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Sample records for jet impingement cooling

  1. Rewetting of hot vertical rod during jet impingement surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Chitranjan; Kumar, Ravi; Gupta, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, Barun

    2016-06-01

    A stainless steel (SS-316) vertical rod of 12 mm diameter at 800 ± 10 °C initial temperature was cooled by normal impinging round water jet. The surface rewetting phenomenon was investigated for a range of jet diameter 2.5-4.8 mm and jet Reynolds number 5000-24,000 using a straight tube type nozzle. The investigation were made from the stagnation point to maximum 40 mm downstream locations, simultaneously for both upside and downside directions. The cooling performance of the vertical rod was evaluated on the basis of rewetting parameters i.e. rewetting temperature, wetting delay, rewetting velocity and the maximum surface heat flux. Two separate Correlations have been proposed for the dimensionless rewetting velocity in terms of rewetting number and the maximum surface heat flux that predicts the experimental data within an error band of ±20 and ±15 % respectively.

  2. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  3. Modular jet impingement assemblies with passive and active flow control for electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Feng; Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Joshi, Shailesh

    2016-09-13

    Power electronics modules having modular jet impingement assembly utilized to cool heat generating devices are disclosed. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a modular manifold having a distribution recess, one or more angled inlet connection tubes positioned at an inlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly couple the inlet tube to the distribution recess and one or more outlet connection tubes positioned at an outlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly coupling the outlet tube to the distribution recess. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a manifold insert removably positioned within the distribution recess and include one or more inlet branch channels each including an impinging slot and one or more outlet branch channels each including a collecting slot. Further a heat transfer plate coupled to the modular manifold, the heat transfer plate comprising an impingement surface including an array of fins that extend toward the manifold insert.

  4. Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

    2014-09-01

    Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

  5. Advanced Liquid Cooling for a Traction Drive Inverter Using Jet Impingement and Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Moreno, G.; Bennion, K.; Jeffers, J.

    2014-08-01

    Jet impingement on plain and micro-finned enhanced surfaces was compared to a traditional channel flow configuration. The jets provide localized cooling to areas heated by the insulated-gate bipolar transistor and diode devices. Enhanced microfinned surfaces increase surface area and thermal performance. Using lighter materials and designing the fluid path to manage pressure losses increases overall performance while reducing weight, volume, and cost. Powering four diodes in the center power module of the inverter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to characterize the baseline as well as jet-impingement-based heat exchangers. CFD modeling showed the thermal performance improvements should hold for a fully powered inverter. Increased thermal performance was observed for the jet-impingement configurations when tested at full inverter power (40 to 100 kW output power) on a dynamometer. The reliability of the jets and enhanced surfaces over time was also investigated. Experimentally, the junction-to- coolant thermal resistance was reduced by up to 12.5% for jet impingement on enhanced surfaces s compared to the baseline channel flow configuration. Base plate-to-coolant (convective) resistance was reduced by up to 37.0% for the jet-based configuration compared to the baseline, suggesting that while improvements to the cooling side reduce overall resistance, reducing the passive stack resistance may contribute to lowering overall junction-to-coolant resistance. Full inverter power testing showed reduced thermal resistance from the middle of the module baseplate to coolant of up to 16.5%. Between the improvement in thermal performance and pumping power, the coefficient of performance improved by up to 13% for the jet-based configuration.

  6. CPV cells cooling system based on submerged jet impingement: CFD modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montorfano, Davide; Gaetano, Antonio; Barbato, Maurizio C.; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Pedretti, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cells offer higher efficiencies with regard to the PV ones and allow to strongly reduce the overall solar cell area. However, to operate correctly and exploit their advantages, their temperature has to be kept low and as uniform as possible and the cooling circuit pressure drops need to be limited. In this work an impingement water jet cooling system specifically designed for an industrial HCPV receiver is studied. Through the literature and by means of accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, the nozzle to plate distance, the number of jets and the nozzle pitch, i.e. the distance between adjacent jets, were optimized. Afterwards, extensive experimental tests were performed to validate pressure drops and cooling power simulation results.

  7. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lienhard, J.H. V; Khounsary, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The combination of impinging jets and diamond substrates may provide an effective solution to a class of extremely high heat flux problems in which very localized heat loads must be removed. Some potential applications include the cooling of high-heat-load components in synchrotron x-ray, fusion, and semiconductor laser systems. Impinging liquid jets are a very effective vehicle for removing high heat fluxes. The liquid supply arrangement is relatively simple, and low thermal resistances can be routinely achieved. A jet`s cooling ability is a strong function of the size of the cooled area relative to the jet diameter. For relatively large area targets, the critical heat fluxes can approach 20 W/mm{sup 2}. In this situation, burnout usually originates at the outer edge of the cooled region as increasing heat flux inhibits the liquid supply. Limitations from liquid supply are minimized when heating is restricted to the jet stagnation zone. The high stagnation pressure and high velocity gradients appear to suppress critical flux phenomena, and fluxes of up to 400 W/mm{sup 2} have been reached without evidence of burnout. Instead, the restrictions on heat flux are closely related to properties of the cooled target. Target properties become an issue owing to the large temperatures and large temperature gradients that accompany heat fluxes over 100 W/mm{sup 2}. These conditions necessitate a target with both high thermal conductivity to prevent excessive temperatures and good mechanical properties to prevent mechanical failures. Recent developments in synthetic diamond technology present a possible solution to some of the solid-side constraints on heat flux. Polycrystalline diamond foils can now be produced by chemical vapor deposition in reasonable quantity and at reasonable cost. Synthetic single crystal diamonds as large as 1 cm{sup 2} are also available.

  8. Effect of surface thickness on the wetting front velocity during jet impingement surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Chitranjan; Gotherwal, Deepesh; Singh, Chandradeep; Singh, Charan

    2016-06-01

    A hot stainless steel (SS-304) surface of 450 ± 10 °C initial temperature is cooled with a normally impinging round water jet. The experiments have been performed for the surface of different thickness e.g. 1, 2, 3 mm and jet Reynolds number in the range of Re = 26,500-48,000. The cooling performance of the hot test surface is evaluated on the basis of wetting front velocity. The wetting front velocity is determined for 10-40 mm downstream spatial locations away from the stagnation point. It has been observed that the wetting front velocity increase with the rise in jet flow rate, however, diminishes towards the downstream spatial location and with the rise in surface thickness. The proposed correlation for the dimensionless wetting front velocity predicts the experimental data well within the error band of ±30 %, whereas, 75 % of experimental data lies within the range of ±20 %.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of a cooling impinging jet to a turbulent crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Michail; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we report on Large Eddy Simulations of a cooling impinging jet to a turbulent channel flow. The impinging jet enters the turbulent stream in an oblique direction. This type of flow is relevant to the so-called ``Pressurized Thermal Shock'' phenomenon that can occur in pressurized water reactors. First we elaborate on issues related to the set-up of the simulations of the flow of interest such as, imposition of turbulent inflows, choice of subgrid-scale model and others. Also, the issue of the commutator error due to the anisotropy of the spatial cut-off filter induced by non-uniform grids is being discussed. In the second part of the talk we present results of our simulations. In particular, we focus on the high-shear and recirculation zones that are developed and on the characteristics of the temperature field. The budget for the mean kinetic energy of the resolved-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations is also discussed and analyzed. Financial support has been provided by Bel V, a subsidiary of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control of Belgium.

  10. Mixed convection cooling of a cylinder using slot jet impingement at different circumferential angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderipour, S.; Yousefi, T.; Ashjaee, M.; Naylor, D.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental study using Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been carried out to investigate the heat transfer from an isothermal horizontal circular cylinder, which is exposed to an air slot jet at different angles of jet impingement. A square edged nozzle is mounted parallel with the cylinder axis and jet flow impinges on the side of the cylinder at angles Θ = 0°, 30°, 60° and 90°. The Reynolds number varied from 240 to 1900 while the Grashof number and slot- to cylinder-spacing is kept constant at Gr = 22,300 and H/w = 7 respectively. The Richardson number varied from 0.006 to 0.4. The flow field is greatly influenced by the slot exit velocity and the buoyancy force due to density change. The local Nusselt number around the cylinder has been calculated using the infinite fringe interferograms at 10° intervals. Average Nusselt number shows that heat transfer is decreased when the angle of jet impingement is increased .

  11. Analysis of liquid-metal-jet impingement cooling in a corner region and for a row of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A conformal mapping method was used to analyze liquid-metal-jet impingement heat transfer. The jet flow region and energy equation are transformed to correspond to uniform flow in a parallel plate channel with nonuniform heat addition along a portion of one wall. The exact solution for the wall-temperature distribution was obtained in the transformed channel, and the results are mapped back into the physical plane. Two geometries are analyzed. One is for a single slot jet directed either into an interior corner formed by two flat plates, or over the external sides of the corner; the flat plates are uniformly heated, and the corner can have various included angles. The heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation point at the apex of the plates is obtained as a function of the corner angle, and temperature distributions are calculated along the heated walls. The second geometry is an infinite row of uniformly spaced parallel slot jets impinging normally against a uniformly heated plate. The heat-transfer behavior is obtained as a function of the spacing between the jets. Results are given for several jet Peclet numbers from 5 to 50.

  12. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  13. Design Of A Hybrid Jet Impingement / Microchannel Cooling Device For Densely Packed PV Cells Under High Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrau, Jérôme; Rosell, Joan; Ibañez, Manel

    2010-10-01

    A hybrid jet impingement / microchannel cooling scheme was designed and applied to densely packed PV cells under high concentration. An experimental study allows validating the principles of the design and confirming its applicability to the cited system. In order to study the characteristics of the device in a wide range of conditions, a numerical model was developed and experimentally validated. The results allow evaluating the contributions of the cooling device to the performances of densely packed PV cells under high concentration. The main advantages of the system are related to its compactness, its good capacity of heat extraction associated to relatively low pressure losses and its capability to improve the temperature uniformity of the PV receiver with respect to other cooling schemes. These features improve the net electric output of the whole system and its reliability.

  14. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  15. Enhancement of Nucleate Boiling Heat Flux on Macro/Micro-Structured Surfaces Cooled by Multiple Impinging Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kugler, Scott Lee

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer from modified surfaces cooled by multiple in-line impinging circular jets is reported and found to agree with single jet results. A copper block is heated from the back by two electrical arcs, and cooled on the opposite side by three identical liquid jets of distilled water at subcoolings of 25 C 50 C and 77 C and Freon 113 at 24 C subcooling. Liquid flow rates are held constant at 5, 10, and 15 GPH for each of the three jets with jet velocities ranging from 1.4 m/s to 1 1.2 m/s and jet diameters from 0.95 mm to 2.2 mm. To increase the maximum heat flux (CHF) and heat removal rate, the boiling surface was modified by both macro and micro enhancements. Macro modification consists of machined radial grooves in the boiling surface arranged in an optimally designed pattern to allow better liquid distribution along the surface. These grooves also reduce splashing of liquid droplets, and provide 'channels' to sweep away bubbles. Micro modification was achieved by flame spraying metal powder on the boiling surface, creating a porous, sintered surface. With the addition of both micro and macro structured enhancements, maximum heat flux and nucleate boiling can be enhanced by more than 200%. Examination of each surface modification separately and together indicates that at lower superheats, the micro structure provides the enhanced heat transfer by providing more nucleation sites, while for higher superheats the macro structure allows better liquid distribution and bubble removal. A correlation is presented to account for liquid subcoolings and surface enhancements, in addition to the geometrical and fluid properties previously reported in the literature.

  16. Regeneratively cooled transition duct with transversely buffered impingement nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Jay A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Crawford, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    A cooling arrangement (56) having: a duct (30) configured to receive hot gases (16) from a combustor; and a flow sleeve (50) surrounding the duct and defining a cooling plenum (52) there between, wherein the flow sleeve is configured to form impingement cooling jets (70) emanating from dimples (82) in the flow sleeve effective to predominately cool the duct in an impingement cooling zone (60), and wherein the flow sleeve defines a convection cooling zone (64) effective to cool the duct solely via a cross-flow (76), the cross-flow comprising cooling fluid (72) exhausting from the impingement cooling zone. In the impingement cooling zone an undimpled portion (84) of the flow sleeve tapers away from the duct as the undimpled portion nears the convection cooling zone. The flow sleeve is configured to effect a greater velocity of the cross-flow in the convection cooling zone than in the impingement cooling zone.

  17. Jet array impingement flow distributions and heat transfer characteristics. Effects of initial crossflow and nonuniform array geometry. [gas turbine engine component cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Su, C. C.; Isoda, Y.; Tseng, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of circular air jets impinging on a heat transfer surface parallel to the jet orifice plate are considered. The jet flow, after impingement, is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer surface. The configurations considered are intended to model those of interest in current and contemplated gas turbine airfoil midchord cooling applications. The effects of an initial crossflow which approaches the array through an upstream extension of the channel are considered. Flow distributions as well as heat transfer coefficients and adiabatic wall temperatures resolved to one streamwise hole spacing were measured as a function of the initial crossflow rate and temperature relative to the jet flow rate and temperature. Both Nusselt number profiles and dimensionless adiabatic wall temperature (effectiveness) profiles are presented and discussed. Special test results which show a significant reduction of jet orifice discharge coefficients owing to the effect of a confined crossflow are also presented, along with a flow distribution model which incorporates those effects. A nonuniform array flow distribution model is developed and validated.

  18. Nanofluid impingement jet heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Obida; Ali, Mohamed

    2012-02-17

    Experimental investigation to study the heat transfer between a vertical round alumina-water nanofluid jet and a horizontal circular round surface is carried out. Different jet flow rates, jet nozzle diameters, various circular disk diameters and three nanoparticles concentrations (0, 6.6 and 10%, respectively) are used. The experimental results indicate that using nanofluid as a heat transfer carrier can enhance the heat transfer process. For the same Reynolds number, the experimental data show an increase in the Nusselt numbers as the nanoparticle concentration increases. Size of heating disk diameters shows reverse effect on heat transfer. It is also found that presenting the data in terms of Reynolds number at impingement jet diameter can take into account on both effects of jet heights and nozzle diameter. Presenting the data in terms of Peclet numbers, at fixed impingement nozzle diameter, makes the data less sensitive to the percentage change of the nanoparticle concentrations. Finally, general heat transfer correlation is obtained verses Peclet numbers using nanoparticle concentrations and the nozzle diameter ratio as parameters.

  19. Nanofluid impingement jet heat transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Experimental investigation to study the heat transfer between a vertical round alumina-water nanofluid jet and a horizontal circular round surface is carried out. Different jet flow rates, jet nozzle diameters, various circular disk diameters and three nanoparticles concentrations (0, 6.6 and 10%, respectively) are used. The experimental results indicate that using nanofluid as a heat transfer carrier can enhance the heat transfer process. For the same Reynolds number, the experimental data show an increase in the Nusselt numbers as the nanoparticle concentration increases. Size of heating disk diameters shows reverse effect on heat transfer. It is also found that presenting the data in terms of Reynolds number at impingement jet diameter can take into account on both effects of jet heights and nozzle diameter. Presenting the data in terms of Peclet numbers, at fixed impingement nozzle diameter, makes the data less sensitive to the percentage change of the nanoparticle concentrations. Finally, general heat transfer correlation is obtained verses Peclet numbers using nanoparticle concentrations and the nozzle diameter ratio as parameters. PMID:22340669

  20. Single and multiple jet impingement heat transfer on rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, D. E.; Partipilo, V. A.

    1989-01-01

    In some gas turbine engine designs cooling air jets are directed at the rotating disk in an atempt to enhance the convection coefficients and reduce the amount of gas flow required for cooling. The jet-impingement scheme is particularly attractive for achieving intense cooling at a specific radial location, such as the blade attachment region. In earlier single-jet studies, the interaction between an impinging jet and rotating disk has been found to involve a flow regime transition. The present study extends the previously acquired data base with new results from both heat-transfer and flow-visualization testing, including effects of hub size, jet travel distance, and the number of jets. Results include a superposition scheme for predicting heat transfer for multiple jets and a criterion for the minimum amount of flow required through each jet nozzle to assure enhancement of the disk convection.

  1. Experimental simulation of impingement cooling in midchord region of turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liguo; Jiang, Jun; Chang, Haiping; Zhang, Donglia

    1989-10-01

    Simulation experiments have been completed to research the characteristics of impingement cooling in the midchord region of a turbine blade for a given geometric parameter of jet array, initial crossflow, and pressure ratios of the film-cooling exhaust. Comparative experiments have been made on curvilinear and flat plate impinged surfaces, and impinged surfaces with and without a chordwise fin. Moreover, the thermal patterns from a liquid crystal show that the jet hole arrangement and distance between cooled surface and jet plate affect the heat transfer distributions for jet array impingement. Finally, the effects of the cooling air axially injected into guide tube on radial jet flow have also been determined.

  2. Bistability and hysteresis of annular impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisovsky, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    In present study, the bistability and hysteresis of annular impinging jets is investigated. Annular impinging jets are simulated using open source CFD code - OpenFOAM. Both flow field patterns of interest are obtained and hysteresis is found by means of dynamic mesh simulation. Effect of nozzle exit velocity on resulting hysteresis loop is also illustrated.

  3. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  4. Microtextured Surfaces for Turbine Blade Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can exceed the blade and disk material limits by 600 F or more, necessitating both internal and film cooling schemes in addition to the use of thermal barrier coatings. Internal convective cooling is inadequate in many blade locations, and both internal and film cooling approaches can lead to significant performance penalties in the engine. Micro Cooling Concepts, Inc., has developed a turbine blade cooling concept that provides enhanced internal impingement cooling effectiveness via the use of microstructured impingement surfaces. These surfaces significantly increase the cooling capability of the impinging flow, as compared to a conventional untextured surface. This approach can be combined with microchannel cooling and external film cooling to tailor the cooling capability per the external heating profile. The cooling system then can be optimized to minimize impact on engine performance.

  5. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  6. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-11-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  7. Improved Stirling engine performance using jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. C.; Britt, E. J.; Thieme, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    Of the many factors influencing the performance of a Stirling engine, that of transferring the combustion gas heat into the working fluid is crucial. By utilizing the high heat transfer rates obtainable with a jet impingement heat transfer system, it is possible to reduce the flame temperature required for engine operation. Also, the required amount of heater tube surface area may be reduced, resulting in a decrease in the engine nonswept volume and a related increase in engine efficiency. A jet impingement heat transfer system was designed by Rasor Associates, Inc., and tested in the GPU-3 Stirling engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. For a small penalty in pumping power (less than 0.5% of engine output) the jet impingement heat transfer system provided a higher combustion-gas-side heat transfer coefficient and a smoothing of heater temperature profiles resulting in lower combustion system temperatures and a 5 to 8% increase in engine power output and efficiency.

  8. Unsteady pressures under impinging jets in crossflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, K.; Bray, D.; Wilson, M. J.

    The flowfield surrounding single and twin jets impinging in a cross-flow has been investigated experimentally. Two regions of the flowfield are seen to be particularly unsteady: the ground vortex formed by separation of the wall jet in the cross-flow; and the fountain formed between two adjacent impinging jets. The ground vortex formed by twin (side-by-side) impingen jets is found to be even more unsteady than that due to a single jet. The unsteadiness has been quantified by ground plane pressure measurements. These have shown the fluctuations to be broadband in nature but with a low frequency hump. This confirms results from elsewhere using low speed jets. The present work also suggests that the peak amplitudes in ground plane pressure fluctuations occur either side of the vortex. There is, as yet, no evidence that the vortex fluctuations are fed by impinging jet instabilities. Nor does nozzle pressure ratio seem to have a direct effect on the spectrum of fluctuations.

  9. Circular and Elliptic Submerged Impinging Water Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudey, Eric; Benedicto, Olivier; Ravier, Emmanuel; Gutmark, Ephraim

    1999-11-01

    Experiments and CFD have been performed to study circular and elliptic jets in a submerged water jet facility. The tests included discharge coefficient measurement to evaluate pressure losses encountered in noncircular nozzles compared to circular ones. Three-dimensional pressure mappings on the impingement surface and PIV measurement of the jet mean and turbulent velocity have been performed at different compound impingement angles relative to the impingement surface and at different stand-off distances. The objective was to investigate the effect of the non-circular geometry on the flow field and on the impact region. The tests were performed in a close loop system in which the water was pumped through the nozzles into a clear Plexiglas tank. The Reynolds numbers were typically in the range of 250000. Discharge coefficients of the elliptic nozzle was somewhat lower than that of the circular jet but spreading rate and turbulence level were higher. Pressure mapping showed that the nozzle exit geometry had an effect on the pressure distribution in the impact region and that high-pressure zones were generated at specific impact points. PIV measurements showed that for a same total exit area, the elliptic jets affected a surface area that is 8the equivalent circular. The turbulence level in the elliptic jet tripled due to the nozzle design. Results of the CFD model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Industrial stator vane with sequential impingement cooling inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A; Goebel, Gloria E; Krueger, Judson J; Rawlings, Christopher K; Memmen, Robert L

    2013-08-06

    A turbine stator vane for an industrial engine, the vane having two impingement cooling inserts that produce a series of impingement cooling from the pressure side to the suction side of the vane walls. Each insert includes a spar with a row of alternating impingement cooling channels and return air channels extending in a radial direction. Impingement cooling plates cover the two sides of the insert and having rows of impingement cooling holes aligned with the impingement cooling channels and return air openings aligned with the return air channel.

  11. An approximation technique for jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Mahmoud; Fincher, Donald; Rahni, Taeibi; Javadi, KH.; Massah, H.

    2015-03-10

    The analytical approximate solution of a non-linear jet impingement flow model will be demonstrated. We will show that this is an improvement over the series approximation obtained via the Adomian decomposition method, which is itself, a powerful method for analysing non-linear differential equations. The results of these approximations will be compared to the Runge-Kutta approximation in order to demonstrate their validity.

  12. Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Raphael Durand

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

  13. Impinging jets in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, K.; Bray, D.; Bailey, P. J.; Curtis, P.

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation of flowfields generated by the impingement of single and twin jets in cross-flows gives attention to the ground vortex position-defining parameters of cross-flow/nozzle velocities ratio, cross-flow boundary layer thickness, nozzle height, nozzle pressure ratio, vector angle, and nozzle splay (with both fixed and moving ground-planes). The results obtained indicate that the ground vortex moves away from the nozzle centerline as the ratio of cross-flow velocity to nozzle exit velocity is decreased. The positional rate of change, however, depends on other parameters. Self-similarity laws are proposed for the ground vortex and wall jet.

  14. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  15. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  16. Impingement cooling with film coolant extraction in the airfoil leading edge regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liguo; Li, Zhaohui

    An extensive experimental study is conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of arrays of air jets impinging on perforated target surfaces in turbine blade leading edge regions by six large-scale models. The relations of pressure loss and Nusselt number to jet Reynolds number are obtained in a wide range of parameter combinations of interest in cooled airfoil practice for various models, respectively. These parameter combinations are covered in a test matrix, including combinations of variations in jet Reynolds number, airfoil leading edge curvature radius-to-diameter ratio, jet pitch-to-diameter ratio, and jet impingement gap-to-diameter ratio.

  17. Study of an under-expanded sonic impinging jet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Ho

    The under-expanded impinging jet is used in various situations, such as the launch of a rocket, the takeoff and landing of a vertical/short take off and landing aircraft, jet engine exhaust impingement, or the thrust vector control system of a solid rocket motor. It is also of considerable interest to study the fluid dynamics of jet impingement on a surface with respect to heat transfer. Past investigations of sonic or supersonic impinging jets were limited to only a single jet and were primarily concentrated on fluid mechanics phenomena. No results exist in the literature for an under-expanded sonic impinging jet array. The present study is focused on the fluid dynamics for an array of under-expanded sonic impinging jets with the ultimate objective being to study the understanding of the interaction between impinging jets and the effect of jet-to-jet spacing (s/d), jet-to-plate spacing (z/d), and the degree of under-expansion (P0/Pa). Schlieren videography was applied to study the variation of structures that dominate the supersonic impinging flow, such as the intercepting shock, reflected shock, normal disk, stand-off-plate shock, and stagnation bubble. A high frequency transducer was used to measure the pressure field of the fluid flow near the impingement surface. Test configurations included non-dimensional jet-to-plate heights from 1 to 10, non-dimensional jet-to-jet spacing of 2 and 4, and pressure ratios from 3.3 to 12.9. Jets with orifice diameter of 12.7 and 25.4 mm were used. The fluid dynamics of an under-expanded sonic jet array differ largely from a single jet at s/d = 2. Midway between jets and near each stagnation bubble region, the jet array shows higher values in surface pressure due to the jet interaction. Both a single jet and a jet array have the linear dependence between z/d for the location of the shock cell and transition from supersonic wall jet to subsonic wall jet. However, the jet array show the location of the shock cell is changing

  18. Heat transfer characteristics of a pair of impinging synthetic jets: Effect of orifice spacing and impingement distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanning, Eoin; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina B.

    2012-11-01

    Recent research has shown that an impinging synthetic jet attains local heat transfer rates that rival those of a steady impinging jet. A single synthetic jet still requires a buoyancy-driven or forced cross flow to avoid recirculation of heated fluid. However, multiple adjacent synthetic jets exhibit a fluidic interaction that results in flow vectoring towards the direction of the jet leading in phase. Previous results have shown a significant heat transfer enhancement and the establishment of a jet-induced cross-flow, which could eliminate the need for an external forced cross-flow. This paper presents the findings of an experimental study to optimize the orifice-to-impingement distance H and orifice centre-to-centre separation distance S. The convective heat transfer rate is determined on an electrically heated metal foil using thermal imaging. The jets are driven by a pair of adjacent jet actuators forcing air through two rectangular slot orifices of width D = 1.65mm and aspect ratio α = 27:1. The jets are maintained at a constant Reynolds number and stroke length (Re = 600, L0/D = 29). For the parameter range considered, an optimum setting of H/D = 24 and S/D = 3 operated within a phase difference region of 60° < phi < 120° gives the best cooling performance.

  19. Three-dimensional numerical study of laminar confined slot jet impingement cooling using slurry of nano-encapsulated phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohib Ur Rehman, M.; Qu, Z. G.; Fu, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    This Article presents a three dimensional numerical model investigating thermal performance and hydrodynamics features of the confined slot jet impingement using slurry of Nano Encapsulated Phase Change Material (NEPCM) as a coolant. The slurry is composed of water as a base fluid and n-octadecane NEPCM particles with mean diameter of 100nm suspended in it. A single phase fluid approach is employed to model the NEPCM slurry.The thermo physical properties of the NEPCM slurry are computed using modern approaches being proposed recently and governing equations are solved with a commercial Finite Volume based code. The effects of jet Reynolds number varying from 100 to 600 and particle volume fraction ranging from 0% to 28% are considered. The computed results are validated by comparing Nusselt number values at stagnation point with the previously published results with water as working fluid. It was found that adding NEPCM to the base fluid results with considerable amount of heat transfer enhancement.The highest values of heat transfer coefficients are observed at H/W=4 and Cm=0.28. However, due to the higher viscosity of slurry compared with the base fluid, the slurry can produce drastic increase in pressure drop of the system that increases with NEPCM particle loading and jet Reynolds number.

  20. Round impinging jets with relatively large stand-off distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shademan, Mehrdad; Balachandar, Ram; Roussinova, Vesselina; Barron, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Large eddy simulation and particle image velocimetry measurements have been performed to evaluate the characteristics of a turbulent impinging jet with large nozzle height-to-diameter ratio (H/D = 20). The Reynolds number considered is approximately 28 000 based on the jet exit velocity and nozzle diameter. Mean normalized centerline velocity in both the free jet and impingement regions and pressure distribution over the plate obtained from simulations and experiments show good agreement. The ring-like vortices generated due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the exit of the nozzle merge, break down and transform into large scale structures while traveling towards the impingement plate. A Strouhal number of 0.63 was found for the vortices generated at the exit of the nozzle. However, this parameter is reduced along the centerline towards the impingement zone. A characteristic frequency was also determined for the large scale structures impinging on the plate. The expansion, growth, tilt, and three-dimensionality of the impinging structures cause dislocation of the impinging flow from the centerline, which is significantly larger when compared with flows having small H/D ratios. Contrary to the behavior of impinging jets with small stand-off distance, due to the loss of coherence, the large scale structures do not result in significant secondary vortices in the wall jet region and consequently less fluctuations were observed for wall shear stress.

  1. Jet-impingement heat transfer in gas turbine systems.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Goldstein, R J

    2001-05-01

    A review of jet-impingement heat transfer in gas turbine systems is presented. Characteristics of the different flow regions for submerged jets--free jet, stagnation flow, and wall jet--are reviewed. Heat transfer characteristics of both single and multiple jets are discussed with consideration of the effects of important parameters relevant to gas turbine systems including curvature of surfaces, crossflow, angle of impact, and rotation.

  2. Experimental study of turbulence in isothermal jet impingement at intermediate plate spacings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landfried, D. Tyler; Valentino, Alex; Mazumdar, Sagnik; Jana, Anirban; Kimber, Mark

    2013-11-01

    One fundamental problem in fluid dynamics is that of the axisymmetric round flow impinging on a plate placed some distance downstream of the jet. Impinging jets have a rich history of applications including small plate spacings, H/D ~ 1, such as encountered in electronics cooling, or large plate spacings, H/D ~ 102, such as vertical takeoff aircrafts and rocket engines. However, intermediate plate spacings, such as the lower plenum of the next generation nuclear reactors, are not typically studied. In this paper, an experimental study is conducted investigating the effect of the impingement plate on the flow behavior compared to the near free jet behavior when the plate is removed. Using air as the working fluid, a single jet is considered at jet Reynolds numbers of 10000, 20000, and 30000. A three-wire anemometer probe is used to quantify the mean components of velocities as well as the Reynolds stress and the third-order moments in the flow field at various distances between the jet outlet and the impingement plate. When present, the impingement plate is placed a distance of 8, 11, 14, and 17 diameters downstream of the jet. Additionally trends in the kinetic energy and dissipation are investigated for validation with numerical models.

  3. Numerical study of a confined slot impinging jet with nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat transfer enhancement technology concerns with the aim of developing more efficient systems to satisfy the increasing demands of many applications in the fields of automotive, aerospace, electronic and process industry. A solution for obtaining efficient cooling systems is represented by the use of confined or unconfined impinging jets. Moreover, the possibility of increasing the thermal performances of the working fluids can be taken into account, and the introduction of nanoparticles in a base fluid can be considered. Results In this article, a numerical investigation on confined impinging slot jet working with a mixture of water and Al2O3 nanoparticles is described. The flow is turbulent and a constant temperature is applied on the impinging. A single-phase model approach has been adopted. Different geometric ratios, particle volume concentrations and Reynolds number have been considered to study the behavior of the system in terms of average and local Nusselt number, convective heat transfer coefficient and required pumping power profiles, temperature fields and stream function contours. Conclusions The dimensionless stream function contours show that the intensity and size of the vortex structures depend on the confining effects, given by H/W ratio, Reynolds number and particle concentrations. Furthermore, for increasing concentrations, nanofluids realize increasing fluid bulk temperature, as a result of the elevated thermal conductivity of mixtures. The local Nusselt number profiles show the highest values at the stagnation point, and the lowest at the end of the heated plate. The average Nusselt number increases for increasing particle concentrations and Reynolds numbers; moreover, the highest values are observed for H/W = 10, and a maximum increase of 18% is detected at a concentration equal to 6%. The required pumping power as well as Reynolds number increases and particle concentrations grow, which is almost 4.8 times greater than the

  4. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  5. Supersonic moist air jet impingements on flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Miah Md. Ashraful; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2010-02-01

    Pronounced aeroacoustic resonances are exhibited in the flowfield where a jet emerges from an orifice or a nozzle and impinges on a solid surface. One instance where such resonances are produced is in a high speed jet impingement, such as in the space launch vehicle systems, jet-engine exhaust impingement, and in the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, etc. A highly unsteady flowfield leading to a drastic increase of noise level with very high dynamic pressure and thermal loads are noticed on nearby surfaces results dramatic lift loss, severe ground erosion and hot gas ingestion to the inlet in the jet engines. This highly unsteady behavior of the impinging jets is due to a feedback loop between the fluid and acoustic fields. In actual jet flow, the working gas may contain condensable gas such as steam or moist air. In these cases, the non-equilibrium condensation may occur at the region between nozzle exit and an object. The jet flow with non-equilibrium condensation may be quite different from that without condensation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of the non-equilibrium condensation of moist air on the axisymmetric under-expanded supersonic impinging jet on a vertical flat plate was investigated numerically.

  6. Two stage serial impingement cooling for isogrid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Morrison, Jay A.

    2014-09-09

    A system for cooling a wall (24) of a component having an outer surface with raised ribs (12) defining a structural pocket (10), including: an inner wall (26) within the structural pocket and separating the wall outer surface within the pocket into a first region (28) outside of the inner wall and a second region (40) enclosed by the inner wall; a plate (14) disposed atop the raised ribs and enclosing the structural pocket, the plate having a plate impingement hole (16) to direct cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (38) of the first region; a cap having a skirt (50) in contact with the inner wall, the cap having a cap impingement hole (20) configured to direct the cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (44) of the second region, and; a film cooling hole (22) formed through the wall in the second region.

  7. Heat convection in a micro impinging jet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, John Dzung Hoang

    2000-10-01

    This thesis covers the development of an efficient micro impinging jet heat exchanger, using MEMS technology, to provide localized cooling for present and next generation microelectronic computer chips. Before designing an efficient localized heat exchanger, it is necessary to investigate fluid dynamics and heat transfer in the micro scale. MEMS technology has been used in this project because it is the only tool currently available that can provide a large array of batch-fabricated, micro-scale nozzles for localized cooling. Our investigation of potential MEMS heat exchanger designs begins with experiments that measure the pressure drops and temperature changes in a micro scale tubing system that will be necessary to carry fluid to the impingement point. Our basic MEMS model is a freestanding micro channel with integrated temperature microsensors. The temperature distribution along the channel in a vacuum is measured. The measured flow rates are compared with an analytical model developed for capillary flow that accounts for 2-D, slip and compressibility effects. The work is focused on obtaining correlations in the form of the Nussult number, the Reynolds number and a H/d geometric factor. A set of single MEMS nozzles have been designed to test heat transfer effectiveness as a function of nozzle diameter, ranging from 1.0 mm to 250 um. In addition, nozzle and slot array MEMS devices have been fabricated. In order to obtain quantitative measurements from these micron scale devices, a series of target temperature sensor chips were custom made and characterized for these experiments. The heat transfer characteristics of various MEMS nozzle configurations operating at various steady inlet pressures, at different heights above the heated substrate, have been characterized. These steady results showed that the average heat transfer coefficient, averaged over a 1 cm2 test area, was usually less than 0.035 W/cm 2K for any situation. However, the local heat transfer

  8. Supersonic impinging jet noise reduction using a hybrid control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Alex; Kumar, Rajan

    2015-07-01

    Control of the highly resonant flowfield associated with supersonic impinging jet has been experimentally investigated. Measurements were made in the supersonic impinging jet facility at the Florida State University for a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded jet. Measurements included unsteady pressures on a surface plate near the nozzle exit, acoustics in the nearfield and beneath the impingement plane, and velocity field using particle image velocimetry. Both passive control using porous surface and active control with high momentum microjet injection are effective in reducing nearfield noise and flow unsteadiness over a range of geometrical parameters; however, the type of noise reduction achieved by the two techniques is different. The passive control reduces broadband noise whereas microjet injection attenuates high amplitude impinging tones. The hybrid control, a combination of two control methods, reduces both broadband and high amplitude impinging tones and surprisingly its effectiveness is more that the additive effect of the two control techniques. The flow field measurements show that with hybrid control the impinging jet is stabilized and the turbulence quantities such as streamwise turbulence intensity, transverse turbulence intensity and turbulent shear stress are significantly reduced.

  9. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  10. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  11. Experimental and Computational Study of Underexpanded Jet Impingement Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Shann J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Picetti, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was performed to assess CFD modeling of a hypersonic-vehicle breach, boundary-layer flow ingestion and internal surface impingement. Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. Four simulated breaches were tested and impingement heat flux data was obtained for each case using both phosphor thermography and thin film gages on targets placed inside the model. A separate target was used to measure the surface pressure distribution. The measured jet impingement width and peak location are in good agreement with CFD analysis.

  12. Heat transfer and flow visualization of swirling impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The heat transfer performance of swirling impinging jets was experimentally investigated, and the flow fields were visualized for a jet diameter, d{sub j} = 12.7 mm and swirl angles, {theta} = 15{degree}, 30{degree}, and 45{degree}. Other experimental parameters included Reynolds number, Re = 3,620--17,600, vertical jet spacing, h = 12.7--76.2 mm, and radial distance from the stagnation point, r = 0--65 mm. The results showed significant enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient, both with respect to radial uniformity and local values, compared to a circular straight impinging jet of the same dimensions at the same test conditions. The flow field visualizations confirmed the measured enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient for the swirling jets as well as the radial distribution of local Nusselt number.

  13. Average heat-transfer characteristics of a row of circular air jets impinging on a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the average heat-transfer characteristics of air jets impinging on the concave side of a right-circular semicylinder is reported. Results from existing correlating are compared with each other and with experimental heat-transfer data for a row of circular jets. Two correlations available in the literature are recommended for use in designing cooled turbine vanes and blades.

  14. Splattering during turbulent liquid jet impingement on solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, S.K.; Lienhard, J.H. V . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    In turbulent liquid jet impingement, a spray of droplets often breaks off of the liquid layer formed on the target. This splattering of liquid alters the efficiencies of jet impingement heat transfer processes and chemical containment safety devices, and leads to problems of aerosol formation in jet impingement cleaning processes. In this paper, the authors present a more complete study of splattering and improved correlations that extend and supersede the previous reports on this topic. The authors report experimental results on the amount of splattering for jets of water, isopropanol-water solutions, and soap-water mixtures. Jets were produced by straight tube nozzles of diameter 0.8--5.8 mm, with fully developed turbulent pipe-flow upstream of the nozzle exist. These experiments cover Weber numbers between 130--31,000, Reynolds numbers between 2,700--98,000, and nozzle-to-target separations of 0.2 [<=]l/d[<=]125. Splattering of up to 75 percent of the incoming jet liquid is observed. The results show that only the Weber number and l/d affect the fraction of jet liquid splattered. The presence of surfactants does not alter the splattering. A new correlation for the onset condition for splattering is given. In addition, the authors establish the range of applicability of the model of Lienhard et al. and the authors provide a more accurate set of coefficients for their correlation.

  15. The Effect of Impingement on Transitional Behavior in Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation into the development of flow unsteadiness in impinging axisymmetric underexpanded jets has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The study has examined the effect of an impingement target placed at various distances and angles on transitional behavior of such jets. Two nozzles, with exit Mach numbers of 1.0 and 2.6, were used in this investigation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of nitric oxide (NO PLIF) has been used to identify flow unsteadiness and to image transitional and turbulent flow features. Measurements of the location of the onset of various degrees of unsteady flow behavior have been made using these PLIF images. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons are presented to demonstrate the observed effects of impingement and flow parameters on the process of the transition to turbulence. The presence of the impingement target was found to significantly shorten the distance to transition to turbulence by up to a factor of approximately three, with closer targets resulting in slightly shorter distance to transition and turbulence. The location at which the flow first exhibits unsteadiness was found to have a strong dependence on the presence and location of key flow structures. This paper presents quantitative results on transition criteria for free and impinging jets.

  16. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  17. Jet array impingement with crossflow-correlation of streamwise resolved flow and heat transfer distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Truman, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Correlations for heat transfer coefficients for jets of circular offices and impinging on a surface parallel to the jet orifice plate are presented. The air, following impingement, is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer (impingement) surface. The downstream jets are subjected to a crossflow originating from the upstream jets. Impingement surface heat transfer coefficients resolved to one streamwise jet orifice spacing, averaged across the channel span, are correlated with the associated individual spanwise orifice row jet and crossflow velocities, and with the geometric parameters.

  18. Thermal chip fabrication with arrays of sensors and heaters for micro-scale impingement cooling heat transfer analysis and measurements.

    PubMed

    Shen, C H; Gau, C

    2004-07-30

    The design and fabrication for a thermal chip with an array of temperature sensors and heaters for study of micro-jet impingement cooling heat transfer process are presented. This thermal chip can minimize the heat loss from the system to the ambient and provide a uniform heat flux along the wall, thus local heat transfer processes along the wall can be measured and obtained. The fabrication procedure presented can reach a chip yield of 100%, and every one of the sensors and heaters on the chip is in good condition. In addition, micro-jet impingement cooling experiments are performed to obtain the micro-scale local heat transfer Nusselt number along the wall. Flow visualization for the micro-impinging jet is also made. The experimental results indicate that both the micro-scale impinging jet flow structure and the heat transfer process along the wall is significantly different from the case of large-scale jet impingement cooling process. PMID:15142582

  19. Mach number effect on jet impingement heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Brevet, P; Dorignac, E; Vullierme, J J

    2001-05-01

    An experimental investigation of heat transfer from a single round free jet, impinging normally on a flat plate is described. Flow at the exit plane of the jet is fully developed and the total temperature of the jet is equal to the ambient temperature. Infrared measurements lead to the characterization of the local and averaged heat transfer coefficients and Nusselt numbers over the impingement plate. The adiabatic wall temperature is introduced as the reference temperature for heat transfer coefficient calculation. Various nozzle diameters from 3 mm to 15 mm are used to make the injection Mach number M vary whereas the Reynolds number Re is kept constant. Thus the Mach number influence on jet impingement heat transfer can be directly evaluated. Experiments have been carried out for 4 nozzle diameters, for 3 different nozzle-to-target distances, with Reynolds number ranging from 7200 to 71,500 and Mach number from 0.02 to 0.69. A correlation is obtained from the data for the average Nusselt number. PMID:11460655

  20. Experimental study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gomon, M.

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to study the behavior of highly viscous gravity-driven jets filling a container. Matters of interest are the formation of voids in the fluid pool during the filling process and the unstable behavior of the fluid in the landing region which manifests itself as an oscillating motion. The working fluids used in this research are intended to simulate the flow behavior of molten glass. Qualitative and quantitative results are obtained in a parametric study. The fraction of voids present in the fluid pool after the filling of the container is measured for different parameter values of viscosity and mass flow rate. Likewise, frequencies of the oscillating jet are measured. Results are inconclusive with regard to a correlation between parameter settings and void fractions. As for frequencies, power law correlations are established.

  1. Numerical evaluation of single central jet for turbine disk cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, M. R.; Hadid, A. H.; McConnaughey, P. K.

    The cooling arrangement of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) incorporates two jet rings, each of which produces 19 high-velocity coolant jets. At some operating conditions, the frequency of excitation associated with the 19 jets coincides with the natural frequency of the turbine blades, contributing to fatigue cracking of blade shanks. In this paper, an alternate turbine disk cooling arrangement, applicable to disk faces of zero hub radius, is evaluated, which consists of a single coolant jet impinging at the center of the turbine disk. Results of the CFD analysis show that replacing the jet ring with a single central coolant jet in the HPOTP leads to an acceptable thermal environment at the disk rim. Based on the predictions of flow and temperature fields for operating conditions, the single central jet cooling system was recommended for implementation into the development program of the Technology Test Bed Engine at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Computational analysis for dry-ice sublimation assisted CO2 jet impingement flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Songmi; Lee, Jaeseon

    2015-11-01

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of the novel gas-solid two-phase jet impingement are investigated computationally. When the high pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) flow passes through a nozzle or orifice, it experiences the sudden expansion and the rapid temperature drop occurred by Joule-Thomson effect. This temperature drop causes the lower bulk jet fluid temperature than the CO2 sublimation line, so dry-ice becomes formed. By using CO2 gas-solid mixture as a working fluid of jet impingement, it is expected the heat transfer enhancement can be achieved due to the low bulk temperature and the additional phase change latent heat. In this study, 2D CFD model is created to predict the cooling effect of gas-solid CO2 jet. The gas-solid CO2 flow is considered by Euler-Lagrangian approach of mixed phase and the additional heat transfer module is embedded to account for the sublimation phenomena of the solid state CO2. The jet flow and heat transfer performance of gas-solid CO2 jet is investigated by the variance of flow parameter like Reynolds number, solid phase concentration and jet geometries.

  3. Particle streak velocimetry and its application to impinging laminar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergthorson, Jeff; Dimotakis, Paul

    2002-11-01

    The technique of Particle Streak Velocimetry (PSV) was improved to include digital imaging and image processing, allowing it to compete with PIV or LDV in terms of accuracy and ease of implementation. PSV provides advantages over other techniques, such as low particle mass loading, short run time experiments, and high accuracy velocity data through the direct measurement of Lagrangian trajectories. PSV, coupled with measurements of the static (Bernoulli) pressure drop across a well designed nozzle contraction, provided redundancy in the measurement of the axisymmetric impinging laminar jet. The impinging laminar jet was studied in the intermediate regime where the existence of a stagnation plate will affect the flow out of the nozzle. This nozzle separation to diameter ratio, L/d_j, regime has not been well characterized. The results indicate that a one-dimensional streamfunction formulation is not sufficient to characterize this flow.

  4. Heat transfer measurements and CFD simulations of an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petera, Karel; Dostál, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Heat transport in impinging jets makes a part of many experimental and numerical studies because some similarities can be identified between a pure impingement jet and industrial processes like, for example, the heat transfer at the bottom of an agitated vessel. In this paper, experimental results based on measuring the response to heat flux oscillations applied to the heat transfer surface are compared with CFD simulations. The computational cost of a LES-based approach is usually too high therefore a comparison with less computationally expensive RANS-based turbulence models is made in this paper and a possible improvement of implementing an anisotropic explicit algebraic model for the turbulent heat flux model is evaluated.

  5. A computational study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M.W.

    1998-11-01

    Two commercially-available computational fluid dynamics codes, FIDAP (Fluent, Inc., Lebanon, NH) and FLOW-3D (Flow Science, Inc., Los Alamos, NM), were used to simulate the landing region of jets of highly viscous fluids impinging on flat surfaces. The volume-of-fluid method was combined with finite difference and finite element approaches to predict the jet behavior. Several computational models with varying degrees of physical realism were developed, and the results were compared with experimental observations. In experiments, the jet exhibited several complex behaviors. As soon as it exited the nozzle, the jet began to neck down and become narrower. When it impacted the solid surface, the jet developed an instability near the impact point and buckled to the side. This buckling became a spiraling motion, and the jet spiraled about the impact point. As the jet spiraled around, a cone-shaped pile was build up which eventually became unstable and slumped to the side. While all of these behaviors were occurring, air bubbles, or voids, were being entrapped in the fluid pool. The results obtained from the FLOW-3D models more closely matched the behavior of real jets than the results obtained from /the FIDAP models. Most of the FLOW-3D models predicted all of the significant jet behaviors observed in experiments: necking, buckling, spiraling, slumping, and void entrapment. All of the FIDAP models predicted that the jet would buckle relatively far from the point of impact, whereas the experimentally observed jet behavior indicates that the jets buckle much nearer the impact point. Furthermore, it was shown that FIDAP is incapable of incorporating heat transfer effects into the model, making it unsuitable for this work.

  6. Reduction of glycine particle size by impinging jet crystallization.

    PubMed

    Tari, Tímea; Fekete, Zoltán; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Aigner, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The parameters of crystallization processes determine the habit and particle size distribution of the products. A narrow particle size distribution and a small average particle size are crucial for the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble pharmacons. Thus, particle size reduction is often required during crystallization processes. Impinging jet crystallization is a method that results in a product with a reduced particle size due to the homogeneous and high degree of supersaturation at the impingement point. In this work, the applicability of the impinging jet technique as a new approach in crystallization was investigated for the antisolvent crystallization of glycine. A factorial design was applied to choose the relevant crystallization factors. The results were analysed by means of a statistical program. The particle size distribution of the crystallized products was investigated with a laser diffraction particle size analyser. The roundness and morphology were determined with the use of a light microscopic image analysis system and a scanning electron microscope. Polymorphism was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Headspace gas chromatography was utilized to determine the residual solvent content. Impinging jet crystallization proved to reduce the particle size of glycine. The particle size distribution was appropriate, and the average particle size was an order of magnitude smaller (d(0.5)=8-35 μm) than that achieved with conventional crystallization (d(0.5)=82-680 μm). The polymorphic forms of the products were influenced by the solvent ratio. The quantity of residual solvent in the crystallized products was in compliance with the requirements of the International Conference on Harmonization.

  7. Experimental Optimisation of the Thermal Performance of Impinging Synthetic Jet Heat Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marron, Craig; Persoons, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Zero-net-mass flow synthetic jet devices offer a potential solution for energy- efficient cooling of medium power density electronic components. There remains an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these flows with extended surfaces, which prevents the wider implementation of these devices in the field. This study examines the effect of the main operating parameters on the heat transfer rate and electrical power consumption for a synthetic jet cooled heat sink. Three different heat sink geometries are tested. The results find that a modified sink with a 14 × 14 pin array with the central 6 × 6 pins removed provides superior cooling to either a fully pinned sink or flat plate. Furthermore each heat sink is found to have its own optimum jet orifice-to-sink spacing for heat transfer independent of flow conditions. The optimum heat transfer for the modified sink is H = 34 jet diameters. The effect of frequency on heat transfer is also studied. It is shown that heat transfer increases superlinearly with frequency at higher stroke lengths. The orientation of the impingement surface with respect to gravity has no effect on the heat transfer capabilities of the tested device. These tests are the starting point for further investigation into enhanced synthetic jet impingement surfaces. The equivalent axial fan cooled pinned heat sink (Malico Inc. MFP40- 18) has a thermal resistance of 1.93K/W at a fan power consumption of 0.12W. With the modified pinned heat sink, a synthetic jet at Re = 911, L0/D = 10, H/D = 30 provides a thermal resistance of 2.5K/W at the same power consumption.

  8. Full surface local heat transfer coefficient measurements in a model of an integrally cast impingement cooling geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, D.R.H.; Wang, Z.; Ireland, P.T.; Kohler, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    Cast impingement cooling geometries offer the gas turbine designer higher structural integrity and improved convective cooling when compared to traditional impingement cooling systems, which rely on plate inserts. In this paper, it is shown that the surface that forms the jets contributes significantly to the total cooling. Local heat transfer coefficient distributions have been measured in a model of an engine wall cooling geometry using the transient heat transfer technique. The method employs temperature-sensitive liquid crystals to measure the surface temperature of large-scale perspex models during transient experiments. Full distributions of local Nusselt number on both surfaces of the impingement plate, and on the impingement target plate, are presented at engine representative Reynolds numbers. The relative effects of the impingement plate thermal boundary condition and the coolant supply temperature on the target plate heat transfer have been determined by maintaining an isothermal boundary condition at the impingement plate during the transient tests. The results are discussed in terms of the interpreted flow field.

  9. Jet impingement and primary atomization of non-Newtonian liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, Jennifer A.

    The effect of liquid rheology on the flowfield resulting from non-Newtonian impinging jets was investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data were acquired using a unique experimental apparatus developed to examine the jet impingement of non-Newtonian liquids. The analytical modeling was aimed at determining which physical mechanisms transform non-Newtonian impinging jets into a sheet with waves on its surface, how those waves influence sheet fragmentation and subsequent ligament formation, and how those ligaments break up to form drops (primary atomization). Prior to impinging jet measurements, the rheological properties of 0.5 wt.-% CMC-7HF, 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.06 wt.-% CMC-7MF 75 wt.-% glycerin, 1 wt.-% Kappa carrageenan, and 1 wt.-% Agar were determined through the use of rotational and capillary rheometers. Two approaches were used to experimentally measure solid-like gel propellant simulant static surface tension. All liquids exhibited pseudoplastic rheological behavior. At various atomizer geometric and flow parameters sheet instability wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop sizes were measured from high-speed video images. Results showed that viscosity dependence on shear rate is not the sole factor that determines atomization likelihood. Instead, a key role is played by the interaction of the gelling agent with the solvent at the molecular level. For instance, despite high jet exit velocities and varying atomizer geometric parameters HPC gel propellant simulants did not atomize. The molecular nature of HPC results in physical entanglement of polymer chains when gelled, which resists liquid breakup and subsequent spray formation. However, atomization was achieved with Agar, which absorbs the water and forms a network around it rather than bonding to it. The measured liquid sheet instability wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop sizes were compared to predictions from a

  10. The impingement of sonic and sub-sonic jets onto a flat plate at inclined angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crafton, Jimmy Wayne

    The flow field associated with a jet impinging onto a surface at an inclined angle is investigated using the image-based technologies of Temperature- and Pressure-Sensitive Paints and Particle Image Velocimetry. These diagnostics are used to produce two-dimensional measurements of temperature, Nusselt number, and pressure on the impingement surface and two-components of velocity above the surface. In the process of measuring Nusselt number a novel technique for determining the adiabatic wall temperature has been developed. This image-based technique was used to measure the adiabatic wall temperature on the impingement surface beneath both compressible and incompressible jets. The results of this investigation indicate that as a free jet impinges on a flat surface at an inclined angle the jet is turned by and spread laterally onto the impingement surface. The impingement angle of the jet is the dominant parameter in determining the rate of turning/spreading for the jet. Qualitatively, the structure of the half maximum pressure contour on the impingement surface is similar to an ellipse created by projecting the nozzle through the impingement surface. The center of the ellipse is located near the location of maximum pressure and the eccentricity is a function of the impingement angle. The width of the minor axis is just over one jet diameter. The point of maximum pressure, Nusselt number, and the stagnation point are each located upstream of the geometric impingement point, and this location is a strong function of impingement angle. The relative locations of the stagnation point, the point of maximum Nusselt number, the point of maximum pressure, and the geometric impingement point are identified and a simple correlation for the location of each of these points relative to the geometric impingement point is presented. Finally, the maximum value of both pressure and Nusselt number are found to be a function of impingement distance and impingement angle.

