Bhatia, Vikram; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is extremely rare; even rarer is its association with pancreatitis. The authors report a case of PAVM causing recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis in a 46-year-old male. Patient refused surgery and was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization using liquid embolic agent (mixture of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate glue and lipiodol), which resulted in a significant decrease in the size of the PAVM. PMID:27081231

  1. Percutaneous Injection Therapy for a Peripheral Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Failed Transcatheter Coil Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyungwoo; Shin, Taebeom; Choi, Jinsu; Kim, Younghwan

    2008-09-15

    Coil embolization to occlude the feeding artery of a pseudoaneurysm is an effective treatment to control hemoptysis. However, a feeding artery of the pseudoaneurysm may not be identified at pulmonary angiography, resulting in a failure to obtain embolization. We describe here two cases of a Rasmussen aneurysm that was successfully treated with percutaneous injection of thrombin (case 1) and N-butyl cyanoacrylate (case 2) under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance after failed transcatheter coil embolization.

  2. Intractable oesophageal variceal bleeding caused by splenic arteriovenous fistula: treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Hung, C; Tseng, J; Lui, K; Wan, Y; Tsai, C; Shem, C; Wu, C

    1999-01-01

    We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. It was diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography, and obliterated with giant Gianturco steel coils.


Keywords: splenic arteriovenous fistula; gastrointestinal bleeding; transcatheter arterial embolization PMID:10435172

  3. Percutaneous Treatment of Sac Rupture in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Mangini, Monica Fontana, Federico; Nicotera, Paolo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) previously treated by EVAR. In the last year, two male patients with AAAs, treated 8 and 23 months ago with bifurcated stent-graft, were observed because of lumbar pain and hemorragic shock. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma; in both cases a type III endoleak was detected, in one case associated with a type II endoleak from the iliolumbar artery. The procedures were performed in the theater, in emergency. Type II endoleak was treated with transcatheter superselective glue injection; type III endoleaks were excluded by a stent-graft extension. The procedures were successful in both patients, with immediate hemodynamic stabilization. MDCT after the procedure showed complete exclusion of the aneurysms. In conclusion, endovascular treatment is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of ruptured AAAs previously treated by EVAR; this approach allows avoidance of surgical conversion, which is technical very challenging, with a high morbidity and mortality rate.

  4. Image-based mechanical analysis of stent deformation: concept and exemplary implementation for aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Hopf, Raoul; Pollok, Thomas; Russ, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Sündermann, Simon Harald; Hirsch, Sven; Mazza, Edoardo; Székely, Gábor; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    An approach for extracting the radial force load on an implanted stent from medical images is proposed. To exemplify the approach, a system is presented which computes a radial force estimation from computer tomography images acquired from patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The deformed shape of the implanted valve prosthesis' Nitinol frame is extracted from the images. A set of displacement vectors is computed that parameterizes the observed deformation. An iterative relaxation algorithm is employed to adapt the information extracted from the images to a finite-element model of the stent, and the radial components of the interaction forces between the stent and the tissue are extracted. For the evaluation of the method, tests were run using the clinical data from 21 patients. Stent modeling and extraction of the radial forces were successful in 18 cases. Synthetic test cases were generated, in addition, for assessing the sensitivity to the measurement errors. In a sensitivity analysis, the geometric error of the stent reconstruction was below 0.3 mm, which is below the image resolution. The distribution of the radial forces was qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable. An uncertainty remains in the quantitative evaluation of the radial forces due to the uncertainty in defining a radial direction on the deformed stent. With our approach, the mechanical situation of TAVI stents after the implantation can be studied in vivo, which may help to understand the mechanisms that lead to the complications and improve stent design. PMID:24626769

  5. Organ protection during aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kak Khee; Groeneveld, Menno; Lu, Joyce Ja-Ning; van Diemen, Pepijn; Jongkind, Vincent; Wisselink, Willem

    2016-09-01

    Open surgical repair of an aortic aneurysm requires aortic cross-clamping, resulting in temporary ischemia of all organs and tissues supplied by the aorta distal to the clamp. Major complications of open aneurysm repair due to aortic cross-clamping include renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and postoperative colonic ischemia in case of supra- and infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair. Ischemia-reperfusion injury results in excessive production of reactive oxygen species and in oxidative stress, which can lead to multiple organ failure. Several perioperative protective strategies have been suggested to preserve renal function during aortic cross-clamping, such as pharmacotherapy and therapeutic hypothermia of the kidneys. In this chapter, we will briefly discuss the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion injury and the preventative measures that can be taken to avoid abdominal organ injury. Finally, techniques to minimize the risk of complications during and after open aneurysm repair will be presented. PMID:27650341

  6. Successful management of para-aortic lymphocyst with laparoscopic fenestration.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Cortellini, P; Pavlidis, C; Simonazzi, M; Sebastio, N

    2000-04-01

    Para-aortic lymphocyst occasionally follows retroperitoneal para-aortic node dissection for neoplastic diseases. We present a case in which the leakage of chylous fluid and then a para-aortic lymphocyst followed right nephrectomy and para-aortic node dissection for kidney cancer. Our method of treatment utilized conservative management of chylous ascites and laparoscopic internal drainage of the retroperitoneal lymphocyst.

  7. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, M G A; Lloyd, G M; Bown, M J; Fishwick, G; London, N J; Sayers, R D

    2007-01-01

    The operative mortality following conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has not fallen significantly over the past two decades. Since its inception in 1991, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided an alternative to open AAA repair and perhaps an opportunity to improve operative mortality. Two recent large randomised trials have demonstrated the short and medium term benefit of EVAR over open AAA repair, although data on the long term efficacy of the technique are still lacking. This review aimed at providing an overview of EVAR and a discussion of the potential benefits and current limitations of the technique. PMID:17267674

  8. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  9. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  10. From Unicuspid to Quadricuspid: Influence of Aortic Valve Morphology on Aortic 3D Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Entezari, Pegah; Schnell, Susanne; Mahadevia, Riti; Malaisrie, Chris; McCarthy, Patrick; Mendelson, Marla; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of aortic valve morphology on aortic hemodynamicsbetweennormal tricuspid and congenitally anomalous aortic valvesranging from unicuspid to quadricuspid morphology. Materials and Methods Aortic 3D blood flow was evaluated by 4D flow MRI in 14 healthy volunteers with normal trileaflet valves and 14 patients withunicuspid(n=3), bicuspid (n=9, 3 ‘true’ bicuspid, 3 right-left (RL), 3 right-non (RN) coronary leaflet fusion, and quadricuspid aortic valves (n=2). Data analysis included the co-registered visualization of aortic valve morphology with systolic 3D blood flow. The influence of valve morphology on aortic hemodynamics was quantified by valve flow angle. Results All RL-BAV were associated with flow jets directed towards the right anterior aortic wallwhile RN-fusion and unicuspid valves resulted in flow jet patterns towards the right-posterior or posterior wall. Flow angles were clearly influenced by valve morphology(47°±10, 28°±2, 29°±18, 18°±12, 15°±2 for unicuspid, trueBAV, RN-BAV, RL-BAV, quadricuspid valves) and increased compared to controls (7.2°±1.1, p=0.001). Conclusions Altered 3D aortic hemodynamics are impacted by the morphology of congenitally malformed aortic valves. PMID:24265266

  11. Aortic root size and prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Babaee Bigi, Mohammad Ali; Aslani, Amir

    2007-08-01

    Athletes involved in mainly static or isometric exercise (e.g., weight lifting, power lifting, and bodybuilding) develop pressure overloads due to the high systemic arterial pressure found in this type of exercise. It is hypothesized that chronically elevated aortic wall tension in strength-trained athletes is associated with aortic dilatation and regurgitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate aortic root size and the prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength-trained athletes. The cohort included 100 male athletes (mean age 22.1 +/- 3.6 years; all were finalists or medalists in the country) and 128 healthy age- and height-matched subjects (the control group). Aortic root diameters at end-diastole were measured at 4 locations: (1) the aortic annulus, (2) the sinuses of Valsalva, (3) the sinotubular junction, and (4) the maximal diameter of the proximal ascending aorta. Aortic root diameters at all levels were significantly greater in the strength-trained athletes (p <0.05 for all comparisons). When the strength-trained athletes were divided into quartiles of duration of high-intensity strength training (first quartile: <18 months; second quartile: >18 and <36 months; third quartile: >36 and <54 months; fourth quartile: >54 months), progressive enlargement was found at all aortic diameters. In conclusion, aortic root diameters in all segments of the aortic root were significantly greater in elite strength-trained athletes compared with an age- and height-matched population.

