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Sample records for jet ii x-ray

  1. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR-II Radio Galaxy 3C353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Siemiginowska, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Swain, M.R.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Goodger, J.L.; Iwasawa, K.; Edwards, P.G.

    2008-06-13

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4-inch wide and 2-feet long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  2. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR II Radio Galaxy 3C 353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun

    2008-12-24

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4''-wide and 2'-long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  3. Chandra Reveals Twin X-Ray Jets in the Powerful FR II Radio Galaxy 3C 353

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, Ł.; Harris, D. E.; Siemiginowska, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Swain, M. R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Goodger, J. L.; Iwasawa, K.; Edwards, P. G.

    2008-10-01

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Due to 3C 353's two 4' ' wide and 2' long jets we are able to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the subarcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hot spots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely nonthermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio to X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular although not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  4. AGN jet power, formation of X-ray cavities, and FR I/II dichotomy in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the ability of jets in active galactic nuclei to break out of the ambient gas with sufficiently large advance velocities. Using observationally estimated jet power, we analyze 28 bright elliptical galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters. Because the gas density profiles in the innermost regions of galaxies have not been resolved so far, we consider two extreme cases for temperature and density profiles. We also follow two types of evolution for the jet cocoons: being driven by the pressure inside the cocoon [Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I], and being driven by the jet momentum (FR type II). Our main result is that regardless of the assumed form of the density profiles, jets with observed powers of ≲1044 erg s-1 are not powerful enough to evolve as FR II sources. Instead, they evolve as FR I sources and appear to be decelerated below the buoyant velocities of the cocoons when jets were propagating through the central dense regions of the host galaxies. This explains why FR I sources are more frequent than FR II sources in clusters. Furthermore, we predict the sizes of X-ray cavities from the observed jet powers and compare them with the observed ones-they are consistent within a factor of two if the FR I type evolution is realized. Finally, we find that the jets with a power ≳1044 erg s-1 are less affected by the ambient medium, and some of them, but not all, could serve as precursors of the FR II sources.

  5. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David; Robe, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T is approximately 105 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division

  6. X-ray jets in microquasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, S.

    2003-03-01

    Large scale moving relativistic X-ray jets have been recently discovered around the microquasar XTE J1550--564 (Corbel et al. 2002, Sci., 298, 196). They have been observed over a timescale of at least four years. The broadband spectra of the jets are consistent with synchrotron emission from high energy (up to 10 TeV) particles accelerated in shocks, possibly during the interaction of the jets with the interstellar medium. XTE J1550-564 offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamical evolution of relativistic jets on time scales inaccessible for active galactic nuclei jets, with implications for our understanding of relativistic jets from Galactic x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. New results from the continuing multiwavelength campaign, as well as a comparison with other jet producing system, will be shown during this presentation.

  7. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  8. Observations of X-ray jets with the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Ishido, Yoshinori; Acton, Loren W.; Strong, Keith T.; Hirayama, Tadashi; Uchida, Yutaka; Mcallister, Alan H.; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Tsuneta, Saku; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The features of the multiple X-ray jets in the solar corona, revealed by the time series of the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope images are described. The typical size of a jet was from 5 x 10 exp 3 to 4 x 10 exp 5 km, the translational velocity was 30-300 km/s, and the corresponding kinetic energy was estimated to be from 10 exp 25 to 10 exp 28 erg. Many of the jets were found to be associated with flares in X-ray bright points, emerging flux regions, or active regions, and they sometimes occurred several times from the same X-ray feature. One of the jets associated with a flaring bright point was identified as being an H-alpha surge.

  9. Chandra enables study of x-ray jets

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The exquisite angular resolution of the Chandra x-ray telescope has enabled the detection and study of resolved x-ray jets in a wide variety of astronomical systems. Chandra has detected extended jets in our galaxy from protostars, symbiotic binaries, neutron star pulsars, black hole binaries, extragalactic jets in radio sources, and quasars. The x-ray data play an essential role in deducing the emission mechanism of the jets, in revealing the interaction of jets with the intergalactic or intracluster media, and in studying the energy generation budget of black holes. PMID:20378839

  10. Surprise Discovery of an X-Ray Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Accreting, supermassive black holes that reside at galactic centers can power enormous jets, bright enough to be observed from vast distances away. The recent discovery of such a jet in X-ray wavelengths, without an apparent radio counterpart, has interesting implications for our understanding of how these distant behemoths shine.An Excess of X-RaysQuasar B3 0727+409 was serendipitously discovered to host an X-ray jet when a group of scientists, led by Aurora Simionescu (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), was examining Chandra observations of another object.The Chandra data reveal bright, compact, extended emission from the core of quasar B3 0727+409, with a projected length of ~100 kpc. There also appears to be further X-ray emission at a distance of ~280 kpc, which Simionescu and collaborators speculate may be the terminal hotspot of the jet.The quasar is located at a redshift of z=2.5 which makes this jet one of only a few high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. But what makes it especially intriguing is that, though the authors searched through both recent and archival radio observations of the quasar, the only radio counterpart they could find was a small feature close to the quasar core (which may be a knot in the jet). Unlike what is typical of quasar jets, there was no significant additional radio emission coinciding with the rest of the X-ray jet.Making Jets ShineX-ray-to-radio flux ratio vs. redshift, for X-ray quasar jets detected with Chandra. B3 0727+409 is shown in red (with and without the radio knot). The curves represent inverse-Compton scattering models with different magnetic field strengths. [Simionescu et al. 2016]What does this mean? To answer this, we must consider one of the outstanding questions about quasar jets: what radiation processes dominate their emission? One process possibly contributing to the X-ray emission is inverse-Compton scattering of low-energy cosmic microwave

  11. DISCOVERY OF AN EXTENDED X-RAY JET IN AP LIBRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, S.; Wagner, S. J.; Tibolla, O.

    2013-10-20

    Chandra observations of the low-energy-peaked BL Lac object (LBL) AP Librae (AP Lib) revealed the clear discovery of a non-thermal X-ray jet. AP Lib is the first LBL with an extended non-thermal X-ray jet that shows emission into the very high energy range. The X-ray jet has an extension of ∼15''(≈ 14 kpc). The X-ray jet morphology is similar to the radio jet observed with Very Large Array at 1.36 GHz emerging in the southeast direction and bends by 50° at a distance of 12'' toward the northeast. The intensity profiles of the X-ray emission studied are consistent with those found in the radio range. The spectral analysis reveals that the X-ray spectra of the core and jet region are both inverse-Compton-(IC)-dominated. This adds to a still small sample of BL Lac objects whose X-ray jets are IC-dominated and thus more similar to the high-luminosity Fanaroff-Riley II sources than to the low-luminosity Fanaroff-Riley I objects, which are usually considered to be the parent population of BL Lac objects.

  12. Discovery of an Extended X-Ray Jet in AP Librae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, S.; Wagner, S. J.; Tibolla, O.

    2013-10-01

    Chandra observations of the low-energy-peaked BL Lac object (LBL) AP Librae (AP Lib) revealed the clear discovery of a non-thermal X-ray jet. AP Lib is the first LBL with an extended non-thermal X-ray jet that shows emission into the very high energy range. The X-ray jet has an extension of ~15''(≈ 14 kpc). The X-ray jet morphology is similar to the radio jet observed with Very Large Array at 1.36 GHz emerging in the southeast direction and bends by 50° at a distance of 12'' toward the northeast. The intensity profiles of the X-ray emission studied are consistent with those found in the radio range. The spectral analysis reveals that the X-ray spectra of the core and jet region are both inverse-Compton-(IC)-dominated. This adds to a still small sample of BL Lac objects whose X-ray jets are IC-dominated and thus more similar to the high-luminosity Fanaroff-Riley II sources than to the low-luminosity Fanaroff-Riley I objects, which are usually considered to be the parent population of BL Lac objects.

  13. Formation and Destruction of Jets in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylafix, N. D.; Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Christodoulou, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries (XRBs) exhibit radio jets, whose properties depend on the X-ray spectral state e.nd history of the source. In particular, black-hole XRBs emit compact, 8teady radio jets when they are in the so-called hard state. These jets become eruptive as the sources move toward the soft state, disappear in the soft state, and then re-appear when the sources return to the hard state. The jets from neutron-star X-ray binaries are typically weaker radio emitters than the black-hole ones at the same X-ray luminosity and in some cases radio emission is detected in the soft state. Aims. Significant phenomenology has been developed to describe the spectral states of neutron-star and black-hole XRBs, and there is general agreement about the type of the accretion disk around the compact object in the various spectral states. We investigate whether the phenomenology describing the X-ray emission on one hand and the jet appearance and disappearance on the other can be put together in a consistent physical picture. Methods. We consider the so-called Poynting-Robertson cosmic battery (PRCB), which has been shown to explain in a natural way the formation of magnetic fields in the disks of AGNs and the ejection of jets. We investigate whether the PRCB can also explain the [ormation, destruction, and variability or jets in XRBs. Results. We find excellent agreement between the conditions under which the PRCB is efficient (i.e., the type of the accretion disk) and the emission or destruction of the r.adio jet. Conclusions. The disk-jet connection in XRBs can be explained in a natural way using the PRCB.

  14. X-ray Emission from YSOs, Protostellar Jets, and Accretion Eruptive Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringfellow, Guy

    2010-10-01

    Imaging in X-rays has become an extremely useful tool to identify YSOs residing in star forming regions. X-ray emission is also being measured in eruptive young stars, the FUOr-EXOr type stars, and in protostellar jets. Recent deep near-IR imaging of the North American and Pelican nebulae in JHKs and narrowband emission lines of H2 and [FeII] have revealed one of the most active, richest star forming regions in the Galaxy. Within a single EPIC FOV lies dozens of resolved outflows, jets, clusters of YSOs, and even eruptive FUOR-EXOr stars currently undergoing outbursts. I propose to obtain XMM-Newton imaging of three regions rich in all three types of objects to render x-ray detections to assist with confirming the YSOs, and to measure the x-ray flux of the eruptive stars and shocked outflows.

  15. Revised View of Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.; Adams, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the onset of ~20 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jetwas near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ''bright point'' in anedge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. Weexamined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels,including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang,which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptionsof miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. In manycases, much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperaturejet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption andthe hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point formsat the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to theformation of a standard solar flare arcade via flare (``internal'') reconnection in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thespire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergoneinterchange (''external'') reconnection with the erupting field that envelops andcarries the miniature filament. This is consistent with what we found for theonset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014), and theobservations of other workers. It is however not consistent with the basicversion of the ''emerging-flux model'' for X-ray jets. This work was supported byfunding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  16. Spectacular X-ray Jet Points Toward Cosmic Energy Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spectacular luminous spike of X rays that emanates from the vicinity of a giant black hole in the center of the radio galaxy Pictor A. The spike, or jet, is due to a beam of particles that streaks across hundreds of thousands of light years of intergalactic space toward a brilliant X-ray hot spot that marks its end point. Pictor A Image Press Image and Caption The hot spot is at least 800 thousand light years (8 times the diameter of our Milky Way galaxy) away from where the jet originates. It is thought to represent the advancing head of the jet, which brightens conspicuously where it plows into the tenuous gas of intergalactic space. The jet, powered by the giant black hole, originates from a region of space no bigger than the solar system. "Both the brightness and the spectrum of the X rays are very different from what theory predicts," Professor Andrew Wilson reported today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. Wilson, of the University of Maryland, College Park, along with Dr. Patrick Shopbell and Dr. Andrew Young, also of the University of Maryland, are submitting an article on this research to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra observations are telling us that something out there is producing many more high-energy particles than we expected," said Wilson. One possible explanation for the X rays is that shock waves along the side and head of the X-ray jet are accelerating electrons and possibly protons to speeds close to that of light. In the process the electrons are boosted to energies as high as 100 million times their own rest mass energy. These electrons lose their energy rapidly as they produce X rays, so this could be the first direct evidence of this process so far outside a galaxy. The hot spot has been seen with optical and radio telescopes. Radio telescopes have also observed a faint jet. Jets are thought to be produced by the extreme

  17. A KPC-Scale X-Ray Jet in the BL Lac Source S5 2007+777

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Donato, Davide; Cheung, C.C.; Tavecchio, F.; Maraschi, L.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray jets in AGN are commonly observed in FRII and FRI radiogalaxies, but rarely in BL Lacs, most probably due to their orientation close to the line of sight and the ensuing foreshortening effects. Only three BL Lacs are known so far to contain a kpc-scale X-ray jet. In this paper, we present the evidence for the existence of a fourth extended X-ray jet in the classical radio-selected source S5 2007+777, which for its hybrid FRI/II radio morphology has been classified as a HYMOR (HYbrid MOrphology Radio source). Our Chandra ACISS observations of this source revealed an X-ray counterpart to the 19"-long radio jet. Interestingly, the X-ray properties of the kpc-scale jet in S5 2007+777 are very similar to those observed in FRII jets. First, the X-ray morphology closely mirrors the radio one, with the X-rays being concentrated in the discrete radio knots. Second, the X-ray continuum of the jet/brightest knot is described by a very hard power law, with photon index gamma(sub x) approximately 1. Third, the optical upper limit from archival HST data implies a concave radio-to-X-ray SED. If the X-ray emission is attributed to IC/CMB with equipartition, strong beaming (delta= 13) is required, implying a very large scale (Mpc) jet. The beaming requirement can be somewhat relaxed assuming a magnetic field lower than equipartition. Alternatively, synchrotron emission from a second population of very high-energy electrons is viable. Comparison to other HYMOR jets detected with Chandra is discussed, as well as general implications for the origin of the FRI/II division.

  18. Toward Active X-ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Sanmartin, Daniel Rodriguez; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the sensitivity for detection of cosmic x-ray sources has improved by ten orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (greater than 1 m2) and finer angular resolution (less than 1.). Combined with the special requirements of grazing-incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging.requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (greater than 100 m2) of lightweight (approximately 1 kg m2 areal density) mirrors. Achieving precise and stable alignment and figure control may entail active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  19. Electrospinning jets as X-ray sources at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, P.; Mikeš, P.; Lukáš, D.

    2010-11-01

    Electrospinning jets producing nanofibres from a polymer solution by electrical forces are fine cylindrical electrodes that create extremely high electric-field strength in their vicinity at atmospheric conditions. However, this quality of electrospinning is only scarcely investigated, and the interactions of the electric fields generated by them with ambient gases are nearly unknown. Here we report on the discovery that electrospinning jets generate X-ray beams up to energies of 20 keV at atmospheric conditions. The X-ray nature of the detected radiation is incontrovertibly proved by a spectroscopic experiment. We hypothesize how the field strength increases to gigantic values in the vicinity of charged electrospinning jets, as a consequence of counterion condensation, to accelerate charged particles, at a short distance, comparable with their mean path at atmospheric pressure, up to kinetic energies that give rise to the detection of X-rays. The experimental set-up designed by us for the generation and detection of high-energy electromagnetic radiation from electrospinning is extremely simple.

  20. The Energetics of 100 KPC X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.; Marshall, Herman L.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Worrall, Diana M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Lovell, James J.; Jauncey, David L.; Perlman, Eric S.; Murphy, David W.

    We discuss the physical properties of 12 quasar jets as revealed by our Chandra X-ray and our ATCA and VLA radio observations. These 12 jets were detected in a 5 ksec snapshot survey of a sample of 20 bright flat spectrum radio sources with arcsec scale jets. When we interpret the X-ray emission as inverse Compton scattering of the radio emitting electrons on the Cosmic Microwave Background and assume equipartition we find that the emitting regions must be relativistically beamed even at distances 200 to 500 kpc from the quasar. We report on the structure of magnetic field strengths relativistic Doppler factors and kinetic flux as a function of distance from the quasar core. The minimum kinetic power is generally comparable to or larger than the quasar radiative luminosity implying that the jets must be a significant factor in the energetics of the accretion process powering the central black hole. This research has been funded in part by NASA contract NAS8-39073 to SAO and SAO SV1-61010 to MIT and NASA grant GO2-3151C to SAO. E.S.P. acknowledges support from NASA LTSA grant NAG5-9997. Part of this research was performed at JPL/CIT under contract to NASA.

  1. Blowout Jets: Hinode X-Ray Jets that Don't Fit the Standard Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly half of all H-alpha macrospicules in polar coronal holes appear to be miniature filament eruptions. This suggests that there is a large class of X-ray jets in which the jet-base magnetic arcade undergoes a blowout eruption as in a CME, instead of remaining static as in most solar X-ray jets, the standard jets that fit the model advocated by Shibata. Along with a cartoon depicting the standard model, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures expected of blowout jets in coronal X-ray images. From Hinode/XRT movies and STEREO/EUVI snapshots in polar coronal holes, we present examples of (1) X-ray jets that fit the standard model, and (2) X-ray jets that do not fit the standard model but do have features appropriate for blowout jets. These features are (1) a flare arcade inside the jet-base arcade in addition to the small flare arcade (bright point) outside that standard jets have, (2) a filament of cool (T is approximately 80,000K) plasma that erupts from the core of the jetbase arcade, and (3) an extra jet strand that should not be made by the reconnection for standard jets but could be made by reconnection between the ambient unipolar open field and the opposite-polarity leg of the filament-carrying flux-rope core field of the erupting jet-base arcade. We therefore infer that these non-standard jets are blowout jets, jets made by miniature versions of the sheared-core-arcade eruptions that make CMEs

  2. Powerful jets from black hole X-ray binaries in low/hard X-ray states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, R. P.

    2001-03-01

    Four persistent (Cygnus X-1, GX 339-4, GRS 1758-258 and 1E 1740.7-2942) and three transient (GS 2023+38, GRO J0422+32 and GS 1354-64) black hole X-ray binary systems have been extensively observed at radio wavelengths during extended periods in the low/hard X-ray state, which is characterized in X-rays by a hard power-law spectrum and strong variability. All seven systems show a persistent flat or inverted (in the sense that α>~0, where Sν~να) radio spectrum in this state, markedly different from the optically thin radio spectra exhibited by most X-ray transients within days of outburst. Furthermore, in none of the systems is a high-frequency cut-off to this spectral component detected, and there is evidence that it extends to near-infrared or optical regimes. Luminous persistent hard X-ray states in the black hole system GRS 1915+105 produce a comparable spectrum. This spectral component is considered to arise in synchrotron emission from a conical, partially self-absorbed jet, of the same genre as those originally considered for active galactic nuclei. Whatever the physical origin of the low/hard X-ray states, these self-similar outflows are an ever-present feature. The power in the jet component is likely to be a significant (>=5per cent) and approximately fixed fraction of the total accretion luminosity. The correlation between hard X-ray and synchrotron emission in all the sources implies that the jets are intimately related to the Comptonization process, and do not have very large bulk Lorentz factors, unless the hard X-ray emission is also beamed by the same factor.

  3. Modeling the X-ray light curves of Cygnus X-3. Possible role of the jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhu, O.; Hannikainen, D. C.

    2013-02-01

    Context. We address the physics behind the soft X-ray light curve asymmetries in Cygnus X-3, a well-known microquasar. Aims: Observable effects of the jet close to the line-of-sight were investigated and interpreted within the frame of light curve physics. Methods: The path of a hypothetical imprint of the jet, advected by the Wolf-Rayet-wind, was computed and its crossing with the line-of-sight during the binary orbit determined. We explored the possibility that physically this "imprint" is a formation of dense clumps triggered by jet bow shocks in the wind ("clumpy trail"). Models for X-ray continuum and emission line light curves were constructed using two absorbers: mass columns along the line-of-sight of i) the WR wind and ii) the clumpy trail, as seen from the compact star. These model light curves were compared with the observed ones from the RXTE/ASM (continuum) and Chandra/HETG (emission lines). Results: We show that the shapes of the Cyg X-3 light curves can be explained by the two absorbers using the inclination and true anomaly angles of the jet as derived from gamma-ray Fermi/LAT observations. The clumpy trail absorber is much larger for the lines than for the continuum. We suggest that the clumpy trail is a mixture of equilibrium and hot (shock heated) clumps. Conclusions: A possible way for studying jets in binary stars when the jet axis and the line-of-sight are close to each other is demonstrated. The X-ray continuum and emission line light curves of Cygnus X-3 can be explained by two absorbers: the WR companion wind plus an absorber lying in the jet path (clumpy trail). We propose that the clumpy trail absorber is due to dense clumps triggered by jet bow shocks.

  4. NSLS-II X-Ray Diagnostics Development

    SciTech Connect

    ILINSKI, P.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II x-ray diagnostics will provide continuous online data of electron beam dimensions, which will be used to derive electron beam emittance and energy spread. It will also provide information of electron beam tilt for coupling evaluation. X-ray diagnostics will be based on imaging of bending magnet and three-pole wiggler synchrotron radiation sources. Diagnostics from three-pole wiggler source will be used to derive particles energy spread. Beta and dispersion functions will have to be evaluated for emittance and particles energy spread calculations. Due to small vertical source sizes imaging need to be performed in x-ray energy range. X-ray optics with high numerical aperture, such as compound refractive lens, will be used to achieve required spatial resolution. Optical setups with different magnifications in horizontal and vertical directions fill be employed to deal with large aspect ratio of the source. X-ray diagnostics setup will include x-ray imaging optics, monochromatization, x-ray imaging and recording components.

  5. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    SciTech Connect

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Sikora, Marek; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bechtold, Jill; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  6. The Active Nucleus and 200-KPC X-Ray Jet in NGC 6251

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2002-09-01

    The jet of the FRI radio galaxy NGC 6251 is known to be an X-ray source on scales out to 200 kpc from the nucleus, making it the largest-scale FRI X-ray jet known. However, existing observations do not provide adequate information on the structure or spectrum of any of the X-ray jet components or on the spectrum of the active nucleus. We propose to make a sensitive observation of this unique object. We will measure the X-ray spectrum at multiple points along the jet to determine the emission mechanism and search for differences in particle acceleration as a function of distance. We will also determine whether the hot gas around the jet has pressure sufficient to confine it, and we will make a good spectrum of the X-ray nucleus for comparison with radio and optical observations.

  7. Constraints on the Nature of Jets from KPC Scale X-Ray Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, D. E.; Krawczynski, H.

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by the large number of jets detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and by the inverse Compton X-ray emission model (IC/CMB) for relativistic jets, we revisit two basic questions: ``If the medium that carries the jet's energy consists of hot electrons, can we use the physical length of the jet to constrain the maximum electron energy?'' and ``Why do jets have knots?'' Based on the two non-thermal emission processes for X-rays from jets, we consider constraints on the jet medium and other properties from these two simple questions. We argue that hot pairs cannot be the dominant constituent of the medium responsible for the jet's momentum flux and that some mechanisms for producing fluctuating brightness along jets (rather than a monotonically decreasing intensity) are precluded by observed jet morphologies.

  8. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  9. Detecting Relativistic X-Ray Jets in High-redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, Kathryn; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, Łukasz; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Stein, Nathan; Stampoulis, Vasileios; van Dyk, David A.; Wardle, J. F. C.; Lee, N. P.; Harris, D. E.; Schwartz, D. A.; Donato, Davide; Maraschi, Laura; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray images of a sample of 11 quasars that are known to contain kiloparsec scale radio jets. The sample consists of five high-redshift (z ≥ 3.6) flat-spectrum radio quasars, and six intermediate redshift (2.1 < z < 2.9) quasars. The data set includes four sources with integrated steep radio spectra and seven with flat radio spectra. A total of 25 radio jet features are present in this sample. We apply a Bayesian multi-scale image reconstruction method to detect and measure the X-ray emission from the jets. We compute deviations from a baseline model that does not include the jet, and compare observed X-ray images with those computed with simulated images where no jet features exist. This allows us to compute p-value upper bounds on the significance that an X-ray jet is detected in a pre-determined region of interest. We detected 12 of the features unambiguously, and an additional six marginally. We also find residual emission in the cores of three quasars and in the background of one quasar that suggest the existence of unresolved X-ray jets. The dependence of the X-ray to radio luminosity ratio on redshift is a potential diagnostic of the emission mechanism, since the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons (IC/CMB) is thought to be redshift dependent, whereas in synchrotron models no clear redshift dependence is expected. We find that the high-redshift jets have X-ray to radio flux ratios that are marginally inconsistent with those from lower redshifts, suggesting that either the X-ray emissions are due to the IC/CMB rather than the synchrotron process, or that high-redshift jets are qualitatively different.

  10. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, Sebastian; Harris, D.E.; Marshall, H.L.; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  11. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  12. Miniature Filament Eruptions and their Reconnections in X-Ray Jets: Evidence for a New Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of approximately10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size less than approximately 10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the jet in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament is ejected, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions. They are evidently produced the same way as an on-disk coronal jet we observed in Adams et al. (2014); that on-disk jet had no obvious emerging magnetic field in its base. We conclude that, for many jets, the standard idea of X-ray jets forming from reconnection between emerging flux and preexisting coronal field is incorrect. ACS and RLM were supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  13. X-ray jets from B2224+65: A Middle-aged Pulsar's New Trick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Johnson, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars, though typically not aged ones, are believed to be an important source of energetic cosmic rays. Therefore, it may not be too surprising to detect an X-ray jet associated with the middle-aged radio/X-ray pulsar B2224+65, which is well known for its very high proper motion and its trailing ``Guitar Nebula''. Most unexpected, however, is that this jet is offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. Furthermore, an X-ray counter jet and a faint X-ray trail associated with the ``Guitar Nebula'' are now identified in the combined data set of three epoch Chandra observations with a total exposure of 200 ks. We are carrying out a detailed measurements of the X-ray spectral variation with time and across the jets and are critically testing scenarios proposed to explain this enigmatic phenomenon. The study should have strong implications for understanding the origin of cosmic rays, as well as similar linear nonthermal X-ray-emitting features that are associated with more distant pulsars, especially pulsar wind nebula candidates in the central 100 pc region of the Galaxy.

  14. X-Ray Telescope Onboard Astro-E. II. Ground-Based X-Ray Characterization.

    PubMed

    Shibata, R; Ishida, M; Kunieda, H; Endo, T; Honda, H; Misaki, K; Ishida, J; Imamura, K; Hidaka, Y; Maeda, M; Tawara, Y; Ogasaka, Y; Furuzawa, A; Watanabe, M; Terashima, Y; Yoshioka, T; Okajima, T; Yamashita, K; Serlemitsos, P J; Soong, Y; Chan, K W

    2001-08-01

    X-ray characterization measurements of the x-ray telescope (XRT) onboard the Astro-E satellite were carried out at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan) x-ray beam facility by means of a raster scan with a narrow x-ray pencil beam. The on-axis half-power diameter (HPD) was evaluated to be 1.8?-2.2?, irrespective of the x-ray energy. The on-axis effective areas of the XRTs for x-ray imaging spectrometers (XISs) were approximately 440, 320, 240, and 170 cm(2) at energies of 1.49, 4.51, 8.04, and 9.44 keV, respectively. Those of the x-ray spectrometer (XRS) were larger by 5-10%. The replication method introduced for reflector production significantly improved the imaging capability of the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophyics (ASCA) XRT, whose HPD is ~3.6?. The increase in the effective area by a factor of 1.5-2.5, depending upon the x-ray energy, compared with that of the ASCA, was brought about by mechanical scale up and longer focal lengths. The off-axis HPDs were almost the same as those obtained on the optical axis. The field of view is defined as the off-axis angle at which the effective area becomes half of the on-axis value. The diameter of the field of view was ~19? at 1.49 keV, decreasing with increasing x-ray energy, and became ~13? at 9.44 keV. The intensity of stray light and the distribution of this kind of light on the focal plane were measured at the large off-axis angles 30? and 60?. In the entire XIS field of view (25.4 mm x 25.4 mm), the intensity of the stray light caused by a pointlike x-ray source became at most 1% of the same pointlike source that was on the optical axis.

  15. Jet power and feedback from the newly-discovered radio/optical/X-ray microquasar S26 in NGC 7793

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Corbel, Stephane; Pakull, Manfred; Motch, Christian

    2009-07-01

    We have discovered an exceptional radio/optical/X-ray microquasar in the Sculptor galaxy NGC7793 (distance of 3.4 Mpc), with a large (300 x 150 pc) shock-ionized bubble, and X-ray hot spots where the collimated jet hits the interstellar medium. The radio nebula has an integrated flux of 1.2 mJy at 6 cm (more luminous than Cas A). The system resembles the famous Galactic microquasar SS433, but on an even grander scale. We propose deeper radio observations at higher spatial resolution with the ATCA: to identify the radio hot spots; to infer the jet power from the synchrotron luminosity of the hot spots; to determine the shape of the radio cocoon and compare it with the H-alpha, HeII 4686 and X-ray nebulae; to estimate the total (integrated) energy injected in the nebula by the jet/wind, and constrain its age; to search for the radio core. Our combined radio, X-ray and optical study of this source will help us model the radiative and mechanical power budget of accreting black holes, and their feedback onto the interstellar or intergalactic medium.

  16. Searching for X-Ray Variability in Resolved Jets from Radio-Loud AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeNigris, Natalie; Meyer, Eileen T.; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2017-01-01

    Nearly all large galaxies host a super-massive black hole (SMBH) at their centers, featuring an accretion disk that may become so luminious that it outshines the host galaxy. In some cases, accreting SMBH may also produce bipolar jets of fully-ionized relativistic plasma. The origin of these jets is not fully understood; however, they are large enough to be resolved by high-resolution telescopes such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra Space Telescope. Through multi-wavelength observations it has been shown that these jets produce synchrotron (ST) radiation; still, the nature of X-ray emission from the jets is a long-standing mystery. We propose that any variability observed would conclusively rule out one of the two competing models for the X-ray emission, namely, the inverse-Compton (IC) model where relativistic electrons in the jet upscatter ambient CMB photons to produce electrons. In this case, the flux of the jet should remain steady over time. On the other hand, by detecting significant variability, the ST radiation model would be preferred. By measuring the flux in jet knots over multiple observations of a single source, we tested variability in the X-ray emission of jets. Observations were obtained using Chandra’s open-source archive of X-ray imaging data, and processed using the open-source processing package CIAO.

  17. FIBRILLAR CHROMOSPHERIC SPICULE-LIKE COUNTERPARTS TO AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET AND SOFT X-RAY BLOWOUT CORONAL JET

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Harra, Louise K. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.go

    2010-10-20

    We observe an erupting jet feature in a solar polar coronal hole, using data from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), and X-Ray Telescope (XRT), with supplemental data from STEREO/EUVI. From extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) images we identify the erupting feature as a blowout coronal jet: in SXRs it is a jet with a bright base, and in EUV it appears as an eruption of relatively cool ({approx}50,000 K) material of horizontal size scale {approx}30'' originating from the base of the SXR jet. In SOT Ca II H images, the most pronounced analog is a pair of thin ({approx}1'') ejections at the locations of either of the two legs of the erupting EUV jet. These Ca II features eventually rise beyond 45'', leaving the SOT field of view, and have an appearance similar to standard spicules except that they are much taller. They have velocities similar to that of 'type II' spicules, {approx}100 km s{sup -1}, and they appear to have spicule-like substructures splitting off from them with horizontal velocity {approx}50 km s{sup -1}, similar to the velocities of splitting spicules measured by Sterling et al. Motions of splitting features and of other substructures suggest that the macroscopic EUV jet is spinning or unwinding as it is ejected. This and earlier work suggest that a subpopulation of Ca II type II spicules are the Ca II manifestation of portions of larger scale erupting magnetic jets. A different subpopulation of type II spicules could be blowout jets occurring on a much smaller horizontal size scale than the event we observe here.

  18. Formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in magnetized protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustamujic, S.; Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; López-Santiago, J.

    2016-12-01

    Context. X-ray observations of protostellar jets show evidence of strong shocks heating the plasma up to temperatures of a few million degrees. In some cases, the shocked features appear to be stationary. They are interpreted as shock diamonds. Aims: We investigate the physics that guides the formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in protostellar jets; the role of the magnetic field in determining the location, stability, and detectability in X-rays of these shocks; and the physical properties of the shocked plasma. Methods: We performed a set of 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations that modelled supersonic jets ramming into a magnetized medium and explored different configurations of the magnetic field. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. We compared the model results with observations, via the emission measure and the X-ray luminosity synthesized from the simulations. Results: Our model explains the formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in a natural way. The magnetic field collimates the plasma at the base of the jet and forms a magnetic nozzle there. After an initial transient, the nozzle leads to the formation of a shock diamond at its exit which is stationary over the time covered by the simulations ( 40-60 yr; comparable with timescales of the observations). The shock generates a point-like X-ray source located close to the base of the jet with luminosity comparable with that inferred from X-ray observations of protostellar jets. For the range of parameters explored, the evolution of the post-shock plasma is dominated by the radiative cooling, whereas the thermal conduction slightly affects the structure of the shock. A movie is available at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Hard X-Ray Burst Detected From Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment Magnetic Reconnection Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Ryan S.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    In the Caltech plasma jet experiment a 100 kA MHD driven jet becomes kink unstable leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that quickly causes a magnetic reconnection event. Movies show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is simultaneous with voltage spikes across the electrodes that provide the current that drives the jet. Hard x-rays between 4 keV and 9 keV have now been observed using an x-ray scintillator detector mounted just outside of a kapton window on the vacuum chamber. Preliminary results indicate that the timing of the x-ray burst coincides with a voltage spike on the electrodes occurring in association with the Rayleigh-Taylor event. The x-ray signal accompanies the voltage spike and Rayleigh-Taylor event in approximately 50% of the shots. A possible explanation for why the x-ray signal is sometimes missing is that the magnetic reconnection event may be localized to a specific region of the plasma outside the line of sight of the scintillator. The x-ray signal has also been seen accompanying the voltage spike when no Rayleigh-Taylor is observed. This may be due to the interframe timing on the camera being longer than the very short duration of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  20. Evidence for Simultaneous Jets and Disk Winds in Luminous Low-mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen; Neilsen, Joseph; Allen, Jessamyn L.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Fender, Rob; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Schulz, Norbert

    2016-10-01

    Recent work on jets and disk winds in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) suggests that they are to a large extent mutually exclusive, with jets observed in spectrally hard states and disk winds observed in spectrally soft states. In this paper we use existing literature on jets and disk winds in the luminous neutron star (NS) LMXB GX 13+1, in combination with archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, to show that this source is likely able to produce jets and disk winds simultaneously. We find that jets and disk winds occur in the same location on the source’s track in its X-ray color-color diagram. A further study of literature on other luminous LMXBs reveals that this behavior is more common, with indications for simultaneous jets and disk winds in the black hole LMXBs V404 Cyg and GRS 1915+105 and the NS LMXBs Sco X-1 and Cir X-1. For the three sources for which we have the necessary spectral information, we find that simultaneous jets/winds all occur in their spectrally hardest states. Our findings indicate that in LMXBs with luminosities above a few tens of percent of the Eddington luminosity, jets and disk winds are not mutually exclusive, and the presence of disk winds does not necessarily result in jet suppression.

  1. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main

    We study a detailed broad-band X-ray/UV emission from the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 based on two XMM-Newton and single Swift/XRT observations. Both XMM-Newton observations show the soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV when the best-fit 2 - 10 keV power law is extrapolated down to 0.3 keV. We find the blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc and Comptonized disc emission both describe the observed soft excess well. We find a remarkable trend of decreasing UV flux with increasing soft X-ray excess and power law emission. We suggest that this could be due to that the external edge of corona hide a fraction of accretion disk. Co-Author: Prof. Gulab C. Dewangan (IUCAA), Prof. Ranjeev Misra (IUCAA), Pramod Kumar (Nanded university)

  2. Bayesian Multiscale Analysis of X-Ray Jet Features in High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, Kathryn; Siemiginowska, A.; Kashyap, V.; Stein, N.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission of powerful quasar jets may be a result of the inverse Compton (IC) process in which the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons gain energy by interactions with the jet’s relativistic electrons. However, there is no definite evidence that IC/CMB process is responsible for the observed X-ray emission of large scale jets. A step toward understanding the X-ray emission process is to study the Radio and X-ray morphologies of the jet. We implement a sophisticated Bayesian image analysis program, Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) (Esch et al. 2004; Conners & van Dyk 2007), to analyze jet features in 11 Chandra images of high redshift quasars (z ~ 2 - 4.8). Out of the 36 regions where knots are visible in the radio jets, nine showed detectable X-ray emission. We measured the ratios of the X-ray and radio luminosities of the detected features and found that they are consistent with the CMB radiation relationship. We derived a range of the bulk lorentz factor (Γ) for detected jet features under the CMB jet emission model. There is no discernible trend of Γ with redshift within the sample. The efficiency of the X-ray emission between the detected jet feature and the corresponding quasar also shows no correlation with redshift. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and the Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no.1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution, and by NASA Contract NAS8-39073 to the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC). This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and Chandra Source Catalog, and software provided by the CXC in the application packages CIAO, ChIPS, and Sherpa. We thank Teddy Cheung for providing the VLA radio images. Connors, A., & van Dyk, D. A. 2007, Statistical Challenges in Modern Astronomy IV, 371, 101 Esch, D. N., Connors, A., Karovska, M., & van Dyk, D. A. 2004, ApJ, 610, 1213

  3. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüring, T.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Rutishauser, S.; David, C.; Hertz, H. M.; Stampanoni, M.

    2013-08-01

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ˜1012 photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Witnessing the Gradual Slowdown of Powerful Extragalactic Jets: The X-Ray-Optical-Radio Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georganopoulos, Markos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    A puzzling feature of the Chandra-detected quasar jets is that their X-ray emission decreases faster along the jet than their radio emission, resulting from an outward-increasing radio-to-X-ray ratio. In some sources this behavior is so extreme that the radio emission peak is located clearly downstream of that of the X-rays. This is a rather unanticipated behavior given that the inverse Compton nature of the X-rays and the synchrotron radio emission are attributed to roughly the same electrons of the jet's nonthermal electron distribution. In this letter we show that this morphological behavior can result from the gradual deceleration of a relativistic flow and that the offsets in peak emission at different wavelengths carry the imprint of this deceleration. This notion is consistent with another recent finding, namely, that the jets feeding the terminal hot spots of powerful radio galaxies and quasars are still relativistic with Lorentz factors GAMMA approximately 2-3. The picture of the kinematics of powerful jets emerging from these considerations is that they remain relativistic as they gradually decelerate from kiloparsec scales to the hot spots, where, in a final collision with the intergalactic medium, they slow down rapidly to the subrelativistic velocities of the hot spot advance speed.

  5. Wind-jet interaction in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Jets in high-mass X-ray binaries can strongly interact with the stellar wind from the donor. The interaction leads, in particular, to formation of recollimation shocks. The shocks can then accelerate electrons in the jet and lead to enhanced emission, observable in the radio and gamma-ray bands. DooSoo, Zdziarski & Heinz (2016) have formulated a condition on the maximum jet power (as a function of the jet velocity and wind rate and velocity) at which such shocks form. This criterion can explain the large difference in the radio and gamma-ray loudness between Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3. The orbital modulation of radio emission observed in Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3 allows a measurement of the location of the height along the jet where the bulk of emission at a given frequency occurs. Strong absorption of X-rays in the wind of Cyg X-3 is required to account for properties of the correlation of the radio emission with soft and hard X-rays. That absorption can also account for the unusual spectral and timing X-ray properties of this source.

  6. X-ray jets from B2224+65: A Middle-aged Pulsar's New Trick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    2014-11-01

    B2224+65 is well known to have a very high proper motion and to be associated with the ``Guitar Nebula'' in the opposite direction of the motion. A jet-like X-ray feature, however, is offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. Furthermore, the X-ray luminosity and morphology of the feature changed significantly between three Chandra observations. We are carrying out a detailed measurements of the X-ray spectral variation with time and across the feature and are critically testing scenarios proposed to explain this enigmatic system. The study will also have strong implications for understanding somewhat similar linear nonthermal X-ray-emitting features that have been identified in the central 100 pc region of the Galaxy.

  7. Small-Scale Filament Eruptions Leading to Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse; Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the onset of ~10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Å, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Å, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare arcade in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scalechromospheric filament. The spire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergone interchange reconnection with the erupting field that envelops and carries the miniature filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions via ``internal'' and ``external'' reconnection of the erupting field. This is consistent with what we found for the onset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014). This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  8. Relativistic baryonic jets from an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji-Feng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Song; Justham, Stephen; Lu, You-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Qing-Zhong; di Stefano, Rosanne; Guo, Jin-Cheng; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Álvarez, Pedro; Cao, Yi; Kulkarni, Shri

    2015-12-01

    The formation of relativistic jets by an accreting compact object is one of the fundamental mysteries of astrophysics. Although the theory is poorly understood, observations of relativistic jets from systems known as microquasars (compact binary stars) have led to a well established phenomenology. Relativistic jets are not expected to be produced by sources with soft or supersoft X-ray spectra, although two such systems are known to produce relatively low-velocity bipolar outflows. Here we report the optical spectra of an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source (ULS) in the nearby galaxy M81 (M81 ULS-1; refs 9, 10). Unexpectedly, the spectra show blueshifted, broad Hα emission lines, characteristic of baryonic jets with relativistic speeds. These time-variable emission lines have projected velocities of about 17 per cent of the speed of light, and seem to be similar to those from the prototype microquasar SS 433 (refs 11, 12). Such relativistic jets are not expected to be launched from white dwarfs, and an origin from a black hole or a neutron star is hard to reconcile with the persistence of M81 ULS-1’s soft X-rays. Thus the unexpected presence of relativistic jets in a ULS challenges canonical theories of jet formation, but might be explained by a long-speculated, supercritically accreting black hole with optically thick outflows.

  9. Relativistic baryonic jets from an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Feng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Song; Justham, Stephen; Lu, You-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Qing-Zhong; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Guo, Jin-Cheng; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Álvarez, Pedro; Cao, Yi; Kulkarni, Shri

    2015-12-03

    The formation of relativistic jets by an accreting compact object is one of the fundamental mysteries of astrophysics. Although the theory is poorly understood, observations of relativistic jets from systems known as microquasars (compact binary stars) have led to a well established phenomenology. Relativistic jets are not expected to be produced by sources with soft or supersoft X-ray spectra, although two such systems are known to produce relatively low-velocity bipolar outflows. Here we report the optical spectra of an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source (ULS) in the nearby galaxy M81 (M81 ULS-1; refs 9, 10). Unexpectedly, the spectra show blueshifted, broad Hα emission lines, characteristic of baryonic jets with relativistic speeds. These time-variable emission lines have projected velocities of about 17 per cent of the speed of light, and seem to be similar to those from the prototype microquasar SS 433 (refs 11, 12). Such relativistic jets are not expected to be launched from white dwarfs, and an origin from a black hole or a neutron star is hard to reconcile with the persistence of M81 ULS-1's soft X-rays. Thus the unexpected presence of relativistic jets in a ULS challenges canonical theories of jet formation, but might be explained by a long-speculated, supercritically accreting black hole with optically thick outflows.

  10. Observations of solar X-ray and EUV jets and their related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Bučík, R.; Guo, L.-J.; Nitta, N.

    2016-11-01

    Solar jets are fast-moving, elongated brightenings related to ejections seen in both images and spectra on all scales from barely visible chromospheric jets to coronal jets extending up to a few solar radii. The largest, most powerful jets are the source of type III radio bursts, energetic electrons and ions with greatly enhanced 3He and heavy element abundances. The frequent coronal jets from polar and equatorial coronal holes may contribute to the solar wind. The primary acceleration mechanism for all jets is believed to be release of magnetic stress via reconnection; however the energy buildup depends on the jets' source environment. In this review, we discuss how certain features of X-ray and EUV jets, such as their repetition rate and association with radio emission, depends on their underlying photospheric field configurations (active regions, polar and equatorial coronal holes, and quiet Sun).

  11. X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray excited optical luminescence studies of II-VI semiconducting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael Wayne

    2010-06-01

    Various II-VI semiconducting nanomaterials such as ZnO-ZnS nanoribbons (NRs), CdSxSe1-x nanostructures, ZnS:Mn NRs, ZnS:Mn,Eu nanoprsims (NPs), ZnO:Mn nanopowders, and ZnO:Co nanopowders were synthesized for study. These materials were characterized by techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, element dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The electronic and optical properties of these nanomaterials were studied by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) techniques, using tuneable soft X-rays from a synchrotron light source. The complementary nature ofthe XAFS and XEOL techniques give site, element and chemical specific measurements which allow a better understanding of the interplay and role of each element in the system. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of ZnS powder in a limited oxygen environment resulted in side-by-side biaxial ZnO-ZnS NR heterostructures. The resulting NRs contained distinct wurtzite ZnS and wurtzite ZnO components with widths of 10--100 nm and 20 --500 nm, respectively and a uniform interface region of 5-15 nm. XAFS and XEOL measurements revealed the luminescence of ZnO-ZnS NRs is from the ZnO component. The luminescence of CdSxSe1-x nanostructures is shown to be dependent on the S to Se ratio, with the band-gap emission being tunable between that of pure CdS and CdSe. Excitation of the CdSxSe 1-x nanostructures by X-ray in XEOL has revealed new de-excitation channels which show a defect emission band not seen by laser excitation. CVD of Mn2+ doped ZnS results in nanostructures with luminescence dominated by the yellow Mn2+ emission due to energy transfer from the ZnS host to the Mn dopant sites. The addition of EuCl3 to the reactants in the CVD process results in a change in morphology from NR to NP. Zn1-xMnxO and Zn1-xCOxO nanopowders were prepared by sol-gel methods at dopant concentrations

  12. The coupling of a disk corona and a jet for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin

    2016-02-01

    We interpret the radio/X-ray correlation of L R ~ L X ~1.4 for L X/L Edd >~ 10-3 with a detailed disk corona-jet model, in which the accretion flow and the jet are connected by a parameter, η, describing the fraction of the matter in the accretion flow ejected outward to form the jet. We calculate L R and L X at different Ṁ, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for L X/L Edd > 10-3. It is found that the value of η for this radio/X-ray correlation for L X/L Edd > 10-3, is systematically less than that of the case for L X/L Edd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  13. From Cradle To Grave: Chandra Discovers The History Of Black Hole X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, astronomers have tracked the life cycle of X-ray jets from a black hole. A series of images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed that as the jets evolved, they traveled at near light speed for several years before slowing down and fading. "Watching these jets slow down and disappear is like watching a time-lapse movie of the rise and fall of the Bronze Age," said Stephane Corbel of the University of Paris VII and the French Atomic Energy Commission in Saclay, lead author of a paper in the October 4th issue of the journal Science. "Since the jets came from a stellar black hole in our galaxy, we watched in a few years developments that would have taken thousands of years to occur around a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy." Astronomers have been using Chandra and radio telescopes to observe two opposing jets of high-energy particles emitted following an outburst, first detected in 1998 by NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, from the double-star system XTE J1550-564. The X-ray jets, which require a continuous source of trillion-volt electrons to remain bright, were observed moving at about half the speed of light. Four years later, they are now more than three light years apart and slowing down. One of the jets has recently been observed to fade. XTE J1550-564 Time-Lapse Movie XTE J1550-564 Time-Lapse Movie "The ejection of jets from stellar and supermassive black holes is a common occurrence in the universe, so it is extremely important to understand the process," said John Tomsick of the University of California, San Diego, and author of an Astrophysical Journal paper scheduled for January 2003 publication describing the research. "For the first time, we have observed a jet from the initial explosion until it slowed and faded." The observations indicate that one jet, the eastern jet, is moving along a line tilted toward the Earth whereas the western jet is pointed away from the Earth. This alignment explains why the

  14. The pulsar B2224+65 and its jets: a two epoch X-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Wang, Q. D.

    2010-10-01

    We present an X-ray morphological and spectroscopic study of the pulsar B2224+65 and its apparent jet-like X-ray features based on two epoch Chandra observations. The main X-ray feature, which shows a large directional offset from the ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula (Guitar nebula), is broader in apparent width and shows evidence for spectral hardening (at 95 per cent confidence) in the second epoch compared to the first. Furthermore, the sharp leading edge of the feature is found to have a proper motion consistent with that of the pulsar (~180 mas yr-1). The combined data set also provides evidence for the presence of a counter feature, albeit substantially fainter and shorter than the main one. Additional spectral trends along the major and minor axes of the feature are only marginally detected in the two epoch data, including softening counter to the direction of proper motion. Possible explanations for the X-ray features include diffuse energetic particles being confined by an organized ambient magnetic field as well as a simple ballistic jet interpretation; however, the former may have difficulty in explaining observed spectral trends between epochs and along the feature's major axis, whereas the latter may struggle to elucidate its linearity. Given the low counting statistics available in the two epoch observations, it remains difficult to determine a physical production scenario for these enigmatic X-ray emitting features with any certainty.

  15. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  16. Catching A Symbiotic Star's Pulsed Jet in the Act: X-Ray Observations of MWC560

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Although jets are ubiquitous and important components in many different astrophysical systems, their formation remains very poorly understood. The pole-on jet in the symbiotic system MWC 560 serves as a Rosetta Stone for understanding pulsed, highly collimated, jets. We propose to use XMM for X-ray observations of the symbiotic star MWC 560. It provides us with a unique opportunity to observe the launch site of the jet, the shock-induced propagation of the jet, and its end point, where the ejecta merge into the jet head. We detected with XMM a hard component from the accretion site and a soft component associated with the jet. Further observations are required for solving questions concerning the accretion process and for characterizing the soft component.

  17. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K.

    2016-03-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 using a 137 ks long and another 13 ks short XMM-Newton observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing 76.9 ± 4.9 per cent in 2012 and 58.8 ± 10.2 per cent in 2001 in the 0.3-2 keV band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of ˜20 ks reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the power-law components. The fractional variability amplitude Fvar derived from EPIC-pn light curves at different energy bands is nearly constant (Fvar ˜ 20 per cent). This is in contrast to other active galactic nuclei where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the `lamppost' model. Thus, the variations in power-law emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due to the changes of height of compact corona. The variable UV emission (Fvar ˜ 1 per cent) is uncorrelated to any of the X-ray components on short time-scales suggesting that the UV emission is not dominated by the reprocessed emission. The gradual observed decline in the UV emission in 2012 may be related to the secular decline due to the changes in the accretion rate. In this case, the short term X-ray variability is not due to the changes in the seed photons but intrinsic to the hot corona.

  18. Structure of the X-Ray Emission from the Jet of 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Lee, J. C.; Ogle, P. M.; Drake, J. J.; Fruscione, A.; Grimes, J.; Harris, D.; Kraft, R.; Pease, D.; Schwartz, D.; Siemiginowska, A.; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present images from four Chandra observations of the quasar 3C 273. The zeroth order images from two grating observations using the AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) detector are used to examine the structure and spectrum of the jet. The jet has at least four distinct features which are not resolved in previous observations. Using jet feature nomenclature based on HST observations, we find that knot Al is very bright in X-rays. We have measured the X-ray spectrum of this X-ray knot for the first time, obtaining a photon index of 1.36 +/- 0.11 and a flux density of 37 +/- 4 nJy at 1 keV. Combining this measurement with lower frequency data shows that a pure synchrotron model can fit the spectrum of knot Al from 4 GHz to 5 keV (over nine decades in energy) without a change of spectral slope. Knot A2 is also detected and is somewhat blended with knot B1 but synchrotron emission is not likely to explain the X-ray emission due to the spectral turnover observed in the optical-UV band. No other knots are clearly detected but there is an indication of weak emission from the eastern portion of knot H3. near the "head," which is radio-bright. There is diffuse flux which extends from 14 arcsec to 20 arcsec which shows curvature that is comparable to the optical flux found by Bahcall, et al.

  19. Fibrillar Chromospheric Spicule-Like Counterparts to an EUV and Soft X-Ray Blowout Coronal Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louise K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    We observe an erupting jet feature in a solar polar coronal hole, using data from Hinode/SOT, EIS, and XRT, with supplemental data from STEREO/EUVI. From EUV and soft X-ray (SXR) images we identify the erupting feature as a blowout coronal jet: in SXRs it is a jet with bright base, and in EUV it appears as an eruption of relatively cool (approximately 50,000 K) material of horizontal size scale approximately 30" originating from the base of the SXR jet. In SOT Ca II H images the most pronounced analog is a pair of thin (approximately 1") ejections, at the locations of either of the two legs of the erupting EUV jet. These Ca II features eventually rise beyond 45", leaving the SOT field of view, and have an appearance similar to standard spicules except that they are much taller. They have velocities similar to that of "type II" spicules, approximately 100 kilometers per second, and they appear to have spicule-like substructures splitting off from them with horizontal velocity approximately 50 kilometers per second, similar to the velocities of splitting spicules measured by Sterling et al. (2010). Motions of splitting features and of other substructures suggest that the macroscopic EUV jet is spinning or unwinding as it is ejected. This and earlier work suggests that a sub-population of Ca II type II spicules are the Ca II manifestation of portions of larger-scale erupting magnetic jets. A different sub-population of type II spicules could be blowout jets occurring on a much smaller horizontal size scale than the event we observe here.

