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Sample records for jet mk ii

  1. Differential expression of CaMK-II genes during early zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sarah C; Lister, James A; Tombes, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    CaMK-II is a highly conserved Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expressed throughout the lifespan of all vertebrates. During early development, CaMK-II regulates cell cycle progression and "non-canonical" Wnt-dependent convergent extension. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, CaMK-II activity rises within 2 hr after fertilization. At the time of somite formation, zygotic expression from six genes (camk2a1, camk2b1, camk2g1, camk2g2, camk2d1, camk2d2) results in a second phase of increased activity. Zebrafish CaMK-II genes are 92-95% identical to their human counterparts in the non-variable regions. During the first three days of development, alternative splicing yields at least 20 splice variants, many of which are unique. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that camk2g1 comprises the majority of maternal expression. All six genes are expressed strongly in ventral regions at the 18-somite stage. Later, camk2a1 is expressed in anterior somites, heart, and then forebrain. Camk2b1 is expressed in somites, mid- and forebrain, gut, retina, and pectoral fins. Camk2g1 appears strongly along the midline and then in brain, gut, and pectoral fins. Camk2g2 is expressed early in the midbrain and trunk and exhibits the earliest retinal expression. Camk2d1 is elevated early at somite boundaries, then epidermal tissue, while camk2d2 is expressed in discrete anterior locations, steadily increasing along either side of the dorsal midline and then throughout the brain, including the retina. These findings reveal a complex pattern of CaMK-II gene expression consistent with pleiotropic roles during development. PMID:17103413

  2. [Fe II] jets from intermediate-mass protostars in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Bally, John

    2016-09-01

    We present new HST/WFC3-IR narrowband [Fe II] images of protostellar jets in the Carina Nebula. Combined with 5 previously published sources, we have a sample of 18 jets and 2 HH objects. All of the jets we targeted with WFC3 show bright infrared [Fe II] emission, and a few Hα candidate jets are confirmed as collimated outflows based on the morphology of their [Fe II] emission. Continuum-subtracted images clearly separate jet emission from the adjacent ionization front, providing a better tracer of the collimated jet than Hα and allowing us to connect these jets with their embedded driving sources. The [Fe II] 1.64 μm/Hα flux ratio measured in the jets is ≳ 5 times larger than in the adjacent ionization fronts. The low-ionization jet core requires high densities to shield Fe+ against further ionization by the FUV radiation from O-type stars in the H II region. High jet densities imply high mass-loss rates, consistent with the intermediate-mass driving sources we identify for 13 jets. The remaining jets emerge from opaque globules that obscure emission from the protostar. In many respects, the HH jets in Carina look like a scaled-up version of the jets driven by low-mass protostars. Altogether, these observations suggest that [Fe II] emission is a reliable tracer of dense, irradiated jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars. We argue that highly collimated outflows are common to more massive protostars, and that they suggest the outflow physics inferred for low-mass stars formation scales up to at least ˜8 M⊙.

  3. Validating the Serpent Model of FiR 1 Triga Mk-II Reactor by Means of Reactor Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viitanen, Tuomas; Leppänen, Jaakko

    2016-02-01

    A model of the FiR 1 Triga Mk-II reactor has been previously generated for the Serpent Monte Carlo reactor physics and burnup calculation code. In the current article, this model is validated by comparing the predicted reaction rates of nickel and manganese at 9 different positions in the reactor to measurements. In addition, track-length estimators are implemented in Serpent 2.1.18 to increase its performance in dosimetry calculations. The usage of the track-length estimators is found to decrease the reaction rate calculation times by a factor of 7-8 compared to the standard estimator type in Serpent, the collision estimators. The differences in the reaction rates between the calculation and the measurement are below 20%.

  4. Simvastatin pretreatment protects cerebrum from neuronal injury by decreasing the expressions of phosphor-CaMK II and AQP4 in ischemic stroke rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min-xia; Lu, Chao; Xia, Chun-mei; Qiao, Zhong-wei; Zhu, Da-nian

    2014-12-01

    Excitotoxicity and cytotoxic edema are the two major factors resulting in neuronal injury during brain ischemia and reperfusion. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II), the downstream signal molecular of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), is a mediator in the excitotoxicity. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4), expressed mainly in the brain, is an important aquaporin to control the flux of water. In a previous study, we had reported that pretreatment of simvastatin protected the cerebrum from ischemia and reperfusion injury by decreasing neurological deficit score and infarct area (Zhu et al. PLoS One 7:e51552, 2012). The present study used a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model to further explore the pleiotropic effect of simvastatin via CaMK II and AQP4. The results showed that simvastatin reduced degenerated cells and brain edema while decreasing the protein expressions of phosphor-CaMK II and AQP4, and increasing the ratios of Bcl-2/Bax, which was independent of cholesterol-lowering effect. Immunocomplexes formed between the subunit of NMDARs-NR3A and AQP4 were detected for the first time. It was concluded that simvastatin could protect the cerebrum from neuronal excitotoxicity and cytotoxic edema by downregulating the expressions of phosphor-CaMK II and AQP4, and that the interaction between NR3A and AQP4 might provide the base for AQP4 involving in the signaling pathways mediated by NMDARs.

  5. Application of LiF thermoluminescence dosimeter powders in neutron gamma mixed field dosimetry and dose mapping in the thermal column of a triga Mk II reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Böck, Helmut; Vana, Norbert

    1987-02-01

    Thermal neutron and fission product gamma dose rates at different positions in the horizontal thermal column of a TRIGA Mk-II reactor, as well as in a cadmium cladded cylindrical cavity embedded in a borated wooden box placed in the thermal column, were assessed with TLD-600 and TLD-700 dosimeter powders.

  6. Jet Charge Tagging at CDF using Run II Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    We present a study of the jet charge tagging in Run II CDF. The jet charge tagging method is applied to determine the b/barb-quark flavor of B hadrons at the time of production in a sample of b arrow ℓ ν X decays collected in 2002-2003.

  7. Verification of MCNP simulation of neutron flux parameters at TRIGA MK II reactor of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yavar, A R; Khalafi, H; Kasesaz, Y; Sarmani, S; Yahaya, R; Wood, A K; Khoo, K S

    2012-10-01

    A 3-D model for 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor was simulated. Neutron flux parameters were calculated using MCNP-4C code and were compared with experimental results obtained by k(0)-INAA and absolute method. The average values of φ(th),φ(epi), and φ(fast) by MCNP code were (2.19±0.03)×10(12) cm(-2)s(-1), (1.26±0.02)×10(11) cm(-2)s(-1) and (3.33±0.02)×10(10) cm(-2)s(-1), respectively. These average values were consistent with the experimental results obtained by k(0)-INAA. The findings show a good agreement between MCNP code results and experimental results. PMID:22885391

  8. HOT ELECTROMAGNETIC OUTFLOWS. II. JET BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2013-08-20

    We consider the interaction between radiation, matter, and a magnetic field in a compact, relativistic jet. The entrained matter accelerates outward as the jet breaks out of a star or other confining medium. In some circumstances, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the magnetization of the jet is greatly reduced by an advected radiation field while the jet is optically thick to scattering. Where magnetic flux surfaces diverge rapidly, a strong outward Lorentz force develops and radiation and matter begin to decouple. The increase in magnetization is coupled to a rapid growth in Lorentz factor. We take two approaches to this problem. The first examines the flow outside the fast magnetosonic critical surface, and calculates the flow speed and the angular distribution of the radiation field over a range of scattering depths. The second considers the flow structure on both sides of the critical surface in the optically thin regime, using a relaxation method. In both approaches, we find how the terminal Lorentz factor and radial profile of the outflow depend on the radiation intensity and optical depth at breakout. The effect of bulk Compton scattering on the radiation spectrum is calculated by a Monte Carlo method, while neglecting the effects of internal dissipation. The peak of the scattered spectrum sits near the seed peak if radiation pressure dominates the acceleration, but is pushed to a higher frequency if the Lorentz force dominates. The unscattered seed radiation can form a distinct, low-frequency component of the spectrum, especially if the magnetic Poynting flux dominates.

  9. MiR-152 May Silence Translation of CaMK II and Induce Spontaneous Immune Tolerance in Mouse Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingcheng; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Chen, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jinhua; Zhao, Jiacong; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous immune tolerance in mouse liver transplantation has always been a hotspot in transplantation-immune research. Recent studies revealed that regulatory T cells (Tregs), hepatic satellite cells and Kupffer cells play a potential role in spontaneous immune tolerance, however the precise mechanism of spontaneous immune tolerance is still undefined. By using Microarray Chips, we investigated different immune regulatory factors to decipher critical mechanisms of spontaneous tolerance after mouse liver transplantation. Allogeneic (C57BL/6-C3H) and syngeneic (C3H-C3H) liver transplantation were performed by 6-8 weeks old male C57BL/6 and C3H mice. Graft samples (N = 4 each group) were collected from 8 weeks post-operation mice. 11 differentially expressed miRNAs in allogeneic grafts (Allografts) vs. syngeneic grafts (Syngrafts) were identified using Agilent Mouse miRNA Chips. It was revealed that 185 genes were modified by the 11 miRNAs, furthermore, within the 185 target genes, 11 of them were tightly correlated with immune regulation after Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis and Genbank data cross-comparison. Verified by real-time PCR and western blot, our results indicated that mRNA expression levels of IL-6 and TAB2 were respectively down regulated following miR-142-3p and miR-155 augment. In addition, increased miR-152 just silenced mRNA of CaMK II and down-regulated translation of CaMK II in tolerated liver grafts, which may play a critical role in immune regulation and spontaneous tolerance induction of mouse liver transplantation. PMID:25133393

  10. A Protostellar Jet Emanating from a Hypercompact H ii Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Contreras, Yanett; Dougados, Catherine; Cabrit, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    We present radio continuum observations of the high-mass young stellar object (HMYSO) G345.4938+01.4677 obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 5, 9, 17, and 19 GHz. These observations provide definite evidence that the outer and inner pairs of radio lobes consist of shock-ionized material being excited by an underlying collimated and fast protostellar jet emanating from a hypercompact H ii region. By comparing with images taken 6 years earlier at 5 and 9 GHz using the same telescope, we assess the proper motions (PMs) of the radio sources. The outer west and east lobes exhibit PMs of 64 ± 12 and 48 ± 13 mas yr-1, indicating velocities projected in the plane of the sky and receding from G345.4938+01.4677 of 520 and 390 {\\text{km s}}-1, respectively. The internal radio lobes also display PM signals consistently receding from the HMYSO with magnitudes of 17 ± 11 and 35 ± 10 mas yr-1 for the inner west and east lobes, respectively. The morphology of the outer west lobe is that of a detached bow shock. At 17 and 19 GHz, the outer east lobe displays an arcuate morphology also suggesting a bow shock. These results show that disk accretion and jet acceleration—possibly occurring in a very similar way compared with low-mass protostars—is taking place in G345.4938+01.4677 despite the presence of ionizing radiation and the associated hypercompact H ii region.

  11. A Protostellar Jet Emanating from a Hypercompact H ii Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Contreras, Yanett; Dougados, Catherine; Cabrit, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    We present radio continuum observations of the high-mass young stellar object (HMYSO) G345.4938+01.4677 obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 5, 9, 17, and 19 GHz. These observations provide definite evidence that the outer and inner pairs of radio lobes consist of shock-ionized material being excited by an underlying collimated and fast protostellar jet emanating from a hypercompact H ii region. By comparing with images taken 6 years earlier at 5 and 9 GHz using the same telescope, we assess the proper motions (PMs) of the radio sources. The outer west and east lobes exhibit PMs of 64 ± 12 and 48 ± 13 mas yr‑1, indicating velocities projected in the plane of the sky and receding from G345.4938+01.4677 of 520 and 390 {\\text{km s}}-1, respectively. The internal radio lobes also display PM signals consistently receding from the HMYSO with magnitudes of 17 ± 11 and 35 ± 10 mas yr‑1 for the inner west and east lobes, respectively. The morphology of the outer west lobe is that of a detached bow shock. At 17 and 19 GHz, the outer east lobe displays an arcuate morphology also suggesting a bow shock. These results show that disk accretion and jet acceleration—possibly occurring in a very similar way compared with low-mass protostars—is taking place in G345.4938+01.4677 despite the presence of ionizing radiation and the associated hypercompact H ii region.

  12. Observations of Chromospheric Anemone Jets with Hinode CaII Broadband Filtergraph and Hida CaII Spectroheliograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Satoshi; Shibata, Kazunari; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Kitai, Reizaburo; Otsuji, Ken-Ichi

    2010-08-01

    We report on the first simultaneous observations of chromospheric ``anemone'' jets in solar active regions with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) CaII H broadband filtergraph and the CaII K spetroheliograph on the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory. During the period of coordinated observations, nine chromospheric anemone jets were simultaneously observed with the two instruments. These observations revealed three important features: (1) the jets are generated in the lower chromosphere; i.e., these cannot be seen in CaII K3; (2) the length and lifetime of the jets are 0.4-5 Mm and 40-320 s, respectively; (3) the apparent velocity of the jets observed with the SOT is 3-24 km s-1, while the CaII K3 component at the jets shows a blueshift (in 5 events) in the range of 2-6 km s-1. The chromospheric anemone jets are associated with mixed polarity regions, which are either small emerging flux regions or moving magnetic features. It is found that the CaII K line often shows red or blue asymmetry in the K2/K1 component; the footpoint of the jets associated with emerging flux regions often shows a redshift (2-16 km s-1), while the one with moving magnetic features shows a blueshift (˜5 km s-1). A detailed analysis of the magnetic evolution of the jet-forming regions revealed that the reconnection rate (or canceling rate) of the total magnetic flux at the footpoint of the jets is on the order of 1016 Mx s-1, and the resulting magnetic energy release rate is (1.1-10) × 1024 erg s-1, with a total energy release of (1-13) × 1026 erg for the duration of the magnetic cancellation, ˜130 s. These are comparable to the estimated total energy, ˜1026 erg, in a single chromospheric anemone jet. In addition to the DST CaII K spectroheliogram and the SOT CaII H broadband filtergram, we also used for analysis an SOT magnetogram as well as a Hida Hα filtergram. We present a physical model of the jet based on the observation, and discuss the relation between

  13. QUASI-STATIC MODEL OF MAGNETICALLY COLLIMATED JETS AND RADIO LOBES. II. JET STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Fowler, T. Kenneth; Hooper, E. Bickford; McClenaghan, Joseph; Lin, Zhihong

    2015-11-10

    This is the second in a series of companion papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetically driven, and mediated helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. In the first paper, we showed self-consistently that minimizing viscous dissipation in the disk naturally leads to jets of maximum power with boundary conditions known to yield jets as a low-density, magnetically collimated tower, consistent with observational constraints of wire-like currents at distances far from the black hole. In this paper we show that these magnetic towers remain collimated as they grow in length at nonrelativistic velocities. Differences with relativistic jet models are explained by three-dimensional magnetic structures derived from a detailed examination of stability properties of the tower model, including a broad diffuse pinch with current profiles predicted by a detailed jet solution outside the collimated central column treated as an electric circuit. We justify our model in part by the derived jet dimensions in reasonable agreement with observations. Using these jet properties, we also discuss the implications for relativistic particle acceleration in nonrelativistically moving jets. The appendices justify the low jet densities yielding our results and speculate how to reconcile our nonrelativistic treatment with general relativistic MHD simulations.

  14. Gas dynamics of a supersonic radial jet. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, V. F.; Klinkov, S. V.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the radial distributions of the pressure measured with a Pitot tube for the case of a radial jet with/without swirling of the input flow in the pre-chamber; the length of the supersonic part of the jet, dependency of the jet thickness as a function of the distance from the nozzle outlet, and approximating analytical formula for the jet thickness that generalizes the experimental data. Experimental data demonstrated that at the deposition distances lower than 4-6 gauges from the nozzle outlet, the solid particle velocity and temperature are almost uniform over the jet cross section. This means that the target surface can be allocated here without loss in coating quality and deposition coefficient. The maximal recommended distance where the deposition is still possible is the length of l s0 ~ 16 gauges.

  15. Chromospheric Anemone Jets Observed with Hinode/SOT and Hida Ca II Spectroheliograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Shibata, K.; Ueno, S.; Ichimoto, K.; Kitai, R.; Otsuji, K.

    2012-08-01

    We present the first simultaneous observations of chromospheric “anemone” jets in active regions with the Ca II H broadband filetergram on the Hinode/SOT and with the Ca II K spetroheliogram on the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at the Hida Observatory. During coordinated observation period, 9 chromospheric anemone jets were simultaneously observed with the two instruments. These observations revealed: (1) the jets are generated in the low chromosphere because these cannot be seen in Ca II K3, (2) these jets are associated with mixed polarity regions which are either small emerging flux regions or moving magnetic features, (3) the Ca II K line often show red or blue asymmetry in K2/K1 component; the footpoint of the jets associated with emerging flux regions often show red asymmetry (2-16 km s-1), while the one with moving magnetic features show blue asymmetry (˜5 km s-1). The magnetic cancellations were observed at the footpoint of the jets. The canceling rates are of order of 1016 Mx s-1, and the resulting magnetic energy release rate (1.1-10)×1024 erg s-1, with the total energy release (1-13)×1026 erg for the duration of the magnetic cancellations, ˜130 s. These are comparable to the estimated total energy, ˜1026 erg, in a single chromospheric anemone jet.

  16. VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYERS OF RADIATION-DOMINATED, RELATIVISTIC JETS. II. THE FREE-STREAMING JET MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2015-08-10

    We analyze the interaction of a radiation-dominated jet and its surroundings using the equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit. In a previous paper we considered the two-stream scenario, which treats the jet and its surroundings as distinct media interacting through radiation viscous forces. Here we present an alternative boundary layer model, known as the free-streaming jet model—where a narrow stream of fluid is injected into a static medium—and present solutions where the flow is ultrarelativistic and the boundary layer is dominated by radiation. It is shown that these jets entrain material from their surroundings and that their cores have a lower density of scatterers and a harder spectrum of photons, leading to observational consequences for lines of sight that look “down the barrel of the jet.” These jetted outflow models may be applicable to the jets produced during long gamma-ray bursts and super-Eddington phases of tidal disruption events.

  17. [Fe II] Emission Tracing Massive, Irradiated Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    We present new spectroscopy and HST and ground-based AO imaging of five protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars, but is excited by non-ionizing FUV photons that penetrate the ionization front within the jet. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude higher than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (~2-8 Msun) protostars. For two of the sources, mid-IR luminosities of the driving sources are clearly consistent with intermediate-mass protostars, while the other two driving sources are more deeply embedded and require imaging at longer wavelengths with high spatial resolution to confirm their luminosity. Tangential velocities from new proper motion measurements exceed velocities typical for lower-luminosity sources (100-200 km/s). In addition, these outflows are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exists in a feedback dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to ~8 Msun form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  18. Development and Testing of a Jet Assisted Polycrystalline Diamond Drilling Bit. Phase II Development Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Pixton

    1999-09-20

    Phase II efforts to develop a jet-assisted rotary-percussion drill bit are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) a design for a more robust polycrystalline diamond drag cutter; (2) a new drilling mechanism which improves penetration and life of cutters; and (3) a means of creating a high-pressure mud jet inside of a percussion drill bit. Field tests of the new drill bit and the new robust cutter are forthcoming.

  19. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the midpoint algorithm in Run II at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Group, Robert Craig

    2006-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint jet clustering algorithm in five different rapidity regions. This is the first analysis which measures the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint algorithm in the forward region of the detector. The measurement is based on more than 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of Run II data taken by the CDF experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The results are consistent with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  20. Dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV. II - Pitching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Maeda, H.

    The dynamic pitching characteristics of peripheral jet ACV (Air Cushion Vehicle) which have a stability curtain are investigated analytically and experimentally. The measured values of moment, lift and cushion pressure are compared with numerical results noting applicability to the pitching motion. The response of ACV to the sinusoidal pitching oscillation of the ground is also studied.

  1. Interaction of Fanaroff-Riley class II radio jets with a randomly magnetized intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Krause, M.; Alexander, P.

    2011-12-01

    A combination of 3D magnetohydrodynamics and synthetic numerical simulations are presented to follow the evolution of a randomly magnetized plasma that models the intracluster medium, under the isolated effects of powerful, light, hypersonic and bipolar Fanaroff-Riley class II jets. We prescribe the cluster magnetic field (CMF) as a Gaussian random field with a Kolmogorov-like energy spectrum. Both the power of the jets and the viewing angle that is used for the synthetic rotation measure (RM) observations are investigated. We find the model radio sources introduce and amplify fluctuations on the RM statistical properties which we analyse as a function of time as well as the viewing angle. The average RM and the RM standard deviation are increased by the action of the jets. Energetics, RM statistics and magnetic power spectral analysis consistently show that the effects also correlate with the jets' power, and that the lightest, fastest jets produce the strongest changes in their environment. We see jets distort and amplify the CMFs especially near the edges of the lobes and the jets' heads. This process leads to a flattening of the RM structure functions at scales comparable to the source size. The edge features we find are similar to ones observed in Hydra A. The results show that jet-produced RM enhancements are more apparent in quasars than in radio galaxies. Globally, jets tend to enhance the RM standard deviation which may lead to overestimations of the CMFs' strength by about 70 per cent. This study means to serve as a pathfinder for the SKA, EVLA and LOFAR to follow the evolution of cosmic magnetic fields.

  2. Triggering on B-jets at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, Silvia; Casarsa, Massimo; Cortiana, Giorgio; Donini, Julien; Lucchesi, Donatella; Pagan Griso, Simone; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a trigger algorithm able to select online events enriched of b-jets. This feature is of central interest in order to extend the physics reach for standard model and minimal super symmetric model Higgs decaying into a pair of b-quarks. The algorithm fully exploits the recently upgraded CDFII tracking system and Level 2 CALorimeter cluster finder. These upgrades are necessary to cope with Tevatron increasing luminosity and provide new and refined trigger primitives that are the key elements of our algorithm together with the already existing silicon vertex trigger. A b-hadron can travel some millimeters before decaying and the trigger algorithm exploits this characteristic by searching for tracks displaced with respect to the primary vertex and matched to energetic jets of particles. We discuss the study and the optimization of the algorithm, its technical implementation as well as its performance. The new trigger provides an efficient selection for Higgs decaying into a pair of b-quarks and runs up to high luminosity with an acceptable occupancy of the available bandwidth.

  3. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section at D0 Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Agram, Jean-Laurent

    2004-12-17

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the DØ experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb-1. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics.

  4. Jet-gas interactions and hotspots in FR I/II transition sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Diana; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Sources with intermediate FR I/II morphologies, and with powers in the decade straddling the FR I/II boundary, provide an opportunity to understand triggers responsible for the different workings of the two classes. Illustrated by deep Chandra observations of several sources, this presentation will show evidence that the physics changes within the transition range, and the work done in driving shocks can exceed that in evacuating the cavities common in FR I sources. Hotspots can be absent, seen only on one side (jet-side or counter-jet-side), or both, in which case X-ray/radio correspondence can be very different on the two sides. Evidence will be shown for radio-emitting plasma running along boundaries between gas of different temperature, apparently lubricating the gas flows and inhibiting heat transfer.

  5. AGN jet power, formation of X-ray cavities, and FR I/II dichotomy in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the ability of jets in active galactic nuclei to break out of the ambient gas with sufficiently large advance velocities. Using observationally estimated jet power, we analyze 28 bright elliptical galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters. Because the gas density profiles in the innermost regions of galaxies have not been resolved so far, we consider two extreme cases for temperature and density profiles. We also follow two types of evolution for the jet cocoons: being driven by the pressure inside the cocoon [Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I], and being driven by the jet momentum (FR type II). Our main result is that regardless of the assumed form of the density profiles, jets with observed powers of ≲1044 erg s-1 are not powerful enough to evolve as FR II sources. Instead, they evolve as FR I sources and appear to be decelerated below the buoyant velocities of the cocoons when jets were propagating through the central dense regions of the host galaxies. This explains why FR I sources are more frequent than FR II sources in clusters. Furthermore, we predict the sizes of X-ray cavities from the observed jet powers and compare them with the observed ones-they are consistent within a factor of two if the FR I type evolution is realized. Finally, we find that the jets with a power ≳1044 erg s-1 are less affected by the ambient medium, and some of them, but not all, could serve as precursors of the FR II sources.

  6. A Phase II Dose-Ranging Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of the Orexin Receptor Antagonist Filorexant (MK-6096) in Patients with Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Erin; Jackson, Saheeda; Hutzelmann, Jill; Zhao, Xin; Jia, Nan; Snyder, Ellen; Snavely, Duane; Michelson, David; Roth, Thomas; Herring, W. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Filorexant (MK-6096) is an orexin receptor antagonist; here, we evaluate the efficacy of filorexant in the treatment of insomnia in adults. Methods: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, two 4-week–period, adaptive crossover polysomnography study was conducted at 51 sites worldwide. Patients (18 to <65 years) with insomnia received 1 of 4 doses of oral filorexant (2.5, 5, 10, 20mg) once daily at bedtime during one period and matching placebo in the other period in 1 of 8 possible treatment sequences. Polysomnography was performed on night 1 and end of week 4 of each period. The primary endpoint was sleep efficiency at night 1 and end of week 4. Secondary endpoints included wakefulness after persistent sleep onset and latency to onset of persistent sleep. Results: A total of 324 patients received study treatment, 315 received ≥1 dose of placebo, and 318 ≥1 dose of filorexant (2.5mg, n=79; 5mg, n=78; 10mg, n=80; 20mg, n=81). All filorexant doses (2.5/5/10/20mg) were significantly superior to placebo in improving sleep among patients with insomnia as measured by sleep efficiency and wakefulness after persistent sleep onset on night 1 and end of week 4. The 2 higher filorexant doses (10/20mg) were also significantly more effective than placebo in improving sleep onset as measured by latency to onset of persistent sleep at night 1 and end of week 4. Filorexant was generally well tolerated. Conclusions: Orexin receptor antagonism by filorexant significantly improved sleep efficiency in nonelderly patients with insomnia. Dose-related improvements in sleep onset and maintenance outcomes were also observed with filorexant. PMID:26979830

  7. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets topology at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Tsukuba U.

    2007-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. They analyze events from the single lepton plus jets final state (t{bar t} {yields} W{sup +}bW{sup -}{bar b} {yields} lvbq{bar q}{bar b}). The top quark mass is extracted using a direct calculation of the probability density that each event corresponds to the t{bar t} final state. The probability is a function of both the mass of the top quark and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, they achieve the single most precise measurement of the top quark mass, 170.8 {+-} 2.2(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. HH 666: different kinematics from H α and [Fe II] emission provide a missing link between jets and outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Kiminki, Megan M.; Bally, John

    2015-06-01

    HH 666 is an externally irradiated protostellar outflow in the Carina nebula for which we present new near-IR [Fe II] spectra obtained with the Folded-Port Infrared Echellette spectrograph at Magellan Observatory. Earlier H α and near-IR [Fe II] imaging revealed that the two emission lines trace substantially different morphologies in the inner ˜40 arcsec of the outflow. H α traces a broad cocoon that surrounds the collimated [Fe II] jet that extends throughout the parent dust pillar. New spectra show that this discrepancy extends to their kinematics. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces steady, fast velocities of ±200 km s-1 from the eastern and western limbs of the jet. We compare this to a previously published H α spectrum that reveals a Hubble-flow velocity structure near the jet-driving source. New, second-epoch Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) H α images reveal the lateral spreading of the H α outflow lobe away from the jet axis. H α proper motions also indicate a sudden increase in the mass-loss rate ˜1000 yr ago, while steady [Fe II] emission throughout the inner jet suggest that the burst is ongoing. An accretion burst sustained for ˜1000 yr is an order of magnitude longer than expected for FU Orionis outbursts, but represents only a small fraction of the total age of the HH 666 outflow. Altogether, available data suggests that [Fe II] traces the highly collimated protostellar jet while H α traces the entrained and irradiated outflow. HH 666 appears to be a missing link between bare jets seen in H II regions and entrained molecular outflows seen from embedded protostars in more quiescent regions.

  9. HST/WFC3 imaging of protostellar jets in Carina: [Fe II] emission tracing massive jets from intermediate-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    We present narrow-band Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)-UVIS and WFC3-IR images of four externally irradiated protostellar jets in the Carina nebula: HH 666, HH 901, HH 902 and HH 1066. These massive jets are unusual because they are bathed in UV radiation from dozens of nearby O-type stars, but despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of the jet remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, far-ultraviolet radiation or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates on to their driving protostars, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (˜2-8 M⊙) stars. Indeed, the IR driving sources of two of these outflows have luminosities that require intermediate-mass protostars (the other two are so deeply embedded that their luminosity is uncertain). All four of these HH jets are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to those observed in low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in wide-angle molecular outflows associated with intermediate- and high-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable in the harsh radiative environment of the Carina nebula. In more quiescent environments, this atomic core remains invisible, and outflows traced by shock-excited molecules in the outflow cavity give the impression that these outflows have a wider opening angle. Thus, the externally irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars and offer strong additional evidence

  10. A Direct Top-Quark Width Measurement from Lepton + Jets Events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width using t{bar t} events produced in p{bar p} collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. In the mode where the top quark decays to a W boson and a bottom quark, we select events in which one W decays leptonically and the other hadronically (lepton + jets channel) . From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of W boson that decays hadronically are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths ({Lambda}{sub t}) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale ({Delta}{sub JES}) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where {Delta}{sub JES} is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of {Lambda}{sub t} < 7.6 GeV and a two-sided 68% CL interval of 0.3 GeV < {Lambda}{sub t} < 4.4 GeV for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}, which are consistant with the standard model prediction. This is the first direct measurement of {Lambda}{sub t} to set a lower limit with 68% CL.