  12. Nontraumatic avulsion of aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rei-Yeuh; Chen, Chien-Chang; Hsu, Wei-Pang; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Tsai, Han-Lin; Hsiao, Ping-Gune; Wu, Jiann-Der; Guo, How-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Avulsion of the aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation is mostly due to trauma, infective endocarditis, or ascending aortic dissection. Nontraumatic avulsion of the aortic valve commissure is very rare. We reviewed the literature and analyzed potential risk factors of nontraumatic avulsion. Case presentation: An 80-year-old male with hypertension was seen in the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea. Echocardiogram revealed left ventricular hypertrophy with adequate systolic function, prolapse of the noncoronary cusp, and incomplete coaptation of the right coronary and noncoronary cusps with severe aortic valve regurgitation. Surgery revealed an avulsion between the left coronary and noncoronary cusps. Histopathology examination of the aortic valve showed myxoid degeneration, fibrosis, and calcification. Examination of the ascending aorta revealed myxoid degeneration and fragmentation of elastic fibers. Aortic valve replacement was performed, and the patient was alive and well 4 years after surgery. A review of the literature showed that more than three-fourths of the similar cases occurred in males, and about half in patients with hypertension and those 60 years of age or older. Conclusions: In the case of acute aortic regurgitation without a history of trauma, infection, or valvotomy, when 2 prolapsed aortic cusps are observed by echocardiography in the absence of an intimal tear of the ascending aorta, an avulsion of the aortic commissure should be suspected, especially in males with hypertension who are 60 years of age or older. PMID:27749570

  13. Percutaneous Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement: Patient-specific Three-dimensional Computer-based Heart Model and Prototyping.

    PubMed

    Vaquerizo, Beatriz; Theriault-Lauzier, Pascal; Piazza, Nicolo

    2015-12-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease worldwide. Despite the widespread availability of curative surgical intervention, a considerable proportion of patients with severe mitral regurgitation are not referred for treatment, largely due to the presence of left ventricular dysfunction, advanced age, and comorbid illnesses. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement is a promising therapeutic alternative to traditional surgical valve replacement. The complex anatomical and pathophysiological nature of the mitral valvular complex, however, presents significant challenges to the successful design and implementation of novel transcatheter mitral replacement devices. Patient-specific 3-dimensional computer-based models enable accurate assessment of the mitral valve anatomy and preprocedural simulations for transcatheter therapies. Such information may help refine the design features of novel transcatheter mitral devices and enhance procedural planning. Herein, we describe a novel medical image-based processing tool that facilitates accurate, noninvasive assessment of the mitral valvular complex, by creating precise three-dimensional heart models. The 3-dimensional computer reconstructions are then converted to a physical model using 3-dimensional printing technology, thereby enabling patient-specific assessment of the interaction between device and patient. It may provide new opportunities for a better understanding of the mitral anatomy-pathophysiology-device interaction, which is of critical importance for the advancement of transcatheter mitral valve replacement.

  14. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  15. Pathology specific secondary aortic interventions after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore T.; Beck, Adam W.; Butler, Khayree; Feezor, Robert J.; Martin, Tomas D.; Hess, Philip J.; Huber, Thomas S.; Chang, Catherine K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Despite improved short-term outcomes, concerns remain regarding durability of thoracic endovascular aortic repair(TEVAR). The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the pathology-specific incidence of secondary aortic interventions(SAI) after TEVAR and their impact on survival. Methods: Retrospective review was performed of all TEVAR procedures and SAI at one institution from 2004-2011. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate survival. Results: Of 585 patients, 72(12%) required SAI at a median of 5.6 months(interquartile range(IQR):1.4-14.2) with 22(3.7%) requiring multiple SAI. SAI incidence differed significantly by pathology(P=.002): acute dissection(21.3%), post-surgical(20.0%), chronic dissection(16.7%), degenerative aneurysm(10.8%), traumatic transection(8.1%), penetrating ulcer(1.5%), and other etiologies(14.8%). Most common indications after dissection were persistent false lumen flow and proximal/distal extension of disease. For degenerative aneurysms, SAI was performed primarily to treat type I/III endoleaks. SAI patients had a greater mean number of comorbidities(P<.0005), stents placed(P=.0002), and postoperative complications after the index TEVAR(P<.0005) compared to those without SAI. Freedom from SAI at 1 and 5 years(95% CI) was estimated to be 86%(82-90%) and 68%(57-76%), respectively. There were no differences in survival(95% CI) between patients requiring SAI and those who did not: SAI 1-year: 88%(77-93%), 5-year: 51%(37-63%) and no SAI 1-year: 82%(79-85%), 5-year: 67%(62-71%)(Log-rank P=0.2). Conclusion: SAI after TEVAR is not uncommon, particularly in patients with dissection, but does not affect long-term survival. Aortic pathology is the most important variable impacting survival and dictated need, timing and mode of SAI. The varying incidence of SAI by indication underscores the need for diligent surveillance protocols that should be pathology-specific. PMID:24571937

  16. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  17. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

  18. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  19. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus. PMID:27449463

  20. [Transcatheter embolization of the renal artery to treat massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage in long-term dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Eiro, I; Nakajo, M

    1992-06-25

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal tumors often develop in long-term dialysis patients. In addition, rupture of the cysts leading to hemorrhagic shock can be another serious complication. There are few reports on transcatheter arterial embolization for retroperitoneal hemorrhage caused by cyst rupture in chronic dialysis patients. We report here three cases of massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage, caused by cyst rupture in two patients with ACKD and another patient with polycystic kidney disease during long-term dialysis, which were successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolization. Embolization of the renal artery was performed with absolute ethanol and/or stainless steel coils.

  1. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis. PMID:27785132

  2. A rare cause of recurrent aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old man with a history of Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), which was diagnosed when he had a Stanford type A aortic dissection. He also had multiple aneurysms including ones in the innominate, right common carotid, and right internal mammary arteries. He had had multiple procedures including Bentall's procedure, repeat sternotomy with complete arch and valve replacement, and coil embolization of internal mammary artery aneurysm in the past. His LDS was characterized by gene mutation for transforming growth factor-β receptor 1. He presented to our facility with sudden onset of back pain, radiating to the right shoulder and chest. He was diagnosed with Stanford type B aortic dissection and underwent thoracic aorta endovascular repair for his aortic dissection. This case represents the broad spectrum of pathology associated with LDS where even with regular surveillance and aggressive medical management the patient developed Stanford B aortic dissection. PMID:27358537

  3. The diagnosis and management of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Karthikesalingam, A; Holt, P J E; Hinchliffe, R J; Thompson, M M; Loftus, I M

    2010-04-01

    Aortic dissection represents the most common aortic emergency, affecting 3 to 4 per 100,000 people per year and is still associated with a high mortality. Twenty percent of the patients with aortic dissection die before reaching hospital and 30% die during hospital admission. Aortic dissections may be classified in 3 ways: according to their anatomical extent (the Stanford or DeBakey systems), according to the time from onset (acute or chronic), and according to the underlying pathology (the European Society of Cardiologists' system). Advances in endovascular technology have provided new treatment options. Hybrid endovascular and conventional open surgical repair represent the mainstay of treatment for acute type A dissection. Medical management remains the gold standard for acute and uncomplicated chronic type B dissection, though endovascular surgery offers exciting potential in the management of complicated type B dissection through sealing of the intimal entry tear.