  11. Discharge coefficients of impingement and film cooling holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, T.; Brown, A.; Garret, S.

    1985-03-01

    In this article measurements of fluid flow through impingement and film cooling holes for typical turbine blade cooling systems are presented. The purpose of the measurements was to determine hole discharge coefficients over a range of Reynolds numbers from 5,000 to 30,000 and to observe in this range the dependence of discharge coefficient on Reynolds number. The effect of hole geometry, that is, sharp edged inlet or corner radius inlet, on discharge coefficients is also measured. Correlations relating discharge coefficients to Reynolds number, corner radius to hole diameter ratio, and blowing parameter are suggested.

  12. Impingement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uziel, Mary S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the impact of impingement in fishery resources at different power plants in the United States, covering publications of 1976-77. Consideration is given to engineering studies and biological effects for reducing impingement. A list of 96 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Effects of surface roughness on the average heat transfer of an impinging air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Beitelmal, A.H.; Saad, M.A.; Patel, C.D.

    2000-01-01

    Localized cooling by impinging flow has been used in many industrial applications such as in cooling of gas turbine blades and drying processes. Here, effect of surface roughness of a uniformly heated plate on the average heat transfer characteristics of an impinging air jet was experimentally investigated. Two aluminum plates, one with a flat surface and the second with some roughness added to the surface were fabricated. The roughness took the shape of a circular array of protrusions of 0.5mm base and 0.5mm height. A circular Kapton heater of the same diameter as the plates (70mm) supplied the necessary power. The surfaces of the plates were polished to reduce radiation heat losses and the back and sides insulated to reduce conduction heat losses. temperatures were measured over a Reynolds number ranging from 9,600 to 38,500 based on flow rate through a 6.85mm diameter nozzle. The temperature measurements were repeated for nozzle exit-to-plate spacing, z/d, ranging from 1 to 10. The average Nusselt number for both cases was plotted versus the Reynolds number and their functional correlation was determined. The results indicate an increase of up to 6.0% of the average Nusselt number due to surface roughness. This modest increase provides evidence to encourage further investigation and characterization of the surface roughness as a parameter for enhancing heat transfer.

  14. Mixing and Noise Benefit Versus Thrust Penalty in Supersonic Jets Using Impingement Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation on the effect of impingement tones generated by obstacles of various geometries on the spreading of a supersonic jet flow. A rectangular supersonic jet was produced using a convergent-divergent nozzle that was operated near its design point (with shocks minimized). The immersion of obstacles in the flow produced an intense impingement tone which then propagated upstream (as feedback) to the jet lip and excited the antisymmetric hydrodynamic mode in the jet, thus setting up a resonant self-sustaining loop. The violent flapping motion of the jet due to excitation of the antisymmetric mode, combined with the unsteady wakes of the obstacles, produced large changes in jet mixing. It was possible to control the frequency and amplitude of the impingement tone excitation by varying the nozzle-to-obstacle distance and the obstacle immersion. By proper shaping of the obstacles it was possible to reduce the thrust penalty significantly.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Jet Impingement Heat Transfer Using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Brian Paul

    1997-01-01

    Jet impingement cooling of a hypersonic airfoil leading edge is experimentally investigated using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCS) to measure surface temperature. The experiment uses computer data acquisition with digital imaging of the TLCs to determine heat transfer coefficients during a transient experiment. The data reduction relies on analysis of a coupled transient conduction - convection heat transfer problem that characterizes the experiment. The recovery temperature of the jet is accounted for by running two experiments with different heating rates, thereby generating a second equation that is used to solve for the recovery temperature. The resulting solution requires a complicated numerical iteration that is handled by a computer. Because the computational data reduction method is complex, special attention is paid to error assessment. The error analysis considers random and systematic errors generated by the instrumentation along with errors generated by the approximate nature of the numerical methods. Results of the error analysis show that the experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients are accurate to within 15%. The error analysis also shows that the recovery temperature data may be in error by more than 50%. The results show that the recovery temperature data is only reliable when the recovery temperature of the jet is greater than 5 C, i.e. the jet velocity is in excess of 100 m/s. Parameters that were investigated include nozzle width, distance from the nozzle exit to the airfoil surface, and jet velocity. Heat transfer data is presented in graphical and tabular forms. An engineering analysis of hypersonic airfoil leading edge cooling is performed using the results from these experiments. Several suggestions for the improvement of the experimental technique are discussed.

  16. Computational study of triangular waveform oscillation mode to the temperature distribution of a heated wall impinged by a synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinaldi, Rhakasywi, Damora; Defriadi, Rikko

    2012-06-01

    This research is a continuation of synthetic jet characteristics investigation over convective cooling of impinging jet model. The synthetic jet cooling uses an air flowing in a vertical direction into the heated wall. This model uses an oscilating membrane to push and pull the air from and to the cavity. The purpose of this model of synthetic jet is to create vortices pair to come out from nozzle which will accelerate the heat transfer process occurring at the wall. This heat transfer enhancement principle has became the basis to simulate an alternative cooling system in order to substitute the conventional fan cooling in electronic devices due to its advantage for having a small form factor and low noise. The investigation is conducted in the computational work. In this research, the synthetic jet prototype model was simulated to examine the distribution of heat flow on the walls using a mathematical turbulent model k-ω SST. Meshing order was elements Tet/Hybrid and type Tgrid and the number of grid was more than 233.886 in order to ensure detail discretization and more accurate calculation results. This simulation used a triangular waveform as it excitation source. The frequencies of excitation were 80 Hz, 120 Hz, 160 Hz and the amplitude was 1 m/s. Using this variation, the main goal is to increase the heat transfer coefficient generated by the synthetic jet blow.

  17. Mathematical modeling of a gas jet impinging on a two phase bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Álvárez, J.; Ramírez-Argáez, Marco A.; González-Rivera, C.

    2012-09-01

    In this work a three phase 3D mathematical model was developed using the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) algorithm, which is able to accurately describe the cavity geometry and size as well as the liquid flow patterns created when a gas jet impinges on a two phase liquid free surface. These phenomena are commonly found in steelmaking operations such as in the Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) and the Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) where oxygen jets impinge on a steel bath and they control heat, momentum and mass transfer. The cavity formed in the liquids by the impinging jet depends on a force balance at the free surface where the inertial force of the jet governs these phenomena. The inertial force of the jet and its angle play important roles, being the lowest angle the best choice to shear the bath and promote stronger circulation and better mixing in the liquids.

  18. Trailing edge cooling using angled impingement on surface enhanced with cast chevron arrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Heneveld, Benjamin E.; Brown, Glenn E.; Klinger, Jill

    2015-05-26

    A gas turbine engine component, including: a pressure side (12) having an interior surface (34); a suction side (14) having an interior surface (36); a trailing edge portion (30); and a plurality of suction side and pressure side impingement orifices (24) disposed in the trailing edge portion (30). Each suction side impingement orifice is configured to direct an impingement jet (48) at an acute angle (52) onto a target area (60) that encompasses a tip (140) of a chevron (122) within a chevron arrangement (120) formed in the suction side interior surface. Each pressure side impingement orifice is configured to direct an impingement jet at an acute angle onto an elongated target area that encompasses a tip of a chevron within a chevron arrangement formed in the pressure side interior surface.

  19. Jet Velocity Profile Effects on Spray Characteristics of Impinging Jets at High Reynolds and Weber Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.; Kulkarni, Varun; Sojka, Paul E.

    2014-11-01

    While like-on-like doublet impinging jet atomization has been extensively studied in the literature, there is poor agreement between experimentally observed spray characteristics and theoretical predictions (Ryan et al. 1995, Anderson et al. 2006). Recent works (Bremond and Villermaux 2006, Choo and Kang 2007) have introduced a non-uniform jet velocity profile, which lead to a deviation from the standard assumptions for the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter. These works have assumed a parabolic profile to serve as another limit to the traditional uniform jet velocity profile assumption. Incorporating a non-uniform jet velocity profile results in the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter depending on the sheet azimuthal angle. In this work, the 1/7th power-law turbulent velocity profile is assumed to provide a closer match to the flow behavior of jets at high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which correspond to the impact wave regime. Predictions for the maximum wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop diameter are compared with experimental observations. The results demonstrate better agreement between experimentally measured values and predictions, compared to previous models. U.S. Army Research Office under the Multi-University Research Initiative Grant Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  20. The effect of confinement on the development of an axisymmetric wall-jet in confined jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of a confined developing axisymmetric wall-jet is reported. The wall-jet is formed downstream of a circular, confined, impinging jet of water. Stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) experiments are conducted at three different nozzle-to-plate spacings (2, 4 and 8 jet diameters) and across Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 9000. Special attention is paid to the development of the wall-jet. The growth rate of the boundary layer thickness, decay rate of the local maximum velocity, and velocity profile scaling for both the inner- and outer-layer are investigated. Measurements are obtained with a maximum spatial resolution of 25 μm and a temporal resolution of 750 Hz. Both ensemble-averaged and instantaneous time-resolved three-component, two-dimensional (3C-2D) flow fields are obtained and analyzed. The upper confinement plate is found to limit the supply of ambient liquid for both the impinging-jet and wall-jet entrainment, and thus significantly influences the wall-jet development; the growth and decay rate of the wall-jet are shown to be greatest at the smallest confinement height. The influence of these confining effects on recirculation patterns and coherent-structure evolution is also reported. These flow field measurements and analyses will serve to inform a variety of practical applications that use impinging jets.

  1. Conjugate heat transfer study of a turbulent slot jet impinging on a moving plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achari, A. Madhusudana; Das, Manab Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulation of the flow field and conjugate heat transfer in an impinging jet with moving impingement plate is one of the important problems as it mimics closely with practical applications in industries. The Yang-Shih version of low Reynolds number k-ɛ model has been used to resolve the flow field and the temperature field in a two-dimensional, steady, incompressible, confined, turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a moving flat plate of finite thickness. The turbulence intensity and the Reynolds number considered at the inlet are 2 % and 15,000, respectively. The bottom face of the impingement plate has been maintained at a constant temperature higher than the nozzle exit temperature. The confinement plate has been considered to be adiabatic. The nozzle-to-surface spacing for the above study has been taken to be 6 and the surface-to-jet velocity ratios have been taken over a range of 0.25-1. The effects of impingement plate motion on the flow field and temperature field have been discussed elaborately with reference to stationary impingement plate. The dependence of flow field and fluid temperature field on impingement plate motion has been analyzed by plotting streamlines, isotherms for different plate speeds. A thorough study of flow characteristics for different surface-to-jet velocity ratios has been carried out by plotting profiles of mean vertical and horizontal components of velocity, pressure distribution, local shear stress distribution. The isotherms in the impingement plate of finite thickness, the distributions of solid-fluid interface temperature, the local Nusselt number, and the local heat flux for different surface-to-jet velocity ratios added to the understanding of conjugate heat transfer phenomenon.

  2. Analysis of impingement heat transfer for two parallel liquid-metal slot jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for determining heat transfer by impinging liquid-metal slot jets. The method involves mapping the jet flow region, which is bounded by free streamlines, into a potential plane where it becomes a uniform flow in a channel of constant width. The energy equation is transformed into potential plane coordinates and is solved in the channel flow region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution back into the physical plane and obtain the desired heat-transfer characteristics. The analysis given here determines the heat-transfer characteristics for two parallel liquid-metal slot jets impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jets are inviscid and that molecular conduction is dominating heat diffusion. Wall temperature distributions along the heated plate are obtained as a function of spacing between the jets and the jet Peclet number.

  3. Ground vortex formation for uniform and nonuniform jets impinging on a ground plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Cavage, William M.

    1992-08-01

    An experimental investigation of the impingement of a single circular jet on a ground plane in a cross flow is presented. This geometry is a simplified model of the interaction of propulsive jet exhaust from a V/STOL aircraft with the ground in forward flight. Variation of observed ground vortex size with cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio is consistent with previous observations.

  4. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  5. Flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactor by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Youzhi; Qi, Guisheng; Jiao, Weizhou; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-08-01

    The flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactors (FIJRs) were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The effects of the Reynolds number (Re) and the ratio of jet distance to jet diameter (w/d) on flow behavior were discussed for equal volumetric flow rates of the two jets. The impingement plane, instantaneous velocity, mean velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) distribution of FIJRs are measured from captured images using the PIV technique. As Re increases, the average diameter of the impingement plane linearly increases. The instability of the liquid is closely related to the jet velocity or the Re. However, the stagnation point is insensitive to the variation of the Re. The droplets break up from the turbulent liquid in the ‘wall-free’ environment of FIJRs, so that the liquid back-flow found in confined impinging jet reactors (CIJRs) is not observed. Increasing the Re from 1800–4100 or decreasing the w/d from 20–6 plays a similar role in increasing the TKE values and intensifying turbulence, which promotes the momentum transfer and mixing efficiency in FIJRs.

  6. Flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactor by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Youzhi; Qi, Guisheng; Jiao, Weizhou; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-08-01

    The flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactors (FIJRs) were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The effects of the Reynolds number (Re) and the ratio of jet distance to jet diameter (w/d) on flow behavior were discussed for equal volumetric flow rates of the two jets. The impingement plane, instantaneous velocity, mean velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) distribution of FIJRs are measured from captured images using the PIV technique. As Re increases, the average diameter of the impingement plane linearly increases. The instability of the liquid is closely related to the jet velocity or the Re. However, the stagnation point is insensitive to the variation of the Re. The droplets break up from the turbulent liquid in the ‘wall-free’ environment of FIJRs, so that the liquid back-flow found in confined impinging jet reactors (CIJRs) is not observed. Increasing the Re from 1800-4100 or decreasing the w/d from 20-6 plays a similar role in increasing the TKE values and intensifying turbulence, which promotes the momentum transfer and mixing efficiency in FIJRs.

  7. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane therebetween. Each band includes a nozzle wall, a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and the nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The impingement plate has a turned flange welded to the inturned flange. A backing plate overlies the turned flange and aligned apertures are formed through the backing plate and turned flange to direct and focus cooling flow onto the side wall of the nozzle segment.

  8. Characterization of an impinging jet into porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Alhani, Salwan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, characteristic behavior of a liquid jet into porous hydrophobic / hydrophilic particle media is investigated. In porous media, the capillary effect becomes significant, especially when the jet Reynolds Number is low. To analyze the cavity creation phenomena, the effect of jet's diameter, speed and acceleration as well as particles' size are carefully studied. Such knowledge of fluid behavior will provide guidance for medicine injection process. This work is supported by Caltech GALCIT STEM program.

  9. Measurement of heat transfer from a supersonic impinging jet onto an inclined flat plate at 45 deg

    SciTech Connect

    Chan Lee; Myung Kyoon Chung ); Kyung Bin Lim; Yoon Soo Kang )

    1991-08-01

    The problem of heat and momentum transfer by the impingement of a jet on a solid object arises in a wide variety of engineering devices, such as multistage rocket separation, jet engine exhaust impingement of V/STOL aircraft, shock impingement heating, and so on. Previous investigations of this problem were mainly conducted with subsonic impinging jets. The present experiment was performed with a supersonic jet from a rocket nozzle. Since direct instantaneous measurements of high temperature and heat flux on the plat surface are enarly impossible in heated supersonic impinging jet by presently available techniques, local heat transfer was obtained by applying a locally quasi-one-dimensional heat conduction model to the temperature data measured beneath the plate surface. This indirect method was used to determine the Nusselt number, as is explained.

  10. Investigation of impinging jet resonant modes using unsteady pressure-sensitive paint measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy; Edstrand, Adam; Alvi, Farrukh; Cattafesta, Louis; Yorita, Daisuke; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-05-01

    At given nozzle to plate spacings, the flow field of high-speed impinging jets is known to be characterized by a resonance phenomenon. Large coherent structures that convect downstream and impinge on the surface create strong acoustic waves that interact with the inherently unstable shear layer at the nozzle exit. This feedback mechanism, driven by the coherent structures in the jet shear layer, can either be axisymmetric or helical in nature. Fast-response pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is applied to the impingement surface to map the unsteady pressure distribution associated with these resonant modes. Phase-averaged results acquired at several kHz are obtained using a flush mounted unsteady pressure transducer on the impingement plate as a reference signal. Tests are conducted on a Mach 1.5 jet at nozzle to plate spacings of . The resulting phase-averaged distribution reveals dramatically different flow fields at the corresponding impingement heights. The existence of a purely axisymmetric mode with a frequency of 6.3 kHz is identified at and is characterized by concentric rings of higher/lower pressure that propagate radially with increasing phase. Two simultaneous modes are observed at with one being a dominant symmetric mode at 7.1 kHz and the second a sub-dominant helical mode at 4.3 kHz. Complimentary phase-conditioned Schlieren images are also obtained visualizing the flow structures associated with each mode and are consistent with the PSP results.

  11. Unsteady flow and heat transfer analysis of an impinging synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazdidi-Tehrani, Farzad; Karami, Mahdi; Jahromi, Mehdi

    2011-11-01

    The present paper focuses on the analysis of unsteady flow and heat transfer regarding an axisymmetric impinging synthetic jet on a constant heat flux disc. Synthetic jet is a zero net mass flux jet that provides an unsteady flow without any external source of fluid. Present results are validated against the available experimental data showing that the SST/ k - ω turbulence model is more accurate and reliable than the standard and low- Re k - ɛ models for predicting heat transfer from an impinging synthetic jet. It is found that the time-averaged Nusselt number enhances as the nozzle-to-plate distance is increased. As the oscillation frequency in the range of 16-400 Hz is increased, the heat transfer is enhanced. It is shown that the instantaneous Nu distribution along the wall is influenced mainly by the interaction of produced vortex ring and wall boundary layer. Also, the fluctuation level of Nu decreases as the frequency is raised.

  12. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Velocity Measurements in Supersonic Underexpanded Impinging Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Barthel, Brett; Alderfer, David W.; Novak, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an application of nitric oxide (NO) flow-tagging velocimetry to impinging underexpanded jet flows issuing from a Mach 2.6 nozzle. The technique reported herein utilizes a single laser, single camera system to obtain planar maps of the streamwise component of velocity. Whereas typical applications of this technique involve comparing two images acquired at different time delays, this application uses a single image and time delay. The technique extracts velocity by assuming that particular regions outside the jet flowfield have negligible velocity and may therefore serve as a stationary reference against which to measure motion of the jet flowfield. By taking the average of measurements made in 100 single-shot images for each flow condition, streamwise velocities of between -200 and +1,000 m/s with accuracies of between 15 and 50 m/s are reported within the jets. Velocity measurements are shown to explain otherwise seemingly anomalous impingement surface pressure measurements.

  13. Apparatus for impingement cooling a side wall adjacent an undercut region of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and vanes therebetween. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. Slots are formed through the inturned flange along the nozzle side wall. A plate having through-apertures extending between opposite edges thereof is disposed in each slot, the slots and plates being angled such that the cooling medium exiting the apertures in the second cavity lie close to the side wall for focusing and targeting cooling medium onto the side wall.

  14. Investigation of flow structure and heat transfer characteristics in an array of impinging slot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozmen, Yucel; Ipek, Gokhan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an experimental and numerical study is carried out to investigate flow field and heat transfer characteristics of unconfined and confined arrays of four turbulent slot air jets issuing from the lower surface and impinging normally on the upper surface. Pressure and temperature distributions on the surfaces were obtained for the nozzle-to-plate spacing (H/W) of 1-10 and for the Reynolds numbers in the range of 5000-15,000 at the jet-to-jet centerline spacing (S/W) of 9. The effects of jet confinement, Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing on the flow structure and heat transfer were investigated. Pressure distributions are obtained experimentally and numerically, while heat transfer distributions are computed numerically. It is observed that the surface pressure distributions on both impingement and confinement plates are independent from the Reynolds number, while they have been largely affected from the nozzle-to-plate spacing. Jet confinement causes a considerable difference at the flow field especially for small nozzle-to-plate spacings. Subatmospheric regions are not observed for unconfined jet. However three different types of subatmospheric pressure regions occur on both impingement and confinement plates for confined jet. Nusselt distributions on the impingement plate for both unconfined and confined jet configurations depend on the Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing. It is concluded that there is a strong correlation between subatmospheric regions and secondary peaks in Nusselt distributions. The numerical results obtained using the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model is in good accordance with the experimental results for moderate values of nozzle-to-plate spacings.

  15. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks under both normal and zero gravity conditions. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted indicating regions where viscous forces were not significant when computing free surface shapes. The demarcation between the viscous and inviscid region was found to depend upon the flow Reynolds number and the ratio between the jet and disk radius.

  16. OVERFLOW Validation for Predicting Plume Impingement of Underexpanded Axisymmetric Jets onto Angled Flat Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry C.; Klopfer, Goetz

    2011-01-01

    This report documents how OVERFLOW, a computational fluid dynamics code, predicts plume impingement of underexpanded axisymmetric jets onto both perpendicular and inclined flat plates. The effects of the plume impinging on a range of plate inclinations varying from 90deg to 30deg are investigated and compared to the experimental results in Reference 1 and 2. The flow fields are extremely complex due to the interaction between the shock waves from the free jet and those deflected by the plate. Additionally, complex mixing effects create very intricate structures in the flow. The experimental data is very limited, so these validation studies will focus only on cold plume impingement on flat and inclined plates. This validation study will help quantify the error in the OVERFLOW simulation when applied to stage separation scenarios.

  17. Flow pulsation in the near-wall layer of impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, V.

    2013-04-01

    Pulsation of impinging jets promises to become a useful way towards achieving the highest possible rate of passive scalar convective transport between fluid and a wall. Author investigated experimentally steady and pulsated impingement by hot-wire anemometer traversing along a radial line at a small height above the impingement wall. The data have shown two conspicuous local maxima of fluctuation intensity. In an attempt to reach understanding of these phenomena, numerical flowfield computations were also made, fitted to the experimental conditions. Despite simplification (isotropic handling of unsteadiness, eddies computed as Reynolds-type phase averages) the synergetic approach (experiment & computation) revealed interesting correlation and resulted in useful interpretations of the old problem of the off-axis extremes - and also brings new views on their behaviour in the pulsating jet case.

  18. Excavation of Regolith by Impinging Jets of Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.; Vu, Bruce T.; Donahue, Carly M.

    2006-01-01

    There are many situations in nature and technology where particulate matter is excavated by a fluid jet. Such a process is often used to excavate soil or to dig wells. Air jets are often used to transport particulate matter such as powders in various industrial processes. Similar situations occur in nature, as when waterfalls scour holes in sand. In other cases, the excavation is unwanted such as when a rocket lands on the sandy or dusty surface of a planet or moon. Recent research into regolith excavation by gas jets has obtained new insights into the physical processes of that excavation, and these may lead to new advances in technology for more efficient fluid-jet excavation processes and for better control of the unwanted excavation effects of landing rockets. This talk will explain the new insights and point to future work supporting lunar exploration.

  19. Heat transfer characteristics within an array of impinging jets. Effects of crossflow temperature relative to jet temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Su, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Spanwise average heat fluxes, resolved in the streamwise direction to one stream-wise hole spacing were measured for two-dimensional arrays of circular air jets impinging on a heat transfer surface parallel to the jet orifice plate. The jet flow, after impingement, was constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and heat transfer surface. The crossflow originated from the jets following impingement and an initial crossflow was present that approached the array through an upstream extension of the channel. The regional average heat fluxes are considered as a function of parameters associated with corresponding individual spanwise rows within the array. A linear superposition model was employed to formulate appropriate governing parameters for the individual row domain. The effects of flow history upstream of an individual row domain are also considered. The results are formulated in terms of individual spanwise row parameters. A corresponding set of streamwise resolved heat transfer characteristics formulated in terms of flow and geometric parameters characterizing the overall arrays is described.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow Structure of Supersonic Impinging Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the jet structure associated with sound production by a supersonic impinging jet is presented. Large plate impinging tones are investigated for a nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) of 4 and nozzle-to-plate spacings between 1 and 5 nozzle exit diameters, where NPR is equal to the ratio of the stagnation pressure to the pressure at the nozzle lip. Results from phase-locked shadowgraph and phase-averaged digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) studies indicate that, during the oscillation cycle, the Mach disk oscillates axially, a well defined recirculation zone is created in the subsonic impingement region and moves toward the plate, and the compression and expansion regions in the outer supersonic flow move downstream, Sound appears to be generated in the wall jet at approximately 2.6R from the jet axis, where R is the nozzle exit radius. The oscillatory motion in the wall jet is the result of the periodic fluid motion in the near wall region.

  1. ANSYS Fluent Modelling of an Underexpanded Supersonic Sootblower Jet Impinging into Recovery Boiler Tube Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroudi, Shahed

    Sootblowers generate high pressure supersonic steam jets to control fireside deposition on heat transfer tubes of a kraft recovery boiler. Sootblowing is energy expensive, using 3-12% of the mill's total steam production. This motivates research on the dynamics of sootblower jet interaction with tubes and deposits, to optimize their use. A CFD investigation was performed using ANSYS Fluent 15.0 to model three-dimensional steady-state impingement of a Mach 2.5 mildly underexpanded (PR 1.2) air jet onto arrays of cylindrical tubes with and without fins, at various nozzle-to-tube centerline offsets. A free jet and four impingement cases for each of the economizer and generating bank geometries are compared to experimental visualizations. Pressure distributions on impinging surfaces suggest that the fins in the economizer produce a reduced but uniform sootblowing force. Pressure contours along the tubes (in the vertical direction) show a sharp decline one tube diameter away from the jet mid-plane.

  2. Development of an Impinging-jet Fuel-injection Valve Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Hemmeter, G H

    1931-01-01

    During an investigation to determine the possibilities and limitations of a two-stroke-cycle engine and ignition, it was necessary to develop a fuel injection valve nozzle to produce a disk-shaped, well dispersed spray. Preliminary tests showed that two smooth jets impinging upon each other at an angle of 74 degrees gave a spray with the desired characteristics. Nozzles were built on this basis and, when used in fuel-injection valves, produced a spray that fulfilled the original requirements. The spray is so well dispersed that it can be carried along with an air stream of comparatively low velocity or entrained with the fuel jet from a round-hole orifice. The characteristics of the spray from an impinging-jet nozzle limits its application to situations where wide dispersion is required by the conditions in the engine cylinder and the combustion chamber.

  3. Analysis of heat transfer for a normally impinging liquid-metal slot jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional liquid-metal slot jet that is impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate is analyzed. The distributions of wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient are obtained as functions of position along the plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jet is inviscid and that molecular condition is dominating heat diffusion. The solution is obtained by mapping the jet flow region into a potential plane where it occupies a strip of uniform width. The energy equation is transformed into potential coordinates, and an exact solution obtained in the strip region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution into the physical plane.

  4. Noise Characteristics of a Four-Jet Impingement Device Inside a Broadband Engine Noise Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.; Hutcheson, Florence V.

    2015-01-01

    The noise generation mechanisms for four directly impinging supersonic jets are investigated employing implicit large eddy simulations with a higher-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory shock-capturing scheme. Impinging jet devices are often used as an experimental apparatus to emulate a broadband noise source. Although such devices have been used in many experiments, a detailed investigation of the noise generation mechanisms has not been conducted before. Thus, the underlying physical mechanisms that are responsible for the generation of sound waves are not well understood. The flow field is highly complex and contains a wide range of temporal and spatial scales relevant for noise generation. Proper orthogonal decomposition of the flow field is utilized to characterize the unsteady nature of the flow field involving unsteady shock oscillations, large coherent turbulent flow structures, and the sporadic appearance of vortex tubes in the center of the impingement region. The causality method based on Lighthill's acoustic analogy is applied to link fluctuations of flow quantities inside the source region to the acoustic pressure in the far field. It will be demonstrated that the entropy fluctuation term in the Lighthill's stress tensor plays a vital role in the noise generation process. Consequently, the understanding of the noise generation mechanisms is employed to develop a reduced-order linear acoustic model of the four-jet impingement device. Finally, three linear acoustic FJID models are used as broadband noise sources inside an engine nacelle and the acoustic scattering results are validated against far-field acoustic experimental data.

  5. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating corium crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Presented is an analysis of the results of the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten corium initially at 3080/sup 0/K was directed downward upon a stainless steel plate. The experiments are a continuation of a program of reactor material tests investigating LWR severe accident phenomena. Objective of the present analysis is to determine the existence or nonexistence of a corium crust during impingement from comparison of the measured heatup of the plate (as measured by thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the steel surface) with model calculations assuming alternately the presence and absence of a stable crust during impingement.

  6. Identification of the resonant modes in supersonic impinging jets using fast response pressure sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy; Edstrand, Adam; Alvi, Farrukh; Cattafesta, Louis; Yorita, Daisuke; Asai, Keisuke

    2013-11-01

    High speed impinging jets have been the focus of several studies owing to their practical application and resonance dominated flow-field. The current study utilizes fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) to examine the jet instability modes of a Mach 1.5 normally impinging jet. These modes are associated with high amplitude, discrete peaks in the power spectra and can be identified as having either axisymmetric or azimuthal modes. Phase-averaged images are acquired at various nozzle to plate spacings and at frequencies of several kHz. Using an unsteady pressure transducer on the impingement surface as a reference signal, a high speed LED with a wavelength of 460 nm is used to illuminate the PSP. The paint fluorescence is then recorded with a CCD camera. The average pressure distribution is removed from the acquired images, resulting in the phase-averaged unsteady pressure distribution. The processed images reveal axisymmetric modes for all nozzle to plate spacings tested except at 4 jet diameters. At this spacing, three distinct resonant modes are identified.

  7. Micro device design and fabrication for the experimental investigation of jet impingement on an array of micro pin fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndao, Sidy; Peles, Yoav; Jensen, Michael K.

    2014-10-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication, and demonstration of micro devices for the experimental investigation of heat transfer characteristics of jets impinging on an array of micro pin fins for high heat flux microelectronics and photonics cooling applications. The micro devices, fabricated using MEMS fabrication techniques, consist of an array of radially spaced micro pin fins with diameters ranging from 50 µm-125 µm, height of 230 µm, pitch of 250 µm, and a base area of 2  ×  2 mm2. The micro pin fins are of different geometries, namely circular, elliptical, hydrofoil, square, and rectangular. Single-phase and boiling heat transfer experiments were carried out using refrigerant R134a. Enhancement of both the single-phase and the two-phase heat transfer coefficients were observed. Due to the presence of the micro pin fins, the boiling heat transfer was characterized by the suppression of boiling hysteresis. With a better heater design, the proposed micro device is an excellent platform for studying jet impingement heat transfer on micro pin fins.

  8. Local quenching phenomena of a lean premixed flat flame impinging with a pulsating air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahagi, Y.; Makino, I.

    2014-08-01

    Local quenching phenomena of a lean methane air premixed flat flame formed horizontally in a wall stagnating flow impinging with a pulsating air jet has been investigated experimentally. The burner system consists of 40mm inverted nozzle burner and a solid wall with 8mm diameter air jet placed in line vertically. The pulsating frequencies set up to 100Hz while the jet intensities generate up to 6 m/s by a loud speaker. Approximately '00mm disk shape flame front is curved by the pulsating air jet and the air jet impacting point is locally quenched. The fuel concentration of quenching start condition increases with increasing the intensity of air jet, because the increased jet intensity linked with the flame strain rate gain. For weak jet intensity range, the quenching hole becomes directly to develop the whole flame extinction. On the other hand, for moderate or strong jet condition, the flame can recover from the local quenching phenomena. In this condition, once the quenching hole creates, but the hole may close by the flame propagation or reigniting process. Then, the whole flame extinction limits are lower than no jet impacting condition depending on the circumstances.

  9. Air jet erosion test on plasma sprayed surface by varying erodent impingement pressure and impingement angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Ajit; Behera, Asit; Mishra, S. C.; Pani, S.; Parida, P.

    2015-02-01

    Fly-ash premixed with quartz and illmenite powder in different weight proportions are thermal sprayed on mild steel and copper substrates at various input power levels of the plasma torch ranging from 11 kW to 21 kW DC. The erosion test has done using Air Jet erosion test Reg (As per ASTM G76) with silica erodent typically 150-250 pm in size. Multiple tests were performed at increasing the time duration from 60 sec to 180 sec with increasing pressure (from 1 bar to 2.5 bar) and angle (60° & 90°). This study reveals that the impact velocity and impact angle are two most significant parameters among various factors influencing the wear rate of these coatings. The mechanisms and microstructural changes that arise during erosion wear are studied by using SEM. It is found that, when erodent are impacting the fresh un-eroded surface, material removal occurs by the continuous evolution of craters on the surface. Upper layer splats are removed out after 60 sec and second layer splat erosion starts. Based on these observations Physical models are developed. Some graphs plotted between mass loss-rate versus time period/impact Pressure/impact Angle gives good correlation with surface features observed.

  10. Analysis of potential for jet-impingement erosion from leaking steam generator tubes during severe accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Diercks, D. R.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2002-05-01

    This report summarizes analytical evaluation of crack-opening areas and leak rates of superheated steam through flaws in steam generator tubes and erosion of neighboring tubes due to jet impingement of superheated steam with entrained particles from core debris created during severe accidents. An analytical model for calculating crack-opening area as a function of time and temperature was validated with tests on tubes with machined flaws. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to calculate the jet velocity impinging on neighboring tubes as a function of tube spacing and crack-opening area. Erosion tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-velocity erosion rig at the University of Cincinnati, using micrometer-sized nickel particles mixed in with high-temperature gas from a burner. The erosion results, together with analytical models, were used to estimate the erosive effects of superheated steam with entrained aerosols from the core during severe accidents.

  11. Role of the confinement of a root canal on jet impingement during endodontic irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, B.; Boutsioukis, C.; Heijnen, G. L.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Versluis, M.

    2012-12-01

    During a root canal treatment the root canal is irrigated with an antimicrobial fluid, commonly performed with a needle and a syringe. Irrigation of a root canal with two different types of needles can be modeled as an impinging axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric jet. These jets are investigated experimentally with high-speed Particle Imaging Velocimetry, inside and outside the confinement (concave surface) of a root canal, and compared to theoretical predictions for these jets. The efficacy of irrigation fluid refreshment with respect to the typical reaction time of the antimicrobial fluid with a biofilm is characterized with a non-dimensional Damköhler number. The pressure that these jets induce on a wall or at the apex of the root canal is also measured. The axisymmetric jet is found to be stable and its velocity agrees with the theoretical prediction for this type of jet, however, a confinement causes instabilities to the jet. The confinement of the root canal has a pronounced influence on the flow, for both the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric jet, by reducing the velocities by one order of magnitude and increasing the pressure at the apex. The non-axisymmetric jet inside the confinement shows a cascade of eddies with decreasing velocities, which at the apex does not provide adequate irrigation fluid refreshment.

  12. An Evaluation of Jet Impingement Heat Transfer Correlations for Piccolo Tube Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Thomas (Technical Monitor); Wright, William B.

    2004-01-01

    Impinging jets have been used for a wide variety of applications where high rates of heat transfer are desired. This report will present a review of heat transfer correlations that have been published. The correlations were then added to the LEWICE software to evaluate the applicability of these correlations to a piccolo tube anti-icing system. The results of this analysis were then compared quantitatively to test results on a representative piccolo tube system.

  13. Rupture of thin liquid films induced by impinging air-jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Kruis, Geerit C F L; Riepen, Michel; Darhuber, Anton A

    2012-07-01

    Thin liquid films on partially wetting substrates are subjected to laminar axisymmetric air-jets impinging at normal incidence. We measured the time at which film rupture occurs and dewetting commences as a function of diameter and Reynolds number of the air-jet. We developed numerical models for the air flow as well as the height evolution of the thin liquid film. The experimental results were compared with numerical simulations based on the lubrication approximation and a phenomenological expression for the disjoining pressure. We achieved quantitative agreement for the rupture times. We found that the film thickness profiles were highly sensitive to the presence of minute quantities of surface-active contaminants.

  14. On the correspondence between flow structures and convective heat transfer augmentation for multiple jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzis, Alexandros

    2016-09-01

    The correspondence between local fluid flow structures and convective heat transfer is a fundamental aspect that is not yet fully understood for multiple jet impingement. Therefore, flow field and heat transfer experiments are separately performed investigating mutual-jet interactions exposed in a self-gained crossflow. The measurements are taken in two narrow impingement channels with different cross-sectional areas and a single exit design. Hence, a gradually increased crossflow momentum is developed from the spent air of the upstream jets. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and liquid crystal thermography (LCT) are used in order to investigate the aerothermal characteristics of the channel with high spatial resolution. The PIV measurements are taken at planes normal to the target wall and along the centreline of the jets, providing quantitative flow visualisation of jet and crossflow interactions. Spatially resolved heat transfer coefficient distributions on the target plate are evaluated with transient techniques and a multi-layer of thermochromic liquid crystals. The results are analysed aiming to provide a better understanding about the impact of near-wall flow structures on the convective heat transfer augmentation for these complex flow phenomena.

  15. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of an undercut region adjacent a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The inturned flange has a plurality of apertures for directing cooling steam to cool the side wall between adjacent nozzle segments.

  16. The Effects of Crossflow on the Pressures and Lift Induced by the Fountain Generated Between Two Impinging Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    When a jet STOVL aircraft is hovering, or in a crossflow, while close to the ground wall jets flowing radially outward from the impingement points of the jets are generated. An upflow, or fountain, is generated where the wall jets from adjacent jets meet on the ground surface. The induced lift and suckdown generated by the impingement of the fountain on the lower surface of the configuration has been the subject of previous studies. This study analyzes the limited available pressure and force data on the effect of crossflow on the fountain induced lift and suckdown. The analysis includes the effects of jet spacing, height and operating conditions. However, it is limited to twin jet configurations of circular, vertical jets operating at subcritical nozzle pressure ratios over a fixed ground surface.

  17. Passive control of wall shear stress and mass transfer generated by submerged lobed impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodjavi, Kodjovi; Montagné, Brice; Meslem, Amina; Byrne, Paul; Serres, Laurent; Sobolik, Vaclav

    2016-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the flow field in an impinging lobed daisy hemispherical nozzle jet in comparison to its counterpart round jet, at a Reynolds number of 5620 based on the exit velocity and the equivalent diameter D e of the nozzle. The limitations of the PIV technique in the vicinity of the target wall due to the laser scattering were addressed by using the electrodiffusion (ED) technique to determine the wall shear rate distribution. The distribution of the mass transfer coefficient is also obtained using the ED technique. The target wall is placed at a distance H = 2 D e from the plane tangent to the nozzle, at the center of the orifice. The entrainment of ambient fluid in the free jet region, which is larger in the lobed jet compared to the round jet, feeds in turn the wall jet region. The maximum wall shear rate was found significantly higher in the daisy jet, with an excess of 93 % compared to the reference round jet. The maximum mass transfer is 35 % higher in the former compared to the latter. Therefore, the hemispherical daisy nozzle is an excellent candidate in passive strategies to enhance local skin-friction and the subsequent local mass transfer at a constant exit Reynolds number.

  18. Multiplex path for magnetorheological jet polishing with vertical impinging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tan; Cheng, Haobo; Chen, Yong; Tam, Honyuen

    2014-04-01

    We report a way to shape surfaces by optimizing the path instead of changing the removal function of a polishing tool for magnetorheological jet polishing (MJP). The M-shaped removal function of MJP generates a track with a W-shaped profile along one path. However, applying two parallel paths with appropriate line spacing can obtain a track with V-shaped profile, which has a removal distribution similar to that by using the Gaussian removal function along one path. Based on this, a multiplex path applying an M-shaped removal function is constructed in an actual process. A transformation model describing the relationship between the M-shaped removal function and the Gaussian removal function is established, which is crucial to determine the velocity function on the multiplex path. By using the M-shaped removal function, we have planned new processing steps by applying the multiplex path and the velocity function for full aperture polishing. Polishing performance is designed and demonstrated on two K9 work-pieces with different multiplex paths. The form error on 23 mm diameter is decreased from 0.256λ PV (λ=632.8 nm) and 0.068λ RMS to 0.038λ PV and 0.005λ RMS with scanning multiplex path. Results indicate that this method of path optimization is suitable for optical manufacturing.

  19. Channel flow modeling of impingement cooling of a rotating turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Local heat transfer distributions in impingement cooling have been measured by Kreatsoulas and Prieser for a range of conditions which model those in actual turbine blades, including the effects of rotation. These data were reported as local Nusselt numbers, but referred to coolant supply conditions. By means of a channel flow modeling of the flow in the supply and impingement passages, the same data are here presented in terms of local Nusselt number distributions such as are used in design. The results in this form are compared to the nonrotating impingement results of Chupp and to the rotating but nonimpingement results of Morris. Rotation reduces the mean Nusselt numbers from these found by Chupp by about 30 percent, and introduces important radial variations which are sensitive to rotation and to leading edge stagger angle.

  20. Large eddy simulation of supersonic twin-jet impingement using a fifth-order WENO scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Hoong Thiam

    A three-dimensional flow field produced by supersonic twin-jet impingement is studied using a large eddy simulation (LES). The numerical model consists of two parallel axisymmetric jets of diameter D*, 3 D* apart, issuing from a plane which is at a distance H* = 4D* above the ground. The jet diameter D*, mean velocity W*o , mean density r*o and mean temperature T*o at the jet center in the exit plane are used as reference values. The Mach number and Reynolds number of the jets are M = 1.5 and Re = 5.5 x 105, respectively. This model is closely related to the experimental setup of Elavarasan et al. [23]. The three-dimensional time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the method of lines. The convective terms are discretized using a fifth-order WENO scheme, whereas the viscous terms are discretized using a fourth-order central-differencing scheme. A low-storage five-stage fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is used to advance the solution in time. Code verification is achieved by comparison with flat-plate boundary-layer linear stability analysis, and computational data by Bendiks et al. [5] for a compressible turbulent round jet. Instantaneous flow, mean flow and Reynolds stresses for the twin-jet impingement are presented and discussed. The results reveal the existence of flapping behavior in the fountain. The flapping fountain is the vortical structure formed by the alternating merging of a primary vortex tube with a secondary vortex tube induced by the neighboring primary vortex tube. The nondimensional period of flapping is found to be 7D*/ W*o . High unsteadiness and strong interaction between the fountain and the jets are also observed. Due to the high diffusion and spreading rate of the fountain, the interaction between the fountain and the jets is only significant up to a height which is less than 3D*. It is found that the mean peak velocity in the fountain is 0.40406 W*o and it occurs at 0.536607D* from the ground. The suitability of

  1. Rolling up of Large-scale Laminar Vortex Ring from Synthetic Jet Impinging onto a Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yang; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jinjun; Flow Control Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Vortex ring impinging onto a wall exhibits a wide range of interesting behaviors. The present work devotes to an experimental investigation of a series of small-scale vortex rings impinging onto a wall. These laminar vortex rings were generated by a piston-cylinder driven synthetic jet in a water tank. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were used for flow visualization/quantification. A special scenario of vortical dynamic was found for the first time: a large-scale laminar vortex ring is formed above the wall, on the outboard side of the jet. This large-scale structure is stable in topology pattern, and continuously grows in strength and size along time, thus dominating dynamics of near wall flow. To quantify its spatial/temporal characteristics, Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields were calculated from PIV velocity fields. It is shown that the flow pattern revealed by FTLE fields is similar to the visualization. The size of this large-scale vortex ring can be up to one-order larger than the jet vortices, and its rolling-up speed and entrainment strength was correlated to constant vorticity flux issued from the jet. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No.11202015 and 11327202).

  2. The influence of the stagnation zone on the fluid dynamics at the nozzle exit of a confined and submerged impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Nicholas; Stafford, Jason; Conway, Ciaran; Punch, Jeff; Walsh, Edmond

    2016-02-01

    Low profile impinging jets provide a means to achieve high heat transfer coefficients while occupying a small quantity of space. Consequently, they are found in many engineering applications such as electronics cooling, annealing of metals, food processing, and others. This paper investigates the influence of the stagnation zone fluid dynamics on the nozzle exit flow condition of a low profile, submerged, and confined impinging water jet. The jet was geometrically constrained to a round, 16-mm diameter, square-edged nozzle at a jet exit to target surface spacing ( H/ D) that varied between 0.25 < {{ H}{/}{ D}} < 8.75. The influence of turbulent flow regimes is the main focus of this paper; however, laminar flow data are also presented between 1350 < Re < 17{,}300. A custom measurement facility was designed and commissioned to utilise particle image velocimetry in order to quantitatively measure the fluid dynamics both before and after the jet exits its nozzle. The velocity profiles are normalised with the mean velocity across the nozzle exit, and turbulence statistics are also presented. The primary objective of this paper is to present accurate flow profiles across the nozzle exit of an impinging jet confined to a low H/ D, with a view to guide the boundary conditions chosen for numerical simulations confined to similar constraints. The results revealed in this paper suggest that the fluid dynamics in the stagnation zone strongly influences the nozzle exit velocity profile at confinement heights between 0 < {{ H}{/}{ D}} < 1. This is of particular relevance with regard to the choice of inlet boundary conditions in numerical models, and it was found that it is necessary to model a jet tube length {{ L}{/}{ D}} > 0.5—where D is the inner diameter of the jet—in order to minimise modelling uncertainty.

  3. Numerical Modelling of Ar-N2 Plasma Jet Impinging on a Flat Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvan, B.; Ramachandran, K.; Pillai, B. C.; Subhakar, D.

    2011-03-01

    Substrate heating in the plasma spray process is one of the important parameters, which affects the microstructure of coatings and bonding between coating and substrate. In this study, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed to study the thermal exchange between the plasma jet and the substrate. The plasma jet temperature and velocity distributions and thermal flux to the substrate surface are predicted. The effects of arc current, gas flow rate, and stand-off distance on the temperature and velocity fields of the impinging plasma jet and thermal flux to the substrate are clarified. Results indicate that the three-dimensional effect has a very weak influence on the substrate heating. The air entrainment is compared for different cases. The present model is validated by comparing the present results with previous predictions and measurements. The temperature distributions in the substrate for different stand-off distances are predicted.

  4. Electric field of atmospheric pressure plasma jet impinging upon a surface and electrical properties of the jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, Ana; Guaitella, Olivier; Garcia Caurel, Enric; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-09-01

    We report on experimentally obtained values of the electric field magnitude of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet impinging upon a dielectric surface. The results were obtained using Pockels technique, on a BSO crystal. The electric field is a function of the gas flow and the area over which the discharge spreads on the dielectric surface. A coaxial configuration of the plasma jet was used, driven by 30 kHz sine voltage, in He flowing at 100-900 SCCM. In this geometry we found 2 modes of operation, a low-power mode stable at one plasma bullet emitted per period and the unstable high-power mode featuring additional micro-discharges. In addition to the electric field measured in the low-power mode, electrical characterization of the jet source will be presented, together with the manner in which properties of the setup can influence the jet and vice versa. The distinction will be made between the plasma jet in room atmosphere and the plasma jet interacting with a dielectric surface.

  5. Confined swirling jet impingement on a flat plate at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, M. A.; Del Pino, C.; Ortega-Casanova, J.

    2009-01-01

    The behavior of a swirling jet issuing from a pipe and impinging on a flat smooth wall is analyzed numerically by means of axisymmetric simulations. The axial velocity profile at the pipe outlet is assumed flat while the azimuthal velocity profile is a Burger's vortex characterized by two non-dimensional parameters; a swirl number S and a vortex core length δ. We concentrate on the effects of these two parameters on the mechanical characteristics of the flow at moderate Reynolds numbers. Our results for S =0 are in agreement with Phares et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 418, 351 (2000)], who provide a theoretical determination of the wall shear stress under nonswirling impinging jets at high Reynolds numbers. In addition, we show that the swirl number has an important effect on the jet impact process. For a fixed nozzle-to-plate separation, we found that depending on the value of δ and the Reynolds number Re, there is a critical swirl number, S =S∗(δ ,Re), above which recirculating vortex breakdown bubbles are observed in the near axis region. For S >S∗, the presence of these bubbles enhances the transition from a steady to a periodic regime. For S

  6. Rapid PCR amplification using a microfluidic device with integrated microwave heating and air impingement cooling.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Docker, Peter T; Yelland, John V; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2010-07-01

    A microwave heating system is described for performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a microfluidic device. The heating system, in combination with air impingement cooling, provided rapid thermal cycling with heating and cooling rates of up to 65 degrees C s(-1) and minimal over- or under-shoot (+/-0.1 degrees C) when reaching target temperatures. In addition, once the required temperature was reached it could be maintained with an accuracy of +/-0.1 degrees C. To demonstrate the functionality of the system, PCR was successfully performed for the amplification of the Amelogenin locus using heating rates and quantities an order of magnitude faster and smaller than current commercial instruments.

  7. Thermal performance analysis of optimized hexagonal finned heat sinks in impinging air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, Kenan; Yeşildal, Faruk; Karabey, Altuǧ; Yakut, Rıdvan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, thermal performance analysis of hexagonal finned heat sinks which optimized according to the experimental design and optimization method of Taguchi were investigated. Experiments of air jet impingement on heated hexagonal finned heat sinks were carried out adhering to the L18(21*36) orthogonal array test plan. Optimum geometries were determined and named OH-1, OH-2. Enhancement efficiency with the first law of thermodynamics was analyzed for optimized heat sinks with 100, 150, 200 mm heights of hexagonal fin. Nusselt correlations were found out and variations of enhancement efficiency with Reynolds number presented in η-Re graphics.

  8. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Analysis of Turbulent Jet Impingement on Rib-roughened Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Prasanth Anand Kumar; Karaiyan, Arul Prakash; Thermo-Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    A Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis on turbulent flow dynamics of confined slot jet impinging on rib-roughened surface is numerically investigated. The data for POD analysis has been obtained by solving mass, momentum and energy equations in Cartesian framework using Streamline Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin Finite element method. Further, turbulent kinetic energy (k) and its dissipation rate (ɛ) are modeled using standard k- ɛ turbulence model with standard wall functions. POD is applied to computational data for a wide range of Reynolds number (Re) = 5000 - 30000 and non-dimensional channel height (H/L) = 0.5 - 4.0 to reveal large scale vortical structures in the flow field. The simulated results demonstrate a better understanding on effect of turbulence and its influence on individual vortical structures for enhancement of heat transfer. The enhancement of heat transfer in stagnation region due to combined effect of oscillation in impingement position caused by large vortical structures and strong acceleration of fluid during impingement is quantified. Furthermore, non-dimensional correlations have been derived for pressure drop and Surface averaged Nusselt number.

  9. Application of the Bernoulli enthalpy concept to the study of vortex noise and jet impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A complete theory of aeroacoustics of homentropic fluid media is developed and compared with previous theories. The theory is applied to study the interaction of sound with vortex flows, for the DC-9 in a standard take-off configuration. The maximum engine-wake interference noise is estimated to be 3 or 4 db in the ground plane. It is shown that the noise produced by a corotating vortex pair departs significantly from the compact M scaling law for eddy Mach numbers (M) greater than 0.1. An estimate of jet impingement noise is given that is in qualitative agreement with experimental results. The increased noise results primarily from the nonuniform acceleration of turbulent eddies through the stagnation point flow. It is shown that the corotating vortex pair can be excited or de-excited by an externally applied sound field. The model is used to qualitatively explain experimental results on excited jets.

  10. Visualization of flow patterns induced by an impinging jet issuing from a circular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, K. R.

    1983-12-01

    A four-jet impingement flow with application to high-performance VTOL aircraft is investigated. Flow visualization studies were conducted with water as the working medium. Photographs of different cross sections of the flow are presented to describe the properties of the fountain upwash and the stagnation-line patterns. The visualization technique involves the introduction of fluorescein-sodium, a fluorescent dye, into the jet flow and illumination by a sheet of light obtained by spreading a laser beam. Streak-line photographs were also taken using air bubbles as tracer particles. The strength and orientation of the fountain(s) were observed for different heights of the nozzle configuration above the ground and inclination angles of the forward nozzles.

  11. Spectrum of the sound produced by a jet impinging on the gas-water interface of a supercavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, A. W.; Howe, M. S.; Brungart, T. A.

    2010-02-01

    An analysis is made of the sound generated by the impingement of an air jet on the gas-water interface of a supercavity. The water is in uniform low Mach number motion over the interface. The interface is rippled by the jet, which produces an unsteady surface force on the water that behaves as a dipole or monopole acoustic source, respectively, at high and low frequencies. In a first approximation the very large difference in the gas density and that of water implies that the surface force is similar to that occurring when a jet impinges on a rigid wall. Data from recent measurements by Foley (2009, Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University) of the frequency spectrum of the surface force produced by the impact of a turbulent jet on a wall are used to formulate an analytical representation of the spectrum and thence to predict the sound produced in water when the same jet impinges on the cavity interface. The prediction is used to estimate the characteristics of gas jet impingement noise for an experimental supercavitating vehicle in use at the Applied Research Laboratory of Penn State University.