  11. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Mark-II Ultra-Cold Jet Target.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppov, V. G.; Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Murray, J. R.; Neumann, J. J.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Kleppner, D.; Davidenko, A. M.; Grishin, V. N.

    2000-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Mark-II). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. Recently, the Jet produced a measured electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam of about 10^15 H s-1 into a 0.3 cm^2 area at the detector. This intensity corresponds to the free jet density of about 10^11 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. So far, the intensity is limited by the high insulation vacuum pressure due to the evaporation of the separation cell's helium film. The beam's angular and radial distributions were measured. A test of a new superfluid-^4He-coated parabolic mirror, attached to the separation cell, appeared to increase the beam intensity by a factor of about 3, as expected.

  12. SOLAR X-RAY JETS, TYPE-II SPICULES, GRANULE-SIZE EMERGING BIPOLES, AND THE GENESIS OF THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2011-04-10

    From Hinode observations of solar X-ray jets, Type-II spicules, and granule-size emerging bipolar magnetic fields in quiet regions and coronal holes, we advocate a scenario for powering coronal heating and the solar wind. In this scenario, Type-II spicules and Alfven waves are generated by the granule-size emerging bipoles (EBs) in the manner of the generation of X-ray jets by larger magnetic bipoles. From observations and this scenario, we estimate that Type-II spicules and their co-generated Alfven waves carry into the corona an area-average flux of mechanical energy of {approx}7 x 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. This is enough to power the corona and solar wind in quiet regions and coronal holes, and therefore indicates that the granule-size EBs are the main engines that generate and sustain the entire heliosphere.

  13. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR II Radio Galaxy 3C 353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun

    2008-12-24

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4''-wide and 2'-long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  14. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR-II Radio Galaxy 3C353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Siemiginowska, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Swain, M.R.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Goodger, J.L.; Iwasawa, K.; Edwards, P.G.

    2008-06-13

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4-inch wide and 2-feet long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Images of Herbig-Haro Energy Sources: [Fe II] Jets, Binarity, and Envelope Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Yu, Ka Chun; Heathcote, Steve; Bally, John; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2000-09-01

    We have observed seven regions surrounding the driving sources of Herbig-Haro flows using the NICMOS infrared camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope. These Herbig-Haro energy sources, which power the HH 34, 47, 83, 111, 199, 300, and 454 flows, have all been previously detected in the centimeter-wavelength radio continuum. The regions were imaged in two broadband filters, F160W and F205W, which, in addition to stellar continuum, principally transmit the [Fe II] 1.644 μm and H2 2.122 μm lines, respectively, of shocks present in the images. Highly collimated infrared jets emerge from the sources of HH 34, 111, 300, and 454. In all of these cases, the [Fe II] emission transmitted in the F160W filter is much stronger than the H2 emission in the F205W band. Combined with previously published NICMOS images of the bright [Fe II] HH 1 jet, these data suggest that [Fe II] emission may be as important a tracer of shocked jets in the infrared as [S II] emission is in the optical. [Fe II] emission may be enhanced near the driving sources relative to the H2 emission by a combination of high jet density and strong far-ultraviolet (7.6-13.6 eV) radiation from the forming star. The HH 454 [Fe II] jet, which emanates from the L1551 NE source, is pointed directly at the bright shock HH 29, providing further evidence that this young star, rather than L1551 IRS 5, is the source of the brightest Herbig-Haro object in the L1551 outflow complex. In five regions, the driving sources are visible at 2 μm. Among these, the sources powering HH 47 and HH 300 are found to be binary stars. One other young stellar system, the source of the HH 111 protostellar jet, is triple. When combined with other studies, these results indicate that 36% of 14 Herbig-Haro energy sources observed with NICMOS are multiple at near-infrared wavelengths with component separations greater than 0.15"-0.20". Therefore, considering incompleteness, obscuration, and faintness of possible companions in the observed

  16. The First measurement of the top quark mass at CDF II in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton + jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. They reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a non-parametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton + jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the diletpon channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. using 332 lepton + jets candidate events and 144 diletpon candidate events, they measure the top quark mass to be m{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Measurement of the W Plus N Inclusive Jets Cross-Section at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Stentz, Dale James

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we present the study of the production of the W boson in association with hadronic jets at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Along with the electroweak properties the W boson, we examine jet kinematic variables with the aim of studying predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We derive several di erential crosssections as a function of the inclusive jet multiplicity and the transverse momenta of each jet. In this analysis, we are using 2.8 fb-1 of data and consider both the electron and muon lepton nal states for the W boson decay.

  18. Metabolism of MK-499, a class III antiarrhythmic agent, in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Vickers, S; Duncan, C A; Slaughter, D E; Arison, B H; Greber, T; Olah, T V; Vyas, K P

    1998-05-01

    MK-499 [(+)-N-[1'-(6-cyano-1, 2, 3, 4-tetrahydro-2(R)-naphthalenyl)-3, 4-dihydro-4(R)-hydroxyspiro(2H-1-benzopyran-2, 4'-piperidin)-6-yl]methanesulfonamide] monohydrochloride is an investigational class III antiarrhythmic agent for treatment of malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The disposition of [3H]MK-499 and [14C]MK-499 was studied in rats and dogs after oral and iv administration. MK-499 was concentrated in organs of excretion and the heart. In the rat, urinary radioactivity elimination values after iv (0.5 mg/kg) and oral (6.25 mg/kg) doses were 21 +/- 3% and 10 +/- 2%, respectively. Corresponding fecal recoveries were 68 +/- 6% and 78 +/- 7%. Similar results were found after corresponding doses of [14C]MK-499. In dogs, urine and feces accounted for 16 +/- 3% and 75 +/- 4% of recovered radioactivity after a [3H]MK-499 iv dose (0.1 mg/kg). Corresponding recoveries after an oral dose (1 mg/kg) were 12 +/- 2% and 76 +/- 3%. Biliary (0-24 hr) excretion accounted for 39 +/- 5% and 41 +/- 18% of [3H] and [14C] oral doses in rats, respectively. Dogs excreted 34% of [3H] oral dose in (0-24 hr) bile. The data indicated that a substantial amount of MK-499 was absorbed by rats and dogs. MK-499, metabolite I (formed by loss of N-substitution), and metabolite II (an acid formed by metabolic scission across the benzopyran ring) each represented 30% of rat urinary label. Rat bile contained MK-499 (10%), II (20%), and IV (10%), which was formed by carbon-4 hydroxylation of the tetralin ring. Additionally, rat bile included glutathione (V) and N-acetyl-1-cysteine (VI) conjugates of a ring-opened metabolite. Metabolite III, a positional isomer of IV, was excreted in rat urine. The major labeled species excreted in dog bile were unchanged MK-499 and its glucuronide (VII), which, respectively, represented 50% and 30% of the biliary radioactivity. MK-499 and a small amount of I represented dog urinary radioactivity. The bioavailability of MK-499 was high in dogs (100%) but

  19. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets topology at CDF II.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-11-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. We analyze events from the single lepton plus jets final state (tt-->W(+)bW(-)b-->lnubqq'b). The top-quark mass is extracted using a direct calculation of the probability density that each event corresponds to the tt final state. The probability is a function of both the mass of the top quark and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we achieve the single most precise measurement of the top-quark mass, 170.8+/-2.2(stat.)+/-1.4(syst.) GeV/c(2).

  20. Pilot study of MK-462 in migraine.

    PubMed

    Cutler, N R; Claghorn, J; Sramek, J J; Block, G; Panebianco, D; Cheng, H; Olah, T V; Reines, S A

    1996-04-01

    MK-462 is a potent, selective 5HT1D receptor agonist which may be useful in treating acute migraine. We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled inpatient study to assess the preliminary efficacy and safety of oral doses of MK-462 20 mg (n = 8) and 40 mg (n = 36) vs placebo (n = 21), administered to 65 male and post-menopausal female migraine patients aged 22-51 with moderate or severe migraine headache. Headache severity and functional disability were measured at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 h post-dose. The 20 mg dose was well tolerated and 4/8 patients obtained relief in headache severity at the 2 h time point. The 40 mg dose was well tolerated and was significantly (p < 0.05) superior to placebo at the 1.5 and 2 h time points (with 27/36 or 75% obtaining relief at 2 h compared to 7/21 or 33% for placebo). Adverse events occurred in 50% of patients on 20 mg MK-462, 72% of those on 40 mg MK-462, and in 52% of placebo-treated subjects. The most common adverse events associated with MK-462 were drowsiness (20 mg 12%; 40 mg 44%; placebo 24%), dry mouth (40 mg 36%; placebo 19%), and lightheadedness/dizziness (40 mg 17%; placebo 10%). Based on these preliminary results, MK-462 appears worthy of continued study for the treatment of acute migraine. PMID:8665577

  1. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from blazar jets - II. An accelerating jet model with a geometry set by observations of M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, William J.; Cotter, Garret

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we develop the jet model of Potter & Cotter to include a magnetically dominated accelerating parabolic base transitioning to a slowly decelerating conical jet with a geometry set by recent radio observations of M87. We conserve relativistic energy-momentum and particle number along the jet and calculate the observed synchrotron emission from the jet by calculating the integrated line-of-sight synchrotron opacity through the jet in the rest frame of each section of plasma. We calculate the inverse-Compton emission from synchrotron, cosmic microwave background (CMB), accretion disc, starlight, broad-line region (BLR), dusty torus and narrow-line region photons by transforming into the rest frame of the plasma along the jet. We fit our model to simultaneous multi-wavelength observations of the Compton-dominant FSRQ type blazar PKS 0227-369, with a jet geometry set by M87 and an accelerating bulk Lorentz factor consistent with simulations and theory. We investigate models in which the jet comes into equipartition at different distances along the jet and equipartition is maintained via the conversion of jet bulk kinetic energy into particle acceleration. We find that the jet must still be magnetically dominated within the BLR and cannot be in equipartition due to the severe radiative energy losses. The model fits the observations, including radio data, very well if the jet comes into equipartition outside the BLR within the dusty torus (1.5 pc) or at further distances (34 pc). The fits require a high-power jet with a large bulk Lorentz factor observed close to the line of sight, consistent with our expectations for a Compton-dominant blazar. We find that our fit in which the jet comes into equipartition furthest along the jet, which has a jet with the geometry of M87 scaled linearly with black hole mass, has an inferred black hole mass close to previous estimates. This implies that the jet of PKS 0227 might be well described by the same jet geometry as M87.

  2. Development and testing of a high-pressure downhole pump for jet-assist drilling. Topical report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The goal of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in deeper gas and oil wells, where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. Increasing the ROP can result in fewer drilling days, and therefore, lower drilling cost. In late 1993, FlowDril and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) began a three-year development of a down hole pump (DHP{reg_sign}) capable of producing 30,000 psi out pressure to provide the high-pressure flow for high-pressure jet-assist of the drill bit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Morgantown, WV (DOE-Morgantown) field office, joined with GRI and FlowDril to develop and test a second prototype designed for drilling in 7-7/8 inch holes. This project, {open_quotes}Development and Testing of a High-Pressure Down Hole Pump for Jet-Assist Drilling,{close_quotes} is for the development and testing of the second prototype. It was planned in two phases. Phase I included an update of a market analysis, a design, fabrication, and an initial laboratory test of the second prototype. Phase II is continued iterative laboratory and field developmental testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase II. In the downhole pump approach shown in the following figure, conventional drill pipe and drill collars are used, with the DHP as the last component of the bottom hole assembly next to the bit. The DHP is a reciprocating double ended, intensifier style positive displacement, high-pressure pump. The drive fluid and the high-pressure output fluid are both derived from the same source, the abrasive drilling mud pumped downhole through the drill string. Approximately seven percent of the stream is pressurized to 30,000 psi and directed through a high-pressure nozzle on the drill bit to produce the high speed jet and assist the mechanical action of the bit to make it drill faster.

  3. Perturbative QCD description of jet data from LHC Run-I and Tevatron Run-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrazza, Stefano; Pires, João

    2014-10-01

    We present a systematic comparison of jet predictions at the LHC and the Tevatron, with accuracy up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The exact computation at NNLO is completed for the gluons-only channel, so we compare the exact predictions for this channel with an approximate prediction based on threshold resummation, in order to determine the regions where this approximation is reliable at NNLO. The kinematic regions used in this study are identical to the experimental setup used by recently published jet data from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, and CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron. We study the effect of choosing different renormalisation and factorisation scales for the NNLO exact prediction and as an exercise assess their impact on a PDF fit including these corrections. Finally we provide numerical values of the NNLO k-factors relevant for the LHC and Tevatron experiments.

  4. Relativistic simulations of black hole-neutron star coalescence: the jet emerges II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Milton; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Black hole-Neutron star (BHNS) systems have been suggested as viable central engines that power short-hard gamma ray bursts. We will present ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of BHNS systems in full general relativity that for the first time demonstrate that jets can be launched after NS tidal disruption if the NS is endowed with a dipolar B-field extending into the exterior. The exterior is initially characterized by a low density atmosphere with constant plasma parameter β ≡Pgas /Pmag . Varying β in the exterior from 0.1 to 0.01, we find that at ~ 100(MNS / 1 . 4M⊙) ms following the onset of accretion of tidally disrupted debris, magnetic field winding above the remnant black hole poles builds up the magnetic field sufficiently to launch a mildly relativistic, collimated outflow - an incipient jet. The duration of the accretion and the lifetime of the jet is Δt ~ 0 . 5(MNS / 1 . 4M⊙)s.

  5. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at D0 Run II with the Matrix Element Method in the Lepton+Jets Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Schieferdecker, Philipp

    2005-08-05

    The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model. Its precise knowledge yields valuable insights into unresolved phenomena in and beyond the Standard Model. A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton+jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events are selected requiring an isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse energy, and exactly four calorimeter jets. For each event, the probabilities to originate from the signal and background processes are calculated based on the measured kinematics, the object resolutions and the respective matrix elements. The jet energy scale is known to be the dominant source of systematic uncertainty. The reference scale for the mass measurement is derived from Monte Carlo events. The matrix element likelihood is defined as a function of both, m{sub top} and jet energy scale JES, where the latter represents a scale factor with respect to the reference scale. The top mass is obtained from a two-dimensional correlated fit, and the likelihood yields both the statistical and jet energy scale uncertainty. Using a dataset of 320 pb-1 of D0 Run II data, the mass of the top quark is measured to be: m$ℓ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 169.5 ± 4.4(stat. + JES)$+1.7\\atop{-1.6}$(syst.) GeV; m$e+jets\\atop{top}$ = 168.8 ± 6.0(stat. + JES)$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(syst.) GeV; m$μ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 172.3 ± 9.6(stat.+JES)$+3.4\\atop{-3.3}$(syst.) GeV. The jet energy scale measurement in the ℓ+jets sample yields JES = 1.034 ± 0.034, suggesting good consistency of the data with the simulation. The measurement forecasts significant improvements to the total top mass uncertainty during Run II before the startup of the LHC, as the data sample will grow by a factor of ten and D0's tracking capabilities will be employed in jet energy reconstruction and flavor identification.

  6. Altitude-chamber performance of British Rolls-Royce Nene II engine III : 18.00-inch-diameter jet nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grey, Ralph E; Brightwell, Virginia L; Barson, Zelmar; NACA

    1950-01-01

    An altitude-chamber investigation of British Rolls-Royce Nene II turbojet engine was conducted over range of altitudes from sea level to 65,000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.10 to 3.50, using an 18.00-inch-diameter jet nozzle. The 18.00-inch-diameter jet nozzle gave slightly lower values of net-thrust specific fuel consumption than either the 18.41- or the standard 18.75-inch-diameter jet nozzles at high flight speeds. At low flight speeds, the 18.41-inch-diameter jet nozzle gave the lowest value of net-thrust specific fuel consumption.

  7. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO II jet stream cirrus case study: Possible influences of volcanic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.; Starr, D.O.C.; Melfi, S.H.; Spinhirne, J.D.; Poellot, M.R.; Eberhard, W.L.; Eloranta, E.W.; Hagen, D.E.; Hallett, J.

    1995-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5-6 December 1992 Project FIRE IFO II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols from the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions may have significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur-based particles that became effective cloud-forming nuclei in cirrus clouds. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded within the upper-level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol-enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to {approximately}600 L{sup {minus}1}), complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between {minus}40{degrees} and {minus}50{degrees}C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects and usual (nonvolcanic aerosol) jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed. 42 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section using the lepton + jets final state at CDF II.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-03-12

    We report two complementary measurements of the WW + WZ cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using pp collision data at square root of s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second more sensitive method uses matrix-element calculations. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4sigma and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results gives sigma(WW + WZ) = 16.0 +/- 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  9. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  10. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  11. Probing the disc wind-jet connection in black hole transients II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Trigo, Maria

    2013-10-01

    We propose six observations of one high inclination black hole low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) at different stages of its outburst. We will investigate the presence of X-ray narrow absorption/emission features in the XMM spectra, which are a signature of a disc wind, and their relation to the accreting regime. Such features, identified with ions like FeXXV and FeXXVI, have been observed in a number of LMXBs and give us information about the mass outflow rate and the launching mechanism of the wind. With simultaneous radio observations we will probe the jet power as a function of the wind properties and how the radio flux density correlates with the X-ray flux at different accretion regimes. We will also investigate the broadening mechanism of the FeK emission line detected up to now in several LMXBs.

  12. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  13. Matrix stiffness affects endocytic uptake of MK2-inhibitor peptides.

    PubMed

    Brugnano, Jamie L; Panitch, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the role of substrate stiffness on the endocytic uptake of a cell-penetrating peptide was investigated. The cell-penetrating peptide, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase II (MK2), enters a primary mesothelial cell line predominantly through caveolae. Using tissue culture polystyrene and polyacrylamide gels of varying stiffness for cell culture, and flow cytometry quantification and enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) for uptake assays, we showed that the amount of uptake of the peptide is increased on soft substrates. Further, peptide uptake per cell increased at lower cell density. The improved uptake seen on soft substrates in vitro better correlates with in vivo functional studies where 10-100 µM concentrations of the MK2 inhibitor cell penetrating peptide demonstrated functional activity in several disease models. Additional characterization showed actin polymerization did not affect uptake, while microtubule polymerization had a profound effect on uptake. This work demonstrates that cell culture substrate stiffness can play a role in endocytic uptake, and may be an important consideration to improve correlations between in vitro and in vivo drug efficacy.

  14. Matrix Stiffness Affects Endocytic Uptake of MK2-Inhibitor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brugnano, Jamie L.; Panitch, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the role of substrate stiffness on the endocytic uptake of a cell-penetrating peptide was investigated. The cell-penetrating peptide, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase II (MK2), enters a primary mesothelial cell line predominantly through caveolae. Using tissue culture polystyrene and polyacrylamide gels of varying stiffness for cell culture, and flow cytometry quantification and enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) for uptake assays, we showed that the amount of uptake of the peptide is increased on soft substrates. Further, peptide uptake per cell increased at lower cell density. The improved uptake seen on soft substrates in vitro better correlates with in vivo functional studies where 10–100 µM concentrations of the MK2 inhibitor cell penetrating peptide demonstrated functional activity in several disease models. Additional characterization showed actin polymerization did not affect uptake, while microtubule polymerization had a profound effect on uptake. This work demonstrates that cell culture substrate stiffness can play a role in endocytic uptake, and may be an important consideration to improve correlations between in vitro and in vivo drug efficacy. PMID:24400117

  15. MK 82 bomb characterization donor study

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, R.A.; Hantel, L.W.

    1989-04-01

    Optical, radiographic, and electronic pin techniques were used to evaluate the fragmentation of tail- and side-initiated MK 82 MOD 1 general-purpose bombs. The bombs were found to contain large voids in the Tritonal explosive fill, which were randomly located from bomb to bomb. The void-side fragments had slightly greater average velocity in the far field. The nonvoid-side wall expansion rate was greater than for the void side for the first few centimeters of motion and then was overtaken by the void-side expansion in the 60- to 100-mm expansion region. The nonvoid-side behavior was quite uniform from bomb to bomb; the void-side expansion was not reproducible from bomb to bomb or from location to location on the same bomb. The data collected will be useful in evaluating suppression systems designed for use with MK 82 bombs. 21 tabs., 52 figs., 11 refs.

  16. [Fe II] 1.64 μm FEATURES OF JETS AND OUTFLOWS FROM YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jae-Joon; Chun, Moo-Young; Lyo, A.-Ran; Moon, Dae-Sik; Kyeong, Jaemann; Park, Byeong-Gon; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Sung, Hwankyung; Hur, Hyeonoh

    2013-11-01

    We present [Fe II] 1.64 μm imaging observations for jets and outflows from young stellar objects (YSOs) over the northern part (∼24' × 45') of the Carina Nebula, a massive star-forming region. The observations were performed with IRIS2 of the Anglo-Australian Telescope and the seeing was ∼1.''5 ± 0.''5. Eleven jet and outflow features are detected at eight different regions and are termed ionized Fe objects (IFOs). One Herbig-Haro candidate that was missed in Hubble Space Telescope Hα observations is newly identified as HHc-16, referring to our [Fe II] images. IFOs have knotty or longish shapes, and the detection rate of IFOs against previously identified YSOs is 1.4%, which should be treated as a lower limit. Four IFOs show anti-correlated peak intensities in [Fe II] and Hα, where the ratio I([Fe II])/I(Hα) is higher for longish IFOs than for knotty IFOs. We estimate the outflow mass loss rate from the [Fe II] flux using two different methods. The jet-driving objects are identified for three IFOs (IFO-2, -4, and -7) for which we study the relations between the outflow mass loss rate and the YSO physical parameters from the radiative transfer model fitting. The ratios of the outflow mass loss rate over the disk accretion rate for IFO-4 and -7 are consistent with the previously reported values (10{sup –2}-10{sup +1}), while the ratio is higher for IFO-2. This excess may result from underestimating the disk accretion rate. The jet-driving objects are likely to be low- or intermediate-mass stars. Other YSO physical parameters, such as luminosity and age, show reasonable relations or trends.

  17. Particle diffusion and localized acceleration in inhomogeneous AGN jets - II. Stochastic variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuhui; Pohl, Martin; Böttcher, Markus; Gao, Shan

    2016-05-01

    We study the stochastic variation of blazar emission under a 2D spatially resolved leptonic jet model we previously developed. Random events of particle acceleration and injection in small zones within the emission region are assumed to be responsible for flux variations. In addition to producing spectral energy distributions that describe the observed flux of Mrk 421, we further analyse the timing properties of the simulated light curves, such as the power spectral density (PSD) at different bands, flux-flux correlations, as well as the cross-correlation function between X-rays and TeV γ-rays. We find spectral breaks in the PSD at a time-scale comparable to the dominant characteristic time-scale in the system, which is usually the pre-defined decay time-scale of an acceleration event. Cooling imposes a delay, and so PSDs taken at lower energy bands in each emission component (synchrotron or inverse Compton) generally break at longer time-scales. The flux-flux correlation between X-rays and TeV γ-rays can be either quadratic or linear, depending on whether or not there are large variation of the injection into the particle acceleration process. When the relationship is quadratic, the TeV flares lag the X-ray flares, and the optical and GeV flares are large enough to be comparable to the ones in X-ray. When the relationship is linear, the lags are insignificant, and the optical and GeV flares are small.

  18. The jovian anticyclone BA. II. Circulation and interaction with the zonal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Legarreta, J.; García-Melendo, E.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.

    2009-10-01

    In this second part of our study of the large jovian anticyclone BA we present detailed measurements of its internal circulation and numerical models of its interaction with the zonal jets and nearby cyclonic regions. We characterized the flow using high-resolution observations obtained by the Cassini spacecraft in December 2000 (9 months after the genesis of BA as a result of the merger of two large White Ovals), by the ACS camera onboard HST in January 2005 and April 2006 and by the New Horizons spacecraft in February 2007. Cloud motions were derived from high-resolution images using an automatic correlator that provides a large sampling of the motions in images separated by short time intervals (30 min-2 h). The internal wind structure did not change when the oval changed its color reddening in late 2005-early 2006 and all four datasets from 2000 to 2007 consistently show a similar wind regime: an asymmetric intense anticyclonic vortex with faster winds in its Southern portion with mean speeds of 110 m/s and peak velocities of 135 m/s. These speeds are slightly higher than those measured in the three White Ovals predecessors of BA by the Voyagers [Mitchell, J.L., Beebe, R.F., Ingersoll, A.P., Garneau, G.W., 1981. J. Geophys. Res. 86, 8751-8757] and Galileo [Vasavada, A.R., and 13 colleagues, 1998. Icarus 135, 265-275] but not as much as it has been recently reported [Simon-Miller, A.A., Chanover, N.J., Orton, G.S., Sussman, M., Tsavaris, I.G., Karkoschka, E., 2006. Icarus 185, 558-562; Cheng, A.F., and 14 colleagues, 2008. Astronom. J. 135, 2446-2452]. The asymmetry of the velocities in the vortex is a consequence of the interaction of BA with the zonal circulation and emerges as a natural result in high-resolution simulations of the vortex dynamics using the EPIC model.

  19. Cytotoxic activity of the MK2 inhibitor CMPD1 in glioblastoma cells is independent of MK2

    PubMed Central

    Gurgis, FMS; Åkerfeldt, MC; Heng, B; Wong, C; Adams, S; Guillemin, GJ; Johns, TG; Chircop, M; Munoz, L

    2015-01-01

    MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) is a checkpoint kinase involved in the DNA damage response. MK2 inhibition enhances the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents; however, whether MK2 inhibition alone, without concurrent chemotherapy, would attenuate survival of cancer cells has not been investigated. CMPD1 is a widely used non-ATP competitive inhibitor that prevents MK2 phosphorylation. We employed CMPD1 together with MK2 knock-down and ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitor III (MK2i) in a panel of glioblastoma cells to assess whether MK2 inhibition could induce cancer cell death. While CMPD1 was effective at selective killing of cancer cells, MK2i and MK2 knock-down had no effect on viability of glioblastoma cells. CMPD1 treatment induced a significant G2/M arrest but MK2i-treated cells were only minimally arrested at G1 phase. Intriguingly, at doses that were cytotoxic to glioblastoma cells, CMPD1 did not inhibit phosphorylation of MK2 and of its downstream substrate Hsp27. These results suggest that CMPD1 exhibits cytotoxic activity independently of MK2 inhibition. Indeed, we identified tubulin as a primary target of the CMPD1 cytotoxic activity. This study demonstrates how functional and mechanistic studies with appropriate selection of test compounds, combining genetic knock-down and pharmacological inhibition, coordinating timing and dose levels enabled us to uncover the primary target of an MK2 inhibitor commonly used in the research community. Tubulin is emerging as one of the most common non-kinase targets for kinase inhibitors and we propose that potential tubulin-targeting activity should be assessed in preclinical pharmacology studies of all novel kinase inhibitors. PMID:27551460

  20. A magnetohydrodynamic model of the M87 jet. II. Self-consistent quad-shock jet model for optical relativistic motions and particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Masanori

    2014-04-20

    We describe a new paradigm for understanding both relativistic motions and particle acceleration in the M87 jet: a magnetically dominated relativistic flow that naturally produces four relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks (forward/reverse fast and slow modes). We apply this model to a set of optical super- and subluminal motions discovered by Biretta and coworkers with the Hubble Space Telescope during 1994-1998. The model concept consists of ejection of a single relativistic Poynting jet, which possesses a coherent helical (poloidal + toroidal) magnetic component, at the remarkably flaring point HST-1. We are able to reproduce quantitatively proper motions of components seen in the optical observations of HST-1 with the same model we used previously to describe similar features in radio very long baseline interferometry observations in 2005-2006. This indicates that the quad relativistic MHD shock model can be applied generally to recurring pairs of super/subluminal knots ejected from the upstream edge of the HST-1 complex as observed from radio to optical wavelengths, with forward/reverse fast-mode MHD shocks then responsible for observed moving features. Moreover, we identify such intrinsic properties as the shock compression ratio, degree of magnetization, and magnetic obliquity and show that they are suitable to mediate diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic particles via the first-order Fermi process. We suggest that relativistic MHD shocks in Poynting-flux-dominated helical jets may play a role in explaining observed emission and proper motions in many active galactic nuclei.

  1. Effect of the Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, MK-421, on Experimentally Induced Drinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregley, Melvin J.; Fater, Dennis C.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1982-01-01

    MK-421, the ethyl ester maleate salt of N-(S)-1-(ethoxycarbonyl)-3-phenyl-propyl- Ala-L-Pro, is an angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor. An initial objective was to determine whether MK-421, administered at 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/kg, ip to 96 female rats 15 min prior to administration of the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (25 microgram/kg, ip), would inhibit the drinking induced by isoproterenol during 2 h after its administration. The water intake induced by isoproterenol was inhibited significantly by 2.5 mg MK-421/kg. When a similar experiment was performed using Angiotensin I (AI) (200 microgram/kg, ip) as the dipsogenic agent, MK-421 (5 mg/kg, ip), administered 15 min prior to AI, inhibited significantly both the dipsogenic and the diuretic effect of AI. However, administration of angiotensin II (AII, 200 microgram/kg, ip) 15 min after MK-421 (5mg/kg) was accompanied by a water intake that did not differ from AII alone. The drink induced by ip administration of 1.0 m NaCl solution (1% of body wt, ip) was not inhibited by administration of MK-421 (5 mg/kg) 15 min prior to allowing access to water while the drink induced by a 24 h dehydration was partially inhibited. Thus, the drinks induced by administraition of either isoproterenol or AI are dependent on formation of AII. That induced by dehydration is partially dependent, while that induced by hypertonic siilinc is independent of the formation of AII.

  2. Relativistic Jets in the Radio Reference Frame Image Database. II. Blazar Jet Accelerations from the First 10 Years of Data (1994-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piner, B. G.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Marvin, C. J.; Arenson, J. G.; Charlot, P.; Fey, A. L.; Collioud, A.; Voitsik, P. A.