  4. Nanobacteria-associated calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Chang, Ho-Huang; Roque, Rod; Malas, Amer M; Warren, Stafford G; Sommer, Andrei P

    2007-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in developed countries, and the major reason for operative valve replacement. In the US, the current annual cost of this surgery is approximately 1 billion dollars. Despite increasing morbidity and mortality, little is known of the cellular basis of the calcifications, which occur in high-perfusion zones of the heart. The case is presented of a patient with calcific aortic valve stenosis and colonies of progressively mineralized nanobacteria in the fibrocalcific nodules of the aortic cusps, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with their outstanding bioadhesivity, nanobacteria might serve as causative agents in the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:17315391

  5. Peripartum presentation of an acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S; Ryder, I; Lovell, A T

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of an acute type A aortic dissection occurring in a 35-year-old parturient. The initial diagnosis was missed; a subsequent emergency Caesarean section 3 weeks after presentation was followed by the development of left ventricular failure and pulmonary oedema in the early postoperative period. Echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of aortic dissection and the patient underwent a successful surgical repair.

  6. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysmectomy in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jebara, Victor A.; Fabiani, Jean-Noël; Moulonguet-Deloris, L.; Acar, Christophe; Debauchez, Mathieu; Chachques, J.C.; Glotz, Denis; Duboust, Alain; Langanay, Thierry; Carpentier, Alain

    1990-01-01

    Because renal transplantation is allowing an increased number of patients to survive for prolonged periods, abdominal aortic aneurysms can be expected to occur with growing frequency in these patients. Surgical management of such cases involves the provision of allograft protection. To date, the literature contains 15 reports of abdominal aortic aneurysms in renal allograft recipients. We describe a 16th case and discuss the management of these patients. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:240-4) Images PMID:15227179

  7. Peripartum presentation of an acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S; Ryder, I; Lovell, A T

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of an acute type A aortic dissection occurring in a 35-year-old parturient. The initial diagnosis was missed; a subsequent emergency Caesarean section 3 weeks after presentation was followed by the development of left ventricular failure and pulmonary oedema in the early postoperative period. Echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of aortic dissection and the patient underwent a successful surgical repair. PMID:15640303

  8. Juxtarenal aortic aneurysm: endoluminal transfemoral repair?

    PubMed

    Ferko, A; Krajina, A; Jon, B; Lesko, M; Voboril, Z; Zizka, J; Eliás, P

    1997-01-01

    Endoluminal transfemoral repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by a stent graft placement requires a segment of the nondilated infrarenal aorta of at least 15 mm long for safe stent graft attachment. The possibility of endoluminal treatment of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with partially covered spiral Z stent was assessed in experiment and in three clinical cases. In the experiment, the noncovered spiral Z stent was placed into the abdominal aorta, across the origins of renal arteries and mesenteric arteries, in six dogs. In the clinical cases, a partially covered stent graft was attached in 3 patients with the juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (of the group of 12 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm). The stent grafts were attached with proximal uncovered parts across the origins of the renal arteries. In experiment, the renal artery occlusions or stenoses were not observed 36 months after stent placement, and in clinic, 3 patients with the juxtarenal aortic aneurysm were successfully treated by stent graft placement. There were no signs of flow impairment into the renal arteries 14 months after stent graft implantation. This approach can possibly expand the indications for endoluminal grafting in the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms in patients who are at high risk for surgery.

  9. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  10. Acute Thrombocytopenia: An Unusual Complication Occurring After Drug-Eluting Microspheres Transcatheter Hepatic Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Poggi, Guido; Quaretti, Pietro; Montagna, Benedetta Sottotetti, Federico Tagliaferri, Barbara Pozzi, Emma Amatu, Alessio Pagella, Chiara; Bernardo, Giovanni

    2011-02-15

    Image-guided transcatheter hepatic chemoembolization (TACE) is accepted worldwide as an effective treatment for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors, colorectal carcinomas, and uveal melanomas. Although the technique is relatively safe, it has been associated with several complications. We report the cases of two patients with colorectal liver metastases who developed acute thrombocytopenia a few hours after TACE. To our knowledge, acute thrombocytopenia occurring after TACE with drug-eluting microspheres has not yet been reported. Here we discuss the hypothetical etiopathogenetic mechanisms.

  11. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Portosystemic Shunts Treated with Transcatheter Embolization and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Sato, Haruka; Miura, Masanobu; Yaoita, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Saori; Tatebe, Shunsuke; Aoki, Tatsuo; Satoh, Kimio; Ota, Hideki; Takase, Kei; Sugimura, Koichiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary abnormalities are often present in patients with liver diseases. We herein report a case of congenital portosystemic shunts complicated by hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH). A 57-year-old woman complained of dyspnea and was subsequently diagnosed with HPS and PoPH caused by congenital portosystemic shunts. Although shunt closure by transcatheter embolization was successfully performed, her dyspnea worsened and pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance elevated. Conventional vasodilator therapy was started, resulting in an improvement of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In some patients with congenital portosystemic shunts, shunt closure could exacerbate PH, and vasodilator therapy may be effective. PMID:27580545

  12. Use of the TriSpan Coil to Facilitate the Transcatheter Occlusion of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. E-mail: barbaros@hacettepe.edu.tr; Erdogan, Cueneyt; Akmangit, Ilkay; Cekirge, Saruhan; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2004-11-15

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is a rare vascular malformation of the lung which may occur as an isolated entity or in association with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Because of considerable risk of serious complications such as cerebral embolism, brain abscess and pulmonary hemorrhage, definitive treatment should be considered in most patients. Embolization with coils or detachable balloons is currently the preferred treatment. Paradoxical embolization of coils and balloons may happen, especially in patients with PAVMs with large feeding arteries. In this report we present our initial experience with the use of the TriSpan coil to lower the risk of coil migration during the transcatheter occlusion of PAVMs.

  13. Transcatheter Embolization of Splenic Artery Pseudo-Aneurysm Rupturing into Colon After Post-Operative Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Iwama, Yuki; Sugimoto, Koji Zamora, Carlos A.; Yamaguchi, Masato; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Taniguchi, Takanori; Mori, Takeki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-02-15

    Splenic pseudoaneurysms following chronic pancreatitis can rarely become a source of life-threatening bleeding by rupturing into various regions or components, including pseudocysts, the abdominal cavity, the gastrointestinal tract, and the pancreatic duct. In such cases, prompt diagnosis and therapy are warranted. We report herein the case of a 52-year-old man in whom a splenic pseudoaneurysm ruptured into the colon via a fistula with an abscess cavity, causing massive bleeding, which was successfully managed by trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE)

  14. Transcatheter Embolization of a Renal Artery Aneurysm Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Rautio, Riitta Haapanen, Arto

    2007-04-15

    Our aim was to treat a clinically silent renal artery aneurysm. The patient was a 76-year-old man with elevated prostate-specific antigen and prostata biopsies with a gradus II-III adenocarcinoma who was incidentally found to have an aneurysm in his right renal artery. We performed a successful transcatheter embolization of the aneurysm using ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx). To avoid migration of the liquid material into the parent artery, a balloon was inflated in the orifice of the neck of the aneurysm while the liquid was injected. Five-month follow-up computed tomography (CT) imaging confirmed total occlusion of the aneurysm.