  12. Verification and validation of impinging round jet simulations using an adaptive FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Dominique; Turgeon, Éric; Tremblay, Dominique

    2004-03-01

    This paper illustrates the use of an adaptive finite element method as a means of achieving verification of codes and simulations of impinging round jets, that is obtaining numerical predictions with controlled accuracy. Validation of these grid-independent solution is then performed by comparing predictions to measurements. We adopt the standard and accepted definitions of verification and validation (Technical Report AIAA-G-077-1998, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 1998; Verification and Validation in Computational Science and Engineering. Hermosa Publishers: Albuquerque, NM, 1998). Mesh adaptation is used to perform the systematic and rigorous grid refinement studies required for both verification and validation in CFD. This ensures that discrepancies observed between predictions and measurements are due to deficiencies in the mathematical model of the flow. Issues in verification and validation are discussed. The paper presents an example of code verification by the method of manufactured solution. Examples of successful and unsuccessful validation for laminar and turbulent impinging jets show that agreement with experiments is achieved only with a good mathematical model of the flow physics combined with accurate numerical solution of the differential equations. The paper emphasizes good CFD practice to systematically achieve verification so that validation studies are always performed on solid grounds.

  13. CFD study of Jet Impingement Test erosion using Ansys Fluent® and OpenFOAM®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Alejandro; Nicholls, William; Stickland, Matthew T.; Dempster, William M.

    2015-12-01

    The initial aim of this study was to compare OpenFoam and Ansys Fluent in order to verify OpenFoam's Lagrangian Library and erosion capabilities. However, it was found that previous versions of Fluent have been providing wrong results for the discrete phase and the differences with the latest version (Ansys Fluent 15) are shown. A Submerged Jet Impingement Test is an effective method for studying erosion created by solid particles entrained in a liquid. When considering low particle concentrations a Lagrangian modeling of the particulate phase is a reasonable approach. Proper linkage between OpenFOAM's Lagrangian library and the solver pimpleFoam for incompressible transient flows allows two-phase simulations to be undertaken for comparison with Ansys Fluent with the aim of verifying OpenFoam's accuracy. Steady state convergence for the fluid flow is first accomplished and the results are compared, confirming a good agreement between the two packages. A transient simulation was then set up and spherical particles incorporated into the fluid flow. An assessment of the two codes' discrete phase models was carried out, focusing on the differences between impact angles and velocities yielded at the impingement plate's surface employing a similar strategy to that outlined first by Hattori et al. (2008) and later by Gnanavelu et al. (2009, 2011). In the comparison of OpenFoam with the latest version of Fluent, the main differences between the injection models are highlighted and the coupling possibilities between phases are taken into consideration. Agreement between trends for both impact angles and velocities is satisfactory when the last version of the commercial package is considered and the average discrepancy between numerical values is very low, verifying OpenFoam's Lagrangian library. Two different Jet Impingement Test configurations are also compared and the differences highlighted.

  14. Computation of Turbulent Recirculating Flow in Channels, and for Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Byong Hoon

    1992-01-01

    Fully elliptic forms of the transport equations have been solved numerically for two flow configurations. The first is turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rectangular ribs, and the second is impingement cooling of a plane surface. Both flows are relevant to proposed designs for active cooling of hypersonic vehicles using supercritical hydrogen as the coolant. Flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion and of a backward-facing step were also solved with various near-wall turbulence models as benchmark problems. A simple form of periodicity boundary condition was used for the channel flow with transverse rectangular ribs. The effects of various parameters on heat transfer in channel flow with transverse ribs and in impingement cooling were investigated using the Yap modified Jones and Launder low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model. For the channel flow, predictions were in adequate agreement with experiment for constant property flow, with the results for friction superior to those for heat transfer. For impingement cooling, the agreement with experiment was generally good, but the results suggest that improved modelling of the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy is required in order to obtain improved heat transfer prediction, especially near the stagnation point. The k-epsilon turbulence model was used to predict the mean flow and heat transfer for constant and variable property flows. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated using the same turbulence model, but comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. Also, the wall function method was modified for use in the variable properties flow with a non-adiabatic surface, and an empirical model is suggested to correctly account for the behavior of the viscous sublayer with heating.

  15. Computation of turbulent recirculating flow in channels, and for impingement cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    Fully elliptic forms of the transport equations have been solved numerically for two flow configurations. The first is turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rectangular ribs, and the second is impingement cooling of a plane surface. Both flows are relevant to proposed designs for active cooling of hypersonic vehicles using supercritical hydrogen as the coolant. Flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion and of a backward-facing step were also solved with various near-wall turbulence models as benchmark problems. A simple form of periodicity boundary condition was used for the channel flow with transverse rectangular ribs. The effects of various parameters on heat transfer in channel flow with transverse ribs and in impingement cooling were investigated using the Yap modified Jones and Launder low Reynolds number k-[epsilon] turbulence model. For the channel flow, predictions were in adequate agreement with experiment for constant property flow, with the results for friction superior to those for heat transfer. For impingement cooling, the agreement with experiment was generally good, but the results suggest that improvement modelling of the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy is required in order to obtain improved heat transfer prediction, especially near the stagnation point. The k-[epsilon] turbulence model was used to predict the mean flow and heat transfer for constant and variable property flows. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated using the same turbulence model, but comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. Also, the wall function method was modified for use in the variable properties flow with a non-adiabatic surface, and an empirical model is suggested to correctly account for the behavior of the viscous sublayer with heating. The wall thermal boundary condition was found to have a significant effect on local heat transfer coefficients in the neighborhood of boundary layer separation.

  16. Stagnation-point heat transfer during impingement of laminar liquid jets - Analysis including surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Gabour, L. A.; Lienhard, J. H., V.

    1993-02-01

    The stagnation-zone characteristics of an impinging liquid jet are of great interest because the maximum heat transfer coefficient occurs in that region. This paper is an analytical study of the fluid flow and heat transfer in the stagnation zone of an unsubmerged liquid jet. The role of surface tension is emphasized. Stagnation-zone transport is strongly dependent on the potential flow above the boundary layer. Only a few studies have examined the potential flow of an unsubmerged jet, each using approximate potential flow theory and neglecting surface tension. In this paper, numerical solutions for a laminar unsubmerged jet are obtained, using a simulation method for steady, inviscid, incompressible flow with surface tension. A series solution that satisfies the boundary conditions in an approximate manner is constructed in terms of Legendre functions. Numerical solution of the momentum equation shows that surface tension has an effect on the stagnation-point flow field when the Weber number is small. Solutions of the associated boundary layer problem are used to obtain predictions of the influence of Weber number on the stagnation zone heat transfer. The results are validated by comparison to measurements at high Weber number.

  17. Numerical simulation of liquid-layer breakup on a moving wall due to an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Taejong; Moon, Hojoon; You, Donghyun; Kim, Dokyun; Ovsyannikov, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Jet wiping, which is a hydrodynamic method for controlling the liquid film thickness in coating processes, is constrained by a rather violent film instability called splashing. The instability is characterized by the ejection of droplets from the runback flow and results in an explosion of the film. The splashing phenomenon degrades the final coating quality. In the present research, a volume-of-fluid (VOF)-based method, which is developed at Cascade Technologies, is employed to simulate the air-liquid multiphase flow dynamics. The present numerical method is based on an unstructured-grid unsplit geometric VOF scheme and guarantees strict conservation of mass of two-phase flow, The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements such as the liquid-film thickness before and after the jet wiping, wall pressure and shear stress distributions. The trajectories of liquid droplets due to the fluid motion entrained by the gas-jet operation, are also qualitatively compared with experimental visualization. Physical phenomena observed during the liquid-layer breakup due to an impinging jet is characterized in order to develop ideas for controlling the liquid-layer instability and resulting splash generation and propagation. Supported by the Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699, the Brain Korea 21+ program, POSCO, and 2014 CTR Summer Program.

  18. Role of fluid elasticity on the dynamics of rinsing flow by an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tienyi T.; Walker, Travis W.; Frank, Curtis W.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2011-03-01

    Rinsing flows are common processes where a jet of one liquid impinges upon a layer of a second liquid for the purpose of removing the second liquid. An imaging setup has been developed to obtain both qualitative and quantitative data on the rinsing flow of a jet of water impinging on either layers of Newtonian or elastic fluids. Three classes of test fluids have been investigated: a Newtonian glycerol-water solution, a semidilute aqueous solution of high molecular weight polyacrylamide solution displaying both elasticity and shear thinning, and an elastic but non-shear thinning Boger fluid. The fluids were designed to have approximately equal zero-shear viscosities. For all cases, a circular hydraulic jump occurs and Saffman-Taylor instabilities were observed at the interface between the low viscosity jet and the higher viscosity coating liquids. Results show that the elasticity (extensional viscosity) of the samples influences the pattern of the instabilities and contributes to dampening surface disturbances in the vicinity of the hydraulic jump. Quantitative measurements of liquid layer thicknesses were obtained using a laser triangulation technique. We observed that shear thinning contributes to increasing the velocity of the hydraulic jump circle growth, and the growth profile appears to be linear instead of logarithmic-like as in the Newtonian fluids. Shear thinning characteristics of the samples also contribute to a larger vertical height of the hydraulic jump and an undercutting phenomenon. The elasticity of the fluids contributes to a "recoil" of the hydraulic jump circle, causing the circle, after initial expansion, to shrink in size before expanding again.

  19. Investigation of impingement region and wall jets formed by the interaction of high aspect ratio lift jets and a ground plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Flow characteristics of impinging jets emanating from rectangular exit area converging nozzles of exit area aspect ratio four, six, and eight were investigated. Azimuthal distributions of wall jet radial momentum flux in the ground plane were strongly directional and sensitive to rectangular nozzle exit area aspect ratio, jet impingement angle, and height above ground, H/D. Effects of jet exit velocity profile nonuniformities were also investigated. Data from the single nozzle rectangular jet impringement investigations were incorporated into an existing VTOL aircraft ground flow field computer program. It is suggested that this program together with the Douglas Neumann program modified for V/STOL applications may be used for the analysis and prediction of flow fields and resulting forces and moments on multijet V/STOL aircraft hovering in ground effect.

  20. A computer program for the transient thermal analysis of an impingement cooled turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program to calculate transient and steady state temperatures, pressures, and coolant flows in a cooled turbine blade or vane with an impingement insert is described. Input to the program includes a description of the blade geometry, coolant supply conditions, outside thermal boundary conditions and wheel speed. Coolant-side heat transfer coefficients are calculated internally in the program, with the user specifying the mode of heat transfer at each internal flow station. Program output includes the temperature at each node, the coolant pressures and flow rates, and the inside heat transfer coefficients. A sample problem is discussed.

  1. Fluid dynamics and convective heat transfer in impinging jets through implementation of a high resolution liquid crystal technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Wiedner, B.; Camci, C.

    1993-01-01

    A combined convective heat transfer and fluid dynamics investigation in a turbulent round jet impinging on a flat surface is presented. The experimental study uses a high resolution liquid crystal technique for the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficients on the impingement plate. The heat transfer experiments are performed using a transient heat transfer method. The mean flow and the character of turbulent flow in the free jet is presented through five hole probe and hot wire measurements, respectively. The flow field character of the region near the impingement plate plays an important role in the amount of convective heat transfer. Detailed surveys obtained from five hole probe and hot wire measurements are provided. An extensive validation of the liquid crystal based heat transfer method against a conventional technique is also presented. After a complete documentation of the mean and turbulent flow field, the convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on the impingement plate are presented. The near wall of the impingement plate and the free jet region is treated separately. The current heat transfer distributions are compared to other studies available from the literature. The present paper contains complete sets of information on the three dimensional mean flow, turbulent velocity fluctuations, and convective heat transfer to the plate. The experiments also prove that the present nonintrusive heat transfer method is highly effective in obtaining high resolution heat transfer maps with a heat transfer coefficient uncertainty of 5.7 percent.

  2. Characterization of an inline row impingement channel for turbine blade cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricklick, Mark A.

    Gas turbines have become an intricate part of today's society. Besides powering practically all 200,000+ passenger aircraft in use today, they are also a predominate form of power generation when coupled with a generator. The fact that they are highly efficient, and capable of large power to weight ratios, makes gas turbines an ideal solution for many power requirement issues faced today. Designers have even been able to develop small, 'micro' turbines capable of producing efficient portable power. Part of the turbine's success is the fact that their efficiency levels have continuously risen since their introduction in the early 1800's. Along with improvements in our understanding and designs of the aerodynamic components of the turbine, as well as improvements in the areas of material design and combustion control, advances in component cooling techniques have predominantly contributed to this success. This is the result of a simple thermodynamic concept; as the turbine inlet temperature is increased, the overall efficiency of the machine increases as well. Designers have exploited this fact to the extent that modern gas turbines produce rotor inlet temperatures beyond the melting point of the sophisticated materials used within them. This has only been possible through the use of sophisticated cooling techniques, particularly in the 1st stage vanes and blades. Some of the cooling techniques employed today have been internal cooling channels enhanced with various features, film and showerhead cooling, as well as internal impingement cooling scenarios. Impingement cooling has proven to be one of the most capable heat removal processes, and the combination of this cooling feature with that of channel flow, as is done in impingement channel cooling, creates a scenario that has understandably received a great deal of attention in recent years. This study has investigated several of the unpublished characteristics of these impingement channels, including the channel

  3. Secondary peak in the Nusselt number distribution of impinging jet flows: A phenomenological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aillaud, P.; Duchaine, F.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Didorally, S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on a wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of an isothermal round submerged air jet impinging on a heated flat plate, at a Reynolds number of 23 000 (based on the nozzle diameter and the bulk velocity at the nozzle outlet) and for a nozzle to plate distance of two jet diameters. This specific configuration is known to lead to a non-monotonic variation of the temporal-mean Nusselt number as a function of the jet center distance, with the presence of two distinct peaks located on the jet axis and close to two nozzle diameters from the jet axis. The objectives are here twofold: first, validate the LES results against experimental data available in the literature and second to explore this validated numerical database by the use of high order statistics such as skewness and probability density functions of the temporal distribution of temperature and pressure to identify flow features at the origin of the second Nusselt peak. Skewness (Sk) of the pressure temporal distribution reveals the rebound of the primary vortices located near the location of the secondary peak and allows to identify the initiation of the unsteady separation linked to the local minimum in the mean heat transfer distribution. In the region of mean heat transfer enhancement, joint velocity-temperature analyses highlight that the most probable event is a cold fluid flux towards the plate produced by the passage of the vortical structures. In parallel, heat transfer distributions, analyzed using similar statistical tools, allow to connect the above mentioned events to the heat transfer on the plate. Thanks to such advanced analyses, the origin of the double peak is confirmed and connected to the flow dynamics.

  4. Free-surface liquid jet impingement on rib patterned superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynes, D.; Johnson, M.; Webb, B. W.

    2011-05-01

    We report experimental results characterizing the dynamics of a liquid jet impinging normally on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces spanning the Weber number (based on the jet velocity and diameter) range from 100 to 1900. The superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated with both hydrophobically coated silicon and polydimethylsiloxane that exhibit alternating microribs and cavities. For all surfaces a transition from a thin radially moving liquid sheet occurs. This takes the form of the classical hydraulic jump for the hydrophilic surfaces but is markedly different for the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, where the transition is significantly influenced by surface tension and a break-up into droplets is observed at high Weber number. For the superhydrophobic surfaces, the transition exhibits an elliptical shape with the major axis being aligned parallel to the ribs, concomitant with the frictional resistance being smaller in the parallel direction than in the transverse direction. However, the total projected area of the ellipse exhibits a nearly linear dependence on the jet Weber number, and was nominally invariant with varying hydrophobicity and relative size of the ribs and cavities. For the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic scenarios, the local Weber number based on the local radial velocity and local depth of the radially moving liquid sheet is observed to be of order unity at the transition location. The results also reveal that for increasing relative size of the cavities, the ratio of the ellipse axis (major-to-minor) increases.

  5. The impingement of a kHz helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guaitella, O.; Sobota, A.

    2015-06-01

    A parametric study of the impingement of a helium kHz atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a flat glass surface was performed by means of time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device imaging. The development of the plasma on the target is linked to the plasma evolution in the source and governed by the power supply. The glass surface takes part in the elongation of the plasma jet by the virtue of two mechanisms: the local enhancement of the electric field and the supply of pre-deposited charge. The evidence for the pre-deposited charge is the formation of a sheath on the glass surface, and the faint discharge formed on the glass surface during the negative voltage slope starting at the maximum of the negative current peak. The influence of the gas flow dynamics taking into account various gas flows, incident angles and distances is more important for the behaviour of the discharge on the surface than the voltage amplitude or the geometry of the source. The capacitance of the target strongly modifies the interaction with the plasma jet and increases the deposited surface charge density, featuring a streamer-like propagation mechanism in the case of high electric field enhancement at the surface.

  6. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, M.; Assoum, H. H.; Martinuzzi, R.; Sobolik, V.; Abed-Meraim, K.; Sakout, A.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the large-scale vortical structures on the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet is investigated experimentally for a Reynolds number of 1260. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and polarographic measurements are performed simultaneously. It is found that the instantaneous wall shear stress is strongly dependent on the vortex dynamics, particularly for different parts of the transverse vortex. The influence of the vortex ring, the secondary and tertiary vortices on the ejection/sweep process near the wall is the main mechanism involved in the wall shear stress variation. In the region of the boundary layer separation, the wall shear stress amplitude increases just upstream of the separation and dramatically decreases in the recirculation zone downstream from the separation. The interaction between primary and secondary structures and their pairing process with the tertiary structure affects the sweep/ejection process near the wall and subsequently the wall shear stress variation. A comparison between the Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) method and the phase average technique is performed. It is shown that both methods describe the flow dynamics in the impinging region of the vortex ring. However, the FTLE method is more suitable for describing the unsteady separation of the boundary layer.

  7. Fuel Regression Characteristics of Cascaded Multistage Impinging-Jet (CAMUI) Type Hybrid Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Mitsunori; Maeda, Takenori; Kakikura, Akihito; Kaneko, Yudai; Mori, Kazuhiro; Nakashima, Takuji; Wakita, Masashi; Uematsu, Tsutomu; Totani, Tsuyoshi; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Harunori

    A series of lab-scale firing tests was conducted to investigate the fuel regression characteristics of Cascaded Multistage Impinging-jet (CAMUI) type hybrid rocket. The alternative fuel grain used in this rocket consists of a number of cylindrical fuel blocks with two ports, which were aligned along the axis of the combustion chamber with a small gap. The ports are aligned staggered with respect to ones of neighboring blocks so that the combustion gas flow impinges on the forward-end surface of each block. In this fuel grain, forward-end surfaces, back-end surfaces and ports of fuel blocks contribute as burning surfaces. Polyethylene and LOX were used as a propellant, and the tests were conducted at the chamber pressure of 0.5 2MPa and the mass flux of 50 200kg/m2s. Main results obtained in this study are in the followings: The regression rate of each surface was obtained as a function of the propellant mass flux and local equivalent ratio of the combustion gas. At back-end surfaces the regression rate has a high sensitivity on the gap height of neighboring fuel blocks. These fuel regression characteristics will contribute as fundamental data to improve the optimum design of the fuel grain.

  8. Incident Shock-Transverse Jet Interactions at Mach 1.9: Effect of Shock Impingement Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare-Behtash, H.; Lo, K. H.; Erdem, E.; Kontis, K.; Lin, J.; Ukai, T.; Obayashi, S.

    The scramjet engine is an efficient design for high-speed propulsion, requiring injection of fuel into a supersonic flow in a short amount of time. Due to the nature of the flow numerous shock waves exist within the combustor of a scramjet, significantly altering the flow characteristics and performance of the engine as the flow Mach number or attitude is changed. According to Mai et al. [1] the location of impingement of the incident shock, relative to the fuel injection location, has significant impact on the mixing and flame-holding properties. This emphasises the importance of understanding and hence the need for controlling the dynamic interactions that are created. Of course another fertile area where transverse jet injections are studied for their application is the creation of forces and moments for pitch and attitude control [2, 3].

  9. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks in zero gravity are determined. Zero gravity drop tower experiments yielded three distinct flow patterns that were classified in terms of the relative effects of surface tension and inertial forces. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted that indicated regions where viscous forces were not significant in the computation of free surface shapes. The free surface analysis was simplified by transforming the governing potential flow equations and boundary conditions into the inverse plane, where the stream function and velocity potential became the coordinates. The resulting nonlinear equations were solved by standard finite difference methods, and comparisons were made with the experimental data for the inertia dominated regime.

  10. Two-phase liquid-liquid flows generated by impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaoulidis, Dimitrios; Li, Qi; Angeli, Panagiota

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flows in intensified small-scale systems find increasing applications in (bio)chemical analysis and synthesis, fuel cells, polymerisation, and separation processes (solvent extraction). Current nuclear spent fuel reprocessing separation technologies have been developed many decades ago and have not taken account recent advances on process intensification which can drive down plant size and economics. In this work, intensified impinging jets will be developed to create dispersions by bringing the two liquid phases into contact through opposing small channels. A systematic set of experiments has been undertaken, to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics, to develop predictive models, and enable comparisons with other contactors. Drop size distribution and mixing intensity will be investigated for liquid-liquid mixtures as a function of various parameters using high speed imaging and conductivity probes.

  11. Numerical Solution of a Plane Jet Impingement on an Infinite Flat Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, S.; Irfan, Nagma

    2015-03-01

    In this paper numerical solution of the unsteady plane incompressible viscous jet impinging on to an infinite flat surface are presented for Re=450. In the present study, all calculations have been done by using Dufort Frankel scheme and over relaxation scheme. Result and graphs have been obtained by using MATLAB programming. The obtained results explain the flow of water after exhaling from nozzle and the streamlines and vorticity of flow ofwater after striking with flat infinite surface. The solutions obtained by proposed method indicate that this approach is easy to implement and computationally very attractive and the results of our investigation are in qualitative agreement with those available in the literature [1, 9]. This method is capable of greatly reducing the size of calculations while still maintaining high accuracy of the numerical solution.

  12. Computer program for generating input for analysis of impingement-cooled, axial-flow turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, D.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program, TACTGRID, was developed to generate the geometrical input for the TACTI program, a program that calculates transient and steady state temperatures, pressures, and cooling flows in an impingement cooled turbine blade. Using spline curves, the TACTGRID program constructs the blade internal geometry from the previously designed external blade surface and newly selected wall and channel thicknesses. The TACTGRID program generates the TACTI calculational grid, calculates arc length between grid points required by TACTI as input, and prepares the namelist input data set used by TACTI for the blade geometry. In addition, TACTGRID produces a scaled computer plot of each blade slice, detailing the grid and calculational stations, and thus eliminates the need for intermediate drafting.

  13. An Analysis of the Pressures, Forces and Moments Induced by the Ground Vortex Generated by a Single Impinging Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    When a jet STOVL aircraft is in STOL operation the jets impinge on the ground and generate wall jets flowing radially outward from the points at which the jets impinge. When the forward flowing part of a wall jet meets the free stream flow it is rolled back on itself forming a parabolic shaped ground vortex. Positive pressures are induced on the lower surface of the configuration ahead of the ground vortex and suction pressures are induced over the ground vortex itself. In addition, the suction pressures induced aft of the jet out of ground effect are reduced and lifting pressures are induced on the upper surface. This study analyzes available pressure and force data and develops a method for estimating the forces and moments induced in ground effect. The method includes the effects of configuration variables, height and operating conditions, as well as the effects of the location, deflection and shape of the jet. However, it is limited to single jets at subcritical nozzle pressure ratios. An analysis of the effects of moving over the ground vs. tests over a fixed ground plane is included.

  14. Heat transfer and material temperature conditions in the leading edge area of impingement-cooled turbine vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, H. P.; Pfaff, K.; Hennecke, D. K.

    The resultant effects on the cooling effectiveness at the leading edge area of an impingement-cooled turbine vane by varying certain geometrical parameters is described with reference to local internal heat transfer coefficients determined from experiment and temperature calculations. The local heat transfer on the cooling-air side is determined experimentally with the aid of the analogy between heat- and mass transfer. The impingement cooling is provided from an inserted sheet-metal containing a single row of holes. The Reynolds Number and several of the cooling geometry parameters were varied. The results demonstrate the high local resolution of the method of measurement, which allows improved analytical treatment of the leading-edge cooling configuration. These experiments also point to the necessity of not always performing model tests under idealized conditions. This becomes very clear in the case of the tests performed on an application-oriented impingement-cooling configuration like that often encountered in engine manufacture. In conclusion, as an example, temperature calculations are employed to demonstrate the effect on the cooling effectiveness of varying the distances between insert and inner surface of the leading edge. It shows how the effectiveness of the leading edge cooling can be increased by simple geometrical measures, which results in a considerable improvement in service life.

  15. The Fluid Dynamics of Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández C., I.; Acosta G., F. A.; Castillejos E., A. H.; Minchaca M., J. I.

    2008-10-01

    For the conditions of thin-slab continuous casting, air-mist secondary cooling occurs in the transition-boiling regime, possibly as a result of an enhanced intermittent contact of high- momentum water drops with the hot metallic surface. The dynamics of the intermittent contact or wetting/dewetting process should be primarily dependent on the drop size, drop impact-velocity and -angle and water-impact flux, which results from the nozzle design and the interaction of the drops with the conveying and entrained air stream. The aim of this article was to develop a model for predicting the last three parameters based on the design and operating characteristics of air-mist nozzles and on experimentally determined drop-size distributions. To do this, the Eulerian fluid-flow field of the air in three dimensions and steady state and the Lagrangian velocities and trajectories of water drops were computed by solving the turbulent Navier Stokes equation for the air coupled to the motion equation for the water drops. In setting this model, it was particularly important to specify appropriately the air-velocity profile at the nozzle orifice, as well as, the water-flux distribution, and the velocities (magnitude and angle) and exit positions of drops with the different sizes generated, hence special attention was given to these aspects. The computed drop velocities, water-impact flux distributions, and air-mist impact-pressure fields compared well with detailed laboratory measurements carried out at ambient temperature. The results indicate that under practical nozzle-operating conditions, the impinging-droplet Weber numbers are high, over most of the water footprint, suggesting that the droplets should establish an intimate contact with the solid surface. However, the associated high mean-droplet fluxes hint that this contact may be obstructed by drop interference at the surface, which would undermine the heat-extraction effectiveness of the impinging mist. The model also points

  16. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  17. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  18. Experimental analysis of the aero-acoustic coupling in a plane impinging jet on a slotted plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoum, Hassan H.; El Hassan, Mouhammad; Abed-Meraïm, Kamel; Martinuzzi, Robert; Sakout, Anas

    2013-08-01

    Impinging jets are encountered in many industrial applications and suppression of the noise generated by these jets is of great fundamental and practical interest. The vortex dynamics and the interaction between the vortical structures and the impinging wall should be understood in order to control the aero-acoustic coupling between shear layer oscillation and the acoustic modes (self-sustained tones). In this study, a plane jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle and impinging on a plate is considered for Re = 3900. The sound pressure, the vibration of the impinged plate and the spatial velocity field are obtained simultaneously using a microphone, an accelerometer and the time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique, respectively. Spectra and cross-correlations are used to educe the role of different vortical structures leading to the aero-acoustic coupling. The results show the evolution of the correlation between acoustic and transverse velocity fields in the longitudinal direction. A pre-whitening technique is used to investigate the coupling between the acoustic and the velocity signals. This method shows that the correlation between the two signals has a centred peak that is not directly related to the passage of the dominant Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  19. Numerical simulation of supersonic water vapor jet impinging on a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuu, Kazuto; Aono, Junya; Shima, Eiji

    2012-11-01

    We investigated supersonic water vapor jet impinging on a flat plate through numerical simulation. This simulation is for estimating heating effect of a reusable sounding rocket during vertical landing. The jet from the rocket bottom is supersonic, M=2 to 3, high temperature, T=2000K, and over-expanded. Atmospheric condition is a stationary standard air. The simulation is base on the full Navier-Stokes equations, and the flow is numerically solved by an unstructured compressible flow solver, in-house code LS-FLOW-RG. In this solver, the transport properties of muti-species gas and mass conservation equations of those species are considered. We employed DDES method as a turbulence model. For verification and validation, we also carried out a simulation under the condition of air, and compared with the experimental data. Agreement between our results and the experimental data are satisfactory. Through this simulation, we calculated the flow under some exit pressure conditions, and discuss the effects of pressure ratio on flow structures, heat transfer and so on. Furthermore, we also investigated diffusion effects of water vapor, and we confirmed that these phenomena are generated by the interaction of atmospheric air and affects the heat transfer to the surrounding environment.

  20. Drop Characteristics of non-Newtonian Impinging Jets at High Generalized Bird-Carreau Jet Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, Paul E.; Rodrigues, Neil S.

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the drop characteristics of three Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sprays produced by the impingement of two liquid jets. The three water-based solutions used in this work (0.5 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, and 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF) exhibited strong shear-thinning, non-Newtonian behavior - characterized by the Bird-Carreau rheological model. A generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number was used as the primary parameter to characterize the drop size and the drop velocity, which were measured using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). PDA optical configuration enabled a drop size measurement range of approximately 2.3 to 116.2 μm. 50,000 drops were measured at each test condition to ensure statistical significance. The arithmetic mean diameter (D10) , Sauter mean diameter (D32) , and mass median diameter (MMD) were used as representative diameters to characterize drop size. The mean axial drop velocity Uz -mean along with its root-mean square Uz -rms were used to characterize drop velocity. Incredibly, measurements for all three CMC liquids and reference DI water sprays seemed to follow a single curve for D32 and MMD drop diameters in the high generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number range considered in this work (9.21E +03

  1. Spatially-resolved, three-dimensional spray characterization of impinging jets by digital in-line holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Rodrigues, Neil; Sojka, Paul; Chen, Jun

    2014-11-01

    The impinging jet injector is a preferred method for the atomization of liquid rocket propellants. The majority of experimental studies in literature are not spatially-resolved due to the limitations of widely available point-wise and two-dimensional (2D) diagnostic techniques such as phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), which requires significant experimental repetitions to give spatially-resolved measurements. In the present study, digital in-line holography (DIH) is used to provide spatially-resolved, three-dimensional (3D) characteristics of impinging jet sprays. A double-exposure DIH setup is configured to measure droplet 3D, three-component velocity as well as the size distribution. The particle information is extracted by the hybrid method, which is recently proposed as a particle detection method. To enlarge the detection volume, two parallel, collimated laser beams are used to simultaneously probe the spray at two locations, and two identical cameras are used to record the corresponding holograms. Such a setup has a detection volume of approximately 20 cm by 3.6 cm by 4.8 cm. Sprays of both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids corresponding to regimes at relatively lower jet Reynolds and Weber numbers are investigated. Measurements from DIH are further verified by comparison with experimental data obtained from shadowgraph and PDA. It is revealed that DIH is particularly suitable to provide spatially-resolved, 3D measurements of impinging jet sprays that are not particularly dense.

  2. Power generation performance of direct flame fuel cell (DFFC) impinged by small jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Endo, Shota

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by a small jet flame on the power generation performance of a direct flame fuel cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small-scale jet flame and the heated product’s gases are impinged toward it. This system is considered to be the simplest and smallest unit of such power generation devices to have been developed. Methane is used as fuel and an equivalence ratio (φ ) of the mixture (with oxygen) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as the experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage increases linearly with the increase of temperature in a wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically to the point at which the equivalence ratio becomes small enough (φ   ⩽  2.0 in the present study) within the specific distance range to bring about the appearance of an inner flame. This could provide sufficient heat and oxygen for the anode, contributing to the generation of the cell’s high electric potential. It is also noted that the appearance of the inner flame does not promise to better the performance unless the preferred conditions (high temperature, low oxygen, rich fuel) near the cell are achieved. The Nernst equation works well for predicting the open circuit voltage under the conditions studied. Systematic design of the entire power generation system is preferable when a miniaturized power generation system is considered by applying DFFC.

  3. Performance Enhancement of a High Speed Jet Impingement System for Nonvolatile Residue Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, James F.; Mei, Renwei; Near, Steve; Stith, Rex

    1996-01-01

    A high speed jet impingement cleaning facility has been developed to study the effectiveness of the nonvolatile residue removal. The facility includes a high pressure air compressor which charges the k-bottles to supply high pressure air, an air heating section to vary the temperature of the high pressure air, an air-water mixing chamber to meter the water flow and generate small size droplets, and a converging- diverging nozzle to deliver the supersonic air-droplet mixture flow to the cleaning surface. To reliably quantify the cleanliness of the surface, a simple procedure for measurement and calibration is developed to relate the amount of the residue on the surface to the relative change in the reflectivity between a clean surface and the greased surface. This calibration procedure is economical, simple, reliable, and robust. a theoretical framework is developed to provide qualitative guidance for the design of the test and interpretation of the experimental results. The result documented in this report support the theoretical considerations.

  4. Analysis of a Cylindrical Specimen Heated by an Impinging Hot Hydrogen Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Luong, Van; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    A computational conjugate heat transfer methodology was developed, as a first step towards an efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber and components. A solid conduction heat transfer procedure was implemented onto a pressure-based, multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, and unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics formulation. The conjugate heat transfer of a cylindrical material specimen heated by an impinging hot hydrogen jet inside an enclosed test fixture was simulated and analyzed. The solid conduction heat transfer procedure was anchored with a standard solid heat transfer code. Transient analyses were then performed with ,variable thermal conductivities representing three composites of a material utilized as flow element in a legacy engine test. It was found that material thermal conductivity strongly influences the transient heat conduction characteristics. In addition, it was observed that high thermal gradient occur inside the cylindrical specimen during an impulsive or a 10 s ramp start sequence, but not during steady-state operations.

  5. The Properties of Flowing Sheets Formed by Impingement of Liquid Jets on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riebling, Robert W.; Powell, Walter B.

    1966-01-01

    An applied research program was conducted to determine the properties of flat sheets of propellants formed by directing jets of liquid tangentially against concave, cylindrical deflector surfaces. The dimensions and spatial orientation of the resultant sheets were found to depend only on the orifice diameter and deflector geometry for three propellant simulants of widely-varying physical properties, over the range of injection velocities encountered in liquid rocket engines. Correlating equations, suitable for use in injector design, are presented for free-sheet width and spreading angle. Distribution of mass and velocity across the free-flowing sheets is also reported. Conditions were discovered under which true sheets do not form, or at best malformed or pulsating sheets result. An envelope of geometrical constraints for deflector design is tentatively defined in order to avoid these undesirable operating regions. The results of the present cold-flow tests are compared with firing test data for impinging-sheet injectors and combustion performance is related to single sheet behavior.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigations of the impingement of an oblique liquid jet onto a superhydrophobic surface: energy transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali

    2016-02-01

    This study presents the theory of impinging an oblique liquid jet onto a vertical superhydrophobic surface based on both experimental and numerical results. A Brassica oleracea leaf with a 160° apparent contact angle was used for the superhydrophobic surface. Distilled water was sent onto the vertical superhydrophobic surface in the range of 1750-3050 Reynolds number, with an inclination angle of 20°-40°, using a circular glass tube with a 1.75 mm inner diameter. The impinging liquid jet spread onto the surface governed by the inertia of the liquid and then reflected off the superhydrophobic surface due to the surface energy of the spreading liquid. Two different energy approaches, which have time-scale and per-unit length, were performed to determine transformation of the energy. The kinetic energy of the impinging liquid jet was transformed into the surface energy with an increasing interfacial surface area between the liquid and air during spreading. Afterwards, this surface energy of the spreading liquid was transformed into the reflection kinetic energy.

  7. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets. 2: Nonlinear Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James M.; Xu, Jianjun; Hardee, Philip

    1997-01-01

    We use two-dimensional time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations to follow the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability in cooling jets into the nonlinear regime. We focus primarily on asymmetric modes that give rise to transverse displacements of the jet beam. A variety of Mach numbers and two different cooling curves are studied. The growth rates of waves in the linear regime measured from the numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the linear stability analysis presented in the first paper in this series. In the nonlinear regime, the simulations show that asymmetric modes of the K-H instability can affect the structure and evolution of cooling jets in a number of ways. We find that jets in which the growth rate of the sinusoidal surface wave has a maximum at a so-called resonant frequency can be dominated by large-amplitude sinusoidal oscillations near this frequency. Eventually, growth of this wave can disrupt the jet. On the other hand, nonlinear body waves tend to produce low-amplitude wiggles in the shape of the jet but can result in strong shocks in the jet beam. In cooling jets, these shocks can produce dense knots and filaments of cooling gas within the jet. Ripples in the surface of the jet beam caused by both surface and body waves generate oblique shock "spurs" driven into the ambient gas. Our simulations show these shock "spurs" can accelerate ambient gas at large distances from the jet beam to low velocities, which represents a new mechanism by which low-velocity bipolar outflows may be driven by high-velocity jets. Rapid entrainment and acceleration of ambient gas may also occur if the jet is disrupted. For parameters typical of protostellar jets, the frequency at which K-H growth is a maximum (or highest frequency to which the entire jet can respond dynamically) will be associated with perturbations with a period of - 200 yr. Higher frequency (shorter period) perturbations excite waves associated with body

  8. Ultra-high-speed 3D astigmatic particle tracking velocimetry: application to particle-laden supersonic impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Cierpka, C.; Kähler, C. J.; Soria, J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper demonstrates ultra-high-speed three-component, three-dimensional (3C3D) velocity measurements of micron-sized particles suspended in a supersonic impinging jet flow. Understanding the dynamics of individual particles in such flows is important for the design of particle impactors for drug delivery or cold gas dynamic spray processing. The underexpanded jet flow is produced via a converging nozzle, and micron-sized particles ( d p = 110 μm) are introduced into the gas flow. The supersonic jet impinges onto a flat surface, and the particle impact velocity and particle impact angle are studied for a range of flow conditions and impingement distances. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high-speed digital camera (Shimadzu HPV-1) capable of recording rates of up to 1 Mfps. Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is used to measure the 3D particle position (Cierpka et al., Meas Sci Technol 21(045401):13, 2010) by coding the particle depth location in the 2D images by adding a cylindrical lens to the high-speed imaging system. Based on the reconstructed 3D particle positions, the particle trajectories are obtained via a higher-order tracking scheme that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution to increase robustness and accuracy of the measurement. It is shown that the particle velocity and impingement angle are affected by the gas flow in a manner depending on the nozzle pressure ratio and stand-off distance where higher pressure ratios and stand-off distances lead to higher impact velocities and larger impact angles.

  9. Numerical heat transfer during partially-confined, confined, and free liquid jet impingement with rotation and chemical mechanical planarization process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallave Cortes, Jorge C.

    This work presents the use of numerical modeling for the analysis of transient and steady state liquid jet impingement for cooling application of electronics, and energy dissipation during a CMP process under the influence of a series of parameters that controls the transport phenomena mechanism. Seven thorough studies were done to explore how the flow structure and conjugated heat transfer in both the solid and fluid regions was affected by adding a secondary rotational flow during the jet impingement process. Axis-symmetrical numerical models of round jets with a spinning or static nozzle were developed using the following configurations: confined, partially-confined, and free liquid jet impingement on a rotating or stationary uniformly heated disk of finite thickness and radius. Calculations were done for various materials, namely copper, silver, Constantan, and silicon with a solid to fluid thermal conductivity ratio covering a range of 36.91.2222, at different laminar Reynolds numbers ranging from 220 to 2,000, under a broad rotational rate range of 0 to 1,000 RPM (Ekman number=infinity--3.31x10--5), nozzle-to-plate spacing (beta=0.25.5.0), dimensionless disk thicknesses (b/dn=0.167.1.67), confinement ratio (rp/rd=0.2.0.75), and Prandtl number (1.29.124.44) using NH3, H2O, FC.77 and MIL.7808 as working fluids. An engineering correlation relating the average Nusselt number with the above parameters was developed for the prediction of system performance. The simulation results compared reasonably well with previous experimental studies. The second major contribution of this research was the development of a three dimensional CMP model that shows the temperature distributions profile as an index of energy dissipation at the wafer and pad surfaces, and slurry interface. A finite element analysis was done with FIDAP 8.7.4 package under the influence of physical parameters, such as slurry flow rates (0.5.1.42 cc/s), polishing pressures (17.24.41.37 kPa), pad

  10. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms. PMID:27531256

  11. Film cooling: case of double rows of staggered jets.

    PubMed

    Dorignac, E; Vullierme, J J; Noirault, P; Foucault, E; Bousgarbiès, J L

    2001-05-01

    An experimental investigation of film cooling of a wall in a case of double rows of staggered hot jets (65 degrees C) in an ambient air flow. The wall is heated at a temperature value between the one of the jets and the one of the main flow. Experiments have been carried out for different injection rates, the main flow velocity is maintained at 32 m/s. Association of the measures of temperature profiles by cold wire and the measures of wall temperature by infrared thermography allows us to describe the behaviour of the flows and to propose the best injection which assures a good cooling of the plate. PMID:11460645

  12. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating oxide fuel crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the crust stability and heat transfer behavior in the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten oxide fuel at approx. 160/sup 0/K above its freezing temperature was impinged normally upon stainless steel plates initially at 300 and 385 K. The major issue is the existence of nonexistence of a stable solidified layer of fuel, or crust, interstitial to the flowing hot fuel and the steel substrate, tending to insulate the steel from the hot molten fuel. A computer model was developed to predict the heatup of thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the surface of the plate for both of the cases in which a stable crust is assumed to be either present or absent during the impingement phase. Comparison of the model calculations with the measured thermocouple temperatures indicates that a protective crust was present over nearly all of the plate surface area throughout the impingement process precluding major melting of the plate steel. However, the experiments also show evidence for very localized and isolated steel melting as revealed by localized and isolated pitting of the steel surface and the response of thermocouples located within the pitted region.

  13. Physical and Mathematical Modeling of Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Zone Air-Mist Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de León B., Melecio; Castillejos E., A. Humberto

    2015-10-01

    This study is an attempt to unveil the fluid dynamic phenomena occurring during interaction of air-mists with the surface of the steel strand during its pass through the continuous casting secondary cooling system. Air-mists generated under conditions of practical interest are studied while impacting on a vertical wall at room temperature. Experimentally a spatial multiple-counting technique based on capturing instantaneous double-exposure shadowgraphs is used to visualize the internal structure of mists at distances between 0 and 4 mm from the wall. Analysis of single exposure images allows determination of size distributions of primary (impinging) and secondary (ejecting) drops and of fluctuating thickness of water films formed on the wall surface. Besides, examination of image pairs enables measurement of velocity and trajectory angles of both kinds of drops. These results aided in the formulation and validation of a transient, turbulent, 3D, multiphase fluid dynamic model for simulating impinging air-mists. The model is based on KIVA-3V and for simulating the airborne mist region it solves the continuity equations—mass, momentum, turbulence quantities—for the air coupled with the equation of motion for drops sampled randomly from distributions assumed to govern their size and volume flux at the nozzle orifice. While for the impingement region submodels are established to estimate the results of drop/wall interaction, i.e., the dynamics of secondary drops and water films formed by the impingement of primary drops. The model forecasts reasonably well the random distributions of diameters, velocities, trajectory angles, and Weber numbers of both kind of drops moving near the wall. Additionally, it predicts well the average thickness of the water film and the important effect that air nozzle pressure has on the normal impinging velocity of drops; high pressures result in large drop velocities favoring intimate contact with the surface.

  14. Numerical thermal analysis of water's boiling heat transfer based on a turbulent jet impingement on heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghraie, D.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a numerical method for simulation of flow boiling through subcooled jet on a hot surface with 800 °C has been presented. Volume fraction (VOF) has been used to simulate boiling heat transfer and investigation of the quench phenomena through fluid jet on a hot horizontal surface. Simulation has been done in a fixed Tsub=55 °C, Re=5000 to Re=50,000 and also in different Tsub =Tsat -Tf between 10 °C and 95 °C. The effect of fluid jet velocity and subcooled temperature on the rewetting temperature, wet zone propagation, cooling rate and maximum heat flux has been investigated. The results of this study show that by increasing the velocity of fluid jet of water, convective heat transfer coefficient at stagnation point increases. More ever, by decreasing the temperature of the fluid jet, convective heat transfer coefficient increases.

  15. Electronic Spectra of the Jet-Cooled Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Min, Ahreum; Kim, Yusic; Choi, Myong Yong; Chang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang Hak; Kim, Seong Keun

    2010-06-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and UV-UV double resonance spectra of the jet-cooled acetaminophen, widely used as a pain reliever and fever reducer, were obtained in the gas phase. Conformational characterizations for acetaminophen will be presented with an aid of spectroscopic techniques and DFT B3LYP calculations.

  16. 2D numerical simulation of impinging jet onto the concave surface by k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Zeinab; Nazari, Mohammad Reza; Khalaji, Erfan

    2016-03-01

    In the present article, the characteristics of turbulent jet impinging onto a concave surface is studied using k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model. Dependent parameters such as inlet Reynolds number (2960 < Re < 12,000), nozzle-plate distance (4 < H/B < 10), concavity (D/B = 30, 60) of confined and unconfined impinging jet are scrutinized to find out whether this approach would bring any privileges compared to other investigations or not. The obtained results indicate better performance in low nozzle-plate distance in comparison with those mentioned in other literatures. Furthermore, the average Nusselt number of confined impinging jet overtakes unconfined one (similar circumstances) while this trend will decline as relative concavity increases. Moreover, local heat transfer of stagnation area and wall jet goes up and down through nozzle-plate distance enhancement respectively. Finally, the effects of sinusoidal pulsed inlet profile on heat transfer of unconfined impinging jet indicate direct affiliation of amplitude and neutral impact of frequency on Nusselt number distribution.

  17. A porous elastic model for bacterial biofilms: application to the simulation of deformation of bacterial biofilms under microfluidic jet impingement.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leo Y; Farnam, Dylan S; Homentcovschi, Dorel; Sammakia, Bahgat G

    2012-05-01

    The presence of bacterial biofilms is detrimental in a wide range of healthcare situations especially wound healing. Physical debridement of biofilms is a method widely used to remove them. This study evaluates the use of microfluidic jet impingement to debride biofilms. In this case, a biofilm is treated as a saturated porous medium also having linear elastic properties. A numerical modeling approach is used to calculate the von Mises stress distribution within a porous medium under fluid-structure interaction (FSI) loading to determine the initial rupture of the biofilm structure. The segregated model first simulates the flow field to obtain the FSI interface loading along the fluid-solid interface and body force loading within the porous medium. A stress-strain model is consequently used to calculate the von Mises stress distribution to obtain the biofilm deformation. Under a vertical jet, 60% of the deformation of the porous medium can be accounted for by treating the medium as if it was an impermeable solid. However, the maximum deformation in the porous medium corresponds to the point of maximum shear stress which is a different position in the porous medium than that of the maximum normal stress in an impermeable solid. The study shows that a jet nozzle of 500 μm internal diameter (ID) with flow of Reynolds number (Re) of 200 can remove the majority of biofilm species.

  18. Experimentally obtained values of electric field of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet impinging on a dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, A.; Guaitella, O.; Garcia-Caurel, E.

    2013-09-01

    We report on experimentally obtained values of the electric field magnitude on a dielectric surface induced by an impinging atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The plasma plume was striking the dielectric surface at an angle of 45°, at 5 mm from the surface measured at the axis of the jet. The results were obtained using Pockels technique on a BSO (Bi12SiO20) crystal. A coaxial configuration of the plasma jet was used, operating in a stable mode with one bullet per voltage period, at 30 kHz and amplitude of 2 kV. The electric field was shown to be a function of the gas flow (He, at 300, 500 and 700 SCCM) and the manner in which the discharge spreads over the dielectric surface. The maximum value of 11.6 × 105 V m-1 was obtained at the negative half-period of the discharge current measured at the grounded electrode, at the flow of 300 SCCM. The largest electric field averaged over the area of the spreading of the discharge (3.6 × 105 V m-1) was found in the same conditions.

  19. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimurthy, M.; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2016-06-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing (Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio (l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  20. Numerical analysis of an impinging jet reactor for the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-06-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  1. Effect of nozzle-to-plate spacing on the development of a plane jet impinging on a heated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, Ben Kalifa; Saïd, Nejla Mahjoub; Bournot, Hervé; Le Palec, Georges

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the behavior of a turbulent air jet impinging on a heated plate. The study of the flow field was performed using a particle image velocimetry. A three-dimensional numerical model with Reynolds stress model has been conducted to examine the global flow. Numerical results agree well with experimental data. The main properties of the fluid occurring between the nozzle and the flat plate are presented. In addition, the effect of the distance between the nozzle exit and the plate (h/e = 14 and 28) were investigated and detailed analysis of the dynamic, turbulent distribution and temperature fields were performed. The wall shear stress and the pressure fields near the heated plate are then explored. Results showed that the mean velocity and the heat transfer characteristics of small nozzle-to-plate spacing are significantly different from those of large nozzle-to-plate spacing.

  2. Numerical Analysis of an Impinging Jet Reactor for the CVD and Gas-Phase Nucleation of Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  3. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  4. Spot cooling. Part 1: Human responses to cooling with air jets

    SciTech Connect

    Melikov, A.K.; Halkjaer, L.; Arakelian, R.S.; Fanger, P.O.

    1994-12-31

    Eight standing male subjects and a thermal manikin were studied for thermal, physiological, and subjective responses to cooling with an air jet at room temperatures of 28 C, 33 C, and 38 C and a constant relative humidity of 50%. The subjects wore a standard uniform and performed light work. A vertical jet and a horizontal jet were employed The target area of the jet, i.e., the cross section of the jet where it first met the subject, had a diameter of 0.4 m and was located 0.5 m from the outlet. Experiments were performed at average temperatures at the jet target area of 20 C, 24 C, and 28 C. Each experiment lasted 190 minutes and was performed with three average velocities at the target area: 1 and 2 m/s and the preferred velocity selected by the subjects. The impact of the relative humidity of the room air, the jet`s turbulence intensity, and the use of a helmet on the physiological and subjective responses of the eight subjects was also studied The responses of the eight subjects were compared with the responses of a group of 29 subjects. The spot cooling improved the thermal conditions of the occupants. The average general thermal sensation for the eight subjects was linearly correlated to the average mean skin temperature and the average sweat rate. An average mean skin temperature of 33 C and an average sweat rate of 33 g{center_dot}h{sup {minus}1} m{sup {minus}2} were found to correspond to a neutral thermal sensation. The local thermal sensation at the neck and at the arm exposed to the cooling jet was found to be a function of the room air temperature and the local air velocity and temperature of the jet. The turbulence intensity of the cooling jet and the humidity of the room air had no impact on the subjects` physiological and subjective responses. Large individual differences were observed in the evaluation of the environment and in the air velocity preferred by the subjects.

  5. Morphology of an aluminum alloy eroded by a jet of angular particles impinging at normal incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The erosion of an aluminum alloy impinged by crushed glass particles at normal incidence was studied. The erosion patterns were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometer measurements. From the analysis of specimens tested at various driving gas pressures and time intervals, four distinct erosion regions were identified. A study of pit morphology and its relationship to cumulative erosion was made. Cutting wear is believed to be the predominant material removal mechanism; some evidence of deformation wear was found during the incubation period.

  6. Analysis of Material Sample Heated by Impinging Hot Hydrogen Jet in a Non-Nuclear Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    A computational conjugate heat transfer methodology was developed and anchored with data obtained from a hot-hydrogen jet heated, non-nuclear materials tester, as a first step towards developing an efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective and thermal radiative, and conjugate heat transfers. Predicted hot hydrogen jet and material surface temperatures were compared with those of measurement. Predicted solid temperatures were compared with those obtained with a standard heat transfer code. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  7. Comparison of calculated and measured fluid jet impingement velocities in a simulated reactor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hertrick, A.K.; Bryan, W.J.; Dorogy, G.M.; Hopkins, R.J.; Riddell, R.A.; Schwirian, E.R.

    1984-11-01

    Comparisons of analytical and experimental results are presented for the fluid jetting resulting from the existence of small gaps between parallel flow regions with dissimilar hydraulic characteristics. The experiment simulates the baffle gaps between a nuclear reactor core and the peripheral region around it, called the barrel-baffle region. Baffle gap fluid velocities are measured by a technique in which the only disturbance to the gap flow is a small pressure tap in the gap wall. The analysis uses an iterative, hydraulic network approach and is shown to yield good results when compared to the measured gap jet velocity and pressure drop distributions.

  8. The ground vortex flow field associated with a jet in a cross flow impinging on a ground plane for uniform and annular turbulent axisymmetric jets. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavage, William M.; Kuhlman, John M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted of the impingement of a single circular jet on a ground plane in a cross flow. This geometry is a simplified model of the interaction of propulsive jet exhaust from a V/STOL aircraft with the ground in forward flight. Jets were oriented normal to the cross flow and ground plane. Jet size, cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio, ground plane-to-jet board spacing, and jet exit turbulence level and mean velocity profile shape were all varied to determine their effects on the size of the ground vortex interaction region which forms on the ground plane, using smoke injection into the jet. Three component laser Doppler velocimeter measurements were made with a commercial three color system for the case of a uniform jet with exit spacing equal to 5.5 diameters and cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio equal to 0.11. The flow visualization data compared well for equivalent runs of the same nondimensional jet exit spacing and the same velocity ratio for different diameter nozzles, except at very low velocity ratios and for the larger nozzle, where tunnel blockage became significant. Variation of observed ground vortex size with cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio was consistent with previous studies. Observed effects of jet size and ground plane-to-jet board spacing were relatively small. Jet exit turbulence level effects were also small. However, an annular jet with a low velocity central core was found to have a significantly smaller ground vortex than an equivalent uniform jet at the same values of cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio and jet exit-to-ground plane spacing. This may suggest a means of altering ground vortex behavior somewhat, and points out the importance of proper simulation of jet exit velocity conditions. LV data indicated unsteady turbulence levels in the ground vortex in excess of 70 percent.