    2012-10-01

    We analyze blazar jet apparent speeds and accelerations from the RDV series of astrometric and geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiments. From these experiments, we have produced and analyzed 2753 global VLBI images of 68 sources at 8 GHz with a median beam size of 0.9 milliarcseconds (mas) and a median of 43 epochs per source. From this sample, we analyze the motions of 225 jet components in 66 sources. The distribution of the fastest measured apparent speed in each source has a median of 8.3c and a maximum of 44c. Sources in the 2FGL Fermi LAT catalog display higher apparent speeds than those that have not been detected. On average, components farther from the core in a given source have significantly higher apparent speeds than components closer to the core; for example, for a typical source, components at ~3 mas from the core (~15 pc projected at z ~ 0.5) have apparent speeds about 50% higher than those of components at ~1 mas from the core (~5 pc projected at z ~ 0.5). We measure accelerations of components in orthogonal directions parallel and perpendicular to their average velocity vector. Parallel accelerations have significantly larger magnitudes than perpendicular accelerations, implying that observed accelerations are predominantly due to changes in the Lorentz factor (bulk or pattern) rather than projection effects from jet bending. Positive parallel accelerations are significantly more common than negative ones, so the Lorentz factor (bulk or pattern) tends to increase on the scales observed here. Observed parallel accelerations correspond to modest source frame increases in the bulk or pattern Lorentz factor.

  3. [Fe II] 1.257 μm and He I 1.083 μm Emission in the Central Region of the Orion Nebula: H II Region, HH Flows, Jets, and Proplyds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Michihiro; Usuda, Tomonori; Sugai, Hajime; Suto, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Takeyama, Norihide; Aoki, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Kohei; Tanaka, Masuo

    2002-02-01

    The [Fe II] 1.257 μm and He I 1.083 μm emission lines were observed in the central 6'×8' region of the Orion Nebula, and their excitation in the photoionized H II region, HH flows, jets, and proplyds is investigated. Observations were carried out using the imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer MUSE at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 1.5 m infrared telescope, which provides a 4'×4' field of view and a spectral resolution λ/δλ of ~2000 at the observed wavelengths. The [Fe II] images exhibit (1) filamentary structures and diffuse emission, which presumably arise from ionization fronts of the photoionized H II region, and (2) a number of knots, some of which are newly identified. Centroidal velocities in most of the knots are negative relative to those in the ionization fronts by up to -60 km s-1, and observed line profiles in the bright knots exhibit blueshifted wings, agreeing with bow shock models. The He I 1.083 μm emission in the observed region is dominated by the photoionized H II region, and its distribution reflects the complicated nature of the excitation. The He I images also contain blueshifted emission from several HH flows and jets and redshifted emission associated with proplyds. Our results for the shocks suggest that the [Fe II] 1.257 μm and He I 1.083 μm emission reflects the ionization of the preshock gas: the [Fe II] 1.257 μm emission is prominent in shocks propagating in molecular/atomic gas, while the He I 1.083 μm is prominent in shocks in the photoionized H II region. Different line excitation in these shocks can be explained by the following physical properties and processes: (1) difference of the excitation energies from the ground state (1 and 20 eV for the [Fe II] and He I lines, respectively), (2) resonance scattering and collisional excitation from the metastable state, enhancing the He I 1.083 μm line in shocks in the photoionized H II region, (3) a large photoionization cross section of Fe+, causing the absence of

  4. ACS Chemical Neuroscience Molecule Spotlight on Telcagepant (MK-0974)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Telcagepant (MK-0974) is a novel calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist currently undergoing clinical trials for migraine (http://www.merck.com/research/pipeline/home.html). MK-0974 is currently being studied in phase III clinical trials. PMID:22816019

  5. Search for Anomalous Production of Photon + Jets + Missing Transverse Energy in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hewamanage, Samantha Kaushalya

    2011-01-01

    A model-independent signature-based search for physics beyond the Standard Model is performed in the photon + jets + missing transverse energy channel in \\ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector. Events with a photon + jets are predicted by the Standard Model and also by many theoretical models beyond the Standard Model. In the Standard Model, the main mechanisms for photon + jets production include quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon scattering. No intrinsic missing transverse energy is present in any of these Standard Model processes. In this search, photon + $\\geq$1 jet and photon + $\\geq$2 jet events are analyzed with and without a minimum requirement on the missing transverse energy. Numerous mass distributions and kinematic distributions are studied and no significant excess over the background prediction is found. All results indicate good agreement with expectations of the Standard Model.

  6. Measurement of the Inclusive Jet Cross Section using the k(T) algorithm in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, Anthony Allen; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, Konstantin; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Comenius U.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on measurements of the inclusive jet production cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using the k{sub T} algorithm and a data sample corresponding to 1.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II. The measurements are carried out in five different jet rapidity regions with |y{sup jet}| < 2.1 and transverse momentum in the range 54 < p{sub T}{sup jet} < 700 GeV/c. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions are in good agreement with the measured cross sections.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and food interaction of MK-462 in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Polvino, W J; Sciberras, D; Yogendran, L; Cerchio, K A; Christie, K; Olah, T V; McLoughlin, D; James, I; Rogers, J D

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single intravenous (IV) doses of 5-90 micrograms kg-1 of MK-462, and the effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of MK-462 administered orally to healthy males. Results of this study indicate that IV doses of MK-462 from 5 to 90 micrograms kg-1 are well tolerated. The disposition kinetics of MK-462 were linear for IV doses up to and including 60 micrograms kg-1. The values of the plasma clearance (CL), steady-state volume of distribution (Vss), plasma terminal half-life (t1/2), and mean residence time in the body (MRT) of MK-462 averaged 1376 mL min-1, 140 L, 1.8 h, and 1.7 h, respectively, and remained essentially constant over the dosage range of 10-60 micrograms kg-1 of IV MK-462. However, as the dose increased from 60 to 90 micrograms kg-1, the mean value of the apparent CL decreased from 1376 to 807 mL min-1. Thus, elimination of MK-462 was dose dependent in this dosage range. Based on the disposition decomposition analysis (DDA), it was shown that the Vss value of MK-462 remained essentially constant over the dosage range of 10-90 micrograms kg-1 of IV MK-462. The following values of two dose-independent parameters were also calculated by using DDA: distribution clearance (CLd) = 2028 mL min-1, and mean transit time in the peripheral tissues (MTTT) = 0.74 h. The mean values of AUC, Cmax, tmax, and apparent t1/2 of MK-462 in 12 subjects each receiving a 40 mg tablet of MK-462 without breakfast were 330 ng.h mL-1, 77 ng mL-1, 1.6 h, and 1.8 h, respectively. Although administration of a standard breakfast prior to dosing increased the AUC value (by approximately 20%) of MK-462 and delayed its absorption, there were no significant effects of the meal on the values of Cmax and apparent t1/2 of MK-462. PMID:8991488

  8. Complete multiwavelength evolution of galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. II. Compact jets and X-ray variability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dinçer, T.; Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the relation between compact jet emission and X-ray variability properties of all black hole transients with multiwavelength coverage during their outburst decays. We studied the evolution of all power spectral components (including low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations; QPOs), and related this evolution to changes in jet properties tracked by radio and infrared observations. We grouped sources according to their tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation and show that the standards show stronger broadband X-ray variability than outliers at a given X-ray luminosity when the compact jet turns on. This trend is consistent with the internal shock model and can be important for the understanding of the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation. We also observed that the total and the QPO rms amplitudes increase together during the earlier part of the outburst decay, but after the compact jet turns, either the QPO disappears or its rms amplitude decreases significantly while the total rms amplitudes remain high. We discuss these results with a scenario including a variable corona and a non-variable disk with a mechanism for the QPO separate from the mechanism that creates broad components. Finally, we evaluated the timing predictions of the magnetically dominated accretion flow model that can explain the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation.

  9. Shot noise thermometry down to 10 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spietz, Lafe; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Pari, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    The authors report measurements of the shot noise thermometer (SNT), a primary thermometer based on the electronic noise from a tunnel junction, in the range from 10to200mK. They demonstrate operation of the SNT down to 10mK with 10% accuracy at the lowest measured temperature. At 10mK, where for a measurement frequency of f =450MHz, hf =2.5kBT, the authors demonstrate that provided that quantum corrections are taken into account, the SNT continues to be a practical thermometer. They also show that self-heating is not a measurable problem and demonstrate a simplified readout of the SNT.

  10. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor MK-626 restores insulin secretion through enhancing autophagy in high fat diet-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Liu, Jian; Yu, Xiaoxing

    2016-02-12

    Autophagy is cellular machinery for maintenance of β-cell function and mass. The current study aimed to investigate the regulatory effects of MK-626, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on insulin secretion through the activation of autophagy in high fat diet-induced obese mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a rodent diet containing 45 kcal% fat for 16 weeks to induce obesity and then were received either vehicle or MK-626 (3 mg/kg/day) orally during the final 4 weeks. Mouse islets were isolated. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine-protein kinase mTOR and levels of light chain 3B I (LC3B I), LC3B II, sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1/p62) and autophagy-related protein-7 (Atg7) were examined by Western blotting. Glucagon like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) level and insulin secretion were measured by ELISA. GLP-1 level in plasma was decreased in obese mice, which was elevated by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor MK-626. In the islets of obese mice, phosphorylation of mTOR, ratio of LC3B I and LC3B II, and level of p62 were elevated and the expression of Atg7 and insulin secretion were reduced compared to those of C57BL/6 mice. However, such effects were reversed by MK-626. Autophagy activator rapamycin stimulated insulin secretion in obese mice but autophagy inhibitor chloroquine treatment inhibited insulin secretion in obese mice administrated by MK-626. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of MK-626 were inhibited by GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39. The present study reveals the activation of autophagy to mediate the anti-diabetic effect of GLP-1.

  11. THE FERMI BUBBLES. II. THE POTENTIAL ROLES OF VISCOSITY AND COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN JET MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G.; Oh, S. Peng

    2012-09-10

    The origin of the Fermi bubbles recently detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the inner Galaxy is mysterious. In the companion paper Guo and Mathews (Paper I), we use hydrodynamic simulations to show that they could be produced by a recent powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet event. Here, we further explore this scenario to study the potential roles of shear viscosity and cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion on the morphology and CR distribution of the bubbles. We show that even a relatively low level of viscosity ({mu}{sub visc} {approx}> 3 g cm{sup -1} s{sup -1}, or {approx}0.1%-1% of Braginskii viscosity in this context) could effectively suppress the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the bubble surface, resulting in smooth bubble edges as observed. Furthermore, viscosity reduces circulating motions within the bubbles, which would otherwise mix the CR-carrying jet backflow near bubble edges with the bubble interior. Thus viscosity naturally produces an edge-favored CR distribution, an important ingredient to produce the observed flat gamma-ray surface brightness distribution. Generically, such a CR distribution often produces a limb-brightened gamma-ray intensity distribution. However, we show that by incorporating CR diffusion that is strongly suppressed across the bubble surface (as inferred from sharp bubble edges) but is close to canonical values in the bubble interior, we obtain a reasonably flat gamma-ray intensity profile. The similarity of the resulting CR bubble with the observed Fermi bubbles strengthens our previous result in Paper I that the Fermi bubbles were produced by a recent AGN jet event. Studies of the nearby Fermi bubbles may provide a unique opportunity to study the potential roles of plasma viscosity and CR diffusion on the evolution of AGN jets and bubbles.

  12. The Fermi Bubbles. II. The Potential Roles of Viscosity and Cosmic-Ray Diffusion in Jet Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.; Dobler, Gregory; Oh, S. Peng

    2012-09-01

    The origin of the Fermi bubbles recently detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the inner Galaxy is mysterious. In the companion paper Guo & Mathews (Paper I), we use hydrodynamic simulations to show that they could be produced by a recent powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet event. Here, we further explore this scenario to study the potential roles of shear viscosity and cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion on the morphology and CR distribution of the bubbles. We show that even a relatively low level of viscosity (μvisc >~ 3 g cm-1 s-1, or ~0.1%-1% of Braginskii viscosity in this context) could effectively suppress the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the bubble surface, resulting in smooth bubble edges as observed. Furthermore, viscosity reduces circulating motions within the bubbles, which would otherwise mix the CR-carrying jet backflow near bubble edges with the bubble interior. Thus viscosity naturally produces an edge-favored CR distribution, an important ingredient to produce the observed flat gamma-ray surface brightness distribution. Generically, such a CR distribution often produces a limb-brightened gamma-ray intensity distribution. However, we show that by incorporating CR diffusion that is strongly suppressed across the bubble surface (as inferred from sharp bubble edges) but is close to canonical values in the bubble interior, we obtain a reasonably flat gamma-ray intensity profile. The similarity of the resulting CR bubble with the observed Fermi bubbles strengthens our previous result in Paper I that the Fermi bubbles were produced by a recent AGN jet event. Studies of the nearby Fermi bubbles may provide a unique opportunity to study the potential roles of plasma viscosity and CR diffusion on the evolution of AGN jets and bubbles.

  13. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  14. Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D I; George, R E; Gunnarsson, D; Haley, R P; Heikkinen, H; Pashkin, Yu A; Penttilä, J; Prance, J R; Prunnila, M; Roschier, L; Sarsby, M

    2016-01-01

    Cooling nanoelectronic structures to millikelvin temperatures presents extreme challenges in maintaining thermal contact between the electrons in the device and an external cold bath. It is typically found that when nanoscale devices are cooled to ∼ 10 mK the electrons are significantly overheated. Here we report the cooling of electrons in nanoelectronic Coulomb blockade thermometers below 4 mK. The low operating temperature is attributed to an optimized design that incorporates cooling fins with a high electron-phonon coupling and on-chip electronic filters, combined with low-noise electronic measurements. By immersing a Coulomb blockade thermometer in the (3)He/(4)He refrigerant of a dilution refrigerator, we measure a lowest electron temperature of 3.7 mK and a trend to a saturated electron temperature approaching 3 mK. This work demonstrates how nanoelectronic samples can be cooled further into the low-millikelvin range. PMID:26816217

  15. Shot Noise Thermometry down to 10 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spietz, Lafe; Schoelkopf, Robert

    2007-03-01

    We report measurements of the Shot Noise Thermometer (SNT), a primary thermometer based on the electronic noise from a tunnel junction, in the range from 10 mK to 200 mK. We demonstrate operation of the SNT down to 10 mK with 10% accuracy at the lowest measured temperature. At 10 mK, where for a measurement frequency of f=450 MHz, hf=2.5kBT, we demonstrate that, provided that quantum corrections are taken into account, the SNT continues to be a practical thermometer. We also show that self-heating is not a measurable problem and demonstrate a simplified readout of the SNT.

  16. Mk12A/W78 ground test project (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Kyle R

    2010-12-01

    The slides present the scope, objectives and status of the Mk12A1W78 Ground Test Project for the purpose of updating the ICBM Project Officers Group. In addition, project constraints and risks are discussed.

  17. Scaffolding by ERK3 regulates MK5 in development

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Stefanie; Laaß, Kathrin; Kant, Shashi; Shi, Yu; Visel, Axel; Gruber, Achim D; Kotlyarov, Alexey; Gaestel, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular-regulated kinase 3 (ERK3, MAPK6) is an atypical member of the ERKs, lacking the threonine and tyrosine residues in the activation loop, carrying a unique C-terminal extension and being mainly regulated by its own protein stability and/or by autophosphorylation. Here we show that ERK3 specifically interacts with the MAPK-activated protein kinase 5 (MK5 or PRAK) in vitro and in vivo. Expression of ERK3 in mammalian cells leads to nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation and activation of MK5 and to phosphorylation of both ERK3 and MK5. Remarkably, activation of MK5 is independent of ERK3 enzymatic activity, but depends on its own catalytic activity as well as on a region in the C-terminal extension of ERK3. In mouse embryonic development, mRNA expression patterns of ERK3 and MK5 suggest spatiotemporal coexpression of both kinases. Deletion of MK5 leads to strong reduction of ERK3 protein levels and embryonic lethality at about stage E11, where ERK3 expression in wild-type mice is maximum, indicating a role of this signalling module in development. PMID:15538386

  18. Critical evaluation of Jet-A spray combustion using propane chemical kinetics in gas turbine combustion simulated by KIVA-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Ying, S.-J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Jet-A spray combustion were obtained by means of the KIVA-II computer code after Jet-A properties were added to the 12 chemical species the program had initially contained. Three different reaction mechanism models are considered. The first model consists of 131 reactions and 45 species; it is evaluated by comparing calculated ignition delay times with available shock tube data, and it is used in the evaluation of the other two simplified models. The simplified mechanisms consider 45 reactions and 27 species and 5 reactions and 12 species, respectively. In the prediction of pollutants NOx and CO, the full mechanism of 131 reactions is considered to be more reliable. The numerical results indicate that the variation of the maximum flame temperature is within 20 percent as compared with that of the full mechanism of 131 reactions. The chemical compositions of major components such as C3H8, H2O, O2, CO2, and N2 are of the same order of magnitude. However, the concentrations of pollutants are quite different.

  19. Alopecia in a novel mouse model RCO3 is caused by mK6irs1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Peters, T; Sedlmeier, R; Büssow, H; Runkel, F; Lüers, G H; Korthaus, D; Fuchs, H; Hrabé de Angelis, M; Stumm, G; Russ, A P; Porter, R M; Augustin, M; Franz, T

    2003-10-01

    Reduced coat 3 (Rco3) is a new spontaneous autosomal recessive mutation with defects in hair structure and progressive alopecia. Here we describe chromosomal mapping and molecular identification of the Rco3 mutation. The murine Rco3 locus maps to a 2-Mb interval on chromosome 15 encompassing the keratin type II gene cluster. Recently, mK6irs1 was described as a type II keratin expressed in Henle's and Huxley's layer of the murine inner root sheath. Genomic sequencing revealed a 10-bp deletion in exon 1 of mK6irs1 resulting in a frameshift after 58 amino acid residues and, therefore, the absence of 422 carboxy-terminal amino acid residues containing the complete alpha-helical rod domain. Henle's and Huxley's layers show no immunoreactivity with mK6irs1-specific antibodies and the absence of intermediate filament formation in electron microscopic images. These results indicate that the expression of functional mK6irs1 is indispensable for intermediate filament formation in the inner root sheath and highlights the importance of the keratinization of the inner root sheath in the normal formation of the hair shaft.

  20. Measurement of R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in top-quark-pair decays using lepton+jets events and the full CDF run II dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-06-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents quarks of type b, s, or d, in the final state with a lepton and hadronic jets. The measurement uses s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collision data from 8.7fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We simultaneously measure R=0.94±0.09 (stat+syst) and the tt¯ production cross section σtt¯=7.5±1.0(stat+syst)pb. The magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, |Vtb|=0.97±0.05 (stat+syst) is extracted assuming three generations of quarks, and a lower limit of |Vtb|>0.89 at 95% credibility level is set.

  1. Multiple scattering of light in a spherical cometary atmosphere with an axisymmetric dust jet. II - Image simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chick, Kenneth M.; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical solution for the multiple light scattering in spherical axisymmetric geometry is applied to the simulation of images of a coma as it would appear to a near-flying satellite such as Giotto. The appearance of symmetric comas and dust jets is examined in detail; the nucleus visibility is studied; the effect of forward scattering is considered; and single and multiple scattering effects are quantified. Attention is given to simulated images of a coma with a hollow cone of dust, as predicted by dust-gas hydrodynamic modeling. The cone's appearance is very similar to the northern area of activity on Comet Halley, observed by the Giotto HMC.

  2. DARK JETS IN SOLAR CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Peter R.

    2015-03-10

    A new solar feature termed a dark jet is identified from observations of an extended solar coronal hole that was continuously monitored for over 44 hr by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode spacecraft in 2011 February 8–10 as part of Hinode Operation Plan No. 177 (HOP 177). Line of sight (LOS) velocity maps derived from the coronal Fe xii λ195.12 emission line, formed at 1.5 MK, revealed a number of large-scale, jet-like structures that showed significant blueshifts. The structures had either weak or no intensity signal in 193 Å filter images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, suggesting that the jets are essentially invisible to imaging instruments. The dark jets are rooted in bright points and occur both within the coronal hole and at the quiet Sun–coronal hole boundary. They exhibit a wide range of shapes, from narrow columns to fan-shaped structures, and sometimes multiple jets are seen close together. A detailed study of one dark jet showed LOS speeds increasing along the jet axis from 52 to 107 km s{sup −1} and a temperature of 1.2–1.3 MK. The low intensity of the jet was due either to a small filling factor of 2% or to a curtain-like morphology. From the HOP 177 sample, dark jets are as common as regular coronal hole jets, but their low intensity suggests a mass flux around two orders of magnitude lower.

  3. Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

    2006-05-01

    Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Dopplerlidar wind data, and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX), explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response issues if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short-lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

  4. Effect of jet-fuel exposure on advanced aerospace composites, II: Mechanical properties. Final report, May-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Curliss, D.B.; Carlin, D.M.

    1990-08-01

    The sensitivity of several advanced aerospace composite materials to military jet fuel, JP-4, was investigated in this study. The following commercially available fiber/matrix prepreg materials were used in this investigation: AS-4/3501-6; IM7/8551-7A; IM7/977-2 (1377-2T); IM7/5250-4; IM8HTA; and AS-4/PEEK(APC-2). The materials were chosen as representative state-of-the-art materials in their classes of standard epoxy, toughened epoxy, toughened BMI, and thermoplastic matrix composites respectively. The materials were processed into (+ or - 45)2S, (0)12T laminates using the manufacturer's recommended process cycle and standard quality assurance checks were performed on the panels. Standard geometry coupons were fabricated from the panels and divided into a control set and test set. The test coupons were immersed in JP-4 in a sealed pressure vessel at 180 F. The weight gain was recorded as a function of the square root of time and the jet fuel was exchanged each time the coupon weight was recorded. In general, the thermoset matrix composites did not pick-up significant levels of fuel in any lay-up examined; while the thermoplastics did absorb JP-4. The amount of JP-4 absorbed by the thermoplastic matrix composites was dependent on the lay-up. After 1680 hours of total exposure time the mechanical properties of the coupons were evaluated.

  5. Clinical physiology and mechanism of dizocilpine (MK-801)

    PubMed Central

    Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2010-01-01

    Dizocilpine (MK-801), an extensively investigated drug possessing secondary amine and benzenoid functions, displays a wide array of biological properties, including anticonvulsant and anesthetic. There is scant discussion of biomechanism. A relevant, important finding is formation of oxidative metabolites in the hydroxylamine and phenolic categories. Analogy to cocaine metabolites suggests participation of redox entities, such as, hydroxylamine, nitroxide and nitrosonium, which can lead to electron transfer and radical formation. There is also similarity to metabolism by 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile and phencyclidine. Alternatively, the phenolic metabolites are well-known precursors of ET quinones. The review documents various physiological effects, mainly involving the central nervous system. Also of interest are the pro- and anti-oxidant properties. Considerable attention has been paid to MK-801 as an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the glutamate category. This aspect is often associated with effects on the central nervous system. The review also provides recent literature dealing with MK-801/NMDA receptor in various areas of bioactivity. Studies were made of MK-801 involvement in working memory processing. Deficits in behavior were noted after administration of the drug. Treatment of mice with dizocilpine induced learning impairment. The influence of MK-801 on fear has been investigated. The substance is known to exert an analgesic effect in pain control. A number of reports deal with anesthetic properties. PMID:20716924

  6. Sound generated by instability waves of supersonic flows. I Two-dimensional mixing layers. II - Axisymmetric jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Burton, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the phenomenon of sound generation by spatially growing instability waves in high-speed flows. It is pointed out that this process of noise generation is most effective when the flow is supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. The inner and outer asymptotic expansions corresponding to an excited instability wave in a two-dimensional mixing layer and its associated acoustic fields are constructed in terms of the inner and outer spatial variables. In matching the solutions, the intermediate matching principle of Van Dyke and Cole is followed. The validity of the theory is tested by applying it to an axisymmetric supersonic jet and comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements. Very favorable agreements are found both in the calculated instability-wave amplitude distribution (the inner solution) and the near pressure field level contours (the outer solution) in each case.

  7. Analysis of Performance of Jet Engine from Characteristics of Components II : Interaction of Components as Determined from Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Alpert, Sumner; Beede, William; Kovach, Karl

    1949-01-01

    In order to understand the operation and the interaction of jet-engine components during engine operation and to determine how component characteristics may be used to compute engine performance, a method to analyze and to estimate performance of such engines was devised and applied to the study of the characteristics of a research turbojet engine built for this investigation. An attempt was made to correlate turbine performance obtained from engine experiments with that obtained by the simpler procedure of separately calibrating the turbine with cold air as a driving fluid in order to investigate the applicability of component calibration. The system of analysis was also applied to prediction of the engine and component performance with assumed modifications of the burner and bearing characteristics, to prediction of component and engine operation during engine acceleration, and to estimates of the performance of the engine and the components when the exhaust gas was used to drive a power turbine.

  8. Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the Lepton+Jets Final State at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-11-01

    We report two complementary measurements of the diboson (WW + WZ) cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second method uses more of the kinematic information in the event through matrix-element calculations of the signal and background processes and has a higher sensitivity. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4{sigma} and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results from both methods gives {sigma}{sub WW+WZ} = 16.0 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  9. W + jet production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, Andrea; /INFN, Rome

    2006-10-01

    A measurement of W {yields} e{nu} + n-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II (CDF II) is presented. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}, and includes events with up to 4 or more jets. In each jet multiplicity sample the differential and cumulative cross sections with respect to the transverse energy of the i{sup th} jet are measured. For W+ {ge} 2 jets the differential cross section with respect to the 2-leading jets invariant mass m{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} and angural separation {Delta} R{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} is also reported. The data are compared to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. SAFARI engineering model 50 mK cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duband, L.; Duval, J. M.; Luchier, N.

    2014-11-01

    SAFARI is an infrared instrument developed by a European based consortium to be flown in SPICA, a Japanese led mission. The SAFARI detectors are transition edge sensors (TES) and require temperatures down to 50 mK for their operation. For that purpose we have developed a hybrid architecture based on the combination of a 300 mK sorption stage and a small adiabatic demagnetization stage. An engineering model has been designed to provide net heat lifts of 0.4 and 14 μW respectively at 50 and 300 mK, with an overall cycle duration of 48 h and a duty cycle objective of over 75%. The cooler is self-contained, fits in a volume of 156 × 312 × 182 mm and is expected to weigh 5.1 kg. It has been designed to withstand static loads of 120 g and a random vibration level of 21 g RMS.

  11. The mystery of the frozen M-K medium.

    PubMed

    McGee, J; Lanier, J D

    1980-09-01

    Donor corneal material stored or transported in M-K medium can freeze easily if placed in an insulated environment, such as a styrofoam container, with ice that is colder than 0 degrees C. To assure proper maintenance of the recommended temperature of M-K medium of + 4 degrees C, the ice used should be allowed to stand at room temperature until it has a glistening, wet look to its surfaces. M-K medium already cooled to + 4 degrees C can be safely stored and maintained at + 4 degrees C in a well-insulated styrofoam container for approximately 24 hours if this type of glistening-wet, melting ice is used.

  12. mkESA: enhanced suffix array construction tool.

    PubMed

    Homann, Robert; Fleer, David; Giegerich, Robert; Rehmsmeier, Marc

    2009-04-15

    We introduce the tool mkESA, an open source program for constructing enhanced suffix arrays (ESAs), striving for low memory consumption, yet high practical speed. mkESA is a user-friendly program written in portable C99, based on a parallelized version of the Deep-Shallow suffix array construction algorithm, which is known for its high speed and small memory usage. The tool handles large FASTA files with multiple sequences, and computes suffix arrays and various additional tables, such as the LCP table (longest common prefix) or the inverse suffix array, from given sequence data. PMID:19246510

  13. Testing of 100 mK bolometers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, A. G.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bhatia, R. S.; Griffin, M. J.; Maffei, B.; Nartallo, R.; Beeman, J. W.; Bock, J.; Lange, A.; DelCastillo, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical and optical performance data are presented for a prototype 100 mK spider-web bolometer operating under very low photon backgrounds. These data are compared with the bolometer theory and are used to estimate the expected sensitivity of such a detector used for low background space astronomy. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of response requirements of the bolometer instruments proposed for these missions can be met by 100 mK spider-web bolometers using neutron transmutation doped germanium as the temperature sensitive element.

  14. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  15. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  16. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  17. Search for vector-like quark production in the lepton+jets and dilepton+jets final states using 5.4 fb-1 of Run II data

    SciTech Connect

    Caughron, Seth

    2011-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics provides an excellent description of particle interactions at energies up to ~1 TeV, but it is expected to fail above that scale. Multiple models developed to describe phenomena above the TeV scale predict the existence of very massive, vector-like quarks. A search for single electroweak production of such particles in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is performed in the W+jets and Z+jets channels. The data were collected by the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1. Events consistent with a heavy object decaying to a vector boson and a jet are selected. We observe no significant excess in comparison to the background prediction and set 95% confidence level upper limits on production cross sections for vector-like quarks decaying to W+jet and Z+jet. Assuming a vector-like quark -- standard model quark coupling parameter $\\tilde{κ}$qQ of unity, we exclude vector-like quarks with mass below 693 GeV for decays to W+jet and mass below 449 GeV for decays to Z+jet. These represent the most sensitive limits to date.