  20. EVIDENCE FOR POLAR X-RAY JETS AS SOURCES OF MICROSTREAM PEAKS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2012-05-01

    It is proposed that the interplanetary manifestations of X-ray jets observed in solar polar coronal holes during periods of low solar activity are the peaks of the so-called microstreams observed in the fast polar solar wind. These microstreams exhibit velocity fluctuations of {+-}35 km s{sup -1}, higher kinetic temperatures, slightly higher proton fluxes, and slightly higher abundances of the low-first-ionization-potential element iron relative to oxygen ions than the average polar wind. Those properties can all be explained if the fast microstreams result from the magnetic reconnection of bright-point loops, which leads to X-ray jets which, in turn, result in solar polar plumes. Because most of the microstream peaks are bounded by discontinuities of solar origin, jets are favored over plumes for the majority of the microstream peaks.

  1. Demonstration of a low electromagnetic pulse laser-driven argon gas jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, N. L.; Aurand, B.; Brown, C. G.; Constantin, C. G.; Everson, E. T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Tauschwitz, A.; Niemann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Laser-produced plasmas are often used as bright x-ray backlighters for time-resolved plasma diagnostics, but such backlighters simultaneously generate damaging electromagnetic pulse (EMP). A laser-driven Ar gas jet x-ray source has been measured with magnetic flux B-dot probes to produce 20 times ±37% less integrated EMP in the 0.5-2.5 GHz band than a solid chlorinated plastic foil, while retaining 85% of the laser to ≈3 keV x-ray conversion efficiency. These results are important for future backlighter development, since tailoring target density may provide a way to reduce EMP even as laser power increases.

  2. Development of light weight replicated x-ray optics, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Choi, B.; Jensen, C.; Kilaru, K.; Ramsey, B.; Sampath, S.

    2014-07-01

    NASA'S future X-ray astronomy missions will require X-ray optics that have large effective area while remaining lightweight, and cost effective. Some X-ray missions, such as XMM-Newton[1] , and the upcoming Spectrum-Röntgen- Gamma[2] mission use an electroformed nickel replication (ENR) process[3] to fabricate the nested grazing incidence X-ray telescope mirror shells for an array of moderate resolution, moderate effective area telescopes. We are developing a process to fabricate metal-ceramic replicated optics which will be lighter weight than current nickel replicated technology. Our technology development takes full advantage of the replication technique by fabricating large diameter mirrors with thin cross sections allowing maximum nesting and increase in collecting area. This will lead to future cost effective missions with large effective area and lightweight optics with good angular resolution. Recent results on fabrication and testing of these optics is presented.

  3. X-ray jet emission from the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1550-564 with CHANDRA in 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, J. A.; Corbel, S.; Fender, R. P.; Miller, J. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Tzioumis, T.; Wijnands, R.; Kaaret, P.

    We have discovered an X-ray jet due to material ejected from the black hole X-ray transient XTE J1550-564 (see also the Corbel et al. contribution to these proceedings). We present results from three Chandra observations made between 2000 June and 2000 September. For these observations, a source is present that moves in an eastward direction away from the point source associated with the compact object. The separation between the new source and the compact object changes from 21''.3 in June to 23''.4 in September, implying a proper motion of 21.2 ± 7.2 mas day-1, a projected separation of 0.31-0.85 pc and a jet velocity >0.22c for a source distance range of d = 2.8-7.6 kpc. These observations represent the first time that an X-ray jet proper motion measurement has been obtained for any accretion powered Galactic or extra-galactic source. Along with a 1998 VLBI proper motion measurement, the Chandra proper motion indicates that the jet decelerated between 1998 and 2000. Although we cannot definitively determine the X-ray emission mechanism, a synchrotron origin is viable and may provide the simplest explanation for the observations.

  4. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X-rays

  5. POTENTIAL GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: guwm@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-06-20

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from the jets of low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, jet dynamics are dominated by magnetic and proton–matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339–4. The results not only can reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339–4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by the Fermi and CTA telescopes. Future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, which could be employed to distinguish the origin of X-ray emissions.

  6. Blowout Jets: Evidence from Hinode/XRT for X-Ray Jets Made by Blowout Eruption of the Emerging Bipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2009-01-01

    Yamauchi et al (2004, ApJ, 605, 511) found that there are two structurally and dynamically distinct types of H macrospicules in polar coronal holes: single-column jet macrospicules and erupting-loop macrospicules. The structure and motion of the single-column jet macrospicules fit the standard Shibata reconnection picture for solar X-ray jets (Shibata et al 1992, PASJ, 44, L173). The form and motion of the erupting-loop macrospicules is reminiscent of the ejective eruption of the sheared-core-field flux rope in the filament-eruption birth of a bubble-type coronal mass ejection (CME). That roughly half of all polar H macrospicules were observed to be erupting-loop macrospicules suggests that there should be a corresponding large class of X-ray jets in which the emerging bipole at the base of the jet undergoes a blowout eruption as in a bubble-type CME, instead of staying closed as in the standard picture for X-ray jets. Along with a cartoon of the standard picture, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures to be expected of a blowout jet in high-resolution coronal X-ray movies such as from Hinode/XRT. From Hinode/XRT movies in polar coronal holes, we show: (1) examples of X-ray jets that fit the standard picture very well, and (2) other examples that do not fit the standard picture but do show signatures appropriate for blowout jets. These signatures are (1) a flare arcade inside the emerging bipole in addition to the flare arcade produced between the emerging bipole and the ambient high-reaching unipolar field by reconnection of these two fields as in the standard picture, and (2) in addition to the jet prong expected from the standard reconnection, a second jet prong or strand, one that could not be produced by the standard reconnection but could be produced by reconnection between the ambient unipolar field and one leg of an erupting core-field flux rope that has blown out the emerging bipole. We therefore infer that these "two pronged" jets are made by

  7. X-Ray Jet Emission from the Black Hole X-Ray Binary XTE J1550-564 with Chandra in 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Corbel, Stéphane; Fender, Rob; Miller, Jon M.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Tzioumis, Tasso; Wijnands, Rudy; Kaaret, Philip

    2003-01-01

    We have discovered an X-ray jet due to material ejected from the black hole X-ray transient XTE J1550-564. The discovery was first reported in 2002 by Corbel and coworkers, and here we present an analysis of the three Chandra observations made between 2000 June and September. For these observations, a source is present that moves in an eastward direction away from the point source associated with the compact object. The separation between the new source and the compact object changes from 21.3" in June to 23.4" in September, implying a proper motion of 21.2+/-7.2 mas day-1, a projected separation of 0.31-0.85 pc, and an apparent jet velocity between 0.34+/-0.12 and 0.93+/-0.32 times the speed of light for a source distance range of d=2.8-7.6 kpc. These observations represent the first time that an X-ray jet proper-motion measurement has been obtained for any accretion-powered Galactic or extragalactic source. While this work deals with the jet to the east of the compact object, the western jet has also been detected in the X-ray and radio bands. The most likely scenario is that the eastern jet is the approaching jet and that the jet material was ejected from the black hole in 1998. Along with a 1998 VLBI proper-motion measurement, the Chandra proper motion indicates that the eastern jet decelerated between 1998 and 2000. There is evidence that the eastern jet is extended by +/-2"-3" in the direction of the proper motion. The upper limit on the source extension in the perpendicular direction is +/-1.5", which corresponds to a jet opening angle of less than 7.5d. The X-ray jet energy spectrum is well but not uniquely described by a power law with an energy index of α=-0.8+/-0.4 (Sν~να) and interstellar absorption. The eastern jet was also detected in the radio band during an observation made within 7.4 days of the June Chandra observation. The overall radio flux level is consistent with an extrapolation of the X-ray power law with α=-0.6. The 0.3-8 keV X-ray jet

  8. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  9. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-07

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  10. A KPC-scale X-ray jet in the BL LAC Source S5 2007+777

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita; Maraschi, Laura; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The BL Lac S3 2007++777, a classical radio-selected BL Lac from the sample of Stirkel et al. exhibiting an extended (19") radio jet. was observed with Chandra revealing an X-ray jet with simi1ar morphology. The hard X-ray spectrum and broad band SED is consistent with an IC/CMB origin for the X-ray emission, implying a highly relativistic flow at small angle to the line of sight with an unusually large deprojected length, 300 kpc. A structured jet consisting of a fast spine and slow wall is consistent with the observations.

  11. X-ray crystal spectrometer upgrade for ITER-like wall experiments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Shumack, A. E.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Karpinski, L.; Jakubowska, K.; Scholz, M.; Byszuk, A.; Cieszewski, R.; Kasprowicz, G.; Pozniak, K.; Wojenski, A.; Zabolotny, W.; Dominik, W.; Conway, N. J.; Dalley, S.; Tyrrell, S.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Figueiredo, J. [EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB; Associação EURATOM and others

    2014-11-15

    The high resolution X-Ray crystal spectrometer at the JET tokamak has been upgraded with the main goal of measuring the tungsten impurity concentration. This is important for understanding impurity accumulation in the plasma after installation of the JET ITER-like wall (main chamber: Be, divertor: W). This contribution provides details of the upgraded spectrometer with a focus on the aspects important for spectral analysis and plasma parameter calculation. In particular, we describe the determination of the spectrometer sensitivity: important for impurity concentration determination.

  12. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, I.; Walther, M.; Lehmkühler, F.; Wochner, P.; Valerio, J.; Mager, R.; Schroer, M. A.; Lee, S.; Roseker, W.; Jain, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Hartmann, R.; Huth, M.; Strüder, L.; Sprung, M.; Robert, A.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Grübel, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser.

  13. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    Steinke, I; Walther, M; Lehmkühler, F; Wochner, P; Valerio, J; Mager, R; Schroer, M A; Lee, S; Roseker, W; Jain, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Hartmann, R; Huth, M; Strüder, L; Sprung, M; Robert, A; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Grübel, G

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser.

  14. INFLATING A CHAIN OF X-RAY-DEFICIENT BUBBLES BY A SINGLE JET ACTIVITY EPISODE

    SciTech Connect

    Refaelovich, Michael; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il

    2012-08-10

    We show that a continuous jet with time-independent launching properties can inflate a chain of close and overlapping X-ray deficient bubbles. Using the numerical code PLUTO we run 2.5D (i.e., a spherical coordinate system with cylindrical symmetry) hydrodynamic simulations and study the interaction of the jets with the intracluster medium. A key process is vortex fragmentation due to several mechanisms, including vortex-shedding and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Our results can account for the structure of two opposite chains of close bubbles as observed in the galaxy cluster Hydra A. Our results imply that the presence of multiple pairs of bubbles does not necessarily imply several jet-launching episodes. This finding might have implications for feedback mechanisms operating by jets.

  15. Modelling X-ray emitting stationary shocks in magnetized protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustamujic, S.; Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; López-Santiago, J.

    2017-03-01

    The early stages of a star birth are characterized by a variety of mass ejection phenomena, including outflows and collimated jets that are strongly related to the accretion process developed in the context of the star-disc interaction. Jets move through the ambient medium producing complex structures observed at different wavelengths. In particular, X-ray observations show evidence of strong shocks heating the plasma up to a few million degrees. In some cases, the shocked features appear to be stationary. They are interpreted as shock diamonds. We aim at investigating the physical properties of the shocked plasma and the role of magnetic fields on the collimation of the jet and the formation of a stationary shock. We performed 2.5D MHD simulations modelling the propagation of a jet ramming with a supersonic speed into an initially isothermal and homogeneous magnetized medium and compared the results with observations.

  16. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STELLAR JETS BY COLLISION AGAINST HIGH-DENSITY MOLECULAR CLOUDS: AN APPLICATION TO HH 248

    SciTech Connect

    López-Santiago, J.; Ustamujic, S.; Castro, A. I. Gómez de; Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Orellana, M.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig–Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 10{sup 7} K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  17. X-ray Emission from Stellar Jets by Collision against High-density Molecular Clouds: an Application to HH 248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Santiago, J.; Bonito, R.; Orellana, M.; Miceli, M.; Orlando, S.; Ustamujic, S.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; de Castro, E.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig-Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 107 K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  18. Most Distant X-Ray Jet Yet Discovered Provides Clues To Big Bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    The most distant jet ever observed was discovered in an image of a quasar made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. Extending more than 100,000 light years from the supermassive black hole powering the quasar, the jet of high-energy particles provides astronomers with information about the intensity of the cosmic microwave background radiation 12 billion years ago. The discovery of this jet was a surprise to the astronomers, according to team members. Astronomers had previously known the distant quasar GB1508+5714 to be a powerful X-ray source, but there had been no indication of any complex structure or a jet. "This jet is especially significant because it allows us to probe the cosmic background radiation 1.4 billion years after the Big Bang," said Aneta Siemiginowska of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., lead author of a report on this research in the November 20th Astrophysical Journal Letters. Prior to this discovery, the most distant confirmed X-ray jet corresponded to a time about 3 billion years after the Big Bang. Quasars are thought to be galaxies that harbor an active central supermassive black hole fueled by infalling gas and stars. This accretion process is often observed to be accompanied by the generation of powerful high-energy jets. Radio image of GB1508 Radio Image of GB1508 As the electrons in the jet fly away from the quasar at near the speed of light, they move through the sea of cosmic background radiation left over from the hot early phase of the universe. When a fast-moving electron collides with one of these background photons, it can boost the photon's energy up into the X-ray band. The X-ray brightness of the jet depends on the power in the electron beam and the intensity of the background radiation. "Everyone assumes that the background radiation will change in a predictable way with time, but it is important to have this check on the predictions," said Siemiginowska. "This jet is hopefully just the

  19. Laser heated gas-jet: a soft x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Charatis, G.; Slater, D.C.; Mayer, F.J.; Tarvin, J.A.; Busch, G.E.; Sullivan, D.; Musinski, D.; Matthews, D.L.; Koppel, L.

    1981-01-01

    The laser irradiated gas jet developed to study collective scattering processes has proven to be a useful soft x-ray source. It is a reproducible and stationary source with large yield and plasma properties characterized by conventional diagnostic techniques. With a density gradient initially set by orifice size and gas pressure, a short (approx. 100 to 1000 psec) pulse operating at 1.05 ..mu..m (or 0.53 ..mu..m) is focused coaxially upstream into the jet producing a moderate temperature plasma. X-ray pinhole photographs show an axially symmetric radiating plume located at the electron density critical surface. The density gradient is obtained by holographic interferometry using a 0.26 ..mu..m wavelength probe pulse. The scale length of approx. 100 to 200 ..mu..m is measured by 2..omega.. and 3/2..omega.. photography. Electron temperatures are determined by using spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectroscopy to record and analyze line emission from H- and He-like configurations. Electron temperatures from approx. 200 to 700 eV were observed at critical electron densities as high as N/sub cr/ approx. 4 x 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/ for gases of hydrogen, nitrogen, neon, argon, and SF/sub 6/.

  20. The Relation Between Accretion Rate And Jet Power in X-Ray Luminous Elliptical Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steven W.; Dunn, R.J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; Reynolds, C.S.; /Maryland U.

    2006-03-10

    Using Chandra X-ray observations of nine nearby, X-ray luminous elliptical galaxies with good optical velocity dispersion measurements, we show that a tight correlation exists between the Bondi accretion rates calculated from the observed gas temperature and density profiles and estimated black hole masses, and the power emerging from these systems in relativistic jets. The jet powers, which are inferred from the energies and timescales required to inflate cavities observed in the surrounding X-ray emitting gas, can be related to the accretion rates using a power law model of the form log (P{sub Bondi}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) = A + B log (P{sub jet}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}), with A = 0.62 {+-} 0.15 and B = 0.77 {+-} 0.18. Our results show that a significant fraction of the energy associated with the rest mass of material entering the Bondi accretion radius (2.4{sub -0.7}{sup +1.0} per cent, for P{sub jet} = 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) eventually emerges in the relativistic jets. Our results have significant implications for studies of accretion, jet formation and galaxy formation. The observed tight correlation suggests that the Bondi formulae provide a reasonable description of the accretion process in these systems, despite the likely presence of magnetic pressure and angular momentum in the accreting gas. The similarity of the P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} values argues that a significant fraction of the matter entering the accretion radius flows down to regions close to the black holes, where the jets are presumably formed. The tight correlation between P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} also suggests that the accretion flows are approximately stable over timescales of a few million years. Our results show that the black hole ''engines'' at the hearts of large elliptical galaxies and groups feed back sufficient energy to stem cooling and star formation, leading naturally to the observed exponential cut off at the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function.

  1. X-ray instrumentation in astronomy II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 15-17, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Golub, L.

    1988-01-01

    Various papers on X-ray instrumentation in astronomy are presented. Individual topics addressed include: concentrating hard X-ray collector, advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera, Fano-noise-limited CCDs, linear CCD with enhanced X-ray quantum efficiency, advances in microchannel plate detectors, X-ray imaging spectroscopy with EEV CCDs, large aperture imaging gas scintillation proportional counter, all-sky monitor for the X-ray Timing Explorer, and miniature satellite technology capabilities for space astronomy. Also discussed are: high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy using microcalorimeters, high-throughput X-ray astrophysics cornerstone, gas mixtures for X-ray proportional counters, transmission grating spectrometer for SPEKTROSAT, efficiency of X-ray reflection gratings, soft X-ray spectrographs for solar observations, observability of coronal variations, Berkeley extreme-UV calibration facility, SURF-II radiometric instrumentation calibration facility, and evaluation of toroidal gratings in the EUV.

  2. Hard X-ray micro-spectroscopy at Berliner Elektronenspeicherring für Synchrotronstrahlung II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erko, A.; Zizak, I.

    2009-09-01

    The capabilities of the X-ray beamlines at Berliner Elektronenspeicherring für Synchrotronstrahlung II (BESSY II) for hard X-ray measurements with micro- and nanometer spatial resolution are reviewed. The micro-X-ray fluorescence analysis (micro-XRF), micro-extended X-ray absorption fine structure (micro-EXAFS), micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (micro-XANES) as well as X-ray standing wave technique (XSW), X-ray beam induced current (XBIC) in combination with micro-XRF and micro-diffraction as powerful methods for organic and inorganic sample characterization with synchrotron radiation are discussed. Mono and polycapillary optical systems were used for fine X-ray focusing down to 1 µm spot size with monochromatic and white synchrotron radiation. Polycapillary based confocal detection was applied for depth-resolved micro-XRF analysis with a volume resolution down to 3.4 · 10 - 6 mm 3. Standing wave excitation in waveguides was also applied to nano-EXAFS measurements with depth resolution on the order of 1 nm. Several examples of the methods and its applications in material research, biological investigations and metal-semiconductor interfaces analysis are given.

  3. First Detection of Mid-infrared Variability from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Holmberg II X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, R. M.; Heida, M.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Walton, D. J.

    2017-04-01

    We present mid-infrared (IR) light curves of the Ultraluminous X-ray Source (ULX) Holmberg II X-1 from observations taken between 2014 January 13 and 2017 January 5 with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 4.5 μm in the Spitzer Infrared Intensive Transients Survey. The mid-IR light curves, which reveal the first detection of mid-IR variability from a ULX, is determined to arise primarily from dust emission rather than from a jet or an accretion disk outflow. We derived the evolution of the dust temperature ({T}{{d}}∼ 600{--}800 {{K}}), IR luminosity ({L}{IR}∼ 3× {10}4 {L}ȯ ), mass ({M}{{d}}∼ 1{--}3× {10}-6 {M}ȯ ), and equilibrium temperature radius ({R}{eq}∼ 10{--}20 {au}). A comparison of X-1 with a sample of spectroscopically identified massive stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud on a mid-IR color–magnitude diagram suggests that the mass donor in X-1 is a supergiant (sg) B[e]-star. The sgB[e]-interpretation is consistent with the derived dust properties and the presence of the [Fe ii] (λ =1.644 μ {{m}}) emission line revealed from previous near-IR studies of X-1. We attribute the mid-IR variability of X-1 to the increased heating of dust located in a circumbinary torus. It is unclear what physical processes are responsible for the increased dust heating; however, it does not appear to be associated with the X-ray flux from the ULX, given the constant X-ray luminosities provided by serendipitous, near-contemporaneous X-ray observations around the first mid-IR variability event in 2014. Our results highlight the importance of mid-IR observations of luminous X-ray sources traditionally studied at X-ray and radio wavelengths.

  4. Constraining the particle spectrum in blazar jets: importance of the hard X-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Atreyee; Sahayanathan, Sunder; Chitnis, Varsha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of the spectral curvature in blazar jets can throw light on the underlying particle spectral distribution, and hence, the acceleration and diffusion processes at play. With the advent of NuSTAR and ASTROSAT, and the upcoming ASTRO-H, this curvature can now be measured accurately across the broadband X-ray energies. We will discuss results from our recent works on two HBLs, Mkn421 (Sinha et al, A&A 2015) and 1ES1011+496 (Sinha et al, ApJ submitted), and show how simultaneous measurement at hard and soft X-ray energies can be crucial in understanding the underlying particle spectrum. Detection of lognormality in blazars is beginning to hint at strong disk-jet connections. India's recently launched multiwavelength satellite, the ASTROSAT will provide simultaneous time resolved data between 0.2-80keV, along with measurements at Optical-UV energies. We will discuss prospects from ASTROSAT for studying jet triggering mechanisms in blazars.

  5. 32.8-nm X-ray laser produced in a krypton cluster jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E P; Vinokhodov, A Yu

    2013-12-31

    We have interpreted the well-known experimental quantum yield data for a 32.8-nm X-ray laser operating at the 3d{sup 9}4d (J = 0) – 3d{sup 9}4p (J = 1) transition of Kr{sup 8+} with the use of gaseous krypton or a krypton cluster jet. Proceeding from our model we propose a novel scheme for the 32.8-nm laser produced in a krypton cluster jet. The quantum yield is shown to saturate for a plasma length of ∼300 μm, a krypton ion density n{sub Kr} ∼ (4 – 9) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, and an electron temperature Te ∼ 5000 eV. In this case, the energy conversion coefficient amounts to ∼5 × 10{sup -3} of the pump pulse energy. We propose the experimental setup for producing a highefficiency subpicosecond X-ray laser in a krypton cluster jet. (lasers)

  6. GIANT H II REGIONS IN M101. I. X-RAY ANALYSIS OF HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wei; Chen Yang; Feng Li; Chu, You-Hua; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wang, Q. Daniel; Li Jiangtao

    2012-11-20

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of {approx}0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft (<1.5 keV) X-ray emission is generally in agreement with the extent of H1105, the most luminous H II region therein, but extends beyond its southern boundary, which could be attributed to outflows from the star cloud between H1105 and H1098. In NGC 5462, the X-ray emission is displaced from the H II regions and a ridge of blue stars; the H{alpha} filaments extending from the ridge of star cloud to the diffuse X-rays suggest that hot gas outflows have occurred. The X-rays from NGC 5471 are concentrated at the B-knot, a 'hypernova remnant' candidate. Assuming a Sedov-Taylor evolution, the derived explosion energy, on the order of 10{sup 52} erg, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background active galactic nucleus, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.

  7. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Alphonse C; Moore, Ronald L; Falconer, David A; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-23

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the 'emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the 'legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament.

  8. Magnetic jets from accretion disks : field structure and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memola, Elisabetta

    2002-06-01

    . We also calculate the X-ray emission in the energy range 0.2--10.1,keV from a microquasar relativistic jet close to its source of 5 solar masses. In order to do it, we apply the jet flow parameters (densities, velocities, temperatures of each volume element along the collimating jet) derived in the literature from the relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations. We obtain theoretical thermal X-ray spectra of the innermost jet as composition of the spectral contributions of the single volume elements along the jet. Since relativistic effects as Doppler shift and Doppler boosting due to the motion of jets toward us might be important, we investigate how the spectra are affected by them considering different inclinations of the line of sight to the jet axis. Emission lines of highly ionized iron are clearly visible in our spectra, probably also observed in the Galactic microquasars GRS 1915+105 and XTE J1748-288. The Doppler shift of the emission lines is always evident. Due to the chosen geometry of the magnetohydrodynamic jet, the inner X-ray emitting part is not yet collimated. Ergo, depending on the viewing angle, the Doppler boosting does not play a major role in the total spectra. This is the first time that X-ray spectra have been calculated from the numerical solution of a magnetohydrodynamic jet. Astrophysikalische Jets sind stark kollimierte Materieströmungen hoher Geschwindigkeit. Sie stehen im Zusammenhang mit einer Fülle verschiedener astrophysikalischer Objekte wie jungen Sternen, stellaren schwarzen Löchern ('Mikro-Quasare'), Galaxien mit aktivem Kern (AGN) und wahrscheinlich auch mit dem beobachteten intensiven Aufblitzen von Gamma-Strahlung (Gamma Ray Bursts). Insbesondere hat sich gezeigt, dass die Jets der Mikro-Quasare wahrscheinlich als kleinskalige Version der Jets der AGN anzusehen sind. Neben den Beobachtungen haben vor allem auch theoretische Überlegungen gezeigt, dass Magnetfelder bei der Jetentstehung, -beschleunigung und -kollimation eine

  9. Simultaneous femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction of photosystem II at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; Difiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Zwart, Petrus H; White, William E; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D; Bogan, Michael J; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K; Yachandra, Vittal K; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-04-26

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD-XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies.

  10. Investigation of Propellant and Explosive Solid Solution Systems II X-Ray Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    A\\Yj* ^\\C/*^ ^ 1 tatf AD 7t ott w AD-E400 125 TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCD-TR-77066 INVESTIGATION OF PROPELLANT AND EXPLOSIVE SOLID SOLUTION SYSTEMS...Report ARLCD-TR-77066 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. *. TITLE (and Subtitle) INVESTIGATION OF PROPELLANT AND EXPLOSIVE SOLID SOLUTION SYSTEMS II X-RAY...Interplanar spacings and x-ray diffraction 9 intensities of AP, KP and their physical mixtures and solid solutions 4 X-ray data of 3 AN: KP solid solution and

  11. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of kink waves in photospheric, chromospheric, and X-ray solar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most enduring mysteries in solar physics is why the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, is millions of kelvins hotter than its surface. Among suggested theories for coronal heating are those that consider the role of various jets of plasma shooting up from just above the Sun's surface through the photosphere and chromosphere to corona. The energy carrying by the waves propagating along the jets can be dissipated and thus transferred to the medium via different mechanisms. Among the various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves which can propagate in the solar atmosphere the most promising for the heating process turns out to be the so cold kink waves. These waves actually are normal modes of the MHD waves running in spatially (or magnetically) bounded flux tubes. When plasma in a flux tube floats the kink mode can become unstable if the jet's speed exceeds some threshold/critical value. The instability which appears is of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type and it can trigger MHD turbulence, more specifically Alvfén waves' turbulence. Notably this kind of turbulence is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of coronal heating. Here, we consider the conditions under which kink waves traveling on three types of solar flowing plasmas, namely photospheric jets, spicules, and X-ray jets, can become unstable against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  12. Aborted jets and the X-ray emission of radio-quiet AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Matt, G.

    2004-01-01

    We propose that radio-quiet quasars and Seyfert galaxies have central black holes powering outflows and jets which propagate only for a short distance, because the velocity of the ejected material is smaller than the escape velocity. We call them ``aborted" jets. If the central engine works intermittently, blobs of material may be produced, which can reach a maximum radial distance and then fall back, colliding with the blobs produced later and still moving outwards. These collisions dissipate the bulk kinetic energy of the blobs by heating the plasma, and can be responsible (entirely or at least in part) for the generation of the high energy emission in radio-quiet objects. This is alternative to the more conventional scenario in which the X-ray spectrum of radio-quiet sources originates in a hot (and possibly patchy) corona above the accretion disk. In the latter case the ultimate source of energy of the emission of both the disk and the corona is accretion. Here we instead propose that the high energy emission is powered also by the extraction of the rotational energy of the black hole (and possibly of the disk). By means of Montecarlo simulations we calculate the time dependent spectra and light curves, and discuss their relevance to the X-ray spectra in radio-quiet AGNs and galactic black hole sources. In particular, we show that time variability and spectra are similar to those observed in Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  13. Photoionization-pumped, Ne II, x-ray laser studies project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.C.; Hagelstein, P.L.; Eckart, M.J.; Forsyth, J.M.; Gerrassimenko, M.; Soures, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The energetics of this pumping scheme are shown. Short-pulse (50 to 100 ps) laser irradiation of an appropriate x-ray flashlamp medium generates broad-band emission in the range of 300 to 800 eV which preferentially photoionizes Ne to the /sup 2/S state of Ne II creating an inversion at approximately 27 eV. Although this approach does not depend on precise spectral overlap between the x-ray pump radiation and the medium to be pumped, it does require that the x-ray medium remain un-ionized prior to photoionization by the soft x-ray emission. Well-controlled focus conditions are required to ensure that the x-ray medium is not subjected to electron or x-ray preheat prior to irradiation by the soft x-ray source. The magnitude of the population inversion is predicted to be critically dependent upon rapid photoionization of the two states; therefore, ultra-short pulse irradiation of the laser flashlamps is required.

  14. Sub-mm Jet Properties of the X-Ray Binary Swift J1745-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, A. J.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Curran, P. A.; Russell, T. D.; Coulson, I. M.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S. B.; Migliari, S.; Petitpas, G. R.; Rupen, M. P.; Rushton, A. P.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of our observations of the early stages of the 2012-2013 outburst of the transient black hole X-ray binary (BHXRB), Swift J1745-26, with the Very Large Array, Submillimeter Array, and James Clerk Maxwell telescope (SCUBA-2). Our data mark the first multiple-band mm and sub-mm observations of a BHXRB. During our observations the system was in the hard accretion state producing a steady, compact jet. The unique combination of radio and mm/sub-mm data allows us to directly measure the spectral indices in and between the radio and mm/sub-mm regimes, including the first mm/sub-mm spectral index measured for a BHXRB. Spectral fitting revealed that both the mm (230 GHz) and sub-mm (350 GHz) measurements are consistent with extrapolations of an inverted power law from contemporaneous radio data (1-30 GHz). This indicates that, as standard jet models predict, a power law extending up to mm/sub-mm frequencies can adequately describe the spectrum, and suggests that the mechanism driving spectral inversion could be responsible for the high mm/sub-mm fluxes (compared to radio fluxes) observed in outbursting BHXRBs. While this power law is also consistent with contemporaneous optical data, the optical data could arise from either jet emission with a jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 1× {{10}14} Hz or the combination of jet emission with a lower jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 2× {{10}11} Hz and accretion disk emission. Our analysis solidifies the importance of the mm/sub-mm regime in bridging the crucial gap between radio and IR frequencies in the jet spectrum, and justifies the need to explore this regime further.

  15. Interpreting the radio/X-ray correlation of black hole X-ray binaries based on the accretion-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Two types of correlations between the radio and X-ray luminosities (LR and LX) have been found in black hole X-ray binaries. For some sources, they follow the `original' type of correlation which is described by a single power law. Later it was found that some other sources follow a different correlation consisting of three power-law branches, with each branch having different power-law indexes. In this work, we explain these two types of correlation under the coupled accretion-jet model. We attribute the difference between these two types of sources to the different value of viscosity parameter α. One possible reason for different α is the different configuration of magnetic field in the accretion material coming from the companion stars. For the `single power-law' sources, their α is high; so their accretion is always in the mode of advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) for the whole range of X-ray luminosity. For those `hybrid power-law' sources, the value of α is small so their accretion mode changes from an ADAF to a luminous hot accretion flow, and eventually to two-phase accretion as the accretion rate increases. Because the dependence of radiative efficiency on the mass accretion rate is different for these three accretion modes, different power-law indexes in the LR-LX correlation are expected. Constraints on the ratio of the mass-loss rate into the jet and the mass accretion rate in the accretion flow are obtained, which can be tested in future by radiative magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of jet formation.

  16. Jet-dominated quiescent states in black hole X-ray binaries: the case of V404 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Yang, Qi-Xiang; Ma, Renyi

    2014-07-01

    The dynamical structure and radiative properties of the quiescent state (X-ray luminosity ≲1034 erg s-1) of black hole X-ray transients (BHXTs) remain unclear, mainly because of low luminosity and poor data quantity. We demonstrate that the simultaneous multi-wavelength (including radio, optical, ultraviolet and X-ray bands) spectrum of V404 Cyg in its bright quiescent state can be well described by the radiation from the companion star and more importantly, the compact jet. Neither the outer thin disc nor the inner hot accretion flow is important in the total spectrum. Together with recent findings, i.e. the power-law X-ray spectrum and the non-variable X-ray spectral shape (or constant photon index) in contrast to the dramatic change in the X-ray luminosity, we argue the quiescent state spectrum of BHXTs is actually jet-dominated. Additional observational properties consistent with this jet model are also discussed as supporting evidence.

  17. SWIFT Discovery of Gamma-ray Bursts without Jet Break Feature in their X-ray Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, G.; Yamazaki, R.; Sakamoto, T.; Takahashi, T; Nakazawa, K.; Nakamura, T.; Toma, K.; Hullinger, D.; Tashiro, M.; Parsons, A. M.; Krimm, H. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Burrows, D. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Chincarini, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray afterglows for three GRBs with spectroscopic redshift determinations - GRB 050401, XRF 050416a, and GRB 050525a. We find that the relation between spectral peak energy and isotropic energy of prompt emissions (the Amati relation) is consistent with that for the bursts observed in pre-Swift era. However, we find that the X-ray afterglow lightcurves, which extend up to 10 - 70 days, show no sign of the jet break that is expected in the standard framework of collimated outflows. We do so by showing that none of the X-ray afterglow lightcurves in our sample satisfies the relation between the spectral and temporal indices that is predicted for the phase after jet break. The jet break time can be predicted by inverting the tight empirical relation between the peak energy of the spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy of the prompt emission (the Ghirlanda relation). We find that there are no temporal breaks within the predicted time intervals in X-ray band. This requires either that the Ghirlanda relation has a larger scatter than previously thought, that the temporal break in X-rays is masked by some additional source of X-ray emission, or that it does not happen because of some unknown reason.

  18. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  19. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  20. High-Resolution X-Ray Imaging of Colliding Radio-Jet Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, Kirk D.; Whitmore, Brad

    1996-01-01

    We received ROSAT data for four program objects:3C31,3C278,3C449,and NGC1044. The first three sources were observed with the ROSAT HRI instrument. Our plan was to use the HRI to image the hot gas distribution in a few pairs of strongly disturbed interacting elliptical galaxies which are also strong radio sources having a bent-jet source morphology. The PSPC was used for NGC1044 in order to obtain a flux measurement to use in planning future High Resolution Imager (HRI) observations of that source. Though we never requested such HRI observations of NGC1044, others have used those archival PSPC data from our project for other research projects and analyses. The goal of the program was to elucidate the detailed distribution of hot gas into which the jets flow. The X-ray data were consequently analyzed in conjunction with existing VLA radio maps, optical broad-band and H-alpha Charge Couple device (CCD) images, and optical kinematic data to constrain models for the propagation of ballistic jets in interacting galaxies. We were able to test and validate the claimed causal connection between tidal interaction, the presence of gas, and the onset of activity in galaxies. The full multi-wavelength multi-observatory analyses described here are still on-going and will be published in the future. Because of the relevance of this research to on-going work in the field of active galaxies, the grant was used to support travel to several scientific meetings where our x-ray analysis, numerical modeling, and related radio results were presented and discussed.

  1. Disk-jet coupling in the Galactic black hole X-ray binary MAXI J1836-194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    There is a universal connection between the accretion and ejection phenomena that are observed in black holes across the mass scale. Quantifying this relationship is the first step in understanding how jets are launched, accelerated and collimated. X-ray binaries are ideal systems to study this relationship, as they evolve on human timescales. In outburst, their luminosities increase by several orders of magnitude, with the thermal X-ray emission from the accretion disk and the radio emission from the relativistic jets undergoing dramatic, coupled changes. We present the results of our multiwavelength radio through to X-ray observations of the Galactic black hole candidate X-ray binary MAXI J1836-194 during its 2011 outburst. We find that this system has a near face-on accretion disk with the jet, that is pointed almost directly towards us, accounting for ~6% of the total energy output of the system early in the outburst. We observed the frequency of the transition from optically thick to optically thin synchrotron emission in the jet spectrum evolve by ~3 orders of magnitude as the jet gradually switches on and off on a timescale of a few weeks. This evolution does not appear to follow the expected positive relation with source luminosity. Instead the jet break shifted to higher frequencies as the source luminosity decreased and is likely coupled to the accretion flow in a more complex way. We find the region where the jet is accelerated up to relativistic speeds occurs at much larger distances from the black hole than previously thought and does not scale with the inner radius of the accretion disk. Our simultaneous, high cadence observations provide an unprecedented insight into the accretion processes occurring during an outburst, allowing us to observe the compact jet evolve and the corresponding changes within the accretion regime. This has implications for the launching of jets on all scales, from X-ray binaries to their larger-scale analogues, AGN.

  2. 1RXS J180408.9-342058: An ultra compact X-ray binary candidate with a transient jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present a detailed near-infrared/optical/UV study of the transient low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 performed during its 2015 outburst, which is aimed at determining the nature of its companion star. Methods: We obtained three optical spectra (R ~ 1000) at the 2.1 m San Pedro Mártir Observatory telescope (México). We performed optical and NIR photometric observations with both the REM telescope and the New Technology Telescope (NTT) in La Silla. We obtained optical and UV observations from the Swift archive. Finally, we performed optical polarimetry of the source using the EFOSC2 instrument mounted on the NTT. Results: The optical spectrum of the source is almost featureless since the hydrogen and He I emissions lines, typically observed in LMXBs, are not detected. Similarly, carbon and oxygen lines are not observed either. We marginally detect the He II 4686 Å emission line, suggesting the presence of helium in the accretion disc. No significant optical polarisation level was observed. Conclusions: The lack of hydrogen and He I emission lines in the spectrum implies that the companion is likely not a main-sequence star. Driven by the tentative detection of the He II 4686 Å emission line, we suggest that the system could harbour a helium white dwarf. If this is the case, 1RXS J180408.9-342058 would be an ultra-compact X-ray binary. By combining an estimate of the mass accretion rate together with evolutionary tracks for a He white dwarf, we obtain a tentative orbital period of ~40 min. We also built the NIR-optical-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source at two different epochs. One SED was gathered when the source was in the soft X-ray state and this SED is consistent with the presence of a single thermal component. The second SED, obtained when the source was in the hard X-ray state, shows a thermal component along with a tail in the NIR, which likely indicates the presence of a (transient) jet. Based on observations made with

  3. X-ray and Radio Observations of the Jet--environment Interaction in 3C 123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sarah; Evans, D.; Lee, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a 46.7 ks Chandra observation of the hot intracluster gas associated with the radio galaxy 3C 123, in order to study the energetics of the interaction between the large-scale radio jets emitted from the AGN and the gaseous, X-ray-emitting ICM. We observe large-scale asymmetries in the gas distribution out to 100'' together with smaller scale variations on scales of 20-30''. While gas temperatures on the large scale are well-described by an APEC model with temperature 8 keV, temperatures of the small-scale gaseous regions are described by a similar model with temperature 3 keV. We find that the significant overdensities and underdensities of the intracluster gas on large and small scales are caused by different processes. We calculate the "bubble” enthalpy of a small-scale eastern cavity to be 3 × 1059 ergs per bubble evacuated. We observe a corresponding overdense region which has the same enthalpy in pressure equilibrium with this cavity. We also find that the black hole accretion rate required to evacuate this region is R = 0.05Msunyear-1 per bubble. Our results support the interpretation that there is a large-scale disturbance from equilibrium most likely due to "sloshing” of gas caused by the impact of a subcluster merger, whereas on small scales, the radio outbursts from the AGN have created cavities within the X-ray--emitting gas.

  4. Collimated Jet Or Expanding Outflow: Possible Origins of GRBs And X-Ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Mineshige, Shin; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto

    2006-08-10

    transition between the GRBs, X-ray rich GRBs (XRRs) and X-ray Flashes (XRFs) by the same model but with different {epsilon}{sub 0} values.

  5. Moving relativistic large-scale X-ray jets in the microquasar XTE J1550-564

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, S.; Fender, R. P.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Tomsick, J. A.; Orosz, J. A.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Kaaret, P.

    2003-10-01

    We have discovered large-scale moving X-ray and radio jets from the microquasar XTE J1550-564. Using X-ray and radio observations performed between 2000 and 2002, we showed that plasma ejected from XTE J1550-564 has been able to travel at relativistic velocities during many years, with evidence for gradual deceleration. The broadband spectrum of the jets is consistent with synchrotron emission from high energy particles accelerated in shocks. Full details can be found in Corbel et al. [Science 298 (2002a) 196], Karret et al. [ApJ 582 (2003) 933] and Tomsick et al. [ApJ (2003) 945].

  6. Moving relativistic large-scale X-ray jets in the microquasar XTE J1550-564

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, S.; Fender, R. P.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Tomsick, J. A.; Orosz, J. A.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Kaaret, P.

    We have discovered large-scale moving X-ray and radio jets from the microquasar XTE J1550-564. Using X-ray observations from the Chandra Observatory performed between June 2000 (see also Tomsick et al., these proceedings) and June 2002, we showed that ejected plasma from XTE J1550-564 has been able to travel at relativistic velocities during many years, with evidence for gradual deceleration. The broadband spectrum of the jets is consistent with synchrotron emission from high energy particles accelerated in shocks. Full details can be found in Corbel et al. 2002, Kaaret et al. 2002, Tomsick et al. 2002.

  7. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources in Nearby Galaxies. II. X-Ray Luminosity Functions and Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Jifeng; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the recently completed Chandra/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library of 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular (α ˜ 1.50 ± 0.07) to elliptical (˜1.21 ± 0.02), to spirals (˜0.80 ± 0.02), to peculiars (˜0.55 ± 0.30), and to irregulars (˜0.26 ± 0.10). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosities for different types of galaxies. A radial dependency is found for ellipticals, with a flatter XLF slope for sources located between D 25 and 2D 25, suggesting the XLF slopes in the outer region of early-type galaxies are dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries in globular clusters. This study shows that the ULX rate in early-type galaxies is 0.24 ± 0.05 ULXs per surveyed galaxy, on a 5σ confidence level. The XLF for ULXs in late-type galaxies extends smoothly until it drops abruptly around 4 × 1040 erg s-1, and this break may suggest a mild boundary between the stellar black hole population possibly including 30 M ⊙ black holes with super-Eddington radiation and intermediate mass black holes.

  8. X-ray and optical performance of the flight filters for the JET-X telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Christian M.; Watson, D. J.; Wells, Alan A.; Kent, Barry J.; Barbera, Marco; Collura, Alfonso; Bavdaz, Marcos

    1997-10-01

    The optical filters on board the JET-X telescope comprise thin foils of aluminum coated Lexan. During ground calibration of the filters, narrow spectral regions of high UV leakage, with peak levels of up to a few percent, were observed in broad band optical measurements in the 1000 to 10,000 angstrom range. Furthermore, transmission values were typically up to two orders of magnitude higher than calculated for the aluminum thickness. Investigation showed that these effects were attributed to a combination of aluminum oxidation, which reduces the opacity, and the use of a double sided aluminum layer in the filter design which behaves as a Fabry-Perot interference filter. These effects were verified by a multi- layer model of the filter UV response. Recent redesign of the filters for the flight program eliminated the UV leakage by adopting a single aluminum layer configuration, thus eliminating interference effects, and increasing the thickness by 30% to compensate for oxidation levels. The integrated x- ray transmission below 1 keV was found to be only reduced by 3%. In parallel with the production of the new Lexan flight filters, a set of qualification model filters was produced by the Luxel Corporation in the USA. These filters use polyimide as a substrate material which has the advantage that it is optically opaque to wavelengths below 3000 angstroms, unlike Lexan which is transparent. These new filters were found to have superior mechanical strength, being able to survive extended qualification vibration without any visible degradation in performance, and had a higher cosmetic quality and attenuation levels. As a result, these filters have now been included in the JET-X flight program. We report on the optical tests results from both Lexan and polyimide filters along with high resolution x-ray transmission results carried out at the BESSY synchrotron facility in Germany. Results of the mapping of the filter edge structures, global transmission values and

  9. A decelerating jet observed by the EVN and VLBA in the X-ray transient XTE J1752-223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Brocksopp, C.; Corbel, S.; Paragi, Z.; Tzioumis, T.; Fender, R. P.

    2010-11-01

    The recently discovered Galactic X-ray transient XTE J1752-223 entered its first known outburst in 2010, emitting from the X-ray to the radio regimes. Its general X-ray properties were consistent with those of a black hole candidate in various spectral states, when ejection of jet components is expected. To verify this, we carried out very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. The measurements were carried out with the European VLBI Network (EVN) and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at four epochs in 2010 February. The images at the first three epochs show a moving jet component that is significantly decelerated by the last epoch, when a new jet component appears that is likely to be associated with the receding jet side. The overall picture is consistent with an initially mildly relativistic jet, interacting with the interstellar medium or with swept-up material along the jet. The brightening of the receding ejecta at the final epoch can be well explained by initial Doppler deboosting of the emission in the decelerating jet.

  10. A jet emission model to probe the dynamics of accretion and ejection coupling in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Compact jets are probably the most common form of jets in X-ray binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei. They seem to be present in all sources in the so-called hard X-ray spectral state. They are characterised by a nearly flat Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) extending from the radio to the infrared bands. This emission is usually interpreted as partially self absorbed synchrotron emission from relativistic leptons accelerated in the jet. The observed flat spectral shape requires energy dissipation and acceleration of particules over a wide range of distances along the jet. This distributed energy dissipation is likely to be powered by internal shocks caused by fluctuations of the outflow velocity. I will discuss such an internal shock model in the context of black hole binaries. I will show that internal shocks can produce the observed SEDs and also predict a strong, wavelength dependent, variability that resembles the observed one. The assumed velocity fluctuations of the jet must originate in the accretion flow. The model thus predicts a strong connection between the observable properties of the jet in the radio to IR bands, and the variability of the accretion flow as observed in X-rays. If the model is correct, this offers a unique possibility to probe the dynamics of the coupled accretion and ejection processes leading to the formation of compact jets.

  11. Confronting X-Ray Emission Models with theHighest-Redshift Kiloparsec-Scale Jets: The z = 3.89 Jet in Quasar 1745+624

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2006-06-28

    A newly identified kiloparsec-scale X-ray jet in the high-redshift z=3.89 quasar 1745+624 is studied with multi-frequency Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray imaging data. This is only the third large-scale X-ray jet beyond z > 3 known and is further distinguished as being the most luminous relativistic jet observed at any redshift, exceeding 10{sup 45} erg/s in both the radio and X-ray bands. Apart from the jet's extreme redshift, luminosity, and high inferred equipartition magnetic field (in comparison to local analogues), its basic properties such as X-ray/radio morphology and radio polarization are similar to lower-redshift examples. Its resolved linear structure and the convex broad-band spectral energy distributions of three distinct knots are also a common feature among known powerful X-ray jets at lower-redshift. Relativistically beamed inverse Compton and ''non-standard'' synchrotron models have been considered to account for such excess X-ray emission in other jets; both models are applicable to this high-redshift example but with differing requirements for the underlying jet physical properties, such as velocity, energetics, and electron acceleration processes. One potentially very important distinguishing characteristic between the two models is their strongly diverging predictions for the X-ray/radio emission with increasing redshift. This is considered, though with the limited sample of three z > 3 jets it is apparent that future studies targeted at very high-redshift jets are required for further elucidation of this issue. Finally, from the broad-band jet emission we estimate the jet kinetic power to be no less than 10{sup 46} erg/s, which is about 10% of the Eddington luminosity corresponding to this galaxy's central supermassive black hole mass M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} estimated here via the virial relation. The optical luminosity of the quasar core is about ten times over Eddington, hence the

  12. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, L B; Zastrau, U; Galtier, E; Gamboa, E J; Goede, S; Schumaker, W; Ravasio, A; Gauthier, M; MacDonald, M J; Chen, Z; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Fry, A; Kim, J B; Roedel, C; Mishra, R; Pelka, A; Kraus, D; Barbrel, B; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S H

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  13. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Zastrau, U.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Goede, S.; Schumaker, W.; Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, M.; MacDonald, M. J.; Chen, Z.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Fry, A.; Kim, J. B.; Roedel, C.; Mishra, R.; Pelka, A.; Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  14. Formation and X-ray emission from hot bubbles in planetary nebulae - II. Hot bubble X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Arthur, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    We present a study of the X-ray emission from numerical simulations of hot bubbles in planetary nebulae (PNe). High-resolution, two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the formation and evolution of hot bubbles in PNe, with and without thermal conduction, are used to calculate the X-ray emission and study its time-dependence and relationship to the changing stellar parameters. Instabilities in the wind-wind interaction zone produce clumps and filaments in the swept-up shell of nebular material. Turbulent mixing and thermal conduction at the corrugated interface can produce quantities of intermediate temperature and density gas between the hot, shocked wind bubble, and the swept-up photoionized nebular material, which can emit in soft, diffuse X-rays. We use the CHIANTI software to compute synthetic spectra for the models and calculate their luminosities. We find that models both with conduction and those without can produce the X-ray temperatures and luminosities that are in the ranges reported in observations, although the models including thermal conduction are an order of magnitude more luminous than those without. Our results show that at early times the diffuse X-ray emission should be dominated by the contribution from the hot, shocked stellar wind, whereas at later times the nebular gas will dominate the spectrum. We analyse the effect of sampling on the resultant spectra and conclude that a minimum of 200 counts is required to reliably reproduce the spectral shape. Likewise, heavily smoothed surface-brightness profiles obtained from low-count detections of PNe do not provide a reliable description of the spatial distribution of the X-ray-emitting gas.

  15. Final Report on X-ray Yields from OMEGA II Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K B; May, M J; MacLaren, S A; Coverdale, C A; Davis, J F

    2007-06-20

    We present details about X-ray yields measured with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) diagnostics in soft and moderately hard X-ray bands from laser-driven, doped-aerogel targets shot on 07/14/06 during the OMEGA II test series. Yields accurate to {+-}25% in the 5-15 keV band are measured with Livermore's HENWAY spectrometer. Yields in the sub-keV to 3.2 keV band are measured with LLNL's DANTE diagnostic, the DANTE yields are accurate to 10-15%. SNL ran a PCD-based diagnostic that also measured X-ray yields in the spectral region above 4 keV, and also down to the sub-keV range. The PCD and HENWAY and DANTE numbers are compared. The time histories of the moderately hard (h{nu} > 4 keV) X-ray signals are measured with LLNL's H11 PCD, and from two SNL PCDs with comparable filtration. There is general agreement between the H11 PCD and SNL PCD measured FWHM except for two of the shorter-laser-pulse shots, which is shown not to be due to analysis techniques. The recommended X-ray waveform is that from the SNL PCD p66k10, which was recorded on a fast, high-bandwidth TDS 6804 oscilloscope. X-ray waveforms from target emission in two softer spectral bands are also shown; the X-ray emissions have increasing duration as the spectral content gets softer.

  16. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Latimer, Matthew J; McQueen, Trevor A; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H; White, William E; Adams, Paul D; Bogan, Michael J; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2012-06-19

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O-O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (< 50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the "probe before destroy" approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O-O bond formation.

  17. Thorough small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the instability of liquid micro-jets in air.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Benedetta; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Pérez, Javier; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Liquid jets are of interest, both for their industrial relevance and for scientific applications (more important, in particular for X-rays, after the advent of free-electron lasers that require liquid jets as sample carrier). Instability mechanisms have been described theoretically and by numerical simulation, but confirmed by few experimental techniques. In fact, these are mainly based on cameras, which is limited by the imaging resolution, and on light scattering, which is hindered by absorption, reflection, Mie scattering and multiple scattering due to complex air/liquid interfaces during jet break-up. In this communication it is demonstrated that synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can give quantitative information on liquid jet dynamics at the nanoscale, by detecting time-dependent morphology and break-up length. Jets ejected from circular tubes of different diameters (100-450 µm) and speeds (0.7-21 m s(-1)) have been explored to cover the Rayleigh and first wind-induced regimes. Various solvents (water, ethanol, 2-propanol) and their mixtures have been examined. The determination of the liquid jet behaviour becomes essential, as it provides background data in subsequent studies of chemical and biological reactions using SAXS or X-ray diffraction based on synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers.