  9. Excavation of sand by impinging jets of gas, with application to lunar landings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Philip; Immer, Christopher; Deyo-Svendsen, Matthew; Donahue, Carly; Latta, Robert; Vu, Bruce; Youngquist, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The erosion of sand by jets of gas is dominated in many cases by an interesting bulk flow of the granular material beneath the surface that occurs when the volumetric drag of gases diffusing through the porous medium produces a shear stress sufficient to unjam the material. Prior studies of rocket-induced cratering of a planetary surface had failed to identify this type of granular flow, which we are calling ``diffusion-driven shearing'' (DDS). It explains the simple observation that a crater is deepest in the center, despite the fact that the gases are stagnant directly beneath the center of the jet so that the traditional erosion mechanisms cannot possibly occur there, and despite the fact that the stagnation pressure under the jet is generally insufficient to cause the material to unjam. This study has also worked out a number of the scaling laws for the observed logarithmic growth of crater depth and width, and has explained the feedback mechanisms that govern that growth. The results are applied to controlling the blast effects of landing rockets on the Moon.

  10. Unsteady numerical simulation of a round jet with impinging microjets for noise suppression

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Phoi-Tack; Najafi-Yazdi, Alireza; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of a lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM)-Large Eddy Simulation methodology for the prediction of sound radiation from a round jet-microjet combination. The distinct advantage of LBM over traditional computational fluid dynamics methods is its ease of handling problems with complex geometries. Numerical simulations of an isothermal Mach 0.5, ReD = 1 × 105 circular jet (Dj = 0.0508 m) with and without the presence of 18 microjets (Dmj = 1 mm) were performed. The presence of microjets resulted in a decrease in the axial turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy. The associated decrease in radiated sound pressure level was around 1 dB. The far-field sound was computed using the porous Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings surface integral acoustic method. The trend obtained is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. The results of this study support the accuracy of LBM based numerical simulations for predictions of the effects of noise suppression devices on the radiated sound power. PMID:23967931

  11. Unsteady numerical simulation of a round jet with impinging microjets for noise suppression.

    PubMed

    Lew, Phoi-Tack; Najafi-Yazdi, Alireza; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of a lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM)-Large Eddy Simulation methodology for the prediction of sound radiation from a round jet-microjet combination. The distinct advantage of LBM over traditional computational fluid dynamics methods is its ease of handling problems with complex geometries. Numerical simulations of an isothermal Mach 0.5, Re(D) = 1 × 10(5) circular jet (D(j) = 0.0508 m) with and without the presence of 18 microjets (D(mj) = 1 mm) were performed. The presence of microjets resulted in a decrease in the axial turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy. The associated decrease in radiated sound pressure level was around 1 dB. The far-field sound was computed using the porous Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings surface integral acoustic method. The trend obtained is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. The results of this study support the accuracy of LBM based numerical simulations for predictions of the effects of noise suppression devices on the radiated sound power. PMID:23967931

  12. Conjugate heat transfer from a heated disk to a thin liquid film formed by a controlled impinging jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, A.; Thomas, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and numerical study of the heat transfer from a heated horizontal disk to a thin film of liquid is described. The liquid was delivered to the disk by a collar arrangement such that the film thickness and radial velocity were known at the outer radius of the collar. This method of delivery is termed as a controlled impinging jet. Flow visualization tests were performed and heat transfer data were collected along the radius of the disk for different volumetric flow rates and inlet temperatures in the supercritical and subcritical regions. The heat transfer coefficient was found to increase with flow rate when both supercritical and subcritical regions were present on the heated surface. A numerical simulation of this free surface problem was performed, which included the effects of conjugate heat transfer within the heated disk and the liquid. The numerical predictions agree with the experimental results and show that conjugate heat transfer has a significant effect on the local wail temperature and heat transfer coefficient.

  13. Adiabatic cooling of the artificial Porcupine plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruizhin, Iu. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Moskalenko, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma density obtained during the interaction of the artificial plasma jet, fired into the ionosphere with the body of the Porcupine main payload, have been analyzed for times when there was a well-developed wake effect. Using wake theory, the maximum temperature of the quasi-neutral xenon ion beam has been determined for an intermediate distance from the ion beam source when the beam has left the diamagnetic region but is still much denser than the ionospheric background plasma. The beam temperature is found to be about 4 times less than the temperature at injection. This observation is very well explained by adiabatic cooling of the beam during its initial diamagnetic and current-buildup phases at distances r smaller than 10 m. Outside this region, the beam conserves the temperature achieved. The observation proves that the artificial plasma jet passes through an initial gas-like diamagnetic phase restricted to the vicinity of the beam source, where it expands adiabatically. Partial cooling also takes place outside the diamagnetic region where the beam current still builds up. The observations also support a recently developed current-closure model of the quasi-neutral ion beam.

  14. Cratering Soil by Impinging Jets of Gas, with Application to Landing Rockets on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Vu, B. T.; Taylor, D. E.; Kromann, M. J.; Fuchs, M.; Yutko, B.; Dokos, A.; Immer, Christopher D.; Lane, J. E.; Dunkel, Michael B.; Donahue, Carly M.; Latta, R. C., III

    2007-01-01

    Several physical mechanisms are involved in excavating granular materials beneath a vertical jet of gas. These occur, for example, beneath the exhaust plume of a rocket landing on the soil of the Moon or Mars. A series of experiments and simulations have been performed to provide a detailed view of the complex gas/soil interactions. Measurements have also been taken from the Apollo lunar landing videos and from photographs of the resulting terrain, and these help to demonstrate how the interactions extrapolate into the lunar environment. It is important to understand these processes at a fundamental level to support the ongoing design of higher-fidelity numerical simulations and larger-scale experiments. These are needed to enable future lunar exploration wherein multiple hardware assets will be placed on the Moon within short distances of one another. The high-velocity spray of soil from landing spacecraft must be accurately predicted and controlled lest it erosively damage the surrounding hardware.

  15. Effects of geometry on slot-jet film cooling performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hyams, D.G.; McGovern, K.T.; Leylek, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    The physics of the film cooling process for shaped, inclined slot-jets with realistic slot-length-to-width ratios (L/s) is studied for a range of blowing ratio (M) and density ratio (DR) parameters typical of gas turbine operations. For the first time in the open literature, the effect of inlet and exit shaping of the slot-jet on both flow and thermal field characteristics is isolated, and the dominant mechanisms responsible for differences in these characteristics are documented. A previously documented computational methodology was applied for the study of four distinct configurations: (1) slot with straight edges and sharp corners (reference case); (2) slot with shaped inlet region; (3) slot with shaped exit region; and (4) slot with both shaped inlet and exit regions. Detailed field results as well as surface phenomena involving adiabatic film effectiveness ({eta}) and heat transfer coefficient (h) are presented. It is demonstrated that both {eta} and h results are vital in the proper assessment of film cooling performance. All simulations were carried out using a multi-block, unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching solver with multi-grid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing type acceleration techniques. Special attention was paid to and full documentation provided for: (1) proper modeling of the physical phenomena; (2) exact geometry and high quality grid generation techniques; (3) discretization schemes; and (4) turbulence modeling issues. The key parameters M and DR were varied from 1.0 to 2.0 and 1.5 to 2.0, respectively, to show their influence. Simulations were repeated for slot length-to-width ratio (L/s) of 3.0 and 4.5 in order to explain the effects of this important parameter. Additionally, the performance of two popular turbulence models, standard k-F, and RNG k-E, were studied to establish their ability to handle highly elliptic jet/crossflow interaction type processes.

  16. Direct Flame Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    During the DFI process, high velocity flame jets impinge upon the material being heated, creating a high heat transfer rate. As a result, refractory walls and exhaust gases are cooler, which increases thermal efficiency and lowers NOx emissions. Because the jet nozzles are located a few inches from the load, furnace size can be reduced significantly.

  17. Photodetachment-photoelectron spectroscopy of jet-cooled chrysene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschurl, Martin; Boesl, Ulrich

    2006-03-01

    Jet-cooled chrysene anions have been produced by attachment of slow laser-induced photoelectrons. The molecules have been studied by photodetachment-photoelectron spectroscopy using various wavelengths of the detachment laser. The adiabatic electron affinity of chrysene was directly determined to be 0.32 +/- 0.01 eV. In the S0 state of neutral chrysene two different vibrational modes are visible. Both are assigned to breathing modes of the aromatic ring system. In addition, the first excited triplet state is observed and a singlet triplet energy gap of 2.64 +/- 0.01 eV has been determined. In this state it was also possible to resolve a vibrational mode. At 355 nm an anion resonance was found that ended up in vibrationally highly excited neutral chrysene. As an explanation a special relaxation pathway is suggested.

  18. Jet-Cooled Emission Spectra of the Xylyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selco, J. I.; Carrick, P. G.

    1995-09-01

    Jet-cooled electronic emission spectra from ortho-, meta-, and para-xylyl (methylbenzyl) radicals have been recorded with a corona excited supersonic expansion (CESE) apparatus. A full vibronic analysis of the D1 → D0 transitions for all three isomers has been carried out, allowing for unambiguous assignments of the gas-phase ground state vibrational frequencies. For modes exhibiting progressions (numbering according to Green and Wilson) (11 (18a), 29 (6b), 10 (6a), 9 (1), 25 (3) and 5 (14) in ortho-xylyl; 10 (6b) in meta-xylyl; and 5 (1), 6 (6a), 3 (7a), and 17 (10a) in para-xylyl), anharmonicity constants are calculated and reported. Although CESE excitation of the xylenes (used in this study as precursors) did not result in the interconversion of isomers, it does occur along with homolytic methyl C-H bond dissociation during the formation of the radicals.

  19. Transpiring Cooling of a Scram-Jet Engine Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Song, Kyo D.; Ries,Heidi

    1997-01-01

    The peak cold-wall heating rate generated in a combustion chamber of a scram-jet engine can exceed 2000 Btu/sq ft sec (approx. 2344 W/sq cm). Therefore, a very effective heat dissipation mechanism is required to sustain such a high heating load. This research focused on the transpiration cooling mechanism that appears to be a promising approach to remove a large amount of heat from the engine wall. The transpiration cooling mechanism has two aspects. First, initial computations suggest that there is a reduction, as much as 75%, in the heat flux incident on the combustion chamber wall due to the transpirant modifying the combustor boundary layer. Secondly, the heat reaching the combustor wall is removed from the structure in a very effective manner by the transpirant. It is the second of these two mechanisms that is investigated experimentally in the subject paper. A transpiration cooling experiment using a radiant heating method, that provided a heat flux as high as 200 Btu/sq ft sec ( approx. 234 W/sq cm) on the surface of a specimen, was performed. The experiment utilized an arc-lamp facility (60-kW radiant power output) to provide a uniform heat flux to a test specimen. For safety reasons, helium gas was used as the transpirant in the experiments. The specimens were 1.9-cm diameter sintered, powdered-stainless-steel tubes of various porosities and a 2.54cm square tube with perforated multi-layered walls. A 15-cm portion of each specimen was heated. The cooling effectivenes and efficiencies by transpiration for each specimen were obtained using the experimental results. During the testing, various test specimens displayed a choking phenomenon in which the transpirant flow was limited as the heat flux was increased. The paper includes a preliminary analysis of the transpiration cooling mechanism and a scaling conversion study that translates the results from helium tests into the case when a hydrogen medium is used.

  20. High-resolution photoabsorption spectrum of jet-cooled propyne

    SciTech Connect

    Jacovella, U.; Holland, D. M. P.; Boyé-Péronne, S.; Joyeux, D.; Archer, L. E.; Oliveira, N. de; Nahon, L.; Lucchese, R. R.; Xu, Hong; Pratt, S. T.

    2014-09-21

    The absolute photoabsorption cross section of propyne was recorded between 62 000 and 88 000 cm{sup −1} by using the vacuum-ultraviolet, Fourier-transform spectrometer at the Synchrotron Soleil. This cross section spans the region including the lowest Rydberg bands and extends above the Franck-Condon envelope for ionization to the ground electronic state of the propyne cation, X{sup ~+}. Room-temperature spectra were recorded in a flowing cell at 0.9 cm{sup −1} resolution, and jet-cooled spectra were recorded at 1.8 cm{sup −1} resolution and a rotational temperature of ∼100 K. The reduced widths of the rotational band envelopes in the latter spectra reveal new structure and simplify a number of assignments. Although nf Rydberg series have not been assigned previously in the photoabsorption spectrum of propyne, arguments are presented for their potential importance, and the assignment of one nf series is proposed. As expected from previous photoelectron spectra, Rydberg series are also observed above the adiabatic ionization threshold that converge to the v{sub 3}{sup +} = 1 and 2 levels of the C≡C stretching vibration.

  1. Influence of the elliptical and circular orifices on the local heat transfer distribution of a flat plate impinged by under-expanded jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinze, Ravish; Limeye, M. D.; Prabhu, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental study is carried out to explore the influence of nozzle profile on heat transfer for underexpanded impinging jets. Circular and elliptical orifices are used to generate underexpanded jets for underexpantion ratio ranging from 1.25 to 2.67. The supply pressure maintained in the present study ranges from 2.36 to 5.08 times the ambient pressure. IR thermal imaging camera is used to measure surface temperature of thin foil at different nozzle to plate distances. Shadowgraph and pressure distribution are used to understand the flow structure and distribution of circular and elliptical nozzle. It is observed that plate shock and pressure distribution over the plate have significant influence on the local heat transfer. The performance of the circular orifice is far better at lower z/d. The axis switching is observed for an elliptical orifice. Correlation for local heat transfer predicts Nusselt number comparable within 15 % of experimental results.

  2. Jet-Cooled Chlorofluorobenzyl Radicals: Spectroscopy and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young; Lee, Sang

    2016-06-01

    Whereas the benzyl radical, a prototypic aromatic free radical, has been the subject of numerous spectroscopic studies, halo-substituted benzyl radicals have received less attention, due to the difficulties associated with production of radicals from precursors. In particular, chloro-substituted benzyl radicals have been much less studied because of the weak visible emission intensity and weak C-Cl bond dissociation energy. The jet-cooled chlorofluorobenzyl radicals were generated in a technique of corona excited supersonic jet expansion using a pinhole-type glass nozzle for the vibronic assignments and measurements of electronic energies of the D_1 → D_0 transition. The 2,4-,2.5-, and 2.6- chlorofluorobenzyl radicals were generated by corona discharge of corresponding precursors, chlorofluorotoluenes seeded in a large amount of helium carrier gas. The vibronic emission spectra were recorded with a long-path monochromator in the visible region. The emission spectra show the vibronic bands originating from two types of benzyl-type radicals, chlorofluorobenzyl and fluorobenzyl benzyl radicals, in which fluorobenzyl radicals were obtained by displacement of Cl by H produced by dissociation of methyl C-H bond. From the analysis of the spectra observed, we could determine the electronic energies in D_1 → D_0 transition and vibrational mode frequencies at the D_0 state of chlorofluorobenzyl radicals, which show the origin band of the electronic transition to be shifted to red region, comparing with the parental benzyl radical. From the quantitative analysis of the red-shift, it has been found that the additivity rule can be applied to dihalo-substituted benzyl radicals. In this presentation, the dissociation process of precursors in corona discharge is discussed in terms of bond dissociation energy as well as the spectroscopic analysis of the radicals. C. S. Huh, Y. W. Yoon, and S. K. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 174306 (2012). Y. W. Huh, S. Y. Chae, and S. K. Lee, Chem

  3. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  4. Comparison of heat-transfer test data for a chordwise-finned, impingement-cooled turbine vane tested in a four-vane cascade and a research engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Yeh, F. C.

    1972-01-01

    The heat-transfer characteristics of a chordwise-finned, impingement-cooled vane were investigated in both a modified J-57 research engine and a four-vane cascade. The data were compared by a correlation of temperature difference ratio with coolant- to gas-flow ratio and also by two modifications of this correlation. The results indicated that the cascade vane temperature data can generally be used to represent the engine vane temperature data. A discussion of engine and cascade gas-side heat-transfer coefficients is also presented. A redesign of the vane leading edge could significantly increase the potential turbine-inlet temperature operating limit.

  5. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  6. Design and Testing of an Automated System using Thermochromatic Liquid Crystals to Determine Local Heat Transfer Coefficients for an Impinging Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Benjamin

    1995-01-01

    Using thermochromatic liquid crystal to measure surface temperature, an automated transient method with time-varying free-stream temperature is developed to determine local heat transfer coefficients. By allowing the free-stream temperature to vary with time, the need for complicated mechanical components to achieve a step temperature change is eliminated, and by using the thermochromatic liquid crystals as temperature indicators, the labor intensive task of installing many thermocouples is omitted. Bias associated with human perception of the transition of the thermochromatic liquid crystal is eliminated by using a high speed digital camera and a computer. The method is validated by comparisons with results obtained by the steady-state method for a circular Jet impinging on a flat plate. Several factors affecting the accuracy of the method are evaluated.

  7. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-01-01

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed. PMID:27608626

  8. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-09-09

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed.

  9. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: Comparison with a Conventional Circular Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Sil; Dyussekenov, Nurzhan; Sohn, H. Y.

    2010-02-01

    The top-blow injection technique of a gas-solid mixture through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One of the inherent problems associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than a circular jet was designed in the laboratory scale. With this new configuration, solid particles leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different than with the circular lance in which the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. The results of cold model tests using an air-sand jet issuing from a circular lance and an annular lance into a water bath showed that the penetration of the annular jet is much less sensitive to the variations in particle feed rate as well as gas velocity than that of the circular jet. Correlation equations for the penetration depth for both circular and annular jets show agreement among the experimentally obtained values.

  10. Astrophysical Jets with Conical Wire Arrays: Radiative Cooling, Rotation and Deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Bott, S. C.

    2009-01-21

    Highly collimated outflows or jets are produced by a number of astrophysical objects including protostars. The morphology and collimation of these jets is thought to be strongly influenced by the effects of radiative cooling, angular momentum and the interstellar medium surrounding the jet. Astrophysically relevant experiments are performed with conical wire array z-pinches investigating each of these effects. It is possible in each case to enter the appropriate parameter regime, leading the way towards future experiments where these different techniques can be more fully combined.

  11. Numerical optimization of a multi-jet cooling system for the blown film extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janas, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    The limiting factor for every extrusion process is the cooling. For the blown film process, this task is usually done by means of a single or dual lip air ring. Prior work has shown that two major effects are responsible for a bad heat transfer. The first one is the interaction between the jet and the ambient air. It reduces the velocity of the jet and enlarges the straight flow. The other one is the formation of a laminar boundary layer on the film surface due to the fast flowing cooling air. In this case, the boundary layer isolates the film and prevents an efficient heat transfer. To improve the heat exchange, a novel cooling approach is developed, called Multi-Jet. The new cooling system uses several slit nozzles over the whole tube formation zone for cooling the film. In contrast to a conventional system, the cooling air is guided vertically on the film surface in different heights to penetrate the boundary sublayer. Simultaneously, a housing of the tube formation zone is practically obtained to reduce the interaction with the ambient air. For the numerical optimization of the Multi-Jet system, a new procedure is developed. First, a prediction model identifies a worth considering cooling configuration. Therefore, the prediction model computes a film curve using the formulation from Zatloukal-Vlcek and the energy balance for the film temperature. Thereafter, the optimized cooling geometry is investigated in detail using a process model for the blown film extrusion that is able to compute a realistic bubble behavior depending on the cooling situation. In this paper, the Multi-Jet cooling system is numerically optimized for several different process states, like mass throughputs and blow-up ratios using one slit nozzle setting. For each process condition, the best cooling result has to be achieved. Therefore, the height of any nozzle over the tube formation zone is adjustable. The other geometrical parameters of the cooling system like the nozzle diameter or the

  12. Development of Broad Range Scan Capabilities with Jet Cooled Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codd, Terrance J.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Miller, Terry A.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a technique for obtaining broad scans, >100 Cm-1, for jet cooled cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) spectra. Previously the scans of the jet cooled, CRDS apparatus were limited to <10 Cm-1 due to the use of a narrow linewidth radiation source. However, by coupling our jet cooled, CRDS apparatus with a moderate resolution (≃q 0.05 Cm-1) dye laser we are able to greatly increase our rate of data acquisition thereby gaining the capability to perform broad spectral surveys of jet cooled molecules. As a test of the capabilities of the technique we have scanned the tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition of NO_3 previously reported by Deev et al. at room temperature. We believe that this will be a very useful technique to search for transitions of cold molecules whose frequencies are not well known and which later can be studied using high resolution methods. A. Deev, J. Sommar, and M. Okumura, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 224305 (2005).

  13. Transpiration cooling in the locality of a transverse fuel jet for supersonic combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton; Capriotti, Diego P.; Byington, Carl S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to determine the feasibility of transpiration cooling for the relief of the local heating rates in the region of a sonic, perpendicular, fuel jet of gaseous hydrogen. Experiments were conducted to determine the interaction between the cooling required and flameholding limits of a transverse jet in a high-enthalpy, Mach 3 flow in both open-jet and direct-connect test mode. Pulsed shadowgraphs were used to illustrate the flow field. Infrared thermal images indicated the surface temperatures, and the OH(-) emission of the flame was used to visualize the limits of combustion. Wall, static presures indicated the location of the combustion within the duct and were used to calculate the combustion efficiency. The results from both series of tests at facility total temperatures of 1700 K and 2000 K are presented.

  14. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly.

    PubMed

    Barr, M; Fahy, A; Martens, J; Dastoor, P C

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K. PMID:27250408

  15. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, M.; Fahy, A.; Martens, J.; Dastoor, P. C.

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  16. Detailed flowfield and surface properties for high Knudsen number planar jet impingement at an inclined flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunpei; He, Xin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents two sets of analytical exact solutions for collisionless gas flows from a planar exit, impinging at an inclined flat plate. These analytical results are obtained by using gaskinetic theories. The first set of solutions are for a diffuse reflective plate surface, and the other set of solutions are for a specular reflective plate surface. A virtual nozzle exit is adopted to aid analyzing the specular reflective plate scenario. New formulas for plate surface properties, including velocity slips, pressure, shear stress, and heat flux distributions, are provided. For both problems, the flowfield exact solutions are investigated as well. Numerical simulations with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method are performed to validate these new analytical results, and good agreement is obtained for flows with high Knudsen numbers. The results consider effects from many factors, such as the plate inclination angle, geometry ratios, and exit gas and plate properties (such as exit gas bulk density, gas speed ratio, and exit gas and plate temperatures). Compared with past work, these new solutions are more comprehensive and practical. The results also illustrate that if the plate is quite close to the nozzle exit, it is improper to adopt the traditional treatments of a point source and a simple cosine function.

  17. The spatial and temporal structure of thermal fluctuations associated with a vertical turbulent jet impinging a water surface: laboratory experiments and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judd, K. Peter; Savelyev, Ivan B.; Smith, Geoffrey B.; Marmorino, George

    2012-06-01

    Infrared imaging, in both laboratory and field settings, has become a vital tool in diagnosing near-surface thermalhydrodynamic phenomena such as convective cells, accumulation of surfactant, and coherent turbulent structures. In this presentation, we initially focus on a laboratory scale (0.01-1m) subsurface vertical turbulent water jet that serves as a canonical flow. The jet has a slightly elevated temperature thus the warmer fluid serves as a passive marker. Infrared image sequences of the surface thermal field were collected for various water jet flow rates and for both "clean" and surfactant-contaminated surface conditions. Turbulent characteristics of the near-surface flow field were measured by means of Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV), and these are used to examine the statistical nature of the coupled thermal-hydrodynamic field. An analog of the laboratory jet is the discharge of power-plant cooling water through a vertical pipe on the ocean floor. High-resolution airborne infrared imagery has recently been acquired of such a discharge (from the Huntington Beach Generating Station, CA), and these data are compared with the laboratory results in an attempt to understand striking spatial patterns discovered on the ocean surface.

  18. Collisional-radiative simulations of a supersonic and radiatively cooled aluminum plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, G.; Gil, J. M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J. G.; Mendoza, M. A.; Martel, P.; Minguez, E.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G.; Pickworth, L. A.; Skidmore, J.

    2015-12-01

    A computational investigation based on collisional-radiative simulations of a supersonic and radiatively cooled aluminum plasma jet is presented. The jet, both in vacuum and in argon ambient gas, was produced on the MAGPIE (Mega Ampere Generator for Plasma Implosion Experiments) generator and is formed by ablation of an aluminum foil driven by a 1.4 MA, 250 ns current pulse in a radial foil Z-pinch configuration. In this work, population kinetics and radiative properties simulations of the jet in different theoretical approximations were performed. In particular, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), non-LTE steady state (SS) and non-LTE time dependent (TD) models have been considered. This study allows us to make a convenient microscopic characterization of the aluminum plasma jet.

  19. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of an Auxiliary Cooling System for Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leamy, Kevin; Griffiths, Jim; Andersen, Paul; Joco, Fidel; Laski, Mark; Balser, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical effort of the Active Cooling for Enhanced Performance (ACEP) program sponsored by NASA. It covers the design, fabrication, and integrated systems testing of a jet engine auxiliary cooling system, or turbocooler, that significantly extends the use of conventional jet fuel as a heat sink. The turbocooler is designed to provide subcooled cooling air to the engine exhaust nozzle system or engine hot section. The turbocooler consists of three primary components: (1) a high-temperature air cycle machine driven by engine compressor discharge air, (2) a fuel/ air heat exchanger that transfers energy from the hot air to the fuel and uses a coating to mitigate fuel deposits, and (3) a high-temperature fuel injection system. The details of the turbocooler component designs and results of the integrated systems testing are documented. Industry Version-Data and information deemed subject to Limited Rights restrictions are omitted from this document.

  20. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  1. Analysis of a Free Surface Film from a Controlled Liquid Impinging Jet over a Rotating Disk Including Conjugate Effects, with and without Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Rice, Jeremy; Faghri, Amir; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the liquid film characteristics and the accompanying heat transfer of a free surface controlled liquid impinging jet onto a rotating disk are presented. The computations were run on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric Eulerian mesh while the free surface was calculated with the volume of fluid method. Flow rates between 3 and 15 1pm with rotational speeds between 50 and 200 rpm are analyzed. The effects of inlet temperature on the film thickness and heat transfer are characterized as well as evaporative effects. The conjugate heating effect is modeled, and was found to effect the heat transfer results the most at both the inner and outer edges of the heated surface. The heat transfer was enhanced with both increasing flow rate and increasing rotational speeds. When evaporative effects were modeled, the evaporation was found to increase the heat transfer at the lower flow rates the most because of a fully developed thermal field that was achieved. The evaporative effects did not significantly enhance the heat transfer at the higher flow rates.

  2. Theoretical analysis of specimen cooling rate during impact freezing and liquid-jet freezing of freeze-etch specimens.

    PubMed

    Kopstad, G; Elgsaeter, A

    1982-11-01

    We have carried out a theoretical analysis of specimen cooling rate under ideal conditions during impact freezing and liquid-jet freezing. The analysis shows that use of liquid helium instead of liquid nitrogen as cooling medium during impact freezing results in an increase in a specimen cooling rate of no more than 30-40%. We have further shown that when both impact freezing and liquid-jet freezing are conducted at liquid nitrogen temperature, the two methods give approximately the same specimen cooling rate under ideal conditions except for a thin outer layer of the specimen. In this region impact freezing yields the highest cooling rate. PMID:7171712

  3. Recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling.

    PubMed

    Han, J C; Dutta, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper focuses on turbine blade internal cooling. Internal cooling is achieved by passing the coolant through several rib-enhanced serpentine passages inside the blade and extracting the heat from the outside of the blades. Both jet impingement and pin-fin-cooling are also used as a method of internal cooling. In the past number of years there has been considerable progress in turbine blade internal cooling research and this paper is limited to reviewing a few selected publications to reflect recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling. PMID:11460626

  4. Ballistics Model for Particles on a Horizontal Plane in a Vacuum Propelled by a Vertically Impinging Gas Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, J. E.; Metzger, P. T.

    2010-01-01

    A simple trajectory model has been developed and is presented. The particle trajectory path is estimated by computing the vertical position as a function of the horizontal position using a constant horizontal velocity and a vertical acceleration approximated as a power law. The vertical particle position is then found by solving the differential equation of motion using a double integral of vertical acceleration divided by the square of the horizontal velocity, integrated over the horizontal position. The input parameters are: x(sub 0) and y(sub 0), the initial particle starting point; the derivative of the trajectory at x(sub 0) and y(sub 0), s(sub 0) = s(x(sub 0))= dx(y)/dy conditional expectation y = y((sub 0); and b where bx(sub 0)/y(sub 0) is the final trajectory angle before gravity pulls the particle down. The final parameter v(sub 0) is an approximation to a constant horizontal velocity. This model is time independent, providing vertical position x as a function of horizontal distance y: x(y) = (x(sub 0) + s(sub 0) (y-y(sub 0))) + bx(sub 0) -(s(sub 0)y(sub 0) ((y - y(sub 0)/y(sub 0) - ln((y/y(sub 0)))-((g(y-y(sub 0)(exp 2))/ 2((v(sub 0)(exp 2). The first term on the right in the above equation is due to simple ballistics and a spherically expanding gas so that the trajectory is a straight line intersecting (0,0), which is the point at the center of the gas impingement on the surface. The second term on the right is due to vertical acceleration, which may be positive or negative. The last term on the right is the gravity term, which for a particle with velocities less than escape velocity will eventually bring the particle back to the ground. The parameters b, s(sub 0), and in some cases v(sub 0), are taken from an interpolation of similar parameters determined from a CFD simulation matrix, coupled with complete particle trajectory simulations.

  5. High-sensitivity laser spectroscopy with atoms from a cooled helium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Evans, R.M.; Davids, C.N.; Finn, M.A.; Kaufman, S.L.; Greenlees, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a cryogenic He-jet system which efficiently transports radioactive atoms produced on-line at the Argonne National Laboratory Tandem-Linac Accelertor away from the production region and forms them into a cool atomic beam. This atomic beam will be probed with high sensitivity laser spectroscopy using the photon burst method. The ultimate goal of this work is to determine the sizes, shapes, and magnetic moments of short-lived nuclei through their atomic hyperfine structure. Preliminary measurements with the He-jet system and the adaption of the photon burst method to this new geometry are described.

  6. Pressure-loss and flow coefficients inside a chordwise-finned, impingement, convection, and film air-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Total-pressure-loss coefficients, flow discharge coefficients, and friction factors were determined experimentally for the various area and geometry changes and flow passages within an air-cooled turbine vane. The results are compared with those of others obtained on similar configurations, both actual and large models, of vane passages. The supply and exit air pressures were controlled and varied. The investigation was conducted with essentially ambient-temperature air and without external flow of air over the vane.

  7. Assessment of subgrid-scale models with a large-eddy simulation-dedicated experimental database: The pulsatile impinging jet in turbulent cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baya Toda, Hubert; Cabrit, Olivier; Truffin, Karine; Bruneaux, Gilles; Nicoud, Franck

    2014-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in complex geometries and industrial applications like piston engines, gas turbines, or aircraft engines requires the use of advanced subgrid-scale (SGS) models able to take into account the main flow features and the turbulence anisotropy. Keeping this goal in mind, this paper reports a LES-dedicated experiment of a pulsatile hot-jet impinging a flat-plate in the presence of a cold turbulent cross-flow. Unlike commonly used academic test cases, this configuration involves different flow features encountered in complex configurations: shear/rotating regions, stagnation point, wall-turbulence, and the propagation of a vortex ring along the wall. This experiment was also designed with the aim to use quantitative and nonintrusive optical diagnostics such as Particle Image Velocimetry, and to easily perform a LES involving a relatively simple geometry and well-controlled boundary conditions. Hence, two eddy-viscosity-based SGS models are investigated: the dynamic Smagorinsky model [M. Germano, U. Piomelli, P. Moin, and W. Cabot, "A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model," Phys. Fluids A 3(7), 1760-1765 (1991)] and the σ-model [F. Nicoud, H. B. Toda, O. Cabrit, S. Bose, and J. Lee, "Using singular values to build a subgrid-scale model for large eddy simulations," Phys. Fluids 23(8), 085106 (2011)]. Both models give similar results during the first phase of the experiment. However, it was found that the dynamic Smagorinsky model could not accurately predict the vortex-ring propagation, while the σ-model provides a better agreement with the experimental measurements. Setting aside the implementation of the dynamic procedure (implemented here in its simplest form, i.e., without averaging over homogeneous directions and with clipping of negative values to ensure numerical stability), it is suggested that the mitigated predictions of the dynamic Smagorinsky model are due to the dynamic constant, which strongly depends on the mesh resolution

  8. Engine investigation of an air-cooled turbine rotor blade incorporating impingement-cooled leading edge, chordwise passages, and a slotted trailing edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, R. P.; Yeh, F. C.; Gauntner, J. W.; Fallon, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental temperatures are presented for an air-cooled turbine rotor blade tested in an engine. The data were obtained for turbine stator inlet temperatures from 2000 to 2500 F and for turbine-inlet gas pressures from 32 to 46 psia. Average and local blade heat-transfer data are correlated. Potential allowable increases in gas temperature are also discussed.

  9. Pincer Impingement.

    PubMed

    Hadeed, Michael M; Cancienne, Jourdan M; Gwathmey, F Winston

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a brief review of pincer impingement pathomechanics and the current methods of diagnosis, followed by a discussion of many of the current controversies in addressing pincer morphology. These controversies include controversial surgical indications such as global acetabular retroversion and the role of prophylactic surgery, controversial surgical techniques to address the acetabular labrum, as well as the best methods for intraoperative evaluation of the arthroscopic acetabuloplasty. PMID:27343393

  10. Numerical solution for the temperature distribution in a cooled guide vane blade of a radial gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosny, W. M.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    A two dimensional finite difference numerical technique is presented to determine the temperature distribution of an internal cooled blade of radial turbine guide vanes. A simple convection cooling is assumed inside the guide vane blade. Such cooling has relatively small cooling effectiveness at the leading edge and at the trailing edge. Heat transfer augmentation in these critical areas may be achieved by using impingement jets and film cooling. A computer program is written in FORTRAN IV for IBM 370/165 computer.

  11. Sub-Doppler Slit Jet Discharge Spectroscopy of Jet Cooled Polyacetylenes: the Anti-Symmetric CH Stretch Mode of Triacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Roberts, Melanie A.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-06-01

    Growth of polyacetylenic molecules in acetylene flames is thought to play a central role in combustion chemistry and formation of soot, as well as the chemistry of gas clouds in the interstellar medium. In this talk, we present results from first sub-Doppler, high resolution infrared spectroscopic studies on triacetylene. In particular, we explore the fundamental anti-symmetric CH stretching mode (v_5) of jet-cooled triacetylene in a pulsed slit discharge, where the "{in-situ} synthesis" arises from a discharge of trace(0.1-1%) acetylene/rare gas mixtures followed by rapid CCH + HCCH chemistry in the supersonic expansion environment. The band origin of this mode is determined to be 3329.0544(2) cm^{-1}. At high resolution, a series of avoided energy level crossings arising from rotational perturbations are observed and ascribed to perpendicular Coriolis mixing with a near degenerate manifold of Π vibrational symmetry. The energy level patterns are successfully analyzed to reveal spectroscopic constants and Coriolis coupling matrix elements for the perturbing manifold. In addition, a weak Π-Π hot band progression due to thermal population in the slit jet is observed and assigned. D. McNaughton and D. N. Bruget, J. Mol. Spectrosc.150, 620 (1991) K. Matsumura, K. Kawaguchi, D. McNaughton, and D. N. Bruget, J. Mol. Spectrosc.158, 489 (1993)

  12. Fluorescence excitation spectrum and solvent-assisted conformational isomerization (SACI) of jet-cooled acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Kang, Jeong Seok; Lee, So Young; Kang, Hyuk

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectrum of jet-cooled acetaminophen was obtained. When AAP was expanded with a buffer gas containing 0.3-1.1% of water, absorption peaks of the less stable trans conformer was significantly reduced by solvent-assisted conformational isomerization (SACI), which is confirmed by a separately measured UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy. It is also confirmed by quantum mechanical calculation and RRKM calculation that it is energetically and kinetically possible to induce SACI in AAP with water. The SACI mechanism suggests a possible pathway that acetaminophen can adopt an active conformation in vivo, which is need for molecular recognition and drug activity.

  13. n,. pi. /sup */ state of jet-cooled benzophenone as studied by sensitized phosphorescence excitation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, S.; Sato, T.; Mikami, N.; Ito, M.

    1986-10-23

    The sensitized phosphorescence excitation spectrum of jet-cooled benzophenone due to the S/sub 1/(n,..pi../sup */) produced from S/sub 0/ transition has been measured. It was found that the spectrum consists exclusively of several long progressions of 60 cm/sup -1/ which is the in-phase torsional mode of the phenyl rings. The vibrational analysis and the potential calculation shows that the in the S/sub 1/(n,..pi../sup */) state great geometry changes occur in the dihedral angle between the phenyl rings, the C=O bond distance, and the C-C bonds adjacent to the C=O bond.

  14. High Temperature Ceramic Guide Vane Temperature and Pressure Distribution Calculation for Flow with Cooling Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Rakesh

    2004-01-01

    A ceramic guide vane has been designed and tested for operation under high temperature. Previous efforts have suggested that some cooling flow may be required to alleviate the high temperatures observed near the trailing edge region. The present report describes briefly a three-dimensional viscous analysis carried out to calculate the temperature and pressure distribution on the blade surface and in the flow path with a jet of cooling air exiting from the suction surface near the trailing edge region. The data for analysis was obtained from Dr. Craig Robinson. The surface temperature and pressure distribution along with a flowfield distribution is shown in the results. The surface distribution is also given in a tabular form at the end of the document.

  15. Investigation of flow characteristics effects on heat transfer in water-cooled cylinder heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A. M.; Abd El-Hameed, H. M.; Mahmoud, Osama E.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been performed to investigate the effect of flow characteristics on heat-transfer in water impingement-cooled cylinder heads. Numerous investigations have been made using a three-dimensional model, which is designed and solved by FLUENT software using both realizable k-ɛ turbulent and heat transfer models. The simulation investigates a fully developed turbulent-water flow in asymmetric heated circular passage cooled by parallel flow or impingement of circular submerged confined liquid jet. The following parameters were investigated for both parallel flow and jet impingement flow: flow velocities (1, 2 and 3 m/s), bulk fluid temperatures (50, 70 and 90 °C), main duct diameters (6, 8, 10 and 12 mm). While the following parameters were investigated for jet impingement flow, jet diameter ratio (0.6, 0.8 and 1) and jet inclination angles as measured from horizontal (45°, 60° and 90°). Experimental results were used to verify the theoretical model. Results indicate that, the normal jet (90°) gives the maximum cooling effect in comparison to other angles while the maximum heat transfer coefficient is found at jet interface position.

  16. Multipass laser mass spectrometer with extreme jet-cooled pulsed gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kirihara, Naotoshi; Takahashi, Kenji; Kitada, Norifumi; Tanaka, Mizuho; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2006-09-15

    We have developed a photon accumulated laser mass spectrometer that enables us to identify isomers of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran. This system is comprised of a high temperature (230 deg. C) pulsed gas injector (PGI), multimirror multipath system (MMS), and the conventional time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The PGI induces the formation of a choked supersonic jet gas pulse that cools down to a temperature to restrain fragmentation and reduces vibrational and rotational thermal noises. The results suggest that the excited lifetime numbers and fragment dynamics of these species change completely with jet cooling of molecules. The MMS enhances the soft ionization efficiency (by a factor of 1000 over a single path system) through photon accumulation by extending the irradiation duration (to about 40 ns) and volume, and it further minimizes fragmentation by carefully controlling the laser intensity distribution within the ionization volume. For the typical isomer 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, the system achieved a detection threshold (S/N ratio=3) of 410 ppq (equivalent to 4.4 ng/N m{sup 3})

  17. Spectral characteristics of heterocyclic compounds with a chain structure, cooled in an ultrasonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povedailo, V. A.; Yakovlev, D. L.

    2006-11-01

    We have recorded the fluorescence excitation spectra of three heterocyclic compounds with a chain structure [BPO (2-phenyl-5-(4-diphenylyl)oxazole), POPOP (1,4-di[2-(5-phenyloxazolyl)]benzene, and TOPOT (1,4-di[2-(5-n-tolyloxazolyl)]benzene] and the fluorescence spectra of POPOP, under conditions where the molecules were cooled in an ultrasonic helium jet. A line structure is observed in the spectra of POPOP and TOPOT; for the BPO molecules, whose configuration changes considerably during electronic excitation, vibrational structure is apparent only in the low-frequency region of the excitation spectrum, and a diffuse spectrum is recorded starting from ν 0 0 + 200 cm-1. For all the compounds, in the spectra we recorded vibrations with frequencies up to 100 cm-1, arising due to the flexibility of the molecular structure. The rotational contours of the lines for the electronic and vibronic transitions of the POPOP molecules (Trot = 10.5 K) and TOPOT molecules (Trot = 15 K) are structureless and bell-shaped. The degree of polarization of the fluorescence Pfl for the jet-cooled POPOP molecules for excitation of vibrations along the absorption band up to 2000 cm-1 above ν 0 0 is practically constant (˜8.4%) and matches Pfl for high-temperature vapors.

  18. Comparison of current reversal chronopotentiometry (CRC) and small amplitude cyclic voltammetry (SACV) method to determine the long-term corrosion tendency of copper-nickel alloys in polluted and unpolluted seawater under jet-impingement conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, M.R.; Alhajji, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    The cyclic current reversal chronopotentiometry (CRC) technique is utilized to determine the long-term corrosion tendency of UNS C70600 and UNS C71500 copper-nickel alloys in sulfide polluted and unpolluted seawater. The CRC results were compared with the corrosion tendency obtained by the modified linear polarization method small amplitude cyclic voltammetry (SACV) over a long exposure time and the results are in agreement for both C70600 and C71500 alloys. This contradicts the conclusions on the effects of sulfide on copper-nickel alloys by many previous investigators who misinterpreted the sharp active shift in potential as an indication of increase in corrosion rate. For an active/passive alloy such as C71500 a higher amplitude current per cycle is required (e.g., 100 {micro}A/20 seconds) in the CRC method and under jet-impingement conditions, while a lower amplitude current per cycle (e.g., 1{micro}A/20 seconds) is required for an alloy that does not exhibit active/passive behavior. The CRC technique was found to be unsuccessful in screening out the long-term corrosion tendency of copper alloys in polluted and unpolluted sea water and under stagnant or stirred conditions (i.e., non-jet-impingement conditions).

  19. Multiple Null Point Reconnections in a limb faint cool jet ejection event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.

    2016-09-01

    Giant spicules and macro- spicules are an important extended rather cool structure between the solar surface and the corona, partly filling the space inside the chromosphere and surrounded by a transition thin region. Their formation and dynamical properties are still mysterious. In order to explain solar limb and disc periodic recurrences of these events, a simulation model assuming quasi- random positions of spicules above the solar limb was studied. We allow a set number of spicules with different physical properties (such as height, lifetime and tilt angle as shown by an individual spicule) randomly occurring. It is assumed that after reaching a maximum length, the spicules are less rapidly falling back to the solar surface. This kind of limb event was often reported in the literature (spike; giant spicule; Ha ejection event; spray etc) but no serious quantitative analysis could be done. Indeed from ground-based observations, it is impossible to deduce precised parameters because the earth atmospheric turbulent effects makes impossible to make small scale measurements. SOT space-borne observations we use are unique in providing well reproducible observations permitting very precise measurements. The study of X-ray jets is an important topic to understand the heating of the solar corona and the origin of the fast wind. The recently launched Hinode mission permitted to observe the cool proxies of these jets with an unprecedented high spatial resolution of 120 km on the Sun. We selected a high cadence sequence of SOT (Hinode) observations taken with both the HCaII and the Hα filter to look at the details of the dynamics revealed by a large jet event. Both wavelet and amplitude spectra analysis were used to analyze the observed kink wave and the time variations of intensities during the event. The results are discussed in the frame of different models implying reconnections with the inference of the dynamical phenomena occurring in the vicinity of several null

  20. Experimental investigation of impingement heat transfer from a round rib-roughened surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isman, Mustafa Kemal; Can, Muhiddin

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation on impingement heat transfer from a rib-roughened surface is performed. Single, double, and triple rib configurations are tested. The rib is also located at three different positions for a single rib case. The Reynolds number is varied from 10,000 to 50,000 whereas the dimensionless jet-to-surface distance (z/D) is kept constant as 8. Results show that, the Nusselt number decreases just before a rib. After the rib, however, the Nusselt number decreases by a larger amount. Since ribs cause a reincreasing in the Nusselt number after the stagnation point and since the stagnation point Nusselt number is not affected by ribs, they can be used to enhance heat transfer especially for spot cooling applications. It is also obtained that using ribs is more useful for low speed impinging jets, when heat transfer from the whole surface is considered.

  1. Cooling of Electronically-Excited He2 Molecules in a Microcavity Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui; Houlahan, Thomas J., Jr.; Eden, J. Gary

    2016-06-01

    Helium dimers in the d3Σ+u excited electronic state with potential energy >24 eV and radiative lifetime of 25 ns have been generated in a microcavity plasma jet and rotationally cooled by supersonic expansion in vacuum. The dynamic process of cooling is recorded by imaging the axis of expansion onto the slit of Czerny-Turner spectrometer, yielding spatial-temporal spectrograms of d3Σ+u→b3Πg (v', v'')=(0, 0) emission. Analysis of the data shows the spatial-temporal evolution of the rotational temperature to be a damped sinusoid that reaches a minimum value of 100K. This reproducible behavior is attributed to the reflection of electrons from a virtual cathode located downstream of the nozzle and indicates that the spatially-averaged electron density is 108 cm-3. We present this observed rotational temperature oscillation during the supersonic cooling process as an example of the potential of our supersonic microplasma expansion as a tool to explore physical dynamics in diatomic molecules having high excitation energies and small lifetimes.

  2. Experimental studies of shock wave/wall jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen M.; Nowak, Robert; Olsen, George

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a planar shock wave and a wall jet produced by slot cooling in turbulent hypersonic flow was experimentally studied. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure are obtained in the incident shock/wall jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for two nozzle heights. The major result is that the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks such that the peak heating in the recompression region was not significantly reduced by even the largest levels of film cooling. Regions of boundary layer separation were induced in the film cooling layer, the size of which first increased and then decreased with increasing film cooling. The size of the separated regions and magnitude of the recompression heating were not strongly influenced by the thickness of the cooling film or point of shock impingement relative to the exit plane of the nozzles.

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright μwave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup −1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  4. Identification of Structural Motifs of Imidazolium Based Ionic Liquids from Jet-Cooled Infrared Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Justin W.; Booth, Ryan S.; Annesley, Christopher; Stearns, Jaime A.

    2016-06-01

    Highly variable and potentially revolutionary, ionic liquids (IL) are a class of molecules with potential for numerous Air Force applications such as satellite propulsion, but the complex nature of IL structure and intermolecular interactions makes it difficult to adequately predict structure-property relationships in order to make new IL-based technology a reality. For example, methylation of imidazolium ionic liquids leads to a substantial increase in viscosity but the underlying physical mechanism is not understood. In addition the role of hydrogen bonding in ILs, especially its relationship to macroscopic properties, is a matter of ongoing research. Here, structural motifs are identified from jet-cooled infrared spectra of different imidazolium based ionic liquids, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl)imide. Measurements of the C-H stretches indicate three structural families present in the gas phase.

  5. A Computational Study for the Utilization of Jet Pulsations in Gas Turbine Film Cooling and Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the second part of a three-part final report of research performed under an NRA cooperative Agreement contract. The first part is NASA/CR-2012-217415. The third part is NASA/CR-2012-217417. Jets have been utilized in various turbomachinery applications in order to improve gas turbines performance. Jet pulsation is a promising technique because of the reduction in the amount of air removed from compressor. In this work two areas of pulsed jets applications were computationally investigated using the commercial code Fluent (ANSYS, Inc.); the first one is film cooling of High Pressure Turbine (HPT) blades and second one is flow separation control over Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoil using Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ). Using pulsed jets for film cooling purposes can help to improve the effectiveness and thus allow higher turbine inlet temperature. Effects of the film hole geometry, blowing ratio and density ratio of the jet, pulsation frequency and duty cycle of blowing on the film cooling effectiveness were investigated. As for the low-pressure turbine (LPT) stages, the boundary layer separation on the suction side of airfoils can occur due to strong adverse pressure gradients. The problem is exacerbated as airfoil loading is increased. Active flow control could provide a means for minimizing separation under conditions where it is most severe (low Reynolds number), without causing additional losses under other conditions (high Reynolds number). The effects of the jet geometry, blowing ratio, density ratio, pulsation frequency and duty cycle on the size of the separated region were examined in this work. The results from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation computational approaches were compared with the experimental data.

  6. Performance of water jet cooled silicon monochromators in high power x-ray beams (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Lonny E.; Hart, Michael

    1992-01-01

    We have fabricated and tested water jet cooled silicon (111) and (220) monochromators specially tailored for extended wiggler beam and concentrated undulator beam power loadings. The tests were made at the X25 27 pole, 1.1 T hybrid wiggler beam line1 at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The wiggler-like line-type loading was produced by the direct, unfocused wiggler white beam, in which 300 W of total power in a 60-mm-wide by 5-mm-high [full width at half maximum (FWHM)] cross section were available in the experimental hutch; this represents a typical power density at existing insertion device beam lines. The undulator-like point-type loading was produced by the focused wiggler white beam, generated via reflection of a portion of the direct white beam from a toroidal platinum-coated silicon mirror, resulting in 75 W of total power in a 0.8-mm-wide (FWHM) by 0.45-mm-high (FWHM) cross section in the hutch. This will be a typical power density at next-generation insertion device beam lines. The monochromator design consists of a thin walled silicon box whose bottom is glued to a stainless-steel water manifold; the coolant is delivered through jet tubes directed perpendicular to the underside of the top, diffracting surface of the box.2 Rectangular monochromators with multiple jets were used for the line power loading studies, and cylindrical monochromators with single jets were used for the point power loading studies. Provisions for simple adaptive corrections to compensate for the inevitable beam-induced thermal deformations, consisting of mechanisms to reverse-bend the top surface, and internal heat baffles to frustrate the cooling at the edges of the crystal (to produce an isothermal top surface), were included in the designs. These required approximate matching of the top surface dimensions to the x-ray footprint. To better understand the thermal strain fields, spatial and angular mapping of both fundamental and harmonic Bragg reflections within the

  7. Jet cooled NO 2 intra cavity laser absorption spectroscopy (ICLAS) between 11200 and 16150 cm -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, R.; Delon, A.; Bylicki, F.; Jost, R.; Campargue, A.; Charvat, A.; Chenevier, M.; Stoeckel, F.

    1995-01-01

    We have combined the high sensitivity of the ICLAS technique with the rotational cooling effect of a slit jet expansion in order to observe and to understand the visible and near infrared NO 2 spectrum. By this way, an equivalent absorption pathlength of several kilometers through rotationally cooled molecules has been achieved. Due to the vibronic interaction between the two lowest electronic states, X˜ 2A 1 and à 2B 2, this spectrum is vibronically dense and complex. Moreover, the dense room temperature rotational structure is perturbed by additional rovibronic interactions. In contrast, the rotational analysis of our jet cooled spectrum is straightforward. The NO 2 absorption spectrum is vanishing to the IR but, owing to the high sensitivity of the ICLAS technique, we have been able to record the NO 2 spectrum down to 11200 cm -1 with a new Ti:sapphire ICLAS spectrometer. As a result 249 2B 2 vibronic bands have been observed (175 cold bands and 74 hot bands) in the 11200-16150 cm -1 energy range. Due to the cooling effect of the slit jet we have reduced the rotational temperature down to about 12 K and at this temperature the K = 0 subbands are dominant. Consequently, we have analysed only the K = 0 manifold for N ⩽ 7 of each vibronic band. The dynamical range of the band intensities is about one thousand. Due to the strong vibronic interaction between the X˜ 2A 1 and à 2B 2 electronic states, we observed not only the a 1 vibrational levels of the à 2B 2 state but also the b 2 vibrational levels of the X˜ 2A 1 state interacting with the previous ones. By comparison with the calculated density of states, we conclude that we have observed about 65% of the total number of 2B 2 vibronic levels located in the studied range. However, there are more missing levels in the IR because of the weakness of the spectrum in this range. The correlation properties of this set of vibronic levels have been analysed calculating the power spectrum of the absorption stick

  8. Jet-Cooled Spectroscopy on the Ailes Infrared Beamline of the Synchrotron Radiation Facility Soleil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, Robert

    2015-06-01

    . Vervloet, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141-10150 (2013) The cyclic ground state structure of the HF trimer revealed by far-infrared jet-cooled Fourier transform spectroscopy. P. Asselin, P. Soulard, B. Madebène, M. Goubet, T. R. Huet, R. Georges, O. Pirali and P. Roy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16(10), 4797-806 (2014) Standard free energy of the equilibrium between the trans-monomer and the cyclic-dimer of acetic acid in the gas phase from infrared spectroscopy. M. Goubet, P. Soulard, O. Pirali, P. Asselin, F. Réal, S. Gruet, T. R. Huet, P. Roy and R. Georges, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. DOI: 10.1039/c4cp05684a

  9. Gear Lubrication and Cooling Experiment and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    A gear tooth temperature analysis was performed using a finite element method combined with a calculated heat input, a calculated oil jet impingement depth, and estimated heat transfer coefficients for the different parts of the gear tooth that are oil cooled and air cooled. Experimental measurements of gear tooth average surface temperature and gear tooth instantaneous surface temperature were made with a fast response, infrared, radiometric microscope. Increasing oil pressure has a significant effect on both average surface temperature and peak surface temperature at loads above 1895 N/cm(1083 lb/in) and speeds of 10,000 and 7500 rpm. Both increasing speed (from 5000 to 10,000 rpm) at constant speed cause a significant rise in the average surface temperature and in the instantaneous peak surface temperatures on the gear teeth. The oil jet pressure required to provide the best cooling for gears is the pressure required to obtain full gear tooth impingement. Calculated results for gear tooth temperatures were close to experimental results for various oil jet impingement depths for identical operating conditions.