  18. Explosive Nucleosynthesis in Magnetohydrodynamical Jets from Collapsars. II --- Heavy-Element Nucleosynthesis of s, p, r-Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Kotake, K.; Yamada, S.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis in a massive star of 70 M_{⊙} with solar metallicity in the main sequence stage. The helium core mass after hydrogen burning corresponds to 32 M_{⊙}. Nucleosynthesis calculations have been performed during the stellar evolution and the jetlike supernova explosion of a collapsar model. We focus on the production of elements heavier than iron group nuclei. Nucleosynthesis calculations have been accomplished consistently from hydrostatic to dynamic stages by using large nuclear reaction networks, where the weak s-, p-, and r-processes are taken into account. We confirm that s-elements of 60 < A < 90 are highly overproduced relative to the solar abundances in the hydrostatic nucleosynthesis. During oxygen burning, p-elements of A > 90 are produced via photodisintegrations of seed s-elements. However, the produced p-elements are disintegrated in later stages except for ^{180}Ta. In the explosive nucleosynthesis, elements of 90 < A < 160 are significantly overproduced relative to the solar values owing to the r-process, which is very different from the results of spherical explosion models. Only heavy p-elements (N > 50) are overproduced via the p-process because of the low peak temperatures in the oxygen- and neon-rich layers. Compared with the previous study of r-process nucleosynthesis calculations in the collapsar model of 40 M_{⊙} by Fujimoto et al. [S. Fujimoto, M. Hashimoto, K. Kotake and S. Yamada, Astrophys. J. 656 (2007), 382; S. Fujimoto, N. Nishimura and M. Hashimoto, Astrophys. J. 680 (2008), 1350], our jet model cannot contribute to the third peak of the solar r-elements and intermediate p-elements, which have been much produced because of the distribution of the lowest part of electron fraction in the ejecta. Averaging the overproduction factors over the progenitor masses with the use of Salpeter's IMF, we suggest that the 70 M_{⊙} star could contribute to the solar weak s}-elements of 60 < A < 90 and neutron

  19. An Analysis of 50mK and 300mK Cryogenic Environments for Future ESA Science Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J.; Perkinson, M. C.; D'Arrigo, P.; Geelen, K.; Hepburn, I.; Brockley-Blatt, C.; Duband, L.; Bradshaw, T.

    2008-03-01

    A number of future European Space Agency (ESA), science missions may require detector cooling to sub-Kelvin temperatures. One such mission is the X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy (XEUS), mission, which is a candidate for the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 plan, following XMM-Newton and Chandra. The Detector Spacecraft model payload comprises a passively cooled wide-field camera at 200K, and one of two narrow-field instruments at 300mK and 50mK. As with several other science missions, the required lifetime is at least 5 years, with a 10 year goal, necessitating the use of long-life closed cycle cooling systems. Under contract to ESA, Astrium has worked with the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), and CEA-SBT, to propose a payload accommodation design for XEUS capable of meeting the demanding requirements. Our baseline consists of a two stage Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR), at 50mK, and a helium sorption cooler at 300mK. Each system will be pre-cooled by a closed cycle J-T system, similar to Planck, at 2.5K or 4K, which itself will be pre-cooled by a two-stage Stirling cycle cooler, at 17K or 18K. This paper describes the mission, and discusses the cryogenic architectures in depth.

  20. Inclusive jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-08-01

    Preliminary results on inclusive jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data are presented. Measurements are preformed using different jet algorithms in a wide range of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. The measured cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations

  1. A retinoid responsive cytokine gene, MK, is preferentially expressed in the proximal tubules of the kidney and human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, M.; Shirasawa, T.; Mitarai, T.; Muramatsu, T.; Maruyama, N.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the expression of an embryonic cytokine gene, MK, in the normal organs and neoplastic tissues of adults. Northern analysis showed that MK mRNA was exclusively expressed in the kidney among murine organs including thymus, lung, heart, spleen, liver, and kidney. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that MK expression was localized in the proximal tubules and metaplastic Bowman's epithelium, but not in other nephron segments such as glomeruli, loop of Henle, distal tubules, and collecting ducts. To investigate whether MK expression is a marker of tubular cell lineage, several cell lines originating from renal tubules were tested. No expression of MK was detected in PtK1 and LLC-PK1 cells derived from marsupial and porcine proximal tubules or in MDBK and MDCK cells from bovine and canine distal/collecting tubules. Unexpectedly, the MK gene was expressed in a human renal cell carcinoma line, VMRC-RCW, and the expression was up-regulated in the presence of retinoic acid. To elucidate the involvement of MK in the development of tumors, we further examined its expression in a variety of human neoplastic cell lines: YMB-1-C (breast cancer), EBC-1 (lung squamous cell carcinoma), RERF-LC-OK (lung adenocarcinoma), SBC-3 (lung small cell carcinoma), HSC-2 (mouth squamous cell carcinoma), NUGC-2 (gastric cancer), COLO201 (colon cancer), HepG2 (hepatoma), MIA PaCa-2 (pancreatic cancer), MCAS (ovarian cancer), HeLa (cervical cancer), BeWo (chorionic carcinoma), ITO-II (testicular tumor), T24 (urinary bladder tumor), and G-401 (Wilms' tumor). Strong signals were detected in COLO201, HepG2, ITO-II, T24, G-401, and weaker but distinct signals were detected in YMB-1-C, HSC-2, and MCAS cells. The MK gene was, therefore, widely expressed in neoplastic cells originating from genital organs, intestinal tract, liver, mammary gland, and urinary tract, and the expression was not restricted to adenocarcinomas, but was also observed in other types of

  2. Triggering on electrons, jets and tau leptons with the CMS upgraded calorimeter trigger for the LHC RUN II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabi, A.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Romanteau, T.; Sauvan, J. B.; Strebler, T.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has implemented a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. During Run II, the LHC will increase its centre-of-mass energy up to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition (DAQ) system has been upgraded. A novel concept for the L1 calorimeter trigger is introduced: the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT) . In this design, nine main processors receive each all of the calorimeter data from an entire event provided by 18 preprocessors. This design is not different from that of the CMS DAQ and HLT systems. The advantage of the TMT architecture is that a global view and full granularity of the calorimeters can be exploited by sophisticated algorithms. The goal is to maintain the current thresholds for calorimeter objects and improve the performance for their selection. The performance of these algorithms will be demonstrated, both in terms of efficiency and rate reduction. The callenging aspects of the pile-up mitigation and firmware design will be presented.

  3. Search for Third Generation Squarks in the Missing Transverse Energy plus Jet Sample at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Marono, Miguel Vidal

    2010-03-01

    lightest SUSY particle (LSP) which would provide a candidate for cold dark matter, that account for 23% of the universe content, as strongly suggested by recent astrophysical data [1]. The Tevatron is a hadron collider operating at Fermilab, USA. This accelerator provides proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions with a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. CDF and D0 are the detectors built to analyse the products of the collisions provided by the Tevatron. Both experiments have produced a very significant scientific output in the last few years, like the discovery of the top quark or the measurement of the Bs mixing. The Tevatron experiments are also reaching sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson. The scientific program of CDF includes a broad spectrum on searches for physics signatures beyond the Standard Model. Tevatron is still the energy frontier, what means an unique opportunity to produce a discovery in physic beyond the Standard Model. The analyses presented in this thesis focus on the search for third generation squarks in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state. The production of sbottom ($\\tilde{b}$) and stop ($\\tilde{t}$) quarks could be highly enhanced at the Tevatron, giving the possibility of discovering new physics or limiting the parameter space available in the theory. No signal is found over the predicted Standard Model background in both searches. Instead, 95% confidence level limits are set on the production cross section, and then translated into the mass plane of the hypothetical particles. This thesis sketches the basic theory concepts of the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Extension in Chapter 2. Chapter 3, describes the Tevatron and CDF. Based on the CDF subsystems information, Chapter 4 and 5 describe the analysis objet reconstruction and the heavy flavor tagging tools. The development of the analyses is shown in Chapter 6 and Chapter 7. Finally, Chapter 8 is devoted to discuss the results and conclusions

  4. Water Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  5. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  6. MK3 Modulation Affects BMI1-Dependent and Independent Cell Cycle Check-Points

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmans, Vivian E. H.; Spaapen, Frank; Salvaing, Juliette; Vanhove, Jolien; Geijselaers, Claudia; Bartels, Stefanie J. J.; Partouns, Iris; Neumann, Dietbert; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Wouters, Bradly G.; Voncken, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    Although the MK3 gene was originally found deleted in some cancers, it is highly expressed in others. The relevance of MK3 for oncogenesis is currently not clear. We recently reported that MK3 controls ERK activity via a negative feedback mechanism. This prompted us to investigate a potential role for MK3 in cell proliferation. We here show that overexpression of MK3 induces a proliferative arrest in normal diploid human fibroblasts, characterized by enhanced expression of replication stress- and senescence-associated markers. Surprisingly, MK3 depletion evokes similar senescence characteristics in the fibroblast model. We previously identified MK3 as a binding partner of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) proteins. In the current study we show that MK3 overexpression results in reduced cellular EZH2 levels and concomitant loss of epigenetic H3K27me3-marking and PRC1/chromatin-occupation at the CDKN2A/INK4A locus. In agreement with this, the PRC1 oncoprotein BMI1, but not the PCR2 protein EZH2, bypasses MK3-induced senescence in fibroblasts and suppresses P16INK4A expression. In contrast, BMI1 does not rescue the MK3 loss-of-function phenotype, suggesting the involvement of multiple different checkpoints in gain and loss of MK3 function. Notably, MK3 ablation enhances proliferation in two different cancer cells. Finally, the fibroblast model was used to evaluate the effect of potential tumorigenic MK3 driver-mutations on cell proliferation and M/SAPK signaling imbalance. Taken together, our findings support a role for MK3 in control of proliferation and replicative life-span, in part through concerted action with BMI1, and suggest that the effect of MK3 modulation or mutation on M/SAPK signaling and, ultimately, proliferation, is cell context-dependent. PMID:25853770

  7. Measurement of σ(p$\\bar{p}$ -> t$\\bar{t}$) in the τ + jets channel by the D0 experiment at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arov, Mikhail

    2008-07-01

    The top quark is the heaviest and most mysterious of the known elementary particles. Therefore, careful study of its production rate and other properties is of utmost importance for modern particle physics. The Tevatron is the only facility currently capable of studying top quark properties by on-shell production. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is one of the major goals of the Tevatron Run II physics program. It provides an excellent test of QCD at energies exceeding 100 GeV. We report on a new measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ production at √s = 1.96 TeV using 350 pb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2005. We focus on the final state where a W boson from one of the top quarks decays into a τ lepton and its associated neutrino, while the other decays into a quark-antiquark pair. We aim to select those events in which the τ lepton subsequently decays to one or three charged hadrons, zero or more neutral hadrons and a tau neutrino (the charge conjugate processes are implied in all of the above). The observable signature thus consists of a narrow calorimeter shower with associated track(s) characteristic of a hadronic tau decay, four or more jets, of which two are initiated by b quarks accompanying the W's in the top quark decays, and a large net missing momentum in the transverse plane due to the energetic neutrino-antineutrino pair that leave no trace in the detector media. The preliminary result for the measured cross section is: σ(t$\\bar{t}$) = 5.1$+4.3\\atop{-3.5}$(stat) $+0.7\\atop{-0.7}$(syst) ± 0.3 (lumi.) pb.

  8. Scanning Probe Microscopy at mK Temperatures *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Jae

    2010-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has made significant advances with a wealth of new physics emerging as cryogenic instruments have been developed in the last decade allowing high resolution spectroscopic studies with spatial atomic resolution [1]. Most low temperature SPM instruments today operate at 4 K using liquid ^4He, with a few exceptions [2]. In this talk, we describe the next generation of ultra low temperature scanning probe microscope (SPM) with high magnetic field (15 T) capability operating at 10 mK using the circulation of a ^3He-^4He mixture in a dilution refrigerator (DR). With this system operating at 10 mK, we can extend the capability of scanning tunneling spectroscopy to higher energy resolution ( 3 μeV) for a range of applications in nanoscale systems. To achieve the design goal of mK operation for SPM applications we designed and constructed an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) SPM-compatible DR, an ultra-low temperature compatible SPM module, and extensive vibration isolation and RF shielding components. The DR was designed and constructed with features specific for UHV SPM applications, such as a Joule-Thomson (JT) condenser for lower noise operation. Noise measurements of the tunneling current show virtually no circulation-induced noise using the JT condenser, in contrast to noisy operation with a 1K pot. The custom-designed SPM module, with a three-axis position stage, is made from coin silver and ceramics for rigidity and thermal conduction in the mK regime. We also developed and constructed a low temperature current pre-amplifier, operating on the still at 650 mK, to circumvent problems due to long cable capacitances. Extensive noise measurements and first scanning measurements on graphene samples will be described. *In collaboration with Alexander F. Otte, Young Kuk, Phillip N. First, Walt A. de Heer, and Joseph A. Stroscio [1] D. L. Miller, et al., Science 324, 924 (2009) [2] A. J. Heinrich, et al., Science 306, 466 (2004)

  9. Discovery of a novel glucagon receptor antagonist N-[(4-{(1S)-1-[3-(3, 5-dichlorophenyl)-5-(6-methoxynaphthalen-2-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]ethyl}phenyl)carbonyl]-β-alanine (MK-0893) for the treatment of type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yusheng; Guo, Jian; Candelore, Mari R; Liang, Rui; Miller, Corey; Dallas-Yang, Qing; Jiang, Guoqiang; McCann, Peggy E; Qureshi, Sajjad A; Tong, Xinchun; Xu, Shiyao Sherrie; Shang, Jackie; Vincent, Stella H; Tota, Laurie M; Wright, Michael J; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Bei B; Tata, James R; Parmee, Emma R

    2012-07-12

    A potent, selective glucagon receptor antagonist 9m, N-[(4-{(1S)-1-[3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-(6-methoxynaphthalen-2-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]ethyl}phenyl)carbonyl]-β-alanine, was discovered by optimization of a previously identified lead. Compound 9m is a reversible and competitive antagonist with high binding affinity (IC(50) of 6.6 nM) and functional cAMP activity (IC(50) of 15.7 nM). It is selective for glucagon receptor relative to other family B GPCRs, showing IC(50) values of 1020 nM for GIPR, 9200 nM for PAC1, and >10000 nM for GLP-1R, VPAC1, and VPAC2. Compound 9m blunted glucagon-induced glucose elevation in hGCGR mice and rhesus monkeys. It also lowered ambient glucose levels in both acute and chronic mouse models: in hGCGR ob/ob mice it reduced glucose (AUC 0-6 h) by 32% and 39% at 3 and 10 mpk single doses, respectively. In hGCGR mice on a high fat diet, compound 9m at 3, and 10 mpk po in feed lowered blood glucose levels by 89% and 94% at day 10, respectively, relative to the difference between the vehicle control and lean hGCGR mice. On the basis of its favorable biological and DMPK properties, compound 9m (MK-0893) was selected for further preclinical and clinical evaluations.

  10. Osmotic stress induces the phosphorylation of WNK4 Ser575 via the p38MAPK-MK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Junichi; Kobayashi, Yumie; Umeda, Tsuyoshi; Vandewalle, Alain; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori; Naguro, Isao

    2016-01-01

    The With No lysine [K] (WNK)-Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1 (OSR1) pathway has been reported to be a crucial signaling pathway for triggering pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII), an autosomal dominant hereditary disease that is characterized by hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which the WNK-SPAK/OSR1 pathway is regulated remain unclear. In this report, we identified WNK4 as an interacting partner of a recently identified MAP3K, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 3 (ASK3). We found that WNK4 is phosphorylated in an ASK3 kinase activity-dependent manner. By exploring the ASK3-dependent phosphorylation sites, we identified Ser575 as a novel phosphorylation site in WNK4 by LC-MS/MS analysis. ASK3-dependent WNK4 Ser575 phosphorylation was mediated by the p38MAPK-MAPK-activated protein kinase (MK) pathway. Osmotic stress, as well as hypotonic low-chloride stimulation, increased WNK4 Ser575 phosphorylation via the p38MAPK-MK pathway. ASK3 was required for the p38MAPK activation induced by hypotonic stimulation but was not required for that induced by hypertonic stimulation or hypotonic low-chloride stimulation. Our results suggest that the p38MAPK-MK pathway might regulate WNK4 in an osmotic stress-dependent manner but its upstream regulators might be divergent depending on the types of osmotic stimuli. PMID:26732173

  11. Isolation of the Entomopathogenic Fungal Strain Cod-MK1201 from a Cicada Nymph and Assessment of Its Antibacterial Activities.

    PubMed

    Sangdee, Kusavadee; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Sangdee, Aphidech

    2015-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Cod-MK1201 was isolated from a dead cicada nymph. Three regions of ribosomal nuclear DNA, the internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA repeats (ITS), the partial small subunit of rDNA (nrSSU) , and the partial large subunit of rDNA (nrLSU), and two protein-coding regions, the elongation factor 1α (EF-1α), and the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (rpb1) gene, were sequenced and used for fungal identification. The phylogenetic analysis of the ITS and the combined data set of the five genes indicated that the fungal isolate Cod-MK1201 is a new strain of Cordyceps sp. that is closely related to Cordyceps nipponica and C. kanzashiana. Crude extracts of mycelium-cultured Cod-MK1201 were obtained using distilled water and 50% (v/v) ethanol, and the antibacterial activity of each was determined. Both extracts had activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but the ethanol extract was the more potent of the two. The antibacterial activity of the protein fractions of these extracts was also determined. The protein fraction from the ethanol extract was more antibacterial than the protein fraction from the aqueous extract. Three antibacterial constituents including adenosine, the total phenolic content (TPC), and the total flavonoid content (TFC) was also determined. The results showed that the adenosine content, the TPC, and the TFC of the ethanol extract were more active than those of the aqueous extract. Moreover, synergism was detected between these antibacterial constituents. In conclusion, the entomopathogenic fungal isolate Cod-MK1201 represents a natural source of antibacterial agents. PMID:25746406

  12. A coronal hole jet observed with Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Peter R.; Muglach, Karin

    2014-12-01

    A small blowout jet was observed at the boundary of the south polar coronal hole on 2011 February 8 at around 21:00 UT. Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) revealed an expanding loop rising from one footpoint of a compact, bipolar bright point. Magnetograms from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO showed that the jet was triggered by the cancelation of a parasitic positive polarity feature near the negative pole of the bright point. The jet emission was present for 25 min and it extended 30 Mm from the bright point. Spectra from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode yielded a temperature and density of 1.6 MK and 0.9-1.7 × 108 cm-3 for the ejected plasma. Line-of-sight velocities reached up to 250 km s-1 and were found to increase with height, suggesting plasma acceleration within the body of the jet. Evidence was found for twisting motions within the jet based on variations of the line-of-sight velocities across the jet width. The derived angular speed was in the range (9-12) × 10-3 rad s-1, consistent with previous measurements from jets. The density of the bright point was 7.6 × 108 cm-3, and the peak of the bright point's emission measure occurred at 1.3 MK, with no plasma above 3 MK.

  13. MK-82 bomb characterization for the sympathetic detonation study

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, R.A.; Hantel, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical, radiographic, and electronic pin techniques were used to evaluate the fragmentation of tail- and side-initiated MK-82 MOD 1 general purpose bombs. They were found to contain large voids, randomly located from bomb to bomb, in the Tritonal explosive fill. Characteristics of the void-side performance of the bomb were found to be as much as 10% different from the nonvoid side and were much less reproducible than the characteristics of the nonvoid side. The data collected will be useful in evaluating sympathetic detonation mitigation systems designed for use with the bombs. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Equilibrium shape of 4He crystal under zero gravity below 200 mK

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takuya; Ohuchi, Haruka; Nomura, Ryuji; Okuda, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium crystal shape is the lowest energy crystal shape that is hardly realized in ordinary crystals because of their slow relaxation. 4He quantum crystals in a superfluid have been expected as unique exceptions that grow extremely fast at very low temperatures. However, on the ground, gravity considerably deforms the crystals and conceals the equilibrium crystal shape, and thus, gravity-free environment is needed to observe the equilibrium shape of 4He. We report the relaxation processes of macroscopic 4He crystals in a superfluid below 200 mK under zero gravity using a parabolic flight of a jet plane. When gravity was removed from a gravity-flattened 4He crystal, the crystal rapidly transformed into a shape with flat surfaces. Although the relaxation processes were highly dependent on the initial condition, the crystals relaxed to a nearly homothetic shape in the end, indicating that they were truly in an equilibrium shape minimizing the interfacial free energy. Thanks to the equilibrium shape, we were able to determine the Wulff’s origin and the size of the c-facet together with the vicinal surface profile next to the c-facet. The c-facet size was extremely small in the quantum crystals, and the facet-like flat surfaces were found to be the vicinal surfaces. At the same time, the interfacial free energy of the a-facet and s-facet was also obtained. PMID:26601315

  15. Equilibrium shape of (4)He crystal under zero gravity below 200 mK.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takuya; Ohuchi, Haruka; Nomura, Ryuji; Okuda, Yuichi

    2015-10-01

    Equilibrium crystal shape is the lowest energy crystal shape that is hardly realized in ordinary crystals because of their slow relaxation. (4)He quantum crystals in a superfluid have been expected as unique exceptions that grow extremely fast at very low temperatures. However, on the ground, gravity considerably deforms the crystals and conceals the equilibrium crystal shape, and thus, gravity-free environment is needed to observe the equilibrium shape of (4)He. We report the relaxation processes of macroscopic (4)He crystals in a superfluid below 200 mK under zero gravity using a parabolic flight of a jet plane. When gravity was removed from a gravity-flattened (4)He crystal, the crystal rapidly transformed into a shape with flat surfaces. Although the relaxation processes were highly dependent on the initial condition, the crystals relaxed to a nearly homothetic shape in the end, indicating that they were truly in an equilibrium shape minimizing the interfacial free energy. Thanks to the equilibrium shape, we were able to determine the Wulff's origin and the size of the c-facet together with the vicinal surface profile next to the c-facet. The c-facet size was extremely small in the quantum crystals, and the facet-like flat surfaces were found to be the vicinal surfaces. At the same time, the interfacial free energy of the a-facet and s-facet was also obtained.

  16. MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2)-dependent and -independent models of blister formation in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuming; Li, Hong; Sano, Yasuyo; Gaestel, Matthias; Mo Park, Jin; Payne, Aimee S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies to the keratinocyte adhesion protein desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). Previous studies suggest that PV pathogenesis involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, p38 is a difficult protein to study and therapeutically target because it has four isoforms and multiple downstream effectors. In this study, we identify MAPKAP (mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein) kinase 2 (MK2) as a downstream effector of p38 signaling in PV and describe MK2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of blister formation using passive transfer of human anti-Dsg IgG4 mAbs to neonatal mice. In human keratinocytes, PV mAbs activate MK2 in a dose-dependent manner. MK2 is also activated in human pemphigus skin blisters, causing translocation of MK2 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Small-molecule inhibition of MK2 and silencing of MK2 expression block PV mAb-induced Dsg3 endocytosis in human keratinocytes. In addition, small-molecule inhibition and genetic deletion of p38α and MK2 inhibit spontaneous but not induced suprabasal blisters by PV mAbs in mouse passive transfer models. Collectively, these data suggest that MK2 is a key downstream effector of p38 that can modulate PV autoantibody pathogenicity. MK2 inhibition may be a valuable adjunctive therapy for control of pemphigus blistering.

  17. Biomarkers of Response to Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sangai, Takafumi; Akcakanat, Argun; Chen, Huiqin; Tarco, Emily; Wu, Yun; Do, Kim-Anh; Miller, Todd W.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Mills, Gordon B.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206 inhibits tumor growth, and that PTEN/PIK3CA mutations confer MK-2206 sensitivity. Experimental Design MK-2206 effects on cell signaling were assessed in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor efficacy was assessed in vitro in a panel of cancer cell lines with differing PIK3CA and PTEN status. Its in vivo efficacy was tested as a single agent and in combination with paclitaxel. Results MK-2206 inhibited Akt signaling and cell-cycle progression, and increased apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in breast cancer cell lines. Cell lines with PTEN or PIK3CA mutations were significantly more sensitive to MK-2206; however, several lines with PTEN/PIK3CA mutations were MK-2206 resistant. siRNA knockdown of PTEN in breast cancer cells increased Akt phosphorylation concordant with increased MK-2206 sensitivity. Stable transfection of PIK3CA E545K or H1047R mutant plasmids into normal-like MCF10A breast cells enhanced MK-2206 sensitivity. Cell lines that were less sensitive to MK-2206 had lower ratios of Akt1/Akt2 and had less growth inhibition with Akt siRNA knockdown. In PTEN-mutant ZR75-1 breast cancer xenografts, MK-2206 treatment inhibited Akt signaling, cell proliferation, and tumor growth. In vitro, MK-2206 showed a synergistic interaction with paclitaxel in MK-2206–sensitive cell lines, and this combination had significantly greater antitumor efficacy than either agent alone in vivo. Conclusions MK-2206 has antitumor activity alone and in combination with chemotherapy. This activity may be greater in tumors with PTEN loss or PIK3CA mutation, providing a strategy for patient enrichment in clinical trials. PMID:22932669

  18. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  19. MHD simulations of NSNS mergers in full GR: the role of the initial B field on the emergence of sGRB jets II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Ruiz, Milton; Shapiro, Stuart

    2016-03-01

    Mergers of neutron star-neutron star (NSNS) binaries are among the most promising candidates for the engines that power short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). The most likely sGRB model requires the presence of a highly relativistic jet. However, recent relativistic simulations of NSNS mergers have shown that it is difficult for such jets to emerge following the delayed collapse of the hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) remnant. Varying the initial NS magnetic field in an NSNS binary, we have performed magnetohydrodynamic simulations in full general relativity that explore the formation of jets from the black hole-disk system following the HMNS collapse. In this talk we focus on initial dipole magnetic fields which extend from the neutron star interior into the exterior.

  20. 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine MK2 inhibitors. Part I: Observation of an unexpected inhibitor binding mode

    SciTech Connect

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Ericsson, Anna M.; Harris, Christopher M.; Banach, David L.; Borhani, David W.; Calderwood, David J.; Demers, Megan D.; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dixon, Richard W.; Hardman, Jennifer; Kwak, Silvia; Li, Biqin; Mankovich, John A.; Marcotte, Douglas; Mullen, Kelly D.; Ni, Baofu; Pietras, M.; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Sousa, Silvino; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Wang, L.; Xiang, T.; Talanian, R.V.

    2010-09-17

    MK2 is a Ser/Thr kinase of significant interest as an anti-inflammatory drug discovery target. Here we describe the development of in vitro tools for the identification and characterization of MK2 inhibitors, including validation of inhibitor interactions with the crystallography construct and determination of the unique binding mode of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine inhibitors in the MK2 active site.

  1. The Pseudophosphatase MK-STYX Induces Neurite-Like Outgrowths in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Brittany M.; Rusnak, Lauren E.; Wong, Kristen E.; Banks, Dallas A.; Munyikwa, Michelle R.; McFarland, Alexander G.; Hinton, Shantá D.

    2014-01-01

    The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line is a widely used system to study neuronal differentiation for which sustained activation of the extracellular signaling related kinase (ERK) pathway is required. Here, we investigate the function of MK-STYX [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphoserine/threonine/tyrosine-binding protein] in neuronal differentiation. MK-STYX is a member of the MAPK phosphatase (MKP) family, which is generally responsible for dephosphorylating the ERKs. However, MK-STYX lacks catalytic activity due to the absence of the nucleophilic cysteine in the active site signature motif HC(X5)R that is essential for phosphatase activity. Despite being catalytically inactive, MK-STYX has been shown to play a role in important cellular pathways, including stress responses. Here we show that PC12 cells endogenously express MK-STYX. In addition, MK-STYX, but not its catalytically active mutant, induced neurite-like outgrowths in PC12 cells. Furthermore, MK-STYX dramatically increased the number of cells with neurite extensions in response to nerve growth factor (NGF), whereas the catalytically active mutant did not. MK-STYX continued to induce neurites in the presence of a MEK (MAP kinase kinase) inhibitor suggesting that MK-STYX does not act through the Ras-ERK/MAPK pathway but is involved in another pathway whose inactivation leads to neuronal differentiation. RhoA activity assays indicated that MK-STYX induced extensions through the Rho signaling pathway. MK-STYX decreased RhoA activation, whereas RhoA activation increased when MK-STYX was down-regulated. Furthermore, MK-STYX affected downstream players of RhoA such as the actin binding protein cofilin. The presence of MK-STYX decreased the phosphorylation of cofilin in non NGF stimulated cells, but increased its phosphorylation in NGF stimulated cells, whereas knocking down MK-STYX caused an opposite effect. Taken together our data suggest that MK-STYX may be a regulator of RhoA signaling, and

  2. Measurement of the WW and WZ production cross section using final states with a charged lepton and heavy-flavor jets in the full CDF Run II data set

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; et al

    2016-08-23

    We present a measurement of the total WW and WZ production cross sections inmore » $$p\\bar{p}$$ collision at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 1.96 TeV, in a final state consistent with leptonic W boson decay and jets originating from heavy-flavor quarks from either a W or a Z boson decay. This analysis uses the full data set collected with the CDF II detector during Run II of the Tevatron collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1. An analysis of the dijet mass spectrum provides 3.7σ evidence of the summed production processes of either WW or WZ bosons with a measured total cross section of σWW+WZ = 13.7±3.9 pb. Independent measurements of the WW and WZ production cross sections are allowed by the different heavy-flavor decay patterns of the W and Z bosons and by the analysis of secondary-decay vertices reconstructed within heavy-flavor jets. The productions of WW and of WZ dibosons are independently seen with significances of 2.9σ and 2.1σ, respectively, with total cross sections of σWW = 9.4±4.2 pb and σWZ = 3.7$$+2.5\\atop{-2.2}$$ pb. Lastly, the measurements are consistent with standard-model predictions.« less

  3. Measurement of the W W and W Z production cross section using final states with a charged lepton and heavy-flavor jets in the full CDF Run II data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the total W W and W Z production cross sections in p p ¯ collision at √{s }=1.96 TeV , in a final state consistent with leptonic W boson decay and jets originating from heavy-flavor quarks from either a W or a Z boson decay. This analysis uses the full data set collected with the CDF II detector during Run II of the Tevatron collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1 . An analysis of the dijet mass spectrum provides 3.7 σ evidence of the summed production processes of either W W or W Z bosons with a measured total cross section of σW W +W Z=13.7 ±3.9 pb . Independent measurements of the W W and W Z production cross sections are allowed by the different heavy-flavor decay patterns of the W and Z bosons and by the analysis of secondary-decay vertices reconstructed within heavy-flavor jets. The productions of W W and of W Z dibosons are independently seen with significances of 2.9 σ and 2.1 σ , respectively, with total cross sections of σW W=9.4 ±4.2 pb and σW Z=3. 7-2.2+2.5 pb . The measurements are consistent with standard-model predictions.