  15. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism: A Complication of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Koichi Nojiri, Junichi; Takase, Yukinori; Egashira, Yoshikazu; Azama, Shinichi; Kato, Akira; Kitahara, Kenji; Miyazaki, Koji; Kudo, Sho

    2007-06-15

    We report a case of cerebral lipiodol embolism following transcatheter chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma. A 70-year-old woman with a large unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma underwent TACE. Her level of consciousness deteriorated after the procedure, and magnetic resonance imaging and non-contrast computed tomography revealed a cerebral lipiodol embolism. Despite intensive care, the patient died 2 weeks later. The complication might have been due to systemic-pulmonary shunts caused by previous surgeries and/or direct invasion of the recurrent tumor.

  16. Life-Threatening Hematuria Requiring Transcatheter Embolization Following Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, H.; Whittlestone, T.; Callaway, M.P.

    2006-08-15

    Radiofrequency ablation is increasingly being acknowledged as a valid treatment for renal cell carcinoma in patients in whom definitive curative resection is deemed either undesirable or unsafe. A number of published series have shown the technique to have encouraging results and relatively low complication rates. In this article, we report a case of delayed life-threatening hematuria requiring transcatheter embolization of a bleeding intrarenal artery in a patient who had undergone imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation of a 3 cm renal cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, such a complication has not been reported previously.

  17. Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery-Related Hemoperitoneum Formation After Surgical Drain Placement: Successful Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Woo; Chang, Seong-Hwan Yun, Ik Jin; Lee, Hae Won

    2010-04-15

    A 53-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma underwent living donor liver transplantation. After transplantation, her hemoglobin and hematocrit levels decreased to 6.3 g/dl and 18.5%, respectively, during the course of 3 days. A contrast-enhanced abdominal computed axial tomography (CAT) scan showed a hemoperitoneum in the right perihepatic space with no evidence of abdominal wall hematoma or pseudoaneurysm formation. An angiogram of the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) showed extravasation of contrast media along the surgical drain, which had been inserted during the transplantation procedure. Transcatheter embolization of the branches of the DCIA was successfully performed using N-butyl cyanoacrylate.

  18. Ruptured Mycotic Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm in an Infant: Transcatheter Embolization and CT Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deshmukh, Hemant; Rathod, Krantikumar; Garg, Ashwin Sheth, Rahul

    2003-09-15

    Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the pulmonary artery that ruptures during necrotizing pneumonia is a rare entity that is often fatal. Traditionally it has been treated with open thoracotomy and resection of both the aneurysm and the lobe in which the aneurysm is located. In this report, we describe the radiological findings and transcatheter coil embolization of a mycotic pulmonary pseudoaneurysm in a 6-month-old female infant. We also describe the subsequent morphologic changes observed on follow-up computed tomography after 9 months of embolization.

  19. Chest radiography in acute aortic syndrome: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Rajendran, Surendran; Yung, Wai Heng; Babu, Suresh Balasubramanian; Peh, Wilfred C

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a group of life-threatening diseases of the thoracic aorta that usually present to the emergency department. It includes aortic dissection, aortic intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Rare aortic pathologies of aorto-esophageal fistula and mycotic aneurysm may also be included in this list. All these conditions require urgent treatment with complex clinical care and management. Most patients who present with chest pain are evaluated with a chest radiograph in the emergency department. It is important that maximum diagnostic information is extracted from the chest radiograph as certain signs on the chest radiograph are extremely useful in pointing towards the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome.

  20. Valve sparing: aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique.

    PubMed

    Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Tamer, Sadallah; de Kerchove, Laurent; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve-sparing procedures are alternative options to aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic root aneurysm and/or severe aortic regurgitation reducing the risk of prosthesis-related complications, such as thromboembolism, and have no need for long-term oral anticoagulation. However, these techniques are technically demanding and long-term results are highly dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve function. We describe a systematic approach to aortic valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique the way it is currently performed in our institution. PMID:26137865

  1. Aortic root dissection. Another cause of early systolic closure of the aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Candell-Riera, J; del Castillo, H G; Rius, J

    1980-01-01

    An early systolic closure of the aortic valve was recorded in the echocardiogram in two patients with aortic root dissection. This sign, initially described in discrete subaortic stenosis and occasionally observed in mitral regurgitation and interventricular septal defect, has not so far been described in dissecting aneurysm of the aorta. Images PMID:7378219

  2. [Surgical Outcomes of Aortic Root Repair in Type A Acute Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Asami, Fuyuki; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Mizumoto, Masahiro; Okubo, Yuka; Takesue, Yuki; Yoshii, Sinpei

    2016-04-01

    We carried out a retrospective evaluation of the early and long-term outcomes of aortic root reconstruction for type A acute aortic dissection. Between January 2001 and March 2015, a total of 21 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. Bentall operation was performed in 9 patients( B group) and Patch plasty of sinus of Valsalva patients was performed in 12 patients (V group). There were 3 in-hospital deaths due in the B group and 1 death due in the V group. Overall survival in the V group was 72.9% and was not significantly different from survival in the B group(66.7%). In conclusion, our study demonstrated good early and long-term outcomes for patch plasty of sinus of Valsalva for type A acute aortic dissection. There was no postoperative patch-related complication in the V group. Thus, a patch plasty of sinus of Valsalva for type A acute aortic issection may be acceptable. PMID:27210253

  3. Transcatheter closure of hypertensive ductus with amplatzer post infarction muscular VSD occluder after percutaneous retrieval of embolized amplatzer duct occluder

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Milind S; Karur, Satish; Kerkar, Prafulla G

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter closure of a large hypertensive patent ductus arteriosus is challenging with scant data about it. Even more challenging is retrieval of an embolized Amplatzer duct occluder. We report successful closure of a 12 mm large ductus with the Amplatzer muscular VSD occluder (post myocardial infarction) after percutaneous retrieval of the embolized, largest available, 16/14 mm Amplatzer duct occluder. PMID:24987259

  4. Conscious sedation using dexmedetomidine for percutaneous transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pushkar Mahendra; Umbarkar, Sanjeeta R.; Sarkar, Manjula S.; Lohiya, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine safety and feasibility of conscious sedation using dexmedetomidine for transcatheter atrial septal defect (ASD) device closure. Materials and Methods: A retrospective institutional review of transcatheter ASD device closure without endotracheal intubation over 18 months. The protocol included topical oropharyngeal anesthesia using lignocaine followed by dexmedetomidine bolus 1 μg/kg intravenously over 10 min and maintenance dose 0.2–0.7 μg/kg/h. Ramsay sedation score 2–3 was maintained. Patients were analyzed regarding demographic profile, device size, procedure time, anesthesia time, recovery time, hospital stay, and any hemodynamic or procedural complications. Results: A total of 43 patients with mean age 31.56 ± 13.74 years (range: 12–56 years) were analyzed. Mean anesthesia duration was 71.75 + 21.08 min. Mean recovery time was 7.6 ± 3.01 min. 16 females and one male patient required additional propofol with a mean dose of 30.8 ± 10.49 mg. No hemodynamic instability was noted. No patient required general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. The procedure was successful in 93.02% of patients. Four patients developed atrial fibrillation. All patients were satisfied. Conclusion: Conscious sedation using dexmedetomidine is a safe and effective anesthetic technique for percutaneous ASD closure. PMID:27397450

  5. A Systematic Review of Acquired Uterine Arteriovenous Malformations: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Transcatheter Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Daniel J; Jones, Megan; Taani, Jamal Al; Buhimschi, Catalin; Dowell, Joshua D