  10. Bright Fans in Mars Cryptic Region Caused by Adiabatic Cooling of CO2 Gas Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T. N.; Kieffer, H. H.; Langevin, Y.; Murchie, S.; Seelos, F.; Vincendon, M.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade, observations of the retreat of the southern seasonal cap of Mars have revealed the presence of exotic processes within an area now informally referred to as the cryptic region. The appearance of dark spots, fans, blotches, and halos have been a "hot" topic of scientific discussion since they were first observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) [Malin et al., 1998]. Further observations by the Mars Odyssey (ODY) Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) showed that the dark features remained cold throughout the early-to-mid spring, suggesting that these features were either CO2 ice or were in thermal contact with CO2 ice [Kieffer et al., 2006]. In this paper, we present observations in the near-infrared at spatial resolutions that have previously been unavailable. We present further evidence that many of these features in the cryptic region are the result of cold jets, as first described by Kieffer [2000, 2007]. The adiabatic cooling of gas spewing downwind from the jets produces CO2 frost, thus forming the bright fans. The bright fans appear to be devoid of H2O ice, thus further supporting the hypothesis that they are formed from the downwind settling of CO2 frost. In some areas, the bright fans are adjacent to dark fans and appear to start from common vertices, while in other areas, bright fan-like deposits occur without the strong presence of dark fans. References: Kieffer, H.H. (2000) Annual Punctuated CO2 Slab-Ice and Jets on Mars, International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration, p. 93. Kieffer, H.H. et al. (2006) Nature, 442,793-796. Kieffer, H.H. (2007) JGR, in press. Malin, M.C., M.H. Carr, G.E. Danielson, M.E. Davies, W.K. Hartmann, A.P. Ingersoll, P.B. James, H. Masursky, A.S. McEwen, L.A. Soderblom, P. Thomas, J. Veverka, M.A. Caplinger, M.A. Ravine, and T.A. Soulanille (1998) Early views of the Martian surface from the Mars orbiter camera of Mars global surveyor, Science, 279, 1681-1685.

  11. Modeling and experimental validation of unsteady impinging flames

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, E.C.; Leandro, R.E.

    2006-09-15

    This study reports on a joint experimental and analytical study of premixed laminar flames impinging onto a plate at controlled temperature, with special emphasis on the study of periodically oscillating flames. Six types of flame structures were found, based on parametric variations of nozzle-to-plate distance (H), jet velocity (U), and equivalence ratio (f). They were classified as conical, envelope, disc, cool central core, ring, and side-lifted flames. Of these, the disc, cool central core, and envelope flames were found to oscillate periodically, with frequency and sound pressure levels increasing with Re and decreasing with nozzle-to-plate distance. The unsteady behavior of these flames was modeled using the formulation derived by Durox et al. [D. Durox, T. Schuller, S. Candel, Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 69-75] for the cool central core flames where the convergent burner acts as a Helmholtz resonator, driven by an external pressure fluctuation dependent on a velocity fluctuation at the burner mouth after a convective time delay {tau}. Based on this model, the present work shows that {tau} = [Re[2jtanh{sup -1}((2{delta}{omega}+(1+N)j{omega}{sup 2}-j{omega}{sub 0}{sup 2})/ (2{delta}{omega}+(1-N)j{omega}{sup 2}-j{omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}))]+2{pi}K]/{omega}, i.e., there is a relation between oscillation frequency ({omega}), burner acoustic characteristics ({omega}{sub 0},{delta}), and time delay {tau}, not explicitly dependent on N, the flame-flow normalized interaction coefficient [D. Durox, T. Schuller, S. Candel, Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 69-75], because {partial_derivative}t/{partial_derivative}N = 0. Based on flame motion and noise analysis, K was found to physically represent the integer number of perturbations on flame surface or number of coherent structures on impinging jet. Additionally, assuming that {tau}={beta}H/U, where H is the nozzle-to-plate distance and U is the mean jet velocity, it is shown that {beta}{sub Disc}=1.8, {beta}{sub CCC}=1

  12. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: The Effects of the Density and Size of Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Top-blow injection of a gas-solid jet through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One problem associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than the circular jet was designed in this laboratory. With this new configuration, the solid particles fed through the center tube leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different from that with a circular lance where the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. In previous cold-model investigations in this laboratory, the effects of the gas velocity, particle feed rate, lance height of the annular lance, and the cross-sectional area of the gas jet were studied and compared with the circular lance. This study examined the effect of the density and size of the solid particles on the penetration behavior of the annular gas-solid jet, which yielded some unexpected results. The variation in the penetration depth with the density of the solid particles at the same mass feed rate was opposite for the circular lance and the annular lance. In the case of the circular lance, the penetration depth became shallower as the density of the solid particles increased; on the contrary, for the annular lance, the penetration depth became deeper with the increasing density of particles. However, at the same volumetric feed rate of the particles, the density effect was small for the circular lance, but for the annular lance, the jets with higher density particles penetrated more deeply. The variation in the penetration depth with the particle diameter was also different for the circular and the annular lances. With the circular lance, the penetration depth became deeper as the particle size decreased for all the feed rates, but with the annular lance, the effect of the particle size was

  13. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Scott; Spain, Eileen M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1990-03-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPt has been used to investigate the possibility of d-electron contributions to the bonding in this species. Based on an abrupt onset of predissociation, the bond strength of NiPt is assigned as D0(NiPt)=2.798±0.003 eV. Comparisons of scans using ArF (6.42 eV) or F2 (7.87 eV) radiation as the ionization laser yield IP(NiPt)=8.02±0.15 eV, from which we derive D0(Ni+-Pt)=2.41±0.15 eV and D0(Ni-Pt+) =3.58±0.35 eV. High resolution studies of the 6-0 and 8-0 bands of one of the three identifiable progressions demonstrate an Ω'=0←Ω`=0 transition with r'e =2.3396±0.0039Å and r″0 =2.2078±0.0023Å. The short bond length and large bond strength of NiPt, as compared to the corresponding values (re=2.330±0.003Å and D0=2.34±0.10 eV) for the coinage metal analog, CuAu, demonstrate significant d-orbital contributions to the bonding in NiPt.

  14. Dispersed Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Isobutoxy, 2-METHYL-1-BUTOXY, and Isopentoxy Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, Md Asmaul; Reilly, Neil J.; Alam, Jahangir; Mason, Amy; Liu, Jinjun

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that rate constants of certain reactions of alkoxy radicals, e.g., unimolecular dissociation (decomposition by C-C bond fission) and isomerization via 1,5 H-shift, are highly sensitive to the molecular structure. In the present and the next talks, we report dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of various alkoxy radicals obtained under supersonic jet-cooled conditions by pumping different vibronic bands of their tilde B ← tilde X laser induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation spectra. This talk focuses on the DF spectra of 2-methyl-1-propoxy (isobutoxy), 2-methyl-1-butoxy, and 3-methyl-1-butoxy (isopentoxy). In all cases, strong CO-stretch progressions were observed, as well as transitions to other vibrational levels, including low-frequency ones. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out to aid the assignment of the DF spectra. Franck-Condon factors were calculated using the ezSpectrum program. Wu, Q.; Liang, G.; Zu, L.; Fang, W. J. Phys. Chem A 2012, 116, 3156-3162. Lin, J.; Wu, Q.; Liang, G.; Zu, L.; Fang, W. RSC Adv. 2012, 2, 583-589. Liang, G.; Liu , C.; Hao, H.; Zu, L.; Fang, W. J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 13229- 13235. V. Mozhayskiy and A. I. Krylov, http://iopenshell.usc.edu/

  15. The UV Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled 3-PHENYL-2-PROPYNENITRILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Khadija M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    The atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan is replete with hydrocarbons and nitriles, but knowledge of the formation and sink processes as well as the identities of molecules on the large end of photochemical models of the atmosphere is very limited. 3-phenyl-2-propynenitrile (Ph-C≡C-C≡N) is of potential importance in this atmosphere because it is a likely product of photochemical reaction between cyanoacetylene and benzene, bringing together two of the key functional groups in Titan's atmosphere in a single molecule. We present the UV spectrum of this molecule in the gas phase, under jet-cooled conditions, using 2-color resonant two-photon ionization. The spectrum was recorded from 292-208nm, taking advantage of the wide tunability of a BBO-based OPO as the excitation source. On its long wavelength end, the spectrum has sharp transitions arising from a ΠΠ* transition characteristic of a phenyl derivative, while deeper into the UV the spectrum is broadened in a manner reminiscent of cyanoacteylene.

  16. Quantitative measurement of naphthalene in low-pressure flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartel, M.; Pauwels, J.-F.; Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.

    2010-09-01

    We have recently developed a new laser based set-up (Jet-Cooled Laser-Induced Fluorescence) for the analysis of aromatic compounds generated in flames. This method relies on the extraction of the species from the flame via a thin microprobe and their direct analysis inside a supersonic free jet by Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Under the supersonic conditions of the jet, the vibronic spectra of the molecules become structured as the possibility of electronic transitions is reduced, allowing their selective detection by LIF. In addition, due to the very low quenching efficiency inside the jet, LIF signals can be directly related to the population of the probed species and easily calibrated into absolute concentrations. All of the work presented here has been carried out for naphthalene, which is an important PAH involved in soot formation mechanisms. The calibration procedure is described in detail. We also report a detailed study of the quantitative features of the technique, in particular cooling efficiencies and collision rates as well as some additional potential factors that could bias the quantitative aspect of the method. Finally, the possibilities of the technique for the measurement of PAH within flames in the presence of soot particles along with its accuracy and reproducibility are demonstrated by recording naphthalene mole fractions profiles in several rich CH4/O2/N2 flames. A detection limit of the order of a ppb is demonstrated under flame conditions with and without the presence of soot particles.

  17. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Kopicz, Charles; Bullard, Brad; Michaels, Scott

    2003-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the U. S. Army are jointly investigating vortex chamber concepts for cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon fuel rocket engine applications. One concept, the Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concept (ISVC), has been tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of this concept for the liquid oxygen (LOX)/hydrocarbon fuel (RP-1) propellant system is derived from the one for the gel propellant. An unlike impinging injector is employed to deliver the propellants to the chamber. MSFC has also designed two alternative injection schemes, called the chasing injectors, associated with this vortex chamber concept. In these injection techniques, both propellant jets and their impingement point are in the same chamber cross-sectional plane. One injector has a similar orifice size with the original unlike impinging injector. The second chasing injector has small injection orifices. The team has achieved their objectives of demonstrating the self-cooled chamber wall benefits of ISVC and of providing the test data for validating computational fluids dynamics (CFD) models. These models, in turn, will be used to design the optimum vortex chambers in the future.

  18. Spectroscopy and electronic structure of jet-cooled NiPd and PdPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Scott; Spain, Eileen M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1990-03-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPd and PdPt has revealed a dense vibronic spectrum for NiPd and a much more sparse spectrum for PdPt. Four vibrational progressions have been identified for NiPd, and three have been located for PdPt. High resolution investigations of NiPd have established a ground state bond length of r″0 =2.242±0.005 Å with Ω″=2. The observed spectra have been used to bracket the ionization potentials, giving IP(NiPd)=7.18±0.76 eV and IP(PdPt)=8.27±0.38 eV. In contrast to previous work on Ni2, NiPt, and Pt2, no abrupt onset of rapid predissociation is observed for either NiPd or PdPt. A discussion of this result in terms of the expected potential energy curves for the palladium-containing diatomics is presented, which when combined with the frequencies of the highest energy vibronic bands observed yields estimates of D0(NiPd)≊1.46 eV and D0(PdPt)≊1.98 eV. The lack of observable vibronic transitions in Pd2 above 11 375 cm-1 places D0(Pd2) below 1.41 eV, in agreement with Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Finally a comparison of the platinum group dimers and the coinage metal dimers is given, demonstrating the increasing importance of d-orbital contributions to the bonding in the platinum group dimers as one moves down the periodic table. The anomalous behavior of the palladium-containing diatomics is also discussed in terms of the highly stable 4d105s0, 1S0 ground state of atomic palladium.

  19. Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of jet-cooled clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Robert Allen

    Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IR-CRLAS) employing stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of pulsed dye lasers as the tunable IR source has been developed. This technique allows highly sensitive (ca. 1 ppm fractional absorption) direct absorption measurements to be performed in the 2-8 μm spectral range with complete wavelength coverage. Basic CR-LAS principles and essential SRS theory are reviewed. IR- CRLAS spectrometers based on both a Raman shifted dye laser and a pulsed Alexandrite ring laser are described. The IR-CRLAS spectrometer has been used in a comparative study of the O-H-stretching vibrations of small alcohol clusters. Results indicate an increase in the hydrogen bond strength as the alcohol chain length increases. An IR-CRLAS investigation of the aromatic C-H stretches of benzene and berizene/methane mixtures, performed in an effort to provide experimental support for a theoretically proposed ``antihydrogen bond'', produced negative results. Similarly, negative results from a visible CRLAS search for water cluster absorptions in connection with the anomalous atmospheric absorption of solar radiation are presented. Infrared laser spectroscopic studies of the structures and bonding in jet-cooled carbon clusters are discussed. The measurement and analysis of a rovibrational band at 2074 cm-1, tentatively assigned to linear C10 is presented. The astrophysical significance of carbon clusters is also discussed in conjunction with the first detection of a non polar molecule (C3) in a cold interstellar dust forming region, performed using far-infrared heterodyne spectroscopy aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory.

  20. Jet-Cooled Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of T-Butoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Neil J.; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.; Miller, Terry A.; Liu, Jinjun

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational structures of the tilde A ^2A_1 and tilde X ^2E states of t-butoxy were obtained in jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectroscopic measurements. The observed transitions are assigned based on vibrational frequencies calculated using Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) method and the predicted Franck-Condon factors. The spin-orbit (SO) splitting was measured to be 35(5) cm-1 for the lowest vibrational level of the ground (tilde X ^2E) state and increases with increasing vibrational quantum number of the CO stretch mode. Vibronic analysis of the DF spectra suggests that Jahn-Teller (JT)-active modes of the ground-state t-butoxy radical are similar to those of methoxy and would be the same if methyl groups were replaced by hydrogen atoms. Coupled-cluster calculations show that electron delocalization, introduced by the substitution of hydrogens with methyl groups, reduces the electronic contribution of the SO splittings by only around ten percent, and a calculation on the vibronic levels based on quasidiabatic model Hamiltonian clearly attributes the relatively small SO splitting of the tilde X ^2E state of t-butoxy mainly to stronger reduction of orbital angular momentum by the JT-active modes when compared to methoxy. The rotational and fine structure of the LIF transition to the first CO stretch overtone level of the tilde A^2A_1 state has been simulated using a spectroscopic model first proposed for methoxy, yielding an accurate determination of the rotational constants of both tilde A and tilde X states.

  1. [Impingement and kinesiology].

    PubMed

    Brasseur, J L; Zeitoun-Eiss, D

    2007-01-01

    During physical activity, especially in sport, repeated and/or exaggerated movements may lead to different impingements. Rupture, luxation, and tendon insertion injuries are seen after mobilization in the acute phase, but the goal of this paper is to analyze chronic impingements. It is possible to see the consequences of these impingements in all the musculoskeletal structures but, in relation to movement, three groups can be described. In the first, there is chronic compression and percussion between two structures; in the second there is entrapment and friction, and in the third, there is distraction. These impingements are frequent and are seen in all people, but particular movements during sport can increase their frequency.

  2. Occult hemoglobin as an indicator of impingement stress in fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    During the process of impingement on cooling system intake screens, fish may be subject to different types of stress, the total of which often results in the death of individual fish. This report assesses the use of occult hemoglobin in fish demand mucus as an indicator of impingement stress. (ACR)

  3. Fundamental Study of a Jet-in-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Rigby, David; Heidmann, James

    2009-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF). The study is pertinent to film-cooling applications and its relevance to NASA programs is first briefly discussed. In the experiment, the jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20deg to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular, ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are obtained for a case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. The VG produces a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. The effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. Results over a range of jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (1jet. On the other hand, when the height is doubled, the jet core is dissipated due to larger turbulence intensity. Varying the location of the VG, over a distance of three diameters from the orifice, is found to have little impact.

  4. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  5. Cold plate with combined inclined impingement and ribbed channels

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-12-22

    Heat transfer devices and methods for making the same that include a first enclosure having at least one inlet port; a second enclosure having a bottom plate and one or more dividing walls to establish channels, at least one internal surface of each channel having rib structures to create turbulence in a fluid flow; and a jet plate connecting the first enclosure and the second enclosure having impinging jets that convey fluid from the first enclosure to the channels, said impinging jets being set at an angular deviation from normal to cause local acceleration of fluid and to increase a local heat transfer rate.

  6. Nozzle cavity impingement/area reduction insert

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane

    2002-01-01

    A turbine vane segment is provided that has inner and outer walls spaced from one another, a vane extending between the inner and outer walls and having leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction sides, the vane including discrete leading edge, intermediate, aft and trailing edge cavities between the leading and trailing edges and extending lengthwise of the vane for flowing a cooling medium; and an insert sleeve within at least one of the cavities and spaced from interior wall surfaces thereof. The insert sleeve has an inlet for flowing the cooling medium into the insert sleeve and has impingement holes defined in first and second walls thereof that respectively face the pressure and suction sides of the vane. The impingement holes of at least one of those first and second walls are defined along substantially only a first, upstream portion thereof, whereby the cooling flow is predominantly impingement cooling along a first region of the insert wall corresponding to the first, upstream portion and the cooling flow is predominantly convective cooling along a second region corresponding to a second, downstream portion of the at least one wall of the insert sleeve.

  7. Normal modes of 4-aminobenzonitrile (4-ABN). A comparison of PM3 calculations with experimental jet-cooled spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiping; Joslin, Evelyn; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rzepa, Henry; Phillips, David

    1993-12-01

    The geometry and the normal modes of 4-aminobenzonitrile (4-ABN) in the ground and first excited states have been computed using PM3 formulation. These calculated results, together with previous vapour phase absorption and infrared studies, are used to examine the vibrational modes in the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation and emission spectra of jet-cooled 4-ABN. The calculated vibrational frequencies of the normal modes show good agreement with experiment both for the electronic ground and the first excited states, but there is a relatively large discrepancy in the position of the electronic origin transition.

  8. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  9. Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergholz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective is to provide turbine-cooling technologies to meet Propulsion 21 goals related to engine fuel burn, emissions, safety, and reliability. Specifically, the GE Aviation (GEA) Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program seeks to develop advanced cooling and flow distribution methods for HP turbines, while achieving a substantial reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. Enhanced cooling techniques, such as fluidic devices, controlled-vortex cooling, and directed impingement jets, offer the opportunity to incorporate both active and passive schemes. Coolant heat transfer enhancement also can be achieved from advanced designs that incorporate multi-disciplinary optimization of external film and internal cooling passage geometry.

  10. Computation of the temperature distribution in cooled radial inflow turbine guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Hosny, W.; Hamed, A.

    1977-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-difference numerical technique is presented to determine the temperature distribution of an internally-cooled blade of radial turbine guide vanes. A simple convection cooling is assumed inside the guide vane. Such an arrangement results in relatively small cooling effectiveness at the leading edge and at the trailing edge. Heat transfer augmentation in these critical areas may be achieved by using impingement jets and film cooling. A computer program is written in Fortran IV for IBM 370/165 computer.

  11. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-04-01

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  12. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russel B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-11-04

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  13. Moderate Resolution Jet Cooled Cavity Ringdown Spectra of the tilde{A} State of NO_3 Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codd, Terrance J.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Roudjane, Mourad; Miller, Terry A.

    2012-06-01

    The tilde{A}-tilde{X} spectrum of NO_3 has been previously observed using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) by Andrei Deev et. al under ambient conditions. There the authors assigned a number of vibronic bands in the spectrum. However, under these conditions, hot-bands may be present and the spectrum becomes very congested at frequencies higher than ˜8700 cm-1 due to the density of vibronic states and the overlap of their rotational contours. In order to obtain more information about the tilde{A} state of NO_3 we recently obtained spectra from 7550 cm-1 to over 10000 cm-1 using our moderate resolution (≃ 0.05 cm-1) jet cooled CRDS apparatus. Jet cooling in our apparatus reduces the rotational temperature to <30 K and eliminates vibrational hot bands greatly simplifying the spectrum. We are able to resolve and assign more than 15 vibronic features including a new assignment of the 31_0 band. Analysis of the ν_4 progression shows weak Jahn-Teller coupling in this mode. Anomalous band contours and anharmonic spacings are observed for the ν_1ν_4 combination bands and the cause is being investigated. We also see some features that could belong to vibronically forbidden transitions which may be magnetic dipole allowed. A. Deev, J. Sommar, and M. Okumura, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 224305 (2005)

  14. The excited-state structure, vibrations, lifetimes, and nonradiative dynamics of jet-cooled 1-methylcytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachsel, Maria A.; Wiedmer, Timo; Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Li, Quansong; Ruiz-Barragan, Sergi; Blancafort, Lluís; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the S0 → S1 UV vibronic spectrum and time-resolved S1 state dynamics of jet-cooled amino-keto 1-methylcytosine (1MCyt) using two-color resonant two-photon ionization, UV/UV holeburning and depletion spectroscopies, as well as nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved pump/delayed ionization measurements. The experimental study is complemented with spin-component-scaled second-order coupled-cluster and multistate complete active space second order perturbation ab initio calculations. Above the weak electronic origin of 1MCyt at 31 852 cm-1 about 20 intense vibronic bands are observed. These are interpreted as methyl group torsional transitions coupled to out-of-plane ring vibrations, in agreement with the methyl group rotation and out-of-plane distortions upon 1ππ∗ excitation predicted by the calculations. The methyl torsion and ν1 ' (butterfly) vibrations are strongly coupled, in the S1 state. The S0 → S1 vibronic spectrum breaks off at a vibrational excess energy Eexc ˜ 500 cm-1, indicating that a barrier in front of the ethylene-type S1⇝S0 conical intersection is exceeded, which is calculated to lie at Eexc = 366 cm-1. The S1⇝S0 internal conversion rate constant increases from kIC = 2 ṡ 109 s-1 near the S1(v = 0) level to 1 ṡ 1011 s-1 at Eexc = 516 cm-1. The 1ππ∗ state of 1MCyt also relaxes into the lower-lying triplet T1 (3ππ∗) state by intersystem crossing (ISC); the calculated spin-orbit coupling (SOC) value is 2.4 cm-1. The ISC rate constant is 10-100 times lower than kIC; it increases from kISC = 2 ṡ 108 s-1 near S1(v = 0) to kISC = 2 ṡ 109 s-1 at Eexc = 516 cm-1. The T1 state energy is determined from the onset of the time-delayed photoionization efficiency curve as 25 600 ± 500 cm-1. The T2 (3nπ∗) state lies >1500 cm-1 above S1(v = 0), so S1⇝T2 ISC cannot occur, despite the large SOC parameter of 10.6 cm-1. An upper limit to the adiabatic ionization energy of 1MCyt is determined as 8.41 ± 0.02 e

  15. Excited-state structure, vibrations, and nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Lobsiger, Simon; Trachsel, Maria A; Den, Takuya; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-03-20

    The S0 → S1 vibronic spectrum and S1 state nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled keto-amino 5-fluorocytosine (5FCyt) are investigated by two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.05 cm(–1) resolution. The 0(0)(0) rotational band contour is polarized in-plane, implying that the electronic transition is (1)ππ*. The electronic transition dipole moment orientation and the changes of rotational constants agree closely with the SCS-CC2 calculated values for the (1)ππ* (S1) transition of 5FCyt. The spectral region from 0 to 300 cm(–1) is dominated by overtone and combination bands of the out-of-plane ν1′ (boat), ν2′ (butterfly), and ν3′ (HN–C6H twist) vibrations, implying that the pyrimidinone frame is distorted out-of-plane by the (1)ππ* excitation, in agreement with SCS-CC2 calculations. The number of vibronic bands rises strongly around +350 cm(–1); this is attributed to the (1)ππ* state barrier to planarity that corresponds to the central maximum of the double-minimum out-of-plane vibrational potentials along the ν1′, ν2′, and ν3′ coordinates, which gives rise to a high density of vibronic excitations. At +1200 cm(–1), rapid nonradiative relaxation (k(nr) ≥ 10(12) s(–1)) sets in, which we interpret as the height of the (1)ππ* state barrier in front of the lowest S1/S0 conical intersection. This barrier in 5FCyt is 3 times higher than that in cytosine. The lifetimes of the ν′ = 0, 2ν1′, 2ν2′, 2ν1′ + 2ν2′, 4ν2′, and 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ levels are determined from Lorentzian widths fitted to the rotational band contours and are τ ≥ 75 ps for ν′ = 0, decreasing to τ ≥ 55 ps at the 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ level at +234 cm(–1). These gas-phase lifetimes are twice those of S1 state cytosine and 10–100 times those of the other canonical nucleobases in the gas phase. On the other hand, the 5FCyt gas-phase lifetime is close to the 73 ps lifetime in room-temperature solvents. This lack of

  16. Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAI. Because athletically active people may work the hip joint more vigorously, they may begin to experience pain ... the impingement can prevent future damage to the hip joint. However, not all of the damage can be ...

  17. Impingement syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arch of the shoulder blade, it can cause shoulder pain called impingement syndrome. The tendons become compressed, damaged, and inflamed leading to rotator cuff tendonitis. This can occur ... use of the shoulder like baseball pitching, or from an injury.

  18. Study of Impingement Types and Printing Quality during Laser Printing of Viscoelastic Alginate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Xiong, Ruitong; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong

    2016-03-29

    Laser-induced forward transfer-based laser printing has been being implemented as a promising orifice-free direct-write strategy for different printing applications. The printing quality during laser printing is largely affected by the jet and droplet formation process and subsequential impingement. The objective of this study is to investigate the impingement-based printing type and resulting printing quality during the laser printing of viscoelastic alginate solutions, which are representative inks for soft structure printing such as bioprinting. Three printing types are identified: droplet-impingement printing, jet-impingement printing with multiple breakups, and jet-impingement printing with a single breakup. Printing quality, in terms of printed droplet morphology and size, has been investigated as a function of alginate concentration, laser fluence, and direct-writing height based on a time-resolved imaging approach and microarrays of printed droplets. Of these, the best printing quality is achieved with single-breakup jet-impingement printing, followed by multiple-breakup jet-impingement printing, with droplet-impingement printing producing the lowest quality printing. The printing quality can be improved by using high-concentration alginate solutions. The increase of laser fluence may lead to a well-defined primary droplet for low-concentration alginate solutions; however, this can cause the droplet diameter to increase, which may not be desirable. The direct-writing height (i.e., ribbon coating-receiving substrate distance) also influences the print quality. For example, an increase in direct-writing height can cause the printing type to change from the ideal jet-impingement with a single breakup, to the jet-impingement with multiple breakups, and even the least desired droplet-impingement printing, with only slight variations in droplet diameter. PMID:26934283

  19. Closed circuit steam cooled turbine shroud and method for steam cooling turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Sexton, Brendan Francis; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2002-01-01

    A turbine shroud cooling cavity is partitioned to define a plurality of cooling chambers for sequentially receiving cooling steam and impingement cooling of the radially inner wall of the shoud. An impingement baffle is provided in each cooling chamber for receiving the cooling media from a cooling media inlet in the case of the first chamber or from the immediately upstream chamber in the case of the second through fourth chambers and includes a plurality of impingement holes for effecting the impingement cooling of the shroud inner wall.

  20. Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy of the ν7 band of jet-cooled iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loroño, M.; Cruse, H. A.; Davies, P. B.

    2000-02-01

    The ν7 parallel band of Fe(CO) 5 has been measured in the 620 cm -1 region using high-resolution diode laser absorption spectroscopy in a free jet expansion. A comparison with simulated band profiles indicated a rotational temperature of between 2 and 3 K in the jet. At these temperatures the K-structure of the Q-branch is partly resolved. The following molecular parameters were obtained: ν0=619.95747(12) cm -1, B7=0.026743(2) cm -1, A7=0.030721(1) cm -1. Approximate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants were also obtained from fitting the spectra.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence, dispersed fluorescence and lifetime measurements of jet-cooled chloro-substituted benzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamatani, Satoshi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    We measured the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of jet-cooled α-, o- and m-chlorobenzyl radicals after they were generated by the 193 nm photolysis of the corresponding parent molecules. The vibronically resolved spectra were obtained to analyze their D1-D0 transitions. The fluorescence lifetimes of α-, o-, m- and p-chlorobenzyls in the zeroth vibrational levels of the D1 states were measured to estimate the oscillator strengths of a series of benzyl derivatives. It was found that the α-substitution is inefficient to break the `accidental forbiddenness' of the D1-D0 transition of benzyl, while the ring-substitution enhances the oscillator strength by 50%.

  2. Hip impingement: beyond femoroacetabular

    PubMed Central

    Bardakos, Nikolaos V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, femoroacetabular impingement has been at the forefront of clinical practice as a cause of hip pain in young adults. As arthroscopic techniques for the hip continue to evolve, the possible presence of a new group of conditions creating mechanical conflict in and around the hip joint (ischiofemoral, subspine and iliopsoas impingement) has recently been elucidated whilst interest in already known ‘impingement’ syndromes (pelvic-trochanteric and pectineofoveal impingement) is now revived. This article attempts to increase awareness of these relatively uncommon clinical entities by describing their pathomorphology, contact mechanics, treatment and published results available to present. It is hoped that such knowledge will diversify therapeutic options for the clinician, thereby improving outcomes in a small but not negligible portion of patients with previously unexplained persistent symptoms. PMID:27011843

  3. Analysis of the Cavity Ringdown Spectra of the Smallest Jet-Cooled Alkyl Peroxy Radicals Using a Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, Gabriel M. P.; Rupper, Patrick; Miller, Terry A.; Meerts, W. Leo

    2009-06-01

    Alkyl peroxy radicals long have been well known to bekey intermediates in atmospheric chemistry as well as in low temperature combustion. For the last several years, our group has generated a data set for these radicals using room temperature cavity ringdown spectroscopy. We have recently extended our investigations of these radicals to obtain a similar data set of spectra under jet cooled conditions using a quasi-Fourier-transform-limited laser source, a supersonic slit jet expansion, and a discharge. We were able to observe partially rotationally resolved spectra of isomers and conformers of several peroxy radicals such as methyl peroxy, CH_3O_2/CD_3O_2, ethyl peroxy, C_2H_5O_2 and C_2D_5O_2, propyl peroxy, C_3H_7O_2, and phenyl peroxy, C_6H_5O_2. To analyze our results we employed a new approach by using the evolutionary algorithm method, whereby we can effectively use both the frequency and the intensity information contained in the experimental spectra. This presentation will focus on the results from our fitted spectra which were obtained using this semi-automated method and will demonstrate the power of our technique .

  4. The hybrid nanofluid/microchannel cooling solution for concentrated photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelea, Dorin; Calinoiu, Delia Gabriela; Trif-Tordai, Gavrila; Cioabla, Adrian Eugen; Laza, Ioan; Popescu, Francisc

    2015-02-01

    The paper deals with the cooling solution of the concentrated photovoltaic panel based on a microthermal device with impingement fluid jet and nanofluid as the working fluid. For this purpose, the numerical simulations of the nanofluid flow and heat transfer through the microchannel heat sink with impingement fluid jets is made. The laminar and stationary regime is considered. The water based Al2O3 nanofluid type is considered with various particle diameters and volume fractions of the particles. The results are presented in the form of the thermal resistance considered Reynolds number and fixed pumping power basis. It is concluded that cooling behavior of the micro-thermal device is strongly dependent both on the analysis basis and particle diameter or volume fractions.

  5. Anterosuperior glenoid impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bath, Shelley S; Bath, Shaun S; Tehranzadeh, Jamshid

    2012-01-01

    Anterosuperior glenoid impingement is a well documented cause of shoulder pain. It occurs when there is deep tearing of the subscapularis, with fibers becoming embedded between the anterosuperior glenoid and humeral head. To our knowledge, this has not been described in radiologic literature and we present MRI findings depicting this entity. PMID:22346366

  6. Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2003-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

  7. A flash photographic method for droplet impingement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, V.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental method to visualize the impingement process of a liquid droplet onto a solid surface with sufficient clarity to reveal fine details of the droplet surface structure and rim jet produced during the impingement process. The method incorporates a 35 mm SLR camera with bellows, motor drive, macro lens, backlighting by a short duration flash lamp, diffusers and a commercially available timing control unit to trigger the flash. Results using the experimental arrangement are demonstrated for a water droplet striking a horizontal surface at a velocity of about 1 m/s, though the photographic method may be applied to any other condition and liquid. A series of photographs are presented that show the repeatability of the impingement process, image clarity, surface structure of the droplet during impingement.

  8. Quantifying Cell Adhesion through Impingement of a Controlled Microjet

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Claas Willem; Gielen, Marise V.; Hao, Zhenxia; Le Gac, Séverine; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of a submerged, liquid jet onto a cell-covered surface allows assessing cell attachment on surfaces in a straightforward and quantitative manner and in real time, yielding valuable information on cell adhesion. However, this approach is insufficiently characterized for reliable and routine use. In this work, we both model and measure the shear stress exerted by the jet on the impingement surface in the micrometer-domain, and subsequently correlate this to jet-induced cell detachment. The measured and numerically calculated shear stress data are in good agreement with each other, and with previously published values. Real-time monitoring of the cell detachment reveals the creation of a circular cell-free area upon jet impingement, with two successive detachment regimes: 1), a dynamic regime, during which the cell-free area grows as a function of both the maximum shear stress exerted by the jet and the jet diameter; followed by 2), a stationary regime, with no further evolution of the cell-free area. For the latter regime, which is relevant for cell adhesion strength assessment, a relationship between the jet Reynolds number, the cell-free area, and the cell adhesion strength is proposed. To illustrate the capability of the technique, the adhesion strength of HeLa cervical cancer cells is determined ((34 ± 14) N/m2). Real-time visualization of cell detachment in the dynamic regime shows that cells detach either cell-by-cell or by collectively (for which intact parts of the monolayer detach as cell sheets). This process is dictated by the cell monolayer density, with a typical threshold of (1.8 ± 0.2) × 109 cells/m2, above which the collective behavior is mostly observed. The jet impingement method presents great promises for the field of tissue engineering, as the influence of both the shear stress and the surface characteristics on cell adhesion can be systematically studied. PMID:25564849

  9. Gas-jet and tangent-slot film cooling tests of a 12.5 deg cone at Mach number of 6.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to determine the aerothermal effects of gaseous nitrogen-coolant ejection on a 3-ft base-diameter, 12.5 degree half-angle cone. Free-stream Mach number, total temperature, and unit Reynolds number per foot were 6.7, 3300 deg R, and 1.4 million, respectively. Two coolant ejection noses were tested, an ogive frustum with a forward-facing 0.8-in radius gas-jet tip, and a 3-in radius hemisphere with a 0.243-in high rearward-facing tangent slot. Data include surface pressures and heating rates, shock shapes, and shock-layer profiles; results are compared with no-cooling data obtained with 1-in and 3-in radius solid noses. Surface pressures were reduced with gas-jet ejection but were affected little by tangent-slot ejection. For both gas-jet and tangent-slot ejection, high coolant flow rates reduced heating even far downstream from the region of ejection; however, low coolant rates caused transition to turbulence and increased heating. Shock-layer profiles of pitot pressure, Mach number, and total temperature were reduced for both gas-jet and tangent-slot ejection. Insight into the gas-jet heat-flux mechanisms was obtained by using shock-layer rake data and established, no-cooling, heat-transfer equations.

  10. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  11. Dispersed Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Isobutoxy and 2-Methyl-1-butoxy Radicals.

    PubMed

    Reza, Md Asmaul; Paul, Anam C; Reilly, Neil J; Alam, Jahangir; Liu, Jinjun

    2016-09-01

    We report dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of the isobutoxy and 2-methyl-1-butoxy radicals produced by photolysis of corresponding nitrites in supersonic jet expansion. Different vibrational structures have been observed in the DF spectra when different vibronic bands in the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of each radical were pumped, which suggests that those vibronic bands be assigned to different conformers. Spectra simulated using calculated vibrational frequencies and Franck-Condon factors well reproduce the experimentally observed ones and support the assignment of the vibronic bands in the LIF spectra to the two lowest-energy conformers of each radical. DF spectra obtained by pumping the B̃ ← X̃ origin bands of the LIF spectra are dominated by CO stretch progressions because of the large difference in CO bond length between the ground (X̃) and the second excited (B̃) electronic states. Furthermore, with non-CO stretch bands pumped, the DF spectra are dominated by progressions of combination bands of the CO stretch and the pumped modes as a result of Duschinsky mixing. Ã-X̃ separation of both conformers of the isobutoxy radical has also been determined in the experiment.

  12. Dispersed Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Isobutoxy and 2-Methyl-1-butoxy Radicals.

    PubMed

    Reza, Md Asmaul; Paul, Anam C; Reilly, Neil J; Alam, Jahangir; Liu, Jinjun

    2016-09-01

    We report dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of the isobutoxy and 2-methyl-1-butoxy radicals produced by photolysis of corresponding nitrites in supersonic jet expansion. Different vibrational structures have been observed in the DF spectra when different vibronic bands in the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of each radical were pumped, which suggests that those vibronic bands be assigned to different conformers. Spectra simulated using calculated vibrational frequencies and Franck-Condon factors well reproduce the experimentally observed ones and support the assignment of the vibronic bands in the LIF spectra to the two lowest-energy conformers of each radical. DF spectra obtained by pumping the B̃ ← X̃ origin bands of the LIF spectra are dominated by CO stretch progressions because of the large difference in CO bond length between the ground (X̃) and the second excited (B̃) electronic states. Furthermore, with non-CO stretch bands pumped, the DF spectra are dominated by progressions of combination bands of the CO stretch and the pumped modes as a result of Duschinsky mixing. Ã-X̃ separation of both conformers of the isobutoxy radical has also been determined in the experiment. PMID:27504673

  13. Interplanar torsion in the S1<--S0 electronic spectrum of jet cooled 1-phenylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Evan G; Thompson, Christopher D; Morrison, Richard J S

    2004-12-22

    The S(1)<--S(0) transition of 1-phenylimidazole (1PI) has been studied in a supersonic jet expansion by resonant two-photon ionization. The origin band at 36 075 cm(-1) is accompanied by a low frequency progression associated with torsion about the bond connecting phenyl and imidazole groups. Torsional potentials have been determined for both states. In S(0), phi(min)=37.2+/-0.5 degrees and the planar barrier is 339+/-20 cm(-1), while in S(1), phi(min)=17.6+/-0.5 degrees and the planar barrier is 57+/-2 cm(-1). The transition moment alignment is observed to be consistent with an excited state of L(b) character, in spite of the "off-axis" conjugation provided by the imidazole ring. These results are compared with ab initio calculations on both states, performed using Hartree-Fock, Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation, density functional theory with the Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional, time-dependent density functional theory, configuration interaction singles, and complete active space self-consistent field methods. Solution-phase UV spectra of neutral and protonated 1PI are also reported.

  14. Impingement syndrome in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R J; Kennedy, J C

    1980-01-01

    Athletes, particularly those who are involved in sporting activities requiring repetitive overhead use of the arm (for example, tennis players, swimmers, baseball pitchers, and quarterbacks), may develop a painful shoulder. This is often due to impingement in the vulnerable avascular region of the supraspinatus and biceps tendons. With the passage of time, degeneration and tears of the rotator cuff may result. Pathologically the syndrome has been classified into Stage I (edema and hemorrhage), Stage II (fibrosis and tendonitis), and Stage III (tendon degeneration, bony changes, and tendon ruptures). The impingement syndrome may be a problem for the young, active, and competitive athlete as well as the casual weekend athlete. The "impingement sign" which reproduces pain and resulting facial expression when the arm is forceably forward flexed (jamming the greater tuberosity against the anteroinferior surface of the acromion) is the most reliable physical sign in establishing the diagnosis. Flexibility exercises, strengthening programs, and special training techniques are a preventive and treatment requirement. Rest and local modalities such as ice, ultrasound, and antiinflammatory agents are usually effective to lessen the inflammatory reaction. Surgical decompression by resecting the coracoacromial ligament or a more definitive anterior acromioplasty may rarely be indicated.

  15. Cooling circuit for steam and air-cooled turbine nozzle stage

    DOEpatents

    Itzel, Gary Michael; Yu, Yufeng

    2002-01-01

    The turbine vane segment includes inner and outer walls with a vane extending therebetween. The vane includes leading and trailing edge cavities and intermediate cavities. An impingement plate is spaced from the outer wall to impingement-cool the outer wall. Post-impingement cooling air flows through holes in the outer wall to form a thin air-cooling film along the outer wall. Cooling air is supplied an insert sleeve with openings in the leading edge cavity for impingement-cooling the leading edge. Holes through the leading edge afford thin-film cooling about the leading edge. Cooling air is provided the trailing edge cavity and passes through holes in the side walls of the vane for thin-film cooling of the trailing edge. Steam flows through a pair of intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling of the side walls. Post-impingement steam flows to the inner wall for impingement-cooling of the inner wall and returns the post-impingement cooling steam through inserts in other intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling the side walls of the vane.

  16. Jet-Cooled NO2 in the red and blue/UV Energy Regions by CRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupre, Patrick

    2000-06-01

    The Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy technique emerges as a powerful tool for probing both, weak absorption transitions of gaseous species and traces of contaminants (absorption coefficients as low as ~ 5.10-10/cm). When this technique is associated with CW laser sources, it allows to reach high resolutions (Doppler-limited). Moreover the CRDS cavity is particularly well adapted when using a slit nozzle jet expansion, leading to a residual Doppler effect ~ 0.5.10-6. The blue/UV energy range is reached by frequency doubling a single mode Ti:Sa laser. The CRDS spectra, obtained in the red energy region (800-900 nm) which is characterized by weak absorptions, complementary to the DLIF data, allow to study the renown conical intersection widetildeX ^2A_1-widetildeA ^2B2 of NO_2. Beer-Lambert law violations can be readily observed in the red energy region: the fine control under the energy trapped inside the Ring Down cavity allows to characterize even low saturation effects. Additional non-linear effects like 2-photon absorption, resonant (laser bandwidth-limited) and non-resonant (Doppler-limited), are observed by simultaneously recording the LIF and CRDS signal. This reveals a continuum of absorption even below the dissociation threshold D0 ( ~ 25128.57 cm-1). The CRDS technique is also used for probing the resonances above the dissociation threshold (NO_2arrow NO(^2Π_1/2)+O(^3P_2)). When the usual techniques, based on pulsed sources (PHOFEX, etc...), fail for probing (non-fluorescing) sharp resonances (because the limited resolution), the CW CRDS technique offers a real advantage. Observed resonance widths spread from ~ 0.021 to ~ 0.33 cm-1 in the vicinity of D_0, corresponding to dissociation times going from 15 to 250 ps.

  17. Experimental determination and interpretation of the fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra of chrysene cooled in a supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, N. A.; Dyachenko, G. G.; Petukhov, V. A.; Semenov, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    The fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled chrysene are measured. The frequencies of in-plane vibrations in the ground and first excited singlet electronic states, as well as the relative intensities of transitions between them, are calculated with the MO/M8ST method. Based on these data, experimental spectra are interpreted. In the fluorescence excitation spectrum, the position of the line of the 0-0 transition (28 195 ± 1 cm-1), which is the most intense, is determined. In the experimental fluorescence excitation spectrum, 21 lines correspond to fundamental vibrations (altogether, 37 lines are attributed). This supports our assignment and is consistent with the group-theoretical analysis of vibronic interactions. Upon excitation at the frequency of the 0-0 transition, 10 lines corresponding to the excitation of fundamental vibrations are detected, and all 17 lines observed are attributed. In the fluorescence excitation spectrum, the standard deviation between the calculated and measured frequencies of attributed fundamental vibrations is 19 cm-1, while that in the fluorescence spectrum is 15 cm-1.

  18. Dispersed-Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Calcium Ethoxide Radical (CaOC_2H_5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anam C.; Reza, Md Asmaul; Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    Metal-containing free radicals are important intermediates in metal-surface reactions and in the interaction between metals and organic molecules. In the present work, dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of the calcium ethoxide radical (CaOC_2H_5) have been obtained by pumping the {tilde A^2}{A}' ← {tilde X^2}{A}' and the {tilde B^2}{A}'' ← {tilde X^2}{A}' origin bands in its laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum. CaOC_2H_5 radicals were produced by 1064 nm laser ablation of calcium grains in the presence of ethanol under jet-cooled conditions. Dominant transitions in the vibrationally resolved DF spectra are well reproduced using Franck-Condon factors predicted by complete active space self-consistent (CASSCF) calculations. Differences in transition intensities between the {tilde A^2}{A}' → {tilde X^2}{A}' and the {tilde B^2}{A}'' → {tilde X^2}{A}' DF spectra are attributed to the pseudo-Jahn-Teller interaction between the tilde A ^2 A' and the tilde B ^2 A'' states. Collision-induced population transfer between these two excited electronic states results in additional peaks in the DF spectra.

  19. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled UN: Determination of the ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthew, Daniel J.; Morse, Michael D.

    2013-05-01

    The optical transitions of supersonically cooled uranium nitride (UN) have been investigated in the range from 19 200 to 23 900 cm-1 using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. A large number of bands have been observed, of which seven have been rotationally resolved and analyzed. All are found to arise from the same state, which is presumably the ground state of the molecule. From the analysis of the bands, the ground state has Ω = 3.5, with a bond length of 1.7650(12) Å. Comparisons to the known isovalent molecules are made, and the variations in ground state configuration are explained in terms of the configurational reordering that occurs with changes in the nuclear and ligand charges. It is concluded that the UN molecule is best considered as a U3+N3- species in which the closed shell nitride ligand interacts with a U3+ ion. The ground state of the molecule derives from a U3+ ion in its 7s15f 2 atomic configuration.

  20. 2C-R4WM Spectroscopy of Jet Cooled NO_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masaru; Ishiwata, Takashi; Hirota, Eizi

    2016-06-01

    We have generated NO_3 from pyrolysis of N_2O_5 following supersonic free jet expansion, and carried out two color resonant four wave mixing ( 2C-R4WM ) spectroscopy of the tilde{B} ^2E' - tilde{X} ^2A_2' electronic transition. One laser was fixed to pump NO_3 to a ro-vibronic level of the tilde{B} state, and the other laser ( probe ) was scanned across two levels of the tilde{X} ^2A_2' state lying at 1051 and 1492 cm-1, the ν_1 (a_1') and ν_3 (e') fundamentals, respectively. The 2C-R4WM spectra have unexpected back-ground signal of NO_3 ( stray signal due to experimental set-up is also detected ) similar to laser induced fluorescence ( LIF ) excitation spectrum of the 0-0 band, although the back-ground signal was not expected in considering the 2C-R4WM scheme. Despite the back-ground interference, we have observed two peaks at 1051.61 and 1055.29 cm-1 in the ν_1 region of the spectrum, and the frequencies agree with the two bands, 1051.2 and 1055.3 cm-1, of our relatively higher resolution dispersed fluorescence spectrum, the former of which has been assigned to the ν_1 fundamental. Band width of both peaks, ˜ 0.2 cm-1, is broader than twice the experimental spectral-resolution, 0.04 cm-1 ( because this experiment is double resonance spectroscopy ), and the 1051.61 cm-1 peak is attributed to a Q branch band head ( a line-like Q branch ) of the ν_1 fundamental. The other branches are suspected to be hidden in noise of the back-ground signal. The 1055.29 cm-1 peak is also attributed to a Q band head. The tilde{B} ^2E'1/2 ( J' = 3/2, K' = 1 ) - tilde{X} ^2A_2' ( N'' = 1, K'' = 0 ) ro-vibronic transition was used as the pump transition. The dump ( probe ) transition to both a_1' and e' vibronic levels are then allowed as perpendicular transition. Accordingly, it cannot be determined from present results whether the 1055.29 cm-1 band is attributed to a_1' or e' (ν_3), unfortunately. The 2C-R4WM spectrum of the 1492 cm-1 band region shows one Q head at 1499.79 cm

  1. Jet-Cooled Laser Spectroscopy of a Jahn-Teller and Pseudo Jahn-Teller Active Molecule: the Nitrate Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Wei; Takematsu, Kana; Okumura, Mitchio; Miller, Terry A.

    2009-06-01

    Well-known as an important intermediate in atmospheric chemistry, the nitrate radical (NO_3) has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically. The three energetically lowest electronic states (tilde{X} ^{2}A_{2}^', tilde{A} ^{2}E^'', and tilde{B} ^{2}E^') are strongly coupled by vibronic interactions and hence it is a textbook molecule for understanding the coupling between nearby potential energy surfaces. Such coupling has been treated in considerable detail theoretically. However, corresponding experimental characterization of the interaction is much less detailed. The experimental results primarily consist of IR measurements of vibrational transitions in the ground state. In addition, the electronically forbidden tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition has been observed in ambient temperature CRDS studies. To understand both the Jahn-Teller and pseudo Jahn-Teller coupling in the molecule, further measurements are required with different selection rules and/or higher resolution to resolve the rotational structures of different transitions. In our group, a high-resolution (source Δν≈ 100 MHz in NIR region), jet-cooled CRDS system can be applied to rotationally resolve the electronically forbidden tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition. Furthermore, our high-resolution LIF/SEP system (source Δν≈ 100 MHz) can provide the direct, rotationally resolved measurements of the tilde{B}-tilde{X} and tilde{B}-tilde{A} transitions by operating in the LIF and SEP modes respectively. Such data can provide unambiguous spectral assignments in the tilde{X}, tilde{A} and tilde{B} states. J. F. Stanton, J. Chem. Phys., 126, 134309 (2007) K. Kawaguchi, E. Hirota, T. Ishiwata, and I. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys., 93, 951 (1990) K. Kawaguchi, T. Ishiwata, E. Hirota, and I. Tanaka, Chem. Phys., 231, 193 (1998) A. Deev, J. Sommar, and M. Okumura, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 224305 (2005) S. Wu, P. Dupré, and T. A. Miller, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 1682, (2006)

  2. Photodissociation resonances of jet-cooled NO{sub 2} at the dissociation threshold by CW-CRDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dupré, Patrick

    2015-05-07

    Around 398 nm, the jet-cooled-spectrum of NO{sub 2} exhibits a well identified dissociation threshold (D{sub 0}). Combining the continuous-wave absorption-based cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique and laser induced fluorescence detection, an energy range of ∼25 cm{sup −1} is analyzed at high resolution around D{sub 0}. In addition to the usual molecular transitions to long-lived energy levels, ∼115 wider resonances are observed. The position, amplitude, and width of these resonances are determined. The resonance width spreads from ∼0.006 cm{sup −1} (i.e., ∼450 ps) to ∼0.7 cm{sup −1} (∼4 ps) with large fluctuations. The identification of at least two ranges of resonance width versus the excess energy can be associated with the opening of the dissociation channels NO{sub 2}→NO(X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}, v=0, J=1/2)+O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and NO{sub 2}→NO(X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}, v=0, J=3/2)+O({sup 3}P{sub 2}). This analysis corroborates the existence of loose transition states close to the dissociation threshold as reported previously and in agreement with the phase space theory predictions as shown by Tsuchiya’s group [Miyawaki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 99, 254–264 (1993)]. The data are analyzed in the light of previously reported frequency- and time-resolved data to provide a robust determination of averaged unimolecular dissociation rate coefficients. The density of reactant levels deduced (ρ{sub reac} ∼ 11 levels/cm{sup −1}) is discussed versus the density of transitions, the density of resonances, and the density of vibronic levels.

  3. An Intense Slit Discharge Source of Jet-Cooled Molecular Ions and Radicals (T(sub rot) less than 30 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David T.; Davis, Scott; Zwier, Timothy S.; Nesbitt, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A novel pulsed, slit supersonic discharge source is described for generating intense jet-cooled densities of radicals (greater than 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and molecular ions (greater than 10(exp 10)/cu cm) under long absorption path (80 cm), supersonically cooled conditions. The design confines the discharge region upstream of the supersonic expansion orifice to achieve efficient rotational cooling down to 30 K or less. The collisionally collimated velocity distribution in the slit discharge geometry yields sub-Doppler spectral linewidths, which for open-shell radicals reveals spin-rotation splittings and broadening due to nuclear hyperfine structure. Application of the slit source for high-resolution, direct IR laser absorption spectroscopy in discharges is demonstrated on species such as OH, H3O(+) and N2H(+).

  4. Gas turbine row #1 steam cooled vane

    DOEpatents

    Cunha, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    A design for a vane segment having a closed-loop steam cooling system is provided. The vane segment comprises an outer shroud, an inner shroud and an airfoil, each component having a target surface on the inside surface of its walls. A plurality of rectangular waffle structures are provided on the target surface to enhance heat transfer between each component and cooling steam. Channel systems are provided in the shrouds to improve the flow of steam through the shrouds. Insert legs located in cavities in the airfoil are also provided. Each insert leg comprises outer channels located on a perimeter of the leg, each outer channel having an outer wall and impingement holes on the outer wall for producing impingement jets of cooling steam to contact the airfoil's target surface. Each insert leg further comprises a plurality of substantially rectangular-shaped ribs located on the outer wall and a plurality of openings located between outer channels of the leg to minimize cross flow degradation.