  4. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  5. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  6. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  7. Structure-based lead identification of ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard; de Wilde, Sander; van der Heijden, Ruud; van Someren, Richard; Demont, Dennis; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Versteegh, Judith; van Zeeland, Mario; Seegers, Nicole; Kazemier, Bert; van de Kar, Bas; van Hoek, Maaike; de Roos, Jeroen; Klop, Henri; Smeets, Ruben; Hofstra, Claudia; Hornberg, Jorrit; Oubrie, Arthur

    2011-06-15

    MK2 kinase is a promising drug discovery target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Here, we describe the discovery of novel MK2 inhibitors using X-ray crystallography and structure-based drug design. The lead has in vivo efficacy in a short-term preclinical model.

  8. Structure-based lead identification of ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard; de Wilde, Sander; van der Heijden, Ruud; van Someren, Richard; Demont, Dennis; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Versteegh, Judith; van Zeeland, Mario; Seegers, Nicole; Kazemier, Bert; van de Kar, Bas; van Hoek, Maaike; de Roos, Jeroen; Klop, Henri; Smeets, Ruben; Hofstra, Claudia; Hornberg, Jorrit; Oubrie, Arthur

    2011-06-15

    MK2 kinase is a promising drug discovery target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Here, we describe the discovery of novel MK2 inhibitors using X-ray crystallography and structure-based drug design. The lead has in vivo efficacy in a short-term preclinical model. PMID:21565500

  9. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 2: improvements in kinase selectivity and cell potency.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J; Parikh, Mihir D

    2009-08-15

    Optimization of kinase selectivity for a set of benzothiophene MK2 inhibitors provided analogs with potencies of less than 500 nM in a cell based assay. The selectivity of the inhibitors can be rationalized by examination of X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors bound to MK2.

  10. MK2 inhibitor reduces alkali burn-induced inflammation in rat cornea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanfeng; Yang, Wenzhao; Zhang, Xiaobo; Yang, Shu; Peng, Gao; Wu, Ting; Zhou, Yueping; Huang, Caihong; Reinach, Peter S.; Li, Wei; Liu, Zuguo

    2016-01-01

    MK2 activation by p38 MAPK selectively induces inflammation in various diseases. We determined if a MK2 inhibitor (MK2i), improves cornea wound healing by inhibiting inflammation caused by burning rat corneas with alkali. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that MK2i inhibited alkali burn-induced MK2 activation as well as rises in inflammation based on: a) blunting rises in inflammatory index, inflammatory cell infiltration, ED1+ macrophage and PMN+ neutrophil infiltration; b) suppressing IL-6 and IL-1β gene expression along with those of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1); c) reducing angiogenic gene expression levels and neovascularization (NV) whereas anti-angiogenic PEDF levels increased. In addition, this study found that MK2i did not affect human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) proliferation and migration and had no detectable side effects on ocular surface integrity. Taken together, MK2i selectively inhibited alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation by blocking MK2 activation, these effects have clinical relevance in the treatment of inflammation related ocular surface diseases. PMID:27329698

  11. {sup 3}He melting pressure temperature scale below 25 mK

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E.D.; Ni, W.; Xia, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    Using {sup 60}Co {gamma} ray anisotropy radiation as a primary thermometer, with a Pt NMR susceptibility secondary thermometer, the authors have made high precision measurements of the {sup 3}He melting pressure versus temperature from 500 {mu}K to 25 mK. Temperatures obtained for the fixed points on the melting curve are: the superfluid A transition T{sub A} = 2.505 mK, the A-B transition T{sub AB} = 1.948 mK, and the solid ordering temperature T{sub N} = 0.934 mK. The authors provide a functional form for P(T), which, with the fixed points, constitutes a convenient temperature scale, based on a primary thermometer, usable to well below 1 mK.

  12. Measurement of the top quark mass using the template method in the lepton plus jets channel with in situ W ---> j j calibration at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, Jahred A.; Arguin, J.F.; Bellettini, G.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Chlachidze, G.; Demortier, L.; Gibson, A.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Maruyama, T.; Sato, K.; Shochet, M.; Sinervo, P.; Tomura, T.; Velev, G.; Xie, S.; Yang, U.K.; /Chicago U. /Toronto U. /INFN, Pisa /Dubna, JINR /Rockefeller U. /LBL, Berkeley /Tsukuba U. /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    We report an updated measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses a dataset with integrated luminosity of 680 pb{sup -1}, containing 360 t{bar t} candidates separated into four subsamples. A top quark mass is reconstructed for each event by using energy and momentum constraints on the top quark pair decay products. We also employ the reconstructed mass of hadronic W boson decays W {yields} jj to constrain in situ the largest systematic uncertainty of the top quark mass measurement: the jet energy scale. Monte Carlo templates of the reconstructed top quark and W boson mass are produced as a function of the true top quark mass and the jet energy scale. The distribution of reconstructed top quark and W boson mass in the data are compared to the Monte Carlo templates using a likelihood fit to obtain: M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. CONSTRAINING THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN THE JETS OF γ-RAY FLARING BLAZARS USING CENTIMETER-BAND POLARIMETRY AND RADIATIVE TRANSFER SIMULATIONS. II. EXPLORING PARAMETER SPACE AND IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Philip A.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D. E-mail: mfa@umich.edu

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the shock-in-jet models for the γ-ray flaring blazars 0420-014, OJ 287, and 1156+295 presented in Paper I, quantifying how well the modeling constrains internal properties of the flow (low-energy spectral cutoff, partition between random and ordered magnetic field), the flow dynamics (quiescent flow speed and orientation), and the number and strength of the shocks responsible for radio-band flaring. We conclude that well-sampled, multifrequency polarized flux light curves are crucial for defining source properties. We argue for few, if any, low-energy particles in these flows, suggesting no entrainment and efficient energization of jet material, and for approximate energy equipartition between the random and ordered magnetic field components, suggesting that the ordered field is built by nontrivial dynamo action from the random component, or that the latter arises from a jet instability that preserves the larger-scale, ordered flow. We present evidence that the difference between orphan radio-band (no γ-ray counterpart) and non-orphan flares is due to more complex shock interactions in the latter case.

  14. Constraining the Physical Conditions in the Jets of γ-Ray Flaring Blazars Using Centimeter-band Polarimetry and Radiative Transfer Simulations. II. Exploring Parameter Space and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Philip A.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the shock-in-jet models for the γ-ray flaring blazars 0420-014, OJ 287, and 1156+295 presented in Paper I, quantifying how well the modeling constrains internal properties of the flow (low-energy spectral cutoff, partition between random and ordered magnetic field), the flow dynamics (quiescent flow speed and orientation), and the number and strength of the shocks responsible for radio-band flaring. We conclude that well-sampled, multifrequency polarized flux light curves are crucial for defining source properties. We argue for few, if any, low-energy particles in these flows, suggesting no entrainment and efficient energization of jet material, and for approximate energy equipartition between the random and ordered magnetic field components, suggesting that the ordered field is built by nontrivial dynamo action from the random component, or that the latter arises from a jet instability that preserves the larger-scale, ordered flow. We present evidence that the difference between orphan radio-band (no γ-ray counterpart) and non-orphan flares is due to more complex shock interactions in the latter case.

  15. The pseudophosphatase MK-STYX interacts with G3BP and decreases stress granule formation

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Shantá D.; Myers, Michael P.; Roggero, Vincent R.; Allison, Lizabeth A.; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2010-01-01

    MK-STYX [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phospho-serine/threonine/tyrosine-binding protein] is a pseudophosphatase member of the dual-specificity phosphatase subfamily of the PTPs (protein tyrosine phosphatases). MK-STYX is catalytically inactive due to the absence of two amino acids from the signature motif that are essential for phosphatase activity. The nucleophilic cysteine residue and the adjacent histidine residue, which are conserved in all active dual-specificity phosphatases, are replaced by serine and phenylalanine residues respectively in MK-STYX. Mutations to introduce histidine and cysteine residues into the active site of MK-STYX generated an active phosphatase. Using MS, we identified G3BP1 [Ras-GAP (GTPase-activating protein) SH3 (Src homology 3) domain-binding protein-1], a regulator of Ras signalling, as a binding partner of MK-STYX. We observed that G3BP1 bound to native MK-STYX; however, binding to the mutant catalytically active form of MK-STYX was dramatically reduced. G3BP1 is also an RNA-binding protein with endoribonuclease activity that is recruited to ‘stress granules’ after stress stimuli. Stress granules are large subcellular structures that serve as sites of mRNA sorting, in which untranslated mRNAs accumulate. We have shown that expression of MK-STYX inhibited stress granule formation induced either by aresenite or expression of G3BP itself; however, the catalytically active mutant MK-STYX was impaired in its ability to inhibit G3BP-induced stress granule assembly. These results reveal a novel facet of the function of a member of the PTP family, illustrating a role for MK-STYX in regulating the ability of G3BP1 to integrate changes in growth-factor stimulation and environmental stress with the regulation of protein synthesis. PMID:20180778

  16. Behavioural sensitisation to MK-801 is dose-dependent and independent of environmental context.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Emilia M; Eyles, Darryl W; Burne, Thomas H J

    2016-02-01

    The pathophysiology of schizophrenia is associated with disturbed glutamate signalling, particularly via a dysfunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. In rodents, behavioural sensitisation to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 is proposed to recapitulate aspects of the NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to determine the modulatory role of MK-801 dose and environmental context on the development and expression of MK-801-induced behavioural sensitisation. Sprague Dawley rats were administered saline or varying doses of MK-801 (i.p.) once daily for 7 days and locomotor activity was recorded. After 5 days of withdrawal, rats were challenged with their respective dose to test for sensitisation. From this experiment a sensitising dose was obtained. In the second experiment the magnitude of sensitisation was compared between rats that were treated in either a home or test environmental context. Rats treated with 0.25mg/kg MK-801 developed robust sensitisation when challenged after withdrawal. Rats treated with lower (0.1mg/kg) or higher (0.5mg/kg) doses of MK-801 did not develop locomotor sensitisation. Sensitisation to 0.25mg/kg MK-801 developed equally between rats treated in the home or test context. The study shows that male Sprague Dawley rats develop behavioural sensitisation to repeated injections of MK-801. The development of sensitisation is selective to MK-801 dose in an inverted-U dose response fashion. In this paradigm MK-801 induced sensitisation was expressed similarly between groups treated in two distinct environmental contexts.

  17. Jet Dipolarity: Top Tagging with Color Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Jankowiak, Martin; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    A new jet observable, dipolarity, is introduced that can distinguish whether a pair of subjets arises from a color singlet source. This observable is incorporated into the HEPTopTagger and is shown to improve discrimination between top jets and QCD jets for moderate to high p{sub T}. The impressive resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors means that a typical QCD jet at the LHC deposits energy in {Omicron}(10-100) calorimeter cells. Such fine-grained calorimetry allows for jets to be studied in much greater detail than previously, with sophisticated versions of current techniques making it possible to measure more than just the bulk properties of jets (e.g. event jet multiplicities or jet masses). One goal of the LHC is to employ these techniques to extend the amount of information available from each jet, allowing for a broader probe of the properties of QCD. The past several years have seen significant progress in developing such jet substructure techniques. A number of general purpose tools have been developed, including: (i) top-tagging algorithms designed for use at both lower and higher p{sub T} as well as (ii) jet grooming techniques such as filtering, pruning, and trimming, which are designed to improve jet mass resolution. Jet substructure techniques have also been studied in the context of specific particle searches, where they have been shown to substantially extend the reach of traditional search techniques in a wide variety of scenarios, including for example boosted Higgses, neutral spin-one resonances, searches for supersymmetry, and many others. Despite these many successes, however, there is every reason to expect that there remains room for refinement of jet substructure techniques.

  18. Normal cadmium uptake in microcytic anemia mk/mk mice suggests that DMT1 is not the only cadmium transporter in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tomohito; Momoi, Kanae; Hosoyamada, Makoto Kimura, Masaki; Shibasaki, Toshiaki

    2008-03-15

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is a mammalian iron (Fe) transporter and also transports Cadmium (Cd) in vitro. This study compared Cd absorption in DMT1-dysfunctional MK/Rej-{sup mk}/{sub mk} mice (mk/mk mice) and in DMT1-functional, Fe-deficient wild-type (WT) mice, to clarify the role of DMT1 in intestinal Cd absorption in vivo. Mice were given 1 ppm CdCl{sub 2} aq in drinking water for 2 weeks, and the concentrations of Cd and Fe in liver, kidney, and intestinal epithelium were subsequently determined. The Fe concentration in intestinal epithelia of WT mice was decreased in proportion to the level of dietary Fe limitation, while Cd accumulation under the same conditions was increased. DMT1 mRNA expression in the small intestine of Fe-deficient WT mice was clearly increased compared to that in Fe-sufficient WT mice. Iron deficiency resulted in up-regulation of Cd uptake in the intestine of Fe-deficient WT mice. The mk/mk mice have a mutation in DMT1 and loss of its function led to decreased intestinal Fe concentration. However, intestinal Cd accumulation was the same as in WT mice and it was also increased in Fe-deficient situation. There is the possibility that an unknown Cd pathway has taken a role on Cd intestinal absorption in vivo and that this pathway is regulated by food Fe concentrations. Therefore, DMT1 is not the sole transporter of intestinal cadmium absorption in vivo.

  19. Turbulent Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Perry, T. S.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Gittings, M. L.; Coker, R. F.; Keiter, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Drake, R. P.; Remington, B. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Campbell, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2003-10-01

    Over the last few years we have fielded numerous supersonic jet experiments on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers and Sandia's pulsed-power Z-machine in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. These experiments are being conducted to help validate our radiation-hydrodynamic codes, especially the newly developing ASC codes. One of the outstanding questions is whether these types of jets should turn turbulent given their high Reynolds number. Recently we have modified our experiments to have more Kelvin-Helmholtz shear, run much later in time and therefore have a better chance of going turbulent. In order to diagnose these large (several mm) jets at very late times ( 1000 ns) we are developing point-projection imaging on both the OMEGA laser, the Sandia Z-Machine, and ultimately at NIF. Since these jets have similar Euler numbers to jets theorized to be produced in supernovae explosions, we are also collaborating with the astrophysics community to help in the validation of their new codes. This poster will present a review of the laser and pulsed-power experiments and a comparison of the data to simulations by the codes from the various laboratories. We will show results of simulations wherein these jets turn highly 3-dimensional and show characteristics of turbulence. With the new data, we hope to be able to validate the sub-grid-scale turbulent mix models (e. g. BHR) that are being incorporated into our codes.*This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, Sandia National Laboratories under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Astrophysical Theory Grant.

  20. Dichotomy of X-Ray Jets in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robe, D. M.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    It has been found that there are two different types of X-ray jets observed in the Sun's polar coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. A proposed model of this dichotomy is that a standard jet is produced by a burst of reconnection of the ambient magnetic field with the opposite-polarity leg of the base arcade. In contrast, it appears that a blowout jet is produced when the interior of the arcade has so much pent-up free magnetic energy in the form of shear and twist in the interior field that the external reconnection unleashes the interior field to erupt open. In this project, X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes taken by Hinode were searched for X-ray jets. Co-temporal movies taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 304 Å emission from He II, showing solar plasma at temperatures around 80,000 K, were examined for whether the identified blowout jets carry much more He II plasma than the identified standard jets. It was found that though some jets identified as standard from the X-ray movies could be seen in the He II 304 Å movies, the blowout jets carried much more 80,000 K plasma than did most standard jets. This finding supports the proposed model for the morphology and development of the two types of jets.

  1. The PIT MkV pulsed inductive thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. Lee; Lovberg, Ralph H.

    1993-01-01

    The pulsed inductive thruster (PIT) is an electrodeless, magnetic rocket engine that can operate with any gaseous propellant. A puff of gas injected against the face of a flat (spiral) coil is ionized and ejected by the magnetic field of a fast-rising current pulse from a capacitor bank discharge. Single shot operation on an impulse balance has provided efficiency and I(sub sp) data that characterize operation at any power level (pulse rate). The 1-m diameter MkV thruster concept offers low estimated engine mass at low powers, together with power capability up to more than 1 MW for the 1-m diameter design. A 20 kW design estimate indicates specific mass comparable to Ion Engine specific mass for 10,000 hour operation, while a 100,000 hour design would have a specific mass 1/3 that of the Ion Engine. Performance data are reported for ammonia and hydrazine. With ammonia, at 32 KV coil voltage, efficiency is a little more than 50 percent from 4000 to more than 8000 seconds I(sub sp). Comparison with data at 24 and 28 kV indicates that a wider I(sub sp) range could be achieved at higher coil voltages, if required for deep space missions.

  2. Identification of Statistical Invariance for Anodic Signals of Mk-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect

    Supathorn Phongikaroon; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2007-09-01

    A statistical invariance technique is proposed for an analysis of anodic signals from the Mk-IV electrorefiner (ER) currently used for treating spent EBR-II fuel. Voltage and applied current signals obtained from the Data Archival Software System (DASS) were used in this study. In general, the plots of these signals from different experimental runs present complex patterns to analyze—the currents were adjusted and shut-off due to limited ampere-hr or cut-off cell voltage; the voltage would increase showing a sign that uranium in the fuel elements had been depleted. Rather than directly analyzing these sets of time-series signals, a simple nonlinear function of these signal sequences and division were observed, which returned resistance series information. The primary idea deriving the methodology presented in this paper is that “anodic resistance time series should show intrinsic kinetic progress of anodic ER process.” A simple histogram-based analysis reveals notable statistical information, which may be invariant under ideal ER operating conditions. For instance, the results suggest that mostly uranium dissolution would be preferentially transferred around 0.00217 - 0.00354 ohm and other minor distribution peaks may possibly represent other transfers of fission species in the system.

  3. Evaluation of the angiogenic potency of a novel exopolysaccharide produced by the MK1 bacterial strain.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yun; Kim, Beom Su; Lee, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential physiological step in wound healing and other regenerative processes. Here, we evaluated the angiogenic properties of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) secreted by MK1 (MK1-EPS), a novel bacterial strain isolated from Neungee mushrooms. MK1-EPS significantly increased human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, migration, and vascular tube formation. MK1-EPS enhanced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38, which are mitogen-activated protein kinases. In addition, the expression of p21 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), but not of protein kinase B (AKT), were increased. Specific inhibitors of p38 (SB203580), ERK (PD98059), and JNK (SP600125) inhibited MK1-EPS-induced HUVEC proliferation, tube formation, and cell migration, and partially attenuated MKI-EPS-induced expression of p21 and ICAM1, and STAT3 phosphorylation. After surgical implantation into rabbit calvarial bone defects, new blood vessel formation was significantly higher with MK1-EPS composite bone granules than with granules alone, and new bone formation increased significantly. Therefore, MK1-EPS induces angiogenesis and may have potential for use as a bone regeneration agent in bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:27357535

  4. Interaction of the NMDA receptor noncompetitive antagonist MK-801 with model and native membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Moring, J; Niego, L A; Ganley, L M; Trumbore, M W; Herbette, L G

    1994-01-01

    MK-801, a noncompetitive antagonist of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor, has protective effects against excitotoxicity and ethanol withdrawal seizures. We have determined membrane/buffer partition coefficients (Kp[mem]) of MK-801 and its rates of association with and dissociation from membranes. Kp[mem] (+/- SD) = 1137 (+/- 320) in DOPC membranes and 485 (+/- 99) in synaptoneurosomal (SNM) lipid membranes from rat cerebral cortex (unilamellar vesicles). In multilamellar vesicles, Kp[mem] was higher: 3374 (+/- 253) in DOPC and 6879 (+/- 947) in SNM. In cholesterol/DOPC membranes, Kp[mem] decreased as the cholesterol content increased. MK-801 associated with and dissociated from membranes rapidly. Addition of ethanol to SNM did not affect Kp[mem]. MK-801 decreased the cooperative unit size of DMPC membranes. The decrease was smaller than that caused by 1,4-dihydropyridine drugs, indicating a weaker interaction with the hydrocarbon core. Small angle x-ray diffraction, with multilayer autocorrelation difference function modeling, indicated that MK-801 in a cholesterol/DOPC membrane (mole ratio = 0.6) causes a perturbation at approximately 16.0 A from the bilayer center. In bilayers of cholesterol/DOPC = 0.15 (mole ratio) or pure DOPC, the perturbation caused by MK-801 was more complex. The physical chemical interactions of MK-801 with membranes in vitro are consistent with a fast onset and short duration of action in vivo. PMID:7696477

  5. Synergistic anti-leukemic interactions between panobinostat and MK-1775 in acute myeloid leukemia ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenxiu; Zhang, Wenbo; Edwards, Holly; Chu, Roland; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Taub, Jeffrey W; Wang, Zhihong; Wang, Yue; Li, Chunhuai; Lin, Hai; Ge, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    MK-1775 is the first-in-class selective Wee1 inhibitor which has been demonstrated to synergize with CHK1 inhibitors in various malignancies. In this study, we report that the pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) panobinostat synergizes with MK-1775 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a malignancy which remains a clinical challenge and requires more effective therapies. Using both AML cell line models and primary patient samples, we demonstrated that panobinostat and MK-1775 synergistically induced proliferation arrest and cell death. We also demonstrated that panobinostat had equal anti-leukemic activities against primary AML blasts derived from patients either at initial diagnosis or at relapse. Interestingly, treatment with panobinostat alone or in combination with MK-1775 resulted in decreased Wee1 protein levels as well as downregulation of the CHK1 pathway. shRNA knockdown of CHK1 significantly sensitized AML cells to MK-1775 treatment, while knockdown of Wee1 significantly enhanced both MK-1775- and panobinostat-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that panobinostat synergizes with MK-1775 in AML cells, at least in part through downregulation of CHK1 and/or Wee1, providing compelling evidence for the clinical development of the combination treatment in AML. PMID:26529495

  6. Differential Effects of Olanzapine and Haloperidol on MK-801-induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae Chun; Seo, Mi Kyoung; Park, Sung Woo; Lee, Jung Goo; Kim, Young Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated the differential effects of the antipsychotic drugs olanzapine and haloperidol on MK-801-induced memory impairment and neurogenesis in mice. Methods MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) was administered 20 minutes prior to behavioral testing over 9 days. Beginning on the sixth day of MK-801 treatment, either olanzapine (0.05 mg/kg) or haloperidol (0.05 mg/kg) was administered 40 minutes prior to MK-801 for the final 4 days. Spatial memory performance was measured using a Morris water maze (MWM) test for 9 days (four trials/day). Immunohistochemistry with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to identify newborn cells labeled in tissue sections from the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Results MK-801 administration over 9 days significantly impaired memory performance in the MWM test compared to untreated controls (p<0.05) and these deficits were blocked by treatment with olanzapine (p<0.05) but not haloperidol. The administration of MK-801 also resulted in a decrease in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus (28.6%; p<0.01), which was prevented by treatment with olanzapine (p<0.05) but not haloperidol. Conclusion These results suggest that olanzapine has a protective effect against cognitive impairments induced by MK-801 in mice via the stimulating effects of neurogenesis. PMID:27489382

  7. Down-regulation of vinculin upon MK886-induced apoptosis in LN18 glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Magro, A. D.; Cunningham, C.; Miller, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas are a type of malignant brain tumor and are among the most difficult cancers to treat. One strategy to treat aggressive cancers is the use of drugs that target multiple signaling pathways. MK886 is a drug known to inhibit both 5-lipoxygenase-activating-protein (FLAP) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α). The objectives of this study were to investigate the ability of MK886 to induce apoptotic cell death in LN18 glioblastoma cells and to characterize the cell death mechanisms. MK886 induced massive apoptotic LN18 cell death that was manifested by the release of nucleosomes, annexinV binding to phosphatidylserine in the absence of nuclear staining, and changes in the fluorescent intensity of Mito Tracker Deep Red 633 indicating changes in mitochondrial oxidative function and mass. The alteration of the mitochondrial function implied that MK886 induced apoptosis in LN18 cells via a mitochondrial pathway. The broad caspases inhibitor ZVAD-FMK inhibited MK886-induced nucleosome release, but not annexinV binding or MK886-altered mitochondrial function. Real time RT-PCR demonstrated that LN18 cells expressed significant levels of FLAP and PPAR-α mRNAs. A low level of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX-5) mRNA was detected, but little, if any, arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (ALOX-12) mRNA was present. In addition, MK886-induced apoptosis in LN18 cells was accompanied by a decrease in the protein and mRNA levels of vinculin, but not other focal adhesion proteins. In summary, the data presented here indicate that disruption of the actin-vinculin-cell-cytoskeleton matrix of the LN18 glioblastoma is a component of the MK886 induced apoptosis. In addition, MK886 treated LN18 cells could provide one model in which to investigate drugs that target lipoxygenase and PPAR-α pathways in the chemotherapeutic treatment of glioblastomas. PMID:17949236

  8. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  9. The role of purinergic and dopaminergic systems on MK-801-induced antidepressant effects in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Raquel Bohrer; Siebel, Anna Maria; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-12-01

    Depression is a serious disease characterized by low mood, anhedonia, loss of interest in daily activities, appetite and sleep disturbances, reduced concentration, and psychomotor agitation. There is a growing interest in NMDA antagonists as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. Considering that purinergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in depression and anxiety states, we characterized the role of these signaling pathways on MK-801-induced antidepressant effects in zebrafish. Animals treated with MK-801 at the doses of 5, 10, 15, or 20μM during 15, 30, or 60min spent longer time in the top area of aquariums in comparison to control group, indicating an anxiolytic/antidepressant effect induced by this drug. Animals treated with MK-801 spent longer time period at top area until 2 (5μM MK-801) and 4 (20μM MK-801) hours after treatment, returning to basal levels from 24h to 7days after exposure. Repeated MK-801 treatment did not induce cumulative effects, since animals treated daily during 7days had the same behavioral response pattern observed since the first until the 7th day. In order to investigate the effects of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist and agonist and the influence of modulation of adenosine levels on MK-801 effects, we treated zebrafish with caffeine, DPCPX, CPA, ZM 241385, CGS 21680, AMPCP, EHNA, dipyridamole, and NBTI during 30min before MK-801 exposure. The non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (50mg/kg) and the selective A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (15mg/kg) prevented the behavioral changes induced by MK-801. The non-specific nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitor dipyridamole (10mg/kg) exacerbated the behavioral changes induced by MK-801. Dopamine receptor antagonists (sulpiride and SCH 23390) did not change the behavioral alterations induced by MK-801. Our findings demonstrated that antidepressant-like effects of MK-801 in zebrafish are mediated through adenosine A1 receptor activation.

  10. Weak-value thermostat with 0.2 mK precision.

    PubMed

    Egan, Patrick; Stone, Jack A

    2012-12-01

    A new laser-based thermostat sensitive to 0.2 mK at room temperature is reported. The method utilizes a fluid-filled prism and interferometric weak-value amplification to sense nanoradian deviations of a laser beam: due to the high thermo-optic coefficient of the fluid (colorless fluorocarbon), the deviation angle through the prism is sensitive to temperature. We estimate the daily stability of our device to be 0.2 mK, which is limited by drifts in the apparatus, and the narrow 20 mK capture range is the price paid for the weak measurement.

  11. The role of purinergic and dopaminergic systems on MK-801-induced antidepressant effects in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Raquel Bohrer; Siebel, Anna Maria; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-12-01

    Depression is a serious disease characterized by low mood, anhedonia, loss of interest in daily activities, appetite and sleep disturbances, reduced concentration, and psychomotor agitation. There is a growing interest in NMDA antagonists as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. Considering that purinergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in depression and anxiety states, we characterized the role of these signaling pathways on MK-801-induced antidepressant effects in zebrafish. Animals treated with MK-801 at the doses of 5, 10, 15, or 20μM during 15, 30, or 60min spent longer time in the top area of aquariums in comparison to control group, indicating an anxiolytic/antidepressant effect induced by this drug. Animals treated with MK-801 spent longer time period at top area until 2 (5μM MK-801) and 4 (20μM MK-801) hours after treatment, returning to basal levels from 24h to 7days after exposure. Repeated MK-801 treatment did not induce cumulative effects, since animals treated daily during 7days had the same behavioral response pattern observed since the first until the 7th day. In order to investigate the effects of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist and agonist and the influence of modulation of adenosine levels on MK-801 effects, we treated zebrafish with caffeine, DPCPX, CPA, ZM 241385, CGS 21680, AMPCP, EHNA, dipyridamole, and NBTI during 30min before MK-801 exposure. The non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (50mg/kg) and the selective A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (15mg/kg) prevented the behavioral changes induced by MK-801. The non-specific nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitor dipyridamole (10mg/kg) exacerbated the behavioral changes induced by MK-801. Dopamine receptor antagonists (sulpiride and SCH 23390) did not change the behavioral alterations induced by MK-801. Our findings demonstrated that antidepressant-like effects of MK-801 in zebrafish are mediated through adenosine A1 receptor activation. PMID

  12. Top Jets at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, L.G.; Lee, S.J.; Perez, G.; Sung, I.; Virzi, J.

    2008-10-06

    We investigatethe reconstruction of high pT hadronically-decaying top quarksat the Large Hadron Collider. One of the main challenges in identifying energetictop quarks is that the decay products become increasingly collimated. This reducesthe efficacy of conventional reconstruction methods that exploit the topology of thetop quark decay chain. We focus on the cases where the decay products of the topquark are reconstructed as a single jet, a"top-jet." The most basic"top-tag" methodbased on jet mass measurement is considered in detail. To analyze the feasibility ofthe top-tagging method, both theoretical and experimental aspects of the large QCDjet background contribution are examined. Based on a factorization approach, wederive a simple analytic approximation for the shape of the QCD jet mass spectrum.We observe very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. We consider high pT tt bar production in the Standard Model as an example, and show that our theoretical QCD jet mass distributions can efficiently characterize the background via sideband analyses. We show that with 25 fb-1 of data, our approach allows us to resolve top-jets with pT _> 1 TeV, from the QCD background, and about 1.5 TeV top-jets with 100 fb-1, without relying on b-tagging. To further improve the significancewe consider jet shapes (recently analyzed in 0807.0234 [hep-ph]), which resolve thesubstructure of energy flow inside cone jets. A method of measuring the top quarkpolarization by using the transverse momentum of the bottom quark is also presented.The main advantages of our approach are: (i) the mass distributions are driven byfirst principle calculations, instead of relying solely on Monte Carlo simulation; (ii) for high pT jets (pT _> 1 TeV), IR-safe jet shape variables are robust against detectorresolution effects. Our analysis can be applied to other boosted massive particlessuch as the electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs.