    2016-03-01

    Objective An acquired uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare cause of vaginal bleeding and, although hysterectomy is the definitive therapy, transcatheter embolization (TCE) provides an alternative treatment option. This systematic review presents the indications, technique, and outcomes for transcatheter treatment of the acquired uterine AVMs. Study Design Literature databases were searched from 2003 to 2013 for eligible clinical studies, including the patient characteristics, procedural indication, results, complications, as well as descriptions on laterality and embolic agents utilized. Results A total of 40 studies were included comprising of 54 patients (average age of 33.4 years). TCE had a primary success rate with symptomatic control of 61% (31 patients) and secondary success rate of 91% after repeated embolization. When combined with medical therapy, symptom resolution was noted in 48 (85%) patients without more invasive surgical procedures. Conclusion Low-level evidence supports the role of TCE, including in the event of persistent bleeding following initial embolization, for the treatment of acquired uterine AVMs. The variety of embolic agents and laterality of approach delineate the importance of refining procedural protocols in the treatment of the acquired uterine AVM. Condensation A review on the management of patients with acquired uterine AVMs. PMID:26929872

  6. Treatment of 'High-Flow' Priapism with Superselective Transcatheter Embolization: A Useful Alternative to Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, P.; Browne, R.; McEniff, N.; Lee, M.J.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To review the efficacy of treatment of high-flow priapism with superselective transcatheter embolization. Methods. Over a 2-year period, we reviewed five patients who were treated for traumatic high-flow priapism with superselective embolization. All patients underwent diagnostic angiography that demonstrated a communication between the cavernosal artery and the corpora cavernosa. Each identified fistula was embolized using gel-foam, blood clot, microcoils, or a combination of these. Results. All five patients had successful detumesence of priapism postprocedure. There was normal recurrence of early morning erection with successful detumescence for each patient within a 2- to 4-week period. Two of five patients (40%) presented with recurrence of priapism at 6 months and required a repeat embolization procedure. At 1 year, four of the five patients (80%) had normal erectile function. Conclusion. Superselective transcatheter embolization is a useful therapeutic modality in the treatment of high-flow priapism. It provides equivalent rates of detumesence when compared to surgical techniques, and appears to have a greater success in preserving erectile function.

  7. Cost comparison of Transcatheter and Operative Pulmonary Valve Replacement (from the Pediatric Health Information Systems Database).

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Michael L; Gillespie, Matthew J; Shinohara, Russell T; Dori, Yoav; Rome, Jonathan J; Glatz, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes for transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TC-PVR) and operative pulmonary valve replacement (S-PVR) are excellent. Thus, their respective cost is a relevant clinical outcome. We performed a retrospective cohort study of children and adults who underwent PVR at age ≥ 8 years from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2013, at 35 centers contributing data to the Pediatric Health Information Systems database to address this question. A propensity score-adjusted multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for known confounders. Secondary analyses of department-level charges, risk of re-admission, and associated costs were performed. A total of 2,108 PVR procedures were performed in 2,096 subjects (14% transcatheter and 86% operative). The observed cost of S-PVR and TC-PVR was not significantly different (2013US $50,030 vs 2013US $51,297; p = 0.85). In multivariate analysis, total costs of S-PVR and TC-PVR were not significantly different (p = 0.52). Length of stay was shorter after TC-PVR (p <0.0001). Clinical and supply charges were greater for TC-PVR (p <0.0001), whereas laboratory, pharmacy, and other charges (all p <0.0001) were greater for S-PVR. Risks of both 7- and 30-day readmission were not significantly different. In conclusion, short-term costs of TC-PVR and S-PVR are not significantly different after adjustment. PMID:26552510

  8. Solitary Hepatocellular Carcinoma Fed by the Cystic Artery: Limitation of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Shozo; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Motohara, Tomofumi; Ichikawa, Satoshi

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: To clarify the limitations of transcatheter treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with parasitic feeders from the cystic artery. Methods: Three male patients had a solitary HCC (average diameter 3 cm) fed by the cystic artery among 221 patients with HCC from 1994 to 1997. One tumor was nourished entirely from the cystic artery arising from the medial branch of the left hepatic artery, and two tumors were fed partially by the cystic arteries arising from the anterior inferior branch of the right hepatic artery. We analyzed the indications for transcatheter treatment for these three patients. Results: We chose not to embolize the cystic artery for fear of necrosis of the gallbladder. Although embolization of the anterior branch of the right hepatic artery was performed in one patient with a tumor fed partially by the cystic artery, only half the tumor was embolized. Two patients underwent hepatic resection, and one received percutaneous ethanol injection therapy. At follow-up of 28-40 months (average 33 months) all patients are alive. Conclusion: Feeding by the cystic artery represents a limitation of TAE for HCC.

  9. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  11. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Yuji; Korchi, Amine Mohamed; Shinjo, Takuma; Kato, Shojiro

    2015-04-15

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function.

  12. Thoracic Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Middle Aortic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Taek; Lee, Mina; Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Baek, Wan Ki

    2016-09-01

    Middle aortic syndrome is a rare disease defined as a segmental narrowing of the distal descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. A thoracoabdominal bypass or endovascular treatment is the choice of treatment. Endovascular therapy consists of a balloon dilatation and stent implantation. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has been widely used in a variety of aortic diseases. We report a case of middle aortic syndrome treated with a thoracic endovascular stent graft. PMID:27549552

  13. Real-time transesophageal echocardiography facilitates antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kazato; Yano, Kentaro; Tanaka, Chiharu; Nakashoji, Tomohiro; Tonomura, Daisuke; Takehara, Kosuke; Kino, Naoto; Yoshida, Masataka; Kurotobi, Toshiya; Tsuchida, Takao; Fukumoto, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of severe aortic stenosis (AS) where antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) was performed under real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) guidance. Real-time TEE can provide useful information for evaluating the aortic valve response to valvuloplasty during the procedure. It was led with the intentional wire-bias technique in order to compress the severely calcified leaflet, and consequently allowed the balloon to reach the largest possible size and achieve full expansion of the aortic annulus. PMID:27054107

  14. Rapid prototyping in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bangeas, Petros; Voulalas, Grigorios; Ktenidis, Kiriakos

    2016-04-01

    3D printing provides the sequential addition of material layers and, thus, the opportunity to print parts and components made of different materials with variable mechanical and physical properties. It helps us create 3D anatomical models for the better planning of surgical procedures when needed, since it can reveal any complex anatomical feature. Images of abdominal aortic aneurysms received by computed tomographic angiography were converted into 3D images using a Google SketchUp free software and saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model made of polylactic acid material (thermoplastic filament) was printed. A 3D model of an abdominal aorta aneurysm was created in 138 min, while the model was a precise copy of the aorta visualized in the computed tomographic images. The total cost (including the initial cost of the printer) reached 1303.00 euros. 3D imaging and modelling using different materials can be very useful in cases when anatomical difficulties are recognized through the computed tomographic images and a tactile approach is demanded preoperatively. In this way, major complications during abdominal aorta aneurysm management can be predicted and prevented. Furthermore, the model can be used as a mould; the development of new, more biocompatible, less antigenic and individualized can become a challenge in the future. PMID:26803324

  15. Flow in an Aortic Coarctation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loma, Luis; Miller, Paul; Hertzberg, Jean

    2009-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital cardiovascular defect that causes a constriction in the descending thoracic aorta. To gain a better understanding of the cause of post-surgical problems, a rigid glass and a compliant in vitro model of the aortic arch and descending aorta with a coarctation were constructed. Near-physiologic compliance was obtained using a silicone elastomer. Stereoscopic PIV was used to obtain 3D velocity maps. Results show a high speed turbulent jet formed at the exit of the coarctation. Flow in the rigid model was significantly different from in the compliant model. In the rigid model, the jet was symmetric, creating a toroidal recirculation area. In the compliant model, the jet was directed towards the medial wall, inducing flow reversal only at the lateral wall. Peak velocities and turbulence intensities were higher in the rigid model, however shear rate values in the compliant model were significantly above both the rigid model and normal in vivo values at the medial wall. In both models the reattachment region fluctuated, creating oscillatory shear.