  18. LCLS-II: The Next Leap for X-Ray Science

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-04

    This movie introduces LCLS-II, a future light source at SLAC. It will generate over 8,000 times more light pulses per second than today’s most powerful X-ray laser, LCLS, and produce an almost continuous X-ray beam that on average will be 10,000 times brighter. These unrivaled capabilities will help researchers address a number of grand challenges in science by capturing detailed snapshots of rapid processes that are beyond the reach of other light sources.

  19. Second Preliminary Report on X-ray Yields from OMEGA II Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K B; May, M J; MacLaren, S A; Coverdale, C A; Davis, J F

    2006-08-28

    We present details about X-ray yields measured with LLNL and SNL diagnostics in soft and moderately hard X-ray bands from laser-driven, doped-aerogel targets shot on 07/14/06 during the OMEGA II test series. Yields accurate to {+-}25% in the 5-15 keV band are measured with Livermore's HENWAY spectrometer. Yields in the sub-keV to 3.2 keV band are measured with LLNL's DANTE diagnostic, the DANTE yields may be 35-40% too large. SNL ran a PCD-based diagnostic that also measured X-ray yields in the spectral region above 4 keV, and also down to the nearly sub-keV range. The PCD and HENWAY and DANTE numbers are compared. The time histories of the X-ray signals are measured with LLNL's H11 PCD, and from two SNL PCDs with comparable filtering. There is a persistent disagreement between the H11 PCD and SNL PCD measured FWHM, which is shown not to be due to analysis techniques. The recommended X-ray waveform is that from the SNL PCD p66k10, which was recorded on a fast, high-bandwidth TDS 6804 oscilloscope, and which are not plotted here.

  20. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  1. Table-top soft x-ray microscope using laser-induced plasma from a pulsed gas jet.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias; Mey, Tobias; Niemeyer, Jürgen; Mann, Klaus

    2014-09-22

    An extremely compact soft x-ray microscope operating in the "water window" region at the wavelength λ = 2.88 nm is presented, making use of a long-term stable and nearly debris-free laser-induced plasma from a pulsed nitrogen gas jet target. The well characterized soft x-ray radiation is focused by an ellipsoidal grazing incidence condenser mirror. Imaging of a sample onto a CCD camera is achieved with a Fresnel zone plate using magnifications up to 500x. The spatial resolution of the recorded microscopic images is about 100 nm as demonstrated for a Siemens star test pattern.

  2. Influence of Xe and Kr impurities on x-ray yield from debris-free plasma x-ray sources with an Ar supersonic gas jet irradiated by femtosecond near-infrared-wavelength laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kantsyrev, V L; Schultz, K A; Shlyaptseva, V V; Petrov, G M; Safronova, A S; Petkov, E E; Moschella, J J; Shrestha, I; Cline, W; Wiewior, P; Chalyy, O

    2016-11-01

    Many aspects of physical phenomena occurring when an intense laser pulse with subpicosecond duration and an intensity of 10^{18}-10^{19}W/cm^{2} heats an underdense plasma in a supersonic clustered gas jet are studied to determine the relative contribution of thermal and nonthermal processes to soft- and hard-x-ray emission from debris-free plasmas. Experiments were performed at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Leopard laser operated with a 15-J, 350-fs pulse and different pulse contrasts (10^{7} or 10^{5}). The supersonic linear (elongated) nozzle generated Xe cluster-monomer gas jets as well as jets with Kr-Ar or Xe-Kr-Ar mixtures with densities of 10^{18}-10^{19}cm^{-3}. Prior to laser heating experiments, all jets were probed with optical interferometry and Rayleigh scattering to measure jet density and cluster distribution parameters. The supersonic linear jet provides the capability to study the anisotropy of x-ray yield from laser plasma and also laser beam self-focusing in plasma, which leads to efficient x-ray generation. Plasma diagnostics included x-ray diodes, pinhole cameras, and spectrometers. Jet signatures of x-ray emission from pure Xe gas, as well as from a mixture with Ar and Kr, was found to be very different. The most intense x-ray emission in the 1-9 KeV spectral region was observed from gas mixtures rather than pure Xe. Also, this x-ray emission was strongly anisotropic with respect to the direction of laser beam polarization. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (Non-LTE) models have been implemented to analyze the x-ray spectra to determine the plasma temperature and election density. Evidence of electron beam generation in the supersonic jet plasma was found. The influence of the subpicosecond laser pulse contrast (a ratio between the laser peak intensity and pedestal pulse intensity) on the jets' x-ray emission characteristics is discussed. Surprisingly, it was found that the x-ray yield was not sensitive to the prepulse contrast ratio.

  3. Influence of Xe and Kr impurities on x-ray yield from debris-free plasma x-ray sources with an Ar supersonic gas jet irradiated by femtosecond near-infrared-wavelength laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Schultz, K. A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Petrov, G. M.; Safronova, A. S.; Petkov, E. E.; Moschella, J. J.; Shrestha, I.; Cline, W.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.

    2016-11-01

    Many aspects of physical phenomena occurring when an intense laser pulse with subpicosecond duration and an intensity of 1018-1019W /cm2 heats an underdense plasma in a supersonic clustered gas jet are studied to determine the relative contribution of thermal and nonthermal processes to soft- and hard-x-ray emission from debris-free plasmas. Experiments were performed at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Leopard laser operated with a 15-J, 350-fs pulse and different pulse contrasts (107 or 105). The supersonic linear (elongated) nozzle generated Xe cluster-monomer gas jets as well as jets with Kr-Ar or Xe-Kr-Ar mixtures with densities of 1018-1019cm-3 . Prior to laser heating experiments, all jets were probed with optical interferometry and Rayleigh scattering to measure jet density and cluster distribution parameters. The supersonic linear jet provides the capability to study the anisotropy of x-ray yield from laser plasma and also laser beam self-focusing in plasma, which leads to efficient x-ray generation. Plasma diagnostics included x-ray diodes, pinhole cameras, and spectrometers. Jet signatures of x-ray emission from pure Xe gas, as well as from a mixture with Ar and Kr, was found to be very different. The most intense x-ray emission in the 1-9 KeV spectral region was observed from gas mixtures rather than pure Xe. Also, this x-ray emission was strongly anisotropic with respect to the direction of laser beam polarization. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (Non-LTE) models have been implemented to analyze the x-ray spectra to determine the plasma temperature and election density. Evidence of electron beam generation in the supersonic jet plasma was found. The influence of the subpicosecond laser pulse contrast (a ratio between the laser peak intensity and pedestal pulse intensity) on the jets' x-ray emission characteristics is discussed. Surprisingly, it was found that the x-ray yield was not sensitive to the prepulse contrast ratio.

  4. Population synthesis of accreting white dwarfs - II. X-ray and UV emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Woods, T. E.; Yungelson, L. R.; Gilfanov, M.; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-11-01

    Accreting white dwarfs (WDs) with non-degenerate companions are expected to emit in soft X-rays and the UV, if accreted H-rich material burns stably. They are an important component of the unresolved emission of elliptical galaxies, and their combined ionizing luminosity may significantly influence the optical line emission from warm interstellar medium (ISM). In an earlier paper, we modelled populations of accreting WDs, first generating WD with main-sequence, Hertzsprung gap and red giant companions with the population synthesis code BSE, and then following their evolution with a grid of evolutionary tracks computed with MESA. Now we use these results to estimate the soft X-ray (0.3-0.7 keV), H- and He II-ionizing luminosities of nuclear burning WDs and the number of supersoft X-ray sources for galaxies with different star formation histories. For the starburst case, these quantities peak at ˜1 Gyr and decline by ˜1-3 orders of magnitude by the age of 10 Gyr. For stellar ages of ˜10 Gyr, predictions of our model are consistent with soft X-ray luminosities observed by Chandra in nearby elliptical galaxies and He II 4686 Å/H β line ratio measured in stacked Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of retired galaxies, the latter characterizing the strength and hardness of the UV radiation field. However, the soft X-ray luminosity and He II 4686 Å/H β ratio are significantly overpredicted for stellar ages of ≲4-8 Gyr. We discuss various possibilities to resolve this discrepancy and tentatively conclude that it may be resolved by a modification of the typically used criteria of dynamically unstable mass-loss for giant stars.

  5. A LINK BETWEEN X-RAY EMISSION LINES AND RADIO JETS IN 4U 1630-47?

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Joseph; Coriat, Mickaël; Fender, Rob; Broderick, Jess W.; Lee, Julia C.; Ponti, Gabriele; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Edwards, Philip G.

    2014-03-20

    Recently, Díaz Trigo et al. reported an XMM-Newton detection of relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines associated with steep-spectrum radio emission in the stellar-mass black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its 2012 outburst. They interpreted these lines as indicative of a baryonic jet launched by the accretion disk. Here we present a search for the same lines earlier in the same outburst using high-resolution X-ray spectra from the Chandra HETGS. While our observations (eight months prior to the XMM-Newton campaign) also coincide with detections of steep spectrum radio emission by the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we find no evidence for any relativistic X-ray emission lines. Indeed, despite ∼5 × brighter radio emission, our Chandra spectra allow us to place an upper limit on the flux in the blueshifted Fe XXVI line that is ≳ 20 × weaker than the line observed by Díaz Trigo et al. We explore several scenarios that could explain our differing results, including variations in the geometry of the jet or a mass-loading process or jet baryon content that evolves with the accretion state of the black hole. We also consider the possibility that the radio emission arises in an interaction between a jet and the nearby interstellar medium, in which case the X-ray emission lines might be unrelated to the radio emission.

  6. A Link between X-Ray Emission Lines and Radio Jets in 4U 1630-47?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Joseph; Coriat, Mickaël; Fender, Rob; Lee, Julia C.; Ponti, Gabriele; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Edwards, Philip G.; Broderick, Jess W.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, Díaz Trigo et al. reported an XMM-Newton detection of relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines associated with steep-spectrum radio emission in the stellar-mass black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its 2012 outburst. They interpreted these lines as indicative of a baryonic jet launched by the accretion disk. Here we present a search for the same lines earlier in the same outburst using high-resolution X-ray spectra from the Chandra HETGS. While our observations (eight months prior to the XMM-Newton campaign) also coincide with detections of steep spectrum radio emission by the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we find no evidence for any relativistic X-ray emission lines. Indeed, despite ~5 × brighter radio emission, our Chandra spectra allow us to place an upper limit on the flux in the blueshifted Fe XXVI line that is >~ 20 × weaker than the line observed by Díaz Trigo et al. We explore several scenarios that could explain our differing results, including variations in the geometry of the jet or a mass-loading process or jet baryon content that evolves with the accretion state of the black hole. We also consider the possibility that the radio emission arises in an interaction between a jet and the nearby interstellar medium, in which case the X-ray emission lines might be unrelated to the radio emission.

  7. Optical and X-ray properties of CAL 83 - II. An X-ray pulsation at ˜67 s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odendaal, A.; Meintjes, P. J.; Charles, P. A.; Rajoelimanana, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    CAL 83 is the prototypical close binary supersoft X-ray source in the Large Magellanic Cloud, has a 1 d orbital period, and is believed to consist of a white dwarf (WD) primary accreting from an evolved donor. Based on published WD model atmosphere fits to X-ray data, the WD has a mass of ˜1.3 M⊙, just below the Chandrasekhar limit. From a systematic search through archival XMM-Newton data for periodic emission from CAL 83 down to the shortest possible period just above the WD break-up period, we report the discovery of an ˜67 s supersoft X-ray modulation, which we interpret as the rotation period of a highly spun-up WD. Such a short period can be explained within the framework of a high mass accretion history, where accretion disc torques could have spun up the WD over time-scales comparable to the thermal time-scale. The presence of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in published optical and ultraviolet spectra may suggest CNO cycling in the envelope of a secondary star that is oversized for its inferred mass, suggesting that the secondary star shed a significant fraction of its envelope during a high mass-transfer history, resulting in a highly spun-up WD. The reported 67 s period shows an approximately ±3 s drift from the median value in single runs, which we interpret as a hydrogen burning gas envelope surrounding the WD, with a period not quite synchronized with the WD rotation period.

  8. Energy-dependent Orbital Modulation of X-rays and Constraints on Emission of the Jet in Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Maitra, Chandreyee; Frankowski, Adam; Skinner, Gerald K.; Misra, Ranjeev

    2012-01-01

    We study orbital modulation of X-rays from Cyg X-3, using data from Swift, INTEGRAL and RXTE. Using the wealth of the presently available data and an improved averaging method, we obtain energy-dependent folded and averaged light curves with unprecedented accuracy. We find that above 5 keV, the modulation depth decreases with the increasing energy, which is consistent with the modulation being caused by both bound-free absorption and Compton scattering in the stellar wind of the donor, with minima corresponding to the highest optical depth, which occurs around the superior conjunction. We find a decrease of the depth below 3 keV, which appears to be due to re-emission of the absorbed continuum by the wind in soft X-ray lines. Based on the shape of the folded light curves, any X-ray contribution from the jet in Cyg X-3, which emits ?-rays detected at energies > 0.1 GeV in soft spectral states, is found to be minor up to 100 keV. This implies the presence of a rather sharp low-energy break in the jet MeV-range spectrum.We also calculate phase-resolved RXTE X-ray spectra, and show the difference between the spectra corresponding to phases around the superior and inferior conjunctions can indeed be accounted for by a combined effect of bound-free absorption in an ionized medium and Compton scattering.

  9. Connection Between X-Ray Emission and Relativistic Jets in the Radio Galaxies 3C 111 and 3C 120

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Margo F.

    2005-01-01

    This work represents a part of a longterm study of the X-ray flux variability in radio galaxies and its relation to flux and structural changes in the associated radio jet. The work described here included: 1) continued study of the emission properties of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 120 known to exhibit a jet/disk connection from our past work; and 2) the commencement of monitoring of a second radio galaxy, the FR I1 object 3C 111 which was selected because of similar radio and X-ray properties to 3C 120, including the presence of Fe K a emission. The association between X-ray dips and new superluminal components, suggesting a picture in which the radio jet is fed by accretion events near the black hole, was identified in 3C 120 using combined RXTE and radio flux monitoring data and bi-monthly to monthly imaging data from the VLBA at 43 GHz. Such data were also obtained for both targets during the period described here. Specific goals were to more broadly investigate the X-ray dip/superluminal connection in 3C 120, thereby determining the epochs of X-ray minima and superluminal ejections more accurately (and hence more precisely determining the distance between the accretion disk and the core of the radio jet), and to determine whether a similar pattern is present in the data for a second radio galaxy. In 3C 111 a different time scale (longer time delays between X-ray dips and superluminal ejections) was expected due to the higher black hole mass implied by its higher radio luminosity: no black hole mass is published for this object but one can be determined from a PDS analysis of the RXTE data. The addition of the second source to the study would identify whether a similar connection was present in other sources and, if found, would provide important information on how time scale (and hence size scale) of accretion disk/jet systems depends on black hole mass. The grant included funding for the reduction and analysis of data obtained during the time period of Rossi

  10. Guitar with a bow: a jet-like X-ray-emitting feature associated a fast-moving pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    2011-09-01

    The Guitar Nebula is known to be a ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula associated with the very fast-moving pulsar B2224+65. Existing observations at two epochs have shown an unexpected 2 arcmin long X-ray-emitting jet-like feature emanating from the pulsar and offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. We propose a deep third epoch observation of this system in order to measure the X-ray spectral gradient across the feature as well as to confirm its proper motion, its morphological variation with time, and the presence of a counter jet. We will then critically test scenarios proposed to explain this system, which represents a class of similarly enigmatic objects recently discovered locally and in the central region of our Galaxy.

  11. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. S.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2011-09-09

    The hard x-ray nanoprobe (HXN) beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic, and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state-of-the-art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored.

  12. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. S.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2011-09-01

    The hard x-ray nanoprobe (HXN) beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic, and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state-of-the-art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored.

  13. X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC JET MODELS OF BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Boettcher, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the expected X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarization signatures resulting from synchrotron self-Compton emission in leptonic models compared to the polarization signatures from proton synchrotron and cascade synchrotron emission in hadronic models for blazars. Source parameters resulting from detailed spectral-energy-distribution modeling are used to calculate photon-energy-dependent upper limits on the degree of polarization, assuming a perfectly organized mono-directional magnetic field. In low-synchrotron-peaked blazars, hadronic models exhibit substantially higher maximum degrees of X-ray and gamma-ray polarization than leptonic models, which may be within reach of existing X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarimeters. In high-synchrotron-peaked blazars (with electron-synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission), leptonic and hadronic models predict the same degree of X-ray polarization but substantially higher maximum {gamma}-ray polarization in hadronic models than leptonic ones. These predictions are particularly relevant in view of the new generation of balloon-borne X-ray polarimeters (and possibly GEMS, if revived), and the ability of Fermi-LAT to measure {gamma}-ray polarization at <200 MeV. We suggest observational strategies combining optical, X-ray, and {gamma}-ray polarimetry to determine the degree of ordering of the magnetic field and to distinguish between leptonic and hadronic high-energy emissions.

  14. FRAME DRAGGING, DISK WARPING, JET PRECESSING, AND DIPPED X-RAY LIGHT CURVE OF Sw J1644+57

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-01-10

    The X-ray transient source Sw J1644+57 recently discovered by Swift is believed to be triggered by tidal disruption of a star by a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH). For such events, the outer disk is very likely misaligned with respect to the equatorial plane of the spinning SMBH, since the incoming star before disruption most likely has an inclined orbital plane. The tilted disk is subject to the Lense-Thirring torque, which tends to twist and warp due to the Bardeen-Petterson effect. The inner disk tends to align with the SMBH spin, while the outer region tends to remain in the stellar orbital plane, with a transition zone around the Bardeen-Petterson radius. The relativistic jet launched from the spinning SMBH would undergo precession. The 5-30 day X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 shows a quasi-periodic (2.7 day) variation with noticeable narrow dips. We numerically solve a warped disk and propose a jet-precessing model by invoking a Blandford-Znajek jet collimated by a wind launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius. Through simulations, we show that the narrow dips in the X-ray light curve can be reproduced for a range of geometric configurations. From the data we infer that the inclination angle of the initial stellar orbit is in the range of 10 Degree-Sign -20 Degree-Sign from the SMBH equatorial plane, that the jet should have a moderately high Lorentz factor, and that the inclination angle, jet opening angle, and observer's viewing angle are such that the duty cycle of the line of sight sweeping the jet cone is somewhat less than 0.5.

  15. X-ray emission from the nuclei, lobes and hot-gas environments of two FR II radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croston, J. H.; Birkinshaw, M.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Worrall, D. M.

    2004-09-01

    We report on the detection of multiple components of X-ray emission from the two FR II radio galaxies, 3C 223 and 3C 284, based on new XMM-Newton observations. We attribute the detected X-ray emission from the lobes of both sources to inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons. With this model, we find that the magnetic field strength in the lobes is at the equipartition value for 3C 284, and within a factor of 2 of the equipartition value for 3C 223. We also detect group-scale hot atmospheres around both sources, and determine temperatures and pressures in the gas. The lobes of both sources are in pressure balance with the hot-gas environments, if the lobes contain only the synchrotron-emitting particles and the measured magnetic field strength. The core spectra of both sources contain an unabsorbed soft component, likely to be related to the radio jet, and an additional heavily absorbed power-law component. 3C 223 also displays a bright (EW ~500 eV) Fe Kα emission line.

  16. Surface, morphology and X-ray diffraction studies of Co (II) complexes of pyrazole ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Jain, Garima; Ninama, S.

    2014-09-01

    Pyrazole based complexes of the cobalt (II) Bis-(diethyl 4-amino-1-(P-nitrophenyl) 1H-pyrazole-3,5dicarboxylate) [Co (D4A1(P-N)1HP35D)] and cobalt (II) Bis-(diethyl 4- amino-1-(3-chlorophenyl) 1H-pyrazole-3,5dicarboxylate) [Co (D4A1(3-Cl)1HP35D)] were synthesized by chemical root method and characterized by different method viz. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Transmission electron microscopy studies. All these studies were in good agreement with the synthesized complexes.

  17. Hot, Entrained Gas in the 5-arcmin-long X-ray Jet of the Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, G.; Depree, C.; Wilson, A. S.

    1993-12-01

    The famous, large-scale, bisymmetric ``braided" jets are found to emit most of the X-rays from this nearby SABbc LINER/Seyfert galaxy. After removing wobble-related errors of up to +/-6('') in our 27 ksec ROSAT HRI image, we find that the SE branch of the jet is spatially unresolved across its width along much of its 2.5-arcmin length. The NW branch is more diffuse, and fainter X-ray emission is present throughout much of the more extensive, trailing (in the sense of galactic rotation) radio ``plateaus". The energy spectrum of the jet from a 4 ksec ROSAT PSPC exposure is quite noisy, but the best fit is provided by a Raymond-Smith plasma with T ~ 0.2 keV, log (N_H)~ 20.3 cm(-2) , and integrated X-ray luminosity of 2.2*E(40) ergs s(-1) in the 0.1:2.4 keV band. Shocks with velocities 200-400 km s(-1) (depending on the physical state of the pre-shock gas) produce this temperature. The gaseous excitation and radial velocities derived from our optical, emission-line spectra of the jets (Cecil, Wilson, & Tully 1992 ApJ, 390, 365) are also consistent with these shock speeds, provided that the gas flows along intrinsically helical paths in the region of kinematic braiding near the nucleus. Observed and modeled X-ray luminosities agree if the average ambient gas density is similar to that inferred from the H I. This component is plausibly gas that has become entrained as the jets scrape along complexes of dense molecular clouds, known to be adjacent to the jet in the gas-rich disk of this barred galaxy. The major deficiency of our current spectral model is that it produces too few photons above 0.6 keV, suggesting the presence of a hard component from the jets themselves. Finally, we will also discuss newly acquired optical long-slit and Fabry-Perot spectra that constrain the excitation mechanism of the optical gas.

  18. Chandra and HST Imaging of the Quasars PKS B0106+013 and 3C 345: Inverse Compton X-Rays and Magnetized Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Marshall, H. L.; Hogan, B. S.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from deep (~70 ks) Chandra/ACIS observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F475W observations of two highly optically polarized quasars belonging to the MOJAVE blazar sample, viz., PKS B0106+013 and 1641+399 (3C 345). These observations reveal X-ray and optical emissions from the jets in both sources. X-ray emission is detected from the entire length of the 0106+013 radio jet, which shows clear bends or wiggles—the X-ray emission is brightest at the first prominent kiloparsec jet bend. A picture of a helical kiloparsec jet with the first kiloparsec-scale bend representing a jet segment moving close(r) to our line of sight, and getting Doppler boosted at both radio and X-ray frequencies, is consistent with these observations. The X-ray emission from the jet end, however, peaks at about 0farcs4 (~3.4 kpc) upstream of the radio hot spot. Optical emission is detected both at the X-ray jet termination peak and at the radio hot spot. The X-ray jet termination peak is found upstream of the radio hot spot by around 0farcs2 (~1.3 kpc) in the short projected jet of 3C 345. HST optical emission is seen in an arc-like structure coincident with the bright radio hot spot, which we propose is a sharp (apparent) jet bend instead of a terminal point, that crosses our line of sight and consequently has a higher Doppler beaming factor. A weak radio hot spot is indeed observed less than 1'' downstream of the bright radio hot spot, but has no optical or X-ray counterpart. By making use of the parsec-scale radio and the kiloparsec-scale radio/X-ray data, we derive constraints on the jet Lorentz factors (Γjet) and inclination angles (θ): for a constant jet speed from parsec to kiloparsec scales, we obtain a Γjet of ~70 for 0106+013 and ~40 for 3C 345. On relaxing this assumption, we derive a Γjet of ~2.5 for both the sources. Upper limits on θ of ~13° are obtained for the two quasars. Broadband (radio-optical-X-ray) spectral

  19. The life science X-ray scattering beamline at NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    DiFabio, Jonathan; Yang, Lin; Chodankar, Shirish; Pjerov, Sal; Jakoncic, Jean; Lucas, Michael; Krywka, Christina; Graziano, Vito

    2015-09-30

    We report the current development status of the High Brightness X-ray Scattering for Life Sciences (or Life Science X-ray Scattering, LiX) beamline at the NSLS-II facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. This instrument will operate in the x-ray energy range of 2.1-18 keV, provide variable beam sizes from 1 micron to ~0.5 mm, and support user experiments in three scientific areas: (1) high-throughput solution scattering, in-line size exclusion chromatography and flow mixers-based time-resolved solution scattering of biological macro-molecules, (2) diffraction from single- and multi-layered lipid membranes, and (3) scattering-based scanning probe imaging of biological tissues. In order to satisfy the beam stability required for these experiments and to switch rapidly between different types of experiments, we have adopted a secondary source with refractive lenses for secondary focusing, a detector system consisting of three Pilatus detectors, and specialized experimental modules that can be quickly exchanged and each dedicated to a defined set of experiments. The construction of this beamline is on schedule for completion in September 2015. User experiments are expected to start in Spring 2016.

  20. The life science X-ray scattering beamline at NSLS-II

    DOE PAGES

    DiFabio, Jonathan; Yang, Lin; Chodankar, Shirish; ...

    2015-09-30

    We report the current development status of the High Brightness X-ray Scattering for Life Sciences (or Life Science X-ray Scattering, LiX) beamline at the NSLS-II facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. This instrument will operate in the x-ray energy range of 2.1-18 keV, provide variable beam sizes from 1 micron to ~0.5 mm, and support user experiments in three scientific areas: (1) high-throughput solution scattering, in-line size exclusion chromatography and flow mixers-based time-resolved solution scattering of biological macro-molecules, (2) diffraction from single- and multi-layered lipid membranes, and (3) scattering-based scanning probe imaging of biological tissues. In order to satisfy the beammore » stability required for these experiments and to switch rapidly between different types of experiments, we have adopted a secondary source with refractive lenses for secondary focusing, a detector system consisting of three Pilatus detectors, and specialized experimental modules that can be quickly exchanged and each dedicated to a defined set of experiments. The construction of this beamline is on schedule for completion in September 2015. User experiments are expected to start in Spring 2016.« less

  1. Performance calculations of the X-ray powder diffraction beamline at NSLS-II.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbo; Ghose, Sanjit; Dooryhee, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The X-ray Powder Diffraction (XPD) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II is a multi-purpose high-energy X-ray diffraction beamline with high throughput and high resolution. The beamline uses a sagittally bent double-Laue crystal monochromator to provide X-rays over a large energy range (30-70 keV). In this paper the optical design and the calculated performance of the XPD beamline are presented. The damping wiggler source is simulated by the SRW code and a filter system is designed to optimize the photon flux as well as to reduce the heat load on the first optics. The final beamline performance under two operation modes is simulated using the SHADOW program. For the first time a multi-lamellar model is introduced and implemented in the ray tracing of the bent Laue crystal monochromator. The optimization and the optical properties of the vertical focusing mirror are also discussed. Finally, the instrumental resolution function of the XPD beamline is described in an analytical method.

  2. X-ray absorption and diffraction study of II VI dilute oxide semiconductor alloy epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscherini, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Ciatto, G.; D'Acapito, F.; Bisognin, G.; DeSalvador, D.; Berti, M.; Felici, M.; Polimeni, A.; Nabetani, Y.

    2007-11-01

    Dilute oxide semiconductor alloys obtained by adding oxygen to a II-VI binary compound are of potential applicative interest for blue-light emitters in which the oxygen content could be used to tune the band gap. Moreover, their properties can be usefully compared to the more thoroughly studied dilute nitrides in order to gain insight into the common mechanisms which give rise to their highly non-linear physical properties. Recently, it has been possible to deposit ZnSeO and ZnSeOS epilayers on GaAs(001), which exhibit a red-shift of the band gap and giant optical bowing. In order to provide a structural basis for an understanding of their physical properties, we have performed a study of a set of ZnSeO and ZnSeOS epilayers on GaAs by high resolution x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure. We have found that the strain goes from compressive to tensile with increasing O and S concentration and that, while all epilayers are never found to be pseudomorphic, the ternary ones exhibit a low relaxed fraction if compared to the ZnSe/GaAs sample. O K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectra and corresponding simulations within the full multiple-scattering regime show that O is substitutionally incorporated in the host lattice. Zn and Se K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure detect the formation of Zn-O and Zn-S bonds; the analysis of these spectra within multiple-scattering theory has allowed us to measure the local structural parameters. The value of Zn-Se bond length is found to be in agreement with estimates based on models of local distortions in strained and relaxed epilayers; an increase of the mean-square relative displacement is detected at high O and S concentration and is related to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  3. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-04-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance, and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis on the 2-10 keV energy region and in particular on the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Kα on the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is ~800 eV for models with log ξ ~ 1.5 and decreases monotonically as ξ increases. For lower values of ξ, the Fe Kα EW decreases to a minimum near log ξ ~ 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low-ionized, reflection-dominated cases, the 2-10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S Lα lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca X Kα line. In some cases, the S XV blends with the He-like Si radiative recombination continua producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  4. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. II. DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS FOR X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    GarcIa, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F. E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov

    2011-04-20

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance, and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis on the 2-10 keV energy region and in particular on the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe K{alpha} on the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is {approx}800 eV for models with log {xi} {approx} 1.5 and decreases monotonically as {xi} increases. For lower values of {xi}, the Fe K{alpha} EW decreases to a minimum near log {xi} {approx} 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low-ionized, reflection-dominated cases, the 2-10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L{alpha} lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca X K{alpha} line. In some cases, the S XV blends with the He-like Si radiative recombination continua producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  5. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis to the 2 - 10 keV energy region, and in particular to the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Ka with the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is approx. 800 eV for models with log Epsilon approx. 1.5, and decreases monotonically as Epsilon increases. For lower values of Epsilon the Fe K(alpha) EW decreases to a minimum near log Epsilon approx. 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low ionized, reflection dominated cases, the 2 -10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power-law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L(alpha) lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca x K(alpha) line. In some cases the S xv blends with the He-like Si RRC producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  6. A Link Between X-ray Emission Lines and Radio Jets in 4U 1630-47?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Joseph; Coriat, Mickaël; Fender, Rob; Lee, Julia C.; Ponti, Gabriele; Tzioumis, A.; Edwards, Phillip; Broderick, Jess

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Díaz Trigo et al. reported an XMM-Newton detection of relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines associated with steep-spectrum radio emission in the stellar-mass black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its 2012 outburst. They interpreted these lines as indicative of a baryonic jet launched by the accretion disk. We present a search for the same lines earlier in the same outburst using high-resolution X-ray spectra from the Chandra HETGS. While our observations (eight months prior to the XMM-Newton campaign) also coincide with detections of steep spectrum radio emission by the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we find a strong disk wind but no evidence for any relativistic X-ray emission lines. Indeed, despite ˜5× brighter radio emission, our Chandra spectra allow us to place an upper limit on the flux in the blueshifted Fe XXVI line that is ˜20× weaker than the line observed by Díaz Trigo et al. Thus we can conclusively say that radio emission is not universally associated with relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines in 4U 1630-47. We explore several scenarios that could explain our differing results, including variations in the geometry of the jet or a mass-loading process or jet baryon content that evolves with the accretion state of the black hole. We also consider the possibility that the radio emission arises in an interaction between a jet and the nearby ISM, in which case the X-ray emission lines might be unrelated to the radio emission.

  7. DISCOVERY OF A WANDERING RADIO JET BASE AFTER A LARGE X-RAY FLARE IN THE BLAZAR MARKARIAN 421

    SciTech Connect

    Niinuma, K.; Kino, M.; Doi, A.; Hada, K.; Nagai, H.; Koyama, S.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the location of the radio jet bases (“radio cores”) of blazars in radio images and their stationarity by means of dense very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In order to measure the position of a radio core, we conducted a 12 epoch astrometric observation of the blazar Markarian 421 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry at 22 GHz immediately after a large X-ray flare, which occurred in the middle of 2011 September. For the first time,we find that the radio core is not stationary but rather changes its location toward 0.5 mas downstream. This angular scale corresponds to the de-projected length of a scale of 10{sup 5} Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) at the distance of Markarian 421. This radio-core wandering may be a new type of manifestation associated with the phenomena of large X-ray flares.

  8. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES IN THE 3CR CATALOG: X-RAY EMISSION FROM NUCLEI, JETS, AND HOTSPOTS IN THE CHANDRA ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Wilkes, B. J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J.; Liuzzo, E.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R.; Tremblay, G. R.; Baum, S. A.; O’Dea, C. P.

    2015-09-15

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all Third Cambridge catalog extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have already been published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the Very Large Array archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample, a comparison between the Chandra and radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium for 15 galaxy clusters.

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum

    SciTech Connect

    Trincão, José; Sousa Silva, Marta; Barata, Lídia; Bonifácio, Cecília; Carvalho, Sandra; Tomás, Ana Maria; Ferreira, António E. N.; Cordeiro, Carlos; Ponces Freire, Ana; Romão, Maria João

    2006-08-01

    A glyoxalase II from L. infantum was cloned, purified and crystallized and its structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. In trypanosomatids, trypanothione replaces glutathione in all glutathione-dependent processes. Of the two enzymes involved in the glyoxalase pathway, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, the latter shows absolute specificity towards trypanothione thioester, making this enzyme an excellent model to understand the molecular basis of trypanothione binding. Cloned glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, b = 88.3, c = 85.2 Å) and diffract beyond 2.15 Å using synchrotron radiation. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human glyoxalase II structure as a search model. These results, together with future detailed kinetic characterization using lactoyltrypanothione, should shed light on the evolutionary selection of trypanothione instead of glutathione by trypano-somatids.

  10. An Evolving Compact Jet in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary Maxi J1836-194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; O'Brien, K.; Soria, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Homan, J.; Altanirano, D.; Curran, P. A.; Rupen, M. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Dhawan, V.; Fender, R. P.; Gallo, E.; Gandhi, P.; Heinz, S.; Koerding, E. G.; Krimm, H. A.; Maitra, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from approx 10(exp 11) to approx 4 × 10(exp 13) Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  11. An Evolving Compact Jet in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary MAXI J1836-194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; O'Brien, K.; Soria, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Homan, J.; Altamirano, D.; Curran, P. A.; Rupen, M. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Dhawan, V.; Fender, R. P.; Gallo, E.; Gandhi, P.; Heinz, S.; Körding, E. G.; Krimm, H. A.; Maitra, D.; Migliari, S.; Remillard, R. A.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shahbaz, T.; Tudose, V.

    2013-05-01

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from ~1011 to ~4 × 1013 Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under ESO Program IDs 087.D-0914 and 089.D-0970.

  12. AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A.; O'Brien, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D.; Homan, J.; Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Gallo, E.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  13. Modeling X-Ray Emission of a Straight Jet: PKS 0920-397

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    and with the jet at an angle 2◦to 4◦from our line of sight. Keywords: Quasar jets; X–ray jets; jet emission mechanisms. In t. J. M od . P hy s. D...detection of the jet in the quasar PKS 0637–7513 during the very first pointed observation. While X–ray jet emission from FR I radio galaxies is normally...explained via the synchrotron mechanism, the quasar jets initially presented a puz- zle. Observations, or upper limits, to optical emission from quasar

  14. X-Raying the MOJAVE Sample of Compact Extragalactic Radio Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadler, M.; Sato, G.; Tueller, J.; Sambruna, R. M.; Markwardt, C. B.; Giommi, P.; Gehrels, N.

    2007-01-01

    The MOJAVE sample is the first large radio-selected, VLBI-monitored AGN sample for which complete X-ray spectral information is being gathered. We report on the status of Swift survey observations which complement the available archival X-ray data at 0.3-10 keV and in the UV with its XRT and UVOT instruments. Many of these 133 radio-brightest AGN in the northern sky are now being observed for the first time at these energies. These and complementary other multiwavelength observations provide a large statistical sample of radio-selected AGN whose spectral energy distributions we measured from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths, available at the beginning of GLAST operations in 2008. Here, we report the X-ray spectral characteristics of 36 of these previously unobserved MOJAVE sources. In addition, the number of MOJAVE sources detected by the BAT instrument in the hard X-ray band is growing: we report the detection of five new blazars with BAT.

  15. Apparatus and method for nanoflow liquid jet and serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Bogan, Michael J.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2016-03-01

    Techniques for nanoflow serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography include providing a sample fluid by mixing a plurality of a first target of interest with a carrier fluid and injecting the sample fluid into a vacuum chamber at a rate less than about 4 microliters per minute. In some embodiments, the carrier fluid has a viscosity greater than about 3 centipoise.

  16. Photometry of slow X-ray pulsars. II - The 13.9 minute period of X Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Thorstensen, J. R.; Bowyer, S.; Mason, K. O.; White, N. E.; Sanford, P. W.; Parkes, G.; Stone, R. P. S.; Bailey, J.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for time-resolved narrow-band photometry and spectrophotometry of X Per performed in an unsuccessful effort to confirm previously reported observations of 13.9-min pulsations in the intensity of the He II line at 4686 A. No features that are synchronous with a 13.9-min period are found in the optical data, and simultaneous X-ray observations of 3U 0352+30 are reported which show that a strong 13.9-min X-ray modulation was present during the optical photometry. Some implications of the X-ray periodicities observed for X Per are considered.

  17. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  18. A combined optical and X-ray study of unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei - II. Relation between X-ray emission and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chichuan; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris

    2012-06-01

    In this second paper in a series of three, we study the properties of the various emission features and underlying continuum in the optical spectra of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the unobscured hard X-ray emission as a diagnostic. We introduce the use of the 'correlation spectrum technique' (CST) for the first time. We use this to show the strength of the correlation between the hard X-ray luminosity and each wavelength of the optical spectrum. This shows that for broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies all the strong emission lines (the broad component of Hα and Hβ, [Ne III] λλ3869/3967, [O I] λλ6300/6364, [O II] λλ3726/3729 and [O III] λλ4959/5007) and the optical underlying continuum all strongly correlate with the hard X-ray emission. In contrast, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies show a stronger correlation in the optical continuum but a weaker correlation in the lines. A cross-correlation with luminosity between the various Balmer line components and the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) components shows that the best correlation exists between the hard X-ray component and the broad component (BC) of the Balmer lines. Such a correlation is weaker for the intermediate (IC) and narrow components, which supports the view that the broad-line region (BLR) has the closest link with the AGN's compact X-ray emission. The equivalent widths of the Balmer line IC and BC are found to correlate with ?, ?, Balmer line full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and black hole mass. There is a non-linear dependence of the Balmer line IC and BC luminosities with ? and L5100, which suggests that a second-order factor such as the intermediate-line region (ILR) and BLR covering factors affect the Balmer line component luminosities. The Balmer decrement is found to decrease from ˜5 in the line core to ˜2 in the extended wings, with mean decrements of 2.1 in the BLR and 4.8 in the ILR. This suggests different physical conditions in these regions, such as

  19. The subarcsecond mid-infrared view of local active galactic nuclei - II. The mid-infrared-X-ray correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Hönig, S. F.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present an updated mid-infrared (MIR) versus X-ray correlation for the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) population based on the high angular resolution 12 and 18μm continuum fluxes from the AGN subarcsecond MIR atlas and 2-10 keV and 14-195 keV data collected from the literature. We isolate a sample of 152 objects with reliable AGN nature and multi-epoch X-ray data and minimal MIR contribution from star formation. Although the sample is not homogeneous or complete, we show that our results are unlikely to be affected by significant biases. The MIR-X-ray correlation is nearly linear and within a factor of 2 independent of the AGN type and the wavebands used. The observed scatter is <0.4 dex. A possible flattening of the correlation slope at the highest luminosities probed (˜1045 erg s-1) towards low MIR luminosities for a given X-ray luminosity is indicated but not significant. Unobscured objects have, on average, an MIR-X-ray ratio that is only ≤0.15 dex higher than that of obscured objects. Objects with intermediate X-ray column densities (22 < log NH < 23) actually show the highest MIR-X-ray ratio on average. Radio-loud objects show a higher mean MIR-X-ray ratio at low luminosities while the ratio is lower than average at high luminosities. This may be explained by synchrotron emission from the jet contributing to the MIR at low luminosities and additional X-ray emission at high luminosities. True Seyfert 2 candidates do not show any deviation from the general behaviour suggesting that they possess a dusty obscurer as in other AGN. Double AGN also do not deviate. Finally, we show that the MIR-X-ray correlation can be used to investigate the AGN nature of uncertain objects. Specifically, we give equations that allow us to determine the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosities and column densities for objects with complex X-ray properties to within 0.34 dex. These techniques are applied to the uncertain objects of the remaining AGN MIR atlas, demonstrating the

  20. The ROSAT-ESO flux limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey (REFLEX II). I. Newly identified X-ray luminous clusters at z ≥ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, G.; Böhringer, H.

    2012-02-01

    We report 19 intermediate redshift clusters newly detected in the ROSAT All-Sky survey that are spectroscopically confirmed. They form a part of 911 objects in the REFLEX II cluster catalogue with a limiting flux of 1.8 × 10-12 erg/s/cm2 in the 0.1-2.4 keV ROSAT band at redshift z ≥ 0.2. In addition we report three clusters from the REFLEX III supplementary catalogue, which contains objects below the REFLEX II flux limit but satisfies the redshift constraint above. These clusters are spectroscopically followed-up by our ESO NTT-EFOSC2 campaigns for the redshift measurement. We describe our observing and data reduction methods. We show how X-ray properties such as spectral hardness ratio and source extent can be used as important diagnostics in selecting galaxy cluster candidates. Physical properties of the clusters are subsequently calculated from the X-ray observations. This sample contains the high mass and intermediate-redshift galaxy clusters for astrophysical and cosmological applications. Based on the data obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  1. AN X-RAY VIEW OF THE JET CYCLE IN THE RADIO-LOUD AGN 3C120

    SciTech Connect

    Lohfink, Anne M.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tombesi, Francesco; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Miller, Eric D.; Nowak, Michael A.; Aller, Hugh; Aller, Margo F.; Miller, Jon M.; Brenneman, Laura W.; Fabian, Andrew C.

    2013-08-01

    We present a study of the central engine in the broad-line radio galaxy 3C120 using a multi-epoch analysis of a deep XMM-Newton observation and two deep Suzaku pointings (in 2012). In order to place our spectral data into the context of the disk-disruption/jet-ejection cycles displayed by this object, we monitor the source in the UV/X-ray bands, and in the radio band. We find three statistically acceptable spectral models: a disk-reflection model, a jet model, and a jet+disk model. Despite being good descriptions of the data, the disk-reflection model violates the radio constraints on the inclination, and the jet model has a fine-tuning problem, requiring a jet contribution exceeding that expected. Thus, we argue for a composite jet+disk model. Within the context of this model, we verify the basic predictions of the jet-cycle paradigm, finding a truncated/refilling disk during the Suzaku observations and a complete disk extending down to the innermost stable circular orbit during the XMM-Newton observation. The idea of a refilling disk is further supported by the detection of the ejection of a new jet knot approximately one month after the Suzaku pointings. We also discover a step-like event in one of the Suzaku pointings in which the soft band lags the hard band. We suggest that we are witnessing the propagation of a disturbance from the disk into the jet on a timescale set by the magnetic field.

  2. Analysis of the Response of CVD Diamond Detectors for UV and sX-Ray Plasma Diagnostics Installed at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiffi, B.; Coffey, I.; Pillon, M.; Osipenko, M.; Prestopino, G.; Ripani, M.; Taiuti, M.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    Diamond detectors are very promising candidates for plasma diagnostics in a harsh environment. In fact, they have several proprieties which make them suitable for magnetic fusion devices: radiation hardness, high thermal conductivity, high resistivity, high carrier mobility and a large bandgap (5.5 eV). The latter makes them insensitive to visible radiation and allows low noise measurements without any cooling. In 2008 two CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) single crystal diamond (SCD) detectors were installed at the JET tokamak as extreme UV and soft X-Ray diagnostics [1]. In this work the neutron background in these detectors was measured shielding the UV and soft X-Ray radiation by closing a local vacuum valve. The UV detector was found to be insensitive to the neutron flux, while the soft X Ray detector signal exhibited spikes during the highest neutron rate pulse (neutron rate 1016n/s, which corresponds to a flux of φn ˜105n/cm2s in the detector location). These spikes were found to be due to the (n,p) reaction within the plastic filter in front of the soft X-Ray detector. The UV SCD was also used to perform time of flight (ToF) measurements in laser ablation experiments. ToFs were found to be an order of magnitude higher than expected if only the drift velocity is considered. This discrepancy could be due to a delay between the arrival time of the impurities in the plasma and their emission in an energy range which SCD is sensitive to (Eph >5.5 eV). The delay is found to be comparable with the expected ionization times for edge plasma conditions.

  3. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. N.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2010-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) Beamline of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-lI) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state of the art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored in order to be utilized in supporting endstation instruments. This paper presents results of the various study aspects and their influence on the HXN design optimization.

  4. Local structure studies of some cobalt (II) complexes using extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath; Trivedi, Apurva

    2014-09-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis of Cobalt (II) complex as a ligand of 2 -methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]-3H-l,5 benzodiazepine for finding local structure using conventional method .The Co(II) complexes were prepared by chemical root method. The EXAFS spectra were recorded at Cobalt K-edge i.e.; 7709 eV using Dispersive EXFAS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source(SRS) at RRCAT, Indore, India. The recorded EXAFS data were analysed using the computer software Athena for determine the nearest neighbouring distances (bond lengths) of these complexes with conventional methods and it compared with Fourier transform(FT) analysis. The Fourier Transform convert EXAFS data signal into r-space or k-space. This is useful for visualizing the major contributions to the EXAFS spectrum.

  5. DISCOVERY OF A KILOPARSEC-SCALE X-RAY/RADIO JET IN THE z = 4.72 QUASAR GB 1428+4217

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E.; Schwartz, D. A.; Gobeille, D.; Wardle, J. F. C.

    2012-09-01

    We report the discovery of a one-sided 3.''6 (24 kpc, projected) long jet in the high-redshift, z = 4.72, quasar GB 1428+4217 in new Chandra X-ray and Very Large Array (VLA) radio observations. This is the highest redshift kiloparsec-scale X-ray/radio jet known. Analysis of archival very long baseline interferometry 2.3 and 8.6 GHz data reveal a faint one-sided jet extending out to {approx}200 pc and aligned to within {approx}30 Degree-Sign of the Chandra/VLA emission. The 3.''6 distant knot is not detected in an archival Hubble Space Telescope image, and its broadband spectral energy distribution is consistent with an origin from inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons for the X-rays. Assuming also equipartition between the radiating particles and magnetic field, the implied jet Lorentz factor is Almost-Equal-To 5. This is similar to the other two known z {approx} 4 kpc scale X-ray jet cases and smaller than typically inferred in lower-redshift cases. Although there are still but a few such very high redshift quasar X-ray jets known, for an inverse Compton origin, the present data suggest that they are less relativistic on large scales than their lower-redshift counterparts.

  6. A comprehensive long-term study of the radio and X-ray variability of NGC 4051 Paper II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; McHardy, I.; Maccarone, T. J.

    2017-02-01

    The origin of the low-luminosity radio emission in radio-quiet active galactic nucleus, is unknown. The detection of a positive correlation between the radio and X-ray emission would imply a jet-like origin, similar to that seen in 'hard-state' X-ray binary systems. In our previous work, we found no believable radio variability in the well-known X-ray bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051, despite large amplitude X-ray variability. In this study, we have carefully re-analysed radio and X-ray observations using the same methods as our previous work; we again find no evidence for core radio variability. In direct contrast to our findings, another study claim significant radio variability and a distinctive anticorrelation between radio and X-ray data for the same source. The other study report only integral flux values and do not consider the effect of the changing array on the synthesized beam. In both our studies of NGC 4051, we have taken great care to account for the effect that the changing beam size has on the measured radio flux and as a result we are confident that our method gives more accurate values for the intrinsic core radio flux. However, the lack of radio variability we find is hard to reconcile because radio images of NGC 4051 do show jet-like structure. We suggest that the radio structures observed are likely the result of a previous period of higher radio activity and that the current level of radio emission from a compact nuclear jet is low.

  7. The observed characteristics of flare energy release. II - High-speed soft X-ray fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Xiao, Y. C.; Wu, S. T.; Prokakis, TH.; Dialetis, D.

    1988-01-01

    Flare-associated large-scale brightenings of magnetic loop structures have recently been shown to be related to the propagation of soft X-ray fronts, moving at speeds of the order of 1000 km/s. These are also linked with the brightening of remote H-alpha patches and, in many cases, with type II or U radio emission. A detailed study of the best example found in the Solar Maximum Mission's Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer data was performed and with the help of numerical simulations and additional information provided by H-alpha records, it is shown that all together the three energy transport processes proposed by previous authors, namely high-energy particles, conduction fronts, and shocks, play significant roles in the redistribution of flare energy within the loops. The observable evidence of thermal flux limitation and the implication of these and previous results on the efficiency ratio between thermal and nonthermal processes in flares are discussed. Finally, these results are placed under the perspective of the interacting loop model of flares discussed in previous papers, to show that only about 10 percent of the total energy conversion occurs at the interface between loops. The bulk of the flare energy seems to be released internally within one of the bipolar loop structures.

  8. Small-angle x-ray scattering studies of the manganese stabilizing subunit in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, B.; Tiede, D. M.; Barry, B. A.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2002-08-29

    Small-angle X-ray scattering studies (SAXS) were used to determine the size, shape, and oligomeric composition of the manganese stabilizing protein (MSP) of photosystem II. This extrinsic protein subunit plays an important role in photosynthetic oxygen evolution. As its name implies, MSP stabilizes the tetranuclear Mn cluster of the water oxidation complex. Removal of MSP lowers activity and decreases the stability of active-site manganese. Reconstitution of MSP reverses these effects. In this study, MSP was extracted from spinach PSII membranes using CaCl{sub 2} or urea. Through the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of MSP was determined to be 26.53 kDa. X-ray scattering results show that both samples display a monodisperse scattering pattern; this pattern is consistent with a homogeneous protein solution. The CaCl{sub 2} extracted and urea extracted MSP samples have radii of gyration of 25.9 {+-} 0.4 and 27.0 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, respectively. MSP is shown to be monomeric in solution. This was determined using a cytochrome c standard and the scattering intensity, extrapolated to zero scattering angle, which is proportional to the molecular weight. This SAXS study suggests that, in solution, MSP is a monomeric, elongated prolate ellipsoid with dimensions, 112 x 23 x 23 {angstrom}{sup 3} and an axial ratio of 4.8.

  9. Single crystal artificial diamond detectors for VUV and soft X-rays measurements on JET thermonuclear fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Coffey, I.; Murari, A.; Tartoni, N.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2010-11-01

    Diamond appears to be a promising material for VUV and soft X-ray radiation detection. Its wide band-gap (5.5 eV) results in a very low leakage current (it can operate above room temperature) and its electronic properties (high carrier mobility) allow a fast time response. More importantly, it is optimally suited for harsh environment applications, like those in the JET Tokamak located at the Culham laboratory (UK). Its extreme radiation hardness is well known and another interesting feature, again related to the wide band-gap, is its selective sensitivity to radiation with wavelengths shorter than 225 nm (visible-blind detectors).We report on the performances of two photodetectors based on Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) single crystal diamonds, one optimized for extreme UV detection, the other for soft X-ray radiation detection in the 0.8-8 keV range. These detectors have been fabricated at Roma "Tor Vergata" University using a p-type/intrinsic/metal configuration and they behave like photodiodes allowing operation with no external applied voltage. They have been installed on JET inside a vacuum chamber with a direct horizontal view of JET plasma without any wavelength selection. Their low thickness, low sensitivity to gamma ray and the unbiased operation mode make both detectors ideal for a Tokamak environment. The measurements routinely performed at JET show a low intrinsic dark current (˜0.01 pA) and very high signal to noise ratio (50 dB). Both detectors show a fast response and their signals are acquired using an electronic chain and ADC able to operate at 200 kHz, providing very interesting results for MHD and Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) instability studies on fusion plasmas.