  13. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D.; Robe, D. M.

    2013-07-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode’s X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T ~ 10^5 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets (1) strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field, and hence (2) strengthens the case made by Moore et al (2011

  14. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  15. Altitude Test Chamber Investigation of Performance of a 28-inch Ram-jet Engine II : Effects of Gutter Width and Blocked Area on Operating Range and Combustion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillito, T B; Jones, W L; Kahn, R W

    1950-01-01

    Altitude-test-chamber investigation of effects of flame-holder blocked area and gutter width on performance of 28-inch diameter ram jet at simulated flight Mach number of 2.0 for altitudes from 40,000 to 55,000 feet was conducted at NACA Lewis laboratory. Ten flame holders investigated covered gutter widths from 1.00 to 2.50 inches and blocked areas from 40.5 to 62.0 percent of combustion-chamber area. Gutter width did not appreciably affect combustion efficiency. Increase in blocked area from 40 to 62 percent resulted in 5- to 10-percent increase in combustion efficiency. Increasing gutter width resulted in improvement in fuel-air-ratio operating range.

  16. Pyrroloquinoline quinone prevents MK-801-induced stereotypical behavior and cognitive deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingqin; Chen, Quancheng; Hu, Xindai; Mao, Shishi; Kong, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), an essential nutrient, antioxidant, redox modulator, and nerve growth factor, prevents cognitive deficits associated with oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. Previous molecular imaging studies also demonstrate that PQQ binds to N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In this study, we investigated the effects of PQQ on stereotypical behaviors and cognitive deficits induced by MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA antagonist used to model schizophrenia. Mice were given repeated injections of MK-801 (0.5mg/kg/d) and PQQ (0.2, 2.0, or 20 μg/kg/d) for 60 days. Behavior was evaluated using a variety of motor, social, and cognitive tests. We found that PQQ administration significantly attenuated MK-801-induced increases in stereotypical behavior and ataxia, suggesting a protective role of PQQ against MK-801-induced neuronal dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of PQQ.

  17. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  18. Rapid single-flux-quantum circuits for low noise mK operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intiso, Samuel; Pekola, Jukka; Savin, Alexander; Devyatov, Ygor; Kidiyarova-Shevchenko, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) technology has been proposed as control electronics for superconducting quantum bits because of the material and working temperature compatibility. In this work, we consider practical aspects of RSFQ circuit design for low noise low power operation. At the working temperature of 20 mK and operational frequency of 2 GHz, dissipated power per junction is reduced to 25 pW by using 6 µA critical current junctions available at the Hypres and VTT low Jc fabrication process. To limit phonon temperature to 30 mK, a maximum of 40 junctions can be placed on a 5 mm × 5 mm chip. Electron temperature in resistive shunts of Josephson junctions is minimized by use of cooling fins, giving minimum electron temperatures of about 150 mK for the Hypres process and 70 mK for the VTT process.

  19. Two Types of Magnetohydrodynamic Sheath Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburaki, Osamu

    2009-06-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical jets emanating from various galactic nuclei strongly suggest that a double-layered structure, or a spine-sheath structure, is likely to be their common feature. We propose that such a sheath jet structure can be formed magnetohydrodynamically within a valley of the magnetic pressures, which is formed between the peaks due to the poloidal and toroidal components, with the centrifugal force acting on the rotating sheath plasma being balanced by the hoop stress of the toroidal field. The poloidal field concentrated near the polar axis is maintained by a converging plasma flow toward the jet region, and the toroidal field is developed outside the jet cone owing to the poloidal current circulating through the jet. Under such situations, the set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations allows two main types of solutions, at least, in the region far from the footpoint. The first type solution describes the jets of marginally bound nature. This type is realized when the jet temperature decreases like a virial one, and neither the pressure-gradient nor the MHD forces, which are both determined consistently, cannot completely overcome the gravity, even at infinity. The second type is realized under an isothermal situation, and the gravity is cancelled exactly by the pressure-gradient force. Hence, the jets of this type are accelerated purely by the MHD force. It is also suggested that these two types correspond, respectively, to the jets from type I and II radio galaxies in the Fanaroff-Riley classification.

  20. Effect of cannabidiol in a MK-801-rodent model of aspects of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gururajan, Anand; Taylor, David Alan; Malone, Daniel Thomas

    2011-09-23

    Cannabidiol is a non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid which, based on several previous preclinical and clinical reports, is purported to have antipsychotic potential. The purpose of this investigation was to further investigate if these effects would be seen using an MK-801-induced rat model of aspects of schizophrenia. MK-801 is an NMDA receptor-antagonist known to produce hyperactivity, deficits in prepulse inhibition and social withdrawal, behaviours which correlate well with some of the positive, cognitive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Following a 4-day acclimatisation to the holding room, rats were acclimatised to startle chambers on day 5 and their prepulse inhibition (PPI) determined on day 6 following treatment with cannabidiol or vehicle and MK-801 or vehicle. On day 9, rats were acclimatised to the social interaction testing arena and on day 10, were tested for social interaction and locomotor activity following the same treatments. Cannabidiol treatment alone disrupted PPI and produced hyperactivity but had no effect on social behaviour. Cannabidiol had no effect on MK-801-induced disruption of PPI or hyperactivity but showed potential towards inhibiting MK-801-induced social withdrawal. As a comparator, we also tested the effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine which only partially reversed MK-801-induced disruption of PPI but was able to reverse MK-801-induced hyperactivity and social withdrawal. In conclusion, cannabidiol showed both propsychotic activity and partial antipsychotic activity in an MK-801-induced model of aspects of schizophrenia. Further behavioural studies would be required using a range of species, strains, animal models and testing paradigms to conclusively establish the antipsychotic potential of cannabidiol.

  1. PEPTIDE INHIBITORS OF MK2 SHOW PROMISE FOR INHIBITION OF ABDOMINAL ADHESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Brian C.; Kavalukas, Sandra; Brugnano, Jamie; Barbul, Adrian; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Background Abdominal adhesions are a common side effect of surgical procedures with complications including infertility, chronic pain, and bowel obstruction, which may lead to the need for surgical lyses of the adhesions. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) has been implicated in several diseases involving inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, the development of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) that modulates MK2 activity may confer therapeutic benefit after abdominal surgery in general and more specifically after bowel anastomosis. Study Design This study evaluated the function of a CPP inhibitor of MK2 in human mesothelial cells and in a rat bowel anastomosis model. To determine IC50 and basic specificity, kinase inhibition was performed using a radiometric assay. Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay (ELISA) was used to evaluate interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in response to IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation in vitro to validate MK2 kinase inhibition. Following bowel anastomosis (10 rats for each control and treatment at 4 and 10 days), the rats were evaluated for weight loss, normal healing (colonic burst strength and hydroxyproline content at the anastomosis), and number and density of adhesions. Results The IC50 of the MK2 inhibitor peptide (22µM) was similar to that of the nonspecific small molecule Rottlerin (IC50=5µM). The MK2 inhibitor peptide was effective at suppressing IL-1β and TNF-α stimulated IL-6 expression in mesothelial cells. In vivo, the MK2 inhibitor peptide was effective as suppressing both the density and number of adhesions formed as a result of bowel anastomosis. Importantly, the peptide had no negative effect on normal healing. Conclusions In conclusion, the peptide inhibitor of MK2, MMI-0100, has the potential to significantly reduce inflammation through suppression of inflammatory cytokine expression and showed promise as a therapeutic for abdominal adhesions. PMID:21492875

  2. Effects of MK-801 on learning and memory as assessed using a novel water maze.

    PubMed

    Kant, G J; Wright, W L; Robinson, T N; D'Angelo, C P

    1991-06-01

    The effects of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 [(+)-10,11-dihydro-5-methyl-5H-dibenzo [a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10 imine hydrogen maleate] on learning and memory were assessed using a water maze. The maze was a traditional type of maze with alleys and choices between various paths, but set inside a pool of water to a height of 25 cm. Different mazes could be configured by altering the arrangement of open vs. closed doors. Both the time required to reach an out-of-the-water exit platform and the errors made during the swim from start to finish were recorded. Learning was assessed during the first 10 to 20 trials in a new maze configuration, while memory was tested after the maze was well learned. Three experiments, some with several phases, were performed. These experiments compared the effects of 0.1 mg/kg of either (+)-MK-801, or (-)-MK-801 vs. saline on learning new maze configurations as well as swimming well-learned mazes. Neither of the MK-801 isomers impaired performance of a previously learned maze. (+)-MK-801 clearly slowed learning of new mazes as measured by both maze completion time and errors committed, while (-)-MK-801 had a significant but smaller effect on learning. Rats given (+)- or (-)-MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) for 16 days while learning one maze and then challenged to learn a new maze without drug administration performed no differently on the new maze than controls, suggesting that the acute effect of MK-801 on learning is not long lasting.

  3. Realization of PLTS-2000 for Low-Temperature Resistance Thermometer Calibration Services Below 650 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Hisashi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the Provisional Low Temperature Scale of 2000 (PLTS-2000) was realized below 650 mK for the purpose of launching low-temperature resistance thermometer calibration services in Japan. A Straty-Adams-type 3He melting pressure thermometer (MPT) and a dilution refrigerator were used to realize the PLTS-2000. Offsets due to hydrostatic pressure head in a filling capillary line of the MPT were adjusted using the minimum pressure fixed point on the 3He melting curve. A rather large MPT hysteresis between the decreasing and increasing pressures was observed during pressure calibration of the MPT and was the main source of uncertainty. The combined standard uncertainty (k = 1) between 50 mK and 650 mK was estimated to be in the range of 0.40 mK to 2.62 mK. The MPT and a number of resistance thermometers with negative temperature coefficients were mounted on the experimental platform with a thermal connection to a mixing chamber and compared in a multiple-temperature-point calibration. The temperature range around the melting pressure minimum, 250 mK to 400 mK, was not used for the calibration. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) in the calibration based on realization of the PLTS-2000 between 50 mK and 650 mK was estimated to be in the range of 0.86 mK to 5.25 mK.

  4. Investigation of hyperfine structure of several major lines in PbI and PbII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, T. J.; Drozdowski, R.; Kwela, J.

    2005-06-01

    Hyperfine structure of several lines in neutral and singly ionized lead have been measured. The discharge tube containing metallic isotope 207Pb was used as a light source. The high resolution spectral apparatus consisted of a silver coated Fabry-Perot etalon and a grating spectrograph combined with CCD camera used as a detector. In the analysis of the spectra we used a computer simulation technique. Our experiment yields the following hyperfine splitting constants A: A(6p2 1D2)=(20.69 +/-0.21) mK, A(6p2 3P2)=(91.37+/-0.34) mK A(6p7s 1P1)=(16.45+/-0.95) mK, A(6p7s 3P1)=(293.93+/-0.56) mK, A(6p6d 3F2)=(103.22+/-0.31) mK, A(6p6d 3F3)=(69.12+/-0.28) mK, A(6p8s 3P1)=(202.04+/-0.48) mK, A(6p8p 3P1)=(224.26+/-1.37) mK, A(6p8p 3D2)=(108.02+/-1.14) mK, A(6p7d 3D1)=(-100.86+/-0.53) mK for the levels of PbI and A(6s2 7s 2S1/2)=(352.1+/-1.7) mK, A(6s2 7p 2P3/2)=(13.6+/-1.3) mK, A(6s2 7p 2P1/2)=(70.8+/-1.1) mK for the levels of Pb II. Our results are compared with recent theory and other experiments.

  5. Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA Lewis Research Center space qualified hybrid high temperature superconducting/semiconducting 7.4 GHz low-noise downconverter for NRL HTSSE-II program

    SciTech Connect

    Javadi, H.H.S.; Bowen, J.G.; Rascoe, D.L.; Romanofsky, R.R.; Bhasin, K.B.; Chorey, C.M.

    1996-07-01

    A deep space satellite downconverter receiver was proposed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) for the Naval Research Laboratory`s (NRL) high temperature superconductivity space experiment, phase-II (HTSSE-II) program. Space qualified low-noise cryogenic downconverter receivers utilizing thin-film high temperature superconducting (HTS) passive circuitry and semiconductor active devices were developed and delivered to NRL. The downconverter consists of an HTS preselect filter, a cryogenic low-noise amplifier, a cryogenic mixer, and a cryogenic oscillator with an HTS resonator. HTS components were inserted as the front-end filter and the local oscillator resonator for their superior 77 K performance over the conventional components. The semiconducting low noise amplifier also benefited from cooling to 77 K. The mixer was designed specifically for cryogenic applications and provided low conversion loss and low power consumption. In addition to an engineering model, two space qualified units (qualification, flight) were built and delivered to NRL. Manufacturing, integration and test of the space qualified downconverters adhered to the requirements of JPL class-D space instruments and partially to MIL-STD-883D specifications. The qualification unit has {approximately}50 K system noise temperature which is a factor of three better than a conventional downconverter at room temperature.

  6. Testing jet models: the inner jet in the wide-angle tail radio galaxy 3C465

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2003-09-01

    Chandra has revealed that the strongly decelerating bases of the broad, bright `type I' jets in FRI radio galaxies are often synchrotron X-ray sources; the required local particle acceleration can be explained in terms of shocks and the onset of turbulence. However, some observations also show that the inner `type II' or FRII-like jets in these objects are also synchrotron X-ray sources. This is harder to explain. If these jets, which in FRIIs persist to hundreds of kpc from the nucleus, can be synchrotron sources, parts of the current standard jet model may need to be revised. We propose to test this by observing the strong, bright type II jet in the wide-angle tail radio galaxy 3C465. Our results will show whether type II jets in general have the properties of those seen in FRIs.

  7. Prunella vulgaris attenuates prepulse inhibition deficit and attention disruption induced by MK-801 in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Jin; Jeon, Se Jin; Dela Peña, Ike C; Lee, Hyung Eun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Young Woo; Jung, Jun Man; Shin, Bum Young; Lee, Seungheon; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina is widely distributed in Korea, Japan, China, and Europe, and it has been traditionally used to treat inflammation or hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the ethanolic extract of the spikes of Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina (EEPV) on dizocilpine (MK-801)-induced schizophrenia-like phenotype behaviors such as the disruption of prepulse inhibition and attention deficits in mice. We also determined the effect of EEPV on MK-801-induced alterations in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphorylated protein kinase B, phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3-β, and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein levels in the cortex and hippocampus of mice. MK-801-induced prepulse inhibition deficits were ameliorated by the administration of EEPV, as shown in the acoustic startle response test. Furthermore, EEPV attenuated the MK-801-induced attention deficits in the water finding test. We also found that EEPV attenuated the increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphorylated protein kinase B, or phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3-β levels induced by MK-801 in the cortex but not in the hippocampus. These results suggest that EEPV could be useful for treating schizophrenia because EEPV ameliorates prepulse inhibition disruption and attention deficits induced by MK-801.

  8. Discovery of a Potent Dihydrooxadiazole Series of Non-ATP-Competitive MK2 (MAPKAPK2) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Dhondi, Pawan; Huang, Xianhai; Aslanian, Robert; Fossetta, James; Tian, Fang; Lundell, Daniel; Palani, Anandan

    2012-02-01

    Inhibition of MK2 has been shown to offer advantages over that of p38 MAPK in the development of cures for inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. P38 MAPK knockout in mice was lethal, whereas MK2-null mice demonstrated strong inhibition of disease progression in collagen-induced arthritis and appeared normal and viable. However, it is challenging to develop ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors due to high ATP binding affinity to the kinase. Non-ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors interact and bind to the kinase in a mode independent of ATP concentration, which could provide better selectivity and cellular potency. Therefore, it is desirable to identify non-ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors. Through structure optimization of lead compound 1, a novel series of dihydrooxadiazoles was discovered. Additional structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of this series led to the identification of compound 38 as a non-ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitor with potent enzymatic activity and good cellular potency. The SAR, synthesis, and biological data of dihydrooxadiazole series are discussed.

  9. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David; Robe, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T is approximately 105 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division

  10. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with In Situ Jet Energy Scale Calibration Using Hadronic W Boson Decays at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Arguin, Jean-Francois

    2006-01-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass with the upgraded collider detector at Fermilab (CDF-II). The top quarks are produced in pairs (tt) in proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  11. Capsicum annuum transcription factor WRKYa positively regulates defense response upon TMV infection and is a substrate of CaMK1 and CaMK2.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, Gil-Je; Jung, Ji Hoon; Kim, Yunsik; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2015-01-23

    Plants are constantly exposed to pathogens and environmental stresses. To minimize damage caused by these potentially harmful factors, plants respond by massive transcriptional reprogramming of various stress-related genes via major transcription factor families. One of the transcription factor families, WRKY, plays an important role in diverse stress response of plants and is often useful to generate genetically engineered crop plants. In this study, we carried out functional characterization of CaWRKYa encoding group I WRKY member, which is induced during hypersensitive response (HR) in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) upon Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infection. CaWRKYa was involved in L-mediated resistance via transcriptional reprogramming of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression and affected HR upon TMV-P0 infection. CaWRKYa acts as a positive regulator of this defense system and could bind to the W-box of diverse PR genes promoters. Furthermore, we found Capsicum annuum mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (CaMK1) and 2 (CaMK2) interacted with CaWRKYa and phosphorylated the SP clusters but not the MAPK docking (D)-domain of CaWRKYa. Thus, these results demonstrated that CaWRKYa was regulated by CaMK1 and CaMK2 at the posttranslational level in hot pepper.

  12. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  13. A deep Chandra observation of the poor cluster AWM 4 - II. The role of the radio jets in enriching the intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan; Giacintucci, Simona; David, Laurence P.; Vrtilek, Jan M.; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2011-03-01

    We use a Chandra observation of the poor cluster AWM 4 to map the temperature and abundance of the intracluster medium, so as to examine the influence of the central radio galaxy on its environment. While the cluster core is generally enriched to near-solar abundances, we find evidence of supersolar abundances correlated with the radio jets, extending ˜35 kpc from the core of the central dominant galaxy NGC 6051 along its minor-axis. We conclude that the enriched gas has been transported out of the central galaxy through the action of the radio source. We estimate the excess mass of iron in the entrained gas to be ˜1.4 × 106 M⊙ and find that this can be produced in the core of NGC 6051 within the time-scale of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) outburst. The energy required to transport this gas to its current location is ˜4.5 × 1057 erg, a significant fraction of the estimated total mechanical energy output of the AGN, though this estimate is dependent on the degree of enrichment of the uplifted gas. The larger near-solar abundance region is also compatible with enrichment by metals mixed outwards from NGC 6051 over a much longer time-scale.

  14. NMDA antagonist MK801 recreates auditory electrophysiology disruption present in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Saunders, John A; Gandal, Michael J; Roberts, Timothy P; Siegel, Steve J

    2012-10-01

    Autism is a highly disabling neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits, language impairment, and repetitive behaviors. There are few effective biological treatments for this disorder, partly due to the lack of translational biomarkers. However, recent data suggest that autism has reliable electrophysiological endophenotypes, along with evidence that some deficits may be caused by NMDA receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction. Similarly, the NMDAR antagonist MK801 has been used in behavioral animal models of autism. Since MK801 has also been used as a model of schizophrenia, this paper examines the independent and overlapping ways in which MK801 recreates the electrophysiogical changes present in both diseases. Mouse EEG was recorded in response to auditory stimuli after either vehicle or MK801 and the dose-response relationship for each measure was determined. ERP component amplitude and latency analysis was performed along with time-frequency analysis of gamma frequency inter-trial coherence and evoked power. Evoked gamma power and ITC were decreased by MK801 at the highest dose. P1, N1 latency and gamma baseline power were increased in dose dependent fashion following MK801. There were no amplitude changes in P1 or N1. MK801 caused alterations in evoked gamma activity, gamma ITC, gamma baseline power, P1 and N1 latency similar to findings in autism. These data provide evidence indicating that NMDAR dysfunction may contribute to deficits specific to autism and some that overlap with other disorders such as schizophrenia. Such observations could be important for developing novel therapeutics, as electrophysiological endophenotypes associate with functional measures and may provide early biomarkers for efficacy in clinical trials.

  15. Effects of MK-801 and amphetamine treatments on allergic lung inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamasato, Eduardo Kenji; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz de Paula, Viviane; Peron, Jean Pierre Schatzmann; Damazo, Amílcar Sabino; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Palermo-Neto, João

    2013-08-01

    Glutamate acts as a neurotransmitter within the Central Nervous System (CNS) and modifies immune cell activity. In lymphocytes, NMDA glutamate receptors regulate intracellular calcium, the production of reactive oxygen species and cytokine synthesis. MK-801, a NMDA receptor open-channel blocker, inhibits calcium entry into mast cells, thereby preventing mast cell degranulation. Several lines of evidence have shown the involvement of NMDA glutamate receptors in amphetamine (AMPH)-induced effects. AMPH treatment has been reported to modify allergic lung inflammation. This study evaluated the effects of MK-801 (0.25mg/kg) and AMPH (2.0mg/kg), given alone or in combination, on allergic lung inflammation in mice and the possible involvement of NMDA receptors in this process. In OVA-sensitized and challenged mice, AMPH and MK-801 given alone decreased cellular migration into the lung, reduced IL-13 and IL10 levels in BAL supernatant, reduced ICAM-1 and L-selectin expression in granulocytes in the BAL and decreased mast cell degranulation. AMPH treatment also decreased IL-5 levels. When both drugs were administered, treatment with MK-801 reversed the decrease in the number of eosinophils and neutrophils induced by AMPH in the BAL of OVA-sensitized and challenged mice as well as the effects on the expression of L-selectin and ICAM-1 in granulocytes, the IL-10, IL-5 and IL-13 levels in BAL supernatants and increased mast cell degranulation. At the same time, treatment with MK-801, AMPH or with MK-801+AMPH increased corticosterone serum levels in allergic mice. These results are discussed in light of possible indirect effects of AMPH and MK-801 via endocrine outflow from the CNS (i.e., HPA-axis activity) to the periphery and/or as a consequence of the direct action of these drugs on immune cell activity, with emphasis given to mast cell participation in the allergic lung response of mice.

  16. The Giant Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  17. A pharmacological MRI assessment of dizocilpine (MK-801) in the 3-nitroproprionic acid-lesioned rat.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Toby J; Williams, Steven C R; Modo, Michel

    2008-10-17

    The NMDA-antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) is known to have dissociative, neurotoxic and neuroprotective properties. Although its neuroprotective properties are well documented, at present only ex vivo autoradiography has demonstrated its activity in lesioned brains. We report here the use of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) to visualise the neural substrates of MK-801 in normal control rats and in animals that received systemic 3-nitroproprionic acid (3-NPA) 2 weeks earlier. In control animals, this NMDA-antagonist resulted in activity in the hippocampus, retrospinal (RS) cortex, anterior cingulate and the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). Activity in the MPFC has been associated with the dissociative properties of this agent and has been suggested to be the neurological substrate of positive psychotic symptoms, whereas RS and hippocampus have been the main sites of neurotoxic actions of MK-801. In contrast, in animals with 3-NPA-lesions affecting the striatum, no activity in the MPFC was observed, but a positive BOLD signal in the striatum was apparent. Lesioned animals injected with saline did not show this pattern of activity indicating that it is not merely an artefact of the ongoing neurodegeneration. This striatal activity could therefore be a site of MK-801-mediated neuroprotection. phMRI therefore sheds further light on the in vivo activity of MK-801 which, in turn, may allow us to more fully understand the different actions of NMDA-antagonists.

  18. Sex-specific restoration of MK-801-induced sensorimotor gating deficit by environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Nozari, M; Shabani, M; Farhangi, A M; Mazhari, S; Atapour, N

    2015-07-23

    Despite ample evidence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dysfunction in schizophrenia, no study has addressed the effects of enriched environment (EE) on sensorimotor gating deficits induced by postnatal NMDA receptor blockade. We evaluated the effect of EE on sensorimotor gating (measured by prepulse inhibition, PPI), or on sensorimotor gating deficit induced by the NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801) in both sexes of Wistar rats. Rats were injected with MK-801 (1 mg/kg) on postnatal days (P) 6-10. EE was provided from birth up to the time of experiments on P28-30 or P58-60. PPI data were collected at three prepulse intensities and then averaged to yield global PPI. MK-801 treatment reduced PPI significantly in both sexes. While EE per se had no significant effect on PPI, it restored MK-801-induced PPI deficit only in male rats. An extended period of EE did not influence PPI deficit in female rats. Our results indicate that postnatal exposure to MK-801 may exert long-lasting effects on neuronal circuits underlying sensorimotor gating. Sex-specific modulation of such effects by EE suggests sexually dimorphic mechanisms are involved.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of MK-801 on L-2-chloropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Williams, R E; Lock, E A; Bachelard, H S

    2001-02-01

    L-2-Chloropropionic acid is selectively toxic to the cerebellum in rats; the granule cell necrosis observed within 48 h can be prevented by prior administration of MK-801. Short-term treatment (2 h) with L-2-chloropropionic acid has also been shown to activate the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in fasted adult rats. This study aimed to investigate the effect of prior exposure to MK-801 on the biochemical and neurotoxicological effects of L-2-chloropropionic acid. Extracts were prepared from the forebrain and cerebellum of animals that had been treated with L-2-chloropropionic acid, with and without prior treatment with MK-801, and were analysed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and amino acid analysis. Glucose metabolism was studied by monitoring the metabolism of [1-(13)C]-glucose using GC/MS. L-2-Chloropropionic acid caused increased glucose metabolism in both brain regions 6 h after administration, confirming activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, which was not prevented by MK-801. After 48 h an increase in lactate and a decrease in N-acetylaspartate was observed only in the cerebellum, whereas phosphocreatine and ATP decreased in both tissues. MK-801 prevented the changes in lactate and N:-acetylaspartate, but not those on the energy state. These studies suggest that L-2-chloropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity is only partly mediated by the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor.

  20. A natural therapeutic approach for the treatment of periodontitis by MK615.

    PubMed

    Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoshiko; Tatsuyama, Syoko; Miyashita, Keiko; Emoto, Makiko; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Tokuda, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the tooth-supporting tissues. Gingival fibroblasts are the most abundant cells in periodontal tissues and they participate actively in the host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens that is known to mediate local tissue destruction in periodontitis. The Japanese apricot, known as Ume in Japanese, has been a traditional Japanese medicine for centuries and is a familiar and commonly consumed food. The health benefits of Ume are widely recognized and have been confirmed in recent studies showing that MK615, an extract of compounds from Ume, has strong anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the potential role of MK615 in oral health is unknown. We hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory activities of MK615 could be exploited to inhibit the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by periodontal bacterial pathogens, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Here, we show that LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 production by gingival fibroblasts was dose-dependently inhibited by MK615. As a potent inhibitor of the inflammatory responses induced by periodontal pathogens, MK615 merits further testing as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis. PMID:26305447

  1. Effect of MK-801 and Clozapine on the Proteome of Cultured Human Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cassoli, Juliana S.; Iwata, Keiko; Steiner, Johann; Guest, Paul C.; Turck, Christoph W.; Nascimento, Juliana M.; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Separate lines of evidence have demonstrated the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and oligodendrocyte dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Here, we have carried out shotgun mass spectrometry proteome analysis of oligodendrocytes treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 to gain potential insights into these effects at the molecular level. The MK-801 treatment led to alterations in the levels of 68 proteins, which are associated with seven distinct biological processes. Most of these proteins are involved in energy metabolism and many have been found to be dysregulated in previous proteomic studies of post-mortem brain tissues from schizophrenia patients. Finally, addition of the antipsychotic clozapine to MK-801-treated oligodendrocyte cultures resulted in changes in the levels of 45 proteins and treatment with clozapine alone altered 122 proteins and many of these showed opposite changes to the MK-801 effects. Therefore, these proteins and the associated energy metabolism pathways should be explored as potential biomarkers of antipsychotic efficacy. In conclusion, MK-801 treatment of oligodendrocytes may provide a useful model for testing the efficacy of novel treatment approaches. PMID:26973466

  2. Sensorimotor gating impairments induced by MK-801 treatment may be reduced by tolerance effect and by familiarization in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Saletti, Patricia G.; Maior, Rafael S.; Hori, Etsuro; Nishijo, Hisao; Tomaz, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Dizocilpine (MK-801) is a non-competitive NMDA antagonist that induces schizophreniclike effects. It is therefore widely used in experimental models of schizophrenia including prepulse inhibition (PPI) impairments in rodents. Nevertheless, MK-801 has never been tested in monkeys on a PPI paradigm. In order to evaluate MK-801 effects on monkeys’ PPI, we tested eight capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) using three different doses of MK-801 (0.01; 0.02; 0.03 mg/kg). Results show PPI impairment in acute administration of the highest dose (0.03 mg/kg). PPI impairment induced by MK-801 was reversed by re-exposure to the PPI test throughout treatment trials, in contrast with rodent studies. These results indicate that tolerance effect and familiarization with PPI test may reduce the sensorimotor gating deficits induced by MK-801 in monkeys, suggesting a drug-training interaction. PMID:26441660

  3. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize.