  16. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutakis, Dean J; Zammert, Martin; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Belkin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms is an important technique in the vascular surgeon's armamentarium, which has created a seismic shift in the management of aortic pathology over the past two decades. In comparison to traditional open repair, the endovascular approach is associated with significantly improved perioperative morbidity and mortality. The early survival benefit of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is sustained up to 3 years postoperatively, but longer-term life expectancy remains poor regardless of operative modality. Nonetheless, most abdominal aortic aneurysms are now repaired using endovascular stent grafts. The technology is not perfect as several postoperative complications, namely endoleak, stent-graft migration, and graft limb thrombosis, can develop and therefore lifelong imaging surveillance is required. In addition, a postoperative inflammatory response has been documented after endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms; the clinical significance of this finding has yet to be determined. Subsequently, the safety and applicability of endovascular stent grafts are likely to improve and expand with the introduction of newer-generation devices and with the simplification of fenestrated systems. PMID:27650343

  17. Primary Stenting in Infrarenal Aortic Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Uher, Petr; Lindh, Mats; Lindblad, Bengt; Ivancev, Krasnodar

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of primary stenting in aortic occlusive disease.Methods: Thirty patients underwent primary stenting of focal concentric (n = 2) and complex aortic stenoses (n = 19), and aortic or aorto-iliac occlusions (n = 9). Sixteen patients underwent endovascular outflow procedures, three of whom also had distal open surgical reconstructions. Median follow-up was 16 months (range 1-60 months).Results: Guidewire crossing of two aorto-biiliac occlusions failed, resulting in a 93% (28/30) technical success. Major complications included one access hematoma, one myocardial infarction, one death (recurrent thromboembolism) in a patient with widespread malignancy, and one fatal hemorrhage during thrombolysis of distal emboli from a recanalized occluded iliac artery. One patient did not improve his symptoms, resulting in a 1-month clinical success of 83% (25/30). Following restenting the 26 stented survivors changed their clinical limb status to +3 (n = 17) and +2 (n = 9). During follow-up one symptomatic aortic restenosis occurred and was successfully restented.Conclusions: Primary stenting of complex aortic stenoses and short occlusions is an attractive alternative to conventional surgery. Larger studies with longer follow-up and stratification of lesion morphology are warranted to define its role relative to balloon angioplasty. Stenting of aorto-biiliac occlusions is feasible but its role relative to bypass grafting remains to be defined.

  18. Echocardiographic assessment of severity of aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, K E; Barritt, D W

    1975-01-01

    An echocardiographic study of left ventricular diameter was made in 27 patients with aortic regurgitation. Comparison was made with a group of 21 normal subjects and a group of 6 patients with large left ventricles without valvar regurgitation. Total stroke volume, total left ventricular output, and ejection fraction were derived by the method of cubing the left ventricular diameter to give approximate left ventricular volumes at and-diastole and end-systole. The patients were assessed independently and placed into three grades of severity. The eechocardiographic dimensions of patients with mild aortic regurgitation were not significantly different from those of the normal subjects. With increasing severity of aortic regurgitation, there were increases in group values for left ventricular diameter, total stroke volume, and total left ventricular output. The ejection fraction was depressed below the normal range in only one patient with aortic regurgitation. It is concluded that echocardiographic measurement of left ventribular dimensions is of value in assessing the severity of aortic regurgitation. Images PMID:1156476

  19. Endovascular repair of a type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly, and aortic dissection involving a right-sided aortic arch is extremely rare. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with a right-sided aortic arch and a right descending aortic dissection and a stent-graft was accurately deployed without perioperative complications. There were no any complaints and complications after 18 months follow-up. The CTA demonstrated that the false lumen was largely thrombosed only with a mild type II endoleak and a mild descending aortic expansion. We feel that endovascular repair is feasible to patient of type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed. PMID:23343010

  20. Physical exercise, aortic blood pressure, and aortic wall elasticity and composition in rats.

    PubMed

    Niederhoffer, N; Kieffer, P; Desplanches, D; Lartaud-Idjouadiene, I; Sornay, M H; Atkinson, J

    2000-04-01

    With a training schedule (8 weeks' treadmill running at 30 m/min up a 10% incline 5 d/wk for 90 min/day), we investigated whether exercise modifies aortic wall dimensions, composition (calcium and elastin content), or stiffness in normotensive 6-month-old male Wistar WAG/Rij rats. Maximal oxygen uptake was measured in half of the rats (n=10 per group). Wall stiffness was evaluated in the other half (9 trained and 10 untrained) on the basis of changes in thoracoabdominal pressure pulse wave velocity and differences in amplitude between the peripheral and central aortic pressure signals. Experiments were performed in nonanesthetized, unrestrained rats and then after pithing. The impact of exercise on the oxidative capacity of the plantaris muscles was evaluated with the measurement of citrate synthase activity. Training increased maximal oxygen uptake by 34% and citrate synthase activity by 40%. Mean peripheral aortic pressure increased by 6% and 19% in trained rats, under awake and pithed conditions, whereas mean central aortic pressure increased by 16%, after pithing only. All indexes of aortic stiffness were similar in trained and control rats, as were aortic wall dimensions, composition, cardiac mass, and heart rate. In conclusion, physical exercise in young rats appears to have no effect on aortic stiffness. PMID:10775562

  1. Diagnosis and management of acute aortic syndromes: dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Bonaca, Marc P; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    Acute aortic syndromes constitute a spectrum of conditions characterized by disruptions in the integrity of the aortic wall that may lead to potentially catastrophic outcomes. They include classic aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Although imaging studies are sensitive and specific, timely diagnosis can be delayed because of variability in presenting symptoms and the relatively low frequency with which acute aortic syndromes are seen in the emergency setting. Traditional classification systems, such as the Stanford system, facilitate early treatment decision-making through recognition of the high risk of death and major complications associated with involvement of the ascending aorta (type A). These patients are treated surgically unless intractable and severe co-morbidities are present. Outcomes with dissections that do not involve the ascending aorta (type B) depend on the presence of acute complications (e.g., malperfusion, early aneurysm formation, leakage), the patency and size of the false lumen, and patient co-morbidities. Patients with uncomplicated type B dissections are initially treated medically. Endovascular techniques have emerged as an alternative to surgery for the management of complicated type B dissections when intervention is necessary. Patients with acute aortic syndromes require aggressive medical care, risk stratification for additional complications and targeted genetic assessment as well as careful long-term monitoring to assess for evolving complications. The optimal care of patients with acute aortic syndrome requires the cooperation of members of an experienced multidisciplinary team both in the acute and chronic setting.

  2. General anaesthesia vs. conscious sedation for transfemoral aortic valve implantation: a single UK centre before-and-after study.