  10. Extended X-ray absorption studies of copper (II) dibenzoyal methane diquinoline complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Sharma, P.; Malviya, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    X-ray K-absorption spectroscopic studies have been carried out on copper (II) mixed-ligand complexes. Copper is a transition metal, which in the zero oxidation state has an electron configuration of [Ar] 4s24p63d9. Copper is found in three different oxidation states: Cu(I), Cu(II), and Cu(III). In the copper (II) oxidation state, the metal has 9 d electrons. Jahn-Teller distortion causes a splitting of eg and t2g orbitals. Most Cu(II) complexes are square planar for this reason. In a series of those compounds, we have prepared copper (II) complexes containing two nitrato ligands and a 2,2'-dipyridylamine(dpa) derivative ligand. The 2,2' - dipyridylamine and its derivatives have been widely used for metal complexes because of their good chelating property, structural flexibility. we have estimated the average metalligand bond distances from the fine structure data. We have determined the bond lengths for the copper (II) complexes with the help of Levy's, LSS, Fourier transform, Lytle's Methods.

  11. A setup for synchrotron-radiation-induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near-edge structure recently commissioned at BESSY II BAMline.

    PubMed

    Fittschen, U; Guilherme, A; Böttger, S; Rosenberg, D; Menzel, M; Jansen, W; Busker, M; Gotlib, Z P; Radtke, M; Riesemeier, H; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2016-05-01

    An automatic sample changer chamber for total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis in TXRF geometry was successfully set up at the BAMline at BESSY II. TXRF and TXRF-XANES are valuable tools for elemental determination and speciation, especially where sample amounts are limited (<1 mg) and concentrations are low (ng ml(-1) to µg ml(-1)). TXRF requires a well defined geometry regarding the reflecting surface of a sample carrier and the synchrotron beam. The newly installed chamber allows for reliable sample positioning, remote sample changing and evacuation of the fluorescence beam path. The chamber was successfully used showing accurate determination of elemental amounts in the certified reference material NIST water 1640. Low limits of detection of less than 100 fg absolute (10 pg ml(-1)) for Ni were found. TXRF-XANES on different Re species was applied. An unknown species of Re was found to be Re in the +7 oxidation state.

  12. Simulation of a He II Lyman-alpha soft x-ray laser pumped by DESY/XFEL radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ke; Fill, Ernst E.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jurgen

    2003-12-01

    The high brilliance expected from the X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL"s) now under construction suggest re-investigating the feasibility of a photopumped soft X-ray laser. We present simulations of a Lyman-α X-ray laser in hydrogenic He (λ = 30.4 nm) pumped by XFEL radiation with parameters of the TESLA Test Facility, phase II, at DESY/Hamburg. The simulations show that high gain can be achieved at a pump intensity of 1015 W/cm2. The realization of such a laser could provide a better understanding of the physics of photopumped lasers and thus help to develop table-top X-ray lasers.

  13. The 2015 Decay of the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni: Robust Disk-jet Coupling and a Sharp Transition into Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, R. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Gallo, E.; Jonker, P. G.; Homan, J.; Tomsick, J. A.; Kaaret, P.; Russell, D. M.; Heinz, S.; Hodges-Kluck, E. J.; Markoff, S.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Altamirano, D.; Neilsen, J.

    2017-01-01

    We present simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cygni at the end of its 2015 outburst. From 2015 July 11–August 5, we monitored V404 Cygni with Chandra, Swift, and NuSTAR in the X-ray, and with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and the Very Long Baseline Array in the radio, spanning a range of luminosities that were poorly covered during its previous outburst in 1989 (our 2015 campaign covers 2× {10}33≲ {L}{{X}}≲ {10}34 {erg} {{{s}}}-1). During our 2015 campaign, the X-ray spectrum evolved rapidly from a hard photon index of {{Γ }}≈ 1.6 (at {L}{{X}}≈ {10}34 {erg} {{{s}}}-1) to a softer {{Γ }}≈ 2 (at {L}{{X}}≈ 3× {10}33 {erg} {{{s}}}-1). We argue that V404 Cygni reaching {{Γ }}≈ 2 marks the beginning of the quiescent spectral state, which occurs at a factor of ≈3–4 higher X-ray luminosity than the average pre-outburst luminosity of ≈ 8× {10}32 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. V404 Cygni falls along the same radio/X-ray luminosity correlation that it followed during its previous outburst in 1989, implying a robust disk-jet coupling. We exclude the possibility that a synchrotron-cooled jet dominates the X-ray emission in quiescence, leaving synchrotron self-Compton from either a hot accretion flow or from a radiatively cooled jet as the most likely sources of X-ray radiation, and/or particle acceleration along the jet becoming less efficient in quiescence. Finally, we present the first indications of correlated radio and X-ray variability on minute timescales in quiescence, tentatively measuring the radio emission to lag the X-ray by 15+/- 4 minute, suggestive of X-ray variations propagating down a jet with a length of <3.0 au.

  14. Completing a Flux-limited Survey for X-ray Emission from Radio Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Herman

    2009-07-01

    We will measure the changing flow speeds, magnetic fields, and energy fluxes in well-resolved quasar jets found in our short-exposure Chandra survey by combining new, deep Chandra data with radio and optical imaging. We will image each jet with sufficient sensitivity to estimate beaming factors and magnetic fields in several distinct regions, and so map the variations in these parameters down the jets. HST observations will help diagnose the role of synchrotron emission in the overall SED, and may reveal condensations on scales less than 0.1 arcsec.

  15. X-ray Dips Followed by Superluminal Ejections as Evidence for An Accretion Disc Feeding the Jet in A Radio Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Gomez, Jose-Luis; Aller, Margo F.; Terasranta, Harri; Lister, Matthew L.; Stirling, Alastair, M.

    2002-01-01

    Accretion onto black holes is thought to power the relativistic jets and other high-energy phenomena in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the "microquasar" binary systems located in our Galaxy. However, until now there has been insufficient multifrequency monitoring to establish a direct observational link between the black hole and the jet in an AGE. This contrasts with the case of microquasars, in which superluminal features appear and propagate down the radio jet shortly after sudden decreases in the X-ray flux. Such an X-ray dip is most likely caused by the disappearance of a section of the inner accretion disc, part of which falls past the event horizon and the remainder of which is injected into the jet. This infusion of energy generates a disturbance that propagates down the jet, creating the appearance of a superluminal bright spot. Here we report the results of three years of intensive monitoring of the X-ray and radio emission of the Seyfert-like radio galaxy 3C 120. As in the case of microquasars, dips in the X-ray emission are followed by ejections of bright superluminal knots in the radio jet. Comparison of the characteristic length and time scales allows us to infer that the rotational states of the black holes in these two objects are different.

  16. Structural determination of a short-lived excited iron(II) complex by picosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gawelda, Wojciech; Pham, Van-Thai; Benfatto, Maurizio; Zaushitsyn, Yuri; Kaiser, Maik; Grolimund, Daniel; Johnson, Steven L; Abela, Rafael; Hauser, Andreas; Bressler, Christian; Chergui, Majed

    2007-02-02

    Structural changes of the iron(II)-tris-bipyridine ([Fe(II)(bpy)(3)](2+)) complex induced by ultrashort pulse excitation and population of its short-lived (< or =0.6 ns) quintet high spin state have been detected by picosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The structural relaxation from the high spin to the low spin state was followed over the entire lifetime of the excited state. A combined analysis of the x-ray-absorption near-edge structure and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy features delivers an Fe-N bond elongation of 0.2 A in the quintet state compared to the singlet ground state.

  17. Jets, hotspots and lobes: what X-ray observations tell us about extra-galactic radio sources.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Martin J

    2005-12-15

    The brightest and most numerous discrete radio sources in the sky, radio galaxies and quasars, are powered by twin jets of plasma which emerge at relativistic speeds from very small regions at the centre of large elliptical galaxies, powered by mass infall on to supermassive black holes. The jets can carry material out to very large distances (millions of light years) where it forms balloon-like lobes. Until recently it has been impossible to make definite statements about the energy or the nature of the matter supplied by the jets, or the dynamics of the lobes as they expand into the external medium. This has meant that crucial questions about the generation of radio sources and their effect on their environment have gone unanswered. The situation has been revolutionized by the launch at the start of this decade of a new generation of X-ray observatories, Chandra and XMM-Newton. In this article, I explain why observations with these instruments have made such a difference, what we have learned as a result and why the community remains divided on some important features of the interpretation of the data.

  18. The Large-Scale, Decelerating X-ray Jets from the Microquasar Xte J1550-564: Evidence for External Shocks Caused by the Jet-Ism Interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Lu, T.

    2005-06-01

    Large-scale, decelerating, relativistic X-ray jets from microquasar XTE J1550-564 has been recently discovered with Chandra by Corbel et al. (2002). We find that the dynamical evolution of the approaching jet at the late time is consistent with the well-known Sedov evolutionary phase R∝ t 2/5. A trans-relativistic external shock dynamic model by analogy with the evolution of gamma-ray burst remnants, is shown to be able to fit the proper-motion data of the approaching jet reasonably well. The inferred interstellar medium density around the source is well below the canonical value n ISM˜1 cm-3. The rapidly fading X-ray emission can be interpreted as synchrotron radiation from the non-thermal electrons in the adiabatically expanding ejecta. These electrons were accelerated by the reverse shock (moving back into the ejecta) which becomes important when the inertia of the swept external matter leads to an appreciable slowing down of the original ejecta.

  19. The Large-Scale, Decelerating X-Ray Jets from the Microquasar XTE J1550—564: Evidence for External Shocks Caused by the Jet-Ism Interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Lu, T.

    Large-scale, decelerating, relativistic X-ray jets from microquasar XTE J1550—564 has been recently discovered with Chandra by Corbel et al. (2002). We find that the dynamical evolution of the approaching jet at the late time is consistent with the well-known Sedov evolutionary phase R ∝ t2/5. A trans-relativistic external shock dynamic model by analogy with the evolution of gammaray burst remnants, is shown to be able to fit the proper-motion data of the approaching jet reasonably well. The inferred interstellar medium density around the source is well below the canonical value nISM ˜ 1 cm-3. The rapidly fading X-ray emission can be interpreted as synchrotron radiation from the non-thermal electrons in the adiabatically expanding ejecta. These electrons were accelerated by the reverse shock (moving back into the ejecta) which becomes important when the inertia of the swept external matter leads to an appreciable slowing down of the original ejecta.

  20. FERMI RULES OUT THE INVERSE COMPTON/CMB MODEL FOR THE LARGE-SCALE JET X-RAY EMISSION OF 3C 273

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2014-01-10

    The X-ray emission mechanism in large-scale jets of powerful radio quasars has been a source of debate in recent years, with two competing interpretations: either the X-rays are of synchrotron origin, arising from a different electron energy distribution than that producing the radio to optical synchrotron component, or they are due to inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons (IC/CMB) by relativistic electrons in a powerful relativistic jet with bulk Lorentz factor Γ ∼ 10-20. These two models imply radically different conditions in the large-scale jet in terms of jet speed, kinetic power, and maximum energy of the particle acceleration mechanism, with important implications for the impact of the jet on the large-scale environment. A large part of the X-ray origin debate has centered on the well-studied source 3C 273. Here we present new observations from Fermi which put an upper limit on the gamma-ray flux from the large-scale jet of 3C 273 that violates at a confidence greater that 99.9% the flux expected from the IC/CMB X-ray model found by extrapolation of the UV to X-ray spectrum of knot A, thus ruling out the IC/CMB interpretation entirely for this source when combined with previous work. Further, this upper limit from Fermi puts a limit on the Doppler beaming factor of at least δ < 9, assuming equipartition fields, and possibly as low as δ < 5, assuming no major deceleration of the jet from knots A through D1.

  1. X-ray studies of quasars with the Einstein Observatory. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorani, G.; Maccacaro, T.; Henry, J. P.; Tananbaum, H.; Soltan, A.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Weymann, R. J.; Smith, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray observations of 107 quasars have been carried out with the Einstein Observatory, and 79 have been detected. A correlation between optical emission and X-ray emission is found; and for radio-loud quasars, the data show a correlation between radio emission and X-ray emission. For a given optical luminosity, the average X-ray emission of radio-loud quasars is about three times higher than that of radio-quiet quasars. The data also suggest that the ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is decreasing with increasing redshift and/or optical luminosity. The data support the picture in which luminosity evolution, rather than pure density evolution, describes the quasar behavior as a function of redshift.

  2. X-ray and UV radiation from accreting nonmagnetic degenerate dwarfs. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylafis, N. D.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical calculations of X-ray and UV emission from accreting nonmagnetic degenerate dwarfs are reported, which span the entire range of accretion rates and stellar masses. Calculations include the effects of bremsstrahlung, Compton cooling, radiation pressure, albedo of the stellar surface, Compton degradation and free-free abscription of the X-ray spectrum by the accreting matter. Maximum X-ray luminosity for degenerate dwarfs undergoing spherical accretion is found to be 2.2 x 10 to the 36th ergs/s, which is little changed if accretion occurs radially over only a fraction of the stellar surface, so that the emitted radiation escapes without significant scattering. The temperature characterizing the X-ray spectra produced by degenerate dwarfs strongly depends on the stellar mass and the accretion rate, and it is suggested that the correlation between spectral temperature and luminosity is an important signature of degenerate X-ray sources.

  3. ATP Dependent Rotational Motion of Group II Chaperonin Observed by X-ray Single Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Ayumi; Moriya, Kazuki; Makabe, Koki; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Sato, Tokushi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Yohda, Masafumi; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2013-01-01

    Group II chaperonins play important roles in protein homeostasis in the eukaryotic cytosol and in Archaea. These proteins assist in the folding of nascent polypeptides and also refold unfolded proteins in an ATP-dependent manner. Chaperonin-mediated protein folding is dependent on the closure and opening of a built-in lid, which is controlled by the ATP hydrolysis cycle. Recent structural studies suggest that the ring structure of the chaperonin twists to seal off the central cavity. In this study, we demonstrate ATP-dependent dynamics of a group II chaperonin at the single-molecule level with highly accurate rotational axes views by diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT). A UV light-triggered DXT study with caged-ATP and stopped-flow fluorometry revealed that the lid partially closed within 1 s of ATP binding, the closed ring subsequently twisted counterclockwise within 2–6 s, as viewed from the top to bottom of the chaperonin, and the twisted ring reverted to the original open-state with a clockwise motion. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that the biphasic lid-closure process occurs with unsynchronized closure and a synchronized counterclockwise twisting motion. PMID:23734192

  4. Characterising the local void with the X-ray cluster survey REFLEX II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Chris A.; Böhringer, Hans; Bristow, Martyn; Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    Claims of a significant underdensity or void in the density distribution on scales out to ~= 300 Mpc have recently been made using samples of galaxies. We present the results of an alternative test of the matter distribution on these scales using clusters of galaxies, which provide an independent and powerful probe of large-scale structure. We study the density distribution of X-ray clusters from the ROSAT-based REFLEX II catalogue, which covers a contiguous area of 4.24 steradians in the southern hempsphere (34% of the entire sky). Using the normalised comoving number density of clusters we find evidence for an underdensity (30-40%), out to z~ 0.04, equivalent to ~=170 Mpc and with a significance of 3.4σ. On scales between 300 Mpc and 1 Gpc the distribution of REFLEX II clusters is consistent with being uniform. We also confirm recent results that the underdensity has a large contribution from the direction of the South Galactic Cap region, but is not significant in the direction of the Northern Galactic Cap as viewed from the southern sky. Both the limited size of the detected underdensity and its lack of isotropy, argue against the idea that the Type Ia supernovae data can be explained without the need for dark energy.

  5. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of x-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose IB and cellulose II

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose IB materials simply based on intensity at 18o 20 in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16o 2O intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and th...

  6. Toward steering a jet of particles into an x-ray beam with optically induced forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerskorn, Niko; Bowman, Richard; Kirian, Richard A.; Awel, Salah; Wiedorn, Max; Küpper, Jochen; Padgett, Miles J.; Chapman, Henry N.; Rode, Andrei V.

    2015-08-01

    Optical trapping of light-absorbing particles in a gaseous environment is governed by a laser-induced photophoretic force, which can be orders of magnitude stronger than the force of radiation pressure induced by the same light intensity. In spite of many experimental studies, the exact theoretical background underlying the photophoretic force and the prediction of its influence on the particle motion is still in its infancy. Here, we report the results of a quantitative analysis of the photophoretic force and the stiffness of trapping achieved by levitating graphite and carbon-coated glass shells of calibrated sizes in an upright diverging hollow-core vortex beam, which we refer to as an `optical funnel'. The measurements of forces were conducted in air at various gas pressures in the range from 5 mbar to 2 bar. The results of these measurements lay the foundation for developing a touch-free optical system for precisely positioning sub-micrometer bioparticles at the focal spot of an x-ray free electron laser, which would significantly enhance the efficiency of studying nanoscale morphology of proteins and biomolecules in femtosecond coherent diffractive imaging experiments.

  7. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND X-RAY IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko; Aikawa, Yuri

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization; here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find that photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N{sub 2}H{sup +}, indicating that it is safe to adopt existing approximations of the X-ray ionization rate in typical T Tauri star-disk systems. The recalculation of the photorates increases the abundances of neutral molecules in the outer disk, highlighting the importance of taking into account the shape of the UV spectrum in protoplanetary disks. A recalculation of the photoreaction rates also affects the gas-phase chemistry due to the adjustment of the H/H{sub 2} and C{sup +}/C ratios. The disk ionization fraction is not significantly affected by the methods adopted to calculate the photochemistry and X-ray ionization. We determine that there is a probable 'dead zone' where accretion is suppressed, present in a layer, Z/R {approx}< 0.1-0.2, in the disk midplane, within R Almost-Equal-To 200 AU.

  8. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays. II. Faint Sources Detected with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, N. E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I.; Mukai, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection from four symbiotic stars that were not known to be X-ray sources. These four object show a ß-type X-ray spectrum, that is, their spectra can be modeled with an absorbed optically thin thermal emission with temperatures of a few million degrees. Photometric series obtained with the Optical Monitor on board XMM-Newton from V2416 Sgr and NSV 25735 support the proposed scenario where the X-ray emission is produced in a shock-heated region inside the symbiotic nebulae.

  9. Palladium(II) complex with thiazole containing tridentate ONN donor ligand: Synthesis, X-ray structure and DFT computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sujan; Pramanik, Ajoy Kumar; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-05-01

    New palladium(II) complex with 2-(2-thiazolyl)-4-methylphenol (TAC) having general formula [Pd(TAC)Cl) (1) has been synthesized and characterized. The complex has been characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. Single crystal X-ray structure shows distorted square planar geometry around palladium(II). Cyclic voltammetric studies shows ligand based irreversible oxidation and reduction peaks. The electronic structure, redox properties and electronic excitations in the complex are interpreted by DFT and TDDFT calculations.

  10. Chandra X-ray Observations of Young Clusters. Volume II; Orion Flanking Fields Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa; Stauffer, John; Strom, Stephen; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hearty, Thomas; Kopan, Eugene L.; Pravdo, Steven; Makidon, Russell; Jones, Burton

    2004-01-01

    We present results of Chandra observations of two flanking fields (FFs) in Orion, outside the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). The observations were taken with the ACIS-I camera with an exposure time of about 48 ks each field. We present a catalog of 417 sources, which includes X-ray luminosity, optical and infrared photometry, and X-ray variability information. We have found 91 variable sources, 33 of which have a flarelike light curve and 11 of which have a pattern of a steady increase or decrease over a 10 hr period. The optical and infrared photometry for the stars identified as X-ray sources are consistent with most of these objects being pre-main-sequence stars with ages younger than 10 Myr. We present evidence for an age difference among the X-ray-selected samples of NGC 2264, Orion FFs, and ONC, with NGC 2264 being the oldest and ONC being the youngest.

  11. Normal incidence X-ray telescope power spectra of X-ray emission from solar active regions. I - Observations. II - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Golub, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to very high resolution image of coronal active regions obtained by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope is used to find a broad isotropic power-law spectrum of the spatial distribution of soft X-ray intensities. Magnetic structures of all sizes are present down to the resolution limit of the instrument. Power spectra for the X-ray intensities of a sample of topologically different active regions are found which fall off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. A model is presented that relates the basic features of coronal magnetic fluctuations to the subphotospheric hydrodynamic turbulence that generates them. The model is used to find a theoretical power spectrum for the X-ray intensity which falls off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. The implications of a turbulent regime in active regions are discussed.

  12. THE NATURE OF THE UV/OPTICAL EMISSION OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IN HOLMBERG II

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Lian; Feng Hua; Kaaret, Philip; Grise, Fabien

    2012-05-10

    We report on UV and X-ray spectroscopy and broadband optical observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source in Holmberg II. Fitting various stellar spectral models to the combined, non-simultaneous data set, we find that normal metallicity stellar spectra are ruled out by the data, while low-metallicity, Z = 0.1 Z{sub Sun }, late O-star spectra provide marginally acceptable fits, if we allow for the fact that X-ray ionization from the compact object may reduce or eliminate UV absorption/emission lines from the stellar wind. By contrast, an irradiated disk model fits both UV and optical data with {chi}{sup 2}/dof = 175.9/178, and matches the nebular extinction with a reddening of E(B - V) = 0.05{sup +0.05}{sub -0.04}. These results suggest that the UV/optical flux of Holmberg II X-1 may be dominated by X-ray irradiated disk emission.

  13. BAT AGN spectroscopic survey-II. X-ray emission and high-ionization optical emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berney, Simon; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Baloković, Mislav; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby (z ≃ 0.04) AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (L_[O III]^{int} ∝ L_{14-195}) with a large scatter (RPear = 0.64, σ = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear = 0.63, σ = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low-ionization lines (H α, [S II]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (σ = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long-term AGN variability are important.

  14. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  15. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  16. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  17. HELIUM IN NATAL H II REGIONS: THE ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY ABSORPTION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Darach; Andersen, Anja C.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Kruehler, Thomas; Laursen, Peter; Leloudas, Giorgos; Malesani, Daniele; Zafar, Tayyaba; Gorosabel, Javier

    2013-05-01

    Soft X-ray absorption in excess of Galactic is observed in the afterglows of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but the correct solution to its origin has not been arrived at after more than a decade of work, preventing its use as a powerful diagnostic tool. We resolve this long-standing problem and find that absorption by He in the GRB's host H II region is responsible for most of the absorption. We show that the X-ray absorbing column density (N{sub H{sub X}}) is correlated with both the neutral gas column density and with the optical afterglow's dust extinction (A{sub V} ). This correlation explains the connection between dark bursts and bursts with high N{sub H{sub X}} values. From these correlations, we exclude an origin of the X-ray absorption which is not related to the host galaxy, i.e., the intergalactic medium or intervening absorbers are not responsible. We find that the correlation with the dust column has a strong redshift evolution, whereas the correlation with the neutral gas does not. From this, we conclude that the column density of the X-ray absorption is correlated with the total gas column density in the host galaxy rather than the metal column density, in spite of the fact that X-ray absorption is typically dominated by metals. The strong redshift evolution of N{sub H{sub X}}/A{sub V} is thus a reflection of the cosmic metallicity evolution of star-forming galaxies and we find it to be consistent with measurements of the redshift evolution of metallicities for GRB host galaxies. We conclude that the absorption of X-rays in GRB afterglows is caused by He in the H II region hosting the GRB. While dust is destroyed and metals are stripped of all of their electrons by the GRB to great distances, the abundance of He saturates the He-ionizing UV continuum much closer to the GRB, allowing it to remain in the neutral or singly-ionized state. Helium X-ray absorption explains the correlation with total gas, the lack of strong evolution with redshift, as well

  18. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Steve; Swartz, Doug; Tice, Neil; Plucinsky, Paul; Grant, Catherine; Marshall, Herman; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60degC) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition may have changed, perhaps partially related to changes in the operating temperature of the ACIS housing. This evolution of the accumulation of the molecular contamination has motivated further analysis of contamination migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, particularly within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon monitored temperature data, and an accordingly refined model of the molecular transport.

  19. Application of CO2 Snow Jet Cleaning in Conjunction with Laboratory Based Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeling, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Allton, J. H.; Rodriquez, M.; Tripa, C. E.; Veryovkin, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    The Genesis mission was the first mission returning solar material to Earth since the Apollo program [1,2]. Unfortunately the return of the space craft on September 8, 2004 resulted in a crash landing, which shattered the samples into small fragments and exposed them to desert soil and other debris. Thus only small fragments of the original collectors are available, each having different degrees of surface contamination. Thorough surface cleaning is required to allow for subsequent analysis of solar wind material embedded within. An initial cleaning procedure was developed in coordination with Johnson Space Center which focused on removing larger sized particulates and a thin film organic contamination acquired during collection in space [3]. However, many of the samples have additional residues and more rigorous and/or innovative cleaning steps might be necessary. These cleaning steps must affect only the surface to avoid leaching and re-distribution of solar wind material from the bulk of the collectors. To aid in development and identification of the most appropriate cleaning procedures each sample has to be thoroughly inspected before and after each cleaning step. Laboratory based total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry lends itself to this task as it is a non-destructive and surface sensitive analytical method permitting analysis of elements from aluminum onward present at and near the surface of a flat substrate [4]. The suitability of TXRF has been demonstrated for several Genesis solar wind samples before and after various cleaning methods including acid treatment, gas cluster ion beam, and CO2 snow jet [5 - 7]. The latter one is non-invasive and did show some promise on one sample [5]. To investigate the feasibility of CO2 snow jet cleaning further, several flown Genesis samples were selected to be characterized before and after CO2 snow application with sample 61052 being discussed below.

  20. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory - II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon temperature data, and a refined model of the molecular transport.

  1. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: II-Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, M.; Ayers, T.; Collura, A.; Nasillo, G.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-01

    The formation flight configuration of the Simbol-X mission implies that the X-ray mirror module will be open to Space on both ends. In order to reduce the power required to maintain the thermal stability and, therefore, the high angular resolution of the shell optics, a thin foil thermal shield will cover the mirror module. Different options are presently being studied for the foil material of these shields. We report results of an experimental investigation conducted to verify that the scattering of X-rays, by interaction with the thin foil material of the thermal shield, will not significantly affect the performances of the telescope.

  2. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: II-Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Barbera, M.; Ayers, T.; Collura, A.; Nasillo, G.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-11

    The formation flight configuration of the Simbol-X mission implies that the X-ray mirror module will be open to Space on both ends. In order to reduce the power required to maintain the thermal stability and, therefore, the high angular resolution of the shell optics, a thin foil thermal shield will cover the mirror module. Different options are presently being studied for the foil material of these shields. We report results of an experimental investigation conducted to verify that the scattering of X-rays, by interaction with the thin foil material of the thermal shield, will not significantly affect the performances of the telescope.

  3. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, Delta Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the delta Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) HETGS (High Energy Transmission Grating), have a total exposure time approximately equal to 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about plus or minus15 percent within a single approximately equal to125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S (sub XV), Si (sub XIII), and Ne (sub IX). For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi = 0.0 when the secondary delta Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability.

  4. High Energy Emission from Quasar Jets: HST polarimetry, X-ray and Gamma-ray Emission and the IC/CMB hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen T.; Cara, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    One of the unique legacies of the Chandra X-ray Observatory is the discovery of X-ray emission from a large number of extragalactic jets (over 100 are now known). In less powerful, FR I radio jets this emission is generally understood to be synchrotron emission from the highest energy electrons, requiring in situ particle acceleration, but the nature of the high-energy emission from the more powerful quasar jets is less well constrained. In quasar jets, the emission extends for tens to hundreds of kiloparsecs, and the observed X-rays are harder and at a higher flux than expected from an extrapolation of the radio to optical spectrum. Over the last 15 years, a persistent debate has arisen as to the nature of this emission, with the leading model being inverse-Comptonization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. This explanation requires the jet to be relativistic out to hundreds of kiloparsecs from the nucleus, and requires an electron spectrum that extends to very low Lorentz factors. The combination of these two results in a very high kinetic power, very close to or over the Eddington limit if the electron spectrum continues to gamma ~ 1. We discuss recent work with HST polarimetry and the X-ray to gamma-ray spectrum that we believe makes it necessary to re-examine the IC/CMB hypothesis. In many quasar jets, the optical and X-ray emission is joined by a single spectral component, and HST polarimetry in that high-energy component is detecting high polarizations, making it difficult to explain the high-energy emission via the IC/CMB hypothesis. So far, this has been found in 2 jets (PKS 1136-135, Cara et al. 2013, and 1150+497), with observations of a third (3C 273) scheduled for January. In addition, IC/CMB of the highest energy synchrotron photons predicts that we should be detecting GeV gamma-ray emission from the extended jets (Georganopoulos et al. 2006, Meyer & Georganopoulos 2014). These lines of evidence have made the IC/CMB hypothesis very unlikely

  5. Wind, jet, hybrid corona and hard X-ray flares: multiwavelength evolution of GRO J1655-40 during the 2005 outburst rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemci, E.; Begelman, M. C.; Maccarone, T. J.; Dinçer, T.; Russell, T. D.; Bailyn, C.; Tomsick, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the complex multiwavelength evolution of GRO J1655-40 during the rise of its 2005 outburst. We detected two hard X-ray flares, the first one during the transition from the soft state to the ultra-soft state, and the second one in the ultra-soft state. The first X-ray flare coincided with an optically thin radio flare. We also observed a hint of increased radio emission during the second X-ray flare. To explain the hard flares without invoking a secondary emission component, we fit the entire data set with the eqpair model. This single, hybrid Comptonization model sufficiently fits the data even during the hard X-ray flares if we allow reflection fractions greater than unity. In this case, the hard X-ray flares correspond to a Comptonizing corona dominated by non-thermal electrons. The fits also require absorption features in the soft and ultra-soft state which are likely due to a wind. In this work we show that the wind and the optically thin radio flare co-exist. Finally, we have also investigated the radio to optical spectral energy distribution, tracking the radio spectral evolution through the quenching of the compact jet and rise of the optically thin flare, and interpreted all data using state transition models.

  6. Distant Cluster Hunting. II; A Comparison of X-Ray and Optical Cluster Detection Techniques and Catalogs from the ROSAT Optical X-Ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan; Scharf, Caleb A.; Mack, Jennifer; Lee, Y. Paul; Postman, Marc; Rosait, Piero; Dickinson, Mark; Voit, G. Mark; Stocke, John T.

    2002-01-01

    We present and analyze the optical and X-ray catalogs of moderate-redshift cluster candidates from the ROSA TOptical X-Ray Survey, or ROXS. The survey covers the sky area contained in the fields of view of 23 deep archival ROSA T PSPC pointings, 4.8 square degrees. The cross-correlated cluster catalogs were con- structed by comparing two independent catalogs extracted from the optical and X-ray bandpasses, using a matched-filter technique for the optical data and a wavelet technique for the X-ray data. We cross-identified cluster candidates in each catalog. As reported in Paper 1, the matched-filter technique found optical counter- parts for at least 60% (26 out of 43) of the X-ray cluster candidates; the estimated redshifts from the matched filter algorithm agree with at least 7 of 1 1 spectroscopic confirmations (Az 5 0.10). The matched filter technique. with an imaging sensitivity of ml N 23, identified approximately 3 times the number of candidates (155 candidates, 142 with a detection confidence >3 u) found in the X-ray survey of nearly the same area. There are 57 X-ray candidates, 43 of which are unobscured by scattered light or bright stars in the optical images. Twenty-six of these have fairly secure optical counterparts. We find that the matched filter algorithm, when applied to images with galaxy flux sensitivities of mI N 23, is fairly well-matched to discovering z 5 1 clusters detected by wavelets in ROSAT PSPC exposures of 8000-60,000 s. The difference in the spurious fractions between the optical and X-ray (30%) and IO%, respectively) cannot account for the difference in source number. In Paper I, we compared the optical and X-ray cluster luminosity functions and we found that the luminosity functions are consistent if the relationship between X-ray and optical luminosities is steep (Lx o( L&f). Here, in Paper 11, we present the cluster catalogs and a numerical simulation of the ROXS. We also present color-magnitude plots for several of the cluster

  7. The MUSIC of galaxy clusters - II. X-ray global properties and scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, V.; Sembolini, F.; De Petris, M.; Valdarnini, R.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present the X-ray properties and scaling relations of a large sample of clusters extracted from the Marenostrum MUltidark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) data set. We focus on a sub-sample of 179 clusters at redshift z ˜ 0.11, with 3.2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ < Mvir < 2 × 1015 h-1 M⊙, complete in mass. We employed the X-ray photon simulator PHOX to obtain synthetic Chandra observations and derive observable-like global properties of the intracluster medium (ICM), as X-ray temperature (TX) and luminosity (LX). TX is found to slightly underestimate the true mass-weighted temperature, although tracing fairly well the cluster total mass. We also study the effects of TX on scaling relations with cluster intrinsic properties: total (M500 and gas Mg,500 mass; integrated Compton parameter (YSZ) of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) thermal effect; YX = Mg,500 TX. We confirm that YX is a very good mass proxy, with a scatter on M500-YX and YSZ-YX lower than 5 per cent. The study of scaling relations among X-ray, intrinsic and SZ properties indicates that simulated MUSIC clusters reasonably resemble the self-similar prediction, especially for correlations involving TX. The observational approach also allows for a more direct comparison with real clusters, from which we find deviations mainly due to the physical description of the ICM, affecting TX and, particularly, LX.

  8. Time-resolved x-ray excited optical luminescence studies of II-VI semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Lee, S.-T.; Kim, P.-S. G.

    2005-03-01

    Due to quantum confinement effects nanostructures often exhibit unique and intriguing fluorescence behavior. X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) provides the capability to chemically map the sites responsible for producing low energy (1-6 eV) fluorescence. By taking advantage of the time structure of the x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source, it also possible to determine the dynamic behavior of the states involved in the luminescence. In this presentation we show how this technique can be utilized to understand the XEOL from ZnS, ZnTe, and ZnO nanowires. Time-gated optical spectra show that the high-energy, band-edge states have a short lifetime while the lower-energy, deep-levels have a relatively long lifetime. X-ray excitation curves are obtained using the relevant optical photons as signals and compared to the corresponding x-ray absorption spectra. We will show how these results enable us to determine the local structure of the luminescent site(s).

  9. High performance X-ray and neutron microfocusing optics. Phase II final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Hirsch

    2000-01-14

    The use of extremely small diameter x-ray beams at synchrotron radiation facilities has become an important experimental technique for investigators in many other scientific disciplines. While there have been several different optical elements developed for producing such microbeams, this SBIR project was concerned with one particular device: the tapered-monocapillary optic.

  10. X-ray absorption edge spectroscopy of Co(II)-binding sites of copper- and zinc-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Desideri, A; Comin, F; Morpurgo, L; Cocco, D; Calabrese, L; Mondovi, B; Maret, W; Rotilio, G

    1981-10-28

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of Co(II) in three derivatives of superoxide dismutase, namely [Cu(II)-Co(II)], [Cu(I)-Co(II)] and [...-Co(II)], suggests a tetrahedral coordination of the metal for all compounds. Significant differences, detected in the spectrum of the [Cu(II)-Co(II)] derivative as compared to the other species, indicate that a conformational change and/or a different charge of the imidazole bridging the two metal sites in superoxide dismutase occur in coincidence with the change of copper valence. The XANES spectra of the cobalt derivatives of alcohol dehydrogenase, carbonic anhydrase and stellacyanin show features that can be accounted for by an increasing degree of covalency in the metal first sphere of coordination, in the following order: alcohol dehydrogenase greater than stellacyanin greater than superoxide dismutase greater than or equal to carbonic anhydrase.

  11. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearby Massive Binary Sigma Orionis Aa. II; X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Richardson, N. D.; Pablo, H.; Evans, N. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Ignace, R.; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Hole, K. T.; Lomax, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution gratings spectral dataset of the Sigma Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS HETGS, have a total exposure time of approximately 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with maximum amplitude of about plus or minus 15 percent within a single approximately 125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 days and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in flux level throughout the 9-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S XV, Si XIII, and Ne IX. For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi equals 0.0 when the secondary Aa2 is at inferior conjunction. We use the results of an SPH radiative transfer code model, customized for this project, to relate the presence of a low density cavity in the primary stellar wind embedded shock that is associated with the secondary star to the emission line width variability.

  12. Synthesis, spectral, X-ray diffraction and thermal studies of new ZnII-pyrazine coordination polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandi, Farzin

    2014-02-01

    Two new zinc(II) coordination polymers with a β-diketone and N-donor ancillary ligands, [Zn(pyz)(ttfa)2]n (1) and [Zn(pyz)(btfa)2]n (2), (Httfa = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone, Hbtfa = benzoyltrifluoroacetone and pyz = pyrazine), have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and studied by thermal gravimetric analysis as well as single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal and molecular structures of 1 and 2 have been solved by X-ray diffraction and they turned out to be one-dimensional polymers with linear dispositions of the metal atoms. These one-dimensional polymers are further connected to form a 3D supramolecular network by CH⋯π (only in 1), CH⋯F, π-π and interesting H⋯H (only in 2) interactions.

  13. Multitone harmonic-balance simulations of an x-ray transition-edge sensor characterized at BESSY II

    SciTech Connect

    Rostem, K.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.; Hoevers, H. F. C.; Gottardi, L.; Kuur, J. van der

    2010-07-15

    We present multitone harmonic-balance (MTHB) simulations of a Ti-Au x-ray transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter in a 5x5 pixel spectrometer array. The dynamic response of the TES microcalorimeter under simulation has been extremely well characterized at the BESSY II Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Berlin. We compare our simulated results directly with these measurements, and show that the MTHB algorithm is able to simulate to great accuracy the dynamic behavior of the TES, even when saturated by 6 keV photons. In this paper, we provide a detailed account of the MTHB simulations, and discuss the impact of this work on future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory.

  14. Quasi-periodic variations in x-ray emission and long-term radio observations: Evidence for a two-component jet in Sw J1644+57

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiu-Zhou; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wang, Ding-Xiong; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Yin; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He E-mail: dxwang@hust.edu.cn E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-06-10

    The continued observations of Sw J1644+57 in X-ray and radio bands accumulated a rich data set to study the relativistic jet launched in this tidal disruption event. The X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 from 5-30 days presents two kinds of quasi-periodic variations: a 200 s quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and a 2.7 day quasi-periodic variation. The latter has been interpreted by a precessing jet launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius of a warped disk. Here we suggest that the ∼200 s QPO could be associated with a second, narrower jet sweeping the observer line-of-sight periodically, which is launched from a spinning black hole in the misaligned direction with respect to the black hole's angular momentum. In addition, we show that this two-component jet model can interpret the radio light curve of the event, especially the re-brightening feature starting ∼100 days after the trigger. From the data we infer that inner jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γ{sub j} ∼ 5.5 and a kinetic energy of E {sub k,} {sub iso} ∼ 3.0 × 10{sup 52} erg, while the outer jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γ{sub j} ∼ 2.5 and a kinetic energy of E{sub k,} {sub iso} ∼ 3.0 × 10{sup 53} erg.

  15. Ensemble X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei. II. Excess variance and updated structure function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnetti, F.; Middei, R.; Antonucci, M.; Paolillo, M.; Serafinelli, R.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Most investigations of the X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been concentrated on the detailed analyses of individual, nearby sources. A relatively small number of studies have treated the ensemble behaviour of the more general AGN population in wider regions of the luminosity-redshift plane. Aims: We want to determine the ensemble variability properties of a rich AGN sample, called Multi-Epoch XMM Serendipitous AGN Sample (MEXSAS), extracted from the fifth release of the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue (XMMSSC-DR5), with redshift between ~0.1 and ~5, and X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-4.5 keV band between ~1042 erg/s and ~1047 erg/s. Methods: We urge caution on the use of the normalised excess variance (NXS), noting that it may lead to underestimate variability if used improperly. We use the structure function (SF), updating our previous analysis for a smaller sample. We propose a correction to the NXS variability estimator, taking account of the light curve duration in the rest frame on the basis of the knowledge of the variability behaviour gained by SF studies. Results: We find an ensemble increase of the X-ray variability with the rest-frame time lag τ, given by SF ∝ τ0.12. We confirm an inverse dependence on the X-ray luminosity, approximately as SF ∝ LX-0.19. We analyse the SF in different X-ray bands, finding a dependence of the variability on the frequency as SF ∝ ν-0.15, corresponding to a so-called softer when brighter trend. In turn, this dependence allows us to parametrically correct the variability estimated in observer-frame bands to that in the rest frame, resulting in a moderate (≲15%) shift upwards (V-correction). Conclusions: Ensemble X-ray variability of AGNs is best described by the structure function. An improper use of the normalised excess variance may lead to an underestimate of the intrinsic variability, so that appropriate corrections to the data or the models must be applied to prevent

  16. Subpicosecond 41.8-nm X-ray laser in the plasma produced by femtosecond laser irradiation of a xenon cluster jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E P

    2012-12-31

    Model calculations are performed of the radiation gain for the 4d5d (J = 0) - 4d5p (J = 1) transition with a wavelength of 41.8 nm in Pd-like xenon ions in the plasma produced by femtosecond laser irradiation of a xenon cluster jet. Conditions for the excitation of an ultrashort-pulse ({approx}1 ps) X-ray laser are discussed. (lasers)

  17. External Shock Model for the Large-Scale, Relativistic X-Ray Jets from the Microquasar XTE J1550-564

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Lu, T.

    2003-07-01

    Large-scale, decelerating, relativistic X-ray jets due to material ejected from the black-hole candidate X-ray transient and microquasar XTE J1550-564 have been recently discovered with Chandra by Corbel and coworkers. We find that the dynamical evolution of the eastern jet at the late time is consistent with the well-known Sedov evolutionary phase. A transrelativistic external shock dynamic model by analogy with the evolution of gamma-ray burst remnants is shown to be able to fit the observation data reasonably well. The inferred interstellar medium density around the source is well below the canonical value nISM~1cm-3. We find that the emission from the continuously shocked interstellar medium (forward shock region) decays too slowly to be a viable mechanism for the eastern X-ray jet. However, the rapidly fading X-ray emission can be interpreted as synchrotron radiation from the nonthermal electrons in the adiabatically expanding ejecta. These electrons were accelerated by the reverse shock (moving back into the ejecta), which becomes important when the inertia of the swept external matter leads to an appreciable slowing down of the original ejecta. To ensure the dominance of the emission from the shocked ejecta over that from the forward shock region during the period of the observations, the magnetic field and electron energy fractions in the forward shock region must be far below equipartition. Future continuous, follow-up multiwavelength observations of new ejection events from microquasars up to the significant deceleration phase should provide more valuable insight into the nature of the interaction between the jets and external medium.

  18. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dimitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is under-abundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (5.28+\\-0.28) x 10(exp -4) (4.9 x 10(exp -4) is solar abundance). \\rVe also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. \\rYe find T(sub scat) = 0.147+/-0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We compare these spectral variations to those observed in Gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data were also used to set new. and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere.

  19. Toward large-area sub-arcsecond x-ray telescopes II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Allured, Ryan; Ames, Andrew O.; Biskach, Michael P.; Broadway, David M.; Bruni, Ricardo J.; Burrows, David N.; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Chung, Yip-Wah; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Hertz, Edward; Jackson, Thomas N.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Riveros, Raul E.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Romaine, Suzanne E.; Saha, Timo T.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Eric D.; Solly, Peter M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ulmer, Melville P.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Wallace, Margeaux L.; Wang, Xiaoli; Windt, David L.; Yao, Youwei; Ye, Shi; Zhang, William W.; Zuo, Heng

    2016-09-01

    In order to advance significantly scientific objectives, future x-ray astronomy missions will likely call for x-ray telescopes with large aperture areas (≍ 3 m2) and fine angular resolution (≍ 12). Achieving such performance is programmatically and technologically challenging due to the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes and to the need for densely nested grazing-incidence optics. Such an x-ray telescope will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (≍ 600 m2) of lightweight (≍ 2 kg/m2 areal density) high-quality mirrors, at an acceptable cost (≍ 1 M$/m2 of mirror surface area). This paper reviews relevant programmatic and technological issues, as well as possible approaches for addressing these issues-including direct fabrication of monocrystalline silicon mirrors, active (in-space adjustable) figure correction of replicated mirrors, static post-fabrication correction using ion implantation, differential erosion or deposition, and coating-stress manipulation of thin substrates.

  20. Toward Large-Area Sub-Arcsecond X-Ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Allured, Ryan; Ames, Andrew O.; Biskach, Michael P.; Broadway David M.; Bruni, Ricardo J.; Burrows, David; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Chung, Yip-Wah; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Hertz, Edward; Jackson, Thomas N.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Riveros, Raul E.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Romaine, Suzanne E.; Saha, Timo T.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Eric D.; Solly, Peter M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Mellville P.; Vikhlilin, Alexey; Wallace, Margeaux L.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    In order to advance significantly scientific objectives, future x-ray astronomy missions will likely call for x-ray telescopes with large aperture areas (approx. = 3 sq m) and fine angular resolution (approx. = 1"). Achieving such performance is programmatically and technologically challenging due to the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes and to the need for densely nested grazing-incidence optics. Such an x-ray telescope will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (approx. = 600 sq m) of lightweight (approx. = 2 kg/sq m areal density) high-quality mirrors, at an acceptable cost (approx. = 1 M$/sq m of mirror surface area). This paper reviews relevant programmatic and technological issues, as well as possible approaches for addressing these issues-including direct fabrication of monocrystalline silicon mirrors, active (in-space adjustable) figure correction of replicated mirrors, static post-fabrication correction using ion implantation, differential erosion or deposition, and coating-stress manipulation of thin substrates.

  1. Structure of the Mn complex in photosystem II: Insights from x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-04-02

    We have used Mn K-edge absorption and Kb emission spectroscopies to determine the oxidation states of the Mn complex in the various S-states. We have started exploring the new technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (RIXS); this technique can be characterized as a Raman process that uses K-edge energies (1s to 4p, {approx}6550 eV) to obtain L-edge-like spectra (2p to 3d, {approx}650 eV). The relevance of these data to the oxidation states and structure of the Mn complex is presented. We have obtained EXAFS data from the S0 and S3 states and observed heterogeneity in the Mn-Mn distances, leading us to conclude that there may be three rather than two di-(mu)-oxo bridged units present per tetranuclear Mn cluster. In addition, we have obtained data using Ca/Sr X-ray spectroscopy that provide evidence for a heteronuclear Mn/Ca cluster. The possibility of three di-(mu)-oxo-bridged Mn Mn moieties and the proximity of Ca is incorporated into developing structural models for the Mn cluster. The involvement of bridging and terminal O ligands of Mn in the mechanism of oxygen evolution is discussed in the context of our X-ray spectroscopy results.

  2. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(II) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Kim, Tae Kyu; Groot, Frank M. F. de; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-02-28

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  3. Development of X-ray computed tomography inspection facility for the H-II solid rocket boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Fujita, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Shimizu, M.; Itoh, S.; Satoh, A.; Miyamoto, H.

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) initiated the development of an X-ray computed tomography (CT) equipment for the H-II solid rocket boosters (SRBs) in 1987 for the purpose of minimizing inspection time and achieving high cost-effectiveness. The CT facility has been completed in Jan. 1991 in Tanegashima Space Center for the inspection of the SRBs transported from the manufacturer's factory to the launch site. It was first applied to the qualification model SRB from Feb. to Apr. in 1991. Through the CT inspection of the SRB, it has been confirmed that inspection time decreased significantly compared with the X-ray radiography method and that even an unskilled inspector could find various defects. As a result, the establishment of a new reliable inspection method for the SRB has been verified. In this paper, the following are discussed: (1) the defect detectability of the CT equipment using a dummy SRB with various artificial defects, (2) the performance comparison between the CT method and the X-ray radiography method, (3) the reliability of the CT equipment, and (4) the radiation shield design of the nondestructive test building.

  4. An XMM-Newton Observation of 4U1755-33 in Quiescence: Evidence for a Fossil X-Ray Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; White, Nicholas E.

    2003-01-01

    We report an XMM-Newton observation of the Low mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) and black hole candidate 4U1755-33. This source had been a bright persistent source for at least 25 yrs, but in 1995 entered an extended quiescent phase. 4U1755-33 was not detected with an upper limit to the 2-10 keV luminosity of 5 x 10(exp 31) d(sup 2) (sub 4kpc) ergs per second (where d(sub 4kpc) is the distance in units of 4 kpc) - consistent with the luminosity of other black hole candidates in a quiescent state. An unexpected result is the discovery of a narrow 7 arc min long X-ray jet centered on the position of 4Ul755-33. The spectrum of the jet is similar to that of jets observed from other galactic and extragalactic sources, and may have been ejected from 4Ul755-33 when it was bright. Jets are a feature of accreting black holes, and the detection of a fossil jet provides additional evidence supporting the black hole candidacy of 4U1755-33. The spectral properties of three bright serendipitous sources in the field are reported and it is suggested these are background active galactic nuclei sources.

  5. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Å snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ~ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  6. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  7. A Multi-Frequency Study of an X-ray Selected Sample of AGN II: Line Emission Studies and the X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, B.; Remillard, R.; Bradt, H.

    1992-12-01

    We carried out a multi-frequency study of a flux-limited (0.95 mu Jy @ 5 keV) sample of 96 emission-line AGN taken from the HEAO-1 LASS/MC survey. Preliminary results of this study were presented at the Jan. 1992 meeting. Here we present new results from line emission and continuum studies and more details regarding the AGN X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs). We find that narrow [OIII] flux correlates well with X-ray flux. This result is consistent with a simple picture where the photoionizing continuum is distributed over a large solid angle in the narrow line region, and is closely related to the X-ray continuum. Broad Balmer lines do not demonstrate a strong correlation with X-ray flux. The UV continuum ( ~ 1400 Angstroms) does not correlate with any optical line emission we measured, but UV variability could have affected this result. In contrast, we find very strong correlations of high-ionization UV broad line fluxes and the simultaneously measured UV continuum. The geometry and/or obscuration effects in the broad line region may therefore be different than those in the narrow line region. A very large spread in the value of broad line Balmer decrements (Hβ /Hα = 0.13 - 0.40) was observed among objects determined to be un-reddened by the lack of an absorption feature at 2175 Angstroms. If there were an intrinsic Balmer decrement for the broad line regions in AGN, the smallest Hβ /Hα values would correspond to extreme values of reddening (E(B-V) > 1 mag). Therefore, we conclude that the broad line Balmer decrement cannot be used in determining continuum reddening in most AGN. We find that the AGN 2-10 keV XLF is roughly a power law, but steepens with increasing luminosity, and turns over below 10(42) erg s(-1) . The XLF of Seyfert 2's resembles a power law from 10(42) - 10(43.5) erg s(-1) , but at higher luminosity, the XLF steepens. In this sample, the cumulative fraction of Seyfert 2's falls rapidly with luminosity, and the overall fraction of Seyfert 2's

  8. X-ray absorption spectral studies of copper (II) mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, B.; Dar, Davood Ah; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the K-edge of copper have been studied in two copper mixed ligand complexes, one having tetramethyethylenediamine (tmen) and the other having tetraethyethylenediamine (teen) as one of the ligands. The spectra have been recorded at BL-8 dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS- 2 synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using the data analysis program Athena. The energy of the K-absorption edge, chemical shift, edge-width and shift of the principal absorption maximum in the complexes have been determined and discussed. The values of these parameters have been found to be approximately the same in both the complexes indicating that the two complexes possess similar chemical environment around the copper metal atom. The chemical shift has been utilized to estimate effective nuclear charge on the absorbing atom. The normalized EXAFS spectra have been Fourier transformed. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length because of energy dependence of the phase factors in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. This distance is thus the phase- uncorrected bond length. Bond length has also been determined by Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The results obtained from LSS and the Fourier transformation methods are comparable with each other, since both are phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  9. A Jet Break in the X-ray Light Curve of Short GRB 111020A: Implications for Energetics and Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Troja, E.; Czekala, I.; Chornock, R.; Gehrels, N.; Sakamoto, T.; Fox, D. B.; Podsiadlowski, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present broadband observations of the afterglow and environment of the short GRB 111020A. An extensive X-ray light curve from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra, spanning approx.100 s to 10 days after the burst, reveals a significant break at (delta)t approx. = 2 days with pre- and post-break decline rates of (alpha)X,1 approx. = -0.78 and (alpha)X,2 < or approx. 1.7, respectively. Interpreted as a jet break, we infer a collimated outflow with an opening angle of (theta)j approx. = 3deg - 8deg. The resulting beaming-corrected gamma-ray (10-1000 keV band) and blast-wave kinetic energies are (2-3) x 10(exp 48) erg and (0.3-2) x 10(exp 49) erg, respectively, with the range depending on the unknown redshift of the burst. We report a radio afterglow limit of <39 micro-Jy (3(sigma)) from Expanded Very Large Array observations that, along with our finding that v(sub c) < v(sub X), constrains the circumburst density to n(sub 0) approx.0.01 0.1/cu cm. Optical observations provide an afterglow limit of i > or approx.24.4 mag at 18 hr after the burst and reveal a potential host galaxy with i approx. = 24.3 mag. The subarcsecond localization from Chandra provides a precise offset of 0".80+/-0".11 (1(sigma))from this galaxy corresponding to an offset of 5.7 kpc for z = 0.5-1.5. We find a high excess neutral hydrogen column density of (7.5+/-2.0) x 10(exp 21)/sq cm (z = 0). Our observations demonstrate that a growing fraction of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated, which may lead to a true event rate of > or approx.100-1000 Gpc(sup -3)/yr, in good agreement with the NS-NS merger rate of approx. = 200-3000 Gpc(sup -3)/ yr. This consistency is promising for coincident short GRB-gravitational wave searches in the forthcoming era of Advanced LIGO/VIRGO.