    PubMed

    Lu Y-T; Feldman, L J; Hidaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants. PMID:11540083

  4. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  5. Discovery of selective and orally available spiro-3-piperidyl ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, Allard; Oubrie, Arthur; de Zwart, Edwin; Hoogenboom, Niels; de Wit, Joeri; van de Kar, Bas; van Hoek, Maaike; Vogel, Gerard; de Kimpe, Vera; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Borsboom, Judith; van Zeeland, Mario; Versteegh, Judith; Kazemier, Bert; de Roos, Jeroen; Wijnands, Frank; Dulos, John; Jaeger, Martin; Leandro-Garcia, Paula; Barf, Tjeerd

    2011-06-15

    The identification of a potent, selective, and orally available MK2 inhibitor series is described. The initial absence of oral bioavailability was successfully tackled by moving the basic nitrogen of the spiro-4-piperidyl moiety towards the electron-deficient pyrrolepyridinedione core, thereby reducing the pK(a) and improving Caco-2 permeability. The resulting racemic spiro-3-piperidyl analogues were separated by chiral preparative HPLC, and the activity towards MK2 inhibition was shown to reside mostly in the first eluting stereoisomer. This led to the identification of new MK2 inhibitors, such as (S)-23, with low nanomolar biochemical inhibition (EC(50) 7.4 nM) and submicromolar cellular target engagement activity (EC(50) 0.5 μM).

  6. Further measurements of the acoustic performance of a variant of the MK 4 helmet earmuff assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogger, M. K.; Wood, S. A.; Lucas, S. H.

    1981-11-01

    Acoustic tests of the attenuation, frequency response and total harmonic distortion of experimental earmuff assemblies intended as alternatives to the B2 production shells fitted to the Mk 4 flight helmet are reported. The experimental earmuff (melamine shells with flanges) dough molded compound without flanges (Mk 4 alternative assemblies) and B2 production shells (Mk 4 helmet) were tested. Attenuation was calculated from insertion loss, i.e., the difference in db between the unoccluded and occluded spectra. Objective tests, using an artificial ear, and semiobjective tests, using 15 short haired, clean shaven subjects were performed. The A-weighted level of the sound field was 99 db(A), lasting for 15 min, the equivalent of 84 db(A) for 8 hr. The experimental earmuff is superior to the other designs.

  7. Discovery of selective and orally available spiro-3-piperidyl ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, Allard; Oubrie, Arthur; de Zwart, Edwin; Hoogenboom, Niels; de Wit, Joeri; van de Kar, Bas; van Hoek, Maaike; Vogel, Gerard; de Kimpe, Vera; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Borsboom, Judith; van Zeeland, Mario; Versteegh, Judith; Kazemier, Bert; de Roos, Jeroen; Wijnands, Frank; Dulos, John; Jaeger, Martin; Leandro-Garcia, Paula; Barf, Tjeerd

    2011-06-15

    The identification of a potent, selective, and orally available MK2 inhibitor series is described. The initial absence of oral bioavailability was successfully tackled by moving the basic nitrogen of the spiro-4-piperidyl moiety towards the electron-deficient pyrrolepyridinedione core, thereby reducing the pK(a) and improving Caco-2 permeability. The resulting racemic spiro-3-piperidyl analogues were separated by chiral preparative HPLC, and the activity towards MK2 inhibition was shown to reside mostly in the first eluting stereoisomer. This led to the identification of new MK2 inhibitors, such as (S)-23, with low nanomolar biochemical inhibition (EC(50) 7.4 nM) and submicromolar cellular target engagement activity (EC(50) 0.5 μM). PMID:21565498

  8. Akt inhibitor MK2206 prevents influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Oxana V; Söderholm, Sandra; Virtanen, Salla; Von Schantz, Carina; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Vashchinkina, Elena; Desloovere, Jens; Tynell, Janne; Ikonen, Niina; Theisen, Linda L; Nyman, Tuula A; Matikainen, Sampsa; Kallioniemi, Olli; Julkunen, Ilkka; Muller, Claude P; Saelens, Xavier; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kainov, Denis E

    2014-07-01

    The influenza pH1N1 virus caused a global flu pandemic in 2009 and continues manifestation as a seasonal virus. Better understanding of the virus-host cell interaction could result in development of better prevention and treatment options. Here we show that the Akt inhibitor MK2206 blocks influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro. In particular, at noncytotoxic concentrations, MK2206 alters Akt signaling and inhibits endocytic uptake of the virus. Interestingly, MK2206 is unable to inhibit H3N2, H7N9, and H5N1 viruses, indicating that pH1N1 evolved specific requirements for efficient infection. Thus, Akt signaling could be exploited further for development of better therapeutics against pH1N1 virus. PMID:24752266

  9. NMDA receptor complex blockade by oral administration of magnesium: comparison with MK-801.

    PubMed

    Decollogne, S; Tomas, A; Lecerf, C; Adamowicz, E; Seman, M

    1997-09-01

    The ion channel of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex is subject to a voltage-dependent regulation by Mg2+ cations. Under physiological conditions, this channel is supposed to be blocked by a high concentration of magnesium in extracellular fluids. A single dose of magnesium organic salts (i.e., aspartate, pyroglutamate, and lactate) given orally to normal mice rapidly increases the plasma Mg2+ level and reveals a significant dose-dependent antagonist effect of magnesium on the latency of NMDA-induced convulsions; this effect is similar to that seen after administration of the dizocilpine (MK-801) channel blocker. An anticonvulsant effect of Mg2+ treatment is also observed with strychnine-induced convulsions but not with bicuculline-, picrotoxin-, or pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions. In the forced swimming test, Mg2+ salts reduce the immobility time in a way similar to imipramine and thus resemble the antidepressant-like activity of MK-801. This activity is masked at high doses of magnesium by a myorelaxant effect that is comparable to MK-801-induced ataxia. Potentiation of yohimbine fatal toxicity is another test commonly used to evaluate putative antidepressant drugs. Administration of Mg2+ salts, like administration of imipramine strongly potentiates yohimbine lethality in contrast to MK-801, which is only poorly active in this test. Neither Mg2+ nor MK-801 treatment can prevent reserpine-induced hypothermia. These data demonstrate that oral administration of magnesium to normal animals can antagonize NMDA-mediated responses and lead to antidepressant-like effects that are comparable to those of MK-801. This important regulatory role of Mg2+ in the central nervous system needs further investigation to evaluate the potential therapeutic advantages of magnesium supplementation in psychiatric disorders. PMID:9264101

  10. Therapeutic effect of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 on low-level laser induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W.-H.; Wu, J.; Chen, P.; Dou, J.-T.; Pan, C.-Y.; Mu, Y.-M.; Lu, J.-M.

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this article was to explore the mechanism of injury in rat retina after constant low-level helium-neon (He-Ne) laser exposure and therapeutic effects of MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, on laser-induced retinal injury. He-Ne laser lesions were created in the central retina of adult Wistar Kyoto rats and were followed immediately by intraperitoneal injection of MK-801 (2 mg/kg) or saline, macroscopical and microscopical lesion were observed by funduscope and light microscope. Ultrastructural changes of the degenerating cells were examined by electron microscopy. Photoreceptor apoptosis was evaluated by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL). mRNA levels were measured by in situ hybridization and NMDA receptor expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Laser induced damage was histologically quantified by image-analysis morphometry. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded at different time point after the cessation of exposure to constant irradiation. There was no visible bleeding, exudation or necrosis under funduscope. TUNEL and electron microscopy showed photoreceptor apoptosis after irradiation. MK-801-treated animals had significantly fewer TUNEL-positive cells in the photoreceptors than saline-treated animals after exposure to laser. In situ hybridization (ISH) showed that the NMDAR mRNA level of MK-801-treated rats decreased in the inner plexiform layer 6 h after the cessation of exposure to constant irradiation when compared with that of saline-treated rats. So did Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Electroretinogram showed that b-wave amplitudes of MK-801-treated group were higher than that of saline-treated group after laser exposure. These findings suggest that Low level laser may cause the retinal pathological changes under given conditions. High expression of NMDAR is one of the possible mechanisms causing experimental retinal laser injury of rats. MK-801 exhibits the therapeutic effect due to promote the

  11. Supplemental Reactor Physics Calculations and Analysis of ELF Mk 1A Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope

    2014-10-01

    These calculations supplement previous the reactor physics work evaluating the Enhanced Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel (ELF) Mk 1A element. This includes various additional comparisons between the current Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and LEU along with further characterization of the performance of the ELF fuel. The excess reactivity to be held down at BOC for ELF Mk 1A fuel is estimated to be approximately $2.75 greater than with HEU for a typical cycle. This is a combined effect of the absence of burnable poison in the ELF fuel and the reduced neck shim worth in LEU fuel compared to HEU. Burnable poison rods were conceptualized for use in the small B positions containing Gd2O3 absorber. These were shown to provide $2.37 of negative reactivity at BOC and to burn out in less than half of a cycle. The worth of OSCCs is approximately the same between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This was evaluated by rotating all banks simultaneously. The safety rod worth is relatively unchanged between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. However, this should be reevaluated with different loadings. Neutron flux, both total and fast (>1 MeV), is either the same or reduced upon changing from HEU to ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This is consistent with the well-established trend of lower neutron fluxes for a given power in LEU than HEU.The IPT loop void reactivity is approximately the same or less positive with ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuel than HEU in the representative loading evaluated.

  12. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    To investigate the possibility of active control of jet noise, knowledge of the noise generation mechanisms in natural jets is essential. Once these mechanisms are determined, active control can be used to manipulate the noise production processes. We investigated the evolution of the flow fields and the acoustic fields of rectangular and circular jets. A predominant flapping mode was found in the supersonic rectangular jets. We hope to increase the spreading of supersonic jets by active control of the flapping mode found in rectangular supersonic jets.

  13. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  14. A Coronal Hole Jet Observed with Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Peter H.; Muglach, Karin

    2014-01-01

    A small blowout jet was observed at the boundary of the south coronal hole on 2011 February 8 at around 21:00 UT. Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) revealed an expanding loop rising from one footpoint of a compact, bipolar bright point. Magnetograms from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO showed that the jet was triggered by the cancelation of a parasitic positive polarity feature near the negative pole of the bright point. The jet emission was present for 25 mins and it extended 30 Mm from the bright point. Spectra from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode yielded a temperature and density of 1.6 MK and 0.9-1.7 × 10( exp 8) cu cm for the ejected plasma. Line-of-sight velocities reached up to 250 km/s. The density of the bright point was 7.6 × 10(exp 8) cu cm, and the peak of the bright point's emission measure occurred at 1.3 MK, with no plasma above 3 MK.

  15. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  16. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  17. Evidence for an X-Ray Jet in DG Tauri A?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, M.; Skinner, S. L.; Briggs, K. R.; Audard, M.; Arzner, K.; Telleschi, A.

    2005-06-01

    We present evidence for an X-ray jet in the T Tauri star DG Tau A based on Chandra ACIS data. DG Tau A, a jet-driving classical T Tauri star with a flat infrared spectrum, reveals an unusual X-ray spectrum that requires two thermal components with different intervening absorption column densities. The softer component shows a low temperature of T~2.9 MK, and its absorption is compatible with the stellar optical extinction (hydrogen column density NH~5×1021 cm-2). In contrast, the harder component reveals a temperature (22 MK) characteristic of active T Tauri stars, but its emission is more strongly absorbed (NH~2.8×1022 cm-2). Furthermore, the high-resolution ACIS-S image reveals a weak excess of soft (0.5-2 keV) counts at distances of 2"-4" from the star precisely along the optical jet, with a suggestive concentration at 4", where a bow shock-like structure has previously been identified in optical line observations. The energy distribution of these photons is similar to those of the stellar soft component. We interpret the soft spectral component as originating from shocks at the base of the jet, with shock-heating continuing out to a distance of at least 500 AU along the jet, whereas the hard component is most likely coronal or magnetospheric as in other young stellar systems.

  18. The effects of vitamin K on the generation of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sakon, M; Monden, M; Gotoh, M; Kobayashi, K; Kanai, T; Umeshita, K; Endoh, W; Mori, T

    1991-03-01

    The clinical significance of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was investigated in 112 patients with and without vitamin K administration. The positivity rate of PIVKA-II was significantly decreased in patients receiving vitamin K (28.5%), compared with those without vitamin K administration (54.5%, p less than 0.05). The plasma levels of vitamin K derivatives [phylloquinone (VK1), menaquinone-4 (MK4), and menaquinone-7 (MK7)] measured were not decreased in patients with HCC, but were significantly increased in MK4 and VK1 + MK4 + MK7. The amount of PIVKA-II in plasma did not correlate with the plasma levels of vitamin K derivatives. However, PIVKA-II was decreased by the administration of vitamin K, and all of the six patients with more than 5.0 ng/ml of VK1 + MK4 + MK7 were within normal limits, whereas half of 32 patients with less than that had abnormal levels of PIVKA-II. Thus, it was suggested that PIVKA-II was not elevated due to vitamin K deficiency, but might result from the impaired metabolism or availability of vitamin K in the tumor. Therefore, PIVKA-II should be measured without vitamin K administration.

  19. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  20. Magnetic jets in long GRBs: jet stability, energy dissipation & the connection with the magnetar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer

    2016-07-01

    It is commonly accepted that jets in long GRBs are powered by the magnetized rotation of a compact object: a BH or a fastly rotating magnetar. Such jets are intrinsically unstable to disruptive kink modes, yet they maintain their shape over many orders of magnitude as they propagate through the star and beyond, while converting their electromagnetic energy into radiation and kinetic energy. This calls for an efficient dissipation mechanism to work within the jet, without causing its disruption. In this talk I will present results from a 3D study of relativistic magnetized GRB jets propagating in stellar envelopes. The collimation of the jet leads to two types of instabilities: i) a local kink mode that causes internal dissipation of the magnetic energy to a state of equipartition with the thermal energy, ii) a global kink mode, which bodily deforms the jet, causing it to slow down may lead to jet stalling. I will discuss the interesting implications from these results on the energy emission in long GRBs and on the type of compact objects that power them. In particular I will show that within the framework of the magnetar model, the jet is expected to become highly kinked unstable and fail to breakout of the star. Instead it inflates a bubble with ~10^52 erg of energy at the center of the star leading to a highly energetic supernova.

  1. Study of Jet Transverse Momentum and Jet Rapidity Dependence on Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthula, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    In a collision experiment involving highly energetic particles such as hadrons, processes at high momentum transfers can provide information useful for many studies involving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One way of analyzing these interactions is through angular distributions. In hadron-hadron collisions, the angular distribution between the two leading jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT ) is affected by the production of additional jets. While soft radiation causes small differences in the azimuthal angular distribution of the two leading jets produced in a collision event, additional hard jets produced in the event have more pronounced influence on the distribution of the two leading jets produced in the collision. Thus, the dijet azimuthal angular distribution can serve as a variable that can be used to study the transition from soft to hard QCD processes in a collision event. This dissertation presents a triple-differential study involving the azimuthal angular distribution and the jet transverse momenta, and jet rapidities of the first two leading jets. The data used for this research are obtained from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions occurring at a center of mass energy of 1.96TeV, using the DØ detector in Run II of the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois, USA. Comparisons are made to perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions at next-to-leading order (NLO).

  2. The effects of CA1 5HT4 receptors in MK801-induced amnesia and hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Tabatabaie, Maryam; Khakpai, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the effects of 5-HT4 receptors of the CA1 on MK801-induced amnesia and hyperlocomotion were examined. One-trial step-down method was used to assess memory retention and then, the hole-board method to assess exploratory behaviors. The results showed that post-training intra-CA1 administration of RS67333 (62.5 and 625 ng/mouse) and RS23597 (1 and 10 ng/mouse) decreased memory consolidation, but it did not alter head-dip counts, head-dip latency and locomotor activity. Similarly, MK801 (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse) decreased memory consolidation, but had no effect on head-dip counts and head-dip latency. Interestingly, it increased locomotor activity. The results also showed that post-training intra-CA1 injection of a sub-threshold dose of RS67333 (6.25 ng/mouse) or RS23597 (0.1 ng/mouse) could heighten MK801 induced amnesia and decrease locomotor activity, but it did not alter head-dip counts and head-dip latency. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the CA1 5-HT4 receptors are involved in MK801-induced amnesia and hyperlocomotion.

  3. 76 FR 14349 - Airworthiness Directives; British Aerospace Regional Aircraft Model HP.137 Jetstream Mk.1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... issued British Aerospace Jetstream Series 3100 & 3200 Service Bulletin 32-JA090240, Revision 1, dated... British Aerospace Regional Aircraft Model HP.137 Jetstream Mk.1, Jetstream Series 200, Jetstream Series...) of British Aerospace Jetstream Series 3100 & 3200 Service Bulletin 32-JA090240, Revision 1,...

  4. Application of human CFU-Mk assay to predict potential thrombocytotoxicity of drugs.

    PubMed

    Pessina, A; Parent-Massin, D; Albella, B; Van Den Heuvel, R; Casati, S; Croera, C; Malerba, I; Sibiril, Y; Gomez, S; de Smedt, A; Gribaldo, L

    2009-02-01

    Megakaryocytopoiesis gives rise to platelets by proliferation and differentiation of lineage-specific progenitors, identified in vitro as Colony Forming Unit-Megakaryocytes (CFU-Mk). The aim of this study was to refine and optimize the in vitro Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) of the CFU-Mk assay for detecting drug-induced thrombocytopenia and to prevalidate a model for predicting the acute exposure levels that cause maximum tolerated decreases in the platelets count, based on the correlation with the maximal plasma concentrations (C max) in vivo. The assay was linear under the SOP conditions, and the in vitro endpoints (percentage of colonies growing) were reproducible within and across laboratories. The protocol performance phase was carried out testing 10 drugs (selected on the base of their recognised or potential in vivo haematotoxicity, according to the literature). Results showed that a relationship can be established between the maximal concentration in plasma (C max) and the in vitro concentrations that inhibited the 10-50-90 percent of colonies growth (ICs). When C max is lower than IC10, it is possible to predict that the chemicals have no direct toxicity effect on CFU-Mk and could not induce thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow damage. When the C max is higher than IC90 and/or IC50, thrombocytopenia can occur due to direct toxicity of chemicals on CFU-Mk progenitors.

  5. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group.

    PubMed

    Bungard, Christopher J; Williams, Peter D; Ballard, Jeanine E; Bennett, David J; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S; Chang, Ronald K; Dubost, David C; Fay, John F; Diamond, Tracy L; Greshock, Thomas J; Hao, Li; Holloway, M Katharine; Felock, Peter J; Gesell, Jennifer J; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J; McKay, Daniel J; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M; Nantermet, Philippe G; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D; Singh, Sanjay K; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M; Vacca, Joseph P; Crane, Sheldon N; McCauley, John A

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile. PMID:27437081

  6. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group.

    PubMed

    Bungard, Christopher J; Williams, Peter D; Ballard, Jeanine E; Bennett, David J; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S; Chang, Ronald K; Dubost, David C; Fay, John F; Diamond, Tracy L; Greshock, Thomas J; Hao, Li; Holloway, M Katharine; Felock, Peter J; Gesell, Jennifer J; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J; McKay, Daniel J; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M; Nantermet, Philippe G; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D; Singh, Sanjay K; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M; Vacca, Joseph P; Crane, Sheldon N; McCauley, John A

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile.

  7. Au-Ge film thermometers for temperature range 30 mK-300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Brusetti, R.; Lasjaunias, J. C.; Sahling, S.

    After optmization of the Au concentration and the annealing temperature, highly sensitive Au-Ge film thermometers for the temperature range 30 mK-300 K were obtained. The thermometers show good reproducibility, a very short relaxation time constant at low temperatures and are quite insensitive to magnetic field.

  8. 4-Anilino-6-phenyl-quinoline inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2).

    PubMed

    Olsson, Henric; Sjö, Peter; Ersoy, Oguz; Kristoffersson, Anna; Larsson, Joakim; Nordén, Bo

    2010-08-15

    A class of inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated kinase 2 (MK2) was discovered via high-throughput screening. This compound class demonstrates activity against the enzyme with sub-microM IC(50) values, and suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha levels in THP-1 cells. MK2 inhibition kinetic measurements indicated mixed binding approaching non-ATP competitive inhibition.

  9. Intra-accumbens injection of a dopamine aptamer abates MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction in a model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Holahan, Matthew R; Madularu, Dan; McConnell, Erin M; Walsh, Ryan; DeRosa, Maria C

    2011-01-01

    Systemic administration of the noncompetitive NMDA-receptor antagonist, MK-801, has been proposed to model cognitive deficits similar to those seen in patients with schizophrenia. The present work investigated the ability of a dopamine-binding DNA aptamer to regulate these MK-801-induced cognitive deficits when injected into the nucleus accumbens. Rats were trained to bar press for chocolate pellet rewards then randomly assigned to receive an intra-accumbens injection of a DNA aptamer (200 nM; n = 7), tris buffer (n = 6) or a randomized DNA oligonucleotide (n = 7). Animals were then treated systemically with MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) and tested for their ability to extinguish their bar pressing response. Two control groups were also included that did not receive MK-801. Data revealed that injection of Tris buffer or the random oligonucleotide sequence into the nucleus accumbens prior to treatment with MK-801 did not reduce the MK-801-induced extinction deficit. Animals continued to press at a high rate over the entire course of the extinction session. Injection of the dopamine aptamer reversed this MK-801-induced elevation in lever pressing to levels as seen in rats not treated with MK-801. Tests for activity showed that the aptamer did not impair locomotor activity. Results demonstrate the in vivo utility of DNA aptamers as tools to investigate neurobiological processes in preclinical animal models of mental health disease.

  10. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  11. MK3 controls Polycomb target gene expression via negative feedback on ERK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interactions are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Polycomb Group proteins constitute part of an epigenetic cellular transcriptional memory system that is subject to dynamic modulation during differentiation. Molecular insight in processes that control dynamic chromatin association and dissociation of Polycomb repressive complexes during and beyond development is limited. We recently showed that MK3 interacts with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). The functional relevance of this interaction, however, remained poorly understood. MK3 is activated downstream of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (M/SAPKs), all of which fulfill crucial roles during development. We here use activation of the immediate-early response gene ATF3, a bona fide PRC1 target gene, as a model to study how MK3 and its effector kinases MAPK/ERK and SAPK/P38 are involved in regulation of PRC1-dependent ATF3 transcription. Results Our current data show that mitogenic signaling through ERK, P38 and MK3 regulates ATF3 expression by PRC1/chromatin dissociation and epigenetic modulation. Mitogenic stimulation results in transient P38-dependent H3S28 phosphorylation and ERK-driven PRC1/chromatin dissociation at PRC1 targets. H3S28 phosphorylation by itself appears not sufficient to induce PRC1/chromatin dissociation, nor ATF3 transcription, as inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling blocks BMI1/chromatin dissociation and ATF3 expression, despite induced H3S28 phosphorylation. In addition, we establish that concomitant loss of local H3K27me3 promoter marking is not required for ATF3 activation. We identify pERK as a novel signaling-induced binding partner of PRC1, and provide evidence that MK3 controls ATF3 expression in cultured cells via negative regulatory feedback on M/SAPKs. Dramatically increased ectopic wing vein formation in the absence of Drosophila MK in a Drosophila ERK gain-of-function wing vein patterning model, supports the existence of MK

  12. Oxytocin reversed MK-801-induced social interaction and aggression deficits in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Fernanda Francine; Gaspary, Karina Vidarte; Siebel, Anna Maria; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2016-09-15

    Changes in social behavior occur in several neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The interaction between individuals is an essential aspect and an adaptive response of several species, among them the zebrafish. Oxytocin is a neuroendocrine hormone associated with social behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of MK-801, a non-competitive antagonist of glutamate NMDA receptors, on social interaction and aggression in zebrafish. We also examined the modulation of those effects by oxytocin, the oxytocin receptor agonist carbetocin and the oxytocin receptor antagonist L-368,899. Our results showed that MK-801 induced a decrease in the time spent in the segment closest to the conspecific school and in the time spent in the segment nearest to the mirror image, suggesting an effect on social behavior. The treatment with oxytocin after the exposure to MK-801 was able to reestablish the time spent in the segment closest to the conspecific school, as well as the time spent in the segment nearest to the mirror image. In addition, in support of the role of the oxytocin pathway in modulating those responses, we showed that the oxytocin receptor agonist carbetocin reestablished the social and aggressive behavioral deficits induced by MK-801. However, the oxytocin receptor antagonist L-368,899 was not able to reverse the behavioral changes induced by MK-801. This study supports the critical role for NMDA receptors and the oxytocinergic system in the regulation of social behavior and aggression which may be relevant for the mechanisms associated to autism and schizophrenia.

  13. Neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing properties of MK-801 flexible analogs. Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Bachurin, S; Tkachenko, S; Baskin, I; Lermontova, N; Mukhina, T; Petrova, L; Ustinov, A; Proshin, A; Grigoriev, V; Lukoyanov, N; Palyulin, V; Zefirov, N

    2001-06-01

    Neuroprotective and biobehavioral properties of a series of novel open chain MK-801 analogs, as well as their structure-activity relationships have been investigated. Three groups of compounds were synthesized: monobenzylamino, benzhydrylamino, and dibenzylamino (DBA) analogs of MK-801. It was revealed that DBA analogs exhibit pronounced glutamate-induced calcium uptake blocking properties and anti-NMDA activity. The hit compound of DBA series, NT-1505, was investigated for its ability to improve cognition functions in animal model of Alzheimer's disease type dementia, simulated by treating animals with cholinotoxin AF64A. The results from an active avoidance test and a Morris water maze test showed that experimental animals, treated additionally with NT-1505, exhibited much better learning ability and memory than the control group (AF64A treated) and close to that of the vehicle group of animals (treated with physiological solution). Study of NT-1505 influence on locomotor activity revealed that it is characterized by a spectrum of behavioral activity radically different from that of MK-801, and in contrast to the latter one does not produce any psychotomimetic side effects in the therapeutically significant dose interval. The computed docking of MK-801 and its flexible analogs on the NMDA receptor elucidated the crucial role of the hydrogen bond formed between these compounds and the asparagine residue for magnesium binding in the NMDA receptor. It was suggested that strong hydrophobic interaction between MK-801 and the hydrophobic pocket in the NMDA receptor-channel complex determines much higher irreversibility of this adduct compared to the intermediates formed between this site and Mg ions or flexible DBA derivatives, which might explain the absence of PCP-like side effects of the latter compounds.

  14. DNA microarray unravels rapid changes in transcriptome of MK-801 treated rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Kulikova, Sofya P; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Pinault, Didier; Masuo, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of MK-801 on gene expression patterns genome wide in rat brain regions. METHODS: Rats were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of MK-801 [0.08 (low-dose) and 0.16 (high-dose) mg/kg] or NaCl (vehicle control). In a first series of experiment, the frontoparietal electrocorticogram was recorded 15 min before and 60 min after injection. In a second series of experiments, the whole brain of each animal was rapidly removed at 40 min post-injection, and different regions were separated: amygdala, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, midbrain and ventral striatum on ice followed by DNA microarray (4 × 44 K whole rat genome chip) analysis. RESULTS: Spectral analysis revealed that a single systemic injection of MK-801 significantly and selectively augmented the power of baseline gamma frequency (30-80 Hz) oscillations in the frontoparietal electroencephalogram. DNA microarray analysis showed the largest number (up- and down- regulations) of gene expressions in the cerebral cortex (378), midbrain (376), hippocampus (375), ventral striatum (353), amygdala (301), and hypothalamus (201) under low-dose (0.08 mg/kg) of MK-801. Under high-dose (0.16 mg/kg), ventral striatum (811) showed the largest number of gene expression changes. Gene expression changes were functionally categorized to reveal expression of genes and function varies with each brain region. CONCLUSION: Acute MK-801 treatment increases synchrony of baseline gamma oscillations, and causes very early changes in gene expressions in six individual rat brain regions, a first report. PMID:26629322

  15. Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-08-01

    Recent jet results in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the CDF experiment at the Tevatron are presented. The jet inclusive cross section is compared to next-to-leading order QCD prediction in different rapidity regions. The b-jet inclusive cross section is measured exploiting the long lifetime and large mass of B-hadrons. Jet shapes, W+jets and W/Z+photon cross sections are also measured and compared to expectations from QCD production.

  16. Protostellar Jets: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, B. F.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical simulations of astrophysical jets have been made in order to study their collimation and internal structure. Recently Ouyed & Pudritz (1997) did numerical simulations of axi-simetric magnetocentrifugal jets from a keplerian acretion disk employing the eulerian finite difference code Zeus-2D. During their simulation, it was raised a steady state jet confirming a lot of results of the MHD winds steady state theory. Following this scenario we did tridimensional numerial simulations of this model allowing the jet, after a perturbation, evolve into a not steady state producing the helical features observed in some protostellar jets.

  17. Climate change simulated by full and mixed-layer ocean versions of CSIRO Mk3.5 and Mk3.0: The Asia-Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, Ian G.