  5. Bucket platform cooling scheme and related method

    DOEpatents

    Abuaf, Nesim; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Chopra, Sanjay; Kercher, David Max; Kellock, Iain Robertson; Lenahan, Dean Thomas; Nellian, Sankar; Starkweather, John Howard; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil extending from a platform, having high and low pressure sides; a wheel mounting portion; a hollow shank portion located radially between the platform and the wheel mounting portion, the platform having an under surface. An impingement cooling plate is located in the hollow shank portion, spaced from the under surface, and the impingement plate is formed with a plurality of impingement cooling holes therein.

  6. Ground and excited state infrared spectroscopy of jet-cooled radicals: exploring the photophysics of trihydronaphthyl and inden-2-ylmethyl.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Nathanael M; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N; Korn, Joseph A; Sibert, Edwin L; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-06-01

    The alkyl and aromatic CH stretch infrared spectra of inden-2-ylmethyl (I2M, C10H9) and trihydronaphthyl (THN, C10H11) radicals have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions in the ground (D0) and first electronically excited (D1) states using resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy. Previously, the vibronic spectroscopy of a series of C10H9 and C10H11 hydronaphthyl radicals were investigated and their thermochemical properties were evaluated with isomer specificity [J. A. Sebree et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 11, 6255-6262 (2010)]. We show here that one of the m/z 129 spectral carriers characterized in that work was misidentified as 2-hydronaphthyl (2-HN) radical, appearing in a discharge of 1,2-dihydronaphthalene in close proximity to 1-hydronaphthyl radical. The D0-RIDIR spectrum in the alkyl CH stretch region positively identifies the m/z 129 isomer as I2M, whose two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) spectrum was recently reported by Schmidt and co-workers [T. P. Troy et al., Chem. Sci. 2, 1755-1765 (2011)]. Here, we further characterize the I2M and THN radicals by recording their gas phase IR spectra in the alkyl and aromatic CH stretch regions, and explore the spectroscopic consequences of electronic excitation on the CH stretch absorptions. A local-mode CH stretch Hamiltonian incorporating cubic stretch-bend coupling between anharmonic CH stretches and CH2 scissor modes is utilized to describe their Fermi resonance interactions. Excellent agreement between the experimental and theoretical results facilitates the interpretation of the D0- and D1-state RIDIR spectra of I2M, revealing that upon excitation the alkyl CH stretches decrease in frequency by 70 cm(-1), while the allyl-like CH stretches experience a modest blueshift. In comparison, the photophysics of THN are strikingly different in that the IR transitions that possess vibrational motion along the CβH and CδH bonds are absent in the D1-RIDIR spectrum yet are predicted to be present

  7. Laser induced fluorescence and resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1-hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Haeng; Huh, Hyun; Kim, Hyung Min; Kim, Choong Ik; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2005-01-01

    We carried out laser induced fluorescence and resonance enhanced two-color two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1-hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (1-HAQ). The 0-0 band transition to the lowest electronically excited state was found to be at 461.98 nm (21 646 cm-1). A well-resolved vibronic structure was observed up to 1100 cm-1 above the 0-0 band, followed by a rather broad absorption band in the higher frequency region. Dispersed fluorescence spectra were also obtained. Single vibronic level emissions from the 0-0 band showed Stokes-shifted emission spectra. The peak at 2940 cm-1 to the red of the origin in the emission spectra was assigned as the OH stretching vibration in the ground state, whose combination bands with the C=O bending and stretching vibrations were also seen in the emission spectra. In contrast to the excitation spectrum, no significant vibronic activity was found for low frequency fundamental vibrations of the ground state in the emission spectrum. The spectral features of the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra indicate that a significant change takes place in the intramolecular hydrogen bonding structure upon transition to the excited state, such as often seen in the excited state proton (or hydrogen) transfer. We suggest that the electronically excited state of interest has a double minimum potential of the 9,10-quinone and the 1,10-quinone forms, the latter of which, the proton-transferred form of 1-HAQ, is lower in energy. On the other hand, ab initio calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level predicted that the electronic ground state has a single minimum potential distorted along the reaction coordinate of tautomerization. The 9,10-quinone form of 1-HAQ is the lowest energy structure in the ground state, with the 1,10-quinone form lying ˜5000 cm-1 above it. The intramolecular hydrogen bond of the 9,10-quinone was found to be unusually strong, with an estimated bond energy of ˜13 kcal/mol (˜4500 cm-1), probably due to

  8. Ground and excited state infrared spectroscopy of jet-cooled radicals: Exploring the photophysics of trihydronaphthyl and inden-2-ylmethyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N.; Korn, Joseph A.; Sibert, Edwin L.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The alkyl and aromatic CH stretch infrared spectra of inden-2-ylmethyl (I2M, C10H9) and trihydronaphthyl (THN, C10H11) radicals have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions in the ground (D0) and first electronically excited (D1) states using resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy. Previously, the vibronic spectroscopy of a series of C10H9 and C10H11 hydronaphthyl radicals were investigated and their thermochemical properties were evaluated with isomer specificity [J. A. Sebree et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 11, 6255-6262 (2010)]. We show here that one of the m/z 129 spectral carriers characterized in that work was misidentified as 2-hydronaphthyl (2-HN) radical, appearing in a discharge of 1,2-dihydronaphthalene in close proximity to 1-hydronaphthyl radical. The D0-RIDIR spectrum in the alkyl CH stretch region positively identifies the m/z 129 isomer as I2M, whose two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) spectrum was recently reported by Schmidt and co-workers [T. P. Troy et al., Chem. Sci. 2, 1755-1765 (2011)]. Here, we further characterize the I2M and THN radicals by recording their gas phase IR spectra in the alkyl and aromatic CH stretch regions, and explore the spectroscopic consequences of electronic excitation on the CH stretch absorptions. A local-mode CH stretch Hamiltonian incorporating cubic stretch-bend coupling between anharmonic CH stretches and CH2 scissor modes is utilized to describe their Fermi resonance interactions. Excellent agreement between the experimental and theoretical results facilitates the interpretation of the D0- and D1-state RIDIR spectra of I2M, revealing that upon excitation the alkyl CH stretches decrease in frequency by 70 cm-1, while the allyl-like CH stretches experience a modest blueshift. In comparison, the photophysics of THN are strikingly different in that the IR transitions that possess vibrational motion along the CβH and CδH bonds are absent in the D1-RIDIR spectrum yet are predicted to be present from

  9. Turbine stator vane segment having internal cooling circuits

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Raymond Joseph; Burns, James Lee; Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy; Jones, Schotsch Margaret

    2003-01-01

    A turbine stator vane includes outer and inner walls each having outer and inner chambers and a vane extending between the outer and inner walls. The vane includes first, second, third, fourth and fifth cavities for flowing a cooling medium. The cooling medium enters the outer chamber of the outer wall, flows through an impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer band wall defining in part the hot gas path and through openings in the first, second and fourth cavities for flow radially inwardly, cooling the vane. The spent cooling medium flows into the inner wall and inner chamber for flow through an impingement plate radially outwardly to cool the inner wall. The spent cooling medium flows through the third cavity for egress from the turbine vane segment from the outer wall. The first, second or third cavities contain inserts having impingement openings for impingement cooling of the vane walls. The fifth cavity provides air cooling for the trailing edge.

  10. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization and Uv-Uv Hole-Burning Spectroscopic Studies of Jet-Cooled Acetanilide Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ceol Joo; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Seung Jun; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Seong Keun

    2013-06-01

    Conformational investigations and photochemistry of jet-cooled methacetine (MA) and phenacetine (PA) using one color resonant two-photon ionization (REMPI), UV-UV hole-burning and IR-dip spectroscopy are presented. MA and PA are derivatives of acetanilide, substituted by methoxyl, ethoxyl group in the para position of acetanilide, respectively. Moreover, we have investigated conformational information of the acetanilide derivatives (AAP, MA and PA)-water. In this work, we will present and discuss the solvent effects of the hydroxyl group of acetanilide derivatives in the excited state.

  11. Empirical relations for cavitation and liquid impingement erosion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    A unified power-law relationship between average erosion rate and cumulative erosion is presented. Extensive data analyses from venturi, magnetostriction (stationary and oscillating specimens), liquid drop, and jet impact devices appear to conform to this relation. A normalization technique using cavitation and liquid impingement erosion data is also presented to facilitate prediction. Attempts are made to understand the relationship between the coefficients in the power-law relationships and the material properties.

  12. Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method

    DOEpatents

    Cromer, Robert Harold; Bechtel, William Theodore; Sutcu, Maz

    2002-01-01

    A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

  13. Simultaneous convective heat and mass transfer in impingement ink drying

    SciTech Connect

    Can, M.

    1998-08-01

    Effective and economical drying of thin ink films is essential in the printing, packaging and coating industries. In evaporative drying, high heat and mass transfer rates are commonly achieved by means of high velocity impinging air jets. To provide data for dryer design a program of research has been implemented to study the heat and mass transfer processes which underlie the drying of thin ink films. The heat transfer situation under impinging air jets is outlined and some experimental results are presented. Optimization of nozzle arrays for impinging air jets is analyzed for practical applications. A non-contact infra-red technique for continuously monitoring the ink drying process is described and drying curves for an ink based on a single solvent (4-Methyl-2-pentanol-MIBC) are presented. Heat and mass transfer theory has been used to predict drying times in the constant rate drying period. These predictions have been compared with experimentally determined drying times. This research has served to confirm the fundamental importance of the drying curve as a basis for dryer design.

  14. Isomer discrimination of PAHs formed in sooting flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence: application to the measurement of pyrene and fluoranthene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouton, Thomas; Mercier, Xavier; Desgroux, Pascale

    2016-05-01

    Jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence is a spectroscopic method, specifically developed for the study of PAHs formed in flames. This technique has already been used to measure different aromatic species in sooting low-pressure methane flames such as benzene, naphthalene, and pyrene. The use of the LIF technique to excite PAHs drastically cooled down inside a supersonic jet offers the possibility to get selective and quantitative profiles of PAHs sampled from sooting flames. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of this experimental method to separate the contribution of two mass isomers generated in sooting flames which are the pyrene and the fluoranthene. The selectivity of the method is demonstrated by studying the spectral properties of these species. The method is then applied to the measurement of both these species in two sooting flames with different equivalence ratios and stabilized at 200 torr (26.65 kPa). The sensitivity of the technique has been found to reach a few ppb in the case of fluoranthene measurements.

  15. Droplet-surface Impingement Dynamics for Intelligent Spray Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Kizito, John P.; Tryggvason, Gretar; Berger, Gordon M.; Mozes, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Spray cooling has high potential in thermal management and life support systems by overcoming the deleterious effect of microgravity upon two-phase heat transfer. In particular spray cooling offers several advantages in heat flux removal that include the following: 1. By maintaining a wetted surface, spray droplets impinge upon a thin fluid film rather than a dry solid surface 2. Most heat transfer surfaces will not be smooth but rough. Roughness can enhance conductive cooling, aid liquid removal by flow channeling. 3. Spray momentum can be used to a) substitute for gravity delivering fluid to the surface, b) prevent local dryout and potential thermal runaway and c) facilitate liquid and vapor removal. Yet high momentum results in high We and Re numbers characterizing the individual spray droplets. Beyond an impingement threshold, droplets splash rather than spread. Heat flux declines and spray cooling efficiency can markedly decrease. Accordingly we are investigating droplet impingement upon a) dry solid surfaces, b) fluid films, c) rough surfaces and determining splashing thresholds and relationships for both dry surfaces and those covered by fluid films. We are presently developing engineering correlations delineating the boundary between splashing and non-splashing regions.

  16. The planar jet-plate oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, David; Ziada, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The aeroacoustic noise generated by a high speed, planar gas jet impinging on a flat plate is investigated experimentally. The jet used in this study is typical of those commonly found in industrial applications such as in various coating control and heat transfer processes. Normal jet impingement on the plate is found to generate strong acoustic tones over a wide range of impingement distances and jet velocities. The characteristics of these tones, as a function of the jet velocity and impingement distance, are quantified. Phase and amplitude measurements of the pressure fluctuations on the impingement plate indicate that the acoustic tones are generated by an antisymmetric instability mode of the jet oscillation. The effect of plate inclination in both the transverse and span-wise directions, with respect to the incident jet, is also studied. The jet-plate tone is found to be much more sensitive to changes in the span-wise plate inclination than to changes in the transverse inclination, but in both cases, a complete suppression of the tone is found to be possible.

  17. Liquid Metal Drop Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Judy; Han, Jaehoon; Tryggvason, Gretar; Ceccio, Steven

    1996-11-01

    "Ballistic Partical Manufacturing" is a process in which individual drops are layered to form a part. We examine how metal drops deform and solidify, and how the solidification rate affects the material microstructure using both numerical simulations and experiments. A single set of equations governing the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum are written for all phases involved, and the phase boundary is treated as an imbedded interface by adding the appropriate source terms. We have simulated single drops colliding with a surface using a simple model which assumes that a melt solidifies below the melting point. Although simple, this model captures many aspects of the fluid flow and solidification. The experimental apparatus creates a single drop of prescribed size and propels it toward a cooled substrate. Favorable comparisons of experimental and numerical results have been achieved.

  18. Augmented heat transfer in a triangular duct by using multiple swirling jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.J.; Cheng, C.S.

    1999-08-01

    In the modern gas turbine design, the trend is toward high inlet gas temperature (1400--1500 C) for improving thermal efficiency and power density. Here, measurements of detailed heat transfer coefficients on two principal walls of a triangular duct with a swirling flow are undertaken by using a transient liquid crystal technique. The vertex corners of the triangular duct are 45, 45, and 90 deg. The swirl-motioned airflow is induced by an array of tangential jets on the side entries. The effects of flow Reynolds number (8600 {le} Re {le} 21,000) and the jet inlet angle ({alpha} = 75, 45, and 30 deg) are examined. Flow visualization by using smoke injection is conducted for better understanding the complicated flow phenomena in the swirling-flow channel. Results show that the heat transfer for {alpha} = 75 deg is enhanced mainly by the wall jets as well as the impinging jets; while the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement for {alpha} = 45 and 30 deg could be characterized as the swirling-flow cooling. On the bottom wall, jets at {alpha} = 75 deg produce the best wall-averaged heat transfer due to the strongest wall-jet effect among the three angles ({alpha}) investigated. On the target wall, however, the heat transfer enhancements by swirling flow ({alpha} = 45 and 30 deg) are slightly higher than those by impinging jets ({alpha} = 75 deg). Correlations for wall-averaged Nusselt number for the bottom and target walls of the triangular duct are developed in terms of the flow Reynolds number for different jet inlet angles.

  19. Role of coherent structures in supersonic impinging jetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajan; Wiley, Alex; Venkatakrishnan, L.; Alvi, Farrukh

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a study examining the flow field and acoustic characteristics of a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded supersonic jet impinging on a flat surface and its control using steady microjets. Emphasis is placed on two conditions of nozzle to plate distances (h/d), of which one corresponds to where the microjet based active flow control is very effective in reducing flow unsteadiness and near-field acoustics and the other has minimal effectiveness. Measurements include unsteady pressures, nearfield acoustics using microphone and particle image velocimetry. The nearfield noise and unsteady pressure spectra at both h/d show discrete high amplitude impinging tones, which in one case (h/d = 4) are significantly reduced with control but in the other case (h/d = 4.5) remain unaffected. The particle image velocimetry measurements, both time-averaged and phase-averaged, were used to better understand the basic characteristics of the impinging jet flow field especially the role of coherent vortical structures in the noise generation and control. The results show that the flow field corresponding to the case of least control effectiveness comprise well defined, coherent, and symmetrical vortical structures and may require higher levels of microjet pressure supply for noise suppression when compared to the flow field more responsive to control (h/d = 4) which shows less organized, competing (symmetrical and helical) instabilities.

  20. Biomass and number of fish impinged at a nuclear power plant by the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Bryhn, Andreas C; Bergenius, Mikaela A J; Dimberg, Peter H; Adill, Anders

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the number and biomass of impinged fish at Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden, located on the coast of the Baltic Sea. Of particular interest was the number of impinged individuals of the critically endangered European eel (Anguilla anguilla) which is regularly caught in the cooling system. Another aim was to determine the comparability of the results from Forsmark and results from impingement studies in other types of waters. Cross-systems studies make it possible to (1) estimate fish loss at plants where fish is not counted, and (2) to predict changes in fish loss from changes in electricity production or cooling water use. In 2010, 31,300,000 fish with a total biomass of 62,600 kg were impinged at Forsmark. In 2011, 27,300,000 fish weighing 38,500 kg were impinged. The maximum peak in total fish number and biomass occurred in spring. The most critical period for herring was in late summer and early autumn. Regarding eel, the largest impingement losses were recorded in November. The number of fish agreed with earlier established quantities of impinged fish in both freshwater and marine ecosystems. The study also estimated that 1,300 critically endangered eels could survive at Forsmark each year if a fish return system would be constructed to allow the passage of fish from the plant back to the Baltic Sea. PMID:23880915

  1. Laser spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiF: Application of Hougen's approximate model for the low-lying electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, D. L.; Tokaryk, D. W.; Adam, A. G.; Linton, C.

    2016-06-01

    We have taken laser-induced fluorescence spectra of jet-cooled nickel monofluoride formed in a laser-ablation molecular beam source. Dispersed-fluorescence spectroscopy confirms predictions by Hougen (2011) that the parity assignments of levels in the Ω = 1 / 2 state 1570 cm-1 above the ground state should be reversed from those given in Krouti et al. (2002). The quality of the high-resolution spectra was sufficient to measure the [22.9]1.5-X1.5 band for five isotopologues of nickel and the [22.9]1.5-[0.25]0.5 band for molecules containing 58Ni and 60Ni. The spectral line positions for each isotopologue were fit to the Hamiltonian model given by Hougen, which was extended to allow for calculation of the parity-splitting parameter in the ground state.

  2. Jet-Cooled Excitation Spectra of Large Benzannulated Benzyl Radicals: 9-ANTHRACENYLMETHYL (C_{15}H_{11}) and 1-PYRENYLMETHYL (C_{17}H_{11})

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Gerard D.; Bacskay, George B.; Woodhouse, Gabrielle V. G.; Troy, Tyler P.; Nauta, Klaas; Kable, Scott H.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2013-06-01

    The jet-cooled D_1 ← D_0 excitation spectra of two benzannulated benzyl radicals (BBRs), 9-anthracenylmethyl (9-AnMe) and 1-pyrenylmethyl (9-PyMe), have been obtained using mass-resolved resonant two-colour two-photon ionization spectroscopy (R2C2PI). Analysis of the spectra in view of symmetry and calculated vibrational frequencies indicate significant vibronic coupling. From the spectrum of 9-AnMe we elucidate significant anharmonicity in the excited state. This anharmonic behaviour is examined computationally through both TDDFT and ab initio methods. Excited state properties of 9-AnMe and 1-PyMe are examined with reference to the existing spectra of smaller BBRs. Trends in the observed spectra of BBRs allow spectroscopic properties of larger BBRs to be predicted. These predictions suggest the D_1 ← D_0 transitions of large BBRs are unlikely to be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands.

  3. Plant sunscreens in the UV-B: ultraviolet spectroscopy of jet-cooled sinapoyl malate, sinapic acid, and sinapate ester derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jacob C; Kusaka, Ryoji; Walsh, Patrick S; Allais, Florent; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-10-22

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy of sinapoyl malate, an essential UV-B screening agent in plants, was carried out in the cold, isolated environment of a supersonic expansion to explore its intrinsic UV spectral properties in detail. Despite these conditions, sinapoyl malate displays anomalous spectral broadening extending well over 1000 cm(-1) in the UV-B region, presenting the tantalizing prospect that nature's selection of UV-B sunscreen is based in part on the inherent quantum mechanical features of its excited states. Jet-cooling provides an ideal setting in which to explore this topic, where complications from intermolecular interactions are eliminated. In order to better understand the structural causes of this behavior, the UV spectroscopy of a series of sinapate esters was undertaken and compared with ab initio calculations, starting with the simplest sinapate chromophore sinapic acid, and building up the ester side chain to sinapoyl malate. This "deconstruction" approach provided insight into the active mechanism intrinsic to sinapoyl malate, which is tentatively attributed to mixing of the bright V ((1)ππ*) state with an adiabatically lower (1)nπ* state which, according to calculations, shows unique charge-transfer characteristics brought on by the electron-rich malate side chain. All members of the series absorb strongly in the UV-B region, but significant differences emerge in the appearance of the spectrum among the series, with derivatives most closely associated with sinapoyl malate showing characteristic broadening even under jet-cooled conditions. The long vibronic progressions, conformational distribution, and large oscillator strength of the V (ππ*) transition in sinapates makes them ideal candidates for their role as UV-B screening agents in plants.

  4. Plant sunscreens in the UV-B: ultraviolet spectroscopy of jet-cooled sinapoyl malate, sinapic acid, and sinapate ester derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jacob C; Kusaka, Ryoji; Walsh, Patrick S; Allais, Florent; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-10-22

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy of sinapoyl malate, an essential UV-B screening agent in plants, was carried out in the cold, isolated environment of a supersonic expansion to explore its intrinsic UV spectral properties in detail. Despite these conditions, sinapoyl malate displays anomalous spectral broadening extending well over 1000 cm(-1) in the UV-B region, presenting the tantalizing prospect that nature's selection of UV-B sunscreen is based in part on the inherent quantum mechanical features of its excited states. Jet-cooling provides an ideal setting in which to explore this topic, where complications from intermolecular interactions are eliminated. In order to better understand the structural causes of this behavior, the UV spectroscopy of a series of sinapate esters was undertaken and compared with ab initio calculations, starting with the simplest sinapate chromophore sinapic acid, and building up the ester side chain to sinapoyl malate. This "deconstruction" approach provided insight into the active mechanism intrinsic to sinapoyl malate, which is tentatively attributed to mixing of the bright V ((1)ππ*) state with an adiabatically lower (1)nπ* state which, according to calculations, shows unique charge-transfer characteristics brought on by the electron-rich malate side chain. All members of the series absorb strongly in the UV-B region, but significant differences emerge in the appearance of the spectrum among the series, with derivatives most closely associated with sinapoyl malate showing characteristic broadening even under jet-cooled conditions. The long vibronic progressions, conformational distribution, and large oscillator strength of the V (ππ*) transition in sinapates makes them ideal candidates for their role as UV-B screening agents in plants. PMID:25295994

  5. Jet-Cooled Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy of the ~a ^2E^"-~X ^2A_2^' Vibronic Transition of NO_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Wei; Just, Gabriel M. P.; Codd, Terrance; Miller, Terry A.

    2010-06-01

    The three energetically lowest electronic states (~X 2A2^', ~A 2E^", and ~B 2E^') of NO_3 are strongly coupled by vibronic interactions and have been treated in considerable detail theoretically. Corresponding experimental characterization of the interaction is much less detailed. Previous experimental results primarily consist of IR measurements of vibrational transitions in the ground state. In addition, the electronically forbidden ~A-~X transition has been observed in ambient temperature CRDS studies. A slit-jet nozzle with a high voltage pulsed discharge has been applied to produce the NO_3 radical by dissociating the N-O bond of N_2O_5, and the jet-cooled NO_3 CRDS absorption spectrum has been successfully observed with a high-resolution laser source (Δν≈250MHz, intrinsic resolution considering the instrumental linewidth and the residual Doppler broadening in the jet). The 4^1_0 band (parallel band) shows complex rotational structure which is presently being analyzed. The 2^1_0 band has also been measured as an example of a perpendicular band. Besides the ν_2 and ν_4 vibronic bands, the vibronically forbidden origin band (0^0_0 band) has been recorded under the same experimental conditions. The weakly observed ~A-~X origin band is likely either a magnetic dipole or an electric quardrupole transition. J. F. Stanton, J. Chem. Phys., 126, 134309 (2007) K. Kawaguchi, E. Hirota, T. Ishiwata, and I. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys., 93, 951 (1990) K. Kawaguchi, T. Ishiwata, E. Hirota, and I. Tanaka, Chem. Phys., 231, 193 (1998) A. Deev, J. Sommar, and M. Okumura, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 224305 (2005) E. Hirota, T. Ishiwata, K. Kawaguchi, M. Fujitake, N. Ohashi, I. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys., 107, 2829 (1997)

  6. Particle impingement in SRM nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hirohide; Tanno, Haruhito; Tokudome, Shinichiro; Kohno, Masahiro

    It is experimentally shown that an improved two-phase flow program can well predict the alumina particle impingement location in small rocket motor nozzles as well as motor performance. The size distribution of particles in the nozzle flow is well characterized by a log-normal distribution. The program has achieved sufficient accuracy of prediction to be an effective nozzle contouring design tool.

  7. An experimental and theoretical study of the A˜ 2A″Π -X˜ 2A' band system of the jet-cooled HBBr/DBBr free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2016-06-01

    The electronic spectra of the HBBr and DBBr free radicals have been studied in depth. These species were prepared in a pulsed electric discharge jet using a precursor mixture of BBr3 vapor and H2 or D2 in high pressure argon. Transitions to the electronic excited state of the jet-cooled radicals were probed with laser-induced fluorescence and the ground state energy levels were measured from the single vibronic level emission spectra. HBBr has an extensive band system in the red which involves a linear-bent transition between the two Renner-Teller components of what would be a 2Π state at linearity. We have used high level ab initio theory to calculate potential energy surfaces for the bent 2A' ground state and the linear A˜ 2A″Π excited state and we have determined the ro-vibronic energy levels variationally, including spin orbit effects. The correspondence between the computed and experimentally observed transition frequencies, upper state level symmetries, and H and B isotope shifts was used to make reliable assignments. We have shown that the ground state barriers to linearity, which range from 10 000 cm-1 in HBF to 2700 cm-1 in BH2, are inversely related to the energy of the first excited 2Σ (2A') electronic state. This suggests that a vibronic coupling mechanism is responsible for the nonlinear equilibrium geometries of the ground states of the HBX free radicals.

  8. The complex spectrum of a "simple" free radical: the Ã-X̃ band system of the jet-cooled boron difluoride free radical.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Ellis, Blaine; Clouthier, Dennis J

    2011-09-01

    The near-ultraviolet band system of the jet-cooled boron difluoride free radical has been studied by a combination of laser-induced fluorescence and single vibronic level wavelength resolved emission spectroscopies. The radical was produced in a supersonic discharge jet using a precursor mixture of 1%-3% of BF(3) or (10)BF(3) in high pressure argon. A large number of bands were found in the 340-286 nm region and assigned as transitions from the X̃(2)A(1) ground state to the lower Renner-Teller component of the Ã(2)Π excited state, based on our previous ab initio potential energy surface predictions, matching the emission spectra Franck-Condon profiles of (11)BF(2) and (10)BF(2), and comparison of observed and calculated boron isotope effects. Several bands have been rotationally analyzed providing ground state structural parameters of r(0)('') (BF) = 1.3102(9) Å and θ(0)('') (FBF) = 119.7(6)°. The ground state totally symmetric vibrational energy levels of both boron isotopologues have also been measured and assigned up to energies of more than 8000 cm(-1). Although BF(2) might be considered to be a "simple" free radical, understanding the details of its electronic spectrum remains a major challenge for both theory and experiment.

  9. An experimental and theoretical study of the Ã(2)A(″)Π-X̃(2)A(') band system of the jet-cooled HBBr/DBBr free radical.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2016-06-21

    The electronic spectra of the HBBr and DBBr free radicals have been studied in depth. These species were prepared in a pulsed electric discharge jet using a precursor mixture of BBr3 vapor and H2 or D2 in high pressure argon. Transitions to the electronic excited state of the jet-cooled radicals were probed with laser-induced fluorescence and the ground state energy levels were measured from the single vibronic level emission spectra. HBBr has an extensive band system in the red which involves a linear-bent transition between the two Renner-Teller components of what would be a (2)Π state at linearity. We have used high level ab initio theory to calculate potential energy surfaces for the bent (2)A' ground state and the linear Ã(2)A(″)Π excited state and we have determined the ro-vibronic energy levels variationally, including spin orbit effects. The correspondence between the computed and experimentally observed transition frequencies, upper state level symmetries, and H and B isotope shifts was used to make reliable assignments. We have shown that the ground state barriers to linearity, which range from 10 000 cm(-1) in HBF to 2700 cm(-1) in BH2, are inversely related to the energy of the first excited (2)Σ ((2)A') electronic state. This suggests that a vibronic coupling mechanism is responsible for the nonlinear equilibrium geometries of the ground states of the HBX free radicals. PMID:27334164

  10. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  11. Effects of cryogenic cooling by liquid nitrogen jet on forces, temperature and surface residual stresses in grinding steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Chattopadhyay, A. B.

    Grinding is a widely employed finishing process for different materials such as metals, ceramics, glass, carbides, rocks, etc. to achieve good geometrical (form) and dimensional accuracy with acceptable surface finish and surface integrity. However, it is inherently characterized by high specific energy requirements, unlike other conventional machining processes such as turning, milling, etc., which lead to a high grinding zone temperature and poor surface integrity. Many methods have been investigated to control this high grinding zone temperature, but all have their shortfalls, both technological and environmental, in exchange for controlling the grinding zone temperature. This paper briefly discusses the results obtained with regard to grinding forces, specific energy, grinding zone temperature and surface residual stress when using cryogenic cooling and compares them to the results from dry grinding and grinding with soluble oil. Cryogenic cooling seems to have the edge over other coolants in terms of controlling the temperature, residual stresses and grinding forces, and it is also environment friendly.

  12. Visualization and modeling of the hydrodynamics of an impinging microjet.

    PubMed

    Bitziou, Eleni; Rudd, Nicola C; Edwards, Martin A; Unwin, Patrick R

    2006-03-01

    The use of fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for flow visualization is described, with a focus on elucidating the pattern of flow in the microjet electrode (MJE). The MJE employs a nozzle, formed from a fine glass capillary, with an inner diameter of approximately 100 microm, to direct solution at an electrode surface, using high velocity but at moderate volume flow rates. For CLSM visualization, the jetted solution contains a fluorescent probe, fluorescein at high pH, which flows into a solution buffered at low pH, where the fluorescence is extinguished, thereby highlighting the flow field of the impinging microjet. The morphology of the microjet and the hydrodynamic boundary layer are shown to be highly sensitive to the volume flow rate, with a collimated jet and thin boundary layer formed at the faster flow rates (approximately 1 cm(3) min(-1)). In contrast, at lower flow rates and for relatively large substrates, an unusual recirculation zone is observed experimentally for the first time. This effect can be eliminated by employing small substrates. The experimental observations have been quantified through numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations of continuity and momentum balance. The new insights provided by CLSM imaging demonstrate that flow in the MJE, and impinging jets in general, are more complex than predicted by classical models but are well-defined and quantifiable.

  13. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  14. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  15. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  16. Visualization of heat transfer for impinging swirl flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bakirci, K.; Bilen, K.

    2007-10-15

    The objective of the experimental study was to visualize the temperature distribution and evaluate heat transfer rate on the impingement surface kept at a constant wall temperature boundary condition for the swirling (SIJ), multi-channel (MCIJ) and conventional impinging jet (CIJ) using liquid crystal technique. The swirling jet assembly consisted of a housing tube and a solid swirl generator insert which had four narrow slots machined on its surface. The swirl angle, {theta}, was set as 0 , 22.5 , 41 , 50 to change the direction and strength of the swirl in the air flow exiting the housing tube. The local Nusselt numbers of the MCIJ ({theta} = 0 ) were generally much higher than those of CIJ and SIJs. As the swirl angle increased, the radial uniformity of the heat transfer was seen compared to MCIJ and SIJ; the best results were for {theta} = 50 and the jet-to-surface distance of H/D = 14. The location of the distance of the maximum heat transfer for the swirl angles of {theta} = 41 and 50 was shifted away from the stagnation point in a radial distance of nearly r/D = 2.5. Increasing Reynolds number for same swirler angle increased the heat transfer rate on the entire surface, and increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface, but had no significant effect on the position of the individual impingement regions, but increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface. The lower Reynolds number (Re = 10 000) and the highest H/D = 14 gave much more uniform local and average heat transfer distribution on the surface, but decreased their values on the entire surface. (author)

  17. Jet flow on ribbed curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, Iu. A.; Sokolova, I. N.; Shumilkina, E. A.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the possibility of using microribbing to reduce turbulent friction in Coanda flows over curved surfaces. It is shown that ribs make it possible to reduce the effect of a jet impinging on an obstacle and to prevent the Coanda effect when jet attachment is undesirable. The optimal rib parameters are determined.

  18. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  19. Tunable far-IR laser spectroscopy of jet-cooled carbon clusters: the nu 2 bending vibration of C3.

    PubMed

    Schmuttenmaer, C A; Cohen, R C; Pugliano, N; Heath, J R; Cooksy, A L; Busarow, K L; Saykally, R J

    1990-08-24

    Seven rovibrational transitions of the (01(1)0) <-- (00(0)0) fundamental bending band of C3 have been measured with high precision with the use of a tunable far-infrared laser spectrometer. The C3 molecules were produced by laser vaporization of a graphite rod and cooled in a supersonic expansion. The astrophysically important nu 2 fundamental frequency is determined to be 63.416529(40) cm-1. These measurements provide the basis for studies of C3 in the interstellar medium with far-infrared astronomy.

  20. Os trigonum impingement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Marotta, J J; Micheli, L J

    1992-01-01

    Sixteen patients underwent surgical excision of an impinging ossicle through a posterior lateral approach. Twelve of these patients (15 ankles) were available for followup and were retrospectively surveyed at an average of 28 months after surgery. There were 9 women and 3 men. Nine were professional ballet dancers and 3 were students of advanced ballet schools. Preoperative symptoms included pain localized to the posterior ankle, limitation of motion, weakness, swelling, or neurologic changes associated with dance activities. All patients were severely hampered in their dance participation and had failed nonsurgical therapies. Postoperatively, all patients followed an aggressive rehabilitation protocol. All had improvement in their impingement symptoms; eight (67%) still had occasional discomfort. All professional dancers returned to unrestricted dance activity. The mean time to full activity was 3 months. One patient had a superficial wound infection requiring antibiotic treatment and another suffered a transient tibial nerve neurapraxia. Both of these complications resolved without sequelae. We conclude that posterior ankle impingement in ballet dancers, caused by an os trigonum and resistant to nonsurgical therapies, is effectively treated with simple excision of the offending structure.

  1. [Secondary impingement syndrome in athletes].

    PubMed

    Jerosch, J; Castro, W H; Sons, H U

    1990-12-01

    Dysfunction of the shoulder joint is based not only on anatomic conditions. The consideration of the special kinesiology of the shoulder helps to understand the shoulder pathology. This mainly applies to young "overhead athletes" like swimmers, handball-, basketball-, volleyball-, and racketplayers. These disciplines cause stress on the anterior joint structures (capsule, ligaments, labrum, subscapularis tendon) and lead to anterior instability. This includes anterior subluxation or even dislocation. Finally, an impingement syndrome with the typical symptoms can frequently result from these conditions. The impingement-syndrome of the elderly must be considered as a primary disease, whereas the young overhead athlete suffers from the impingement syndrome as a secondary disease and does not take the first place in therapy. The first step in therapy should to be treat the muscular imbalance of the shoulder. To gain a regular pattern of motion the rotator cuff must be strengthened. This regimen is likely to be successful in 80-90% of the cases. If the conservative therapy fails the surgical treatment may come into consideration. Arthroscopic surgery has the advantage not to affect the proprioceptivity. To retain the previous level of performance an adequate rehabilitation programme is essential for the athlete.

  2. Experimental investigation of mixed convection in large enclosure with vertical cooling plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Fenglei

    Passive containment cooling systems (PCCS) provide a new safety design for the nuclear industry that provides the safety-related ultimate heat sink for a new generation of inherently safe reactors such as Westinghouse's AP600 and AP 1000 and General Electric's SBWR and ESBWR. It uses only natural forces, such as gravity, natural circulation, and a small number of automatic valves to make the system work. This research investigates experimentally mixed convection and heat transfer augmentation by forced jets in a large enclosure, at conditions simulating those of actual passive containment cooling systems and scales approaching those of actual containment buildings or compartments. The experiment is designed to measure the key parameters governing the heat transfer augmentation by forced jets and affecting the potential for ambient stratification, and to investigate the effects of geometric factors, including the jet diameter, jet injection orientation, interior structures, and enclosure aspect ratio. The tests cover a variety of injection modes leading to flow configurations of interest (jet impinging on a containment wall, buoyant plumes, and wall jets, etc.) that contribute to reveal the nature of mixing and stratification phenomena in the containment under accident conditions of interest. By nondimensionalizing the governing equations, the heat transfer of mixed convection can be predicted to be controlled by jet Archimedes number and geometric factors. Using a combining rule for mixed convection and appropriate forced and natural convection models, the correlations of heat transfer augmentation by forced jets are developed and then tested by experimental data. The effects of jet diameter, injection orientation, interior structures, and enclosure aspect ratio on heat transfer augmentation are illustrated with analysis of experimental results. The recirculation speed is theoretically evaluated through the enclosure mechanical energy balance and correlated to the

  3. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  4. High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of the ν_3+ν_8 Combination Band of Jet-Cooled Propyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongfeng; Linnartz, Harold

    2014-06-01

    Propyne (CH3-C≡CH) is an important molecule in astrophysics and planetary atmospheres, and an important constituent of fuels. Spectroscopic investigation of propyne is also of fundamental interest in intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) dynamics of hydrocarbons. Although extensive spectroscopic studies on this simple organic molecule have been performed, the ν_3+ν_8 band has not been reported before. In this presentation, the high-resolution infrared spectrum of the ν_3+ν_8 combination band of propyne is presented. Continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy is used to measure this weak infrared band in the 3175 cm-1 region using a supersonic free jet. The rotational analysis of the experimental spectrum results in accurate spectroscopic parameters for the ν_3+ν_8 combination vibrational state. Severe perturbations are found for K = 3 and 4 rotational levels, and are likely due to near-resonant or non-resonant interactions between the ν_3+ν_8 and other vibrational states. Moreover, three parallel-transition type subbands are observed and their analysis is presented as well. D. Zhao, H. Linnartz, Chem. Phys. Lett. (2014), DOI: 10.1016/j.cplett.2014.02.016.

  5. High resolution spectroscopy of jet cooled phenyl radical: The ν1 and ν2 a1 symmetry C-H stretching modes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-07-28

    A series of CH stretch modes in phenyl radical (C6H5) has been investigated via high resolution infrared spectroscopy at sub-Doppler resolution (∼60 MHz) in a supersonic discharge slit jet expansion. Two fundamental vibrations of a1 symmetry, ν1 and ν2, are observed and rotationally analyzed for the first time, corresponding to in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric CH stretch excitation at the ortho/meta/para and ortho/para C atoms with respect to the radical center. The ν1 and ν2 band origins are determined to be 3073.968 50(8) cm(-1) and 3062.264 80(7) cm(-1), respectively, which both agree within 5 cm(-1) with theoretical anharmonic scaling predictions based on density functional B3LYP/6-311g++(3df,3dp) calculations. Integrated band strengths for each of the CH stretch bands are analyzed, with the relative intensities agreeing remarkably well with theoretical predictions. Frequency comparison with previous low resolution Ar-matrix spectroscopy [A. V. Friderichsen et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 1977 (2001)] reveals a nearly uniform Δν ≈ + 10-12 cm(-1) blue shift between gas phase and Ar matrix values for ν1 and ν2. This differs substantially from the much smaller red shift (Δν ≈ - 1 cm(-1)) reported for the ν19 mode, and suggests a simple physical model in terms of vibrational mode symmetry and crowding due to the matrix environment. Finally, the infrared phenyl spectra are well described by a simple asymmetric rigid rotor Hamiltonian and show no evidence for spectral congestion due to intramolecular vibrational coupling, which bodes well for high resolution studies of other ring radicals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In summary, the combination of slit jet discharge methods with high resolution infrared lasers enables spectroscopic investigation of even highly reactive combustion and interstellar radical intermediates under gas phase, jet-cooled (Trot ≈ 11 K) conditions. PMID:27475358

  6. High resolution spectroscopy of jet cooled phenyl radical: The ν1 and ν2 a1 symmetry C-H stretching modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-07-01

    A series of CH stretch modes in phenyl radical (C6H5) has been investigated via high resolution infrared spectroscopy at sub-Doppler resolution (˜60 MHz) in a supersonic discharge slit jet expansion. Two fundamental vibrations of a1 symmetry, ν1 and ν2, are observed and rotationally analyzed for the first time, corresponding to in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric CH stretch excitation at the ortho/meta/para and ortho/para C atoms with respect to the radical center. The ν1 and ν2 band origins are determined to be 3073.968 50(8) cm-1 and 3062.264 80(7) cm-1, respectively, which both agree within 5 cm-1 with theoretical anharmonic scaling predictions based on density functional B3LYP/6-311g++(3df,3dp) calculations. Integrated band strengths for each of the CH stretch bands are analyzed, with the relative intensities agreeing remarkably well with theoretical predictions. Frequency comparison with previous low resolution Ar-matrix spectroscopy [A. V. Friderichsen et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 1977 (2001)] reveals a nearly uniform Δν ≈ + 10-12 cm-1 blue shift between gas phase and Ar matrix values for ν1 and ν2. This differs substantially from the much smaller red shift (Δν ≈ - 1 cm-1) reported for the ν19 mode, and suggests a simple physical model in terms of vibrational mode symmetry and crowding due to the matrix environment. Finally, the infrared phenyl spectra are well described by a simple asymmetric rigid rotor Hamiltonian and show no evidence for spectral congestion due to intramolecular vibrational coupling, which bodes well for high resolution studies of other ring radicals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In summary, the combination of slit jet discharge methods with high resolution infrared lasers enables spectroscopic investigation of even highly reactive combustion and interstellar radical intermediates under gas phase, jet-cooled (Trot ≈ 11 K) conditions.

  7. Two-color resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy of jet-cooled indan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yonggang; Kong, Wei

    2005-06-01

    We report studies of supersonically cooled indan using two-color resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and two-color zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. With the aid of ab initio and density-functional calculations, vibrational modes of the first electronically excited state of the neutral species and those of the cation have been assigned, and the adiabatic ionization energy has been determined to be 68458±5cm-1. Similar to the ground state and the first electronically excited state of the neutral molecule, the ground state of the cation is also proven to be nonplanar, with an estimated barrier of 213cm-1 and a puckering angle of 15.0°. These conclusions will be discussed in comparison with a previous study of an indan derivative 1,3-benzodioxole.

  8. Spray cooling simulation implementing time scale analysis and the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzer, Paul Joseph

    Spray cooling research is advancing the field of heat transfer and heat rejection in high power electronics. Smaller and more capable electronics packages are producing higher amounts of waste heat, along with smaller external surface areas, and the use of active cooling is becoming a necessity. Spray cooling has shown extremely high levels of heat rejection, of up to 1000 W/cm 2 using water. Simulations of spray cooling are becoming more realistic, but this comes at a price. A previous researcher has used CFD to successfully model a single 3D droplet impact into a liquid film using the level set method. However, the complicated multiphysics occurring during spray impingement and surface interactions increases computation time to more than 30 days. Parallel processing on a 32 processor system has reduced this time tremendously, but still requires more than a day. The present work uses experimental and computational results in addition to numerical correlations representing the physics occurring on a heated impingement surface. The current model represents the spray behavior of a Spraying Systems FullJet 1/8-g spray nozzle. Typical spray characteristics are indicated as follows: flow rate of 1.05x10-5 m3/s, normal droplet velocity of 12 m/s, droplet Sauter mean diameter of 48 microm, and heat flux values ranging from approximately 50--100 W/cm2 . This produces non-dimensional numbers of: We 300--1350, Re 750--3500, Oh 0.01--0.025. Numerical and experimental correlations have been identified representing crater formation, splashing, film thickness, droplet size, and spatial flux distributions. A combination of these methods has resulted in a Monte Carlo spray impingement simulation model capable of simulating hundreds of thousands of droplet impingements or approximately one millisecond. A random sequence of droplet impingement locations and diameters is generated, with the proper radial spatial distribution and diameter distribution. Hence the impingement, lifetime

  9. Anterior femoroacetabular impingement: an update.

    PubMed

    Lequesne, Michel; Bellaïche, Laurence

    2012-05-01

    Anterior femoroacetabular impingement can cause early hip osteoarthritis. The typical patient is an adult younger than 50 years of age, often with a history of sporting activities. The main symptom is intermittent pain triggered by static flexion (low seats) or dynamic flexion (during sporting or occupational activities that require repeated hip flexion). The characteristic physical finding is pain triggered by placing the hip in internal rotation and 70 to 110° of flexion. In additional to anteroposterior and false-profile radiographs, lateral Dunn or Ducroquet views should be obtained on both sides to visualize the anterior part of the head-neck junction. Instead of being concave, the head-neck junction is either flat or convex, causing a cam effect that damages the labrum and anterosuperior cartilage. Non-sphericity of the femoral head with an anterior ovoid bulge induces a similar cam effect. In pincer impingement, which is less common, over-coverage by the anterosuperior acetabular rim pinches the labrum between the rim and the femoral head-neck junction when the hip is flexed. Pincer impingement is related to acetabular retroversion or protrusion. Arthrography coupled with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging visualizes the morphological abnormalities (e.g., ovoid shape of the femoral head or retroversion of the acetabulum) and detects secondary lesions such as labral tears or separation or damage to the anterosuperior cartilage. Arthroscopy allows removal of the damaged labrum and correction of the morphological abnormalities via femoroplasty to restore the normal concave shape of the neck and/or acetabuloplasty to eliminate over-coverage. Short- or mid-term results are satisfactory in 75 to 80% of patients. However, the presence of degenerative lesions in about two-thirds of patients at the time of arthroplastic surgery limits the probability of achieving good long-term results. PMID:22281229

  10. Impingement of Water Droplets on a Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Saper, Paul G.; Kadow, Charles F.

    1955-01-01

    Droplet trajectories about a sphere in ideal fluid flow were calculated. From the calculated droplet trajectories the droplet impingement characteristics of the sphere were determined. Impingement data and equations for determining the collection efficiency, the area, and the distribution of impingement are presented in terms of dimensionless parameters. The range of flight and atmospheric conditions covered in the calculations was extended considerably beyond the range covered by previously reported calculations for the sphere.

  11. High-efficiency impurity activation by precise control of cooling rate during atmospheric pressure thermal plasma jet annealing of 4H-SiC wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Hanafusa, Hiroaki; Ashihara, Ryuhei; Hayashi, Shohei; Murakami, Hideki; Higashi, Seiichiro

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated high-temperature and rapid annealing of a silicon carbide (SiC) wafer by atmospheric pressure thermal plasma jet (TPJ) irradiation for impurity activation. To reduce the temperature gradient in the SiC wafer, a DC current preheating system and the lateral back-and-forth motion of the wafer were introduced. A maximum surface temperature of 1835 °C within 2.4 s without sample breakage was achieved, and aluminum (Al), phosphorus (P), and arsenic (As) activations in SiC were demonstrated. We have investigated precise control of heating rate (Rh) and cooling rate (Rc) during rapid annealing of P+-implanted 4H-SiC and its impact on impurity activation. No dependence of resistivity on Rh was observed, while increasing Rc significantly decreased resistivity. A minimum resistivity of 0.0025 Ω·cm and a maximum carrier concentration of 2.9 × 1020 cm-3 were obtained at Rc = 568 °C/s.

  12. Infrared and ultraviolet laser spectroscopy of jet-cooled substituted salicylic acids; substitution effects on the excited state intramolecular proton transfer in salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Hakam Abou El-Nasr, E.; Fujii, A.; Ebata, T.; Mikami, N.

    Substitution effects on the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in the salicylic acid (SA) frame were studied by electronic and infrared spectroscopy of jet-cooled 5-methoxylsalicylic acid (5-MeOSA), 5-methylsalicylic acid (5-MeSA), 5-fluorosalicylic acid (5-FSA), 6-fluorosalicylic acid (6-FSA), and methyl salicylate (MS). Infrared spectra were measured in the 3 µm region for both the electronic ground (S0) and first excited (S1) states. The electronic excitation/emission spectra of 5-MeSA and 6-FSA showed the typical spectral features of ESIPT, which have been found in the spectra of SA. On the other hand, 5-MeOSA and 5-FSA exhibit a mirror-image relation between their excitation and emission spectra, which has been regarded as a result of the suppression of ESIPT. Despite such a remarkable difference among the electronic spectra, IR spectroscopy shows that a drastic change of the phenolic OH stretching vibration does occur upon electronic excitation of all substituted SAs, that is, the phenolic OH band of all the SAs disappears from the 3 µm region, indicating a large elongation of the phenolic O-H bond (over 0.1 Å) in S1. This result means that the intramolecular hydrogen bond strength is remarkably enhanced by electronic excitation in all the substituted SAs. Substitution effects on ESIPT in dimers are also discussed.

  13. Thermal Analysis for Orbiter and ISS Plume Impingement on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, William C.; Reid, Ethan A.; Carl, Terry L.; Smith, Ries N.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Reaction Control System (RCS) Plume Model (RPM) is an exhaust plume flow field and impingement heating code that has been updated and applied to components of the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study was to use this code to determine if plume environments from either Orbiter PRCS jets or ISS reboost and Attitude Control System (ACS) jets cause thermal issues on ISS component surfaces. This impingement analysis becomes increasingly important as the ISS is being assembled with its first permanent crew scheduled to arrive by the end of fall 2000. By early summer 2001 , the ISS will have a number of major components installed such as the Unity (Node 1), Destiny (Lab Module), Zarya (Functional Cargo Block), and Zvezda (Service Module) along with the P6 solar arrays and radiators and the Z-1 truss. Plume heating to these components has been analyzed with the RPM code as well as additional components for missions beyond Flight 6A such as the Propulsion Module (PM), Mobile Servicing System, Space Station Remote Manipulator System, Node 2, and the Cupola. For the past several years NASA/JSC has been developing the methodology to predict plume heating on ISS components. The RPM code is a modified source flow code with capabilities for scarfed nozzles and intersecting plumes that was developed for the 44 Orbiter RCS jets. This code has been validated by comparison with Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) heat flux and pressure data and with CFD and Method of Characteristics solutions. Previous analyses of plume heating predictions to the ISS using RPM have been reported, but did not consider thermal analysis for the components nor jet-firing histories as the Orbiter approaches the ISS docking ports. The RPM code has since been modified to analyze surface temperatures with a lumped mass approach and also uses jet-firing histories to produce pulsed heating rates. In addition, RPM was modified to include plume heating from ISS

  14. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled OsN: 520-418 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Maria A.; Morse, Michael D.

    2011-09-01

    The optical transitions of supersonically cooled OsN have been investigated in the range from 19 200 to 23 900 cm-1 using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. More than 20 vibronic bands were observed, 17 of which were rotationally resolved and analyzed. The ground state is confirmed to be 2Δ5/2, deriving from the 1σ2 2σ2 1π4 1δ3 3σ2 electronic configuration. The X 2Δ5/2 ground state rotational constant for 192Os14N was found to be B0 = 0.491921(34) cm-1, giving r0 = 1.62042(6) Å (1σ error limits). The observed bands were grouped into three band systems with Ω' = 7/2 and four with Ω' = 3/2, corresponding to the three 2Φ7/2 and four 2Π3/2 states expected from the 1σ2 2σ2 1π4 1δ3 3σ1 2π1 and 1σ2 2σ2 1π4 1δ2 3σ2 2π1 electronic configurations. In addition, two interacting upper states with Ω' = 5/2 were observed, one of which is thought to correspond to a 1σ2 2σ2 1π3 1δ3 3σ2 2π1, 2Δ5/2 state. Spectroscopic constants are reported for all of the observed states, and comparisons to related molecules are made. The ionization energy of OsN is estimated as IE(OsN) = 8.80 ± 0.06 eV.

  15. Electronic Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Triatomics and Cumulenes: Hydrogen Sulfide, Carbon Disulfide, Allene, and Carbon Suboxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Kathleen O'brien

    The primary emphasis of this dissertation is to investigate the photoreactivity of a few small polyatomic molecules in their excited electronic states in the vacuum ultraviolet region. In this thesis, there are two types of polyatomics explored; triatomics (CS_2 and H_2S) and cumulenes (rm C_3O_2 and rm C_3H_4). The excited electronic states whose photoreactivity is investigated are the ^1Pi_{rm g} electronic state of CS_2 (1800-1650 A), the first electronic band of hydrogen sulfide (2300 -1700 A), the ^1{rm B}_2 electronic state of allene, H_2 C=C=CH_2, and a moderately strong structured band of carbon suboxide, O=C=C=C=O, centered at 1780 A. To understand the photoreactivity of a molecule, it is ideal to characterize the relevant potential energy surfaces and interpret the dynamics along these surfaces from reactant to products. This requires the collaboration of experimentalist and theoreticians. The allure of triatomics is that they are the simplest of polyatomic molecules having only three or four vibrational degrees of freedom. In practice, even triatomics have eluded a detailed analysis of their photoreactivity due to the complexity of the dynamics occurring on coupled multiple surfaces. Cumulenes are much more complex systems consisting of repetitive double bonds. These rigid molecules give rise to very low vibrational frequencies in the bending and torsional modes, which makes these molecules interesting prototypes for studying the effects of low frequency motions on the dynamics of the photodissociation. In this work, direct absorption spectroscopy will be used coupled with a supersonic expansion of the molecules under investigation. Direct absorption spectroscopy provides important information on the early time dynamics of the molecules' photodissociation toward products. A supersonic expansion of the sample reduces spectral congestion by cooling internal rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the molecules which facilitates the analysis of the

  16. Scaling approach and thermal-hydraulic analysis in the reactor cavity cooling system of a high temperature gas -cooled reactor and thermal-jet mixing in a sodium fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotowa, Olumuyiwa A.