  10. A JET BREAK IN THE X-RAY LIGHT CURVE OF SHORT GRB 111020A: IMPLICATIONS FOR ENERGETICS AND RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Czekala, I.; Chornock, R.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Sakamoto, T.; Fox, D. B.; Podsiadlowski, P.

    2012-09-10

    We present broadband observations of the afterglow and environment of the short GRB 111020A. An extensive X-ray light curve from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra, spanning {approx}100 s to 10 days after the burst, reveals a significant break at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 2 days with pre- and post-break decline rates of {alpha}{sub X,1} Almost-Equal-To -0.78 and {alpha}{sub X,2} {approx}< -1.7, respectively. Interpreted as a jet break, we infer a collimated outflow with an opening angle of {theta}{sub j} Almost-Equal-To 3 Degree-Sign -8 Degree-Sign . The resulting beaming-corrected {gamma}-ray (10-1000 keV band) and blast-wave kinetic energies are (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} erg and (0.3-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg, respectively, with the range depending on the unknown redshift of the burst. We report a radio afterglow limit of <39 {mu}Jy (3{sigma}) from Expanded Very Large Array observations that, along with our finding that {nu}{sub c} < {nu}{sub X}, constrains the circumburst density to n{sub 0} {approx} 0.01-0.1 cm{sup -3}. Optical observations provide an afterglow limit of i {approx}> 24.4 mag at 18 hr after the burst and reveal a potential host galaxy with i Almost-Equal-To 24.3 mag. The subarcsecond localization from Chandra provides a precise offset of 0.''80 {+-} 0.''11 (1{sigma}) from this galaxy corresponding to an offset of 5-7 kpc for z 0.5-1.5. We find a high excess neutral hydrogen column density of (7.5 {+-} 2.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (z = 0). Our observations demonstrate that a growing fraction of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated, which may lead to a true event rate of {approx}> 100-1000 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}, in good agreement with the NS-NS merger rate of Almost-Equal-To 200-3000 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. This consistency is promising for coincident short GRB-gravitational wave searches in the forthcoming era of Advanced LIGO/VIRGO.

  11. Native structure of photosystem II at 1.95 Å resolution viewed by femtosecond X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Suga, Michihiro; Akita, Fusamichi; Hirata, Kunio; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ago, Hideo; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts light energy into biologically useful chemical energy vital to life on Earth. The initial reaction of photosynthesis takes place in photosystem II (PSII), a 700-kilodalton homodimeric membrane protein complex that catalyses photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through an S-state cycle of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The structure of PSII has been solved by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at 1.9 ångström resolution, which revealed that the OEC is a Mn4CaO5-cluster coordinated by a well defined protein environment. However, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies showed that the manganese cations in the OEC are easily reduced by X-ray irradiation, and slight differences were found in the Mn-Mn distances determined by XRD, EXAFS and theoretical studies. Here we report a 'radiation-damage-free' structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the S1 state at a resolution of 1.95 ångströms using femtosecond X-ray pulses of the SPring-8 ångström compact free-electron laser (SACLA) and hundreds of large, highly isomorphous PSII crystals. Compared with the structure from XRD, the OEC in the X-ray free electron laser structure has Mn-Mn distances that are shorter by 0.1-0.2 ångströms. The valences of each manganese atom were tentatively assigned as Mn1D(III), Mn2C(IV), Mn3B(IV) and Mn4A(III), based on the average Mn-ligand distances and analysis of the Jahn-Teller axis on Mn(III). One of the oxo-bridged oxygens, O5, has significantly longer distances to Mn than do the other oxo-oxygen atoms, suggesting that O5 is a hydroxide ion instead of a normal oxygen dianion and therefore may serve as one of the substrate oxygen atoms. These findings provide a structural basis for the mechanism of oxygen evolution, and we expect that this structure will provide a blueprint for the design of artificial catalysts for water oxidation.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  13. Point spread function and centroiding accuracy measurements with the JET-X mirror and MOS CCD detector of the Swift gamma ray burst explorer's X-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Abbey, A. F.; Hutchinson, I. B.; Willingale, R.; Wells, A.; Short, A. D. T.; Campana, S.; Citterio, O.; Tagliaferri, G.; Burkert, W.; Brauninger, H.

    2002-08-01

    The optical components of the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) are already developed items. They are the flight spare X-ray mirror from the JET-X/Spectrum-X program and an MOS CCD (CCD22) of the type currently operating in orbit as part of the EPIC focal plane camera on XMM-Newton (SPIE 4140 (2000) 64). The JET-X mirrors were first calibrated at the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics' (MPE) Panter facility, Garching, Germany in 1996 (SPIE 2805 (1996) 56; SPIE 3114 (1997) 392). Half-energy widths of 16arcsec at 1.5keV were confirmed for the two flight mirrors and the flight spare. The calibration of the flight spare was repeated at Panter in July 2000 in order to establish whether any changes had occurred during the 4yr that the mirror had been in storage at the OAB, Milan, Italy. The results reported in this paper confirm that the resolution of the JET-X mirrors has remained stable over this storage period. In an extension of this test program, the flight spare EPIC camera was installed at the focus of the JET-X mirror to simulate the optical system of the Swift XRT. Tolerances in the mirror focal length, the on-axis and off-axis point spread functions were measured and calibration data sets were used to obtain centroid positions of X-ray point sources. The results confirmed Swift's ability to determine the centroid positions of sources at 100mCrab brightness to better than 1arcsec and provided a calibration of the centroiding process as a function of source flux and off-axis angle. The presence of background events in the image frame introduced errors in the centroiding process and this was accounted for by reducing the sampling area used for the centroiding algorithm.

  14. Highly efficient tabletop x-ray laser at {lambda}=41.8 nm in Pd-like xenon pumped by optical-field ionization in a cluster jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2011-10-15

    The atomic-kinetic calculations of gain at 41.8 nm in Pd-like xenon are performed. The interpretation of known experiments has proved that x-ray laser in Pd-like xenon is feasible in the extremely wide range of atomic densities: 10{sup 17}{<=}[Xe{sup 8+}]{<=} 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. This result is due to the large cross sections (and rates) of level excitations in Pd-like xenon by electron impact. We propose a highly efficient tabletop x-ray laser pumped by optical-field ionization in a xenon cluster jet. The efficiency of {approx}0.5% is possible with a pump laser pulse energy of {>=}0.001 J and an intensity of {approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis, EPR Studies, and Computational Calculations of a Cu(II) Tetramic Acid Complex

    PubMed Central

    Matiadis, Dimitrios; Tsironis, Dimitrios; Stefanou, Valentina; Igglessi–Markopoulou, Olga; McKee, Vickie; Sanakis, Yiannis; Lazarou, Katerina N.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a structural and spectroscopic analysis of a copper(II) N-acetyl-5-arylidene tetramic acid by using both experimental and computational techniques. The crystal structure of the Cu(II) complex was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and shows that the copper ion lies on a centre of symmetry, with each ligand ion coordinated to two copper ions, forming a 2D sheet. Moreover, the EPR spectroscopic properties of the Cu(II) tetramic acid complex were also explored and discussed. Finally, a computational approach was performed in order to obtain a detailed and precise insight of product structures and properties. It is hoped that this study can enrich the field of functional supramolecular systems, giving place to the formation of coordination-driven self-assembly architectures. PMID:28316540

  16. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, C. E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; ODell, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  17. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts.

  18. General laws of X-ray reflection from rough surfaces: II. Conformal roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, I. V.

    2012-07-01

    Is shown that, if the expansions of the Debye-Waller formulas for the reflection and total scattering coefficients in the roughness height σ are limited to terms of order σ2, these expressions are valid for any layered inhomogeneous medium with conformal (depth-periodic) roughness and for any distribution function of the roughness heights if the roughness correlation length along the surface is sufficiently large. The advantages of measuring the total reflection coefficient, which characterizes the total intensity of radiation (both specularly reflected and diffusively scattered) directed by a rough surface back into vacuum, for solving the inverse problem of X-ray reflectometry (i.e., the reconstruction of the permittivity profile from a measured reflection curve) are discussed.

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF RADIATIVE MAGNETIZED HERBIG-HARO JETS: THE INFLUENCE OF PRE-IONIZATION FROM X-RAYS ON EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Tesileanu, O.; Mignone, A.; Massaglia, S.; Bacciotti, F. E-mail: mignone@ph.unito.it E-mail: fran@arcetri.astro.it

    2012-02-10

    We investigate supersonic, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic jets with a time-dependent injection velocity by numerical simulations with the PLUTO code. Using a comprehensive set of parameters, we explore different jet configurations in the attempt to construct models that can be directly compared to observational data of microjets. In particular, we focus our attention on the emitting properties of traveling knots and construct, at the same time, accurate line intensity ratios and surface brightness maps. Direct comparison of the resulting brightness and line intensity ratios distributions with observational data of microjets shows that a closer match can be obtained only when the jet material is pre-ionized to some degree. A very likely source for a pre-ionized medium is photoionization by X-ray flux coming from the central object.

  20. X-ray diffraction and X-ray K-absorption near edge studies of Copper (II) Micro cyclic Carbamide complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malviya, P. K.; Sharma, P.; Mishra, A.; Bhalse, D.

    2016-10-01

    Synthesis of metal complexes [Cu (Carbamide)] (X = Br, Cl, NO3, SO4,CH3COO) by the chemical root method. The XRD data have been recorded at DAE, IUC Indore.XANES spectra have been recorded at the K-edge of Cu using the dispersive beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source RRCAT (Raja Ramanna Center for Advance Technology), Indore, India. XRD and XANES data have been analysed using the computer software Origin 8.0 professional and Athena. X-ray diffraction studies of all the complexes are indicative of their crystalline nature. The crystalline size of the samples is estimated using the Scherer's formula. The values of the chemical shifts suggest that copper is in oxidation state +2 in all of the complexes.

  1. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  2. The extended ROSAT-ESO flux limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey (REFLEX II) II. Construction and properties of the survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, H.; Chon, G.; Collins, C. A.; Guzzo, L.; Nowak, N.; Bobrovskyi, S.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. Therefore X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters are one of the best ways to obtain a statistical census of the galaxy cluster population. Aims: In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s cm (0.1-2.4 keV). Methods: We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. Results: The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is z = 0.102. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 90% complete with a contamination less than 10%. Conclusions: With this publication we give a comprehensive statistical description of the REFLEX II survey and provide all the complementary information necessary for a proper modeling of the survey for astrophysical and cosmological applications. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory La Silla, ChileFull Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A30

  3. Elliptically polarised soft x-rays produced using a local bump in MAX II - Characterisation of the degree of polarisation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J. Hunter; LeBlanc, G.; Andersson, A.; Lindgren, L.-J.; Hahlin, A.; Karis, O.; Arvanitis, D.

    2004-05-12

    MAX-lab has introduced a local perturbation to the electron orbit of the MAX II storage ring, providing users at the SX700 monochromator beam line, D1011, with elliptically polarised soft x-rays. This is achieved by using corrector magnets to send the electron orbit on an ascending or descending trajectory through the dipole magnet source. This simple 'bump' approach has many advantages over and above insertion device based solutions. To illustrate the potential of the approach, the degree of circular polarisation, Pc, has both been calculated and measured. The calculation was made by applying the Stokes formalism to the intensities given by the standard dipole emission formula. Experimentally Pc was characterised using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements. In such experiments magnetic contrast scales directly proportional to Pc. Using a 25 atomic layer bcc Fe film deposited on the Cu(100) surface as a calibration standard the spin moment, ms, was determined. By comparing the values of ms obtained here with those reported earlier, the degree of circular polarisation could be estimated. At {approx} 715 eV the calculated and measured values of Pc are 0.93 and 0.85, respectively.

  4. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  5. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose Iβ and cellulose II.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sunghyun; French, Alfred D; Condon, Brian D; Concha, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose Iβ materials simply based on intensity at 18° 2θ in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16° 2θ intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and the degree of polymorphic conversion, we simulated the diffraction patterns of cotton celluloses (Iβ and II) and compared the simulated amorphous fractions with the Segal values. The diffraction patterns of control and mercerized cottons, respectively, were simulated with perfect crystals of cellulose Iβ (1.54° FWHM) and cellulose II (2.30° FWHM) as well as 10% and 35% amorphous celluloses. Their Segal amorphous fractions were 15% and 31%, respectively. The higher Segal amorphous fraction for control cotton was attributed to the peak overlap. Although the amorphous fraction was set in the simulation, the peak overlap induced by the increase of FWHM further enhanced the Segal amorphous intensity of cellulose Iβ. For cellulose II, the effect of peak overlap was smaller; however the lower reflection of the amorphous cellulose scattering in its Segal amorphous location resulted in smaller Segal amorphous fractions. Despite this underestimation, the relatively good agreement of the Segal method with the simulation for mercerized cotton was attributed to the incomplete conversion to cellulose II. The (1-10) and (110) peaks of cellulose Iβ remained near the Segal amorphous location of cellulose II for blends of control and mercerized cotton fibers.

  6. Chloride ligation in inorganic manganese model compounds relevant to Photosystem II studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Shelly A.; Visser, Hendrik; Cinco, Roehl M.; Robblee, John H.; Pal, Samudranil; Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Mok, Henry J.; Sauer, Kenneth; Wieghardt, Karl; Armstrong, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Chloride ions are essential for proper function of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II). Although proposed to be directly ligated to the Mn cluster of the OEC, the specific structural and mechanistic roles of chloride remain unresolved. This study utilizes X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to characterize the Mn–Cl interaction in inorganic compounds that contain structural motifs similar to those proposed for the OEC. Three sets of model compounds are examined; they possess core structures MnIV3O4X (X = Cl, F, or OH) that contain a di-μ-oxo and two mono-μ-oxo bridges or MnIV2O2X (X = Cl, F, OH, OAc) that contain a di-μ-oxo bridge. Each set of compounds is examined for changes in the XAS spectra that are attributable to the replacement of a terminal OH or F ligand, or bridging OAc ligand, by a terminal Cl ligand. The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) shows changes in the spectra on replacement of OH, OAc, or F by Cl ligands that are indicative of the overall charge of the metal atom and are consistent with the electronegativity of the ligand atom. Fourier transforms (FTs) of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra reveal a feature that is present only in compounds where chloride is directly ligated to Mn. These FT features were simulated using various calculated Mn–X interactions (X = O, N, Cl, F), and the best fits were found when a Mn–Cl interaction at a 2.2–2.3 Å bond distance was included. There are very few high-valent Mn halide complexes that have been synthesized, and it is important to make such a comparative study of the XANES and EXAFS spectra because they have the potential for providing information about the possible presence or absence of halide ligation to the Mn cluster in PS II. PMID:14758524

  7. X-RAY PROPERTIES OF YOUNG EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES. II. ABUNDANCE RATIO IN THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Pipino, Antonio

    2012-05-20

    Using Chandra X-ray observations of young, post-merger elliptical galaxies, we present X-ray characteristics of age-related observational results by comparing them with typical old elliptical galaxies in terms of metal abundances in the hot interstellar matter (ISM). While the absolute element abundances may be uncertain because of unknown systematic errors and partly because of the smaller amount of hot gas in young ellipticals, the relative abundance ratios (e.g., the {alpha}-element to Fe ratio, and most importantly the Si/Fe ratio) can be relatively well constrained. In two young elliptical galaxies (NGC 720 and NGC 3923) we find that the Si to Fe abundance ratio is super-solar (at a 99% significance level), in contrast to typical old elliptical galaxies where the Si to Fe abundance ratio is close to solar. Also, the O/Mg ratio is close to solar in the two young elliptical galaxies, as opposed to the sub-solar O/Mg ratio reported in old elliptical galaxies. Both features appear to be less significant outside the effective radius (roughly 30'' for the galaxies under study), consistent with the observations that confine to the centermost regions the signatures of recent star formation in elliptical galaxies. Observed differences between young and old elliptical galaxies can be explained by the additional contribution from SNe II ejecta in the former. In young elliptical galaxies, the later star formation associated with recent mergers would have a dual effect, resulting both in galaxy scale winds-and therefore smaller observed amounts of hot ISM-because of the additional SN II heating, and in different metal abundances, because of the additional SN II yields.

  8. An Expanding Plasma Model for the X-ray/radio knots in KPC-scale Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahayanathan, S.; Misra, R.; Kembhavi, A. K.; Kaul, C. L.

    2003-03-01

    We model the observed X-ray/radio knots in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) as isotropically expanding spherical plasma clouds fed continously by non-thermal electrons. The time-dependent electron distribution and the emitted photon spectrum are computed using the standard kinetic equation considering synchrotron, adiabatic and inverse Compton cooling processes. We use this model to study the knots of 1136 - 135 and 1150 + 497, recenly observed by Chandra. 29

  9. trans-Platinum(II) complex of 3-aminoflavone - synthesis, X-ray crystal structure and biological activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabijańska, Małgorzata; Studzian, Kazimierz; Szmigiero, Leszek; Rybarczyk-Pirek, Agnieszka J; Pfitzner, Arno; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Smolewski, Piotr; Zyner, Elżbieta; Ochocki, Justyn

    2015-01-21

    This paper describes the synthesis of trans-bis-(3-aminoflavone)dichloridoplatinum(ii) (trans-Pt(3-af)2Cl2; TCAP) for use as a potential anticancer compound, and the evaluation of its structure by elemental and spectral analyses, and X-ray crystallography. The complex demonstrated a significant cytotoxic effect against human and murine cancer cell lines, as well as weaker toxicity towards healthy cells (human peripheral blood lymphocytes) in comparison with cisplatin. Various biochemical and morphological methods confirm that the proapoptotic activity of trans-Pt(3-af)2Cl2 is markedly higher than the reference cisplatin. Our results suggest that trans-Pt(3-af)2Cl2 may have a different antitumour specificity from that of cisplatin.

  10. Study of x-rays produced from debris-free sources with Ar, Kr and Kr/Ar mixture linear gas jets irradiated by UNR Leopard laser beam with fs and ns pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Schultz, K. A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Safronova, A. S.; Shrestha, I. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Moschella, J. J.; Petkov, E. E.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Weller, M. E.; Cline, W.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.

    2016-06-01

    Experiments of x-ray emission from Ar, Kr, and Ar/Kr gas jet mixture were performed at the UNR Leopard Laser Facility operated with 350 fs pulses at laser intensity of 2 × 1019 W/cm2 and 0.8 ns pulses at an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. Debris free x-ray source with supersonic linear nozzle generated clusters/monomer jet with an average density of ≥1019 cm-3 was compared to cylindrical tube subsonic nozzle, which produced only monomer jet with average density 1.5-2 times higher. The linear (elongated) cluster/gas jet provides the capability to study x-ray yield anisotropy and laser beam self-focusing with plasma channel formation that are interconnecting with efficient x-ray generation. Diagnostics include x-ray diodes, pinhole cameras and spectrometers. It was observed that the emission in the 1-9 keV spectral region was strongly anisotropic depending on the directions of laser beam polarization for sub-ps laser pulse and supersonic linear jet. The energy yield in the 1-3 keV region produced by a linear nozzle was an order of magnitude higher than from a tube nozzle. Non-LTE models and 3D molecular dynamic simulations of Ar and Kr clusters irradiated by sub-ps laser pulses have been implemented to analyze obtained data. A potential evidence of electron beam generation in jets' plasma was discussed. Note that the described debris-free gas-puff x-ray source can generate x-ray pulses in a high repetition regime. This is a great advantage compared to solid laser targets.

  11. Ni(II) and Pd(II) complexes with new N,O donor thiophene appended Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, electrochemistry, X-ray structure and DFT calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Subhankar; Pramanik, Ajoy Kumar; Mondal, Apurba Sau; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The thiophene appended Schiff's base ligand, 1-(2-(thiophen-2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)naphthalene-2-ol (HL) with N,O donor sites has been synthesized by the condensation between 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and thiophene-2-ethylamine. The square planar 1:2 complexes of HL having general formula [M(L)2] (M = Ni(1) and Pd(2)) with nickel(II) and palladium(II) have been synthesized and characterized by several spectroscopic techniques. The geometry has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray study for complex 1. The electronic structure and spectral properties of the complexes are interpreted by DFT and TDDFT studies.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Trincão, José; Sousa Silva, Marta; Barata, Lídia; Bonifácio, Cecília; Carvalho, Sandra; Tomás, Ana Maria; Ferreira, António E. N.; Cordeiro, Carlos; Ponces Freire, Ana; Romão, Maria João

    2006-01-01

    In trypanosomatids, trypanothione replaces glutathione in all glutathione-dependent processes. Of the two enzymes involved in the glyoxalase pathway, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, the latter shows absolute specificity towards trypanothione thioester, making this enzyme an excellent model to understand the molecular basis of trypanothione binding. Cloned glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, b = 88.3, c = 85.2 Å) and diffract beyond 2.15 Å using synchrotron radiation. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human glyoxalase II structure as a search model. These results, together with future detailed kinetic characterization using lactoyltrypanothione, should shed light on the evolutionary selection of trypanothione instead of glutathione by trypano­somatids. PMID:16880563

  13. Short GRB 130603B: Discovery of a jet break in the optical and radio afterglows, and a mysterious late-time X-ray excess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Chornock, R.; Migliori, G.; Zauderer, B. A.; Lunnan, R.; Laskar, T.; Metzger, B. D.; Foley, R. J.; Desch, S. J.; Meech, K. J.; Sonnett, S.; Dickey, C.; Hedlund, A.; Harding, P.

    2014-01-10

    We present radio, optical/NIR, and X-ray observations of the afterglow of the short-duration Swift and Konus-Wind GRB 130603B, and uncover a break in the radio and optical bands at ≈0.5 day after the burst, best explained as a jet break with an inferred jet opening angle of ≈4°-8°. GRB 130603B is only the third short GRB with a radio afterglow detection to date, and represents the first time that a jet break has been evident in the radio band. We model the temporal evolution of the spectral energy distribution to determine the burst explosion properties and find an isotropic-equivalent kinetic energy of ≈(0.6-1.7) × 10{sup 51} erg and a circumburst density of ≈5 × 10{sup –3}-30 cm{sup –3}. From the inferred opening angle of GRB 130603B, we calculate beaming-corrected energies of E {sub γ} ≈ (0.5-2) × 10{sup 49} erg and E {sub K} ≈ (0.1-1.6) × 10{sup 49} erg. Along with previous measurements and lower limits we find a median opening angle of ≈10°. Using the all-sky observed rate of 10 Gpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1}, this implies a true short GRB rate of ≈20 yr{sup –1} within 200 Mpc, the Advanced LIGO/VIRGO sensitivity range for neutron star binary mergers. Finally, we uncover evidence for significant excess emission in the X-ray afterglow of GRB 130603B at ≳ 1 day and conclude that the additional energy component could be due to fall-back accretion or spin-down energy from a magnetar formed following the merger.

  14. Interaction of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation with gamma rays produced by a jet in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zbyszewska, Magda

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory give evidence for the existence of a type of blazar with strong gamma-ray emission. Data obtained by EGRET for the quasar 3C 279 show a spectrum between 100 MeV and 10 GeV. Photons of such energies should interact with the X-rays and produce positron/electron pairs. If the optical depth against pair production for the gamma rays is large (tau(gamma gamma) greater than 1), the gamma-ray spectrum should be affected. The importance of this process has been pointed out by, e.g., Maraschi, Ghisellini, & Celotti (1992). Several works (e.g., Dermer 1993; Zbyszewska 1993; Sikora, Begelman, & Rees 1993) concerning gamma-ray radiation from quasar 3C 279 have proposed a model in which the gamma rays are produced via interaction between a moving cloud of relativistic electrons and external soft photons. The presence of gamma rays in active galactic nuclei spectra gives constraints on the localization and the luminosity of the medium which produces ultraviolet/X-ray photons. We investigate what conditions should be fulfilled in the above model to avoid the absorption of the gamma rays due to pair production.

  15. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  16. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  17. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  18. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  19. The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS). II. X-Ray Emission from Compact Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M.; Montez, R., Jr.; Kastner, J. H.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Chu, Y.-H.; De Marco, O.; Frank, A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Lopez, J. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sandin, C.; Schönberner, D.; Soker, N.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Steffen, M.; Toalá, J. A.; Ueta, T.; Villaver, E.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ~1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. ChanPlaNS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. ChanPlaNS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R neb <~ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ~1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall ChanPlaNS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ~27% and the point source detection rate to ~36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (lsim 5 × 103 yr), and likewise compact (R neb <~ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (ne >~ 1000 cm-3), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H2 emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  20. Type II Turn of Receptor-bound Salmon Calcitonin Revealed by X-ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Eva; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Hansen, Ann Maria Kruse; Shaw, Allan Christian; Becker, Peter; Schäffer, Lauge; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-06-24

    Calcitonin is a peptide hormone consisting of 32 amino acid residues and the calcitonin receptor is a Class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The crystal structure of the human calcitonin receptor ectodomain (CTR ECD) in complex with a truncated analogue of salmon calcitonin ([BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32)) has been determined to 2.1-Å resolution. Parallel analysis of a series of peptide ligands showed that the rank order of binding of the CTR ECD is identical to the rank order of binding of the full-length CTR, confirming the structural integrity and relevance of the isolated CTR ECD. The structure of the CTR ECD is similar to other Class B GPCRs and the ligand binding site is similar to the binding site of the homologous receptors for the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedulin (AM) recently published (Booe, J. M., Walker, C. S., Barwell, J., Kuteyi, G., Simms, J., Jamaluddin, M. A., Warner, M. L., Bill, R. M., Harris, P. W., Brimble, M. A., Poyner, D. R., Hay, D. L., and Pioszak, A. A. (2015) Mol. Cell 58, 1040-1052). Interestingly the receptor-bound structure of the ligand [BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32) differs from the receptor-bound structure of the homologous ligands CGRP and AM. They all adopt an extended conformation followed by a C-terminal β turn, however, [BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32) adopts a type II turn (Gly(28)-Thr(31)), whereas CGRP and AM adopt type I turns. Our results suggest that a type II turn is the preferred conformation of calcitonin, whereas a type I turn is the preferred conformation of peptides that require RAMPs; CGRP, AM, and amylin. In addition the structure provides a detailed molecular explanation and hypothesis regarding ligand binding properties of CTR and the amylin receptors.

  1. Impulsiveness and energetics in solar flares with and without type II radio bursts - A comparison of hard X-ray characteristics for over 2500 solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Douglas H.; Nelson, Robert; Kojoian, Gabriel; Seal, James

    1989-01-01

    The hard X-ray characteristics of more than 2500 solar flares are used to study the relative size, impulsiveness, and energetics of flares with and without type II radio bursts. A quantitative definition of the hard X-ray impulsiveness is introduced, which may be applied to a large number of events unambiguously. It is found that the flares with type II bursts are generally not significantly larger, more impulsive, or more energetic than those without type II bursts. Also, no evidence is found to suggest a simple classification of the flares as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual'. Because type II bursts are present even in small flares with relatively unimpulsive energy releases, it is concluded that changes in the ambient conditions of the solar atmosphere causing an unusually low Alfven speed may be important in the generation of the shock wave that produces type II radio bursts.

  2. S3 State of the O2-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II: Insights from QM/MM, EXAFS, and Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Askerka, Mikhail; Wang, Jimin; Vinyard, David J; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2016-02-23

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II has been studied in the S3 state by electron paramagnetic resonance, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and femtosecond X-ray diffraction (XRD). However, the actual structure of the OEC in the S3 state has yet to be established. Here, we apply hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods and propose a structural model that is consistent with EXAFS and XRD. The model supports binding of water ligands to the cluster in the S2 → S3 transition through a carousel rearrangement around Mn4, inspired by studies of ammonia binding.

  3. INTEGRAL SPI Observations of Cygnus X-1 in the Soft State: What about the Jet Contribution in Hard X-Rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.; Chauvin, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the first 7 yr of the INTEGRAL mission (2003-2009), Cyg X-1 has essentially been detected in its hard state (HS), with some incursions in intermediate HSs. This long, spectrally stable period allowed in particular the measurement of the polarization of the high-energy component that has long been observed above 200 keV in this peculiar object. This result strongly suggests that here we see the contribution of the jet, known to emit a strong synchrotron radio emission. In 2010 June, Cyg X-1 underwent a completed transition toward a soft state (SS). It gave us the unique opportunity to study in detail the corona emission in this spectral state, and to investigate in particular the behavior of the jet contribution. Indeed, during the SS, the hard X-ray emission decreases drastically, with its maximum energy shifted toward lower energy and its flux divided by a factor of ~5-10. Interestingly, the radio emission follows a similar drop, supporting the correlation between the jet emission and the hard component, even though the flux is too low to quantify the polarization characteristics. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland), the Czech Republic and Poland with the participation of Russia and USA.

  4. INTEGRAL SPI observations of Cygnus X-1 in the soft state: What about the jet contribution in hard X-rays?

    SciTech Connect

    Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.; Chauvin, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the first 7 yr of the INTEGRAL mission (2003-2009), Cyg X-1 has essentially been detected in its hard state (HS), with some incursions in intermediate HSs. This long, spectrally stable period allowed in particular the measurement of the polarization of the high-energy component that has long been observed above 200 keV in this peculiar object. This result strongly suggests that here we see the contribution of the jet, known to emit a strong synchrotron radio emission. In 2010 June, Cyg X-1 underwent a completed transition toward a soft state (SS). It gave us the unique opportunity to study in detail the corona emission in this spectral state, and to investigate in particular the behavior of the jet contribution. Indeed, during the SS, the hard X-ray emission decreases drastically, with its maximum energy shifted toward lower energy and its flux divided by a factor of ∼5-10. Interestingly, the radio emission follows a similar drop, supporting the correlation between the jet emission and the hard component, even though the flux is too low to quantify the polarization characteristics.

  5. Accretion Disk Spectra of the Ultra-luminous X-ray Sources in Nearby Spiral Galaxies and Galactic Superluminal Jet Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Ebisawa, Ken; Zycki, Piotr; Kubota, Aya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Watarai, Ken-ya

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-luminous Compact X-ray Sources (ULXs) in nearby spiral galaxies and Galactic superluminal jet sources share the common spectral characteristic that they have unusually high disk temperatures which cannot be explained in the framework of the standard optically thick accretion disk in the Schwarzschild metric. On the other hand, the standard accretion disk around the Kerr black hole might explain the observed high disk temperature, as the inner radius of the Kerr disk gets smaller and the disk temperature can be consequently higher. However, we point out that the observable Kerr disk spectra becomes significantly harder than Schwarzschild disk spectra only when the disk is highly inclined. This is because the emission from the innermost part of the accretion disk is Doppler-boosted for an edge-on Kerr disk, while hardly seen for a face-on disk. The Galactic superluminal jet sources are known to be highly inclined systems, thus their energy spectra may be explained with the standard Kerr disk with known black hole masses. For ULXs, on the other hand, the standard Kerr disk model seems implausible, since it is highly unlikely that their accretion disks are preferentially inclined, and, if edge-on Kerr disk model is applied, the black hole mass becomes unreasonably large (greater than or approximately equal to 300 Solar Mass). Instead, the slim disk (advection dominated optically thick disk) model is likely to explain the observed super- Eddington luminosities, hard energy spectra, and spectral variations of ULXs. We suggest that ULXs are accreting black holes with a few tens of solar mass, which is not unexpected from the standard stellar evolution scenario, and their X-ray emission is from the slim disk shining at super-Eddington luminosities.

  6. Winds in collision. II - An analysis of the X-ray emission from the eruptive symbiotic HM Sge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, L. A.; Wallerstein, G.; Brugel, E. W.; Stencel, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray emissions from HM Sge obtained in 1981 from the HEAO-2 satellite are analyzed and compared quantitatively with observations of HM Sge made in 1980 and of HM Sge, V 1016 Cyg, and RR Tel made in 1979. The change in the X-ray emission from HM Sge between 1979 and 1981 is found to be consistent with the X-ray luminosity and/or temperature of the emitting region declining with an e-folding timescale of the order of one to several decades. Comparison with X-ray data from V 1016 Cyg and RR Tel gives a composite X-ray light curve that is also consistent with such a decline. A comparison of the X-ray observation with spectroscopic information makes it possible to constrain the properties of the X-ray emitting region: the result is consistent with emission from an optically thin region between the two stars in the system where their winds collide head on. It is also shown that the observations are inconsistent with a stellar (blackbody) source, with emission from an accretion disk around a white dwarf or a neutron star, and with emission from a single star wind from either a white dwarf or a neutron star.

  7. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. II - The Pleiades cluster as observed with the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal X-ray emission of the Pleiades stars is investigated, and maximum likelihood, integral X-ray luminosity functions are computed for Pleiades members in selected color-index ranges. A detailed search is conducted for long-term variability in the X-ray emission of those stars observed more than once. An overall comparison of the survey results with those of previous surveys confirms the ubiquity of X-ray emission in the Pleiades cluster stars and its higher rate of emission with respect to older stars. It is found that the X-ray emission from dA and early dF stars cannot be proven to be dissimilar to that of Hyades and field stars of the same spectral type. The Pleiades cluster members show a real rise of the X-ray luminosity from dA stars to early dF stars. X-ray emission for the young, solarlike Pleiades stars is about two orders of magnitude more intense than for the nearby solarlike stars.

  8. Electronic and molecular structure of photoexcited [Ru(II)(bpy)3]2+ probed by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gawelda, Wojciech; Johnson, Melanie; de Groot, Frank M F; Abela, Rafael; Bressler, Christian; Chergui, Majed

    2006-04-19

    L(2,3) X-ray absorption spectra of aqueous [Ru(II)(bpy)3]2+ have been recorded in its ground and excited states, 50 ps after short pulse laser excitation. Significant changes in both the XANES (X-ray Near-Edge Absorption Structure) and the EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) regions of the excited state complex are detected. The XANES line shapes have been quantitatively simulated using a crystal field multiplet code in trigonal symmetry. In addition, spectral changes in the EXAFS region of both ground and excited states are analyzed in order to extract structural parameters of their corresponding molecular structures. We obtain a Ru-N bond contraction by approximately 0.03 angstroms in the excited-state complex, as compared to the ground-state compound. This contraction results from electrostatic and polarization contributions, limited by steric constraints on the bpy ligands.

  9. Reaction Mechanism of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II Revealed by Mutagenesis, X-ray Crystallography, and Computational Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Klusak, Vojtech; Barinka, Cyril; Plechanovova, Anna; Mlcochova, Petra; Konvalinka, Jan; Rulisek, Lubomir; Lubkowski, Jacek

    2009-05-29

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII, EC 3.4.17.21) is a zinc-dependent exopeptidase and an important therapeutic target for neurodegeneration and prostate cancer. The hydrolysis of N-acetyl-l-aspartyl-l-glutamate (N-Ac-Asp-Glu), the natural dipeptidic substrate of the GCPII, is intimately involved in cellular signaling within the mammalian nervous system, but the exact mechanism of this reaction has not yet been determined. To investigate peptide hydrolysis by GCPII in detail, we constructed a mutant of human GCPII [GCPII(E424A)], in which Glu424, a putative proton shuttle residue, is substituted with alanine. Kinetic analysis of GCPII(E424A) using N-Ac-Asp-Glu as substrate revealed a complete loss of catalytic activity, suggesting the direct involvement of Glu424 in peptide hydrolysis. Additionally, we determined the crystal structure of GCPII(E424A) in complex with N-Ac-Asp-Glu at 1.70 {angstrom} resolution. The presence of the intact substrate in the GCPII(E424A) binding cavity substantiates our kinetic data and allows a detailed analysis of GCPII/N-Ac-Asp-Glu interactions. The experimental data are complemented by the combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations (QM/MM) which enabled us to characterize the transition states, including the associated reaction barriers, and provided detailed information concerning the GCPII reaction mechanism. The best estimate of the reaction barrier was calculated to be {Delta}G {approx} 22({+-}5) kcal{center_dot}mol{sup -1}, which is in a good agreement with the experimentally observed reaction rate constant (k{sub cat} {approx} 1 s{sup -1}). Combined together, our results provide a detailed and consistent picture of the reaction mechanism of this highly interesting enzyme at the atomic level.

  10. Serial time-resolved crystallography of photosystem II using a femtosecond X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    Kupitz, Christopher; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Raimund; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Rendek, Kimberly N.; Hunter, Mark S.; Shoeman, Robert L.; White, Thomas A.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Yang, Jay-How; Cobb, Danielle E.; Reeder, Brenda; Sierra, Raymond G.; Liu, Haiguang; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew L.; Deponte, Daniel; Kirian, Richard A.; Bari, Sadia; Bergkamp, Jesse J.; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Davis, Katherine M.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Galli, Lorenzo; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Milathianaki, Despina; Nass, Karol; Ros, Alexandra; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Schmidt, Kevin; Seibert, Marvin; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Yan, Lifen; Yoon, Chunhong; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Pushkar, Yulia; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Doak, R. Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; Frank, Matthias; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis, a process catalysed by plants, algae and cyanobacteria converts sunlight to energy thus sustaining all higher life on Earth. Two large membrane protein complexes, photosystem I and II (PSI and PSII), act in series to catalyse the light-driven reactions in photosynthesis. PSII catalyses the light-driven water splitting process, which maintains the Earth’s oxygenic atmosphere1. In this process, the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII cycles through five states, S0 to S4, in which four electrons are sequentially extracted from the OEC in four light-driven charge-separation events. Here we describe time resolved experiments on PSII nano/microcrystals from Thermosynechococcus elongatus performed with the recently developed2 technique of serial femtosecond crystallography. Structures have been determined from PSII in the dark S1 state and after double laser excitation (putative S3 state) at 5 and 5.5 Å resolution, respectively. The results provide evidence that PSII undergoes significant conformational changes at the electron acceptor side and at the Mn4CaO5 core of the OEC. These include an elongation of the metal cluster, accompanied by changes in the protein environment, which could allow for binding of the second substrate water molecule between the more distant protruding Mn (referred to as the ‘dangler’ Mn) and the Mn3CaOx cubane in the S2 to S3 transition, as predicted by spectroscopic and computational studies3,4. This work shows the great potential for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography for investigation of catalytic processes in biomolecules. PMID:25043005

  11. Characterization of pure and mixed Ar, Kr and Xe gas jets generated by different nozzles and a study of X-ray radiation yields after interaction with a sub-ps laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, K. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Moschella, J. J.; Wiewior, P.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Petkov, E. E.; Shrestha, I. K.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M. C.

    2016-10-01

    Gas jets accelerated through a linear supersonic and a conical nozzle, comprising a monomer/cluster mix, were characterized at UNR using a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer and Rayleigh scattering. A comparison of the two nozzle types is presented, showing that the linear nozzle produces gas jets of an order of magnitude denser than the conical nozzle. The linear gas jets of Ar, Kr, and Xe as well as triple mixtures with different percentages of each of the aforementioned gases were characterized. The densest gas jets used Ar as the target gas, while the least dense jets came from Kr. Cluster radii of the pure gases were measured, and Xe gas jets were found to produce the largest gas clusters. A study of X-ray generation by gas jet-laser plasma was performed at the UNR Leopard laser (1.057 μm, 350 fs, ˜1019 W/cm2) on the linear nozzle. The gas jets were irradiated with a high-intensity sub-ps laser pulse. An absolute X-ray output of the laser-gas jet interactions measured by the calibrated PCDs is presented and show that triple mixtures of Xe, Kr, and Ar each exhibited a higher X-ray yield compared to the pure gases. A strong anisotropy of X-ray radiation with respect to laser beam polarization direction is observed in all the gas jets. In fact, this anisotropy is different in three spectral regions (>1.4, 3.5 and 9 keV).

  12. Time Resolved X-Ray Spectral Analysis of Class II YSOs in NGC 2264 During Optical Dips and Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Mario Giuseppe; Flaccomio, Ettore; Micela, Giuseppina; Argiroffi, Costanza; Venuti, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Pre-Main Sequence stars are variable sources. The main mechanisms responsible for their variability are variable extinction, unsteady accretion, and rotational modulation of both hot and dark photospheric spots and X-ray active regions. In stars with disks this variability is thus related to the morphology of the inner circumstellar region (<0.1 AU) and that of photosphere and corona, all impossible to be spatially resolved with present day techniques. This has been the main motivations of the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC2264, a set of simultaneous observations of NGC2264 with 15 different telescopes.We analyze the X-ray spectral properties of stars with disks extracted during optical bursts and dips in order to unveil the nature of these phenomena. Stars are analyzed in two different samples. In stars with variable extinction a simultaneous increase of optical extinction and X-ray absorption is searched during the optical dips; in stars with accretion bursts we search for soft X-ray emission and increasing X-ray absorption during the bursts. In 9/33 stars with variable extinction we observe simultaneous increase of X-ray absorption and optical extinction. In seven dips it is possible to calculate the NH/AV ratio in order to infer the composition of the obscuring material. In 5/27 stars with optical accretion bursts, we observe soft X-ray emission during the bursts that we associate to the emission of accreting gas. It is not surprising that these properties are not observed in all the stars with dips and bursts since favorable geometric configurations are required. The observed variable absorption during the dips is mainly due to dust-free material in accretion streams. In stars with accretion bursts we observe in average a larger soft X-ray spectral component not observed in non accreting stars. This indicates that this soft X-ray emission arises from the accretion shocks.

  13. A radio jet from the optical and x-ray bright stellar tidal disruption flare ASASSN-14li.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, S; Anderson, G E; Stone, N C; Fraser, M; Wevers, T; Metzger, B D; Jonker, P G; van der Horst, A J; Staley, T D; Mendez, A J; Miller-Jones, J C A; Hodgkin, S T; Campbell, H C; Fender, R P

    2016-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a short-lived thermal flare. Despite extensive searches, radio follow-up observations of known thermal stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) have not yet produced a conclusive detection. We present a detection of variable radio emission from a thermal TDF, which we interpret as originating from a newly launched jet. The multiwavelength properties of the source present a natural analogy with accretion-state changes of stellar mass black holes, which suggests that all TDFs could be accompanied by a jet. In the rest frame of the TDF, our radio observations are an order of magnitude more sensitive than nearly all previous upper limits, explaining how these jets, if common, could thus far have escaped detection.

  14. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  15. The O2-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II: Recent Insights from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), and Femtosecond X-ray Crystallography Data.

    PubMed

    Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-01-17

    Efficient photoelectrochemical water oxidation may open a way to produce energy from renewable solar power. In biology, generation of fuel due to water oxidation happens efficiently on an immense scale during the light reactions of photosynthesis. To oxidize water, photosynthetic organisms have evolved a highly conserved protein complex, Photosystem II. Within that complex, water oxidation happens at the CaMn4O5 inorganic catalytic cluster, the so-called oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which cycles through storage "S" states as it accumulates oxidizing equivalents and produces molecular oxygen. In recent years, there has been significant progress in understanding the OEC as it evolves through the catalytic cycle. Studies have combined conventional and femtosecond X-ray crystallography with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and have addressed changes in protonation states of μ-oxo bridges and the coordination of substrate water through the analysis of ammonia binding as a chemical analog of water. These advances are thought to be critical to understanding the catalytic cycle since protonation states regulate the relative stability of different redox states and the geometry of the OEC. Therefore, establishing the mechanism for substrate water binding and the nature of protonation/redox state transitions in the OEC is essential for understanding the catalytic cycle of O2 evolution. The structure of the dark-stable S1 state has been a target for X-ray crystallography for the past 15 years. However, traditional X-ray crystallography has been hampered by radiation-induced reduction of the OEC. Very recently, a revolutionary X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) technique was applied to PSII to reveal atomic positions at 1.95 Å without radiation damage, which brought us closer than ever to establishing the ultimate structure of the OEC in the S1 state. However, the atom positions in this crystal

  16. NEAR-SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF X-RAY PLASMA EJECTION, CORONAL MASS EJECTION, AND TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon-Han; Bong, Su-Chan; Park, Y.-D.; Cho, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2009-11-10

    We report the first simultaneous observation of X-ray plasma ejection (XPE), coronal mass ejection (CME), and type II solar radio burst on 1999 October 26. First, an XPE was observed from 21:12 UT to 21:24 UT in the Yohkoh SXT field of view (1.1 to 1.4 R{sub sun}). The XPE was accelerated with a speed range from 190 to 410 km s{sup -1} and its average speed is about 290 km s{sup -1}. Second, the associated CME was observed by the Mauna Loa Mk4 coronameter (1.1-2.8 R{sub sun}) from 21:16 UT. The CME front was clearly identified at 21:26 UT and propagated with a deceleration of about -110 m s{sup -2}. Its average speed is about 360 km s{sup -1}. At the type II burst start time (21:25 UT), the height of the CME front is around 1.7 R{sub sun} and its speed is about 470 km s{sup -1}. Third, a type II solar radio burst was observed from 21:25 UT to 21:43 UT by the Culgoora solar radio spectrograph. The burst shows three emission patches during this observing period and the emission heights of the burst are estimated to be about 1.3 R{sub sun} (21:25 UT), 1.4 R{sub sun} (21:30 UT), and 1.8 R{sub sun} (21:40 UT). By comparing these three phenomena, we find that: (1) kinematically, while the XPE shows acceleration, the associated CME front shows deceleration; (2) there is an obvious height difference (0.3 R {sub sun}) between the CME front and the XPE front around 21:24 UT and the formation height of the type II burst is close to the trajectory extrapolated from the XPE front; (3) both speeds of the XPE and the CME are comparable with each other around the starting time of the type II burst. Considering the formation height and the speed of the type II burst, we suggest that its first emission is due to the coronal shock generated by the XPE and the other two emissions are driven by the CME flank interacting with the high-density streamer.

  17. Solar Observations during Skylab, April 1973-February 1974. I. Coronal X-Ray Structure. II. Solar Flare Activity,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Telephone: (704) 258-25501 World Dats Center A for Solor -Terrestrial Physics Geigrphy.Navironmmtel Data and Information Service, MOMA World Data...association of a solar wind stream with a coronal hole photographed on a rocket flight in 1970 (1.iager et at., 1973]. Later, the ASE Skylab data from the S...054 X-ray spectrographic telescope allowed us to extend the associations between coronal X-ray structure and solar wind streams [Krieage et at., 1976

  18. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Multispectral Solar Telescope Array is a rocket-borne observatory which encompasses seven compact soft X-ray/EUV, multilayer-coated, and two compact far-UV, interference film-coated, Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes. Extensive measurements are presented on the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the X-ray/EUV telescopes. Attention is given to systematic errors and measurement errors.

  19. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure and spectroscopy of a Werner-type host Co(II) complex, trans-bisisothiocyanatotetrakis( trans-4-styrylpyridine)cobalt(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, C.; Thomas, K. R. J.; Shunmugasundaram, A.; Murugesan, R.

    2000-05-01

    Single crystals of the title Co(II) complex, [Co(stpy) 4(NCS) 2] [stpy= trans-4-styrylpyridine] are prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, and UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure determination. The complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pna2 1 with unit-cell parameters, a=32.058(3), b=15.362(5), c=9.818(5) Å, and Z=4. The structure consists of discrete monomeric units of [Co(stpy) 4(NCS) 2]. The equatorial positions of the Co(II) polyhedron are occupied by nitrogen atoms of the four stpy ligands and the axial positions are occupied by the nitrogen atoms of the two thiocyanate ions. The unit cell packing reveals interpenetration of styryl groups owing to conformational flexibility of phenyl and pyridyl rings in stpy ligands. Thus, it leads to efficient packing of the crystal lattice leaving no space available for guest inclusion. IR spectra reveal nitrogen coordination from stpy and terminal -NCS coordination of the thiocyanate group. The optical reflectance bands 475, 540 (shoulder) and 1022 nm suggest octahedral geometry in accordance with the X-ray data. However, the optical spectrum of acetonitrile solution shows an intense band at 615 nm and a weak shoulder at 570 nm suggesting participation of the solvent molecules in the coordination sphere. These bands indicate the presence of both tetrahedral and octahedral species in solution.

  20. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer. II. Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here we perform detailed photoionization modeling of they infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter-bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 1040 erg per second would be needed to produce the measured [O IV] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shacks likely contribute very little, if at all, to the high excitation line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on they predicted strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] hi some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  1. Synthesis, X-ray powder structure, and magnetic properties of the new, weak ferromagnet iron(II) phenylphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Bellitto, C; Federici, F; Altomare, A; Rizzi, R; Ibrahim, S A

    2000-04-17

    A new molecule-based weak ferromagnet of formula Fe[C6H5PO3].H2O was synthesized. It was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and UV-visible and infrared spectroscopy, and the magnetic properties were studied using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The crystal structure of the compound was determined "ab initio" from X-ray powder diffraction data and refined by the Rietveld method. The crystals of Fe[C6H5PO3].H2O are orthorhombic, space group Pmn2(1), with a = 5.668(8) A, b = 14.453(2) A, c = 4.893(7) A, and Z = 2. The title compound is isostructural with the previously reported lamellar M[C6H5PO3].H2O, M = Mn(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II). The inorganic layers are made of Fe(II) ions octahedrally coordinated by five phosphonate oxygen atoms and one from oxygen of the water molecule. These layers are then separated by bilayers of the phenyl groups, and van der Waals contacts are established between them. The refinement has shown that the phenyl rings are disordered in the lattice. The oxidation state of the metal ion is +2, and the electronic configuration is d6 (S = 2) high-spin, as determined from dc magnetic susceptibility measurements from 150 K to room temperature. Below 100 K, the magnetic moment of Fe[C6H5PO3].H2O rises rapidly to a maximum at TN = 21.5 K, and then it decreases again. The peak at TN is associated with the 3D antiferromagnetic long-range ordering. Below the critical temperature, the title compound behaves as a "weak" ferromagnet, which represents the third type of magnetic materials characterized by having a finite zero-field magnetization, ferromagnets and ferrimagnets being the other two types. The large coercive field (i.e., 6400 G) observed in the hysteresis loop at T = 10 K is rare in molecule-based materials; it can be ascribed to a pronounced spin-orbit coupling for the 5T2g ground state of the Fe(II) ion in the octahedral environment.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and X-ray structural studies of four copper (II) complexes containing dinuclear paddle wheel structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various dinuclear copper (II) complexes with octahedral geometry have been reported. The majority of these complexes contain N containing aromatic rings as axial ligands. There are also a few cases where the solvent used in the reaction occupies the axial position of the dinuclear copper (II) complex. This may occur by planned synthesis or some times by serendipity. Here we report some four copper (II) complexes containing solvent and or N containing heterocyclic ring as the axial ligand. Results Four compounds, each containing dinuclear Copper (II) units (with the most robust, frequently occurring paddle wheel structures) were synthesized and characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction and by IR spectroscopy. The compounds 1 & 2 have the general formula Cu2(RCOO) 4(L)2 [(for (1) RCOO= 4-Chloro Benzoate, L= Isopropanol; for 2 RCOO= Benzoate, L= 2-Amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine )] while 3 & 4 have the general formula, Cu2(RCOO) 4(S)2 Cu2(RCOO) 4(L)2 [RCOO=5-Chloro-thiophene-2-carboxylate L= 2-Amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine, for 3 S= ethanol; for 4 S= methanol ]. A wide range of hydrogen bonds (of the O-H…O, N-H…O and N-H…N type) and π-π stacking interactions are present in the crystal structures. Conclusions All compounds contain the dinuclear units, in which two Cu (II) ions are bridged by four syn, syn-η1:η1:μ carboxylates, showing a paddle-wheel cage type with a distorted octahedral geometry. The compounds 1 &2 contain a single dimeric unit while 3 &4 contain two dimeric units. The structures 3 and 4 are very interesting co-crystals of two paddle wheel molecules. Also it is interesting to note that the compounds 3 &4 are isostructural with similar cell parameters. Both the compounds 3 &4 differ in the solvent molecule coordinated to copper in one of the dimeric units. In all the four compounds, each of the copper dimers has an inversion centre. Every copper has a distorted octahedral centre, formed by four oxygen atoms (from different

  3. Jet physics at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Safonov, A.; /UC, Davis

    2004-12-01

    The latest results on jet physics at CDF are presented and discussed. Particular attention is paid to studies of the inclusive jet cross section using 177 pb{sup -1} of Run II data. Also discussed is a study of gluon and quark jet fragmentation.