    PubMed

    Miles, L F; Joshi, K R; Ogilvie, E H; Densem, C G; Klein, A A; O'Sullivan, M; Martinez, G; Sudarshan, C D; Abu-Omar, Y; Irons, J F

    2016-08-01

    Reported data suggest that 99% of transfemoral, transcatheter aortic valve implantations in the UK are performed under general anaesthesia. This before-and-after study is the first UK comparison of conscious sedation vs. general anaesthesia for this procedure. Patients who underwent general anaesthesia received tracheal intubation, positive pressure ventilation, radial arterial and central venous access and urinary catheterisation. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol or sevoflurane. Patients who received conscious sedation had a fascia iliaca and ilioinguinal nerve block and low-dose remifentanil infusion, without invasive monitoring or urinary catheterisation. Recruitment took place between August 2012 and July 2015, with a 6-month crossover period between November 2013 and June 2014. A total of 88 patients were analysed, evenly divided between the two groups. Patients receiving conscious sedation had a shorter anaesthetic time (mean (SD) 121 (28) min vs. 145 (41) min; p < 0.001) and recovery room time (110 (50) min vs. 155 (48) min; p = 0.001), lower requirement for inotropes (4.6% vs 81.8%; OR (95% CI) 0.1 (0.002-0.050); p < 0.001) and a lower incidence of malignant dysrhythmia (0% vs 11.4%; p = 0.020). Conscious sedation appears a feasible alternative to general anaesthesia for this procedure and is associated with a reduced requirement for inotropic support and improved efficiency.

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients who had undergone renal transplantation 3 months to 23 years ago were operated on successfully for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the first case, dating from 1973, the kidney was protected by general hypothermia. In the remaining patients, no measure was used to protect the kidney. Only one patient showed a moderate increase of blood creatinine in the postoperative period; renal function returned to normal in 15 days. All five patients have normal renal function 6 months to 11 years after aortic repair. Results obtained in this series show that protection of the transplant during aortic surgery is not necessary, provided adequate surgical technique is used. Such a technique is described in detail. Its use simplifies surgical treatment of such lesions and avoids the complex procedures employed in the seven previously published cases. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A and B. FIGS. 3A and B. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A and B. PMID:3510592

  4. Aortic stiffness and distensibility among hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Meenakshisundaram, R; Kamaraj, K; Murugan, S; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P

    2009-09-01

    Hypertension is one among many factors that contribute to aortic stiffness, which has repercussions mainly on the heart. To assess aortic stiffness among essential hypertensives of South India and its relationship with gender. An analytical study was designed to assess aortic stiffness among 60 nonobese, nonalcoholic, nonsmoking, and non-caffeine consuming essential hypertensives without any overt illness or infection, and compared with 30 healthy age- and sex-matched nonhypertensives. They were assessed clinically and also by laboratory means. Their left ventricular mass (LV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured using Transthoracic echocardiogram. Aortic systolic and diastolic diameters were measured by using M-mode echocardiography during consecutive beats and averaged for each case. Finally, aortic stiffness was calculated. The data were analyzed statistically. Hypertensives were divided into Group I, consisting of patients with hypertension at least for 5 years, who were not adherent to medication, and Group II, consisting of patients with hypertension of duration between 6 months and 1 year. There were 20 males and 10 females in each group. There was no significant difference between the hypertensive groups and a control, normotensive, group with regard to BMI or total cholesterol. The means of LV mass (in grams), systolic BP (in mmHg), diastolic BP (in mmHg), aortic systolic diameter (in mm), aortic diastolic diameter (in mm), aortic distensibility (in mm), and aortic stiffness found in Group I, Group II, and controls were 105.8 +/- 23.8, 101.5 +/- 21, and 84 +/- 9.8; 138 +/- 14.2, 153 +/- 17.1, and 120 +/- 8.3; 90.5 +/- 11.6, 101.7 +/- 17.1, and 76.5 +/- 5; 30.85 +/- 2.6, 28.7 +/- 2.6, and 27.7 +/- 2.4; 28.7 +/- 2.2, 25.8 +/- 2.5, and 24.2 +/- 2.5; 2.14 +/- 0.3, 2.84 +/- 0.5, and 3.5 +/- 0.6; and 1.31 +/- 0.09, 1.14 +/- 0.1, and 1.04 +/- 0.08, respectively. The differences between the hypertensive groups and the control group were

  5. ED 02-1 ACUTE AORTIC SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    The successful clinical introduction of various non-invasive imaging modalities has contributed to the establishment of 'acute aortic syndrome', a relatively new clinical syndrome incorporating several disease entities with similar clinical features (at the time of clinical presentation). Aortic dissection (AD) with intimal flap and two aortic channels (true and false lumens) is the most important disease entity in acute aortic syndrome. Clinical characteristics of AD have been established, with standardized treatment strategies depending on the affected site of the aorta. For the past several decades, variant forms of classic AD, including aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) and incomplete dissection, have been increasingly diagnosed in routine clinical practice worldwide, and imaging findings characteristic of these variant forms have been established for their differential diagnosis. As imaging findings, rather than clinical features, are critical for the differential diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome, careful interpretation of imaging results is necessary for accurate diagnosis and better clinical decision-making, thus improving patient outcomes. IMH is probably the most important variant form of classic AD and has been the source of intense controversy regarding its pathogenesis and optimal treatment options. Clinical reports regarding outcomes of patients with IMH from different centers have shown conflicting results and risk stratification based on imaging findings remains a challenging clinical issue.Intimal tears can have a very wide spectrum. For example, a stellate or linear intimal tear can involve the exposure of the underlying aortic media or adventitial layers but without the progression and separation of the medial layers, resulting in extensive undermining of the intimal layers. This incomplete dissection, characterized by an intimal tear without an intimal flap or hematoma, was reported to be present in 9 of 181 (5%) consecutive patients with

  6. Mechanical versus biological aortic valve replacement strategies.

    PubMed

    Reineke, D; Gisler, F; Englberger, L; Carrel, T

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the most frequently performed procedure in valve surgery. The controversy about the optimal choice of the prosthetic valve is as old as the technique itself. Currently there is no perfect valve substitute available. The main challenge is to choose between mechanical and biological prosthetic valves. Biological valves include pericardial (bovine, porcine or equine) and native porcine bioprostheses designed in stented, stentless and sutureless versions. Homografts and pulmonary autografts are reserved for special indications and will not be discussed in detail in this review. We will focus on the decision making between artificial biological and mechanical prostheses, respectively. The first part of this article reviews guideline recommendations concerning the choice of aortic prostheses in different clinical situations while the second part is focused on novel strategies in the treatment of patients with aortic valve pathology. PMID:26678683

  7. Temporary extracorporeal bypass modalities during aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bassin, Levi; Bell, David

    2016-09-01

    The key to aortic surgery is protection of the brain, heart, spinal cord, and viscera. For operations involving the aortic arch, the focus is on cerebral protection, while for pathology involving the descending thoracic aorta, the focus is on spinal protection. Optimal cerebral and spinal protection requires an extensive knowledge of the operative steps and an understanding of the cardiopulmonary bypass modalities that are possible. A bloodless field is required when operating on the aorta. As a result, periods of ischemia to the central nervous system and end-organ viscera are often unavoidable. The main techniques to mitigate ischemia include hypothermia and selective perfusion of the ischemic organ in question. This chapter will first briefly review bypass modalities and then describe how they can be used for various aortic scenarios. PMID:27650344

  8. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Ibrahim; Kische, Stephan; Rehders, Tim C.; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Rauchhaus, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition with structural weakness of the aortic wall, which can progress to arterial dilatation and rupture. Today, both an increasing awareness of vascular disease and the access to tomographic imaging facilitate the diagnosis of TAA even in an asymptomatic stage. The risk of rupture for untreated aneurysms beyond a diameter of 5.6 cm ranges from 46% to 74% and the two-year mortality rate is greater than 70%, with most deaths resulting from rupture. Treatment options include surgical and non-surgical repair to prevent aneurysm enlargement and rupture. While most cases of ascending aortic involvement are subject to surgical repair (partially with valve-preserving techniques), aneurysm of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta are amenable to emerging endovascular techniques as an alternative to classic open repair or to a hybrid approach (combining debranching surgery with stent grafting) in an attempt to improve outcomes. PMID:22419919

  9. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  10. Spinal ischemia following abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Bergan, J J; Conn, J; Yao, J S

    1975-03-01

    Serious spinal cord ischemia may follow infrarenal abdominal aortic surgery. Five cases are summarized and added to the 23 previously published cases in order to identify this syndrome, emphasize its importance, and draw attention to the possibility of spontaneous recovery which may occur. The multifactorial complex which comprises each patient's clinical picture clouds a precise and specific cause for paraplegia in these cases. However, neither hypotension, steal phenomena nor emboli are necessary for completion of the syndrome. The relevant spinal cord arterial anatomy indicates that the common anomalies which occur favor development of spinal cord ischemia in the arteriosclerotic population which requires aortic surgery. No means of prevention is possible at this time.