    This dissertation develops and demonstrates the application of the top-down and bottom-up scaling methodologies to thermal-hydraulic flows in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and upper plenum of the sodium fast reactor (SFR), respectively. The need to integrate scaled separate effects and integral tests was identified. Experimental studies and computational tools (CFD) have been integrated to guide the engineering design, analysis and assessment of this scaling methods under single and two-phase flow conditions. To test this methods, two applicable case studies are considered, and original contributions are noted. Case 1: "Experimental Study of RCCS for the HTGR". Contributions include validation of scaling analysis using the top-down approach as guide to a ¼-scale integral test facility. System code, RELAP5, was developed based on the derived scaling parameters. Tests performed included system sensitivity to decay heat load and heat sink inventory variations. System behavior under steady-state and transient scenarios were predicted. Results show that the system has the capacity to protect the cavity walls from over-heating during normal operations and provide a means for decay heat removal under accident scenarios. A full width half maximum statistical method was devised to characterize the thermal-hydraulics of the non-linear two-phase oscillatory behavior. This facilitated understanding of the thermal hydraulic coupling of the loop segments of the RCCS, the heat transfer, and the two-phase flashing flow phenomena; thus the impact of scaling overall. Case 2: "Computational Studies of Thermal Jet Mixing in SFR". In the pool-type SFR, susceptible regions to thermal striping are the upper instrumentation structure and the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). We investigated the thermal mixing above the core to UIS and the potential impact due to poor mixing. The thermal mixing of dual-jet flows at different

  17. Side wall cooling for nozzle segments for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane segment includes outer and inner band portions with a vane extending therebetween and defining first and second cavities separated by an impingement plate for flowing cooling medium for impingement cooling of nozzle side walls. The side wall of each nozzle segment has an undercut region. The impingement plate has an inturned flange with a plurality of openings. Cooling inserts or receptacles having an open end are received in the openings and the base and side walls of the receptacles have apertures for receiving cooling medium from the first cavity and directing the cooling medium for impingement cooling of the side wall of the nozzle segment and a portion of the nozzle wall.

  18. Droplet-Surface Impingement Dynamics for Intelligent Spray Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Kizito, John P.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2004-01-01

    Spray cooling has high potential in thermal management and life support systems by overcoming the deleterious effect of microgravity upon two-phase heat transfer. In particular spray cooling offers several advantages in heat flux removal that include the following: 1) By maintaining a wetted surface, spray droplets impinge upon a thin fluid film rather than a dry solid surface; 2. Most heat transfer surfaces will not be smooth but rough. Roughness can enhance conductive cooling, aid liquid removal by flow channeling; and 3. Spray momentum can be used to a) substitute for gravity delivering fluid to the surface, b) prevent local dryout and potential thermal runaway and c) facilitate liquid and vapor removal. Yet high momentum results in high We and Re numbers characterizing the individual spray droplets. Beyond an impingement threshold, droplets splash rather than spread. Heat flux declines and spray cooling efficiency can markedly decrease. Accordingly we are investigating droplet impingement upon a) dry solid surfaces, b) fluid films, c) rough surfaces and determining splashing thresholds and relationships for both dry surfaces and those covered by fluid films. We are presently developing engineering correlations delineating the boundary between splashing and non-splashing regions. Determining the splash/non-splash boundary is important for many practical applications. Coating and cooling processes would each benefit from near-term empirical relations and subsequent models. Such demonstrations can guide theoretical development by providing definitive testing of its predictive capabilities. Thus, empirical relations describing the boundary between splash and non-splash are given for drops impinging upon a dry solid surface and upon a thin fluid film covering a similar surface. Analytical simplification of the power laws describing the boundary between the splash and non-splash regions yields insight into the engineering parameters governing the splash and non

  19. Space Station flexible dynamics under plume impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1993-01-01

    Assembly of the Space Station requires numerous construction flights by the Space Shuttle. A particularly challenging problem is that of control of each intermediate station configuration when the shuttle orbiter is approaching it to deliver the next component. The necessary braking maneuvers cause orbiter thruster plumes to impinge on the station, especially its solar arrays. This in turn causes both overall attitude errors and excitation of flexible-body vibration modes. These plume loads are predicted to lead to CMG saturation during the approach of the orbiter to the SC-5 station configuration, necessitating the use of the station RCS jets for desaturation. They are also expected to lead to significant excitation of solar array vibrations. It is therefore of great practical importance to investigate the effects of plume loads on the flexible dynamics of station configuration SC-5 as accurately as possible. However, this system possesses a great many flexible modes (89 below 5 rad/s), making analysis time-consuming and complicated. Model reduction techniques can be used to overcome this problem, reducing the system model to one which retains only the significant dynamics, i.e. those which are strongly excited by the control inputs or plume disturbance forces and which strongly couple with the measured outputs. The particular technique to be used in this study is the subsystem balancing approach which was previously developed by the present investigator. This method is very efficient computationally. Furthermore, it gives accurate results even for the difficult case where the structure has many closed-spaced natural frequencies, when standard modal truncation can give misleading results. Station configuration SC-5 is a good example of such a structure.

  20. Postoperative imaging in femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tobias J; Dora, Claudio; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been recognized as a common cause of pain, limited range of motion, and development of early osteoarthritis of the hip in adolescents and adults. Current surgical approaches include femoral osteochondroplasty, acetabular rim resection, and reattachment of torn labrum as either open surgical or arthroscopic techniques as well as periacetabular osteotomy. Conventional radiographs are routinely obtained in the postoperative setting. In addition, MRI serves for work-up in patients with persistent or recurrent groin pain after surgery. Inappropriate correction of the underlying femoral or acetabular osseous abnormality, insufficiency fractures of the femoral neck due to bone resection, intra-articular adhesions, ongoing joint degeneration including advanced cartilage damage, iatrogenic cartilage injury, retear of the labrum, rarely avascular necrosis of the femoral head, defects of the hip joint capsule, or heterotopic ossification might be observed after surgery for FAI. PMID:23787981

  1. Numerical computation of three-dimensional blunt body flow fields with an impinging shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    A time-marching finite-difference method was used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for the three-dimensional wing-leading-edge shock impingement problem. The bow shock was treated as a discontinuity across which the exact shock jump conditions were applied. All interior shock layer detail such as shear layers, shock waves, jets, and the wall boundary layer were automatically captured in the solution. The impinging shock was introduced by discontinuously changing the freestream conditions across the intersection line at the bow shock. A special storage-saving procedure for sweeping through the finite-difference mesh was developed which reduces the required amount of computer storage by at least a factor of two without sacrificing the execution time. Numerical results are presented for infinite cylinder blunt body cases as well as the three-dimensional shock impingement case. The numerical results are compared with existing experimental and theoretical results.

  2. High-resolution rovibrational spectroscopy of jet-cooled phenyl radical: the ν19 out-of-phase symmetric CH stretch.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Grant T; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J

    2013-10-01

    Phenyl radical has been studied via sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy in a slit supersonic discharge expansion source, with assignments for the highest frequency b2 out-of-phase C-H symmetric stretch vibration (ν19) unambiguously confirmed by ≤6 MHz (0.0002 cm(-1)) agreement with microwave ground state combination differences of McMahon et al. [Astrophys. J. 2003, 590, L61-64]. Least squares analysis of over 100 resolved rovibrational peaks in the sub-Doppler spectrum to a Watson Hamiltonian yields precision excited-state rotational constants and a vibrational band origin (ν0 = 3071.8915(4) cm(-1)) consistent with a surprisingly small red-shift (0.9 cm(-1)) with respect to Ar matrix isolation studies of Ellison and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 1977]. Nuclear spin weights and inertial defects confirm the vibrationally averaged planarity and (2)A1 rovibronic symmetry of phenyl radical, with analysis of the rotational constants consistent with a modest C2v distortion of the carbon backbone frame due to partial sp rehybridization of the σ C radical-center. Most importantly, despite the number of atoms (N = 11) and vibrational modes (3N - 6 = 27), phenyl radical exhibits a remarkably clean jet cooled high-resolution IR spectrum that shows no evidence of intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) phenomena such as local or nonlocal perturbations due to strongly coupled nearby dark states. This provides strong support for the feasibility of high-resolution infrared spectroscopy in other aromatic hydrocarbon radical systems.

  3. High Resolution Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Phenyl Radical: the ν_{19} Out-Of Symmetric C-H Stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Grant T.; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-06-01

    Phenyl radical has been studied via sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy in a slit supersonic discharge expansion source, with assignments for the highest frequency b_{2} out-of-phase C-H symmetric stretch vibration (ν_{19}) unambiguously confirmed by ≤ 6 MHz (0.0002 cm^{-1}) agreement with microwave ground state combination differences of McMahon et al. [Astrophys. J. 590, L61-64 (2003)]. Least squares analysis of > 100 resolved rovibrational peaks in the sub-Doppler spectrum to a Watson Hamiltonian yields precision exited-state rotational constants and a vibrational band origin (ν_{0} = 3071.8915(4) cm^{-1}) consistent with a surprisingly small red-shift (0.9 cm^{-1}) with respect to Ar matrix isolation studies of Ellison and coworkers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 1977 (2001)]. Nuclear spin weights and inertial defects confirm the vibrationally averaged planarity and ^{2}A_{1} rovibronic symmetry of phenyl radical, with analysis of the rotational constants consistent with a modest C_{2v} distortion of the carbon backbone frame due to partial sp rehybridization of the σ C radical-center. Most importantly, despite the number of atoms (N = 11) and vibrational modes (3N-6 = 27), phenyl radical exhibits a remarkably clean jet cooled high resolution IR spectrum that shows no evidence of intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) phenomena such as local or non-local perturbations due to strongly coupled nearby dark states. This provides strong support for the feasibility of high resolution infrared spectroscopy in other cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical systems.

  4. High-Resolution Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Phenyl Radical: The ν19 Out-of-Phase Symmetric CH Stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Grant T.; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-10-01

    Phenyl radical has been studied via sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy in a slit supersonic discharge expansion source, with assignments for the highest frequency b2 out-of-phase C-H symmetric stretch vibration (-19) unambiguously confirmed by ≤6 MHz (0.0002 cm-1) agreement with microwave ground state combination differences of McMahon et al. [Astrophys. J. 2003, 590, L61-64]. Least squares analysis of over 100 resolved rovibrational peaks in the sub-Doppler spectrum to a Watson Hamiltonian yields precision excited-state rotational constants and a vibrational band origin (-0 = 3071.8915(4) cm-1) consistent with a surprisingly small red-shift (0.9 cm-1) with respect to Ar matrix isolation studies of Ellison and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 1977]. Nuclear spin weights and inertial defects confirm the vibrationally averaged planarity and 2A1 rovibronic symmetry of phenyl radical, with analysis of the rotational constants consistent with a modest C2v distortion of the carbon backbone frame due to partial sp rehybridization of the σ C radical-center. Most importantly, despite the number of atoms (N = 11) and vibrational modes (3N - 6 = 27), phenyl radical exhibits a remarkably clean jet cooled high-resolution IR spectrum that shows no evidence of intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) phenomena such as local or nonlocal perturbations due to strongly coupled nearby dark states. This provides strong support for the feasibility of high-resolution infrared spectroscopy in other aromatic hydrocarbon radical systems.

  5. Infrared and Electronic Spectroscopy of the Jet-Cooled 5-Methyl-2-furanylmethyl Radical Derived from the Biofuel 2,5-Dimethylfuran.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Nathanael M; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N; Korn, Joseph A; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-08-18

    The electronic and infrared spectra of the 5-methyl-2-furanylmethyl (MFM) radical have been characterized under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. This resonance-stabilized radical is formed by H atom loss from one of the methyl groups of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), a promising second-generation biofuel. As a resonance-stabilized radical, it plays an important role in the flame chemistry of DMF. The D0-D1 transition was studied using two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) spectroscopy. The electronic origin is in the middle of the visible spectrum (21934 cm(-1) = 455.9 nm) and is accompanied by Franck-Condon activity involving the hindered methyl rotor. The frequencies and intensities are fit to a one-dimensional methyl rotor potential, using the calculated form of the ground state potential. The methyl rotor reports sensitively on the local electronic environment and how it changes with electronic excitation, shifting from a preferred ground state orientation with one CH in-plane and anti to the furan oxygen, to an orientation in the excited state in which one CH group is axial to the plane of the furan ring. Ground and excited state alkyl CH stretch infrared spectra are recorded using resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy, offering a complementary view of the methyl group and its response to electronic excitation. Dramatic changes in the CH stretch transitions with electronic state reflect the changing preference for the methyl group orientation. PMID:27456434

  6. An optical-optical double resonance probe of the lowest triplet state of jet-cooled thiophosgene: Rovibronic structures and electronic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takashige; Lim, Edward C.; Judge, Richard H.; Moule, David C.

    2006-03-01

    The vibrational structure, rotational structure, and electronic relaxation of the "dark" T1A23(n,π*) state of jet-cooled thiophosgene have been investigated by two-color S2←T1←S0 optical-optical double resonance (OODR) spectroscopy, which monitors the S2→S0 fluorescence generated by S2←T1 excitation. This method is capable of isolating the T1 vibrational structure into a1, b1, and b2 symmetry blocks. The fluorescence-detected vibrational structure of the Tz spin state of T1 shows that the CS stretching frequency as well as the barrier height for pyramidal deformation are significantly greater in the A23(n,π*) state than in the corresponding A21(n,π*) state. The differing vibrational parameters of the T1 thiophosgene relative to the S1 thiophosgene can be attributed to the motions of unpaired electrons that are better correlated when they are in the excited singlet state than when they are in the triplet state of same electron configuration. A set of T1 structural parameters and the information concerning the T1 spin states have been obtained from least-square fittings of the rotationally resolved T1←S0 excitation spectrum. The nearly degenerate ∣x⟩ and ∣y⟩ spin states are well removed from ∣z⟩ spin component, indicating that T1 thiophosgene is a good example of case (ab) coupling. The decay of the ∣z⟩ spin state of T1 thiophosgene, obtained from time-resolved S2←T1←S0 OODR experiment, is characteristic of strong-coupling intermediate-case decay in which an initial rapid decay is followed by recurrences and/or a long-lived quasiexponential decay.

  7. Spectroscopy of jet-cooled AlMn and trends in the electronic structure of the 3d transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-10-01

    Jet-cooled diatomic AlMn has been spectroscopically investigated and is shown to possess a 5Πi ground state deriving from the Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn (3d54s2,6S) separated atom limit. This implies that the aluminum atom favors a 3pπ approach to the manganese atom, a result that is in agreement with previous studies on the related AlCa and AlZn molecules. The ground state bond length has been measured as 2.6384±0.0010 Å, a value which includes corrections due to spin-uncoupling effects in the X 5Πi state. It is suggested that the 5Πi state emerges as the ground state due to a particularly favorable configuration interaction with a low-lying 5Πi state that derives from the interaction of Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn [3d6(5D)4s1,6D]. Combination of the atoms in this excited state leads to a strong σ2 covalent bond via a 3pσAl-4sσMn interaction, which causes this excited electronic state to drop in energy so that it is expected to lie within a few thousand cm-1 of the ground electronic state. Following a discussion of the spectroscopic results on AlMn, an overall summary of the spectroscopic results on the 3d series of transition metal aluminides is presented, along with predictions of the ground electronic states of the as yet unobserved AlSc, AlTi, and AlFe molecules.

  8. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott

    2002-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (LD). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer orifices and one fuel orifice) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme an Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 9295, can be obtained. MSFC and the U. S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of this concept

  9. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  10. Graft impingement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Shirakura, Kenji; Fu, Freddie H

    2013-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft impingement is one of the most troubling complications in ACL reconstruction. In the previous strategy of isometric "non-anatomical" ACL reconstruction, posterior tibial tunnel placement and notchplasty were recommended to avoid graft impingement. Recently, the strategy of ACL reconstruction is shifting towards "anatomical" reconstruction. In anatomical ACL reconstruction, the potential risk of graft impingement is higher than in non-anatomical reconstruction because the tibial tunnel is placed at a more anterior portion on the tibia. However, there have been few studies reporting on graft impingement in anatomical ACL reconstruction. This study will provide a review of graft impingement status in both non-anatomical and the more recent anatomical ACL reconstruction techniques. In conclusion, with the accurate creation of bone tunnels within ACL native footprint, the graft impingement might not happen in anatomical ACL reconstruction. For the clinical relevance, to prevent graft impingement, surgeons should pay attention of creating correct anatomical tunnels when they perform ACL reconstruction. Level of evidence IV.

  11. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    PubMed

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-01

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  12. Fourier transform spectroscopy of the Swan (d(sup 3)pi(sub g) - a(sup 3)pi(sub u)) system of the jet-cooled C2 molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. V. V.; Bernath, P. F.

    1994-01-01

    The Swan (d(sup 3)pi(sub g) - a(sup 3)pi(sub u)) system of the C2 molecule was produced in a jet-cooled corona excited supersonic expansion of helium using diazoacetonitrile as a percursor molecule. This spectrum was recorded using the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer of the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak. A total of nine bands with v prime = 0 to 3 and v prime prime = 0 to 4 in the range 16,570-22,760/cm were observed and rotationally analyzed. The C2 molecules in this source had a rotational temperature of only 90 K so that only the low-J lines were present in the spectrum. In some sense the low temperatures in the jet source simulate conditions in the interstellar medium. The Swan system of C2 was also produced in a composite wall hollow cathode made Al4C3/Cu, and the rotational structure of the 1-0, 2-1, 3-2, 0-0, and 1-1 bands were analyzed. The data obtained from both these spectra were fitted together along with some recently published line positions. The rotational constants, lambda doubling parameters and the vibrational constants were estimated from this global fit. Our work on jet-cooled C2 follows similar work on the violet and red systems of CN. A summary of this CN work is also presented. also presented.

  13. Exploration of Impinging Water Spray Heat Transfer at System Pressures Near the Triple Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, Shi-Chune

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer of a water spray impinging upon a surface in a very low pressure environment is of interest to cooling of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, and to industrial processes where flash evaporation occurs. At very low pressure, the process occurs near the triple point of water, and there exists a transient multiphase transport problem of ice, water and water vapor. At the impingement location, there are three heat transfer mechanisms: evaporation, freezing and sublimation. A preliminary heat transfer model was developed to explore the interaction of these mechanisms at the surface and within the spray.

  14. Integrated Fuel Injection and Mixing System with Impingement Cooling Face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Adel B. (Inventor); Harvey, Rex J. (Inventor); Tacina, Robert R. (Inventor); Laing, Peter (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An atomizing injector includes a metering set having a swirl chamber, a spray orifice and one or more feed slots etched in a thin plate. The swirl chamber is etched in a first side of the plate and the spray orifice is etched through a second side to the center of the swirl chamber. Fuel feed slots extend non-radially to the swirl chamber. The injector also includes integral swirler structure. The swirler structure includes a cylindrical air swirler passage, also shaped by etching, through at least one other thin plate. The cylindrical air swirler passage is located in co-axial relation to the spray orifice of the plate of the fuel metering set such that fuel directed through the spray orifice passes through the air swirler passage and swirling air is imparted to the fuel such that the fuel has a swirling component of motion. At least one air feed slot is provided in fluid communication with the air swirler passage and extends in non-radial relation thereto. Air supply passages extend through the plates of the metering set and the swirler structure to feed the air feed slot in each plate of the swirler structure.

  15. Measurement and Empirical Correlation of Transpiration-Cooling Parameters on a 25 degree Cone in a Turbulent Boundary Layer in Both Free Flight and a Hot-Gas Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Thomas E., Jr.; Rashis, Bernard

    1961-01-01

    Transpiration-cooling parameters are presented for a turbulent boundary layer on a cone configuration with a total angle of 250 which was tested in both free flight and in an ethylene-heated high-temperature jet at a Mach number of 2.0. The flight-tested cone was flown to a maximum Mach number of 4.08 and the jet tests were conducted at stagnation temperatures ranging from 937 R to 1,850 R. In general, the experimental heat transfer was in good agreement with the theoretical values. Inclusion of the ratio of local stream temperature to wall temperature in the nondimensional flow rate parameter enabled good correlation of both sets of transpiration data. The measured pressure at the forward station coincided with the theoretical pressure over a sharp cone; however, the measured pressure increased with distance from the nose tip.

  16. High Resolution Infrared Spectra of Plasma Jet-Cooled - and Triacetylene in the C-H Stretch Region by CW Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Guss, J.; Walsh, A.; Doney, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2013-06-01

    Polyacetylenes form an important series of unsaturated hydrocarbons that are of astrophysical interest. Small polyacetylenes have been detected from infrared observations in dense atmosphere of Titan and in a protoplanetary nebula CRL 618. We present here high-resolution mid-infrared spectra of diacetylene (HC_{4}H) and triacetylene (HC_{6}H) that are recorded in a supersonically expanded pulsed planar plasma using an ultra-sensitive detection technique. This method uses an all fiber-laser-based optical parametric oscillator (OPO), in combination with continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) as a direct absorption detection tool. A hardware-based multi-trigger concept is developed to apply cw-CRDS to pulsed plasmas. Vibrationally hot but rotationally cold HC_{4}H and HC_{6}H are produced by discharging a C_{2}H_{2}/He/Ar gas mixture which is supersonically expanded into a vacuum chamber through a slit discharge nozzle. Experimental spectra are recorded at a resolution of ˜100 MHz in the 3305-3340 cm^{-1} region, which is characteristic of the C-H stretch vibrations of HC_{4}H and HC_{6}H. Jet-cooling in our experiment reduces the rotational temperature of both HC_{4}H and HC_{6}H to <20 K. In total, ˜2000 lines are measured. More than fourteen (vibrationally hot) bands for HC_{4}H and four bands for HC_{6}H are assigned based on Loomis-Wood diagrams, and nearly half of these bands are analyzed for the first time. For both molecules improved and new molecular constants of a series of vibrational levels are presented. The accurate molecular data reported here, particularly those for low-lying (bending) vibrational levels may be used to interpret the ro-vibrational transitions in the FIR and submillimeter/THz region. D. Zhao, J. Guss, A. Walsh, H. Linnartz Chem. Phys. Lett., {dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cplett.2013.02.025}, in press, 2013.

  17. An experimental and ab initio study of the electronic spectrum of the jet-cooled F{sub 2}BO free radical

    SciTech Connect

    Grimminger, Robert; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Sheridan, Phillip M.

    2014-04-28

    We have studied the B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1}–X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2} laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of the jet-cooled F{sub 2}BO radical for the first time. The transition consists of a strong 0{sub 0}{sup 0} band at 446.5 nm and eight weak sequence bands to shorter wavelengths. Single vibronic level emission spectra obtained by laser excitation of individual levels of the B{sup ~} state exhibit two electronic transitions: a very weak, sparse B{sup ~}–X{sup ~} band system in the 450–500 nm region and a stronger, more extensive set of B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1}–A{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 1} bands in the 580–650 nm region. We have also performed a series of high level ab initio calculations to predict the electronic energies, molecular structures, vibrational frequencies, and rotational and spin-rotation constants in the X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2}, A{sup ~2}B{sub 1} and B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1} electronic states as an aid to the analysis of the experimental data. The theoretical results have been used as input for simulations of the rotationally resolved B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1}–X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2} 0{sub 0}{sup 0} LIF band and Franck-Condon profiles of the LIF and single vibronic level emission spectra. The agreement between the simulations obtained with purely ab initio parameters and the experimental spectra validates the geometries calculated for the ground and excited states and the conclusion that the radical has C{sub 2v} symmetry in the X{sup ~}, A{sup ~}, and B{sup ~} states. The spectra provide considerable new information about the vibrational energy levels of the X{sup ~} and A{sup ~} states, but very little for the B{sup ~} state, due to the very restrictive Franck-Condon factors in the LIF spectra.

  18. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  19. Fluctuating pressures in flow fields of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. C.; Haviland, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    The powered lift configurations under present development for STOL aircraft are the externally blown flap (EBF), involving direct jet impingement on the aircraft flaps, and the upper surface blown (USB), where the jet flow is attached on the upper surface of the wing and directed downwards. Towards the goal of developing scaling laws to predict unsteady loads imposed on the structural components of these STOL aircraft from small model tests, the near field fluctuating pressure behavior for the simplified cases of a round free cold jet and the same jet impinging on a flat plate was investigated. Examples are given of coherences, phase lags (giving convection velocities), and overall fluctuating pressure levels measured. The fluctuating pressure levels measured on the flat plate are compared to surface fluctuating pressure levels measured on full-scale powered-lift configuration models.

  20. Long-term monitoring dataset of fish assemblages impinged at nuclear power plants in northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hungyen; Liao, Yun-Chih; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Jeng-I; Chen, Lee-Sea; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-12-08

    The long-term species diversity patterns in marine fish communities are garnering increasing attention from ecologists and conservation biologists. However, current databases on quantitative abundance information lack consistent long-term time series, which are particularly important in exploring the possible underlying mechanism of community changes and evaluating the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation measures. Here we describe an impinged fish assemblage dataset containing 1, 283, 707 individuals from 439 taxa. Once a month over 19 years (1987-1990 and 2000-2014), we systematically collected the fish killed by impingement upon cooling water intake screens at two nuclear power plants on the northern coast of Taiwan. Because impingement surveys have low sampling errors and can be carried out over many years, they serve as an ideal sampling tool for monitoring how fish diversity and community structure vary over an extended period of time.

  1. Long-term monitoring dataset of fish assemblages impinged at nuclear power plants in northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hungyen; Liao, Yun-Chih; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Jeng-I; Chen, Lee-Sea; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-01-01

    The long-term species diversity patterns in marine fish communities are garnering increasing attention from ecologists and conservation biologists. However, current databases on quantitative abundance information lack consistent long-term time series, which are particularly important in exploring the possible underlying mechanism of community changes and evaluating the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation measures. Here we describe an impinged fish assemblage dataset containing 1, 283, 707 individuals from 439 taxa. Once a month over 19 years (1987-1990 and 2000-2014), we systematically collected the fish killed by impingement upon cooling water intake screens at two nuclear power plants on the northern coast of Taiwan. Because impingement surveys have low sampling errors and can be carried out over many years, they serve as an ideal sampling tool for monitoring how fish diversity and community structure vary over an extended period of time. PMID:26647085

  2. Long-term monitoring dataset of fish assemblages impinged at nuclear power plants in northern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hungyen; Liao, Yun-Chih; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Jeng-I; Chen, Lee-Sea; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-01-01

    The long-term species diversity patterns in marine fish communities are garnering increasing attention from ecologists and conservation biologists. However, current databases on quantitative abundance information lack consistent long-term time series, which are particularly important in exploring the possible underlying mechanism of community changes and evaluating the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation measures. Here we describe an impinged fish assemblage dataset containing 1, 283, 707 individuals from 439 taxa. Once a month over 19 years (1987–1990 and 2000–2014), we systematically collected the fish killed by impingement upon cooling water intake screens at two nuclear power plants on the northern coast of Taiwan. Because impingement surveys have low sampling errors and can be carried out over many years, they serve as an ideal sampling tool for monitoring how fish diversity and community structure vary over an extended period of time. PMID:26647085

  3. Comparative mass spectrometric analyses of Photofrin oligomers by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Siegel, M M; Tabei, K; Tsao, R; Pastel, M J; Pandey, R K; Berkenkamp, S; Hillenkamp, F; de Vries, M S

    1999-06-01

    Photofrin (porfimer sodium) is a porphyrin derivative used in the treatment of a variety of cancers by photodynamic therapy. This oligomer complex and a variety of porphyrin monomers, dimers and trimers were analyzed with five different mass spectral ionization techniques: fast atom bombardment, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electrospray ionization, and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization. All five approaches resulted in very similar oligomer distributions with an average oligomer length of 2.7 +/- 0.1 porphyrin units. In addition to the Photofrin analysis, this study provides a side-by-side comparison of the spectra for the five different mass spectrometric techniques.

  4. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of Automatic Transmission Fluid Jets with Implications for Electric Machine Thermal Management: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, Kevin; Moreno, Gilberto

    2015-09-29

    Thermal management for electric machines (motors/ generators) is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. Cooling of the electric machine(s) in some electric vehicle traction drive applications is accomplished by impinging automatic transmission fluid (ATF) jets onto the machine's copper windings. In this study, we provide the results of experiments characterizing the thermal performance of ATF jets on surfaces representative of windings, using Ford's Mercon LV ATF. Experiments were carried out at various ATF temperatures and jet velocities to quantify the influence of these parameters on heat transfer coefficients. Fluid temperatures were varied from 50 degrees C to 90 degrees C to encompass potential operating temperatures within an automotive transaxle environment. The jet nozzle velocities were varied from 0.5 to 10 m/s. The experimental ATF heat transfer coefficient results provided in this report are a useful resource for understanding factors that influence the performance of ATF-based cooling systems for electric machines.

  5. Reducing Coal Dust With Water Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, M. D.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Jets also cool and clean cutting equipment. Modular pick-and-bucket miner suffers from disadvantage: Creates large quantities of potentially explosive coal dust. Dust clogs drive chain and other parts and must be removed by hand. Picks and bucket lips become overheated by friction and be resharpened or replaced frequently. Addition of oscillating and rotating water jets to pick-and-bucket machine keeps down dust, cools cutting edges, and flushes machine. Rotating jets wash dust away from drive chain. Oscillating jets cool cutting surfaces. Both types of jet wet airborne coal dust; it precipitates.

  6. Experimental investigation on the composite cooling of a semicylinder leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ji-Rui; Ji, Hong-Hu

    Composite cooling of the leading edge region of a semicylinder simulating a turbine vane was studied experimentally. The cylinder's inner surface served as an impingement target for studying impingement cooling; the outer surface was used to study the film cooling effectiveness. The equipment for composite cooling was a sucked-wind tunnel with the test section of 140 x 200-sq m in cross section and with transparent windows for flow visualization. Three test models and five different impingement tubes were used. The effects of geometrical parameters of the test models and impingement tubes and of the location and direction of the film holes on both the impingement and the film cooling are described.

  7. Treatments for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Goost, Hans; Lin, Xiang-Bo; Burger, Christof; Paul, Christian; Wang, Zeng-Li; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Welle, Kristian; Kabir, Koroush

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant–Murley score (CMS). Direct comparisons were performed using the conventional pair-wise meta-analysis method, while a network meta-analysis based on the Bayesian model was used to calculate the results of all potentially possible comparisons and rank probabilities. Included in the meta-analysis procedure were 33 randomized controlled trials involving 2300 patients. Good agreement was demonstrated between the results of the pair-wise meta-analyses and the network meta-analyses. Regarding nonoperative treatments, with respect to the pain score, combined treatments composed of exercise and other therapies tended to yield better effects than single-intervention therapies. Localized drug injections that were combined with exercise showed better treatment effects than any other treatments, whereas worse effects were observed when such injections were used alone. Regarding the CMS, most combined treatments based on exercise also demonstrated better effects than exercise alone. Regarding surgical treatments, according to the pain score and the CMS, arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) together with treatments derived from it, such as ASD combined with radiofrequency and arthroscopic bursectomy, showed better effects than open subacromial decompression (OSD) and OSD combined with the injection of platelet-leukocyte gel. Exercise therapy also demonstrated good performance. Results for inconsistency, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression all supported the robustness and reliability of these network meta-analyses. Exercise and other exercise-based therapies, such as kinesio taping

  8. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident-shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  9. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  10. Simulation of deep-seated zonal jets and shallow vortices in gas giant atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Jupiter's banded cloud layer hosts spots of various sizes. The bands are defined by eastward and westward jet streams and the spots correspond to vortices, predominantly anticyclones, which rotate in the opposite direction of Earth's cyclonic storms. Despite 350 years of observation, the origin and dynamics of jets and vortices in the atmospheres of giant planets remain debated. Simulations of the shallow weather layer produce both features, but only reproduce observed prograde equatorial flow on Jupiter and Saturn under special conditions. In contrast, deep convection models reproduce equatorial superrotation, but lack coherent vortices. Here we combine both approaches in a three-dimensional simulation where deep convection grades into a stably stratified shallow layer. We find that steady zonal jets are driven by deep convective flows, whereas anticyclonic vortices form where upwelling plumes impinge on the shallow layer. The simulated vortex circulation consists of cool anticyclones shielded by warm downwelling cyclonic rings and filaments, in agreement with observations and theory. We find that the largest vortices form in westward anticyclonic shear flow nearest to the equatorial jet, similar to Saturn's so-called storm alley and Jupiter's Great Red Spot. We conclude that vortices have a deep origin in gas giant atmospheres.

  11. Jet Cooled Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of FCH2CH2O and Other Photo-Fragments of XCH2CH2ONO (X=F, Cl, Br, Oh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Chen, Ming-Wei; Miller, Terry A.

    2011-06-01

    HOCH2CH2O is one of the prototypical hydroxyalkoxy intermediates formed in the OH mediated oxidation of olefins in the atmosphere. Specifically, HOCH2CH2O is produced from NO assisted reduction of HOCH2CH2OO which in turn is formed by the OH mediated oxidation of ethene in the atmosphere. Halogen substituted ethoxy can be a model to study the hydroxy substituted ethoxy. Our group has successfully studied different primary, secondary and unsaturated alkoxy radicals using Laser Induced Fluorescence technique (LIF) coupled with supersonic free jet expansion in the past. In this talk we will present the jet cooled LIF spectrum of FCH2CH2O. FCH2CH2O was produced in the jet by 351nm photodissociation of FCH2CH2ONO. Aided by ab inito calculations and past experiments, we were able to assign our spectrum to different conformers of FCH2CH2O based on the G(±120°) and T(O°) orientations of the OCCF dihedral angle. Besides FCH2CH2O, we also found transitions belonging to HCHO and CH2CHO from FCH2CH2ONO photodissociation. HCHO and CH2CHO were also found in Cl, Br and OH substituted precursors.

  12. Jet-cooled spectroscopy of the α-methylbenzyl radical: probing the state-dependent effects of methyl rocking against a radical site.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Nathanael M; Reilly, Neil J; Nebgen, Ben; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N; Hoehn, Ross D; Kokkin, Damian L; McCarthy, Michael C; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Zwier, Timothy S

    2013-12-19

    The state-dependent spectroscopy of α-methylbenzyl radical (α-MeBz) has been studied under jet-cooled conditions. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI), laser-induced fluorescence, and dispersed fluorescence spectra were obtained for the D0-D1 electronic transition of this prototypical resonance-stabilized radical in which the methyl group is immediately adjacent to the primary radical site. Extensive Franck-Condon activity in hindered rotor levels was observed in the excitation spectrum, reflecting a reorientation of the methyl group upon electronic excitation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from the set of internal rotor levels are combined with the excitation spectrum to obtain a global fit of the barrier heights and angular change of the methyl group in both D0 and D1 states. The best-fit methyl rotor potential in the ground electronic state (D0) is a flat-topped 3-fold potential (V3" = 151 cm(-1), V6" = 34 cm(-1)) while the D1 state has a lower barrier (V3' = 72 cm(-1), V6' = 15 cm(-1)) with Δφ = ± π/3, π, consistent with a reorientation of the methyl group upon electronic excitation. The ground state results are compared with calculations carried out at the DFT B3LYP level of theory using the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set, and a variety of excited state calculations are carried out to compare against experiment. The preferred geometry of the methyl rotor in the ground state is anti, which switches to syn in the D1 state and in the cation. The calculations uncover a subtle combination of effects that contribute to the shift in orientation and change in barrier in the excited state relative to ground state. Steric interaction favors the anti conformation, while hyperconjugation is greater in the syn orientation. The presence of a second excited state close by D1 is postulated to influence the methyl rotor properties. A resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectrum in the alkyl and aromatic CH stretch regions was also recorded, probing in a

  13. Droplet impinging behavior on surfaces: Part II - Water on aluminium and cast iron surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangavi, S.; Balaji, S.; Mithran, N.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Droplet cooling of metal surfaces is an important area of research in industrial applications such as material quenching, nozzle spraying, etc. Fluids (water) act as an excellent agent in heat transfer to remove excess heat in various processes by convection and conduction. Such cooling process varies the material properties. The bubbles formed during droplet impinging on the surface act as heat sink and causes variation of height and spreading radius of the droplet with increase in temperature. In the present work, an experimental study of the droplet impinging behavior on Aluminium and Cast iron surfaces is reported. The water droplets are made to fall on the surface of the specimens from a specific height, which also influences the spreading radius. The effect of temperature on droplet height and droplet spreading radius is detailed.

  14. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge

  15. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Hooks, Todd R; Wilk, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities. An effective nonoperative treatment for impingement syndrome is aimed at addressing the underlying causative factor or factors that are identified after a complete and thorough evaluation. The clinician devises an effective rehabilitation program to regain full glenohumeral range of motion, reestablish dynamic rotator cuff stability, and implement a progression of resistive exercises to fully restore strength and local muscular endurance in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. The clinician can introduce stresses and forces via sport-specific drills and functional activities to allow a return to activity. PMID:24648778

  16. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials [preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S-W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  17. Periodic steamwise variations of heat transfer coefficients for incline and staggered arrays of circular jets with crossflow of spent air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Berry, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Heat transfer characteristics were measured for inline and staggered arrays of circular jets impinging on a surface parallel to the jet orifice plate. The impinging flow was constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet plate and the heat transfer surface. In this configuration the air discharged from upstream transverse rows of jet holes imposes a crossflow of increasing magnitude on the succeeding downstream jet rows. Streamwise heat transfer coefficient profiles were determined for a streamwise resolution of one-third the streamwise hole spacing, utilizing a specially constructed test surface.

  18. Viscous flowfields induced by three-dimensional lift jets in ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulent flowfields associated with single and multiple jets impinging on a ground plane are relevant to the aerodynamics of VTOL aircraft in ground effect. These flowfields are computed using the Reynolds equations and a two-equation turbulence model to describe an isolated jet and two interacting jets with fountain formation. Coordinate transformations are employed to apply the boundary conditions for the governing equations in the far field, and a third-order-accurate upwind-difference scheme is used to discretize the resulting system. Flowfield properties calculated for these impinging-jet configurations are presented and compared with experimental data.

  19. Characterization of jet-contaminant interaction flow in chemical decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. M.

    1984-09-01

    A numerical simulation and study are presented for characterization of the flow interaction of a water jet with a chemical contaminant droplet on a plane wall, which occurs in chemical decontamination processes. Two models are developed for this analysis, namely, one-fluid flow and two-fluid flow, both governed by the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Emphases of the study are on the evolution of the contaminant droplet and the effects of various flow parameters. Computer plots of the movement of the droplet are present. Computed results show that a jet impingement at 45-60 degrees from the contaminated wall can perform in the most effective and most efficient way in displacing the contaminant. The results also show that an increase in the jet velocity or the cross-sectional area of the jet can greatly improve the cleaning power. However, for a given jet flow rate, it is more advantageous to adopt a jet spray composed of a number of small high-speed jets than one consisting of a single large low-speed jet. The jet-contaminant interactions taking place in confined geometries, such as cavities and corners of two perpendicular walls, are also examined. We have found that an inclined jet is more effective than a normal jet for decontaminating such geometries. In all of the flow cases studied, the impact pressure on the impingement wall far exceeds the steady-state stagnation pressure of the jet.

  20. Particle-Molecule Collection by Sonic Flow Impingers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Melbourne L.

    1974-01-01

    The theoretical basis of the sonic-flow impinger is discussed. Details are given for the design, prediction of performance, preliminary evaluation for particle collection, and field use of a sonic-flow impinger train. (DT)

  1. Subacromial impingement syndrome secondary to scapulothoracic dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae-Ho; Han, Seung-Hwan; Hyun, Hwan-Sub; Lee, Doo-Hyung

    2012-10-01

    The authors describe two cases of subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder secondary to scapular dyskinesia caused by a tumor in young adults. The two tumors, an osteochondroma and a ganglion, were located in the scapulothoracic joint and inhibited normal kinesis of the scapula during arm motion. PMID:22127513

  2. Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities: ● Swim ● Throw ● Play tennis ● Lift weights ● Play golf ● Play volleyball ● Do gymnastics ● Paint ● Stock shelves SHOULDER ... impingement, your healthcare provider will examine you to learn what movements elicit symptoms. As part of the ...

  3. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    .org Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis Page ( 1 ) One of the most common physical complaints is shoulder pain. Your shoulder is made up of several ... is vulnerable to many different problems. The rotator cuff is a frequent source of pain in the ...

  4. The arthroscopic treatment of subacromial impingement.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, F X; Nicholas, J A; Rubinstein, M P

    1987-07-01

    In order to effectively employ arthroscopic techniques for a subacromial decompression, a thorough understanding of the impingement syndrome and its clinical manifestations is necessary. The authors' preliminary experience with the arthroscopic subacromial decompression suggests excellent results with early return to competitive athletics.

  5. Femoroacetabular impingement: biomechanical and dynamic considerations.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oca, C; Maluta, T; Micheloni, G M; Romeo, T; Zambito, A; Malagò, R; Magnam, B

    2014-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (F.A.I.) is a pathologic process caused by an abnormal shape of the acetabulum, of the femoral head, or both. F.A.I., often referred to as idiopathic, may be secondary to slipped capital femoral epiphysis, congenital hypoplasia of the femur, Legg-Calvé Perthes disease, post-traumatic mal-union and protrusio acetabuli. From 2009 to 2012 we studied 21 patients (14 males), with a mean age of 52 (33 y - 75 y), affected by idiopathic F.A.I. Every patient underwent pelvic and hip joint X-rays and CT scan with 3D reconstructions, in order to evaluate the morphology of the pelvis and the hip joint and the torsion of the lower limbs (Femoroacetabular ante-retroversion). Our results show an average femoral ante-version angle of 12,4° (15°-20° physiological range) in patients affected by CAM impingement and an average acetabular ante-version angle of 13,5° (15°-20° physiological range) for those with PINCER impingement. These values, in patients affected by F.A.I., are probably related to morphologic and biomechanical features that may lead to the onset of idiopathic femoroacetabular impingement. In the literature, other studies partially support our findings, suggesting a more critical approach to a patient with idiopathic F.A.I. extending evaluations to nearby articulations. PMID:25409718

  6. Experimental Investigation of Water Droplet Impingement on Airfoils, Finite Wings, and an S-duct Engine Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, Michael; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Yeong, Hsiung Wei; Bidwell, Colin S.; Breer, Martin D.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2002-01-01

    Validation of trajectory computer codes, for icing analysis, requires experimental water droplet impingement data for a wide range of aircraft geometries as well as flow and icing conditions. This report presents improved experimental and data reduction methods for obtaining water droplet impingement data and provides a comprehensive water droplet impingement database for a range of test geometries including an MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a GLC-305 airfoil, an NACA 65(sub 2)-415 airfoil, a commercial transport tail section, a 36-inch chord natural laminar flow NLF(1)-0414 airfoil, a 48-inch NLF(1)-0414 section with a 25 percent chord simple flap, a state-of-the-art three-element high lift system, a NACA 64A008 finite span swept business jet tail, a full-scale business jet horizontal tail section, a 25 percent-scale business jet empennage, and an S-duct turboprop engine inlet. The experimental results were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for spray clouds with median volumetric diameter (MVD) of 11, 11.5, 21, 92, and 94 microns and for a range of angles of attack. The majority of the impingement experiments were conducted at an air speed of 175 mph corresponding to a Reynolds number of approximately 1.6 million per foot. The maximum difference of repeated tests from the average ranged from 0.24 to 12 percent for most of the experimental results presented. This represents a significant improvement in test repeatability compared to previous experimental studies. The increase in test repeatability was attributed to improvements made to the experimental and data reduction methods. Computations performed with the LEWICE-2D and LEWICE-3D computer codes for all test configurations are presented in this report. For the test cases involving median volumetric diameters of 11 and 21 microns, the correlation between the analytical and experimental impingement efficiency distributions was good. For the median volumetric diameters of 92 and 94-micron cases, however

  7. Visualization of high speed liquid jet impaction on a moving surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Two apparatuses for examining liquid jet impingement on a high-speed moving surface are described: an air cannon device (for examining surface speeds between 0 and 25 m/sec) and a spinning disk device (for examining surface speeds between 15 and 100 m/sec). The air cannon linear traverse is a pneumatic energy-powered system that is designed to accelerate a metal rail surface mounted on top of a wooden projectile. A pressurized cylinder fitted with a solenoid valve rapidly releases pressurized air into the barrel, forcing the projectile down the cannon barrel. The projectile travels beneath a spray nozzle, which impinges a liquid jet onto its metal upper surface, and the projectile then hits a stopping mechanism. A camera records the jet impingement, and a pressure transducer records the spray nozzle backpressure. The spinning disk set-up consists of a steel disk that reaches speeds of 500 to 3,000 rpm via a variable frequency drive (VFD) motor. A spray system similar to that of the air cannon generates a liquid jet that impinges onto the spinning disc, and cameras placed at several optical access points record the jet impingement. Video recordings of jet impingement processes are recorded and examined to determine whether the outcome of impingement is splash, splatter, or deposition. The apparatuses are the first that involve the high speed impingement of low-Reynolds-number liquid jets on high speed moving surfaces. In addition to its rail industry applications, the described technique may be used for technical and industrial purposes such as steelmaking and may be relevant to high-speed 3D printing. PMID:25938331

  8. Visualization of high speed liquid jet impaction on a moving surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Two apparatuses for examining liquid jet impingement on a high-speed moving surface are described: an air cannon device (for examining surface speeds between 0 and 25 m/sec) and a spinning disk device (for examining surface speeds between 15 and 100 m/sec). The air cannon linear traverse is a pneumatic energy-powered system that is designed to accelerate a metal rail surface mounted on top of a wooden projectile. A pressurized cylinder fitted with a solenoid valve rapidly releases pressurized air into the barrel, forcing the projectile down the cannon barrel. The projectile travels beneath a spray nozzle, which impinges a liquid jet onto its metal upper surface, and the projectile then hits a stopping mechanism. A camera records the jet impingement, and a pressure transducer records the spray nozzle backpressure. The spinning disk set-up consists of a steel disk that reaches speeds of 500 to 3,000 rpm via a variable frequency drive (VFD) motor. A spray system similar to that of the air cannon generates a liquid jet that impinges onto the spinning disc, and cameras placed at several optical access points record the jet impingement. Video recordings of jet impingement processes are recorded and examined to determine whether the outcome of impingement is splash, splatter, or deposition. The apparatuses are the first that involve the high speed impingement of low-Reynolds-number liquid jets on high speed moving surfaces. In addition to its rail industry applications, the described technique may be used for technical and industrial purposes such as steelmaking and may be relevant to high-speed 3D printing.

  9. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  10. Experimental Droplet Impingement on Four Bodies of Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James P.; Ruggeri, Robert S.

    1957-01-01

    The rate and. area of cloud droplet impingement on four bodies of revolution were obtained experimentally in the NACA Lewis icing tunnel with a dye-tracer technique. The study included spheres, ellipsoidal forebodies of fineness ratios of 2.5 and 3.0, and a conical forebody of 300 included angle and covered a range of angles of attack from 0? to 60 and rotational speeds up to 1200 rpm. The data were obtained at an airspeed of 157 knots and are correlated by dimensionless impingement parameters. In general, the experimental data show that the local and total impingement rates and impingement limits of bodies of revolution are primarily functions of the modified inertia parameters, the body shape, and fineness ratio. Both the local impingement rate and impingement limits depend upon the angle of attack. Rotation of the bodies had a negligible effect on the impingement characteristics except for an averaging effect at angle of attack. For comparable diameters the bluffer bodies had the largest total impingement efficiency, but the finer and sharper bodies had the largest values of maximum local impingement efficiency and, in most cases, the largest limits of impingement. In most cases, the impingement characteristics were less than those calculated from theoretical trajectories; in general, however, fairly good agreement was obtained between the experimental and theoretical impingement characteristics.

  11. High-resolution room temperature and jet-cooled spectroscopic investigation of 15NH3 in the ν1+ν3 band region (1.51 μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földes, T.; Vanfleteren, T.; Rizopoulos, A.; Herman, M.; Vander Auwera, J.; Softley, T. P.; Di Lonardo, G.; Fusina, L.

    2016-08-01

    Spectra of 99% isotopically pure 15NH3 were recorded using cavity ring-down (CRD, 6567-6639 cm-1) and Fourier transform (FT, 6350-6985 cm-1) spectroscopy under jet cooled and room temperature conditions, respectively. Measured line positions on both data sets improve on literature values, in particular by one order of magnitude for the ν1+ν3 band. A room temperature list of line positions, with approximate line intensities, is provided, much more complete and precise than presently available. Line broadening effects in the CRD spectrum allowed lines with J‧‧‧- values between 0 and 3 to be identified. Ground state combination differences were used to refine the assignments, further assisted by intensity ratios between the two data sets. Reliable values for J, K and inversion symmetry of the ground state vibrational levels, as well as further information on a/s doublets could be obtained, updating and extending literature assignments.

  12. Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy of the ν3 band of the jet-cooled Fe(CO)2 radical produced by ultraviolet photolysis of Fe(CO)5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Yasuhisa; Sakaguchi, Kouichi; Hikida, Toshihide; Tanaka, Takehiko

    1999-09-01

    The infrared spectrum of the iron dicarbonyl radical Fe(CO)2 produced in a supersonic jet expansion by the excimer laser photolysis of iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO)5 was observed by time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy. About 170 transitions, each split into one or two fine structure components, were assigned to the ν3 (CO antisymmetric stretch) band of Fe(CO)2. The assignment was greatly facilitated by spectral simplification caused by rotational as well as vibrational cooling in the supersonic jet. It was observed that lines are missing at alternate J quantum numbers in each spin component, which confirmed that Fe(CO)2 is a linear molecule with D∞h symmetry and that the electronic ground state is of 3Σg- symmetry. The rotational and centrifugal distortion constants in the ground state were determined to be B0=1414.675(46) MHz and D0=0.3077(74) kHz, respectively. The spin-spin interaction constants obtained, λ0=655.3(42) GHz, is comparable with that of the FeCO radical, λ0=684.470(51) GHz. The ν3 band origin was determined to be 1928.184335 (82) cm-1. The figures in parentheses are uncertainties (1σ) in units of the last digit.

  13. Droplet impact dynamics for two liquids impinging on anisotropic superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John T.; Maynes, Daniel; Webb, Brent W.

    2012-09-01

    Droplet impingement experiments were performed on grooved hydrophobic surfaces with cavity fractions of 0, 80, and 93 % using droplets of water and a 50 %/50 % water/glycerol mixture. The influence of liquid viscosity, cavity fraction, and spreading direction, relative to the surface grooves, is explored qualitatively and quantitatively. The maximum droplet spread diameter, velocity of the rebounding jet, and the time delay between droplet impact and jet emission were characterized for Weber numbers, We, based on droplet impact speed and diameter, up to 500. The unequal shear stresses and contact angles influence the maximum spread diameters in the two primary spread directions. At We > 100, the ratio of the spread diameter along the direction of the grooves to the spread diameter perpendicular to the grooves increases above unity with increasing We. The maximum droplet spread diameter is compared to recent predictive models, and the data reveal differing behavior for the two fluids considered. The results also reveal the existence of very high relative jet velocities in the range 5 ≤ We ≤ 15 for water droplets, while such jets were not observed for the more viscous mixture. Further, in the range 115 ≤ We ≤ 265, the water/glycerol jet formation dynamics are radically different from the water behavior. Most evident is the existence of two-pronged jets, which arise from the anisotropy of the surface and the unequal shear stresses and contact angles that prevail on the surfaces. It is these influences that give rise to differences in the maximum spread diameters in the two primary spread directions. Similar two-pronged jet emission was observed for water over the very narrow range of We from 91 to 96. The issuing jet velocities were also observed to increase with increasing cavity fraction for both fluids and over the entire range of We explored. Lastly, the elapsed time between droplet impact and jet emission decreased with increasing cavity fraction.

  14. Shoulder muscle imbalance and subacromial impingement syndrome in overhead athletes.

    PubMed

    Page, Phil

    2011-03-01

    Subacromial impingement is a frequent and painful condition among athletes, particularly those involved in overhead sports such as baseball and swimming. There are generally two types of subacromial impingement: structural and functional. While structural impingement is caused by a physical loss of area in the subacromial space due to bony growth or inflammation, functional impingement is a relative loss of subacromial space secondary to altered scapulohumeral mechanics resulting from glenohumeral instability and muscle imbalance. The purpose of this review is to describe the role of muscle imbalance in subacromial impingement in order to guide sports physical therapy evaluation and interventions.

  15. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  16. Experimental flow coefficients of a full-coverage film-cooled-vane chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.; Hippensteele, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient- and elevated-temperature flow tests were performed on a four-times-actual-size model of an impingement- and film-cooled segment of a core engine turbine vane. Tests were conducted with the impingement and film cooling plates combined to form a chamber and also with each of the individual separated plates. For the combined tests, the proximity of the film cooling plate affected the flow of coolant through the impingement plate, but not conversely. Impingement flow is presented in terms of a discharge coefficient, and the film cooling flow discharging into still air with no main stream gas flow is presented in terms of a total pressure-loss coefficient. The effects of main stream gas flow on discharge from the film cooling holes are evaluated as a function of coolant to main-stream gas momentum flux ratio. A smoothing technique is developed that identifies and helps reduce flow measurement data scatter.