  4. Suzaku View of X-Ray Spectral Variability of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus A: Partial Covering Absorber, Reflector, and Possible Jet Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hiragi, Kazuyoshi; Yamazaki, Syoko; Mizuno, Motohiro; Hayashi, Kazuma; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishino, Sho; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Ohno, Masanori

    2011-12-01

    We observed a nearby radio galaxy, Centaurus A (Cen A), three times with Suzaku in 2009 and measured the wide-band X-ray spectral variability more accurately than previous measurements. The Cen A was in an active phase in 2009, and the flux became higher by a factor of 1.5-2.0 and the spectrum became harder than that in 2005. The Fe-K line intensity increased by 20%-30% from 2005 to 2009. The correlation of the count rate between the XIS 3-8 keV and PIN 15-40 keV band showed a complex behavior with a deviation from a linear relation. The wide-band X-ray continuum in 2-200 keV can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model plus a reflection component, or a power law with a partial covering Compton-thick absorption. The difference spectra between high and low flux periods in each observation were reproduced by a power law with a partial covering Compton-thick absorption. Such a Compton-thick partial covering absorber was observed for the first time in Cen A. The power-law photon index of the difference spectra in 2009 is almost the same as that of the time-averaged spectra in 2005, but steeper by ~0.2 than that of the time-averaged spectra in 2009. This suggests an additional hard power-law component with a photon index of <1.6 in 2009. This hard component could be a lower part of the inverse-Compton-scattered component from the jet, whose gamma-ray emission has recently been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  5. High resolution synchrotron-based radiography and tomography using hard X-rays at the BAM line (BESSY II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, A.; Zabler, S.; Müller, B. R.; Riesemeier, H.; Weidemann, G.; Lange, A.; Goebbels, J.; Hentschel, M.; Görner, W.

    2008-02-01

    The use of high brilliance and partial coherent synchrotron light for radiography and computed tomography (CT) allows to image micro-structured, multi-component specimens with different contrast modes and resolutions up to submicrometer range. This is of high interest for materials research, life science and non-destructive evaluation applications. An imaging setup for microtomography and radiography installed at BESSY II (a third generation synchrotron light source located in Berlin, Germany) as part of its first hard X-ray beamline (BAM line) can now be used for absorption, refraction as well as phase contrast — dedicated to inhouse research and applications by external users. Monochromatic synchrotron light between 6 keV and 80 keV is attained via a fully automated double multilayer monochromator. For imaging applications the synchrotron beam transmitted by the sample is converted with a scintillator into visible light. By use of microscope optics this luminescence image is then projected onto, e.g., a CCD chip. Several scintillating materials are used in order to optimise the performance of the detector system. Different optical systems are available for imaging ranging from a larger field of view and moderate resolutions (macroscope — up to 14 mm×14 mm field of view) to high resolution (microscope — down to 0.35 μm pixel size), offering magnifications from 1.8× to 40×. Additionally asymmetric cut Bragg crystals in front of the scintillator can be used for a further magnification in one dimension by a factor of about 20. Slow and fast cameras are available, with up to 16 bit dynamic range. We show the suitability of the setup for numerous applications from materials research and life science.

  6. A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II (491st Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, Juergen

    2014-02-06

    Time is money and for scientists who need to collect data at research facilities like Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), “beamtime” can be a precious commodity. While scanning a complex material with a specific technique and standard equipment today would take days to complete, researchers preparing to use brighter x-rays and the new sub-micron-resolution x-ray spectroscopy (SRX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) could scan the same sample in greater detail with just a few hours of beamtime. Talk about savings and new opportunities for researchers! Users will rely on these tools for locating trace elements in contaminated soils, developing processes for nanoparticles to deliver medical treatments, and much more. Dr. Thieme explains benefits for next-generation research with spectroscopy and more intense x-rays at NSLS-II. He discusses the instrumentation, features, and uses for the new SRX beamline, highlighting its speed, adjustability, and versatility for probing samples ranging in size from millimeters down to the nanoscale. He will talk about complementary beamlines being developed for additional capabilities at NSLS-II as well.

  7. Communication: Single crystal x-ray diffraction observation of hydrogen bonding between 1-propanol and water in a structure II clathrate hydrate.

    PubMed

    Udachin, Konstantin; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2011-03-28

    Single crystal x-ray crystallography is used to detect guest-host hydrogen bonding in structure II (sII) binary clathrate hydrate of 1-propanol and methane. X-ray structural analysis shows that the 1-propanol oxygen atom is at a distance of 2.749 and 2.788 Å from the closest clathrate hydrate water oxygen atoms from a hexagonal face of the large sII cage. The 1-propanol hydroxyl hydrogen atom is disordered and at distances of 1.956 and 2.035 Å from the closest cage water oxygen atoms. These distances are compatible with guest-water hydrogen bonding. The C-C-C-O torsional angle in 1-propanol in the cage is 91.47° which corresponds to a staggered conformation for the guest. Molecular dynamics studies of this system demonstrated guest-water hydrogen bonding in this hydrate. The molecular dynamics simulations predict most probable distances for the 1-propanol-water oxygen atoms to be 2.725 Å, and the average C-C-C-O torsional angle to be ~59° consistent with a gauche conformation. The individual cage distortions resulting from guest-host hydrogen bonding from the simulations are rather large, but due to the random nature of the hydrogen bonding of the guest with the 24 water molecules making up the hexagonal faces of the large sII cages, these distortions are not observed in the x-ray structure.

  8. Insights into Photosystem II from Isomorphous Difference Fourier Maps of Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction Data and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Structural Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin; Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-02-10

    Understanding structure-function relations in photosystem II (PSII) is important for the development of biomimetic photocatalytic systems. X-ray crystallography, computational modeling, and spectroscopy have played central roles in elucidating the structure and function of PSII. Recent breakthroughs in femtosecond X-ray crystallography offer the possibility of collecting diffraction data from the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) before radiation damage of the sample, thereby overcoming the main challenge of conventional X-ray diffraction methods. However, the interpretation of XFEL data from PSII intermediates is challenging because of the issues regarding data-processing, uncertainty on the precise positions of light oxygen atoms next to heavy metal centers, and different kinetics of the S-state transition in microcrystals compared to solution. Here, we summarize recent advances and outstanding challenges in PSII structure-function determination with emphasis on the implementation of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques combined with isomorphous difference Fourier maps, direct methods, and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  9. Insights into Photosystem II from Isomorphous Difference Fourier Maps of Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction Data and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Structural Models

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Understanding structure–function relations in photosystem II (PSII) is important for the development of biomimetic photocatalytic systems. X-ray crystallography, computational modeling, and spectroscopy have played central roles in elucidating the structure and function of PSII. Recent breakthroughs in femtosecond X-ray crystallography offer the possibility of collecting diffraction data from the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) before radiation damage of the sample, thereby overcoming the main challenge of conventional X-ray diffraction methods. However, the interpretation of XFEL data from PSII intermediates is challenging because of the issues regarding data-processing, uncertainty on the precise positions of light oxygen atoms next to heavy metal centers, and different kinetics of the S-state transition in microcrystals compared to solution. Here, we summarize recent advances and outstanding challenges in PSII structure–function determination with emphasis on the implementation of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques combined with isomorphous difference Fourier maps, direct methods, and high-resolution spectroscopy. PMID:28217747

  10. Time-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) study on the transformation of zinc basic salt into bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II).

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung-Min; Jo, Won-Young; Park, Man; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2007-11-01

    Solid transchelation reaction was established for the synthesis of bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II), commonly known as zinc pyrithione (ZPT), to control particle size using zinc basic salt (ZBS) and aqueous sodium pyrithione solution. Distinguished from ZPT particles prepared by usual precipitation reaction, the obtained ZPT nanoparticles exhibited very narrow size distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Zn K-edge was systematically examined to elucidate time-dependent local structural evolution during solid transchelation reaction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis clearly revealed that local environment around zinc atoms transformed into pentahedron as reaction proceeded. Based on quantitative X-ray diffraction and XANES analysis, we made structural models. Theoretical XAS spectrum calculated with FEFF code could reproduce experimental one, suggesting that XAS analysis could be very powerful tool to probe phase transformation. Furthermore, according to extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting results, Zn-O distance in reaction products gradually increased from 1.96 to 2.07 angstroms, suggesting that zinc atoms bounded with oxygen ones in ZBS were transchelated with pyrithione ligands. This study could be a strong evidence for the usefulness of XAS to study time-dependent structural transformation of nanocrystalline materials.

  11. Central electron temperature estimations of TJ-II neutral beam injection heated plasmas based on the soft x ray multi-foil technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baiao, D.; Varandas, C.

    2012-05-15

    The core electron temperature (T{sub e0}) of neutral beam heated plasmas is determined in TJ-II stellarator by using soft x ray detectors with beryllium filters of different thickness, based on the method known as the foil absorption technique. T{sub e0} estimations are done with the impurity code IONEQ, making use of complementary information from the TJ-II soft x ray tomography and the VUV survey diagnostics. When considering the actual electron density and temperature profile shapes, an acceptable agreement is found with Thomson scattering measurements for 8 different magnetic configurations. The impact of the use of both neutral beam injectors on the T{sub e0} measurements is addressed. Also, the behaviour of T{sub e0} during spontaneous profile transitions is presented.

  12. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) - III. Construction of the first flux-limited supercluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Böhringer, Hans; Nowak, Nina

    2013-03-01

    We present the first supercluster catalogue constructed with the extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX II) Galaxy Cluster survey data, which comprises 919 X-ray selected galaxy clusters with a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2. Based on this cluster catalogue we construct a supercluster catalogue using a friends-of-friends algorithm with a linking length depending on the (local) cluster density, which thus varies with redshift. The resulting catalogue comprises 164 superclusters at redshift z ≤ 0.4. The choice of the linking length in the friends-of-friends method modifies the properties of the superclusters. We study the properties of different catalogues such as the distributions of the redshift, extent and multiplicity by varying the choice of parameters. In addition to the supercluster catalogue for the entire REFLEX II sample, we compile a large volume-limited cluster sample from REFLEX II with the redshift and luminosity constraints of z ≤ 0.1 and LX ≥ 5 × 1043 erg s-1. With this catalogue we construct a volume-limited sample of superclusters. This sample is built with a homogeneous linking length, and hence selects effectively the same type of superclusters. By increasing the luminosity cut we can build a hierarchical tree structure of the volume-limited samples, where systems at the top of the tree are only formed via the most luminous clusters. This allows us to test if the same superclusters are found when only the most luminous clusters are visible, comparable to the situation at higher redshift in the REFLEX II sample. We find that the selection of superclusters is very robust, independent of the luminosity cut, and the contamination of spurious superclusters among cluster pairs is expected to be small. Numerical simulations and observations of the substructure of clusters suggest that regions of high cluster number density provide an astrophysically different environment for galaxy clusters, where the mass function and X-ray

  13. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer. I. Observational Results for Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    We presen the first Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the [O IV] 25.89 um emission line detected from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. This line is a well established signature of high excitation usually associated with AGN. Its detection suggests that the ULX has a strong impact on the surrounding gas. A Spitzer high resolution spectral map shows that the [O IV] is coincident with the X-ray position of the ULX. The ratios of the [O IV] to lower ionization lines are similar to those observed in AGN, suggesting that a strong UV and X-ray source is responsible for the, photoionization. The best XMM-Newton data is used to model the X-ray band which is then extrapolated into the UV. We perform infrared and ultraviolet photometry, and use its previously published optical and radio data to construct the full SED for the ULX and its companion. The preferred model to describe the SED includes an accretion disk which dominates the soft X-rays but contributes little at UV and optical wavelengths. The optical counterpart is consistent with a B supergiant as previously suggested in other studies. The bolometric luminosity of the ULX suggests the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >85 M for sub-Eddington accretion or, alternatively, a stellar-mass black hole that is accreting at super-Eddington rates. In a follow-up second paper we perform detailed photoionization modeling of the infrared lines in order to constrain the bolometric luminosity of the ULX.

  14. The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B. C., Jr.; Allen, Max J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed seven compact soft X-ray/EUV (XUV) multilayer coated and two compact FUV interference film coated Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes for a rocket borne observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. We report here on extensive measurements of the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the XUV telescopes carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  15. Compact Stellar X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van der Klis, Michiel

    2006-04-01

    1. Accreting neutron stars and black holes: a decade of discoveries D. Psaltis; 2. Rapid X-ray variability M. van der Klis; 3. New views of thermonuclear bursts T. Strohmayer and L. Bildsten; 4. Black hole binaries J. McClintock and R. Remillard; 5. Optical, ultraviolet and infrared observations of X-ray binaries P. Charles and M. Coe; 6. Fast X-ray transients and X-ray flashes J. Heise and J. in 't Zand; 7. Isolated neutron stars V. Kaspi, M. Roberts and A. Harding; 8. Globular cluster X-ray sources F. Verbunt and W. Lewin; 9. Jets from X-ray binaries R. Fender; 10. X-Rays from cataclysmic variables E. Kuulkers, A. Norton, A. Schwope and B. Warner; 11. Super soft sources P. Kahabka and E. van den Heuvel; 12. Compact stellar X-ray sources in normal galaxies G. Fabbiano and N. White; 13. Accretion in compact binaries A. King; 14. Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars: magnetar candidates P. Woods and C. Thompson; 15. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and their host galaxies K. Hurley, R. Sari and S. Djorgovski; 16. Formation and evolution of compact stellar X-ray sources T. Tauris and E. van den Heuvel.

  16. Compact Stellar X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter; van der Klis, Michiel

    2010-11-01

    1. Accreting neutron stars and black holes: a decade of discoveries D. Psaltis; 2. Rapid X-ray variability M. van der Klis; 3. New views of thermonuclear bursts T. Strohmayer and L. Bildsten; 4. Black hole binaries J. McClintock and R. Remillard; 5. Optical, ultraviolet and infrared observations of X-ray binaries P. Charles and M. Coe; 6. Fast X-ray transients and X-ray flashes J. Heise and J. in 't Zand; 7. Isolated neutron stars V. Kaspi, M. Roberts and A. Harding; 8. Globular cluster X-ray sources F. Verbunt and W. Lewin; 9. Jets from X-ray binaries R. Fender; 10. X-Rays from cataclysmic variables E. Kuulkers, A. Norton, A. Schwope and B. Warner; 11. Super soft sources P. Kahabka and E. van den Heuvel; 12. Compact stellar X-ray sources in normal galaxies G. Fabbiano and N. White; 13. Accretion in compact binaries A. King; 14. Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars: magnetar candidates P. Woods and C. Thompson; 15. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and their host galaxies K. Hurley, R. Sari and S. Djorgovski; 16. Formation and evolution of compact stellar X-ray sources T. Tauris and E. van den Heuvel.

  17. A new sample of X-ray selected narrow emission-line galaxies. II. Looking for True Seyfert 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, E.; Watson, M. G.

    2016-10-01

    A sample of X-ray and optically selected narrow emission-line galaxies (769 sources) from the 3XMM catalogue cross-correlated with SDSS (DR9) catalogue has been studied. Narrow-emission line active galactic nuclei (AGN; type-2) have been selected on the basis of their emission line ratios and/or X-ray luminosity. We have looked for X-ray unobscured type-2 AGN. As X-ray spectra were not available for our whole sample, we have checked the reliability of using the X-ray hardness ratio (HR) as a probe of the level of obscuration and we found a very good agreement with full spectral fitting results, with only 2% of the sources with apparently unobscured HR turning out to have an obscured spectrum. Despite the fact that type-2 AGN are supposed to be absorbed based on the Unified Model, about 60% of them show no sign or very low level of X-ray obscuration. After subtraction of contaminants to the sample, that is Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 and Compton-thick AGN, the fraction of unobscured Sy2 drops to 47%. For these sources, we were able to rule out dust reddening and variability for most of them as an explanation of the absence of optical broad emission-lines. The main explanations remaining are the dilution of weak/very broad emission-lines by the host galaxy and the intrinsic absence of the broad-line region (BLR) due to low accretion rates (i.e. True Sy2). However, the number of True Sy2 strongly depends on the method used to verify the intrinsic lack of broad lines. Indeed using the optical continuum luminosity to predict the BLR properties gives a much larger fraction of True Sy2 (about 90% of the unobscured Sy2 sample) than the use of the X-ray 2 keV luminosity (about 20%). Nevertheless the number of AGN we securely detected as True Sy2 is at least three times larger that the previously confirmed number of True Sy2.

  18. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  19. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  20. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... not being scanned. Alternative Names X-ray - bone Images Skeleton Skeletal spine Osteogenic sarcoma - x-ray References ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  1. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... think you might be pregnant. Alternative Names Radiography Images X-ray X-ray References Geleijns J, Tack ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  2. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sensitive to the risks of an x-ray. Images X-ray References Kelly DM. Congenital anomalies of ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  3. X-Ray Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Radiographic Image Acquisition & Processing Software for Security Markets. Used in operation of commercial x-ray scanners and manipulation of x-ray images for emergency responders including State, Local, Federal, and US Military bomb technicians and analysts.

  4. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  5. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  6. Potential Characteristics and Applications of X-Ray Lasers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    X - ray lasers derives from their potential uses. Both radiation physics and materials ...laboratory sources of X - rays , from radioactive materials and X - ray tubes, through storage rings, to plasmas and eventually X - ray lasers, have unique and... ray laser research; (ii) radiation physics; (iii) natrrial_ analysis ; and (iv) materials modification. These categories, whilst broad and

  7. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer: Evidence of High Unbeamed Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line detected from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. This line is a well established signature of high excitation, usually associated with AGN. Its detection suggests that the ULX has a strong impact on the surrounding gas. A Spitzer high resolution spectral map shows that the [O IV] is coincident with the X-ray position of the Holmberg II ULX. We find that the luminosity and the morphology of the line emission is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is radiation bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the west, and probably matter bounded to the east. Evidence for a massive black hole (BH) in this ULX is mounting. Detailed photoionization models favor an intermediate mass black hole of at least 85 Solar Mass as the ionization source for the [OIV] emission. We find that the spectral type of the companion star strongly affects the expected strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] in some starburst galaxies containing black hole binaries.

  8. Photodiode-Based X-Ray Beam-Position Monitor With High Spatial-Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P.S.; Siddons, D. P.

    2009-05-25

    We developed a photodiode-based monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high spatial resolution for the project beamlines of the NSLS-II. A ring array of 32 Si PIN-junction photodiodes were designed for use as a position sensor, and a low-noise HERMES4 ASIC chip was integrated into the electronic readout system. A series of precision measurements to characterize electrically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise is sufficiently below tolerance levels. Following up modeling of detector's performance, including geometrical optimization using a Gaussian beam, we fabricated and assembled a first prototype. In this paper, we describe the development of this new state-of-the-art X-ray BPM along the beamline, in particular, downstream from the monochromator.

  9. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II - The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J. L.; Rydgren, A. E.; Vrba, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a 'naked' T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars.

  10. Local electronic structure of aqueous zinc acetate: oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy on micro-jets.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Atak, Kaan; Suljoti, Edlira; Hodeck, Kai F; Lange, Kathrin M; Soldatov, Mikhail A; Engel, Nicholas; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-06-07

    Oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, emission, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra were measured to site selectively gain insights into the electronic structure of aqueous zinc acetate solution. The character of the acetate ion and the influence of zinc and water on its local electronic structure are discussed.

  11. X-ray emission from the Wolf-Rayet bubble NGC 6888 - II. XMM-Newton EPIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Arthur, S. J.; Tafoya, D.; Gruendl, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    We present deep XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble NGC 6888 around the star WR 136. The complete X-ray mapping of the nebula confirms the distribution of the hot gas in three maxima spatially associated with the caps and north-west blowout hinted at by previous Chandra observations. The global X-ray emission is well described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma model (T1 = 1.4 × 106 K, T2 = 8.2 × 106 K) with a luminosity of LX = 7.8 × 1033 erg s-1 in the 0.3-1.5 keV energy range. The rms electron density of the X-ray-emitting gas is estimated to be ne = 0.4 cm-3. The high-quality observations presented here reveal spectral variations within different regions in NGC 6888, which allowed us for the first time to detect temperature and/or nitrogen abundance inhomogeneities in the hot gas inside a WR nebula. One possible explanation for such spectral variations is that the mixing of material from the outer nebula into the hot bubble is less efficient around the caps than in other nebular regions.

  12. X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    We describe the chemical information that can be obtained by means of hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). XES is presented as a technique that is complementary to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and that provides valuable information with respect to the electronic structure (local charge- and spin-density) as well as the ligand environment of a 3d transition metal. We address non-resonant and resonant XES and present results that were recorded on Mn model systems and the Mn(4)Ca-cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. A brief description of the instrumentation is given with an outlook toward future developments.

  13. Polarized X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Single-Crystal Mn(V) Complexes Relevant to the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, J.K.; Robblee, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Marcus, M.A.; Bendix, J.; Workman, J.M.; Collins, T.J.; Solomon, E.I.; George, S.D.; Yachandra, V.K.; /LBL, Berkeley /Copenhagen U. /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-16

    High-valent Mn-oxo species have been suggested to have a catalytically important role in the water splitting reaction which occurs in the Photosystem II membrane protein. In this study, five- and six-coordinate mononuclear Mn(V) compounds were investigated by polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy in order to understand the electronic structure and spectroscopic characteristics of high-valent Mn species. Single crystals of the Mn(V)-nitrido and Mn(V)-oxo compounds were aligned along selected molecular vectors with respect to the X-ray polarization vector using X-ray diffraction. The local electronic structure of the metal site was then studied by measuring the polarization dependence of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) pre-edge spectra (1s to 3d transition) and comparing with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Mn(V)-nitrido compound, in which the manganese is coordinated in a tetragonally distorted octahedral environment, showed a single dominant pre-edge peak along the MnN axis that can be assigned to a strong 3dz2-4pz mixing mechanism. In the square pyramidal Mn(V)-oxo system, on the other hand, an additional peak was observed at 1 eV below the main pre-edge peak. This component was interpreted as a 1s to 3dxz,yz transition with 4px,y mixing, due to the displacement of the Mn atom out of the equatorial plane. The XANES results have been correlated to DFT calculations, and the spectra have been simulated using a TD (time-dependent)-DFT approach. The relevance of these results to understanding the mechanism of the photosynthetic water oxidation is discussed.

  14. Polarized X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Single-Crystal Mn(V) Complexes Relevant to the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Robblee, John; Pushkar, Yulia; Marcus, Matthew A.; Bendix, Jesper; Workman, José M.; Collins, Terrence J.; Solomon, Edward I.; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    High-valent Mn-oxo species have been suggested to have a catalytically important role in the water splitting reaction which occurs in the Photosystem II membrane protein. In this study, five- and six-coordinate mononuclear Mn(V) compounds were investigated by polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy in order to understand the electronic structure and spectroscopic characteristics of high-valent Mn species. Single crystals of the Mn(V)-nitrido and Mn(V)-oxo compounds were aligned along selected molecular vectors with respect to the X-ray polarization vector using X-ray diffraction. The local electronic structure of the metal site was then studied by measuring the polarization dependence of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) pre-edge spectra (1s to 3d transition) and comparing with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Mn(V)-nitrido compound, in which the manganese is coordinated in a tetragonally distorted octahedral environment, showed a single dominant pre-edge peak along the Mn≡N axis that can be assigned to a strong 3dz2–4pz mixing mechanism. In the square pyramidal Mn-(V)-oxo system, on the other hand, an additional peak was observed at 1 eV below the main pre-edge peak. This component was interpreted as a 1s to 3dxz,yz transition with 4px,y mixing, due to the displacement of the Mn atom out of the equatorial plane. The XANES results have been correlated to DFT calculations, and the spectra have been simulated using a TD (time-dependent)-DFT approach. The relevance of these results to understanding the mechanism of the photosynthetic water oxidation is discussed. PMID:17918832

  15. Orientation of the oxygen-evolving manganese complex in a photosystem II membrane preparation: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, I; Andrews, J C; DeRose, V J; Latimer, M J; Yachandra, V K; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1994-08-16

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been performed on oriented photosystem II membrane particles isolated from spinach. Structural features of the tetranuclear Mn cluster and the orientation of the cluster with respect to the lipid bilayer were determined in both the S1 and S2 states of the Kok cycle. Variation of the sample orientation with respect to the X-ray e-vector yields highly dichroic K-edge and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra (EXAFS), indicative of an asymmetric tetranuclear cluster. Mn-Mn vectors at 2.72 and 3.38 A can be resolved from these measurements using quantitative analysis. The 2.72-A vector, consisting of at least two component vectors, is oriented at an average angle of 60 degrees +/- 7 degrees to the membrane normal, with an average of 1.1 +/- 0.1 interactions per Mn atom. The 3.38-A vector, most probably an average of two vectors, makes an angle of 43 degrees +/- 10 degrees with respect to the membrane normal, with an average of 0.45 +/- 0.07 backscatterer per Mn atom. Upon advance to the S2 state, the orientation of these vectors and the average numbers of backscatterers are approximately invariant. Analysis of more subtle features of the EXAFS reveals changes accompanying this S-state advance that are consistent with the oxidation of Mn during this transition. However, the dominant structural features of the oxygen-evolving complex remain constant in the S1 and S2 states. The structure of the Mn complex and the orientation of the complex in the membrane within the context of dichroism of the X-ray absorption data are discussed.

  16. A Detailed X-Ray Investigation of ζ Puppis. II. The Variability on Short and Long Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Gosset, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Stellar winds are a crucial component of massive stars, but their exact properties still remain uncertain. To shed some light on this subject, we have analyzed an exceptional set of X-ray observations of ζ Puppis, one of the closest and brightest massive stars. The sensitive light curves that were derived reveal two major results. On the one hand, a slow modulation of the X-ray flux (with a relative amplitude of up to 15% over 16 hr in the 0.3-4.0 keV band) is detected. Its characteristic timescale cannot be determined with precision, but amounts from one to several days. It could be related to corotating interaction regions, known to exist in ζ Puppis from UV observations. Hour-long changes, linked to flares or to the pulsation activity, are not observed in the last decade covered by the XMM observations; the 17 hr tentative period, previously reported in a ROSAT analysis, is not confirmed either and is thus transient, at best. On the other hand, short-term changes are surprisingly small (<1% relative amplitude for the total energy band). In fact, they are compatible solely with the presence of Poisson noise in the data. This surprisingly low level of short-term variability, in view of the embedded wind-shock origin, requires a very high fragmentation of the stellar wind, for both absorbing and emitting features (>105 parcels, comparing with a two-dimensional wind model). This is the first time that constraints have been placed on the number of clumps in an O-type star wind and from X-ray observations. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  17. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  18. A mercuric iodide detector system for X-ray astronomy. II - Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, described by Ricker et al., an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, TX. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 + or - 0.7 x 10 to the -5th counts/s sq cm keV over the energy range of 40-80 keV. This measurement was within 50 percent of the predicted value. The measured rate is about 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range.

  19. Substrate specificity of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases of NP-II family probed by X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Prokofev, I. I.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases, which are widely used in the biotechnological production of nucleosides, have different substrate specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. An interesting feature of these enzymes is that the three-dimensional structure of thymidine-specific nucleoside phosphorylase is similar to the structure of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase. The three-dimensional structures of thymidine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium and nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis in complexes with a sulfate anion were determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography. An analysis of the structural differences between these enzymes demonstrated that Lys108, which is involved in the phosphate binding in pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, corresponds to Met111 in thymidine phosphorylases. This difference results in a decrease in the charge on one of the hydroxyl oxygens of the phosphate anion in thymidine phosphorylase and facilitates the catalysis through SN2 nucleophilic substitution. Based on the results of X-ray crystallography, the virtual screening was performed for identifying a potent inhibitor (anticancer agent) of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, which does not bind to thymidine phosphorylase. The molecular dynamics simulation revealed the stable binding of the discovered compound—2-pyrimidin-2-yl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid—to the active site of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  20. Numerical simulations of loops heated to solar flare temperatures. I - Gasdynamics. II - X-ray and UV spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C.-C.; Oran, E. S.; Doschek, G. A.; Boris, J. P.; Mariska, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL's Dynamic Flux Tube Model is used to numerically simulate the dynamic response of a coronal magnetic loop to an energy input of the order encountered in solar flares. The coronal plasma is heated by the deposition of flare energy at the top of the loop to more than 10 million K, yielding a conduction front that moves toward the chromosphere, where the plasma is heated by the large downward conductive flux and ablates upward to the coronal part of the loop at velocities of a few hundred km/sec. The conduction front simultaneously produces chromospheric ablation and compresses the material ahead of it. With the aid of compressional instabilities, the compressed plasma grows throughout the flare heating phase, presenting a possible source of the flare optical continuum emission which is correlated with soft X-ray radiation. The observational consequences of rapidly heated loop gas dynamic processes are discussed. In the second part of this presentation, the dynamical calculation results previously obtained are used to predict the spectral line intensities, profiles and wavelengths of several X-ray lines and the UV line of Fe XXI at 1354.1 A. Three different viewing orientations of the loop are considered.

  1. X-ray fluorescence analysis of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers II: Commercial and home-grown specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Dávila, E.; Miranda, J.; Pineda, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Elemental analyses of samples of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers were carried out using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Several specimens of Capsicum annuum L., Capsicum chinense, and Capsicum pubescens were analyzed and the results compared to previous studies of elemental contents in other varieties of Capsicum annuum (ancho, morita, chilpotle, guajillo, pasilla, and árbol). The first set of samples was bought packaged in markets. In the present work, the study focuses on home-grown samples of the árbol and chilpotle varieties, commercial habanero (Capsicum chinense), as well as commercial and home-grown specimens of manzano (Capsicum pubescencs). Samples were freeze dried and pelletized. XRF analyses were carried out using a spectrometer based on an Rh X-ray tube, using a Si-PIN detector. The system detection calibration was performed through the analysis of the NIST certified reference materials 1547 (peach leaves) and 1574 (tomato leaves), while accuracy was checked with the reference material 1571 (orchard leaves). Elemental contents of all elements in the new set of samples were similar to those of the first group. Nevertheless, it was found that commercial samples contain high amounts of Br, while home-grown varieties do not.

  2. 2,6-Bis(2,6-diethylphenyliminomethyl)pyridine coordination compounds with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II): synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, X-ray study and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Bulit, Pablo; Garza-Ortíz, Ariadna; Mijangos, Edgar; Barrón-Sosa, Lidia; Sánchez-Bartéz, Francisco; Gracia-Mora, Isabel; Flores-Parra, Angelina; Contreras, Rosalinda; Reedijk, Jan; Barba-Behrens, Norah

    2015-01-01

    Coordination compounds with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) and the ligand 2,6-bis(2,6-diethylphenyliminomethyl)pyridine (L) were synthesized and fully characterized by IR and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and X-ray diffraction for two representative cases. These novel compounds were designed to study their activity as anti-proliferative drugs against different human cancer cell lines. The tridentate ligand forms heptacoordinated compounds from nitrate metallic salts, where the nitrate acts in a chelating form to complete the seven coordination positions. In vitro cell growth inhibition was measured for Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes, as well as for the free ligand. Upon coordination, the IC50 value of the transition-metal compounds is improved compared to the free ligand. The copper(II) and zinc(II) compounds are the most promising candidates for further in vitro and in vivo studies. The activity against colon and prostate cell lines merits further research, in views of the limited therapeutic options for such cancer types.

  3. The Megasecond Chandra X-Ray Visionary Project Observation of NGC 3115. II. Properties of Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Jennings, Zachary G.; Homan, Jeroen; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Brodie, Jean P.; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2015-07-01

    We carried out an in-depth study of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) detected in the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115 using the Megasecond Chandra X-ray Visionary Project observation (total exposure time 1.1 Ms). In total we found 136 candidate LMXBs in the field and 49 in globular clusters (GCs) above 2σ detection, with 0.3-8 keV luminosity LX ˜ 1036-1039 erg s-1. Other than 13 transient candidates, the sources overall have less long-term variability at higher luminosity, at least at {L}{{X}}≳ 2× {10}37 erg s-1. In order to identify the nature and spectral state of our sources, we compared their collective spectral properties based on single-component models (a simple power law or a multicolor disk) with the spectral evolution seen in representative Galactic LMXBs. We found that in the LX versus photon index {{{Γ }}}{PL} and LX versus disk temperature kTMCD plots, most of our sources fall on a narrow track in which the spectral shape hardens with increasing luminosity below {L}{{X}}˜ 7× {10}37 erg s-1, but is relatively constant ({{{Γ }}}{PL}˜ 1.5 or {{kT}}{MCD}˜ 1.5 keV) above this luminosity, which is similar to the spectral evolution of Galactic neutron star (NS) LMXBs in the soft state in the Chandra bandpass. Therefore, we identified the track as the NS LMXB soft-state track and suggested sources with {L}{{X}}≲ 7× {10}37 erg s-1 as atolls in the soft state and those with {L}{{X}}≳ 7× {10}37 erg s-1 as Z sources. Ten other sources (five are transients) displayed significantly softer spectra and are probably black hole X-ray binaries in the thermal state. One of them (persistent) is in a metal-poor GC.

  4. Polarization-modulated infrared spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity of photosystem II core complex at the gas-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, J; Desbat, B; Vaknin, D; Salesse, C

    1998-01-01

    The state of photosystem II core complex (PS II CC) in monolayer at the gas-water interface was investigated using in situ polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity techniques. Two approaches for preparing and manipulating the monolayers were examined and compared. In the first, PS II CC was compressed immediately after spreading at an initial surface pressure of 5.7 mN/m, whereas in the second, the monolayer was incubated for 30 min at an initial surface pressure of 0.6 mN/m before compression. In the first approach, the protein complex maintained its native alpha-helical conformation upon compression, and the secondary structure of PS II CC was found to be stable for 2 h. The second approach resulted in films showing stable surface pressure below 30 mN/m and the presence of large amounts of beta-sheets, which indicated denaturation of PS II CC. Above 30 mN/m, those films suffered surface pressure instability, which had to be compensated by continuous compression. This instability was correlated with the formation of new alpha-helices in the film. Measurements at 4 degreesC strongly reduced denaturation of PS II CC. The x-ray reflectivity studies indicated that the spread film consists of a single protein layer at the gas-water interface. Altogether, this study provides direct structural and molecular information on membrane proteins when spread in monolayers at the gas-water interface. PMID:9826610

  5. X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gray. For some types of X-ray tests, a contrast medium — such as iodine or barium — is introduced into your body to provide greater detail on the images. X-ray technology is used to examine many parts of the ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  7. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  8. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  9. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation. The x-rays penetrate the body to form ... for detecting cavities, unless the decay is very advanced and deep. Many ... The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than ...

  10. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  11. Spherically averaging ellipsoidal galaxy clusters in X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich studies - II. Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buote, David A.; Humphrey, Philip J.

    2012-04-01

    This is the second of two papers investigating the spherical averaging of ellipsoidal galaxy clusters in the context of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations. In the present study, we quantify the orientation-average bias and scatter in observables that result from spherically averaging clusters described by either ellipsoidal generalizations of the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile or a nearly scale-free logarithmic potential. Although the mean biases are small and mostly <1 per cent, the flattest cluster models generally have a significant mean bias; i.e. averaging over all orientations does not always eliminate projection biases. Substantial biases can result from different viewing orientations, where the integrated Compton-y parameter (YSZ) and the concentration have the largest scatter (as large as σ˜ 10 per cent for YSZ), and the emission-weighted temperature (TX) has the smallest (σ≲ 0.5 per cent). The very small scatter for TX leads to YX and Mgas having virtually the same orientation biases. Substantial scatter is expected for individual clusters (up to σ˜ 8 per cent) in the correlation between YSZ and YX in comparison to the small mean bias (σ≲ 1 per cent) applicable to a random sample of clusters of sufficient size. For ellipsoidal NFW models, we show that the orientation bias for the total cluster mass attains a minimum near the radius r2500 so that the spherically averaged mass computed at this radius is always within ≈0.5 per cent of the true value for any orientation. Finally, to facilitate the accounting for orientation bias in X-ray and SZ cluster studies, we provide cubic polynomial approximations to the mean orientation bias and 1σ scatter for each cluster observable as a function of axial ratio for the ellipsoidal NFW models.

  12. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer. 2; Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here we perform detailed photoionization modeling of the infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter-bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 10(exp 40) erg/s would be needed to produce the measured [O IV] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shocks likely contribute very little, if at all, to the high-excitation line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on the predicted strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] in some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  13. The First Detection of (O IV) from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source with Spitzer. 2. Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C T.; Dudik, R P.; Weaver, K A.; Kallman, T R.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here, we perform detailed photoionization modeling of the infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [Oiv] 25.89 micronmeters emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter bounded both in the line-of-sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 10(exp 40) erg s(exp -1) would be needed to produce the measured [O iv] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shocks likely contribute very little, if at all,to the high-ionization line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on the predicted strength of the [O iv] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O iv] in some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  14. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  15. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; ...

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  16. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  19. An x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy study of metal coordination in Co(II)-substituted Carcinus maenas hemocyanin.

    PubMed Central

    Della Longa, S; Bianconi, A; Palladino, L; Simonelli, B; Congiu Castellano, A; Borghi, E; Barteri, M; Beltramini, M; Rocco, G P; Salvato, B

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy was used to characterize the metal sites in three different cobalt-substituted derivatives of Carcinus maenas hemocyanin (Hc), including a mononuclear cobalt, a dinuclear cobalt and a copper-cobalt hybrid derivative. Co(II) model complexes with structures exemplifying octahedral, trigonal bipyramidal, pseudo-tetrahedral, and square planar geometries were also studied. The results provide structural information about the metal binding site(s) in the Co-Hcs that extend earlier results from EPR and optical spectroscopy (Bubacco et al. 1992. Biochemistry. 31: 9294-9303). Experimental spectra were compared to those calculated for atomic clusters of idealized geometry, generated using a multiple scattering approach. The energy of the dipole forbidden 1s-->3d transition and of the absorption edge in the spectra for all cobalt Hc derivatives confirmed the cobaltous oxidation state which rules out the presence of an oxygenated site. Comparisons between data and simulations showed that the mononuclear and dinuclear Co(II) derivatives, as well as the hybrid derivative, contain four-coordinate Co(II) in distorted tetrahedral sites. Although the spectra for Co(II) in dinuclear metal sites more closely resemble the simulated spectrum for a tetrahedral complex than do spectra for the mononuclear derivative, the Co(II) sites in all derivatives are very similar. The Cu K-edge high resolution x-ray absorption near edge structure spectrum of the hybrid Cu-Co-Hc resembles that of deoxy-Hc demonstrating the presence of three-coordinate Cu(I). PMID:8312502

  20. An EXAFS spectroscopic, large-angle X-ray scattering, and crystallographic study of hexahydrated, dimethyl sulfoxide and pyridine 1-oxide hexasolvated mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingmar; Eriksson, Lars; Lindqvist-Reis, Patric; Persson, Per; Sandström, Magnus

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the solvated mercury(II) ion in water and dimethyl sulfoxide has been studied by means of large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The distribution of the Hg-O distances is unusually wide and asymmetric in both solvents. In aqueous solution, hexahydrated [Hg(OH(2))(6)](2+) ions in a distorted octahedral configuration, with the centroid of the Hg-O distance at 2.38(1) A, are surrounded by a diffuse second hydration sphere with HgO(II) distances of 4.20(2) A. In dimethyl sulfoxide, the six Hg-O and HgS distances of the hexasolvated [Hg{OS(CH(3))(2)}(6)](2+) complex are centered around 2.38(1) and 3.45(2) A, respectively. The crystal structure of hexakis(pyridine 1-oxide)mercury(II) perchlorate has been redetermined. The space group R(-)3 implies six equal Hg-O distances of 2.3416(7) A for the [Hg(ONC(5)H(5))(6)](2+) complex at 100 K. However, EXAFS studies of this compound, and of the solids hexaaquamercury(II) perchlorate and hexakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)mercury(II) trifluoromethanesulfonate, also with six equidistant Hg-O bonds according to crystallographic results, reveal in all cases strongly asymmetric Hg-O distance distributions. Vibronic coupling of valence states in a so-called pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect probably induces the distorted configurations.

  1. SPATIALLY RESOLVED [Fe II] 1.64 {mu}m EMISSION IN NGC 5135: CLUES FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ORIGIN OF THE HARD X-RAYS IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Colina, L.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Arribas, S.; Bedregal, A. G.

    2012-04-20

    Spatially resolved near-IR and X-ray imaging of the central region of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) NGC 5135 is presented. The kinematical signatures of strong outflows are detected in the [Fe II] 1.64 {mu}m emission line in a compact region at 0.9 kpc from the nucleus. The derived mechanical energy release is consistent with a supernova rate of 0.05-0.1 yr{sup -1}. The apex of the outflowing gas spatially coincides with the strongest [Fe II] emission peak and with the dominant component of the extranuclear hard X-ray emission. All these features provide evidence for a plausible direct physical link between supernova-driven outflows and the hard X-ray emitting gas in an LIRG. This result is consistent with model predictions of starbursts concentrated in small volumes and with high thermalization efficiencies. A single high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) as the major source of the hard X-ray emission, although not favored, cannot be ruled out. Outside the active galactic nucleus, the hard X-ray emission in NGC 5135 appears to be dominated by the hot interstellar medium produced by supernova explosions in a compact star-forming region, and not by the emission due to HMXBs. If this scenario is common to (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies, the hard X-rays would only trace the most compact ({<=}100 pc) regions with high supernova and star formation densities, therefore a lower limit to their integrated star formation. The star formation rate derived in NGC 5135 based on its hard X-ray luminosity is a factor of two and four lower than the values obtained from the 24 {mu}m and soft X-ray luminosities, respectively.

  2. Structure of the manganese complex of photosystem II upon removal of the 33-kilodalton extrinsic protein: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.L.; Yachandra, V.K.; McDermott, A.E.; Guiles, R.D.; Britt, R.D.; Dexheimer, S.L.; Sauer, K.; Klein, M.P.

    1987-09-22

    The structure of the Mn complex of photosystem II (PSII) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Oxygen-evolving spinach PSII membranes containing 4-5 Mn/PSII were treated with 0.8 M CaCl/sub 2/ to extract the 33-, 24-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) extrinsic membrane proteins. Mn was not released by this treatment, but subsequent incubation at low Cl/sup -/ concentration generated preparations containing 2 Mn/PSII. The Mn X-ray absorption K-edge spectrum of the CaCl/sub 2/-washed preparation containing 4 Mn/PSII is very similar to the spectrum of native PSII, indicating that the oxidation states and ligand symmetry of the Mn complex in these preparations are not significantly different. The Mn extended X-ray absorption find structure (EXAFS) of CaCl/sub 2/-washed PSII fits to a Mn neighbor at approx. 2.75 A and two shells of N or O at approx. 1.78 and approx. 1.92 A. The results demonstrate that the structure of the Mn complex is largely unaffected by removal of 33-, 24-, and 16-kDa extrinsic proteins, and thus these proteins do not provide ligands to Mn. The Mn K-edge spectrum of the CaCl/sub 2/-washed sample containing 2 Mn/PSII has a dramatically altered shape, and the edge infection point is shifted to lower energy. The position of the edge is consistent with a Mn oxidation state of +3. The Mn EXAFS of this preparation is also quite different and cannot be simulated by using the parameters for the native Mn complex. Thus the structure of the Mn complex is disrupted upon depletion of half of the Mn.

  3. Structure of the manganese complex of photosystem II upon removal of the 33-kilodalton extrinsic protein: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Yachandra, V K; McDermott, A E; Guiles, R D; Britt, R D; Dexheimer, S L; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1987-09-22

    The structure of the Mn complex of photosystem II (PSII) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Oxygen-evolving spinach PSII membranes containing 4-5 Mn/PSII were treated with 0.8 M CaCl2 to extract the 33-, 24-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) extrinsic membrane proteins. Mn was not released by this treatment, but subsequent incubation at low Cl- concentration generated preparations containing 2 Mn/PSII. The Mn X-ray absorption K-edge spectrum of the CaCl2-washed preparation containing 4 Mn/PSII is very similar to spectrum of native PSII, indicating that the oxidation states and ligand symmetry of the Mn complex in these preparations are not significantly different. The Mn extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of CaCl2-washed PSII fits to a Mn neighbor at approximately 2.75 A and two shells of N or O at approximately 1.78 and approximately 1.92 A. These distances are similar to those we have previously reported for native PSII preparations [Yachandra, V. K., Guiles, R. D., McDermott, A. E., Cole, J. L., Britt, R. D., Dexheimer, S. L., Sauer, K., & Klein, M. P. (1987) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)] and are indicative of an oxo-bridged Mn complex. Our results demonstrate that the structure of the Mn complex is largely unaffected by removal of 33-, 24-, and 16-kDa extrinsic proteins, do not provide ligands to Mn. The Mn K-edge spectrum of the CaCl2-washed sample containing 2 Mn/PSII has a dramatically altered shape, and the edge inflection point is shifted to lower energy. The position of the edge is consistent with a Mn oxidation state of +3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. NMR studies of chiral P,S-chelate platinum, rhodium, and iridium complexes and the X-ray structure of a palladium(II) allyl derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Albinati, A.; Eckert, J.; Pregosin, P.; Ruegger, H.; Salzmann, R.; Stoessel, C.

    1997-02-18

    Several Rh(I), Ir(III), and Pt(II) complexes of the chiral P,S-bidentate ligand 2 have been prepared and characterized. Detailed two-dimensional NMR studies show that (i) the boat-type chelate ring and the stereogenic sulfur center can invert rapidly at ambient temperature and (ii) the sulfur donor may dissociate, essentially destroying the chiral pocket. The solid-state structure of [Pt({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5})(2)]PF{sub 6} (3) has been determined and the sulfur substituent shown to have an axial orientation. The six-membered chelate ring takes up a boat-like conformation. As shown by an X-ray diffraction study for 3, and via incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS) measurements for the Pd analog, 4, the OH group is remote from the metal atom. 42 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, DFT calculation, DNA binding, and antimicrobial assays of two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Mohamadi, Maryam; Suarez, Sebastian; Baggio, Ricardo; Khaleghi, Moj; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Mostafavi, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(phen)] (1), [Cu(L)(bipy)] (2), where L2- = (3-methoxy-2oxidobenzylidene)benzohydrazidato, phen = 1,10 phenanthroline, and bipy = 2,2‧ bipyridine, were prepared and fully characterized using elemental analyses, FT-IR, molar conductivity, and electronic spectra. The structures of both complexes were also determined by X-ray diffraction. It was found that, both complexes possessed square pyramidal coordination environment in which, Cu(II) ions were coordinated by donor atoms of HL and two nitrogens of heterocyclic bases. Computational studies were performed using DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. DNA binding activities of these complexes were also investigated using electronic absorption, competitive fluorescence titration and cyclic voltammetry studies. The obtained results indicated that binding of the complexes to DNA was of intercalative mode. Furthermore, antimicrobial activities of these compounds were screened against microorganisms.

  6. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  7. Structural and electronic snapshots during the transition from a Cu(II) to Cu(I) metal center of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase by X-ray photoreduction.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Mikael; Kim, Seonah; Wu, Miao; Ishida, Takuya; Momeni, Majid Hadadd; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Lundberg, Daniel; Royant, Antoine; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Beckham, Gregg T; Sandgren, Mats

    2014-07-04

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a recently discovered class of enzymes that employ a copper-mediated, oxidative mechanism to cleave glycosidic bonds. The LPMO catalytic mechanism likely requires that molecular oxygen first binds to Cu(I), but the oxidation state in many reported LPMO structures is ambiguous, and the changes in the LPMO active site required to accommodate both oxidation states of copper have not been fully elucidated. Here, a diffraction data collection strategy minimizing the deposited x-ray dose was used to solve the crystal structure of a chitin-specific LPMO from Enterococcus faecalis (EfaCBM33A) in the Cu(II)-bound form. Subsequently, the crystalline protein was photoreduced in the x-ray beam, which revealed structural changes associated with the conversion from the initial Cu(II)-oxidized form with two coordinated water molecules, which adopts a trigonal bipyramidal geometry, to a reduced Cu(I) form in a T-shaped geometry with no coordinated water molecules. A comprehensive survey of Cu(II) and Cu(I) structures in the Cambridge Structural Database unambiguously shows that the geometries observed in the least and most reduced structures reflect binding of Cu(II) and Cu(I), respectively. Quantum mechanical calculations of the oxidized and reduced active sites reveal little change in the electronic structure of the active site measured by the active site partial charges. Together with a previous theoretical investigation of a fungal LPMO, this suggests significant functional plasticity in LPMO active sites. Overall, this study provides molecular snapshots along the reduction process to activate the LPMO catalytic machinery and provides a general method for solving LPMO structures in both copper oxidation states.

  8. An EXAFS Spectroscopic, Large-Angle X-Ray Scattering, And Crystallographic Study of Hexahydrated, Dimethyl Sulfoxide And Pyridine 1-Oxide Hexasolvated Mercury(II) Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, I.; Eriksson, L.; Lindqvist-Reis, P.; Persson, P.; Sandstrom, M.

    2009-05-21

    The structure of the solvated mercury(II) ion in water and dimethyl sulfoxide has been studied by means of large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The distribution of the Hg-O distances is unusually wide and asymmetric in both solvents. In aqueous solution, hexahydrated [Hg(OH{sub 2}){sub 6}]{sup 2+} ions in a distorted octahedral configuration, with the centroid of the HgO distance at 2.38(1) {angstrom}, are surrounded by a diffuse second hydration sphere with HgOII distances of 4.20(2) {angstrom}. In dimethyl sulfoxide, the six HgO and HgS distances of the hexasolvated [Hg{l_brace}OS(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 6}]{sup 2+} complex are centered around 2.38(1) and 3.45(2) {angstrom}, respectively. The crystal structure of hexakis(pyridine 1-oxide)mercury(II) perchlorate has been redetermined. The space group R implies six equal HgO distances of 2.3416(7) {angstrom} for the [Hg(ONC{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 6}]{sup 2+} complex at 100 K. However, EXAFS studies of this compound, and of the solids hexaaquamercury(II) perchlorate and hexakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)mercury(II) trifluoromethanesulfonate, also with six equidistant HgO bonds according to crystallographic results, reveal in all cases strongly asymmetric HgO distance distributions. Vibronic coupling of valence states in a so-called pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect probably induces the distorted configurations.

  9. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  10. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.

    1983-01-01

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  11. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  12. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  13. Dicoumarol complexes of Cu(II) based on 1,10-phenanthroline: Synthesis, X-ray diffraction studies, thermal behavior and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dholariya, Hitesh R.; Patel, Ketan S.; Patel, Jiten C.; Patel, Kanuprasad D.

    2013-05-01

    A series of Cu(II) complexes containing dicoumarol derivatives and 1, 10-phenanthroline have been synthesized. Structural and spectroscopic properties of ligands were studied on the basis of mass spectra, NMR (1H and 13C) spectra, FT-IR spectrophotometry and elemental analysis, while physico-chemical, spectroscopic and thermal properties of mixed ligand complexes have been studied on the basis of infrared spectra, mass spectra, electronic spectra, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. X-ray diffraction study suggested the suitable octahedral geometry for hexa-coordinated state. The kinetic parameters such as order of reaction (n), energy of activation (Ea), entropy (S*), pre-exponential factor (A), enthalpy (H*) and Gibbs free energy (G*) have been calculated using Freeman-Carroll method. Ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of all complexes were measured. All the compounds were screened for their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus subtilis, while antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger have been carried out. Also compounds against Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows clear enhancement in the anti-tubercular activity upon copper complexation.