  11. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  12. Contemporary management of blunt aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Dubose, J J; Azizzadeh, A; Estrera, A L; Safi, H J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) remains a common cause of death following blunt mechanisms of trauma. Among patients who survive to reach hospital care, significant advances in diagnosis and treatment afford previously unattainable survival. The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) guidelines provide current best-evidence suggestions for treatment of BTAI. However, several key areas of controversy regarding optimal BTAI care remain. These include the refinement of selection criteria, timing for treatment and the need for long-term follow-up data. In addition, the advent of the Aortic Trauma Foundation (ATF) represents an important development in collaborative research in this field.

  13. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  14. Aortic injuries in newer vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ryb, Gabriel E; Dischinger, Patricia C; Kleinberger, Michael; McGwin, Gerald; Griffin, Russell L

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of AI was studied in relation to vehicle model year (MY) among front seat vehicular occupants, age≥16 in vehicles MY≥1994, entered in the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System between 1997 and 2010 to determine whether newer vehicles, due to their crashworthiness improvements, are linked to a lower risk of aortic injuries (AI). MY was categorized as 1994-1997, 1998-2004, or 2005-2010 reflecting the introduction of newer occupant protection technology. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for the association between AI and MY independent of possible confounders. Analysis was repeated, stratified by frontal and near lateral impacts. AI occurred in 19,187 (0.06%) of the 31,221,007 (weighted) cases, and contributed to 11% of all deaths. AIs were associated with advanced age, male gender, high BMI, near-side impact, rollover, ejection, collision against a fixed object, high ΔV, vehicle mismatch, unrestrained status, and forward track position. Among frontal crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed increased adjusted odds of AI when compared to MY 94-97 [OR 1.84 (1.02-3.32) and 1.99 (0.93-4.26), respectively]. In contrast, among near-side impact crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed decreased adjusted odds of AI [OR 0.50 (0.25-0.99) and 0.27 (0.06-1.31), respectively]. While occupants of newer vehicles experience lower odds of AI in near side impact crashes, a higher AI risk is present in frontal crashes. PMID:23831451

  15. EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF AORTIC ANEURYSMS

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O’Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2-4MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45-0.7N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (p<0.0009) with both tensile strength and tear strength, allowing material strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (p<0.0009). This study has successfully designed and developed a range of silicone rubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of the

  16. Pleural Empyema and Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Su, Ta-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ko, Po-Jen; Yu, Sheng-Yueh; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Shen, Te-Chun; Chou, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pleural empyema (PE) may evolve into necrosis, fistula in the thorax, and sepsis; thus, it is also associated with high mortality. We investigated and analyzed the risk of aortic aneurysm (AA) in a cohort study of patients with PE. A total of 34,250 patients diagnosed with PE were identified as the PE cohort, and 137,000 patients without PE were selected randomly as the control group and matched by sex, age, and index year of PE diagnosis. Patients ages 20 years and younger with a history of AA were excluded. The risk of AA was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Excess risk of AA development was 1.69-fold higher in PE patients (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.39–2.05) compared with non-PE patients. The patients with PE exhibited a greater adjusted risk of AA (aHR = 2.01; CI = 1.44–2.81) even if they did not have any of the 9 comorbidities included in our analysis (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, cardiac artery disease, stroke, bacterial endocarditis, and rheumatic endocarditis). Compared with the patients without any of the 9 comorbidities or PE, the patients with only PE had a greater risk of developing AA (aHR = 2.00; CI = 1.43–2.79). The PE cohort had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of AA than the non-PE cohort did during 12 years of follow-up. In a large-scale cohort, patients with PE are linked with an increased risk of AA. PMID:26632741

  17. Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to Morganella morganii: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Young; Lee, Jong Seok; Choi, Han Sung; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ko, Young Gwan

    2011-02-01

    An infected aortic aneurysm, or mycotic aneurysm, is a rare arterial dilatation due to destruction of the infected vessel wall. Common pathogens resulting in an infected aortic aneurysm are Salmonella and Clostridium species, as well as Staphylococcus aureus; Morganella morganii, on the other hand, is very rare. An infected abdominal aortic aneurysm has tendencies to grow rapidly and to rupture. The mortality rate is high in patients undergoing emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by M. morganii. A high index of suspicion and imaging tests are necessary in order to diagnose an infected aortic aneurysm.

  18. Endovascular Management of Chronic Type B Dissecting Aortic Aneurysm Utilizing Aortic and Renal Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J. D. Dunckley, M.; Thompson, M.; Morgan, R. A.

    2008-07-15

    Over the last 10 years endovascular stent-graft placement has been increasingly used to treat complicated acute Type B thoracic aortic dissections. While studies have demonstrated the use of additional aortic stent-grafts to treat continued false lumen perfusion and case reports have detailed the use of renal artery stents to treat renal ischemia related to aortic dissection, to our knowledge the adjuvant use of renal artery stents to reduce false lumen perfusion has not been reported. We present the case of a 72-year-old male who had previously undergone endovascular repair of a complicated Type B thoracic aortic dissection and presented with an expanding false lumen in the peridiaphragmatic aorta despite coverage of the entire thoracic aorta. This was treated by closure of a right renal fenestration using a renal stent.

  19. The Triplex BioValsalva Prostheses To Reconstruct the Aortic Valve and the Aortic Root.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yijun; Li, Bin; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Lin, Jing; Guzman, Randolph; Paynter, Royston; Desaulniers, Denis; Qin, Boyin; Wang, Lu; Germain, Lucie; Zhang, Ze; Guidoin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The Bentall procedure introduced in 1968 represents an undisputed cure to treat multiple pathologies involving the aortic valve and the ascending thoracic aorta. Over the years, multiple modifications have been introduced as well as a standardized approach to the operation with the goal to prevent long-term adverse events. The BioValsalva prosthesis provides a novel manner to more efficiently reconstruct the aortic valve together with the anatomy of the aortic root with the implantation of a valved conduit. This prosthesis comprises three sections: the collar supporting the valve; the skirt mimicking the Valsalva, which is suitable for the anastomoses with the coronary arteries; and the main body of the graft, which is designed to replace the ascending aorta. The BioValsalva prosthesis allows the Bentall operation to be used in patients whose aortic valve cannot be spared. PMID:27649763

  20. Aortic dilatation and aortopathy in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, Keyhan Sayadpour; Niwa, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Longer survival after corrective surgery for congenital heart diseases has rendered late complications more important. One of these complications is aortic dilatation which may occur in patients with repaired or unrepaired disease and can progress to aneurysm, dissection, and rupture. This aortic dilatation in various congenital heart diseases does not simply mean anatomical dilatation of the aortic root, but it closely relates to the aortic pathophysiological abnormality, aortic regurgitation, and aortic and ventricular dysfunction; therefore, we can recognize this complex lesion as a new concept: "aortopathy". The pathophysiology of this disease is complex and only partially understood. In this review, we first discuss history, pathophysiology, and clinical features of aortic dilatation and aortopathy of congenital heart disease. Then we provide a review of the evaluation and management of this disease.