  17. Jet-cooled laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of NiC: Observation of low-lying Ω = 0+ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, Sheo; Yarlagadda, Suresh; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Nakhate, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of 58Ni12C molecules, produced in a free-jet apparatus, have been studied. A new low-lying Ω = 0+ state has been observed at Te = 5178 (6) cm-1. Based on previous ab initio calculations this state is plausibly assigned as 0+ spin-orbit component of the first excited Π state. The term energies of vibrational levels up to v = 10 for X1Σ+ ground and v = 3 for Ω = 0+ states have been determined. The harmonic and anharmonic wavenumbers respectively equal to 833 (4) and 6.7 (13) cm-1 for Ω = 0+ state have been measured.

  18. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    referenced to the rotor surface speed for radial injection cooling. The mass flow rates for the radial injection were 0.032, 0.0432, 0.054 and 0.068 Kg/min, which result in average injection speed of 150, 200, 250 and 300% of rotor surface speed. Several thermocouples were attached at various circumferential directions of the bearing sleeve, two plenums, bearing holder and ball bearing housings to collect the temperature data of the bearing at 30krpm under 10lb of load. Both axial cooling and radial injection are effective cooling mechanism and effectiveness of both cooling methods is directly proportional to the total mass flow rates. However, axial cooling is slightly more efficient in controlling the average temperature of the bearing sleeve, but results in higher thermal gradient of the shaft along the axial direction and also higher thermal gradient of the bearing sleeve along the circumferential direction compared to the radial injection cooling. The smaller thermal gradient of the radial injection cooling is due to the direct cooling effect of the shaft by impinging jets. While the axial cooling has an effect on only the bearing, the radial injection has a cooling effect on both the bearing sleeve and shaft. It is considered the radial injection cooling needs to be further optimized in terms of number of injection holes and their locations.

  19. Femoroacetabular impingement and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Charlie; Li, Linda; Forster, Bruce B.; Kopec, Jacek A.; Ratzlaff, Charles; Halai, Lalji; Cibere, Jolanda; Esdaile, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To outline the clinical presentation, physical examination findings, diagnostic criteria, and management options of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of FAI. Main message In recent years, FAI has been increasingly recognized as a potential precursor and an important contributor to hip pain in the adult population and idiopathic hip osteoarthritis later in life. Femoroacetabular impingement is a collection of bony morphologic abnormalities of the hip joint that result in abnormal contact during motion. Cam-type FAI relates to a non-spherical osseous prominence of the proximal femoral neck or head-neck junction. Pincer-type FAI relates to excessive acetabular coverage over the femoral head, which can occur owing to several morphologic variants. Patients with FAI present with chronic, deep, or aching anterior groin pain most commonly in the sitting position, or during or after activity. Patients might also experience occasional sharp pains during activity. A thorough history should be taken that includes incidence of trauma and exercise frequency. A physical examination should be performed that includes a full hip, low back, and abdominal examination to assess for alternate causes of anterior groin pain. Diagnosis of FAI should be confirmed with radiography. Femoroacetabular impingement can be managed conservatively with rest, modification of activities, medications, and physiotherapy, or it can be treated surgically. Conclusion Femoroacetabular impingement is an important cause of anterior groin pain. Early recognition and intervention by the primary care provider might be critical to alleviating morbidity and preventing FAI progression. PMID:26668284

  20. Simultaneous droplet impingement dynamics and heat transfer on nano-structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jian; Graber, Christof; Liburdy, James; Pence, Deborah; Narayanan, Vinod

    2010-05-15

    This study examines the hydrodynamics and temperature characteristics of distilled deionized water droplets impinging on smooth and nano-structured surfaces using high speed (HS) and infrared (IR) imaging at We = 23.6 and Re = 1593, both based on initial drop impingement parameters. Results for a smooth and nano-structured surface for a range of surface temperatures are compared. Droplet impact velocity, transient spreading diameter and dynamic contact angle are measured. The near surface average droplet fluid temperatures are evaluated for conditions of evaporative cooling and boiling. Also included are surface temperature results using a gold layered IR opaque surface on silicon. Four stages of the impingement process are identified: impact, boiling, near constant surface diameter evaporation, and final dry-out. For the boiling conditions there is initial nucleation followed by severe boiling, then near constant diameter evaporation resulting in shrinking of the droplet height. When a critical contact angle is reached during evaporation the droplet rapidly retracts to a smaller diameter reducing the contact area with the surface. This continues as a sequence of retractions until final dry out. The basic trends are the same for all surfaces, but the nano-structured surface has a lower dissipated energy during impact and enhances the heat transfer for evaporative cooling with a 20% shorter time to achieve final dry out. (author)

  1. Radiative property degradation of water impinging on thermally-controlled surfaces under space conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, D.; Spiller, M. H.; Maples, G.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of an investigation aimed at determining experimentally the directional monochromatic reflectance changes caused under high-vacuum space conditions by a water spray impinging on thermally controlled surfaces consisting of three paint specimens (Z93, S13G, and 92-007) and an aluminum foil. The first two paints and the aluminum foil suffered considerable physical damage, but only small changes resulted in the reflectance of the paints while the reflectance of the aluminum foil decreased with increase in exposure time to the water jet. Only the 92-007 Dow Corning paint retained the same physical and reflective characteristics.

  2. Plume shape optimization of small attitude control thrusters with respect to impingement and thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, K. W.

    1988-08-01

    A comparative description of plumes emanating from different nozzles, similar to those of typical small hydrazine thrusters, is presented. The objective is to point out the effect of nozzle design on free jet expansion. The investigation shows an optimum nozzle wall angle exists which causes the minimal spreading plume. With increasing nozzle size and stagnation pressure the plume spreads wider. In this case the optimum nozzle wall angle is clearly marked concerning the thrust efficiency and minimization of impingement effects, the use of smaller thrusters with large wall angles is favorable.

  3. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  4. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  5. Spray Cooling Processes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John P.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2004-01-01

    The present paper reports ongoing work to develop numerical and modeling tools used to design efficient and effective spray cooling processes and to determine characteristic non-dimensional parametric dependence for practical fluids and conditions. In particular, we present data that will delineate conditions towards control of the impingement dynamics of droplets upon a heated substrate germane to practical situations.

  6. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-02-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to gain an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in material removal by fluidjet machining processes. Experiments were performed to determine conditions under which the liquid jet impacting a solid material will cause material removal and also to delineate possible physical mechanisms of mass removal at optimum jet-cutting conditions. We have also carried out numerical simulations of jet-induced surface pressure rises and of the material deformation and spallation behavior due to multiple droplet impacts. Results obtained from the experiments and theoretical calculations and their physical implications are also discussed.

  7. Low extreme-ultraviolet luminosities impinging on protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Hendler, N. P.; Ricci, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Brooks, K. J.; Contreras, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The amount of high-energy stellar radiation reaching the surface of protoplanetary disks is essential to determine their chemistry and physical evolution. Here, we use millimetric and centimetric radio data to constrain the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity impinging on 14 disks around young (∼2-10 Myr) sun-like stars. For each object we identify the long-wavelength emission in excess to the dust thermal emission, attribute that to free-free disk emission, and thereby compute an upper limit to the EUV reaching the disk. We find upper limits lower than 10{sup 42} photons s{sup –1} for all sources without jets and lower than 5 × 10{sup 40} photons s{sup –1} for the three older sources in our sample. These latter values are low for EUV-driven photoevaporation alone to clear out protoplanetary material in the timescale inferred by observations. In addition, our EUV upper limits are too low to reproduce the [Ne II] 12.81 μm luminosities from three disks with slow [Ne II]-detected winds. This indicates that the [Ne II] line in these sources primarily traces a mostly neutral wind where Ne is ionized by 1 keV X-ray photons, implying higher photoevaporative mass loss rates than those predicted by EUV-driven models alone. In summary, our results suggest that high-energy stellar photons other than EUV may dominate the dispersal of protoplanetary disks around sun-like stars.

  8. Comparison of jet Mach number decay data with a correlation and jet spreading contours for a large variety of nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D. E.; Huff, R. G.; Vonglahn, U. H.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale circular, noncircular, single- and multi-element nozzles with flow areas as large as 122 sq cm were tested with cold airflow at exit Mach numbers from 0.28 to 1.15. The effects of multi-element nozzle shape and element spacing on jet Mach number decay were studied in an effort to reduce the noise caused by jet impingement on externally blown flap (EBF) STOL aircraft. The jet Mach number decay data are well represented by empirical relations. Jet spreading and Mach number decay contours are presented for all configurations tested.

  9. Ankle impingement syndromes: a review of etiology and related implications.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2011-10-01

    Ankle injuries are common occurrences in athletics involving and requiring extreme ranges of motion. Ankle sprains specifically occur with a 1 in 10,000 person rate in active individuals each day. If trauma is repetitive, the ankle structures have potential to experience secondary injury and dysfunction. Included in this category of dysfunction are both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes where disruption of the bony structures, joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons typically occurs. Ankle impingement is described as ankle pain that occurs during athletic activity, with recurrent, extreme dorsiflexion or plantar flexion with the joint under a load. Ankle impingements can be classified according to what structures become involved both anteriorly and posteriorly. Osseous impingement, soft tissue impingement, impingement of the distal fascicle of anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and meniscoid lesions are all documented causes of ankle impingement. These changes tend to be brought about and exacerbated by extreme ranges of motion. Understanding various impingement types will better enable the clinician to prevent, identify, treat, and rehabilitate affected ankles. Acknowledging activities that predispose to ankle impingement syndrome will enhance prevention and recovery processes. Description of ankle impingement etiology and pathology is the objective of the current review.

  10. Study of lubricant jet flow phenomena in spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.; Mross, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Lubricant jet flow impingement and penetration depth into a gear tooth space were measured at 4920 and 2560 rpm using a 8.89 cm (3.5 inch) pitch diameter 8 pitch spur gear at oil pressures from 70,000 to 410,000 n/sqm (10 psi to 60 psi). A high speed motion picture camera was used with xenon and high speed stroboscopic lights to slow down and stop the motion of the oil jet. An analytical model was developed for the vectorial impingement dept and for the impingement depth with tooth space windage effects included. The windage effects for oil drop size greater than .0076 cm (.003 inches). The analytical impingement dept compared favorably with experimental results above an oil jet pressure of 70,000 n/sqm (10psi). There was further penetration into the tooth space after impingement, but much of this oil was thrown out of the tooth space without further contacting the gear teeth.

  11. Analysis of Plume Impingement Effects from Orion Crew Service Module Dual Reaction Control System Engine Firings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisbell, A.; Marichalar, J.; Lumpkin, F.; LeBeau, G.

    2011-05-01

    Plume impingement effects on the Orion Crew Service Module (CSM) were analyzed for various dual Reaction Control System (RCS) engine firings and various configurations of the solar arrays. The study was performed using a decoupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach. This approach included a single jet plume solution for the R1E RCS engine computed with the General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) CFD code. The CFD solution was used to create an inflow surface for the DSMC solution based on the Bird continuum breakdown parameter. The DSMC solution was then used to model the dual RCS plume impingement effects on the entire CSM geometry with deployed solar arrays. However, because the continuum breakdown parameter of 0.05 could not be achieved due to geometrical constraints and because high resolution in the plume shock interaction region is desired, a focused DSMC simulation modeling only the plumes and the shock interaction region was performed. This high resolution intermediate solution was then used as the inflow to the larger DSMC solution to obtain plume impingement heating, forces, and moments on the CSM and the solar arrays for a total of 21 cases that were analyzed. The results of these simulations were used to populate the Orion CSM Aerothermal Database.

  12. Analysis of Plume Impingement Effects from Orion Crew Service Module Dual Reaction Control System Engine Firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisbell, Andrew; Marichalar, J.; Lumpkin, F.; LeBeau, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plume impingement effects on the Orion Crew Service Module (CSM) were analyzed for various dual Reaction Control System (RCS) engine firings and various configurations of the solar arrays. The study was performed using a decoupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach. This approach included a single jet plume solution for the R1E RCS engine computed with the General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) CFD code. The CFD solution was used to create an inflow surface for the DSMC solution based on the Bird continuum breakdown parameter. The DSMC solution was then used to model the dual RCS plume impingement effects on the entire CSM geometry with deployed solar arrays. However, because the continuum breakdown parameter of 0.5 could not be achieved due to geometrical constraints and because high resolution in the plume shock interaction region is desired, a focused DSMC simulation modeling only the plumes and the shock interaction region was performed. This high resolution intermediate solution was then used as the inflow to the larger DSMC solution to obtain plume impingement heating, forces, and moments on the CSM and the solar arrays for a total of 21 cases that were analyzed. The results of these simulations were used to populate the Orion CSM Aerothermal Database.

  13. Editorial Commentary: Ligamentum Teres Tears and Femoroacetabular Impingement: Complex Coexistence of Impingement and Instability.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    In a large Level IV case series of 2,213 hip arthroscopies with the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement, the intraoperative status of the ligamentum teres (LT) was recorded as normal in 11%, frayed and/or partially torn in 88%, and completely torn in 1.5% of hips. Although specific physical examination maneuvers for detecting LT tears were not available early in the study period, thus limiting a detailed assessment of such tests, the authors identified that female gender, a lower lateral center edge angle, a higher Tonnis angle, and capsular laxity were all associated with complete LT tears. This study further supports the complex coexistence of impingement and instability.

  14. Local heat transfer in turbine disk-cavities. I - Rotor and stator cooling with hub injection of coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, R. S.; Metzger, D. E.; Wittig, S.

    1990-06-01

    Detailed radial heat-transfer coefficient distributions applicable to the cooling of disk-cavity regions of gas turbines are obtained experimentally from local heat-transfer data on both the rotating and stationary surfaces of a parallel-geometry disk-cavity system. Attention is focused on the hub injection of a coolant over a wide range of parameters including disk rotational Reynolds numbers of 200,000 to 50,000, rotor/stator spacing-to-disk ratios of 0.025 to 0.15, and jet mass flow rates between 0.10 and 0.40 times the turbulent pumped flow rate of a free disk. It is shown that rotor heat transfer exhibits regions of impingement and rotational domination with a transition region between, while stator heat transfer displays flow reattachment and convection regions with an inner recirculation zone.

  15. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  16. Crystallization kinetics: A solution for geometrical impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, R. A.; Saleh, A. M.

    2002-04-01

    Starting from the wrong derivation by Erukhimovitch and Baram of an equation alternative to the classical Kolmogoroff-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami one for the transformed fraction in an infinite specimen, undergoing an isothermal first-order phase transformation, it is shown that a different exact solution of the geometrical problem of impingement can be obtained. Such solution is equivalent to the empirical one already presented by Austin and Rickett more than sixty years ago and allows to better fit experimental results for isothermal transformations. This also suggests that perhaps different statistical derivations could allow to reach the same result.

  17. Microinstability and internal impingement in overhead athletes.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Lauchlan; Altchek, David W

    2013-10-01

    A complex interplay exists between the static and dynamic stabilizers in the glenohumeral joint, especially in overheard athletes who need a shoulder hypermobile enough to perform overhead activity yet stable enough to prevent joint subluxation. Concomitant shoulder pathologies commonly occur in the setting of microinstability and internal impingement. Before any surgical intervention, a 3- to 6-month course of conservative measures should first be attempted, with exercises focused on rotator cuff and scapular stabilizer strengthening combined with posterior capsule stretching. If surgery is needed, arthroscopic suture plication with treatment of concomitant lesions has been shown to provide the best clinical outcomes.

  18. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes.

  19. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  20. Max Data Report Jet Stability versus Inlet Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Bremer, N.

    2015-09-01

    This document describes experiments investigating the effect of inlet geometry on the flow field within a glass tank where two jets mix and impinge upon the lid. The setup mimics the outlet plenum of a fast reactor where core exit flows of different temperatures can mix in ways that induce thermal cycling in neighboring structures.

  1. Evaluation of Impingement Syndromes in the Overhead-Throwing Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Christopher M.; Coen, Michael J.; Screnar, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Objective: We outline impingement entities, describe the history and physical examination, and provide an overview of treatment beyond that routinely used in glenohumeral and scapulothoracic dysfunction. Background: In the athlete, pain and dysfunction due to excessive overhead use or abnormal positioning of the shoulder is common and can result from multiple etiologies, including impingement syndromes. Primary, secondary, internal, and coracoid impingement have all been described. Description: These entities will be discussed, including pathology, evaluation, and treatment. Clinical Advantages: Incorporating a systematic evaluation and treatment of impingement syndromes optimizes care for the patient with shoulder pain. PMID:16558643

  2. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  3. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  4. Jet-contaminant interactions in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    A numerical simulation is presented for investigation of the early phase of the flow interaction between a water jet and a chemical contaminant residing in cavities of a wall and in corners of two perpendicular walls. Such an interaction often occurs in surface decontamination processes. The flow model for this analysis is a two-dimensional, two-fluid flow governed by the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The equations were solved via finite difference schemes using the SOLA-VOF code. Computer plots of the flow development are presented. The results show that an inclined jet is more effective than a normal jet for decontaminating these confined geometries. In all flow cases studied, the impact pressure on the impingement wall far exceeds the corresponding steady-state dynamic pressure of the jet.

  5. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  6. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  7. 50. NORTHERN VIEW OF NONEVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. NORTHERN VIEW OF NON-EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS IN CENTER, AND EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER COOLING TOWERS ON RIGHT. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  8. Open-configuration MRI study of femoro-acetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Mitsuyoshi; Miki, Hidenobu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Murai, Masakazu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2007-12-01

    Femoro-acetabular impingement has been proposed as a causative factor of primary hip osteoarthritis. However, primary osteoarthritis of the hip is infrequent in Japan and other Asian countries, even though the hips of Asians frequently sustain impingement, since the Asian lifestyle commonly requires a larger range of hip motion than the Western lifestyle. Therefore, using open-configuration MRI, we investigated whether impingement actually occurs during some traditional Japanese hip positions. The hips of 5 healthy Japanese females were examined in 5 sitting postures: 1) sitting straight; 2) bowing while sitting straight; 3) sitting cross-legged; 4) W-sitting; and 5) squatting. The impingement point was detected by multiple plane reconstructed (MPR) views along with the acetabular rim depicted circumferentially. Impingement was considered to have occurred when, on MRI, the anterior femoral head-neck junction approached the acetabular rim and the femoral head was seen to float from the bottom of the acetabulum with the acetabular rim acting as a fulcrum. Impingement was observed in all volunteers in the W-sitting position, and in 2 of 5 volunteers during squatting. These findings show that impingement occurs frequently during daily Japanese activities. Thus, depending on race, femoro-acetabular impingement might not always cause primary osteoarthritis of the hip. (c) 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 25:1582-1588, 2007. PMID:17600811

  9. Lubricant jet flow phenomena in spur and helical gears with modified center distances and/or addendums for out-of-mesh conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Out-of-mesh jet lubrication of gears was examined. The pinion impingement cycle was described briefly. An analysis was developed for the lubricant jet flow in the out-of-mesh condition. The analysis provides for the inclusion of modified center distances and modified addendums. Equations were generated for the limit values of variables necessary to remove the severe limitations to facilitate computer analysis. A computer program was designed using these limit formulas to prevent negative impingement (missing) on the pinion.

  10. Droplet impingement dynamics: effect of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.; Narayanan, Vinod

    2009-11-01

    This study investigates the hydrodynamic characteristics of droplet impingement on heated surfaces and compares the effect of surface temperature when using water and a nanofluid on a polished and nanostructured surface. Results are obtained for an impact Reynolds number and Weber number of approximately 1700 and 25, respectively. Three discs are used: polished silicon, nanostructured porous silicon and gold-coated polished silicon. Seven surface temperatures, including single-phase (non-boiling) and two-phase (boiling) conditions, are included. Droplet impact velocity, transient spreading diameter and dynamic contact angle are measured. Results of water and a water-based single-wall carbon-nanotube nanofluid impinging on a polished silicon surface are compared to determine the effects of nanoparticles on impinging dynamics. The nanofluid results in larger spreading velocities, larger spreading diameters and an increase in early-stage dynamic contact angle. Results of water impinging on both polished silicon and nanostructured silicon show that the nanostructured surface enhances the heat transfer for evaporative cooling at lower surface temperatures, which is indicated by a shorter evaporation time. Using a nanofluid or a nanostructured surface can reduce the total evaporation time up to 20% and 37%, respectively. Experimental data are compared with models that predict dynamic contact angle and non-dimensional maximum spreading diameter. Results show that the molecular-kinetic theory's dynamic contact angle model agrees well with current experimental data for later times, but over-predicts at early times. Predictions of maximum spreading diameter based on surface energy analyses indicate that these models over-predict unless empirical coefficients are adjusted to fit the test conditions. This is a consequence of underestimates of the dissipative energy for the conditions studied.

  11. Multispecies impingement in a tropical power plant, Straits of Malacca.

    PubMed

    Azila, A; Chong, V C

    2010-07-01

    Marine organisms comprised about 70% of the total impinged materials by weight at water intake screens in the Kapar Power Station (KPS), Malaysia. The general groupings of 'fish', 'shrimp', 'crab', 'cephalopod' and 'others' contributed 26% (87 species), 65% (29), 2% (17), 2% (3) and 5% (42) of the total number of impinged organisms, respectively. In general, higher impingement occurred during spring tide, at nighttime and in shallow water. The glass perchlet, anchovies, ponyfishes, mojarra, catfishes, hairtail, scat and young croakers were the most vulnerable fishes. Vulnerable invertebrates included cephalopods, sea urchin, rockshells and jellyfishes, but penaeid shrimps were the most susceptible in terms of both mortality and body injury. Annually, KPS is estimated to kill 8.5 x 10(6) marine organisms (42 tons) by impingement. This amount, however, is minimal compared to commercial fishery harvests. Multispecies impingement at Malaysian power plants poses the problem of finding the best mitigation options for tropical situations.

  12. Multispecies impingement in a tropical power plant, Straits of Malacca.

    PubMed

    Azila, A; Chong, V C

    2010-07-01

    Marine organisms comprised about 70% of the total impinged materials by weight at water intake screens in the Kapar Power Station (KPS), Malaysia. The general groupings of 'fish', 'shrimp', 'crab', 'cephalopod' and 'others' contributed 26% (87 species), 65% (29), 2% (17), 2% (3) and 5% (42) of the total number of impinged organisms, respectively. In general, higher impingement occurred during spring tide, at nighttime and in shallow water. The glass perchlet, anchovies, ponyfishes, mojarra, catfishes, hairtail, scat and young croakers were the most vulnerable fishes. Vulnerable invertebrates included cephalopods, sea urchin, rockshells and jellyfishes, but penaeid shrimps were the most susceptible in terms of both mortality and body injury. Annually, KPS is estimated to kill 8.5 x 10(6) marine organisms (42 tons) by impingement. This amount, however, is minimal compared to commercial fishery harvests. Multispecies impingement at Malaysian power plants poses the problem of finding the best mitigation options for tropical situations. PMID:20338631

  13. SHOULDER POSTERIOR INTERNAL IMPINGEMENT IN THE OVERHEAD ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Grant‐Nierman, Meggan; Lucas, Brennen

    2013-01-01

    Posterior internal impingement (PII) of the glenohumeral joint is a common cause of shoulder complex pain in the overhead athlete. This impingement is very different from standard outlet impingement seen in shoulder patients. Internal impingement is characterized by posterior shoulder pain when the athlete places the humerus in extreme external rotation and abduction as in the cocking phase of pitching or throwing. Impingement in this position occurs between the supraspinatus and or infraspinatus and the glenoid rim. Understanding regarding this pathology continues to evolve. Definitive understanding of precipitating factors, causes, presentation and methods of treatment have yet to be determined. A high index of suspicion should be used when attempting to make this diagnosis. This current concepts review presents the current thinking regarding pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of this condition. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23593557

  14. Technique of Arthroscopic Treatment of Impingement After Total Ankle Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christopher E; Neumann, Julie A; Godin, Jonathan A; DeOrio, James K

    2016-04-01

    Rates of medial and/or lateral gutter impingement after total ankle replacement are not insignificant. If impingement should occur, it typically arises an average of 17 months after total ankle replacement. Our patient underwent treatment for right ankle medial gutter bony impingement with arthroscopic debridement 5 years after her initial total ankle replacement. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals and a 30° 2.7-mm-diameter arthroscope were used. An aggressive soft-tissue and bony resection was performed using a combination of curettes, a 3.5-mm shaver, a 5.5-mm unsheathed burr, a drill, and a radiofrequency ablator. This case shows that arthroscopic treatment is an effective and potentially advantageous alternative to open treatment of impingement after total ankle replacement. In addition, symptoms of impingement often improve in a short amount of time after arthroscopic debridement of the medial and/or lateral gutter.

  15. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal, and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  16. Dispersed Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the ˜{B} ^2E' - ˜{X} ^2A_2' Transition of Jet Cooled ^{14}NO_3 and ^{15}NO_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masaru; Ishiwata, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    We have generated NO_3 in supersonic free jet expansions and observed laser induced fluorescence ( LIF ) of the ˜{B} ^2E' - ˜{X} ^2A_2' transition. We have measured LIF excitation spectra and dispersed fluorescence ( DF ) spectra from the single vibronic levels ( SVL's ) of the ˜{B} ^2E' state of ^{14}NO_3 and ^{15}NO_3. The vibrational structure of the ˜{X} ^2A_2' state has been analyzed by comparing the vibrational structures of the DF spectra of the two isotopomers. The 1,053 cm^{-1} band of ^{14}NO_3 is observed as two bands at 1,039 and 1,053 cm^{-1} with an intensity ratio of 4 : 5, respectively, for ^{15}NO_3, which are observed in the DF spectra with our standard resolution ( ˜ 7 cm^{-1} in FWHM ). Higher resolution measurements ( ˜ 2 cm^{-1} in FWHM ) of the DF spectra show that the 1,053 cm^{-1} band of ^{14}NO_3 is also observed as two bands at 1,051 and 1,056 cm^{-1} with an intensity ratio of 5 : 3, respectively. The 1,051 cm^{-1} band is attributed to be the ν_1 ( a_1' ) fundamental, because of its little isotope shift. There are two possibilities for another band, the band at 1,056 and 1,038 cm^{-1} for ^{14}NO_3 and ^{15}NO_3, respectively; (1) the ν_3 ( e' ) fundamental band, and (2) the ν_2 + ν_4 ( a_2'' and e', respectively ) combination band. If this is the case (1), the ν_3 band should be observed in IR spectrum, but it has yet to be observed. If (2), the intensity must be stolen from the ˜{B} ^2E' - ˜{A} ^2E'' transition through the ν_2 mode, the considerable transition moment of which has been predicted. A simple consideration for the vibronic coupling between the ˜{A} ^2E'' and ˜{X} ^2A_2' states through the ν_2 mode can understand about 20 % of the combination band intensity to that of the ν_1 fundamental. The higher resolution measurements of the DF spectra also show that the 1,499 cm^{-1} band of ^{14}NO_3 is much stronger than the 1,492 cm^{-1} band in the electronic spectrum, while the latter is the strongest band in

  17. Experimental investigation of a confined developing axisymmetric wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew; Vlachos, Pavlos; Garimella, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    The present work reports an experimental study of an axisymmetric, confined wall jet using planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the dielectric liquid HFE-7100. The wall jet is formed downstream from a confined and submerged impinging round jet, 3.75 mm in diameter. Both the developing region and self-similar region of the wall jet are investigated. The experiments are conducted for Reynolds numbers (Re = Ud/ υ) ranging from 1500 to 38000 and at a nozzle-to-plate spacing of four jet diameters. Image-preprocessing techniques are used to eliminate background noise and an ensemble correlation scheme is applied to improve the resolution of the measurement of the mean velocity field near the wall. A maximum measurement resolution of 36 μm is achieved. Profiles of the mean velocity, turbulent intensities, decay rate, spread rate and wall shear stress are used to characterize the influence of confinement on the wall jet development and inner layer scaling.

  18. Femoroacetabular impingement: a review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Sangal, Rohit B; Waryasz, Gregory R; Schiller, Jonathan R

    2014-11-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is becoming an increasingly more common diagnosis in the orthopaedic community for hip pain in the younger population. Variations in the femoral head and acetabulum can lead to a sequelae of changes to the cartilage that can lead to osteoarthritis. Diagnosis is made through a combination of patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic imaging. Plain radiographs are a very useful tool for evaluating the bony anatomy, while CT scan and MRI have roles for surgical planning and more definitive diagnosis. Most patients should trial physical therapy prior to consideration for any arthroscopic or open procedures. Long-term outcome studies are being performed to determine if surgical intervention has any impact on quality of life and development of osteoarthritis.

  19. The Natural History of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; Levy, David M.; Wuerz, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a clinical syndrome resulting from abnormal hip joint morphology and is a common cause of hip pain in young adults. FAI has been posited as a precursor to hip osteoarthritis (OA); however, conflicting evidence exists and the true natural history of the disease is unclear. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of how FAI damages the hip joint by highlighting its pathomechanics and etiology. We then review the current evidence relating FAI to OA. Lastly, we will discuss the potential of hip preservation surgery to alter the natural history of FAI, reduce the risk of developing OA and the need for future arthroplasty. PMID:26636088

  20. Instability and impingement in the athlete's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Ticker, J B; Fealy, S; Fu, F H

    1995-06-01

    The competitive athlete who participates in a sport requiring overhead motion depends on a shoulder with optimal function. An acute episode of injury or a gradual onset of symptoms in the shoulder can affect the athlete's ability to perform. An understanding of shoulder anatomy and function is essential, and an accurate diagnosis of the underlying pathology is critical for planning treatment options. The correct diagnosis may be less clear when the athlete presents with an insidious onset of shoulder pain. A detailed history and physical examination, as well as an evaluation of the overhead motion and onset of pain, is important when the diagnosis of instability or impingement is considered. Rehabilitation of the rotator cuff often succeeds in alleviating symptoms and restoring function. Surgery is considered when symptoms and diminished function persist despite appropriate nonoperative treatment. Operative repair or reconstruction must be anatomical in nature. Postoperative rehabilitation is equally important in this setting, and a motivated athlete helps to ensure success.

  1. Editorial Commentary: Ligamentum Teres Tears and Femoroacetabular Impingement: Complex Coexistence of Impingement and Instability.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    In a large Level IV case series of 2,213 hip arthroscopies with the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement, the intraoperative status of the ligamentum teres (LT) was recorded as normal in 11%, frayed and/or partially torn in 88%, and completely torn in 1.5% of hips. Although specific physical examination maneuvers for detecting LT tears were not available early in the study period, thus limiting a detailed assessment of such tests, the authors identified that female gender, a lower lateral center edge angle, a higher Tonnis angle, and capsular laxity were all associated with complete LT tears. This study further supports the complex coexistence of impingement and instability. PMID:27373179

  2. Treatment of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    FIORENTINO, GENNARO; FONTANAROSA, ALBERTO; CEPPARULO, RICCARDO; GUARDOLI, ALBERTO; BERNI, LUCA; COVIELLO, GIANLUCA; GUARDOLI, ALDO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to evaluate preliminary clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic treatment of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Methods thirty-eight patients underwent hip arthroscopy for cam-type FAI between 2009 and 2012. Preoperative assessment was based on clinical examination, modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and radiographic examination with anteroposterior pelvis, frog-leg and Lequesne views. The patients’ clinical conditions at follow-up were assessed using the mHHS administered as a telephone survey. Radiographic outcome measurements evaluated pre and postoperatively were the alpha angle and femoral head-neck offset. Results the patients were clinically evaluated at a mean follow-up of 36 months. Radiographic follow-up was performed at an average of 12.7 months. Thirty of the 38 patients (79%) were satisfied with the results of the arthroscopic procedure. A total of nine patients subsequently underwent a total hip replacement. All 30 patients who declared themselves satisfied recorded an mHHS increase; in particular, the mHHS increased from a mean of 52.9 preoperatively (range: 27.5–82.5) to a mean of 85.6 postoperatively (range: 45.1–100.1). Three significant differences between the two groups of patients (satisfied and not satisfied) were recorded: mean age, alpha angle and BMI were all significantly greater in the patients who were not satisfied with the treatment. Conclusions a crucial aspect in order to obtain good clinical outcomes of arthroscopic treatment of cam-type impingement is correct selection of patients who are likely to benefit from this kind of surgery. Hip arthroscopy should be avoided in patients aged over 50 years with risk factors for early osteoarthritis (high BMI and a significantly increased alpha angle). Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26605253

  3. Turbine vane segment and impingement insert configuration for fail-safe impingement insert retention

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2003-05-13

    An impingement insert sleeve is provided that is adapted to be disposed in a coolant cavity defined through a stator vane. The insert has a generally open inlet end and first and second pairs of diametrically opposed side walls, and at least one fail-safe tab defined at a longitudinal end of the insert for limiting radial displacement of the insert with respect to the stator vane.

  4. Slurry Erosion Studies on Surface Modified 13Cr-4Ni Steels: Effect of Angle of Impingement and Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manisekaran, T.; Kamaraj, M.; Sharrif, S. M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    Hydroturbine steels, such as 13Cr-4Ni martensitic steels, are generally subjected to heavy-erosive wear and loss of efficiency due to solid particulate entrainment in the water. Surface-modified steels have proven to give better performance in terms of erosive wear resistance. In the present study, an attempt is made to investigate the effect of angle of impingement and particle size on slurry-jet erosion behavior of pulsed plasma nitrided and laser hardened 13Cr-4Ni steels. Laser hardening process has shown good performance at all angles of impingement due to martensitic transformation of retained austenite. Plastic deformation mode of material removal was also an evident feature of all laser-hardened surface damage locations. However, pulsed-plasma nitrided steels have exhibited chip formation and micro-cutting mode of erosive wear. Erosion with 150-300 μm size was twice compared to 150 μm size slurry particulates.

  5. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  6. Apparatus and method for cooling a combustor cap

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Washam, Roy Marshall; Wu, Chunyang

    2014-04-29

    A combustor includes an end cap having a perforated downstream plate and a combustion chamber downstream of the downstream plate. A plenum is in fluid communication with the downstream plate and supplies a cooling medium to the combustion chamber through the perforations in the downstream plate. A method for cooling a combustor includes flowing a cooling medium into a combustor end cap and impinging the cooling medium on a downstream plate in the combustor end cap. The method further includes flowing the cooling medium into a combustion chamber through perforations in the downstream plate.

  7. Water Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  8. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  9. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

    1988-06-07

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

  10. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Sumpman, Wayne C.; Baker, Robert J.; Williams, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

  11. Water-Cooled Total-Temperature Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Reece, Garland D.

    1992-01-01

    Water-cooled supersonic total-pressure, static-pressure, and total-temperature probes developed to study high-temperature jet plumes. Total-temperature probe tested up to 2,000 degrees F incorporates annular cooling system up to thermocouple lead. Lead extends into test chamber to sense temperature of supersonic external flow. Design novel and significant. Applicable in development of jet engines and in research on fast flows of hot gases.

  12. Vortex ring impingement and particle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staymates, Matthew

    2005-11-01

    Previous research has shown that the impact of a vortex ring with a solid surface can dislodge particles attached to that surface and suspend them in the surrounding fluid. A possible use for this phenomenon arises in the detection of trace explosives on clothing and belongings: Once liberated from the surface, suspended particles can be collected and interrogated. The current technology successfully uses round turbulent jets for this purpose, but also generates a large concomitant airflow due to entrainment. Here we present the results of initial experiments to construct vortex-ring generators producing a similar particle release from surfaces with much less entrainment than jets. A discussion of vortex-ring-generator design issues and semi-quantitative flow visualization results will be presented. Both normal and oblique vortex-ring impacts are considered.

  13. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  14. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  15. Statistical Shape Modeling of Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Michael D.; Dater, Manasi; Whitaker, Ross; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Peters, Christopher L.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, statistical shape modeling (SSM) was used to quantify three-dimensional (3D) variation and morphologic differences between femurs with and without cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). 3D surfaces were generated from CT scans of femurs from 41 controls and 30 cam FAI patients. SSM correspondence particles were optimally positioned on each surface using a gradient descent energy function. Mean shapes for control and patient groups were defined from the resulting particle configurations. Morphological differences between group mean shapes and between the control mean and individual patients were calculated. Principal component analysis was used to describe anatomical variation present in both groups. The first 6 modes (or principal components) captured statistically significant shape variations, which comprised 84% of cumulative variation among the femurs. Shape variation was greatest in femoral offset, greater trochanter height, and the head-neck junction. The mean cam femur shape protruded above the control mean by a maximum of 3.3 mm with sustained protrusions of 2.5-3.0 mm along the anterolateral head-neck junction and distally along the anterior neck, corresponding well with reported cam lesion locations and soft-tissue damage. This study provides initial evidence that SSM can describe variations in femoral morphology in both controls and cam FAI patients and may be useful for developing new measurements of pathological anatomy. SSM may also be applied to characterize cam FAI severity and provide templates to guide patient-specific surgical resection of bone.

  16. Is cooling still cool?

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ashwin; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Botha, John

    2015-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH), where patients are cooled to between 32°C and 36°C for a period of 12-24 hours and then gradually rewarmed, may reduce the risk of ischemic injury to cerebral tissue following a period of insufficient blood flow. This strategy of TH could improve mortality and neurological function in patients who have experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA). The necessity of TH in OOHCA was challenged in late 2013 by a fascinating and potentially practice changing publication, which found that targeting a temperature of 36°C had similar outcomes to cooling patients to 33°C. This article reviews the current literature and summarizes the uncertainties and questions raised when considering cooling of patients at risk of hypoxic brain injury. Irrespective of whether TH or targeted temperature management is deployed in patients at risk of hypoxic brain injury, it would seem that avoiding hyperpyrexia is important and that a more rigorous approach to neurological evaluation is mandated. PMID:25423577

  17. Electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.

    2004-10-01

    The brief review of the most significant and interesting achievements in electron cooling method, which took place during last two years, is presented. The description of the electron cooling facilities-storage rings and traps being in operation or under development-is given. The applications of the electron cooling method are considered. The following modern fields of the method development are discussed: crystalline beam formation, expansion into middle and high energy electron cooling (the Fermilab Recycler Electron Cooler, the BNL cooler-recuperator, cooling with circulating electron beam, the GSI project), electron cooling in traps, antihydrogen generation, electron cooling of positrons (the LEPTA project).

  18. THEMIS multi-spacecraft observations of magnetosheath high-speed jets: Scale sizes and other characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, Ferdinand; Hietala, Heli; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Nakamura, Rumi

    2015-04-01

    Under quasi-radial interplanetary magnetic field conditions, the dayside magnetosheath is permeated by localized enhancements of dynamic pressure (high speed jets). When impinging on the magnetopause, these jets cause boundary distortions and excite magnetopause and magnetospheric waves. Multi-spacecraft observations of high speed jets by the THEMIS spacecraft allow us to infer jet flow-parallel and flow-perpendicular scale sizes. We find the scale size distributions to be well-modeled by exponential functions with characteristic diameters of 0.72 (parallel) and 1.34 Earth radii (perpendicular scale sizes). The median flow-parallel scale sizes increase with distance from the bow shock. We are able to link large/small size jets to specific solar wind conditions and jet characteristics. Furthermore, we present flow patterns inside and outside of jets that exhibit vortical plasma motion as a result of jet propagation through the slower-moving magnetosheath plasma.

  19. Impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L W; Van Winkle, W

    1980-01-01

    The impact of power plant impingement on the 1974 and 1975 year classes of the Hudson River white perch population is assessed using a simple model derived from Ricker's theory of fisheries dynamics. The impact of impingement is expressed in the model as the conditional mortality rate, rather than as the more commonly used exploitation rate. Since the calculated impact is sensitive to errors in the estimation of population size and total mortality, ranges of probable values of these quantities are used to compute upper and lower bounds on the fractional reduction in abundance of each year class. Best estimates of abundance and mortality are used to compute the conditional impingement mortality rate separately for each plant and month. The results are used to assess the relative impacts of white perch impingement at six Hudson River power plants and to identify the seasons during which the impact is highest.

  20. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  1. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  2. Plume Impingement Analysis for the European Service Module Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yim, John Tamin; Sibe, Fabien; Ierardo, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Plume impingement analyses were performed for the European Service Module (ESM) propulsion system Orbital Maneuvering System engine (OMS-E), auxiliary engines, and reaction control system (RCS) engines. The heat flux from plume impingement on the solar arrays and other surfaces are evaluated. This information is used to provide inputs for the ESM thermal analyses and help determine the optimal configuration for the RCS engines.

  3. Droplet impinging behavior on surfaces Part I - Hydrogen Peroxide on Aluminium Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwathy, R.; Manikanta Reddy, Karnati; Pramoth Kumar, M.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work the droplet behavior of the hydrogen peroxide (6% by weight) on a aluminum surface is reported. The behavior of hydrogen peroxide droplet is compared with water droplet for the same temperature conditions. Visualization of the droplet falling on a aluminum surface is done using a high speed camera. A data acquisition system is used for measuring the real time temperature. The characterization of droplet dynamics with variation in temperatures is detailed. The results reveal that with increase in temperature, the droplet splashes in to the ambient like a jet which is unlike water behavior, which when subjected to the same temperature conditions. The behavior of water droplet and hydrogen peroxide droplet after impinging and spreading over the surface and evaporation phenomenon is studied and observed.

  4. Two-, three-, and four-poster jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukits, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    In connection with the problems of the ingestion of hot exhaust gases in engines of V/STOL and STOVL aircraft in ground effect, a series of studies have been undertaken. Ground impinging, two- and three-poster jets operating in the presence of cross flow were studied. The current paper is divided into two parts. The first part is a comparison of the low speed, two-, three-, and four-poster jet cases, with respect to the flowfield in the region of interaction between the forward and the jet flows. These include cases with mass balanced inlet suction. An analysis of the inlet entry plane of the low speed two- and three-poster jet cases is also given. In the second part, high speed results for a two jet configuration without inlet suction are given. The results are based on quantitative, marker concentration distributions obtained by digitizing video images.

  5. LIF Measurement of Interacting Gas Jet Flow with Plane Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, A.; Kurihara, S.; Yamazaki, S.; Ota, M.; Maeno, K.

    2011-05-01

    Discharging rarefied gas jets in low-pressure conditions are interesting and important phenomena from an engineering point of view. For example they relate to the attitude control of the space satellite, or the semiconductor technology. The jets, however, deform to the complicated shapes by interacting with solid walls. In this paper we have performed the experiments the flow visualization as a first step by applying the LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) method on the jet-wall interaction. Jet is spouting out from a φ1.0 mm circular hole into the low pressure air chamber, impinging on a flat plate. The LIF visualization of interacting rarefied gas jet is carried out by using the iodine (I2) tracer and argon ion laser.

  6. Impingement of buoyancy-driven flows at a stratified interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, Aline J.; Kudo, Yuriko

    2008-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and particle-image velocimetry (PIV) are used to study both thermals and plumes impinging on a stratified interface. Data are obtained for a central slice of the flow near the stratified interface. Both the thermal and plume are generated by releasing fresh water at the bottom of a tank filled with two layers of salt water of different densities. Thermals and plumes are studied at Reynolds numbers ranging from 3,000 to 8,000, above the value for the mixing transition, a Schmidt number of about 600, and Richardson numbers from 1 to 22. The Richardson and Reynolds numbers are based on the thermal or plume characteristics (size and vertical velocity) before impingement and the initial density difference across the interface. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is used to determine the maximum penetration height, rebound distance and lateral spreading velocity. The vorticity results obtained from the PIV data reveal the vortical structure near impingement. When the thermal impinges upon the stratified interface, a baroclinic eddy generated at the interface appears to merge with eddies comprising the thermal itself to form a vortex ring. This ring remains near the interface, moving mainly along the lateral or horizontal direction away from the region of impingement. These results suggest that lateral transport is significant for thermals impinging on stratified interfaces, and that ignoring such transport may greatly underestimate overall transport and mixing in such flows.

  7. Jet slurry erosion performance of composite clad and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, Lohit R.; Horakeri, Gururaj S.; Bhovi, Prabakhar M.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, development of composite cladding consists of Cr23C6 (chromium carbide) as reinforcement particles 20 wt. % in Ni-based matrix 80 wt. % on austenitic stainless steel through exposure of microwave radiation has been carried out. The jet slurry erosion test was performed on microwave composite clad. The functional performance of composite clad has been evaluated for different parametric conditions like varying impingement velocity and impact angle. The increasing weight loss trend was observed with time for the first 30 min. after that the individual trend decreased; at high impingement velocity and maximum impact angle. SEM micrographs of eroded clad samples at various impact angle and impingement velocity were discussed. The maximum weight loss occurred at 90° angle and velocity of 60 m/s, and minimum at 30° angle and velocity of 20 m/s.

  8. Jet Cooled Rotational Studies of Dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, M. Varela S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Rotational spectra of Gly-Pro and Pro-Gly dipeptides have been examined with laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopy. Three conformers for Gly-Pro and one for Pro-Gly have been unequivocally identified in the supersonic expansion by the comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N (I=1) nuclear quadrupole coupling constants with those predicted by ab initio methods. The quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved and it allows to experimentally characterize the main intramolecular forces which stabilize the assigned conformers. The biomimetic molecule Ac-Ala-NH_2 has been also studied. The C_7 and C_5 peptide conformations (intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded seven- or five-membered cycle, respectively) have been unequivocally identified in the supersonic expansion. The ability to identify peptide conformations suggest that it soon may be possible to explore the structures of larger peptides using LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  9. Simulating regolith ejecta due to gas impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Wesley Allen; Metzger, Philip; Dove, Adrienne; Britt, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Space missions operating at or near the surface of a planet or small body must consider possible gas-regolith interactions, as they can cause hazardous effects or, conversely, be employed to accomplish mission goals. They are also directly related to a body's surface properties; thus understanding these interactions could provide an additional tool to analyze mission data. The Python Regolith Interaction Calculator (PyRIC), built upon a computational technique developed in the Apollo era, was used to assess interactions between rocket exhaust and an asteroid's surface. It focused specifically on threshold conditions for causing regolith ejecta. To improve this model, and learn more about the underlying physics, we have begun ground-based experiments studying the interaction between gas impingement and regolith simulant. Compressed air, initially standing in for rocket exhaust, is directed through a rocket nozzle at a bed of simulant. We assess the qualitative behavior of various simulants when subjected to a known maximum surface pressure, both in atmosphere and in a chamber initially at vacuum. These behaviors are compared to prior computational results, and possible flow patterns are inferred. Our future work will continue these experiments in microgravity through the use of a drop tower. These will use several simulant types and various pressure levels to observe the effects gas flow can have on target surfaces. Combining this with a characterization of the surface pressure distribution, tighter bounds can be set on the cohesive threshold necessary to maintain regolith integrity. This will aid the characterization of actual regolith distributions, as well as informing the surface operation phase of mission design.

  10. Heat Transfer and Flow Structure Evaluation of a Synthetic Jet Emanating from a Planar Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-07-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  11. Time and frequency domain investigation of the heat transfer to a synthetic air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylatt, D. I.; O'Donovan, T. S.

    2012-11-01

    Heat transfer to a synthetic air jets is investigated experimentally. The influence of peaks in heat transfer outwith the stagnation region of the jet are of particular interest. Heat transfer to the jets is reported for experimental parameters, jet exit to impingement surface spacings, H/D = 1, Reynolds number of 3000, non-dimensional Stroke length, L0/D of 14.and an excitation frequency of 70 Hz Peaks in heat transfer outwith the stagnation region of the jet are investigated in both the time and frequency domain and a connection between the driving frequency of the jet and changes in the rate of heat transfer is outlined. It is shown that two type's changes in the rate of heat transfer outwith the stagnation region are present in synthetic jet impingement heat transfer; those associated with the jet excitation frequency and therefore attributed to interactions between the two jet flow regimes and those associated with the breakdown of coherent structures in the jet flow.

  12. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  13. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  14. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  15. Multiphysics Simulation of Active Hypersonic Lip Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Wang, Wen-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the application of the Multidisciplinary Analysis (MDA) solver, Spectrum, in analyzing a hydrogen-cooled hypersonic cowl leading-edge structure. Spectrum, a multiphysics simulation code based on the finite element method, addresses compressible and incompressible fluid flow, structural, and thermal modeling, as well as the interactions between these disciplines. Fluid-solid-thermal interactions in a hydrogen impingement-cooled leading edge are predicted using Spectrum. Two- and semi-three-dimensional models are considered for a leading edge impingement coolant, concept under either specified external heat flux or aerothermodynamic heating from a Mach 5 external flow interaction. The solution accuracy is demonstrated from mesh refinement analysis. With active cooling, the leading edge surface temperature is drastically reduced from 1807 K of the adiabatic condition to 418 K. The internal coolant temperature profile exhibits a sharp gradient near channel/solid interface. Results from two different cooling channel configurations are also presented to illustrate the different behavior of alternative active cooling schemes.

  16. Impingement is not impingement: the case for calling it "Rotator Cuff Disease".

    PubMed

    McFarland, Edward G; Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Murrell, George A C; Garzon-Muvdi, Juan; Petersen, Steve A

    2013-07-01

    Historically, many causes have been proposed for rotator cuff conditions. The most prevalent theory is that the rotator cuff tendons, especially the supraspinatus, make contact with the acromion and coracoacromial ligament, resulting in pain and eventual tearing of the tendon. However, more recent evidence suggests that this concept does not explain the changes in rotator cuff tendons with age. The role of acromioplasty and coracoacromial ligament release in the treatment of rotator cuff disease has become questioned. Evidence now suggests that tendinopathy associated with aging may be a predominant factor in the development of rotator cuff degeneration. We propose that the overwhelming evidence favors factors other than "impingement" as the major cause of rotator cuff disease and that a paradigm shift in the way the development of rotator cuff pathology is conceptualized allows for a more comprehensive approach to the care of the patient with rotator cuff disease. PMID:24367779

  17. Management of Rotator Cuff and Impingement Injuries in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gerald R.; Kelley, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review current concepts of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athlete. Data Sources: The information we present was compiled from a review of classic and recently published material regarding rotator cuff and impingement injuries. These materials were identified through a search of a personal literature database compiled by the authors, as well as by selective searching of the MEDLINE. In addition, much of the information presented represents observations and opinions of the authors developed over 8 to 10 years of treating shoulder injuries in athletes. Data Synthesis: Biomechanics of the normal shoulder and pathophysiology of rotator cuff injuries in the athletic population are discussed, followed by a summary of the important diagnostic features of rotator cuff and impingement injuries. The principles of rehabilitation are extensively presented, along with indications and important technical aspects of selected surgical procedures. General principles and specific protocols of postoperative rehabilitation are also summarized. Conclusions/Recommendations: Rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athletic population are multifactorial in etiology, exhibiting significant overlap with glenohumeral instability. Nonoperative treatment is successful in most athletic patients with rotator cuff and impingement injuries. When nonoperative treatment fails, arthroscopic surgical techniques such as rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression may be successful in returning the athlete to competition. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:16558644

  18. The application of structural reliability techniques to plume impingement loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunis, Isam S.; Carney, Kelly S.

    1993-01-01

    A new aerospace application of structural reliability techniques is presented, where the applied forces depend on many probabilistic variables. This application is the plume impingement loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Arrays. When the space shuttle berths with Space Station Freedom it must brake and maneuver towards the berthing point using its primary jets. The jet exhaust, or plume, may cause high loads on the photovoltaic arrays. The many parameters governing this problem are highly uncertain and random. An approach, using techniques from structural reliability, as opposed to the accepted deterministic methods, is presented which assesses the probability of failure of the array mast due to plume impingement loading. A Monte Carlo simulation of the berthing approach is used to determine the probability distribution of the loading. A probability distribution is also determined for the strength of the array. Structural reliability techniques are then used to assess the array mast design. These techniques are found to be superior to the standard deterministic dynamic transient analysis, for this class of problem. The results show that the probability of failure of the current array mast design, during its 15 year life, is minute.

  19. Idealized simulations of sting jet cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. H.; Gray, S. L.; Clark, P. A.

    2012-04-01

    An idealized modeling study of sting-jet cyclones is presented. Sting jets are descending mesoscale jets that occur in some extratropical cyclones and produce localized regions of strong low-level winds in the frontal fracture region. Moist baroclinic lifecycle (LC1) simulations are performed with modifications to produce cyclones resembling observed sting-jet cyclones. Two jets exist in the control idealized cyclone that descend into the frontal fracture region and result in strong winds near to the top of the boundary layer; one of these satisfies the criteria for a sting jet, the other is associated with the warm front. Sensitivity experiments show that both these jets are robust features. The sting jet strength (measured by maximum low-level wind speed or descent rate) increases with the cyclone growth rate; growth rate increases with increasing basic-state zonal jet maximum or decreasing basic-state tropospheric static stability. The two cyclones with the weakest basic-state static stability have by far the strongest sting jets, with descent rates comparable to those observed. Evaporative cooling contributes up to 20% of the descent rate in these sting jets compared with up to 4% in the other sting jets. Conditional symmetric instability (CSI) release in the cloud head also contributes to the sting jet, although there is less extensive CSI than in observed cases. The robustness of the sting jets suggests that they could occur frequently in cyclones with frontal fracture; however, they are unlikely to be identified unless momentum transport through the boundary layer leads to strong surface wind gusts.

  20. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Parrish Clawson

    the background magnetic fields. The Euler number for the laboratory jet was 9 compared with an estimate of 40 for young stellar object jets [135] which demonstrated adequate scaling between the two frames. A second experiment was performed concerning laboratory simulations of magnetospheres with plasma winds impinging on permanent magnetic dipoles. The ratio of the magnetopause measured with ICCD photography to the calculated magnetopause standoff distance was ~2.