  14. Dicoumarol complexes of Cu(II) based on 1,10-phenanthroline: synthesis, X-ray diffraction studies, thermal behavior and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dholariya, Hitesh R; Patel, Ketan S; Patel, Jiten C; Patel, Kanuprasad D

    2013-05-01

    A series of Cu(II) complexes containing dicoumarol derivatives and 1, 10-phenanthroline have been synthesized. Structural and spectroscopic properties of ligands were studied on the basis of mass spectra, NMR ((1)H and (13)C) spectra, FT-IR spectrophotometry and elemental analysis, while physico-chemical, spectroscopic and thermal properties of mixed ligand complexes have been studied on the basis of infrared spectra, mass spectra, electronic spectra, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. X-ray diffraction study suggested the suitable octahedral geometry for hexa-coordinated state. The kinetic parameters such as order of reaction (n), energy of activation (Ea), entropy (S(*)), pre-exponential factor (A), enthalpy (H(*)) and Gibbs free energy (G(*)) have been calculated using Freeman-Carroll method. Ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of all complexes were measured. All the compounds were screened for their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus subtilis, while antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger have been carried out. Also compounds against Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows clear enhancement in the anti-tubercular activity upon copper complexation.

  15. Quantitative determination of the oxidation state of iron in biotite using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: II. In situ analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, S.P. |; Ilton, E.S.; Veblen, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in individual biotite crystals in thin sections of ten metapelites and one syenite. The in situ XPS analyses of Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in biotite crystals in the metapelites were compared with published Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe values determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) for mineral separates from the same hand samples. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greatest for samples with the lowest Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe (by MS). For eight metamorphic biotites with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe = 9-27% comparison of the two techniques yielded a linear correlation of r = 0.94 and a statistically acceptable fit of [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub xps} = [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub ms}. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greater for two samples with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe {le} 6% (by MS). For biotite in the syenite sample, Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe determined by both in situ XPS and bulk wet chemistry/electron probe microanalysis were similar. This contribution demonstrates that XPS can be used to analyze bulk Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in minerals in thin sections when appropriate precautions taken to avoid oxidation of the near-surface during preparation of samples. 25 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Short-term variability of X-rays from accreting neutron star Vela X-1. II. Monte Carlo modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Odaka, Hirokazu; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Makishima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We develop a Monte Carlo Comptonization model for the X-ray spectrum of accretion-powered pulsars. Simple, spherical, thermal Comptonization models give harder spectra for higher optical depth, while the observational data from Vela X-1 show that the spectra are harder at higher luminosity. This suggests a physical interpretation where the optical depth of the accreting plasma increases with the mass accretion rate. We develop a detailed Monte Carlo model of the accretion flow, including the effects of the strong magnetic field (∼10{sup 12} G), both in geometrically constraining the flow into an accretion column and in reducing the cross section. We treat bulk-motion Comptonization of the infalling material as well as thermal Comptonization. These model spectra can match the observed broadband Suzaku data from Vela X-1 over a wide range of mass accretion rates. The model can also explain the so-called 'low state' in which the luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude. Here, thermal Comptonization should be negligible, so the spectrum is instead dominated by bulk-motion Comptonization.

  17. The Magnetohydrodynamical Model of Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binaries (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  18. The wide band spectral observation of high mass x-ray binary 4u1700-37 with suzaku (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Yuu; Sasaki, Chikako; Kokubun, Motohide

    4U1700-37 is a high mass X-ray binary discovered by Uhuru satellite, whose companion star HD153919 is the brightest one in the visible light. 4U1700-37 was observed with Suzaku from September 13th to 14th, 2006. The observational period corresponded to an orbital phase of 0.30-0.72, and the XIS mode was set to be 1/4 window mode with 1 sec Burst mode. We have divided all observation data into 1000 sec periods and individually fitted the extracted spectra by the cut off power-law model. Several results were obtained from light curves of the best-fit parameters. The normalization of power-law and line flux was fluctuating by a factor of 10, and the absorption was also making a variation such order. On the other hand, the power-law index approximately stayed in a range of 0.7-1.2, except a short period in which the value dropped smaller than 0. The cutoff and folding energy stayed comparatively flat, changing between 4 and 14 keV, 5 and 25 keV, respectively. The line center energy almost remained constant. We will report these results on the wide-band spectral properties and temporal behaviors of 4U1700-37.

  19. The magnetohydrodynamical model of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-10

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  20. Optical studies of the X-ray transient XTE J2123-058 - II. Phase-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, R. I.; Charles, P. A.; Haswell, C. A.; Casares, J.; Zurita, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2001-06-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the soft X-ray transient XTEJ2123-058 in outburst. A useful spectral coverage of 3700-6700Å was achieved spanning two orbits of the binary, with single-epoch coverage extending to ~9000Å. The optical spectrum approximates a steep blue power law, consistent with emission on the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot blackbody spectrum. The strongest spectral lines are Heii 4686Å and Ciii/Niii 4640Å (Bowen blend) in emission. Their relative strengths suggest that XTEJ2123-058 was formed in the Galactic plane, not in the halo. Other weak emission lines of Heii and Civ are present, and Balmer lines show a complex structure, blended with Heii. Heii 4686-Å profiles show a complex multiple S-wave structure, with the strongest component appearing at low velocities in the lower-left quadrant of a Doppler tomogram. Hα shows transient absorption between phases 0.35 and 0.55. Both of these effects appear to be analogous to similar behaviour in SW Sex type cataclysmic variables. We therefore consider whether the spectral line behaviour of XTEJ2123-058 can be explained by the same models invoked for those systems.

  1. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.

    2012-08-10

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

  2. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this page, ... ray views may be uncomfortable. If the whole skeleton is being imaged, the test usually takes 1 ...

  3. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  4. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  5. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data analysis of copper (II) hydroxamic acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, N.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of copper mixed ligand complexes, having hydroxamic acid as one of the ligands, have been recorded at the K-edge of copper at BL-8 Dispersive EXAFS beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS-2 Synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. For the analysis of EXAFS data, crystallographic data of the complex or of its analog is required, which is not available. Hence, for the analysis of EXAFS data, theoretical EXAFS data of the studied complexes have been generated using the EXAFS equation employing computer software program Mathcad. Firstly, the experimental data has been processed using the computer program Athena to obtain the normalized absorption versus energy data. From the experimental EXAFS data, the phase shift parameter (an energy independent constant 5) has been computed using Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method. The backscattering amplitude has been taken from the available theoretical tabulations and other parameters have been taken from crystallographic data of the copper metal. Fourier transforms of both the experimental and theoretical data have been computed, and the two Fourier transforms are found to agree with each other for all the complexes. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of the first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length as a result of energy dependence of the phase factor (5(k)) in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. Since, the Fourier transform method and LSS method both are uncorrected for phase and other parameters of the EXAFS equation, the present method gives phase uncorrected bond length of the first coordination shell.

  6. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data analysis of copper (II) hydroxamic acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, N.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of copper mixed ligand complexes, having hydroxamic acid as one of the ligands, have been recorded at the K-edge of copper at BL-8 Dispersive EXAFS beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS-2 Synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. For the analysis of EXAFS data, crystallographic data of the complex or of its analog is required, which is not available. Hence, for the analysis of EXAFS data, theoretical EXAFS data of the studied complexes have been generated using the EXAFS equation employing computer software program Mathcad. Firstly, the experimental data has been processed using the computer program Athena to obtain the normalized absorption versus energy data. From the experimental EXAFS data, the phase shift parameter (an energy independent constant 5) has been computed using Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method. The backscattering amplitude has been taken from the available theoretical tabulations and other parameters have been taken from crystallographic data of the copper metal. Fourier transforms of both the experimental and theoretical data have been computed, and the two Fourier transforms are found to agree with each other for all the complexes. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of the first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length as a result of energy dependence of the phase factor (δ(k)) in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. Since, the Fourier transform method and LSS method both are uncorrected for phase and other parameters of the EXAFS equation, the present method gives phase uncorrected bond length of the first coordination shell.

  7. Nearest-neighbor nitrogen and oxygen distances in the iron(II)-DNA complex studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Bertoncini, Clelia R A; Meneghini, Rogerio; Tolentino, Helio

    2010-11-01

    In mammalian cells, DNA-bound Fe(II) reacts with H₂O₂ producing the highly reactive hydroxyl radical (OH) in situ. Since ·OH attacks nearby DNA residue generating oxidative DNA damage, many questions have arisen regarding iron-DNA complex formations and their implication in pre-malignant mutations and aging. In this work, a solid sample of Fe(II)-DNA complex containing one Fe(II) per 10 nucleotides was analyzed from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra collected in a synchrotron radiation light source. Best fitting parameters of the EXAFS signal for the first two shells provide evidence of five oxygen atoms at 1.99 ± 0.02 Å and one nitrogen atom at 2.20 ± 0.02 Å in the inner coordination sphere of the Fe(II)-DNA complex. Considering that both purine base moieties bearing nitrogen atoms are prone to chelate iron, these results are consistent with the previously observed lower levels of DNA damage in cytosine nucleotides relative to adenine and guanine sites in cells under more physiological conditions of Fe(II) Fenton reaction.

  8. Implementation of a multichannel soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurements in TJ-II high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baiao, D.; Varandas, C.; Molinero, A.; Chercoles, J.

    2012-10-15

    Based on the multi-foil technique, a multichannel soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurements has been recently implemented in the TJ-II stellarator. The diagnostic system is composed by four photodiodes arrays with beryllium filters of different thickness. An in-vacuum amplifier board is coupled to each array, aiming at preventing induced noise currents. The Thomson scattering and the vacuum ultraviolet survey diagnostics are used for assessing plasma profiles and composition, being the analysis carried out with the radiation code IONEQ. The electron temperature is determined through the different signal-pair ratios with temporal and spatial resolution. The design and preliminary results from the diagnostic are presented.

  9. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics. Part1: Review of LTP errors and methods for the error reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2011-05-11

    Systematic error and instrumental drift are the major limiting factors of sub-microradian slope metrology with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppression of the errors can be achieved by using an optimal measurement strategy suggested in [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 115101 (2009)]. With this series of LSBL Notes, we report on development of an automated, kinematic, rotational system that provides fully controlled flipping, tilting, and shifting of a surface under test. The system is integrated into the Advanced Light Source long trace profiler, LTP-II, allowing for complete realization of the advantages of the optimal measurement strategy method. We provide details of the system’s design, operational control and data acquisition. The high performance of the system is demonstrated via the results of high precision measurements with a spherical test mirror.

  10. A Cu(II) complex of an imidazolium-based ionic liquid: synthesis, X-ray structure and application in the selective electrochemical sensing of guanine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amanpreet; Singh, Ajnesh; Singh, Narinder

    2014-11-21

    An imidazolium-based ionic liquid containing a carboxylic acid group was synthesized and complexed with Cu(II). The resulting complex R1 was fully characterized using various techniques, including IR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Binding studies of the complex R1 were performed with anions and biomolecules using cyclic voltammetry, which showed no change in its voltammogram upon the addition of various anions and most biomolecules. However, a shift in the reduction peak from +0.20 to -0.15 was observed upon the addition of guanine. This selective determination of guanine by R1 was extended by using R1 as an electrochemical sensor for guanine in various voltammetric techniques, including cyclic voltammetry, LSV and DPV. The proposed sensor showed excellent reproducibility and high selectivity and sensitivity towards guanine, with a linear range of 0-20 μM and a detection limit of 45 nM.

  11. Leveraging NMR and X-ray Data of the Free Ligands to Build Better Drugs Targeting Angiotensin II Type 1 G-Protein Coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kellici, Tahsin F; Ntountaniotis, Dimitrios; Kritsi, Eftichia; Zervou, Maria; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis; Potamitis, Constantinos; Durdagi, Serdar; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Ergun, Gizem; Gokdemir, Ebru; Halabalaki, Maria; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Liapakis, George; Tzakos, Andreas; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) has been recently crystallized. A new era has emerged for the structure-based rational drug design and the synthesis of novel AT1R antagonists. In this critical review, the X-ray crystallographic data of commercially available AT1R antagonists in free form are analyzed and compared with the conformational analysis results obtained using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling. The same AT1R antagonists are docked and compared in terms of their interactions in their binding site using homology models and the crystallized AT1R receptor. Various aspects derived from these comparisons regarding rational drug design are outlined.

  12. Measurement of coherence length and incoherent source size of hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Yeong; Hong, Chung Ki; Lim, Jun

    2014-04-15

    We measured the spatial coherence length and incoherent source size of a hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II, the stored electron energy of which has been increased from 2.5 GeV to 3 GeV. The coherence length was determined by single-slit measurement of the visibility of the Fresnel diffraction pattern. The correlated incoherent source size was cross-checked for three different optics: the single slit, beryllium parabolic compound refractive lenses, and the Fresnel zone plate. We concluded that the undulator beamline has an effective incoherent source size (FWHM) of 540 μm (horizontal) × 50 μm (vertical)

  13. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for automated rotating/flipping/aligning system

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2011-07-11

    Systematic error and instrumental drift are the major limiting factors of sub-microradian slope metrology with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppression of the errors can be achieved by using an optimal measurement strategy suggested in [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 115101 (2009)]. With this series of LSBL Notes, we report on development of an automated, kinematic, rotational system that provides fully controlled flipping, tilting, and shifting of a surface under test. The system is integrated into the Advanced Light Source long trace profiler, LTP-II, allowing for complete realization of the advantages of the optimal measurement strategy method. We provide details of the system?s design, operational control and data acquisition. The high performance of the system is demonstrated via the results of high precision measurements with a spherical test mirror.

  14. Purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of an engineered single-chain PvuII restriction endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Meramveliotaki, Chrysi; Kotsifaki, Dina; Androulaki, Maria; Hountas, Athanasios; Eliopoulos, Elias; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2007-10-01

    PvuII is the first type II restriction endonuclease to be converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into an enzymatically active single-chain variant. The enzyme was crystallized and phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement. The restriction endonuclease PvuII from Proteus vulgaris has been converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into the enzymatically active single-chain variant scPvuII by tandemly joining the two subunits through the peptide linker Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly. scPvuII, which is suitable for the development of programmed restriction endonucleases for highly specific DNA cleavage, was purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.35 Å and belong to space group P4{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.92, c = 100.28 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement.

  15. Oxidation and deprotonation of synthetic Fe{sup II}-Fe{sup III} (oxy)hydroxycarbonate Green Rust: An X-ray photoelectron study

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, M. Guillemin, Y.; Ruby, C.

    2008-01-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rusts (GRs). GRs with variable composition, i.e. Fe{sup II}{sub 6(1-x)}Fe{sup III}{sub 6x}O{sub 12}H{sub 2(7-3x)} CO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O where the Fe{sup III} molar fraction of the positively charged hydroxide sheets, x=[Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] belongs to [1/3, 1], were synthesised under an inert atmosphere. The broadened Fe(2p{sub 3/2}) spectra were fitted using Gupta and Sen multiplets peaks and additional satellite and surface features. The [Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] surface atomic ratios closely agree with the x ratios expected from the bulk composition, which gives a high degree of confidence on the validity of the proposed fitting procedure. The valence band spectra are also reported and show dependencies on iron speciation. The O(1s) spectra revealed the presence of O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -} species and adsorbed water. The hydroxyl component decreases with increasing x values, i.e. with the amount of ferric iron, while the oxide component increases. This study provides direct spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyl groups that occurs simultaneously with the oxidation of ferrous iron within the GR structure. - Graphical abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rust (GR) compounds. First spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyls groups occurring simultaneously to the oxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III) species is provided.

  16. Crystal structure of carnidazole form II from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction: structural comparison with form I, the hydrated form and the low energy conformations in vacuo.

    PubMed

    de Armas, Héctor Novoa; Peeters, Oswald M; Blaton, Norbert; Van den Mooter, Guy; De Ridder, Dirk J A; Schenk, Henk

    2006-10-01

    The crystal structure of carnidazole form II, O-methyl [2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-yl)ethyl]thiocarbamate, has been determined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction in combination with simulated annealing and whole profile pattern matching, and refined by the Rietveld method. For structure solution, 12 degrees of freedom were defined: one motion group and six torsions. Form II crystallizes in space group P2(1)/n, Z=4, with unit cell parameters after Rietveld refinement: a=13.915(4), b=8.095(2), c=10.649(3) A, beta=110.83(1) degrees, and V=1121.1(5) A3. The two polymorphic forms, as well as the hydrate, crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n having four molecules in the cell. In form II, the molecules are held together by forming two infinite zig-zag chains via hydrogen bonds of the type N--H...N, the same pattern as in form I. A conformational study of carnidazole, at semiempirical PM3 level, was performed using stochastic approaches based on modification of the flexible torsion angles. The values of the torsion angles for the molecules of the two polymorphic forms and the hydrate of carnidazole are compared to those obtained from the conformational search. Form I and form II are enantiotropic polymorphic pairs this agrees with the fact that the two forms are conformational polymorphs.

  17. What spectroscopy reveals concerning the Mn oxidation levels in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II: X-ray to near infra-red.

    PubMed

    Pace, Ron J; Jin, Lu; Stranger, Rob

    2012-08-28

    Photosystem II (PS II), found in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, catalyses the most energetically demanding reaction in nature, the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen and protons. The water oxidase in PS II contains a Mn(4)Ca cluster (oxygen evolving complex, OEC), whose catalytic mechanism has been extensively investigated but is still unresolved. In particular the precise Mn oxidation levels through which the cluster cycles during functional turnover are still contentious. In this, the first of several planned parts, we examine a broad range of published data relating to this question, while considering the recent atomic resolution PS II crystal structure of Umena et al. (Nature, 2011, 473, 55). Results from X-ray, UV-Vis and NIR spectroscopies are considered, using an approach that is mainly empirical, by comparison with published data from known model systems, but with some reliance on computational or other theoretical considerations. The intention is to survey the extent to which these data yield a consistent picture of the Mn oxidation states in functional PS II - in particular, to test their consistency with two current proposals for the mean redox levels of the OEC during turnover; the so called 'high' and 'low' oxidation state paradigms. These systematically differ by two oxidation equivalents throughout the redox accumulating catalytic S state cycle (states S(0)···S(3)). In summary, we find that the data, in total, substantially favor the low oxidation proposal, particularly as a result of the new analyses we present. The low oxidation state scheme is able to resolve a number of previously 'anomalous' results in the observed UV-Visible S state turnover spectral differences and in the resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) of the Mn pre-edge region of the S(1) and S(2) states. Further, the low oxidation paradigm is able to provide a 'natural' explanation for the known sensitivity of the OEC Mn cluster to cryogenic near infra-red (NIR

  18. Study of laser-generated debris free x-ray sources produced in a high-density linear Ar, Kr, Xe, Kr/Ar and Xe/Kr/Ar mixtures gas jets by 2 ω, sub-ps LLNL Titan laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Schultz, K. A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Safronova, A. S.; Cooper, M. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Petkov, E. E.; Stafford, A.; Moschella, J. J.; Schmidt-Petersen, M. T.; Butcher, C. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Andrews, S. D.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-10-01

    The study of laser-generated debris-free x-ray sources in an underdense plasma produced in a high-density linear gas-puff jet was carried out at the LLNL Titan laser (2 ω, 45 J, sub-ps) with an intensity in the 10 um focal spot of 7 x 1019 W/cm2. A linear nozzle with a fast valve was used for the generation of a clusters/gas jet. X-ray diagnostics for the spectral region of 0.7 - 9 keV include: two spectrometers and pinhole cameras, and 3 groups of fast filtered detectors. Electron beams were measured with the EPPS magnetic spectrometer (>1 MeV) and Faraday cups (>72 keV). Spectralon/spectrometer devices were also used to measure absorption of laser radiation in the jets. New results were obtained on: anisotropic generation of x-rays (laser to x-ray conversion coefficient was >1%) and characteristics of laser-generated electron beams; evolution of x-ray generation with the location of the laser focus in a cluster-gas jet, and observations of a strong x-ray flash in some focusing regimes. Non-LTE kinetic modeling was used to estimate plasma parameters. UNR work supported by the DTRA Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Clocking femtosecond X rays.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Rudati, J; Mills, D M; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Kao, C C; Siddons, D P; Lowney, D P; Macphee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Pahl, R; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Düsterer, S; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Schulte-Schrepping, H; Tschentscher, Th; Schneider, J; Hignette, O; Sette, F; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; van der Spoel, D; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Akre, R A; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Luening, K; Hastings, J B

    2005-03-25

    Linear-accelerator-based sources will revolutionize ultrafast x-ray science due to their unprecedented brightness and short pulse duration. However, time-resolved studies at the resolution of the x-ray pulse duration are hampered by the inability to precisely synchronize an external laser to the accelerator. At the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source at the Stanford Linear-Accelerator Center we solved this problem by measuring the arrival time of each high energy electron bunch with electro-optic sampling. This measurement indirectly determined the arrival time of each x-ray pulse relative to an external pump laser pulse with a time resolution of better than 60 fs rms.

  20. Quasar x-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein satellite is used to re-examine the relationship between the soft (0.2-3.5 keV) X-ray energy index and radio-loudness. We found the following: (1) the tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray slopes than radio-quiet quasars (RQQ's) is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect; (2) there is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core-dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed; (3) for the RQQ's the soft X-ray slopes, with a mean of approximately 1.0, are consistent with the slopes found at higher energies (2-10 keV) although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies (also 2-10 keV) where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data; (4) the correlation of FeII emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 quasars. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and the line emission from the broad emission line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models; and (5) the correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and FeII equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-classes respectively imply that the observed wide range of X-ray spectral slopes is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  1. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  2. Cytotoxic activity, X-ray crystal structures and spectroscopic characterization of cobalt(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) coordination compounds with 2-substituted benzimidazoles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guadarrama, Obdulia; López-Sandoval, Horacio; Sánchez-Bartéz, Francisco; Gracia-Mora, Isabel; Höpfl, Herbert; Barba-Behrens, Noráh

    2009-09-01

    Herein we present the synthesis, structural and spectroscopic characterization of coordination compounds of cobalt(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) with 2-methylbenzimidazole (2mbz), 2-phenylbenzimidazole (2phbz), 2-chlorobenzimidazole (2cbz), 2-benzimidazolecarbamate (2cmbz) and 2-guanidinobenzimidazole (2gbz). Their cytotoxic activity was evaluated using human cancer cell lines, PC3 (prostate), MCF-7 (breast), HCT-15 (colon), HeLa (cervic-uterine), SKLU-1 (lung) and U373 (glioblastoma), showing that the zinc(II) and copper(II) compounds [Zn(2mbz)(2)Cl(2)].0.5H(2)O, [Zn(2cmbz)(2)Cl(2)].EtOH, [Cu(2cmbz)Br(2)].0.7H(2)O and [Cu(2gbz)Br(2)] had significant cytotoxic activity. The isostructural cobalt(II) complexes showed not significant activity. The cytotoxic activity is related to the presence of halides in the coordination sphere of the metal ion. Recuperation experiments with HeLa cells, showed that the cells recuperated after removing the copper(II) compounds and, on the contrary, the cells treated with the zinc(II) compounds did not. These results indicate that the mode of action of the coordination compounds is different.

  3. X-ray and DFT studies of a mono- and binuclear copper(II) ionic compound containing a Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Langer, Vratislav; Mach, Pavol; Gyepesová, Dalma; Andrezálová, Lucia; Kohútová, Mária

    2012-11-01

    In the structure of trans-bis(ethanol-κO)tetrakis(1H-imidazole-κN(3))copper(II) bis[μ-N-(2-oxidobenzylidene)-D,L-glutamato]-κ(4)O(1),N,O(2'):O(2');κ(4)O(2'):O(1),N,O(2')-bis[(1H-imidazole-κN(3))cuprate(II)], [Cu(C(3)H(4)N(2))(4)(C(2)H(6)O)(2)][Cu(2)(C(15)H(14)N(3)O(5))(2)], both ions are located on centres of inversion. The cation is mononuclear, showing a distorted octahedral coordination, while the anion is a binuclear centrosymmetric dimer with a square-pyramidal copper(II) coordination. An extensive three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network is formed between the ions. According to B3LYP/6-31G* calculations, the two equivalent components of the anion are in doublet states (spin density located mostly on Cu(II) ions) and are coupled as a triplet, with only marginal preference over an open-shell singlet.

  4. X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1972-01-01

    The preliminary results from the Sco X-1 and Cyg X-1 obtained from the Apollo 15 X-ray detector data are presented along with preliminary results of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric data of the lunar surface composition. The production of the characteristic X-rays following the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface is described along with the X-ray spectrometer. Preliminary analyses of the astronomical X-ray observation and the X-ray fluorescence data are presented.

  5. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  6. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. II. EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of thermonuclear bursts observed from low-mass X-ray binaries offer a unique tool to measure neutron-star masses and radii. In this paper, we continue our systematic analysis of all the X-ray bursts observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from X-ray binaries. We determine the events that show clear evidence for photospheric radius expansion and measure the Eddington limits for these accreting neutron stars using the bolometric fluxes attained at the touchdown moments of each X-ray burst. We employ a Bayesian technique to investigate the degree to which the Eddington limit for each source remains constant between bursts. We find that for sources with a large number of radius expansion bursts, systematic uncertainties are at a 5%-10% level. Moreover, in six sources with only pairs of Eddington-limited bursts, the distribution of fluxes is consistent with a {approx}10% fractional dispersion. This indicates that the spectroscopic measurements of neutron-star masses and radii using thermonuclear X-ray bursts can reach the level of accuracy required to distinguish between different neutron-star equations of state, provided that uncertainties related to the overall flux calibration of X-ray detectors are of comparable magnitude.

  7. Neck x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at cervical vertebrae. These are the 7 bones of the spine in the neck. ... A neck x-ray can detect: Bone joint that is out of position (dislocation) Breathing in a foreign object Broken bone (fracture) Disk problems (disks ...

  8. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney stone Identify blockage in the intestine Locate an object that has been swallowed Help diagnose diseases, such as tumors or other conditions Normal Results The x-ray will show normal structures for a person your age. What Abnormal Results Mean Abnormal findings ...

  9. EUV, X-ray, and gamma-ray instrumentation for astronomy II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 24-26, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H.; Rothschild, Richard E.

    The present conference discusses proportional counter detectors, microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors, X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging techniques, spaceborne astronomical experiments, and solid-state and cryogenic detectors. Attention is given to imaging gas scintillation proportional counters for ASTRO-D, high-resolution decoding of multianode MCP array detectors, high dynamic range MCP structures, hard X-ray imaging via crystal diffraction, an X-ray interferometric observatory, and a high throughput narrowband self-filtering camera. Also discussed are the use of GaAs as an X-ray detector, multilayer mirrors and filters for imaging the earth's inner magnetosphere, the use of tunnel junctions as X-ray spectrometers, submicron structures for EUV filtering, and proportional counter window materials for the AXAF Bragg crystal spectrometer.

  10. Crystallization of Photosystem II for Time-Resolved Structural Studies Using an X-ray Free Electron Laser

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Jesse; Kupitz, Christopher; Basu, Shibom; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane protein supercomplex that executes the initial reaction of photosynthesis in higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. It captures the light from the sun to catalyze a transmembrane charge separation. In a series of four charge separation events, utilizing the energy from four photons, PSII oxidizes two water molecules to obtain dioxygen, four protons, and four electrons. The light reactions of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) result in the formation of an electrochemical transmembrane proton gradient that is used for the production of ATP. Electrons that are subsequently transferred from PSI via the soluble protein ferredoxin to ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase that reduces NADP+ to NADPH. The products of photosynthesis and the elemental oxygen evolved sustain all higher life on Earth. All oxygen in the atmosphere is produced by the oxygen-evolving complex in PSII, a process that changed our planet from an anoxygenic to an oxygenic atmosphere 2.5 billion years ago. In this chapter, we provide recent insight into the mechanisms of this process and methods used in probing this question. PMID:25950978

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of chondroitin sulfate ABC lyases I and II from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Matte, A; Suzuki, S; Sugiura, N; Miyazono, H; Cygler, M

    2000-07-01

    Chondroitin sulfate ABC lyases (E.C. 4.2.2.4) are broad-specificity glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzymes. Their preferred substrates are chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate, which are broken down to short oligosaccharides. Proteus vulgaris produces two such lyases, ABC lyase I and II, with molecular weights of 112-113 kDa. Diffraction-quality crystals of both enzymes have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. ABC lyase I crystallizes in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 49.3, b = 95.1, c = 230.0 A, Z = 4, and diffracts to 1.9 A resolution. Crystals of ABC lyase II belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 64.3, c = 142.1 A, alpha = 95.7, beta = 98. 1, gamma = 95.5 degrees, Z = 2; diffraction extends to at least 2.1 A.

  12. Trends in ultracool dwarf magnetism. II. The inverse correlation between X-ray activity and rotation as evidence for a bimodal dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, E.

    2014-04-10

    Observations of magnetic activity indicators in solar-type stars exhibit a relationship with rotation with an increase until a 'saturation' level and a moderate decrease in activity in the very fastest rotators ('supersaturation'). While X-ray data have suggested that this relationship is strongly violated in ultracool dwarfs (UCDs; spectral type ≳M7), the limited number of X-ray detections has prevented firm conclusions. In this paper, we analyze the X-ray activity-rotation relation in 38 UCDs. Our sample represents the largest catalog of X-ray active UCDs to date, including seven new and four previously unpublished Chandra observations presented in a companion paper. We identify a substantial number of rapidly rotating UCDs with X-ray activity extending two orders of magnitude below the expected saturation level and measure a 'supersaturation'-type anticorrelation between rotation and X-ray activity. The scatter in UCD X-ray activity at a fixed rotation is ∼3 times larger than that in earlier-type stars. We discuss several mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the data, including centrifugal stripping of the corona, and find them to be inconsistent with the observed trends. Instead, we suggest that an additional parameter correlated with both X-ray activity and rotation is responsible for the observed effects. Building on the results of Zeeman-Doppler imaging of UCD magnetic fields and our companion study of radio/X-ray flux ratios, we argue that this parameter is the magnetic field topology, and that the large scatter in UCD X-ray fluxes reflects the presence of two dynamo modes that produce distinct topologies.

  13. Synthesis and x-ray structure of the first divalent lanthanide acetylacetonate complex, bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptane-3,5-dionato)bis-(dimethoxyethane)europium(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W.J.; Shreeve, J.L.; Ziller, J.W.

    1994-12-21

    The authors describe the synthesis of a novel europium(II)acetylacetonate complex, (THD){sub 2}Eu(DME){sub 2} (1) and (THD){sub 2}Sm(DME){sub 2} (2) and the decomposition product of (2), (THD){sub 3}Sm(DME), (3). The complexes were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  14. Crystal structure of lead(II) acetylacetonate and the structure of the acetylacetone solvated lead(II) ion in solution studied by large-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Lyczko, Krzysztof; Narbutt, Jerzy; Paluchowska, Beata; Maurin, Jan K; Persson, Ingmar

    2006-09-07

    The crystal structure of bis(acetylacetonato)lead(II) and the structure of the acetylacetone solvated lead(II) ion in solution have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS), respectively. The acetylacetone is deprotonated and acts as a bidentate anionic ligand (acac-) in the solid Pb(acac)2 compound. The lead(II) ion binds four oxygen atoms strongly in a nearly flat pyramidal configuration with Pb-O bond lengths in the range 2.32-2.37 A, and additionally three oxygens from neighboring complexes at 3.01-3.26 A. Acetylacetone acts as a solvent (Hacac) at dissolution of lead(II) trifluoromethanesulfonate forming a pentasolvate with a mean Pb-O bond distance of 2.724(5) A. The 6s2 lone electron pair on the lead(II) ion becomes stereochemically active in the crystalline acetylacetonate complex, while it is inactive in the solvate in solution. The solution was also analysed using IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  15. Industrial X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, Lewis Research Center jointly sponsored a conference with the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory focused on high speed imaging. This conference, and early funding by Lewis Research Center, helped to spur work by Silicon Mountain Design, Inc. to break the performance barriers of imaging speed, resolution, and sensitivity through innovative technology. Later, under a Small Business Innovation Research contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the company designed a real-time image enhancing camera that yields superb, high quality images in 1/30th of a second while limiting distortion. The result is a rapidly available, enhanced image showing significantly greater detail compared to image processing executed on digital computers. Current applications include radiographic and pathology-based medicine, industrial imaging, x-ray inspection devices, and automated semiconductor inspection equipment.

  16. X-Ray Variability in M87

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Daniel E.; Biretta, J. A.; Junor, W.

    2000-01-01

    We present the evidence for X-ray variability from the core and from knot A in the M87 jet based on data from two observations with the Einstein Observatory High Resolution Imager (HRI) and three observations with the ROSAT HRI. The core intensity showed a 16% increase in 17 months ('79-'80); a 12% increase in the 3 years '92 to '95; and a 17% drop in the last half of 1995. The intensity of knot A appears to have decreased by 16% between 92Jun and 95Dec. Although the core variability is consistent with general expectations for AGB nuclei, the changes in knot A provide constraints on the x-ray emission process and geometry. Thus we predict that the x-ray morphology of knot A will differ significantly from the radio and optical structure.

  17. Copper(II) complexes of quinoline polyazamacrocyclic scorpiand-type ligands: X-ray, equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carmen E; Angeles Máñez, M; Basallote, Manuel G; Paz Clares, M; Blasco, Salvador; García-España, Enrique

    2012-05-14

    The formation of Cu(II) complexes with two isomeric quinoline-containing scorpiand-type ligands has been studied. The ligands have a tetraazapyridinophane core appended with an ethylamino tail including 2-quinoline (L1) or 4-quinoline (L2) functionalities. Potentiometric studies indicate the formation of stable CuL(2+) species with both ligands, the L1 complex being 3-4 log units more stable than the L2 complex. The crystal structure of [Cu(L1)](ClO(4))(2)·H(2)O shows that the coordination geometry around the Cu(2+) ions is distorted octahedral with significant axial elongation; the four Cu-N distances in the equatorial plane vary from 1.976 to 2.183 Å, while the axial distances are of 2.276 and 2.309 Å. The lower stability of the CuL2(2+) complex and its capability of forming protonated and hydroxo complexes suggest a penta-dentate coordination of the ligand, in agreement with the type of substitution at the quinoline ring. Kinetic studies on complex formation can be interpreted by considering that initial coordination of L1 and L2 takes place through the nitrogen atom in the quinoline ring. This is followed by coordination of the remaining nitrogen atoms, in a process that is faster in the L1 complex probably because substitution at the quinoline ring facilitates the reorganization. Kinetic studies on complex decomposition provide clear evidence on the occurrence of the molecular motion typical of scorpiands in the case of the L2 complex, for which decomposition starts with a very fast process (sub-millisecond timescale) that involves a shift in the absorption band from 643 to 690 nm.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and x-ray crystal structures of cyclam derivatives. 8. Thermodynamic and kinetic appraisal of lead(II) chelation by octadentate carbamoyl-armed macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Cuenot, François; Meyer, Michel; Espinosa, Enrique; Guilard, Roger

    2005-10-31

    En route toward the development of hybrid organic-inorganic extracting materials incorporating lead-selective chelators and their implementation in water purification processes, the lead(II) binding properties of three N-carbamoylmethyl-substituted 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecanes (cyclams) have been fully investigated by spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis, MALDI-TOF MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR), X-ray crystallographic, potentiometric, and kinetic methods. Solution NMR studies revealed that the Pb(2+) ion is entrapped in a molecular cage constituted by the four macrocyclic nitrogen and four amidic oxygen atoms. Protonation and lead binding constants determined in aqueous solution were shown to be linearly dependent, so that all three derivatives possess a similar affinity at any pH value. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters revealed the crucial role played by the intramolecular hydrogen bonds also evidenced in the crystal structure of the tetraacetamide derivative L(1), which involve the lone pair of each macrocyclic tertiary amine and one amidic hydrogen atom belonging to the appended arm. In contrast to L(1), the absence of such intramolecular interactions for N-(dimethyl)carbamoylmethyl- and N-(diethyl)carbamoylmethyl-substituted cyclams (L(2) and L(3), respectively) accounts for the 2-3 orders of magnitude enhancement of their proton and lead binding affinities. Stopped-flow kinetic measurements enabled unraveling the formation process of the three lead(II) complexes that proceeds in a single rate-limiting step according to the Eigen-Winkler mechanism, while the apparent rate constants were found to increase in the order L(3) < L(2) < L(1) as a consequence of the more acidic character of L(1). A common proton-assisted dissociation mechanism has been found for the three lead(II) complexes, which involves the rapid formation of a protonated, six-coordinate intermediate followed by either a unimolecular decomposition or a bimolecular attack of a second hydronium ion.

  19. A zinc(II) quinolinone complex (Et3NH)[Zn(qui)Cl2]: Synthesis, X-ray structure, spectral properties and in vitro cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchtík, Roman; Nemec, Ivan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-02-01

    A new zinc(II) complex with 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone (Hqui) of the composition (Et3NH)[Zn(qui)Cl2] was prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray analysis. The molecular structure is composed of the triethylammonium (Et3NH+) cations and tetrahedral [ZnII(qui)Cl2]- complex anions, in which the Zn(II) atoms are bidentate coordinated by one qui ligand through keto (OK) and phenolate (OP) oxygen atoms and by two chlorido ligands, thus forming the {O2Cl2} donor set, with Zn-OK = 1.9860(14) Å, Zn-OP 1.9961(14) Å and Zn-Cl = 2.2509(6) Å and 2.2266(6) Å. The complex cations are aligned into 1D supramolecular chains through the NH⋯Cl hydrogen bonding between the amine group of the quinolinone ligand and the chlorido ligand of the adjacent complex anion. The amine group from the Et3NH+ cations provides the NH⋯OP hydrogen bond with the phenolate oxygen atoms from the complex anion. Screening of in vitro cytotoxicity of the compound was studied on human osteosarcoma (HOS) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cell lines, with IC50 > 50 μM. The fluorescence study showed that the complex exhibits a relatively high integral intensity (29%) as compared to the standard quinine sulfate, and 1.6-fold enhancement of emission with respect to free Hqui.

  20. X-Ray and Radio Studies of Black Hole X-Ray Transients During Outburst Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Black hole (BH) and black hole candidate (BHC) transients are X-ray binary systems that typically undergo bright outbursts that last a couple months with recurrence times of years to decades. For this ADP project, we are studying BH/BHC systems during the decaying phases of their outbursts using the Rossi X-ray Taming Explorer (RXTE), the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and multi-wavelength facilities. These systems usually undergo state transitions as they decay, and our observations are designed to catch the state transitions. The specific goals of this proposal include: 1. To determine the evolution of the characteristic frequencies present in the power spectrum (such as quasi-periodic oscillations, QPOs) during state transitions in order to place constraints on the accretion geometry; 2. To contemporaneously measure X-ray spectral and timing properties along with flux measurements in the radio band to determine the relationship between the accretion disk and radio jets; 3. To extend our studies of X-ray properties of BHCs to very low accretion rates using RXTE and Chandra. The work performed under this proposal has been highly successful, allowing the PI to lead, direct, or assist in the preparation of 7 related publications in refereed journals and 6 other conference presentations or reports. These items are listed below, and the abstracts for the refereed publications have also been included. Especially notable results include our detailed measurements of the characteristic frequencies and spectral parameters of BH/BHCs after the transition to the hard state (see All A3, and A5) and at low flux levels (see A4). Our measurements provide one of the strongest lines of evidence to date that the inner edge of the optically thick accretion disk gradually recedes from the black hole at low flux levels. In addition, we have succeeded in obtaining excellent multi-wavelength coverage of a BH system as its compact jet turned on (see Al). Our results show, somewhat

  1. Synthesis, spectral, X-ray single structure, DFT calculations and antimicrobial activities of [Co(II)X2 (dmphen)] (X = Br and SCN-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Noaimi, Mousa; Awwadi, Firas F.; Haddad, Salim F.; Talib, Wamidh H.; Jodeh, Shehdeh; Radi, Smaail; Ben Hadda, Taibi; Abdoh, Muneer; Naveen, S.; Lokanath, N. K.; Warad, Ismail

    2015-04-01

    Two tetrahedral mononuclear complexes with a general formula [CoX2(dmphen)](1-2) (where dmphen is 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and 1 (X = Br), 2 (X = NCS)) have been synthesized. These complexes are characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible, TG/DTA and by X-ray diffraction. The calculated electrostatic potential surface of 2 has shown that the electrostatic potential values around sulfur atom is anistropically distributed; the potential values along C-S bond is less negative than the corresponding values in the π-region of S atom. This agrees with the observed geometrical arrangement of C-H⋯S-C hydrogen bonding interactions, the avg. of H⋯S-C angle is 81°. Antimicrobial properties of cobalt(II) complexes was also assessed. Cobalt complexes exhibited significant antibacterial activity against different gram negative and positive human pathogens. The absorption spectrum of these complexes in acetone was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  2. Synthesis, characterization, single crystal X-ray determination, fluorescence and electrochemical studies of new dinuclear nickel(II) and oxovanadium(IV) complexes containing double Schiff base ligands.

    PubMed

    Shafaatian, Bita; Ozbakzaei, Zahra; Notash, Behrouz; Rezvani, S Ahmad

    2015-04-05

    A series of new bimetallic complexes of nickel(II) and vanadium(IV) have been synthesized by the reaction of the new double bidentate Schiff base ligands with nickel acetate and vanadyl acetylacetonate in 1:1 M ratio. In nickel and also vanadyl complexes the ligands were coordinated to the metals via the imine N and enolic O atoms. The complexes have been found to possess 1:1 metals to ligands stoichiometry and the molar conductance data revealed that the metal complexes were non-electrolytes. The nickel and vanadyl complexes exhibited distorted square planar and square pyramidal coordination geometries, respectively. The emission spectra of the ligands and their complexes were studied in methanol. Electrochemical properties of the ligands and their metal complexes were also investigated in DMSO solvent at 150 mV s(-1) scan rate. The ligands and metal complexes showed both quasi-reversible and irreversible processes at this scan rate. The Schiff bases and their complexes have been characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, UV/Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and conductometry. The crystal structure of the nickel complex has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  3. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies of copper (II) mixed ligand complexes having tetramethylethylenediamine as one of the ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sharad; Joshi, S. K.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Hinge, V. K.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been studied at the K-edge of copper in copper(II) mixed ligand complexes, having tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen) as one of the ligands, viz., Cu(tmen)(gly)ClO4, Cu(tmen)(bipy)(ClO4)2 and Cu(tmen)(phen)(ClO4)2. The spectra have been recorded at the dispersive XAFS beamline (BL-8) at the 2.5 GeV INDUS-2 synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed and analyzed using the computer program Athena. It has been observed that K-edge has been found to split in two edges, K and K', in each of the complex. The chemical shift has been utilized to determine the oxidation state of copper in the complexes and also the effective nuclear charge (ENC). The EXAFS data has been analyzed to obtain the bond lengths in the complexes using Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The first peak in the Fourier transform of the spectra gives the value of first shell phase uncorrected bond length. The results obtained from the Fourier transformation and LSS methods are in good agreement.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, single crystal X-ray determination, fluorescence and electrochemical studies of new dinuclear nickel(II) and oxovanadium(IV) complexes containing double Schiff base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafaatian, Bita; Ozbakzaei, Zahra; Notash, Behrouz; Rezvani, S. Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    A series of new bimetallic complexes of nickel(II) and vanadium(IV) have been synthesized by the reaction of the new double bidentate Schiff base ligands with nickel acetate and vanadyl acetylacetonate in 1:1 M ratio. In nickel and also vanadyl complexes the ligands were coordinated to the metals via the imine N and enolic O atoms. The complexes have been found to possess 1:1 metals to ligands stoichiometry and the molar conductance data revealed that the metal complexes were non-electrolytes. The nickel and vanadyl complexes exhibited distorted square planar and square pyramidal coordination geometries, respectively. The emission spectra of the ligands and their complexes were studied in methanol. Electrochemical properties of the ligands and their metal complexes were also investigated in DMSO solvent at 150 mV s-1 scan rate. The ligands and metal complexes showed both quasi-reversible and irreversible processes at this scan rate. The Schiff bases and their complexes have been characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, UV/Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and conductometry. The crystal structure of the nickel complex has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  5. Comparison of the manganese oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of spinach and Synechococcus sp. with multinuclear manganese model compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, V.J.; Mukerji, I.; Latimer, M.J. ); Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P. ); Sauer, K. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-15

    The evaluation of Mn X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) from photosystem II is described for preparations from both spinach and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. poised in the S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] states. In addition to reproducing previous results suggesting the presence of bis([mu]-oxo)-bridged Mn centers in the OEC, a Fourier transform peak due to scatterers at an average distance of > 3 [angstrom] is detected in both types of preparation. In addition, subtle but reproducible changes are found in the relative amplitudes of the Fourier transform peaks due to mainly O ([approximately]1.8 [angstrom]) and Mn ([approximately] 2.7 [angstrom]) neighbors upon cryogenic advance from the S[sub 1] to the S[sub 2] state. Analysis of the peak due to scatterers at [approximately] 3 [angstrom] favors assignment to (per 4 Mn in the OEC) 1-2 heavy atom (Mn, Ca) scatterers at an average distance of 3.3-3.4 [angstrom]. The EXAFS data of several multinuclear Mn model compounds containing such scattering interactions are analyzed and compared with the data for the OEC. Structural models for the OEC are evaluated on the basis of these results. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. DNA binding, antioxidant, cytotoxicity (MTT, lactate dehydrogenase, NO), and cellular uptake studies of structurally different nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes: synthesis, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, R; Kalaivani, P; Huang, R; Poornima, P; Vijaya Padma, V; Dallemer, F; Natarajan, K

    2013-02-01

    Three new nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectral, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In complex 1, the ligand 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydethiosemicarbazone coordinated as a monobasic tridentate donor, whereas in complexes 2 and 3, the ligands salicylaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone coordinated as a dibasic tridentate donor. The DNA binding ability of the complexes in calf thymus DNA was explored by absorption and emission titration experiments. The antioxidant property of the new complexes was evaluated to test their free-radical scavenging ability. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed for the new complexes in A549 and HepG2 cell lines. The new compounds overcome cisplatin resistance in the A549 cell line and they were also active in the HepG2 cell line. The cellular uptake study showed the accumulation of the complexes in tumor cells depended on the nature of the ligand attached to the nickel ion.

  7. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  8. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  9. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  10. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  11. High-energy neutrino fluxes from AGN populations inferred from X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Idunn B.; Wu, Kinwah; On, Alvina Y. L.; Saxton, Curtis J.

    2015-08-01

    High-energy neutrinos and photons are complementary messengers, probing violent astrophysical processes and structural evolution of the Universe. X-ray and neutrino observations jointly constrain conditions in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets: their baryonic and leptonic contents, and particle production efficiency. Testing two standard neutrino production models for local source Cen A (Koers & Tinyakov and Becker & Biermann), we calculate the high-energy neutrino spectra of single AGN sources and derive the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected for the current epoch. Assuming that accretion determines both X-rays and particle creation, our parametric scaling relations predict neutrino yield in various AGN classes. We derive redshift-dependent number densities of each class, from Chandra and Swift/BAT X-ray luminosity functions (Silverman et al. and Ajello et al.). We integrate the neutrino spectrum expected from the cumulative history of AGN (correcting for cosmological and source effects, e.g. jet orientation and beaming). Both emission scenarios yield neutrino fluxes well above limits set by IceCube (by ˜4-106 × at 1 PeV, depending on the assumed jet models for neutrino production). This implies that: (i) Cen A might not be a typical neutrino source as commonly assumed; (ii) both neutrino production models overestimate the efficiency; (iii) neutrino luminosity scales with accretion power differently among AGN classes and hence does not follow X-ray luminosity universally; (iv) some AGN are neutrino-quiet (e.g. below a power threshold for neutrino production); (v) neutrino and X-ray emission have different duty cycles (e.g. jets alternate between baryonic and leptonic flows); or (vi) some combination of the above.

  12. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, and phosphate ester cleavage properties of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine copper(II) complexes with guanidinium pendant groups.

    PubMed

    Belousoff, Matthew J; Tjioe, Linda; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone

    2008-10-06

    Three new derivatives of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (DPA) featuring ethylguanidinium (L (1)), propylguanidinium (L (2)), or butylguanidinium (L (3)) pendant groups have been prepared by the reaction of N, N- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)alkane-alpha,omega-diamines with 1 H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine hydrochloride. The corresponding mononuclear copper(II) complexes were prepared by reacting the ligands with copper(II) nitrate and were isolated as [Cu(LH (+))(OH 2)](ClO 4) 3. xNaClO 4. yH 2O ( C1: L = L (1), x = 2, y = 3; C2: L = L (2), x = 2, y = 4; C3: L = L (3), x = 1, y = 0) following cation exchange purification. Recrystallization yielded crystals of composition [Cu(LH (+))(X)](ClO 4) 3.X ( C1': L = L (1), X = MeOH; C2': L = L (2), X = H 2O; C3': L = L (3), X = H 2O), which were suitable for X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of C1', C2', and C3' indicate that the DPA moieties of the ligands coordinate to the copper(II) centers in a meridional fashion, with a water or methanol molecule occupying the fourth basal position. Weakly bound perchlorate anions located in the axial positions complete the distorted octahedral coordination spheres. The noncoordinating, monoprotonated guanidinium groups project away from the Cu(II)-DPA units and are involved in extensive charge-assisted hydrogen-bonding interactions with cocrystallized water/methanol molecules and perchlorate anions within the crystal lattices. The copper(II) complexes were tested for their ability to promote the cleavage of two model phosphodiesters, bis( p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) and uridine-3'- p-nitrophenylphosphate (UpNP), as well as supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBR 322). While the presence of the guanidine pendants was found to be detrimental to BNPP cleavage efficiency, the functionalized complexes were found to cleave plasmid DNA and, in some cases, the model ribose phosphate diester, UpNP, at a faster rate than the parent copper(II) complex of DPA.

  13. An X-ray and radio study of steep-spectrum radio sources. II - Four fields from a 22 MHz polar cap survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewdney, P. E.; Mchardy, I.; Willis, A. G.; Harris, D. E.; Costain, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    Four fields containing radio sources with spectral indices greater than unity at low frequencies have been observed over a wide range of radio wavelengths and at X-ray wavelengths. For most of the steep-spectrum sources no optical identifications have been found to the detection limit of the Palomar Schmidt prints, even with the positional precision of about 1 arcsec from VLA maps. This implies that the associated galaxies or clusters lie at a great distance. X-ray emission was not detected from any of the steep-spectrum radio sources. In one case, an extended source appears to be a radio halo in an uncataloged cluster of galaxies at a redshift of 0.125, and it is suggested that this object is a promising candidate for the detection of inverse Compton X-rays, since it is not a high-luminosity source of thermal X-rays.

  14. SPARTUVIX II: An improved x-ray ultraviolet spectrograph with temporal and spatial capabilities for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgade, J.L.; Guilly, E.; Bruneau, J.; Gary, S.; Gontier, D.; Renaudin, P.; Reverdin, C.; Thiell, G.

    1997-01-01

    An improved version of the initial x-ray ultraviolet spectrograph SPARTUVIX1 has been developed to record the time evolution of spatially resolved spectra in the soft x-ray range (from 30 to 300 {Angstrom}). This diagnostic can be applied to the new class of laser produced plasma experiments now performed in order to better understand the physical evolution of x-ray indirect drive plasmas. Instead of a one-dimensional streak camera used for the first version, a new widely used 2-D soft x-ray time gated imager allows us to follow the time evolution of the spatially resolved soft x-ray spectra. This instrument was designed for plastic foam soft x-ray opacity measurements. The soft x-rays, emitted by an auxiliary radiography laser plasma source, are transmitted through the foam and dispersed into two parts (+1 and {minus}1 order of the transmission grating). Each dispersed spectrum is placed on two different gated striplines of the soft x-ray imager and thus recorded at two different times (exposure time 300 ps, adjustable interframe 600 ps). The spatial resolution is obtained with a slit added in front of the spectrograph, that images the plasma onto the detector with a magnification ratio of 15 and a spatial resolution of 50 {mu}m. A detailed description of this instrument and the main results obtained for two different plastic foam opacity measurements (undoped and doped with chlorine) will be presented. This work is supported by European Community Contract No. CEE/CHGF-CT-92-0016. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  16. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  17. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ...

  18. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  19. Encapsulating X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Bradley, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor-deposited polymer shields crystals from environment while allowing X rays to pass. Polymer coating transparental to X rays applied to mercuric iodide detector in partial vacuum. Coating protects crystal from sublimation, chemical attack, and electrical degradation.

  20. X-ray variability patterns and radio/X-ray correlations in Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Skinner, Gerald K.; Pooley, Guy G.; Lubiński, Piotr

    2011-09-01

    We have studied the X-ray variability patterns and correlations of the radio and X-ray fluxes in all spectral states of Cyg X-1 using X-ray data from the All-Sky Monitor onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Burst And Transient Source Experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Burst Alert Telescope onboard Swift. In the hard state, the dominant spectral variability is a changing of normalization with a fixed spectral shape, while in the intermediate state, the slope changes, with a pivot point around 10 keV. In the soft state, the low-energy X-ray emission dominates the bolometric flux which is only loosely correlated with the high-energy emission. In black hole binaries in the hard state, the radio flux is generally found to depend on a power of the X-ray flux, FR∝FpX. We confirm this for Cyg X-1. Our new finding is that this correlation extends to the intermediate and soft states, provided the broad-band X-ray flux in the Comptonization part of the spectrum (excluding the blackbody component) is considered instead of a narrow-band medium-energy X-ray flux. We find an index p≃ 1.7 ± 0.1 for 15-GHz radio emission, decreasing to p≃ 1.5 ± 0.1 at 2.25 GHz. We conclude that the higher value at 15 GHz is due to the effect of free-free absorption in the wind from the companion. The intrinsic correlation index remains uncertain. However, based on a theoretical model of the wind in Cyg X-1, it may to be close to ≃1.3, which, in the framework of accretion/jet models, would imply that the accretion flow in Cyg X-1 is radiatively efficient. The correlation with the flux due to Comptonization emission indicates that the radio jet is launched by the hot electrons in the accretion flow in all spectral states of Cyg X-1. On the other hand, we are able to rule out the X-ray jet model. Finally, we find that the index of the correlation, when measured using the X-ray flux in a narrow energy band, strongly depends on the band chosen and is, in general

  1. Effects of X-ray irradiation on natural killer (NK) cell system. II. Increased sensitivity to natural killer cytotoxic factor (NKCF)

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, A.; Mizutani, Y.; Nagamuta, M.; Ikenaga, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation with low-doses of X-rays of tumor cells elevated their susceptibility to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells in an accompanying paper. Cytotoxicity assays conducted at the single cell level revealed that X-ray irradiation of K562 cells did not affect the number of effector-target conjugates but increased the frequency of dead conjugated target cells. During interaction with K562 cells large granular lymphocytes released a soluble cytotoxic factor (NKCF) that killed the target cells. X-ray irradiation did not affect the NKCF stimulatory ability of K562 cells, while it elevated their sensitivity to the lytic effect of NKCF. In contrast to X-rays, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation of K562 cells did not elevate their NK sensitivity but rather reduced it. Treatment with mitomycin C produced no effect on NK sensitivity. These results indicate that X-ray irradiation elevates the target sensitivity to NKCF, which may be involved in the increased NK sensitivity, and that the X-ray effect may be different from that of UV radiation or DNA synthesis inhibition.

  2. Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Combined X-Ray Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy, and Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoe, Jun-Etsu Tsujii, Hirohiko; Hasegawa, Azusa D.D.S.; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Ryo D.D.S.; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Takakura, Kintomo

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with malignant gliomas, treated with combined X-ray radiotherapy (XRT), chemotherapy, and carbon ion radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 48 patients with histologically confirmed malignant gliomas (16 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and 32 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical study. The treatment involved the application of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of XRT, followed by CRT at 8 fractions/2 weeks. Nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) were administered at a dose of 100 mg/m{sup 2} concurrently in weeks 1, 4, or 5 of XRT. The carbon ion dose was increased from 16.8 to 24.8 Gray equivalent (GyE) in 10% incremental steps (16.8, 18.4, 20.0, 22.4, and 24.8 GyE, respectively). Results: There was no Grade 3 or higher acute reaction in the brain. The late reactions included four cases of Grade 2 brain morbidity and four cases of Grade 2 brain reaction among 48 cases. The median survival time (MST) of AA patients was 35 months and that of GBM patients 17 months (p = 0.0035). The median progression-free survival and MST of GBM showed 4 and 7 months for the low-dose group, 7 and 19 months for the middle-dose group, and 14 and 26 months for the high-dose group. Conclusion: The results of combined therapy using XRT, ACNU chemotherapy, and CRT showed the potential efficacy of CRT for malignant gliomas in terms of the improved survival rate in those patients who received higher carbon doses.

  3. Spectroscopic characterization, X-ray structure, antimicrobial activity and DFT calculations of novel dipicolinate copper(II) complex with 2,6-pyridinedimethanol.

    PubMed

    Tamer, Omer; Sarıboğa, Bahtiyar; Uçar, Ibrahim; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2011-12-15

    Novel dipicolinate complex of copper(II) ion, [Cu(dmp)(dpc)]·0.8H(2)O [dmp: 2,6-pyridinedimethanol; dpc: dipicolinate or pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate], has been prepared and fully characterized by single crystal X-ray structure determination. The central copper(II) ion is bonded to dpc and dmp ligands through pyridine nitrogen atom together with two oxygen atom, forming the distorted octahedral geometry. The complex molecules, connected via O-H···O hydrogen bonds, form a supramolecular structure. H(2)dpc, [Cu(dpc)(H(2)O)(3)] and [Cu(dmp)(dpc)]·0.8H(2)O were screened for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and yeast. H(2)dpc and [Cu(dpc)(H(2)O)(3)] exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activity, while [Cu(dmp)(dpc)]·0.8H(2)O exhibited activity only for Gram-positive bacteria. The geometry optimization and EPR parameters were carried out using the following unrestricted hybrid density functionals: LSDA, BPV86, B3LYP, B3PW91, MPW1PW91, PBEPBE and HCTH. Although the supramolecular interactions have some influences on the molecular geometry in solid state phase, calculated data show that the predicted geometries can reproduce the structural parameters. The electronic station in the frontier orbitals of the copper complex calculated from the experimental data is compared to the results of time-depended DFT calculations with the polarizable continuum model. Calculated vibrational frequencies are consistent with the experimental IR data.

  4. Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes of two new hexadentate Schiff base ligands derived from different aldehydes and ethanol amine; X-ray crystal structure, IR and NMR spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Rezaeivala, Majid; Albeheshti, Leila

    2014-11-01

    Four new [Cd(H2L1)(NO3)]ClO4 (1), [Zn(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (2), [Cd(H2L2)(NO3)]ClO4 (3), and [Zn(H2L2)](ClO4)2 (4), complexes were prepared by the reaction of two new Schiff base ligands and Cd(II) and Zn(II) metal ions in equimolar ratios. The ligands H2L1 and H2L2 were synthesized by reaction of 2-[2-(2-formyl phenoxy)ethoxy]benzaldehyde and/or 2-[2-(3-formyl phenoxy)propoxy]benzaldehyde and ethanol amine and characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. All complexes were characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR, COSY, and elemental analysis. Also, the complex 1 was characterized by X-ray in addition to the above methods. The X-ray crystal structure of compound 1 showed that all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of ligand (N2O4) and a molecule of nitrate with two donor oxygen atom have been coordinated to the metal ion and the Cd(II) ion is in an eight-coordinate environment that is best described as a distorted dodecahedron geometry.

  5. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  6. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  13. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  14. [Fe II] jets from intermediate-mass protostars in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Bally, John

    2016-12-01

    We present new HST/WFC3-IR narrow-band [Fe II] images of protostellar jets in the Carina Nebula. Combined with five previously published sources, we have a sample of 18 jets and two Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. All of the jets we targeted with Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) show bright infrared [Fe II] emission, and a few Hα candidate jets are confirmed as collimated outflows based on the morphology of their [Fe II] emission. Continuum-subtracted images clearly separate jet emission from the adjacent ionization front, providing a better tracer of the collimated jet than Hα and allowing us to connect these jets with their embedded driving sources. The [Fe II] 1.64 μm/Hα flux ratio measured in the jets is ≳5 times larger than in the adjacent ionization fronts. The low-ionization jet core requires high densities to shield Fe+ against further ionization by the FUV radiation from O-type stars in the H II region. High jet densities imply high mass-loss rates, consistent with the intermediate-mass driving sources we identify for 13 jets. The remaining jets emerge from opaque globules that obscure emission from the protostar. In many respects, the HH jets in Carina look like a scaled-up version of the jets driven by low-mass protostars. Altogether, these observations suggest that [Fe II] emission is a reliable tracer of dense, irradiated jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars. We argue that highly collimated outflows are common to more massive protostars, and that they suggest the outflow physics inferred for low-mass stars formation scales up to at least ˜8 M⊙.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray Tests of an L-Shaped Laterally Graded Multilayer Mirror for the Analyzer System of the Ultra-High Resolution IXS Spectrometer at NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Honnicke, M.G.; Takacs, P.; Keister, J.W.; Conley, R.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Coburn, D.S.; Reffi, L.; Cai, Y.Q.

    2011-08-02

    Characterization and testing of an L-shaped laterally graded multilayer mirror are presented. This mirror is designed as a two-dimensional collimating optics for the analyzer system of the ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) spectrometer at National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The characterization includes point-to-point reflectivity measurements, lattice parameter determination and mirror metrology (figure, slope error and roughness). The synchrotron X-ray test of the mirror was carried out reversely as a focusing device. The results show that the L-shaped laterally graded multilayer mirror is suitable to be used, with high efficiency, for the analyzer system of the IXS spectrometer at NSLS-II.

  16. The exocyclic amino group of adenine in Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes: a critical comparison of the X-ray crystallographic structural data and gas phase calculations.

    PubMed

    Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Mihály, Béla; Mihály, Timea; Attia, Amr A A; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Lippert, Bernhard

    2017-03-17

    A detailed computational (DFT level of theory) study regarding the nature of the exocyclic amino group, N6H2, of the model nucleobase 9-methyladenine (9MeA) and its protonated (9MeAH(+)) and deprotonated forms (9MeA-H), free and metal-complexed, has been conducted. The metals are Pt(II) and Pd(II), bonded to nitrogen-containing co-ligands (NH3, dien, bpy), with N1, N6, and N7 being the metal-binding sites, individually or in different combinations. The results obtained from gas phase calculations are critically compared with X-ray crystallography data, whenever possible. In the majority of cases, there is good qualitative agreement between calculated and experimentally determined C6-N6 bond lengths, but calculated values always show a trend to larger values, by 0.02-0.08 Å. Both methods indicate, with few exceptions, a high degree of double-bond character of C6-N6, consistent with an essentially sp(2)-hybridized N6 atom. The shortest values for C6-N6 distances in X-ray crystal structures are around 1.30 Å. Exceptions refer to cases in which DFT calculations suggest the existence of a hydrogen bond with N6H2 acting as a H bond acceptor, hence a situation with N6 having undergone a substantial hybridization shift toward sp(3). Nevertheless, even in these cases the C6-N6 bond (1.392 Å) is still halfway between a typical C-N single bond (1.48 Å) and a typical C=N double bond (1.28 Å). This scenario is, however, not borne out by X-ray crystallographic results, and is attributed to the absence of counter anions and solvent molecules in the calculated structures.

  17. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample: A Correlation Study of Blazars and Radio Galaxies in X-ray and Radio Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Brandon Scott

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory has increased the quality and number of detections the X-ray regime since its launch in 1999. It is an important tool for studying the jets which are associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and their possible emission mechanisms. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample (MCS) is a sample of 27 AGN which have been selected from the radio flux-limited MOJAVE (Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) sample. The objects contained in the MOJAVE sample are traditionally associated with relativistically beamed jets that have small viewing angles. The MCS was created to study the correlation of X-ray and radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The complete sample is made up of all MOJAVE Fanaroff & Riley type II objects which have over 100 mJy of extended radio emission at 1.4 GHz and a radio structure of at least 3" in extent. Chandra observations have revealed X-ray and radio correlation in 21 of the 27 jets, bringing the detection rate to ˜78%. The selection criteria provides a quantitative method of discovering new X-ray jets associated with AGN from radio observations. The X-ray morphologies are usually well correlated with the radio emission, except for the sources which show extreme bending on the kiloparsec scale. The emission mechanism for these relativistically beamed quasars and radio galaxies can be interpreted as inverse Compton scattering off of the cosmic microwave background by the electrons in the jets (IC/CMB). The emission mechanism is reinforced by spectral energy distributions (SED) which model the emission mechanisms for sources with sufficient X-ray, optical, and radio data available. I have explored the effects of jet bending and jet deceleration in conjunction with the inverse Compton emission model and used different scenarios to derive best fit viewing angles and bulk Lorentz factors, which were calculated by using the superluminal speeds along with parameters that were derived from the IC/CMB model. The range of

  18. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  19. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  20. Activities in the X-Ray Corona as seen by Hinode X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakao, Taro

    We present observations on the solar corona with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode. XRT is a grazing-incidence imager with a Walter Type-I-like mirror of 34 cm diameter, with a back-illuminated CCD device located at its focus position. In addition to its imaging capability for the X-ray corona with the highest angular resolution (consistent with 1 arcsec CCD pixel size) as a solar X-ray telescope, enhanced sensitivity of the CCD towards longer X-ray wavelengths (particularly longer than 50 angstroms) enables XRT to image, and perform temperature diagnostics on, coronal plasmas in a wide temperature range (1-10 MK). This adds a notable advantage to XRT that it can observe most, if not all, active phenomena in the corona throughout their entire thermal evolution. XRT has so far revealed various new aspects of coronal activities. These include (1) plasma flows in the corona, (2) frequent X-ray jets in the polar regions, (3) eruptive events even with small or moderate X-ray activities, (4) fine structure and evolution of flaring loops, (5) detailed observations on transient brightenings (microflares) in quiet as well as active regions. Some highlights of Hinode XRT observations, centered on those on plasma flows, will be presented and discussed.

  1. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  2. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  3. High Resolution X-Ray Astronomy with the Chandra Observatory Stellar Point Sources and Extended Gaseous Emission of Cen Chandra X-Ray Observations of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2000-02-01

    I will introduce the Chandra Observatory and new results obtained during the Chandra OAC phase. These include the newly discovered X-ray jet in PKS 0637-752; X-ray jet, characteristics of point sources and extended emission in Cen A; and contact discontinuities and merger evidence of A2142.

  4. How Accurately Can Extended X-ray Absorption Spectra Be Predicted from First Principles? Implications for Modeling the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Martha A; Ames, William; Vila, Fernando D; Krewald, Vera; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Mantel, Claire; Pécaut, Jacques; Gennari, Marcello; Duboc, Carole; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Yano, Junko; Rehr, John J; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-10-14

    First principle calculations of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data have seen widespread use in bioinorganic chemistry, perhaps most notably for modeling the Mn4Ca site in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). The logic implied by the calculations rests on the assumption that it is possible to a priori predict an accurate EXAFS spectrum provided that the underlying geometric structure is correct. The present study investigates the extent to which this is possible using state of the art EXAFS theory. The FEFF program is used to evaluate the ability of a multiple scattering-based approach to directly calculate the EXAFS spectrum of crystallographically defined model complexes. The results of these parameter free predictions are compared with the more traditional approach of fitting FEFF calculated spectra to experimental data. A series of seven crystallographically characterized Mn monomers and dimers is used as a test set. The largest deviations between the FEFF calculated EXAFS spectra and the experimental EXAFS spectra arise from the amplitudes. The amplitude errors result from a combination of errors in calculated S0(2) and Debye-Waller values as well as uncertainties in background subtraction. Additional errors may be attributed to structural parameters, particularly in cases where reliable high-resolution crystal structures are not available. Based on these investigations, the strengths and weaknesses of using first-principle EXAFS calculations as a predictive tool are discussed. We demonstrate that a range of DFT optimized structures of the OEC may all be considered consistent with experimental EXAFS data and that caution must be exercised when using EXAFS data to obtain topological arrangements of complex clusters.

  5. Flexibility of CuCl4-tetrahedra in bis[cinchoninium tetrachlorocuprate(II)]trihydrate single crystals. X-ray diffraction and EPR studies.

    PubMed

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, A; Oleksyn, B J; Hoffmann, S K; Sliwiński, J; Borzecka-Prokop, B; Goslar, J; Hilczer, W

    2001-08-27

    Crystal structure of bis[cinchoninium tetrachlorocuprate(II)] trihydrate, [(C19H24N2O)CuCl4]2-3H2O, has been determined by X-ray diffraction at 100 K and reexamined at 293 K. The compound crystallizes in orthorhombic system with a P2(1)2(1)2(1) space group and unit cell parameters a = 15.3031(14), b = 36.415(3), and c = 7.8341(5) A at 100 K, and Z = 4. The asymmetric unit consists of two (CuCl4)(2-) tetrahedral anions linked by hydrogen bonds to two doubly protonated cinchonine molecules and three water molecules. The tetrahedra are strongly flattened, to approximately D(2d) symmetry, with different deformation for two inequivalent (CuCl4)(2-) -ions in the asymmetric unit. The deformation of (CuCl4)(2-) and cinchoninium cations varies with temperature due to a rearrangement of the bifurcated hydrogen bond network. This is a continuous process observed as a monotonic variation of the EPR spectral parameters and the unit cell dimensions. EPR spectra show that very weak exchange coupling J(12) = 0.0030 cm(-1) operates between Cu(2+) ions within asymmetric units, corresponding to the general formula of the compound, as well as between equivalent Cu(2+) sites of different molecules, whereas the coupling is negligible between inequivalent sites. The intermolecular J(12) coupling is temperature-independent indicating that the whole asymmetric unit behaves as a magnetic unit (pseudodimer) in the whole temperature range.

  6. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  7. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  8. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Contrast and resolution in imaging with microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...water jet of carbon suspension and imaged using a microfocus x - ray source coupled in-line with a synchronously gated intensified optically coupled...

  9. Soft x-ray laser microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL's 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  10. Handbook of X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Keith A. (Editor); Smith, Randall K.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    X-ray astronomy was born in the aftermath of World War II as military rockets were repurposed to lift radiation detectors above the atmosphere for a few minutes at a time. These early flights detected and studied X-ray emission from the Solar corona. The first sources beyond the Solar System were detected during a rocket flight in 1962 by a team headed by Riccardo Giaccom at American Science and Engineering, a company founded by physicists from MIT. The rocket used Geiger counters with a system designed to reduce non-X-ray backgrounds and collimators limiting the region of sky seen by the counters. As the rocket spun, the field of view (FOV) happened to pass over what was later found to be the brightest non-Solar X-ray source; later designated See X-1. It also detected a uniform background glow which could not be resolved into individual sources. A follow-up campaign using X-ray detectors with better spatial resolution and optical telescopes identified See X-1 as an interacting binary with a compact (neutron star) primary. This success led to further suborbital rocket flights by a number of groups. More X-ray binaries were discovered, as well as X-ray emission from supernova remnants, the radio galaxies M87 and Cygnus-A, and the Coma cluster. Detectors were improved and Geiger counters were replaced by proportional counters, which provided information about energy spectra of the sources. A constant challenge was determining precise positions of sources as only collimators were available.

  11. Novel zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes of a Mannich base derived from lawsone: Synthesis, single crystal X-ray analysis, ab initio density functional theory calculations and vibrational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Amanda P.; Vargas, Maria D.; Soto, Claudio A. Téllez; Ramos, Joanna M.; Visentin, Lorenzo do C.; Pinheiro, Carlos B.; Mangrich, Antônio S.; de Rezende, Edivaltrys I. P.

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes of a tridentate Mannich base L1 derived from 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, pyridinecarboxyaldehyde and 2-aminomethylpyridine, [ZnL1Cl2]·H2O 1 and [CuL1Cl2]·2H2O 2, have been synthesized and fully characterized. The structure of complex 1 has been elucidated by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study: the zinc atom is pentacoordinate and the coordination geometry is a distorted square base pyramid, with a geometric structural parameter τ equal to 0.149. Vibrational spectroscopy and ab initio DFT calculations of both compounds have confirmed that the two complexes exhibit similar structures. Full assignment of the vibrational spectra was also supported by careful analysis of the distorted geometries generated by the normal modes

  12. The First Detection of (OIV) from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source with Spitzer.I. Observational Results for Holmberg II ULX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-11

    shows that the [O iv] is coincident with the X-ray position of the ULX. The ratios of the [O iv] to lower-ionization lines are similar to those...that the ULX has a strong impact on the surrounding gas. A Spitzer high-resolution spectral map shows that the [O IV] is coincident with the X-ray...this with CLOUDY simulations. Miller et al. (2005) detected extended radio emission from a ∼50 pc diame- ter region coincident with the position of

  13. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  14. Electronic Structure of the Mn[subscript 4]Ca Cluster in the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II Studied by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-11-12

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra simultaneously. The second energy dimension separates the pre-edge (1s to 3d) transitions from the main K-edge (1s to 4p), and thus more precise analysis is possible. The 1s2p RIXS final state electron configuration along the energy transfer axis is identical to conventional L-edge absorption spectroscopy and the RIXS spectra are therefore sensitive to the metal spin state. We have collected data from PS II samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states are small compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms. The RIXS spectra of S{sub 0} and S{sub 3

  15. Electronic Structure of the Mn(4)Ca Cluster in the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem Ii Studied By Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.

    2009-06-04

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i=0--4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra simultaneously. The second energy dimension separates the pre-edge (1s to 3d) transitions from the main K-edge (1s to 4p), and thus more precise analysis is possible. The 1s2p RIXS final state electron configuration along the energy transfer axis is identical to conventional L-edge absorption spectroscopy and the RIXS spectra are therefore sensitive to the metal spin state. We have collected data from PS II samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states are small compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms. The RIXS spectra of S{sub 0} and S{sub 3

  16. Optics for coherent X-ray applications.

    PubMed

    Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-09-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed.

  17. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    PubMed Central

    Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed. PMID:25177986

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a series of transition metal complexes with a new symmetrical polyoxaaza macroacyclic Schiff base ligand: X-ray crystal structure of cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes and their antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keypour, Hassan; Shayesteh, Maryam; Rezaeivala, Majid; Chalabian, Firoozeh; Valencia, Laura

    2013-01-01

    A new symmetrical [N4O2] hexadentate Schiff base ligand, (E)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-2-(3-(2-((E)-pyridin-2-lmethyleneamino)phenoxy)naphthalen-2-yloxy)benzenamine, abbreviated to L, and its complexes of Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) have been synthesized in the presence of metal ions. The complexes were structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, NMR and molar conductivity. The crystal structures of two complexes, [NiL(ONO2)2]·2H2O and [CoLCl2]CH3OH·0.5H2O, have been determined by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study. In these complexes, the ligand is coordinated in a neutral form via pyridine and azomethine nitrogen atoms. The metal ions complete their six coordination with two coordinated nitrate or chloride ions, forming a distorted octahedral geometry. The synthesized compounds have antibacterial activity against the three Gram-positive bacteria: Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus epid and also against the three Gram-negative bacteria: Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella typhi. The activity data show that the complexes are more potent antibacterials than the parent Schiff base.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a series of transition metal complexes with a new symmetrical polyoxaaza macroacyclic Schiff base ligand: X-ray crystal structure of cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes and their antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Keypour, Hassan; Shayesteh, Maryam; Rezaeivala, Majid; Chalabian, Firoozeh; Valencia, Laura

    2013-01-15

    A new symmetrical [N4O2] hexadentate Schiff base ligand, (E)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-2-(3-(2-((E)-pyridin-2-lmethyleneamino)phenoxy)naphthalen-2-yloxy)benzenamine, abbreviated to L, and its complexes of Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) have been synthesized in the presence of metal ions. The complexes were structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, NMR and molar conductivity. The crystal structures of two complexes, [NiL(ONO2)2]·2H2O and [CoLCl2]CH3OH·0.5H2O, have been determined by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study. In these complexes, the ligand is coordinated in a neutral form via pyridine and azomethine nitrogen atoms. The metal ions complete their six coordination with two coordinated nitrate or chloride ions, forming a distorted octahedral geometry. The synthesized compounds have antibacterial activity against the three Gram-positive bacteria: Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus epid and also against the three Gram-negative bacteria: Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella typhi. The activity data show that the complexes are more potent antibacterials than the parent Schiff base.

  20. Polarized X-rays from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Accreting neutron stars span a wide range in X-ray luminosity and magnetic field strength. Accretion may be wind-fed or disk-fed, and the dominant X-ray flux may originate in the disk or a magnetically confined accretion column. In all such systems X-ray polarization may arise due to Compton or Magneto-Compton scattering, and on some occasions polarization of non-thermal emission from jet-like ejection may also be detectable. Spectral and temporal behaviour of the polarized X-rays would carry information regarding the radiation process, as well as of the matter dynamics - and can assist the detection of effects such as the Lense-Thirring precession. This talk will review our current knowledge of the expected X-ray polarization from accreting neutron stars and explore the prospects of detection with upcoming polarimetry missions.

  1. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  2. British X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.

    1986-09-01

    The development of solar and cosmic X-ray studies in the UK, in particular the Skylark and Ariel programs, is discussed. The characteristics and capabilities of the X-ray emulsion detector developed to monitor the solar X-radiation in the Skylark program, and of the proportional counter spectrometer developed for solar X-ray measurements on the Ariel I satellite are described. The designs and functions of the pin-hole camera, the Bragg crystal spectrometer, and the X-ray spectroheliograph are exmained. The Skylark observations of cosmic X-ray sources and high-resolution solar spectra, and the Ariel 5 data on cosmic X-ray sources are presented. Consideration is given to the Ariel 6, the U.S. Einstein Observatory, Exosat, and ASTRO-C.

  3. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  4. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  5. X-Ray Polarization Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    anatomic structures. Johns and Yaffe (2), building on the work of Alvarez and Macovski (3) and that of Lehmann et al (4), discuss a method for...sources of contrast related to both the wave and par- ticulate nature of x rays. References 1. Johns PC, Yaffe MJ. X-ray characterization of normal and...application to mammography. Med Phys 1985; 12:289–296. 3. Alvarez RE, Macovski A. Energy-selective reconstructions in x-ray computerized tomography. Phys

  6. X-ray grating interferometry for 9.25 keV design energy at a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balles, A.; Fella, Ch.; Dittmann, J.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a grating interferometer setup with a liquid-metal-jet source and a high resolution detector. It will be shown that this source is suitable for interferometer setups as it delivers a sufficient spatial coherence that makes a source grating unnecessary. This is confirmed twice by the results of an interferometer setup and a single grating setup, respectively. Both show comparable information on the samples. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the Talbot effect due to the self-built high resolution detector with an effective pixel size of 0.67 µm and due to the coherence of the source, thanks to a small spot size of a few microns. The information on the absorption of a nylon fiber is observed to include inline phase contrast effects. The dark-field signal of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is not quite well understood because of its inhomogeneity.

  7. X-ray photonics: Bending X-rays with nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    X-ray counterparts of visible light optical elements are notoriously difficult to realize because the refractive index of all materials is close to unity. It has now been demonstrated that curved waveguides fabricated on a silicon chip can channel and deflect X-ray beams by consecutive grazing reflections.

  8. Early evolution of AGN X-ray coronae and the X-ray, BLR, disc-wind connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniutti, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    We request a quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and HST/STIS observation of GSN 069, a high-Eddington ratio true/unabsorbed Seyfert 2 galaxy candidate with ultra-soft X-ray spectrum. From our study of previous X-ray/optical spectra and of UV photometric data, we infer that the lack of BLR in this peculiar object may be attributed to ether (i) the lack of hard X-ray emission or (ii) an evolutionary scenario in which the BLR are just forming. Recent Swift pointings have revealed the emergence of hard X-rays in GSN 069, making the proposed observation highly timely. GSN 069 may represent a true Rosetta stone with which to follow the formation and early evolution of the X-ray corona and to study the connection between X-rays and the BLR/disc-wind system.

  9. Early evolution of AGN X-ray coronae and the X-ray, BLR, disc-wind connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniutti, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    We request a quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and HST/STIS observation of GSN 069, a high-Eddington ratio true/unabsorbed Seyfert 2 galaxy candidate withultra-soft X-ray spectrum. From our study of previous X-ray/optical spectra and of UV photometric data, we infer that the lack of BLR in this peculiar object may be attributed to ether (i) the lack of hard X-ray emission or (ii) an evolutionary scenario in which the BLR are just forming. Recent Swift pointings have revealed the emergence of hard X-rays in GSN 069, making the proposed observation highly timely. GSN 069 may represent a true Rosetta stone with which to follow the formation and early evolution of the X-ray corona and to study the connection between X-rays and the BLR/disc-wind system.

  10. Determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in small samples by microbore ion chromatography and photometric, atomic absorption spectrometry and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, T.; Hoffmann, P.; Ortner, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Iron(II) and iron(III) are determined after separation on an ion Chromatographie column by various detection systems. "On-line" detection was achieved by the use of a photometer with a flow cell of 0.8 μl; for "off-line" detection, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry or total-reflection X-ray fluorescence were used. The applicability of the methods is shown for standard solutions and atmospheric samples. As a typical result, 50 μg/l of iron can be determined in a 10 μl sample with a nucrobore ion chromatograph-photometer and atomic absorption system and 40 μg/l of iron in a microbore ion chromatograph-total-reflection X-ray fluorescence combination.

  11. Hard X-Ray Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Francesca; Bassani, L.; Venturi, T.; Molina, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Malizia, A.; La Franca, F.; Landi, R.

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in AGN with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT AGN catalogues. They represent 7-10% of the total AGN population and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities and high Eddington ratios. The radio morphology is typical of FRII galaxies and all of them have an optical classification and a measure of the column density. The observed fraction of absorbed AGN is around 40% among the total sample, and 75% among type 2 AGN. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is 2-3%. In this talk we will discuss the obscuration characteristics of radio galaxies compared to non-radio galaxies selected at hard X-rays.

  12. X-ray spectroscopy of manganese clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, M.M. |

    1996-06-01

    Much of this thesis represents the groundwork necessary in order to probe Mn clusters more productively than with conventional Mn K-edge XAS and is presented in Part 1. Part 2 contains the application of x-ray techniques to Mn metalloproteins and includes a prognosis at the end of each chapter. Individual Mn oxidation states are more readily distinguishable in Mn L-edge spectra. An empirical mixed valence simulation routine for determining the average Mn oxidation state has been developed. The first Mn L-edge spectra of a metalloprotein were measured and interpreted. The energy of Mn K{beta} emission is strongly correlated with average Mn oxidation state. K{beta} results support oxidation states of Mn(III){sub 2}(IV){sub 2} for the S{sub 1} state of Photosystem II chemical chemically reduced preparations contain predominantly Mn(II). A strength and limitation of XAS is that it probes all of the species of a particular element in a sample. It would often be advantageous to selectively probe different forms of the same element. The first demonstration that chemical shifts in x-ray fluorescence energies can be used to obtain oxidation state-selective x-ray absorption spectra is presented. Spin-dependent spectra can also be used to obtain a more simplified picture of local structure. The first spin-polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure using Mn K{beta} fluorescence detection is shown.

  13. Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-05-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

  14. X-Rays from Hybrid Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    The late-type giants and supergiants of the ``hybrid chromosphere'' class display signatures of cool (T<~2×104 K) winds together with hot emission lines from species like C IV (T~105 K). A survey of such stars by Reimers et al. using ROSAT reported numerous X-ray detections (T~106 K), strengthening the (then heretical) idea that hot coronae and cool winds can coexist in luminous giants. However, several of the candidate sources were offset from the predicted stellar coordinates, calling into question the identifications. In an effort to secure better knowledge of the X-ray luminosities of the hybrids, the ROSAT fields from the Reimers et al. survey were reexamined, exploiting the USNO-A2.0 astrometric catalog to register the pointings to a few arcseconds accuracy. On the basis of positional mismatches, at least two of the previously reported detections of key hybrid stars-γ Dra (K5 III) and β Aqr (G0 Ib)-must be rejected. The new X-ray upper limits for these stars, combined with the remaining candidate detections (and nondetections) from the original survey, place the hybrids into the same ``X-ray deficient'' category as the ``noncoronal'' red giants like Arcturus (α Boo: K1.5 III) and Aldebaran (α Tau: K5 III). A few of the hybrid X-ray sources are exceptional, however. The archetype α TrA (K2 II-III), in particular, is securely detected in terms of positional coincidence, but its anomalous, contradictory coronal properties suggest that an unseen companion-a young hyperactive G dwarf-might dominate the X-ray emission.

  15. Identification campaign of supernova remnant candidates in the Milky Way. II. X-ray studies of G38.7-1.4

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R. H. H.; Wu, J. H. K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Hui, C. Y.; Seo, K. A.; Trepl, L.

    2014-04-20

    We report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the Galactic supernova remnant candidate G38.7-1.4, together with complementary radio, infrared, and γ-ray data. An approximately elliptical X-ray structure is found to be well correlated with a radio shell as seen by the Very Large Array. The X-ray spectrum of G38.7-1.4 can be well described by an absorbed collisional ionization equilibrium plasma model, which suggests the plasma is shock heated. Based on the morphology and the spectral behavior, we suggest that G38.7-1.4 is indeed a supernova remnant belonging to a mix-morphology category.

  16. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissues and the ends of the forearm bones (radius and ulna) and eight small wrist bones (carpal bones). The X-ray image is black and white. Dense structures that block the passage of the X-ray beam through the body, such as the bones, appear white on the image. Softer ...

  17. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  18. Dual x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2011-04-01

    Dual x-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. We discuss the physics of the method and exhibit its limitations and show it is related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the x-ray absorption coefficients of materials.

  19. Unwrapping the X-ray Spectra of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C.

    2015-07-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around the spinning supermassive black hole with a compact, probably pair-regulated, X-ray corona. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds (and sometimes jets) are seen and can dominate the source energetics. As I shall review in this talk, each of these components imprints its own characteristic signature into the (time-variable) X-ray spectrum of the AGN. I shall then touch upon a few contemporary topics : (i) the use of new spectral timing techniques for aiding in the decomposition of the spectrum and for probing the geometry of the AGN central engine, (ii) the determination of supermassive black hole spin, (iii) direct confirmation of quasar-mode feedback in some luminous systems. The prospect of AGN observations with Astro-H will be discussed.

  20. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of palladium(II) 1,3-diphenyl-5-(benzothiazol-2-yl)formazanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaĭdman, A. V.; Pervova, I. G.; Rezinskikh, Z. G.; Lipunov, I. N.; Slepukhin, P. A.

    2010-05-01

    The behavior of 1,3-diphenyl-5-(benzothiazol-2-yl)formazan as a bidentate ligand in the synthesis of the mononuclear palladium complex was investigated using slow diffusion. According to the X-ray diffraction study, the PdN4 coordination unit has a distorted square structure. The ligands form two six-membered chelate rings formed through the N1 and N4 atoms of the formazan fragment.

  1. Protons or megavoltage X-rays as boost therapy for patients irradiated for localized prostatic carcinoma. An early phase I/II comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Duttenhaver, J.R.; Shipley, W.U.; Perrone, T.; Verhey, L.J.; Goitein, M.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Prout, G.R.; Parkhurst, E.C.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    A total of 180 patients with carcinoma of the prostate limited to the pelvis were treated with one of two external beam irradiation techniques between 1972 and 1979. One hundred and sixteen patients were treated with conventional pelvic megavoltage x-ray therapy. Sixty-four patients were treated with combined pelvic x-ray therapy plus a perineal proton beam boost to a carefully defined prostatic tumor volume. A 160 MeV proton beam has been modified to irradiate patients with localized tumors by using conventional treatment schedules. This proton beam has the physical advantage over megavoltage x-rays of reducing the dose to normal tissues adjacent to the tumor volume. By using the proton beam boost we have delivered an increased prostatic tumor dose of 500 to 700 cGy without increasing treatment morbidity at all. The two groups are actuarially analyzed for patient survival, disease-free survival and local recurrence-free survival, and thus far, no significant differences have been noted. Because of the minimal complications observed in the proton group despite a 10% increase in dose, a randomized clinical trial comparing these two treatment techniques is studied.

  2. Refinement of the Compton-Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer: II - Extraction of invisible element content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; King, Penelope L.; Nield, Emily; O'Meara, Joanne M.; Pradler, Irina

    2016-02-01

    The intensity ratio C/R between Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks of the exciting Pu L X-rays in the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is strongly affected by the presence of very light elements such as oxygen which cannot be detected directly by the APXS. C/R values are determined along with element concentrations by fitting APXS spectra of geochemical reference materials (GRMs) with the GUAPX code. A quantity K is defined as the ratio between the C/R value determined by Monte Carlo simulation based on the measured element concentrations and the fitted C/R value from the spectrum. To ensure optimally accurate K values, the choice of appropriate GRMs is explored in detail, with attention paid to Rb and Sr, whose characteristic Kα X-ray peaks overlap the Pu Lα scatter peaks. The resulting relationship between the ratio K and the overall oxygen fraction is linear. This provides a calibration from which the concentration of additional light invisible constituents (ALICs) such as water may be estimated in unknown rock and conglomerate samples. Several GRMs are used as 'unknowns' in order to evaluate the accuracy of ALIC concentrations derived in this manner.

  3. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  4. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  6. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  7. The Effect of X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure in Soft X-ray Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Denby, Michael; Wells, Alan; Keay, Adam; Graessle, Dale E.; Blake, Richard L.

    1997-02-01

    Recent in-orbit measurements by high resolution soft X-ray telescopes have revealed low-level fine structure in target spectra that cannot be attributed to a celestial source. Ultimately, this can be traced to the ability of the new high spectral resolution silicon detectors to resolve X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) produced in the various detection subsystems. Based on measurements taken at the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), we have modeled the full-up response function of the Joint European X-ray Telescope (JET-X), taking into account edge structure generated in the detectors, filters, and mirrors. It is found that unfolding celestial source spectra using a response function in which the detailed edge shapes are calculated from standard absorption cross sections leads to the generation of spectral artifacts at every absorption edge. These in turn produce unacceptably high values of χ2 in model fits for total source fluxes above ~4 × 104 counts. For JET-X, this corresponds to a source strength of ~0.4 millicrab observed for 105 s. Statistically significant ``linelike'' features are introduced into the derived source spectra with amplitudes as great as 10% of the source flux. For JET-X, these features rise above the 3 σ level for integral source exposures above ~5 × 104 source counts. The largest deviations in the residuals arise near 0.5 keV and 2.2 keV and are attributed to XAFS produced in the oxide surface layers of the CCD and the gold reflective surface of the mirrors, respectively. These results are significant for data interpretation tasks with the ASCA, JET-X, XMM, and Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) telescopes.

  8. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  9. The X-ray luminous cluster underlying the z = 1.04 quasar PKS 1229-021

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Taylor, G. B.; Sanders, J. S.; Blundell, K. M.; Crawford, C. S.; Johnstone, R. M.; Belsole, E.

    2012-05-01

    We present a 100 ks Chandra observation studying the extended X-ray emission around the powerful z= 1.04 quasar PKS 1229-021. The diffuse cluster X-ray emission can be traced out to ˜15 arcsec (˜120 kpc) radius and there is a drop in the calculated hardness ratio inside the central 5 arcsec consistent with the presence of a cool core. Radio observations of the quasar show a strong core and a bright, one-sided jet leading to the south-west hotspot and a second hotspot visible on the counter-jet side. Although the wings of the quasar point spread function (PSF) provided a significant contribution to the total X-ray flux at all radii where the extended cluster emission was detected, we were able to accurately subtract the PSF emission using Chandra Ray Tracer and MARX simulations. The resulting steep cluster surface brightness profile for PKS 1229-021 appears similar to the profile for the FR II (Fanaroff-Riley class II) radio galaxy 3C 444, which has a similarly rapid surface brightness drop caused by a powerful shock surrounding the radio lobes. Using a model surface brightness profile based on 3C 444, we estimated the total cluster luminosity for PKS 1229-021 to be LX ~ 2 x 1044 erg/s. We discuss the difficulty of detecting cool-core clusters, which host bright X-ray sources, in high redshift surveys.

  10. Accretion and Outflows in X-ray Binaries: What's Really Going on During X-ray Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Rachel K. D.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Buxton, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    X-ray binaries, consisting of a star and a stellar-mass black hole, are wonderful laboratories for studying accretion and outflows. They evolve on timescales quite accessible to us, unlike their supermassive cousins, and allow the possibility of gaining a deeper understanding of these two common astrophysical processes. Different wavelength regimes reveal different aspects of the systems: radio emission is largely generated by outflows and jets, X-ray emission by inner accretion flows, and optical/infrared (OIR) emission by the outer disk and companion star. The search for relationships between these different wavelengths is thus an area of active research, aiming to reveal deeper connections between accretion and outflows.Initial evidence for a strong, tight correlation between radio and X-ray emission has weakened as further observations and newly-discovered sources have been obtained. This has led to discussions of multiple tracks or clusters, or the possibility that no overall relation exists for the currently-known population of X-ray binaries. Our ability to distinguish among these options is hampered by a relative lack of observations at lower luminosities, and especially of truly X-ray quiescent (non-outbursting) systems. Although X-ray binaries spend the bulk of their existence in quiescence, few quiescent sources have been observed and multiple observations of individual sources are largely nonexistent. Here we discuss new observations of the lowest-luminosity quiescent X-ray binary, A0620-00, and the place this object occupies in investigations of the radio/X-ray plane. For the first time, we also incorporate simultaneous OIR data with the radio and X-ray data.In December 2013 we took simultaneous observations of A0620-00 in the X-ray (Chandra), the radio (EVLA), and the OIR (SMARTS 1.3m). These X-ray and radio data allowed us to investigate similarities among quiescent X-ray binaries, and changes over time for this individual object, in the radio/X-ray

  11. Synthesis and characterization of the adducts of bis(O-butylxanthato)Ni(II) with nitrogen donor ligands and X-ray structure of bis(O-butylxanthato)bis(3-chloropyridine)nickel(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kour, Inderjeet; Kour, Gurvinder; Sachar, Renu; Anthal, Sumati; Kant, Rajni

    2017-01-01

    A new series of adducts of bis(O-butylxanthato)nickel(II) with substituted pyridines have been synthesized by treating bis(O-butylxanthato)nickel(II) with substituted pyridines in acetone. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, TGA/DTA studies, infrared and electronic spectral studies. X-ray studies of one of the adduct bis(O-butylxanthato)bis(3-chloropyridine)nickel(II) shows that the central metal is octahedrally coordinated within a trans-N2S4 donor set, with the Ni atom located on a centre of inversion. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with unit cell parameters a = 11.8088(8) Å, b = 12.2042(7) Å, c = 9.0252(5) Å, β = 93.789(6), Z = 2. Crystal structure was solved by direct methods and refined by full matrix least squares procedures to a final R-value of 0.0380 (wR2 = 0.0885) for 2083 observed reflections. The butyl chain is disordered over two set of sites, with occupancy ratios of 0.741:0.259. These studies suggest a distorted octahedral structure and paramagnetic nature of the adducts.

  12. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information.

  13. Solar Hard X-ray Observations with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Andrew; Smith, D. M.; Krucker, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Hurford, G. J.; White, S. M.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Stern, D.

    2012-05-01

    High-sensitivity imaging of coronal hard X-rays allows detection of freshly accelerated nonthermal electrons at the acceleration site. A few such observations have been made with Yohkoh and RHESSI, but a leap in sensitivity could help pin down the time, place, and manner of reconnection. Around the time of this meeting, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR), a NASA Small Explorer for high energy astrophysics that uses grazing-incidence optics to focus X-rays up to 80 keV, will be launched. Three weeks will be dedicated to solar observing during the baseline two-year mission. NuSTAR will be 200 times more sensitive than RHESSI in the hard X-ray band. This will allow the following new observations, among others: 1) Extrapolation of the micro/nanoflare distribution by two orders of magnitude down in flux; 2) Search for hard X-rays from network nanoflares (soft X-ray bright points) and evaluation of their role in coronal heating; 3) Discovery of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung from the electron beams driving type III radio bursts, and measurement of their electron spectrum; 4) Hard X-ray studies of polar soft X-ray jets and impulsive solar energetic particle events at the edge of coronal holes; 5) Study of coronal bremsstrahlung from particles accelerated by coronal mass ejections as they are first launched; 6) Study of particles at the coronal reconnection site when flare footpoints and loops are occulted; 7) Search for weak high-temperature coronal plasmas in active regions that are not flaring; and 8) Search for hypothetical axion particles created in the solar core via the hard X-ray signal from their conversion to X-rays in the coronal magnetic field. NuSTAR will also serve as a pathfinder for a future dedicated space mission with enhanced capabilities, such as a satellite version of the FOXSI sounding rocket.

  14. Solar Hard X-ray Observations with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David M.; Krucker, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Hurford, G. J.; White, S. M.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stern, D.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.

    2011-05-01

    High-sensitivity imaging of coronal hard X-rays allows detection of freshly accelerated nonthermal electrons at the acceleration site. A few such observations have been made with Yohkoh and RHESSI, but a leap in sensitivity could help pin down the time, place, and manner of reconnection. In 2012, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), a NASA Small Explorer for high energy astrophysics that uses grazing-incidence optics to focus X-rays up to 80 keV, will be launched. NuSTAR is capable of solar pointing, and three weeks will be dedicated to solar observing during the baseline two-year mission. NuSTAR will be 200 times more sensitive than RHESSI in the hard X-ray band. This will allow the following new observations, among others: 1) Extrapolation of the micro/nanoflare distribution by two orders of magnitude down in flux 2) Search for hard X-rays from network nanoflares (soft X-ray bright points) and evaluation of their role in coronal heating 3) Discovery of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung from the electron beams driving type III radio bursts, and measurement of their electron spectrum 4) Hard X-ray studies of polar soft X-ray jets and impulsive solar energetic particle events at the edge of coronal holes, and comparison of these events with observations of 3He and other particles in interplanetary space 5) Study of coronal bremsstrahlung from particles accelerated by coronal mass ejections as they are first launched 6) Study of particles at the coronal reconnection site when flare footpoints are occulted; and 7) Search for hypothetical axion particles created in the solar core via the hard X-ray signal from their conversion to X-rays in the coronal magnetic field. NuSTAR will also serve as a pathfinder for a future dedicated space mission with enhanced capabilities, such as a satellite version of the FOXSI sounding rocket.

  15. X-RAY EMISSION FROM OPTICALLY SELECTED RADIO-INTERMEDIATE AND RADIO-LOUD QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Wu Jianfeng; Gibson, R. R.; Steffen, A. T. E-mail: niel@astro.psu.edu E-mail: jfwu@astro.psu.edu E-mail: rgibson@astro.washington.edu

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the X-ray properties of radio-intermediate and radio-loud quasars (RIQs and RLQs, respectively). We combine large, modern optical (e.g., SDSS) and radio (e.g., FIRST) surveys with archival X-ray data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT to generate an optically selected sample that includes 188 RIQs and 603 RLQs. This sample is constructed independently of X-ray properties but has a high X-ray detection rate (85%); it provides broad and dense coverage of the l-z plane, including at high redshifts (22% of objects have z = 2-5), and it extends to high radio-loudness values (33% of objects have R* = 3-5, using logarithmic units). We measure the 'excess' X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs relative to radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) as a function of radio loudness and luminosity, and parameterize the X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs both as a function of optical/UV luminosity and also as a joint function of optical/UV and radio luminosity. RIQs are only modestly X-ray bright relative to RQQs; it is only at high values of radio loudness (R* {approx}> 3.5) and radio luminosity that RLQs become strongly X-ray bright. We find no evidence for evolution in the X-ray properties of RIQs and RLQs with redshift (implying jet-linked IC/CMB emission does not contribute substantially to the nuclear X-ray continuum). Finally, we consider a model in which the nuclear X-ray emission contains both disk/corona-linked and jet-linked components and demonstrate that the X-ray jet-linked emission is likely beamed but to a lesser degree than applies to the radio jet. This model is used to investigate the increasing dominance of jet-linked X-ray emission at low inclinations.

  16. An Extensive Census of Hubble Space Telescope Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae. II. Time Series and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Peter D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Heinke, Craig O.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2003-10-01

    We report time series and variability information for the optical identifications of X-ray sources in 47 Tucanae reported in Paper I (at least 22 cataclysmic variables [CVs] and 29 active binaries). The radial distribution of the CVs is indistinguishable from that of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) detected by Freire et al. A study of the eight CVs with secure orbital periods (two obtained from the Chandra study of Grindlay et al.) shows that the 47 Tuc CVs have fainter accretion disks, in the V band, than field CVs with similar periods. These faint disks and the faint absolute magnitudes (MV) of the 47 Tuc CVs suggests they have low accretion rates. One possible explanation is that the 47 Tuc objects may be a more representative sample of CVs, down to our detection threshold, than the CVs found in the field (where many low accretion rate systems are believed to be undiscovered), showing the advantages of deep globular cluster observations. The median FX/Fopt value for the 47 Tuc CVs is higher than that of all known classes of field CV, partly because of the faint MV values and partly because of the relatively high X-ray luminosities (LX). The latter are only seen in DQ Her systems in the field, but the 47 Tuc CVs are much fainter optically than most field DQ Her's. Previous work by Edmonds et al. has shown that the four brightest CVs in NGC 6397 have optical spectra and broadband colors that are consistent with DQ Her's having lower than average accretion rates. Some combination of magnetic behavior and low accretion rates may be able to explain our observations, but the results at present are ambiguous, since no class of field CV has distributions of both LX and MV that are consistent with those of the 47 Tuc CVs. The radial distribution of the X-ray detected active binaries is indistinguishable from that of the much larger sample of optical variables (eclipsing and contact binaries and BY Dra variables) detected in previous Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2

  17. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  18. QUARK-NOVAE IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES. II. APPLICATION TO G87-7 AND TO GRB 110328A

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Staff, Jan; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-12-20

    We propose a simple model explaining two outstanding astrophysical problems related to compact objects: (1) that of stars such as G87-7 (alias EG 50) that constitute a class of relatively low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) which nevertheless fall away from the C/O composition and (2) that of GRB 110328A/Swift J164449.3+57345 which showed spectacularly long-lived strong X-ray flaring, posing a challenge to standard gamma-ray burst models. We argue that both these observations may have an explanation within the unified framework of a quark-nova (QN) occurring in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB; neutron star (NS)-WD). For LMXBs, where the binary separation is sufficiently tight, ejecta from the exploding NS triggers nuclear burning in the WD on impact, possibly leading to Fe-rich composition compact WDs with mass 0.43 M{sub Sun} < M{sub WD} < 0.72 M{sub Sun }, reminiscent of G87-7. Our results rely on the assumption, which ultimately needs to be tested by hydrodynamic and nucleosynthesis simulations, that under certain circumstances the WD can avoid the thermonuclear runaway. For heavier WDs (i.e., M{sub WD} > 0.72 M{sub Sun }) experiencing the QN shock, degeneracy will not be lifted when carbon burning begins, and a sub-Chandrasekhar Type Ia supernova may result in our model. Under slightly different conditions and for pure He WDs (i.e., M{sub WD} < 0.43 M{sub Sun }), the WD is ablated and its ashes raining down on the quark star (QS) leads to accretion-driven X-ray luminosity with energetics and duration reminiscent of GRB 110328A. We predict additional flaring activity toward the end of the accretion phase if the QS turns into a black hole.

  19. HST Polarimetry of the 3C 273 Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi Alison; Cheung, Chi C.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M.; Martel, Andre; Urry, C. Megan; Stawarz, Lukasz; Coppi, Paolo S.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Cara, Mihai; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results using HST polarimetry of the jet of 3C 273. Polarization is a critical parameter for understanding jet flows, and has proven essential in characterizing the physics of FR I jets; high-quality HST polarimetry has been done for just two other FR II jets previously. Our recent work on two quasar jets, where we measured high optical polarization in the brightest X-ray knots, has favored the synchrotron emission model over the alternative IC/CMB model for their optical to X-ray emission. These new observations of 3C 273 allow for the determination of the magnetic field structure and confirmation of which emission mechanisms are operating to create its optical to X-ray emission, and will allow us to greatly advance modeling efforts for this jet and nail down its kinetic power, a key unknown parameter for understanding quasars and their cosmological effects.

  20. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... radiologist (a doctor who is specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...