    2013-05-01

    The patterns of climate change in the Asia-Pacific region simulated by versions of the CSIRO Mk3.5 and Mk3.0 climate models are examined and compared with those from 23 CMIP3 models. Using fields standardized by global warming, it is seen that both CSIRO coupled models simulate larger surface warming in the tropical western Pacific Ocean, and smaller warming in the eastern Indian Ocean, than the CMIP3 average, and also model versions with a mixed-layer ocean. Corresponding differences in the changes in the pressure, winds, rainfall and other quantities were simulated. Introducing the coupled Mk3.5's sea surface temperature field for the present climate, which has a warm bias, as the base climate for the MLO version had only a minor effect on the MLO version's pattern of climate change. A Pacific-Indian Dipole index quantifying the amplitude of the warming pattern explains much of the variation in rainfall change simulated by the CMIP3 models over Australia and the Indonesian and Melanesian regions. It relates more strongly to Australian average rainfall than several other indices representing southern hemispheric circulation changes. The decline in Australian rainfall produced by the full ocean coupling is largest in summer, but occurs in each season, and extends across the continent. Further assessment of the importance of the dipole change pattern in new simulations is warranted. Analyses aimed at reducing the uncertainty in its potential amplitude could help narrow the range of projections for change in the Australasian region.

  18. Deficiency of MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) prevents adverse remodelling and promotes endothelial healing after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Kapopara, P R; von Felden, J; Soehnlein, O; Wang, Y; Napp, L C; Sonnenschein, K; Wollert, K C; Schieffer, B; Gaestel, M; Bauersachs, J; Bavendiek, U

    2014-12-01

    Maladaptive remodelling of the arterial wall after mechanical injury (e. g. angioplasty) is characterised by inflammation, neointima formation and media hypertrophy, resulting in narrowing of the affected artery. Moreover, mechanical injury of the arterial wall causes loss of the vessel protecting endothelial cell monolayer. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a major downstream target of p38 MAPK, regulates inflammation, cell migration and proliferation, essential processes for vascular remodelling and re-endothelialisation. Therefore, we investigated the role of MK2 in remodelling and re-endothelialisation after arterial injury in genetically modified mice in vivo. Hypercholesterolaemic low-density-lipoprotein-receptor-deficient mice (ldlr-/-) were subjected to wire injury of the common carotid artery. MK2-deficiency (ldlr-/-/mk2-/-) nearly completely prevented neointima formation, media hypertrophy, and lumen loss after injury. This was accompanied by reduced proliferation and migration of MK2-deficient smooth muscle cells. In addition, MK2-deficiency severely reduced monocyte adhesion to the arterial wall (day 3 after injury, intravital microscopy), which may be attributed to reduced expression of the chemokine ligands CCL2 and CCL5. In line, MK2-deficiency significantly reduced the content of monocytes, neutrophiles and lymphocytes of the arterial wall (day 7 after injury, flow cytometry). In conclusion, in a model of endothelial injury (electric injury), MK2-deficiency strongly increased proliferation of endothelial cells and improved re-endothelialisation of the arterial wall after injury. Deficiency of MK2 prevents adverse remodelling and promotes endothelial healing of the arterial wall after injury, suggesting that MK2-inhibition is a very attractive intervention to prevent restenosis after percutaneous therapeutic angioplasty. PMID:25120198

  19. Z boson production in association with heavy quark jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Anthony Zennamo, III

    2013-10-28

    The dominant background in searches for a Higgs boson decaying into b-quarks at the Tevatron is production of a Z boson in association with either b- or c-quark initiated jets (b or c jets). This thesis describes the first measurements of the ratio of differential cross sections σ (Z + b jet)/ σ(Z + jet), and the first measurements of the ratio of cross sections σ (Z + c jet)/ σ(Z + jet) and σ (Z + c jet)/ σ(Z + b jet). These measurements are performed using the full D0 Run II data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The ratio of differential cross sections σ(Z + b jet)/σ (Z + jet) have been measured as a function of jet and Z boson pT , jet η , and Δφ(Z, jet). The Z+c jet ratios of differential cross sections are measured as a function of jet and Z boson pT .

  20. Causality and stability of cosmic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2015-09-01

    In stark contrast to their laboratory and terrestrial counterparts, cosmic jets appear to be very stable. They are able to penetrate vast spaces, which exceed by up to a billion times the size of their central engines. We propose that the reason behind this remarkable property is the loss of causal connectivity across these jets, caused by their rapid expansion in response to fast decline of external pressure with the distance from the `jet engine'. In atmospheres with power-law pressure distribution, pext ∝ z-κ, the total loss of causal connectivity occurs, when κ > 2 - the steepness which is expected to be quite common for many astrophysical environments. This conclusion does not seem to depend on the physical nature of jets - it applies both to relativistic and non-relativistic flows, both magnetically dominated and unmagnetized jets. In order to verify it, we have carried out numerical simulations of moderately magnetized and moderately relativistic jets. The results give strong support to our hypothesis and provide with valuable insights. In particular, we find that the z-pinched inner cores of magnetic jets expand slower than their envelopes and become susceptible to instabilities even when the whole jet is stable. This may result in local dissipation and emission without global disintegration of the flow. Cosmic jets may become globally unstable when they enter flat sections of external atmospheres. We propose that the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) morphological division of extragalactic radio sources into two classes is related to this issue. In particular, we argue that the low power FR-I jets become reconfined, causally connected and globally unstable on the scale of galactic X-ray coronas, whereas more powerful FR-II jets reconfine much further out, already on the scale of radio lobes and remain largely intact until they terminate at hotspots. Using this idea, we derived the relationship between the critical jet power and the optical luminosity of the host

  1. A search for ionized jets towards massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, S. J. D.; Lumsden, S. L.; Hoare, M. G.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cunningham, N.; Purcell, C. R.; Brooks, K. J.; Garay, G.; Gúzman, A. E.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    Radio continuum observations using the Australia telescope compact array at 5.5, 9.0, 17.0 and 22.8 GHz have detected free-free emission associated with 45 of 49 massive young stellar objects and H II regions. Of these, 26 sources are classified as ionized jets (12 of which are candidates), 2 as ambiguous jets or disc winds, 1 as a disc-wind, 14 as H II regions and 2 were unable to be categorized. Classification as ionized jets is based upon morphology, radio flux and spectral index, in conjunction with previous observational results at other wavelengths. Radio luminosity and momentum are found to scale with bolometric luminosity in the same way as low-mass jets, indicating a common mechanism for jet production across all masses. In 13 of the jets, we see associated non-thermal/optically thin lobes resulting from shocks either internal to the jet and/or at working surfaces. 10 jets display non-thermal (synchrotron emission) spectra in their lobes, with an average spectral index of α = -0.55 consistent with Fermi acceleration in shocks. This shows that magnetic fields are present, in agreement with models of jet formation incorporating magnetic fields. Since the production of collimated radio jets is associated with accretion processes, the results presented in this paper support the picture of disc-mediated accretion for the formation of massive stars with an upper limit on the jet phase lasting approximately 6.5 × 104 yr. Typical mass-loss rates in the jet are found to be 1.4 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 with associated momentum rates of the order of (1-2) × 10-2 M⊙ km s-1 yr-1.

  2. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Powling, Alexander; Siodmok, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p T . We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  3. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Sfyrla, Anna

    2008-03-10

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb-1 of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is σWW/WZtheory x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 2.09 ± 0.14 pb. They measured NSignal = 410 ± 212(stat) ± 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section σWW/WZ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 1.47 ± 0.77(stat) ± 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be σ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels

  4. MMI-0100 inhibits cardiac fibrosis in myocardial infarction by direct actions on cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts via MK2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Yates, Cecelia C.; Lockyer, Pamela; Xie, Liang; Bevilacqua, Ariana; He, Jun; Lander, Cynthia; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte

    2014-01-01

    The cell-permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), MMI-0100, inhibits MK2 and downstream fibrosis and inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that MMI-0100 reduces intimal hyperplasia in a mouse vein graft model, pulmonary fibrosis in a murine bleomycin-induced model and development of adhesions in conjunction with abdominal surgery. MK2 is critical to the pathogenesis of ischemic heart injury as MK2 −/− mice are resistant to ischemic remodeling. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting MK2 with MMI-0100 would protect the heart after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in vivo. AMI was induced by placing a permanent LAD coronary ligation. When MMI-0100 peptide was given 30 minutes after permanent LAD coronary artery ligation, the resulting fibrosis was reduced/prevented ~50% at a 2 week time point, with a corresponding improvement in cardiac function and decrease in left ventricular dilation. In cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts, MMI-0100 inhibited MK2 to reduce cardiomyocyte caspase 3/7 activity, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast caspase 3/7 activity, which may explain MMI-0100’s salvage of cardiac function and anti-fibrotic effects in vivo. These findings suggest that therapeutic inhibition of MK2 after acute MI, using rationally-designed cell-permeant peptides, inhibits cardiac fibrosis and maintains cardiac function by mechanisms that involve inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast cell death. PMID:25257914

  5. Evaluation of the ocean technology system's MK 1-S wireless surface unit, MK 1 DCI two diver air radio, MK 1-D-A wireless diver unit, MK 1-D-H hardwire diver unit and MK 1-D/S unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyle, B. E.

    1985-05-01

    The OTS was evaluated for intelligibility, reliability and human engineering. The test subjects possessed various levels of experience with wireless or hardwire communication and SCUBA. The conditions under which the equipment was tested varied. Surface air temperatures ranged from 37 to 85 F; water temperatures from 65 to 80 F; and water depths from 8 feet of seawater (FSW) to greater than 60 FSW. The tests were conducted inside a circular 30 foot deep ascent tower, in shallow open bay water, and finally in an open ocean environment. The equipment was evaluated in areas of both high and low noise levels on the surface as well as in water. The OTS produced an overall intelligibility of 89.24% during manned open water testing using the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) as the evaluation criteria, with a minimum effective range of 330 yards at 12 FSW and at least 875 yards, although it appears that the range of the MK 1-D-A is somewhat greater. Human engineering aspects of the OTS were found to be more than satisfactory, with no material failures encountered during testing. It is interesting to note that whenever the equipment required minor adjustments, these could be effected by the diver in the water (on the surface) and in most cases in less than 5 minutes. The amount of maintenance required on the OTS was minimal.

  6. Heavy element nucleosynthesis in jets from collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichirou; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Kotake, Kei; Yamada, Shoichi

    2007-02-26

    We investigate nucleosynthesis in collapsars, based on long-term, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rapidly rotating massive star of 40M{center_dot} during the core collapse. We have calculated detailed composition of magnetically driven jets ejected from the collapsars, in which the magnetic fields before the collapse, are uniform and parallel to the rotational axis of the star and the magnitudes of the fields, B0, are 1010 G or 1012 G. We follow the evolution of chemical composition up to about 4000 nuclides inside the jets from the collapse phase to the ejection phase through the jet generation phase with use of a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates in the jets from the collapsar of B0 = 1012 G, so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly. Abundance pattern inside the jets is similar to that of r-elements in the solar system. Furthermore, we find that p-nuclei are produced without seed nuclei: not only light p-nuclei, such as 74Se, 78Kr, 84Sr, and 92Mo, but also heavy p-nuclei, 113In, 115Sn, and 138La, can be abundantly synthesized in the jets. The amounts of p-nuclei in the ejecta are much greater than those in core-collapse supernovae (SNe). In particular, 92Mo, 113In, 115Sn, and 138La deficient in the SNe, are significantly produced in the ejecta. On the other hand, in the jets from the collapsar of B0 = 1010 G, the r-process cannot operate and 56Ni, 28Si, 32S, and 4He are abundantly synthesized in the jets, as in ejecta from inner layers of Type II supernovae. An amount of 56Ni is much smaller than that from SN 1987A.

  7. Targeting of Carbon Ion-Induced G2 Checkpoint Activation in Lung Cancer Cells Using Wee-1 Inhibitor MK-1775.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyu; Takahashi, Akihisa; Sejimo, Yukihiko; Adachi, Akiko; Kubo, Nobuteru; Isono, Mayu; Yoshida, Yukari; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The potent inhibitor of the cell cycle checkpoint regulatory factor Wee-1, MK-1775, has been reported to enhance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell sensitivity to photon radiation by abrogating radiation-induced G2 arrest. However, little is known about the effects of this sensitizer after exposure to carbon (C)-ion radiation. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of C ions in combination with MK-1775 on the killing of NSCLC cells. Human NSCLC H1299 cells were exposed to X rays or C ions (290 MeV/n, 50 keV/μm at the center of a 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak) in the presence of MK-1775. The cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blotting. Radiosensitivity was determined using clonogenic survival assays. The mechanisms underlying MK-1775 radiosensitization were studied by observing H2AX phosphorylation and mitotic catastrophe. G2 checkpoint arrest was enhanced 2.3-fold by C-ion exposure compared with X-ray exposure. Radiation-induced G2 checkpoint arrest was abrogated by MK-1775. Exposure to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in the mitotic ratio and increased phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the primary downstream mediator of Wee-1-induced G2 arrest. The Wee-1 inhibitor, MK-1775 restored the mitotic ratio and suppressed Cdk1 phosphorylation. In addition, MK-1775 increased H1299 cell sensitivity to C ions and X rays independent of TP53 status. MK-1775 also significantly increased H2AX phosphorylation and mitotic catastrophe in irradiated cells. These results suggest that the G2 checkpoint inhibitor MK-1775 can enhance the sensitivity of human NSCLC cells to C ions as well as X rays. PMID:26645158

  8. Targeting p38 or MK2 Enhances the Anti-Leukemic Activity of Smac-Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Lalaoui, Najoua; Hänggi, Kay; Brumatti, Gabriela; Chau, Diep; Nguyen, Nhu-Y N; Vasilikos, Lazaros; Spilgies, Lisanne M; Heckmann, Denise A; Ma, Chunyan; Ghisi, Margherita; Salmon, Jessica M; Matthews, Geoffrey M; de Valle, Elisha; Moujalled, Donia M; Menon, Manoj B; Spall, Sukhdeep Kaur; Glaser, Stefan P; Richmond, Jennifer; Lock, Richard B; Condon, Stephen M; Gugasyan, Raffi; Gaestel, Matthias; Guthridge, Mark; Johnstone, Ricky W; Munoz, Lenka; Wei, Andrew; Ekert, Paul G; Vaux, David L; Wong, W Wei-Lynn; Silke, John

    2016-02-01

    Birinapant is a smac-mimetic (SM) in clinical trials for treating cancer. SM antagonize inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and simultaneously induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion to render cancers sensitive to TNF-induced killing. To enhance SM efficacy, we screened kinase inhibitors for their ability to increase TNF production of SM-treated cells. We showed that p38 inhibitors increased TNF induced by SM. Unexpectedly, even though p38 is required for Toll-like receptors to induce TNF, loss of p38 or its downstream kinase MK2 increased induction of TNF by SM. Hence, we show that the p38/MK2 axis can inhibit or promote TNF production, depending on the stimulus. Importantly, clinical p38 inhibitors overcame resistance of primary acute myeloid leukemia to birinapant. PMID:26859455

  9. Characterization of Neutron Fields in the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo Mk-Iii Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Ito, Chikara; Ohkawachi, Yasushi; Sekine, Takashi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2009-08-01

    In 2003, Joyo MK-III core was upgraded to increase the irradiation testing capability. This paper describes the details of distributions of neutron flux and reaction rate in the MK-III core that was measured by characterization tests during the first two operating cycles. The calculation accuracy of the core management codes HESTIA, TORT and MCNP, was also evaluated by the measured data. The calculated fission rates of 235U by HESTIA agreed well with the measured one within approximately 4% in the fuel region. MCNP could simulate within 6% in the central non-fuel irradiation test subassembly and the radial reflector region, while large discrepancies were obtained in TORT results. Hence, the precise geometry model was effective in evaluating the neutron spectrum and the flux at such locations.

  10. Targeting p38 or MK2 Enhances the Anti-Leukemic Activity of Smac-Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Lalaoui, Najoua; Hänggi, Kay; Brumatti, Gabriela; Chau, Diep; Nguyen, Nhu-Y N; Vasilikos, Lazaros; Spilgies, Lisanne M; Heckmann, Denise A; Ma, Chunyan; Ghisi, Margherita; Salmon, Jessica M; Matthews, Geoffrey M; de Valle, Elisha; Moujalled, Donia M; Menon, Manoj B; Spall, Sukhdeep Kaur; Glaser, Stefan P; Richmond, Jennifer; Lock, Richard B; Condon, Stephen M; Gugasyan, Raffi; Gaestel, Matthias; Guthridge, Mark; Johnstone, Ricky W; Munoz, Lenka; Wei, Andrew; Ekert, Paul G; Vaux, David L; Wong, W Wei-Lynn; Silke, John

    2016-02-01

    Birinapant is a smac-mimetic (SM) in clinical trials for treating cancer. SM antagonize inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and simultaneously induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion to render cancers sensitive to TNF-induced killing. To enhance SM efficacy, we screened kinase inhibitors for their ability to increase TNF production of SM-treated cells. We showed that p38 inhibitors increased TNF induced by SM. Unexpectedly, even though p38 is required for Toll-like receptors to induce TNF, loss of p38 or its downstream kinase MK2 increased induction of TNF by SM. Hence, we show that the p38/MK2 axis can inhibit or promote TNF production, depending on the stimulus. Importantly, clinical p38 inhibitors overcame resistance of primary acute myeloid leukemia to birinapant.

  11. MK Classification and Dynamical Masses for Late-Type Visual Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamazian, Vakhtang S.; Docobo, José A.; Melikian, Norair D.; Karapetian, Arthur A.

    2006-06-01

    On the basis of slit spectra obtained with the SCORPIO spectral camera attached to the 2.6 m telescope of the V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (Armenia), MK classifications for 30 visual binaries comprising mostly late K and M type stars are presented. Comparison with other determinations shows that this configuration provides a reliable MK classification. Dynamical masses for 25 systems are computed. Using standard mass-luminosity calibrations, individual mass sums for 11 pairs consisting of virtually single, nonvariable dwarfs are calculated, showing a good agreement with corresponding dynamical masses. The dynamical parallax of HIP 112354 is closer to the trigonometric parallax given in the Yale General Catalogue of Trigonometric Stellar Parallaxes (van Altena et al.) than to the Hipparcos parallax.

  12. Multiphoton infrared isotope separation using the MkIII FEL system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. K.; Chesnokov, E. N.; Gorelik, S. R.; Molin, Yu. N.; Straub, K. D.; Szarmes, E. B.; Madey, J. M. J.

    1998-09-01

    The dissociation of polyatomic molecules induced by the absorption of multiple, infrared photons has been studied extensively beginning in the mid-1970's using multi-line molecular laser sources and tunable optical parametric oscillators. In 1995, we began a series of experiments to explore the use of the MkIII infrared FEL in studies of the dissociation of formic acid, nitromethane, ethyl chloride and chlorodifluoromethane in the gas phase, including measurements of isotopic selectivity [1-5].

  13. Design and Calibration of Rolling Resistance Test Trailer R2Mk.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronowski, G.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes construction and calibration procedures of the rolling resistance test trailer R2 Mk.2. The trailer is design to measure rolling resistance of passenger car tyres in various road conditions on trafficked roads. The trailer utilizes so called angle method also known as vertical arm method. The paper presents also calibration procedures that are necessary to ascertain good precision of the measurements.

  14. Potentiation of Glibenclamide Hypoglycaemia in Mice by MK-467, a Peripherally Acting Alpha2-Adrenoceptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ruohonen, Suvi T; Ranta-Panula, Ville; Bastman, Sanna; Chrusciel, Paulina; Scheinin, Mika; Streng, Tomi

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacological antagonism and genetic depletion of pancreatic α2A-adrenoceptors increase insulin secretion in mice and enhance the insulinotropic action of glibenclamide, a representative of the sulphonylurea class of insulin secretagogues used in the therapy of type 2 diabetes. Antagonism of α2-adrenoceptors in the central nervous system (CNS) causes tachycardia and hypertension, making generalized α2-adrenoceptor blockade unfavourable for clinical use despite its potential to decrease blood glucose levels. The purpose of this study was to test the acute effects of the peripherally acting α2-adrenoceptor antagonist MK-467 alone and in combination with glibenclamide in non-diabetic C57BL/6N mice. Cardiovascular safety was assessed in freely moving mice with radiotelemetry. Dose-dependent decreases in blood glucose and increases in plasma insulin concentrations were seen with the combination of MK-467 and glibenclamide; the combinations were much more potent than glibenclamide or MK-467 alone. Furthermore, MK-467 had no effect on mean arterial pressure or heart rate in freely moving mice and did not prevent the centrally mediated hypotensive effect of the α2-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine. Thus, peripheral blockade of α2-adrenoceptors does not evoke the same cardiovascular adverse effects as antagonism of CNS α2-adrenoceptors. The current results indicate that the combined use of small doses of a peripherally acting α2-adrenoceptor antagonist with a sulphonylurea drug could provide a novel option for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, especially in patients with increased tonic α2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of insulin secretion.

  15. Feedback Cooling of a Cantilever's Fundamental Mode below 5mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, M.; Degen, C. L.; Mamin, H. J.; Rugar, D.

    2007-07-01

    We cool the fundamental mechanical mode of an ultrasoft silicon cantilever from a base temperature of 2.2 K down to 2.9±0.3mK using active optomechanical feedback. The lowest observed mode temperature is consistent with limits determined by the properties of the cantilever and by the measurement noise. For high feedback gain, the driven cantilever motion is found to suppress or “squash” the optical interferometer intensity noise below the shot noise level.

  16. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  17. DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca²⁺/CaMK IIβ Operate in Parallel to Each Other in PLCγ1-Driven Cell Proliferation and Migration of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells, through Akt/mTOR/S6 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianzhi; Zhuang, Luhua; Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Chen, Xiaolei; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Phosphoinositide specific phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) activates diacylglycerol (DAG)/protein kinase C (PKC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)/Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) axes to regulate import events in some cancer cells, including gastric adenocarcinoma cells. However, whether DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca(2+)/CaMK IIβ axes are simultaneously involved in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells and the underlying mechanism are not elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of DAG/PKCδ or CaMK IIβ in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells, using the BGC-823 cell line. The results indicated that the inhibition of PKCδ and CaMK IIβ could block cell proliferation and migration of BGC-823 cells as well as the effect of inhibiting PLCγ1, including the decrease of cell viability, the increase of apoptotic index, the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression level, and the decrease of cell migration rate. Both DAG/PKCδ and CaMK IIβ triggered protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/S6 pathway to regulate protein synthesis. The data indicate that DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca(2+)/CaMK IIβ operate in parallel to each other in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells through Akt/mTOR/S6 pathway, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a molecular biomarker in early gastric cancer diagnosis and disease surveillance.

  18. Additive effect of combined application of magnesium and MK-801 on analgesic action of morphine.

    PubMed

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Duda, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    As previously reported, magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) administered in relatively low doses markedly potentiated opioid analgesia in neuropathic pain, in which the effectiveness of opioids is limited. Considering that Mg(2+) behaves like an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, the effect of this ion on the analgesic action of morphine was compared with that of MK-801. Acute pain was evoked by mechanical or thermal stimuli, whereas neuropathic hyperalgesia was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) administration. Magnesium sulphate (40 mg/kg i.p.) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) administered alone did not modify the nociceptive threshold to acute stimuli or the streptozotocin hyperalgesia but significantly augmented the analgesic action of morphine (5 mg/kg i.p.). Furthermore, if these drugs (i.e. magnesium sulphate and MK-801) were applied concomitantly, a clear additive effect on the analgesic action of morphine occurred in both models of pain. Possible explanations of these observations are discussed. PMID:24577345

  19. Modeling the effects of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 on timing in rats.

    PubMed

    McAuley, J Devin; Miller, Jonathan P; Pang, Kevin C H

    2006-10-01

    The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 produces different effects on timing tasks. In particular, MK-801 produces an underestimation of duration when animals are tested with the differential reinforcement of low rate of responding (DRL) schedule and an overestimation of duration when animals are tested with the peak-interval (PI) procedure. The goal of this study was to develop a model-based explanation for this discrepancy. Two computer simulations were conducted via an implementation of scalar expectancy theory (SET). In Simulation 1, SET was used to provide a quantitative account of PI timing data. Simulation 2 used parameter estimates from Simulation 1 to predict effects of MK-801 on the DRL task. DRL predictions provided a close match to previous empirical data. Results of the simulations suggest that differences in the literature are likely due to inherent differences between PI and DRL tasks, rather than fundamental differences in timing. Overall, the role of NMDA receptors in timing appears to be multifaceted, impacting perception, memory, and decision processes.

  20. Diversity in Beauvericin and Enniatins H, I, and MK1688 by Fusarium oxysporum isolated from potato.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Lee, Hee-Seok; Jeong, Jin-Ho; Park, Hee-Seung; Lee, Chan

    2008-03-20

    Beauvericins and enniatins are cyclohexadepsipeptide mycotoxins that exhibit phytotoxicity and insecticidal activities. In the present study, the production of beauvericin and newly found enniatins (H, I, and MK1688) was characterized in 28 Fusarium strains isolated from potato samples in Korea. The predominant Fusarium species in potato was F. oxysporum (53.6%). Fifteen strains of F. oxysporum and two strains of other Fusarium species produced beauvericin (at concentrations from 3.1 to 743.2 microg/g) in culture on rice. Enniatins H and I were produced by 3 and 11 strains at concentrations from 33.1 to 781.3 microg/g and from 6.5 to 730.3 microg/g, respectively. Five isolates produced enniatin MK1688 at concentrations from 4.6 to 432.6 microg/g. In particular, one isolate (No. 1501) identified as F. oxysporum and two other Fusarium strains (Nos. 804 and 910) produced all of the tested toxins. These results indicate that enniatins H, I, and MK1688 and beauvericin are produced by Fusarium isolates occurring on potato. We do not know if the toxins can accumulate in the environment since it was not demonstrated.

  1. A 30 mK, 13.5 T scanning tunneling microscope with two independent tips

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, Anita; Gubrud, M. A.; Dana, R.; Dreyer, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2014-04-15

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of an ultra-low temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two independent tips. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and operates at a base temperature of 30 mK with magnetic fields of up to 13.5 T. We focus on the design of the two-tip STM head, as well as the sample transfer mechanism, which allows in situ transfer from an ultra high vacuum preparation chamber while the STM is at 1.5 K. Other design details such as the vibration isolation and rf-filtered wiring are also described. Their effectiveness is demonstrated via spectral current noise characteristics and the root mean square roughness of atomic resolution images. The high-field capability is shown by the magnetic field dependence of the superconducting gap of Cu{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. Finally, we present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 μeV.

  2. An expert computer program for classifying stars on the MK spectral classification system

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes an expert computer program (MKCLASS) designed to classify stellar spectra on the MK Spectral Classification system in a way similar to humans—by direct comparison with the MK classification standards. Like an expert human classifier, the program first comes up with a rough spectral type, and then refines that spectral type by direct comparison with MK standards drawn from a standards library. A number of spectral peculiarities, including barium stars, Ap and Am stars, λ Bootis stars, carbon-rich giants, etc., can be detected and classified by the program. The program also evaluates the quality of the delivered spectral type. The program currently is capable of classifying spectra in the violet-green region in either the rectified or flux-calibrated format, although the accuracy of the flux calibration is not important. We report on tests of MKCLASS on spectra classified by human classifiers; those tests suggest that over the entire HR diagram, MKCLASS will classify in the temperature dimension with a precision of 0.6 spectral subclass, and in the luminosity dimension with a precision of about one half of a luminosity class. These results compare well with human classifiers.

  3. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Phylogeny of Plant Calcium and Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases (CCaMKs) and Functional Analyses of Tomato CCaMK in Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a member of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase superfamily and is essential to microbe- plant symbiosis. To date, the distribution of CCaMK gene in plants has not yet been completely understood, and its function in plant disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we systemically identified the CCaMK genes in genomes of 44 plant species in Phytozome and analyzed the function of tomato CCaMK (SlCCaMK) in resistance to various pathogens. CCaMKs in 18 additional plant species were identified, yet the absence of CCaMK gene in green algae and cruciferous species was confirmed. Sequence analysis of full-length CCaMK proteins from 44 plant species demonstrated that plant CCaMKs are highly conserved across all domains. Most of the important regulatory amino acids are conserved throughout all sequences, with the only notable exception being observed in N-terminal autophosphorylation site corresponding to Ser 9 in the Medicago truncatula CCaMK. CCaMK gene structures are similar, mostly containing six introns with a phase profile of 200200 and the exception was only noticed at the first exons. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that CCaMK lineage is likely to have diverged early from a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) gene in the ancestor of all nonvascular plant species. The SlCCaMK gene was widely and differently responsive to diverse pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, knock-down of SlCCaMK reduced tomato resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and decreased H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000 inoculation. Our results reveal that SlCCaMK positively regulates disease resistance in tomato via promoting H2O2 accumulation. SlCCaMK is the first CCaMK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance. PMID:26697034

  5. Phylogeny of Plant Calcium and Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases (CCaMKs) and Functional Analyses of Tomato CCaMK in Disease Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a member of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase superfamily and is essential to microbe- plant symbiosis. To date, the distribution of CCaMK gene in plants has not yet been completely understood, and its function in plant disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we systemically identified the CCaMK genes in genomes of 44 plant species in Phytozome and analyzed the function of tomato CCaMK (SlCCaMK) in resistance to various pathogens. CCaMKs in 18 additional plant species were identified, yet the absence of CCaMK gene in green algae and cruciferous species was confirmed. Sequence analysis of full-length CCaMK proteins from 44 plant species demonstrated that plant CCaMKs are highly conserved across all domains. Most of the important regulatory amino acids are conserved throughout all sequences, with the only notable exception being observed in N-terminal autophosphorylation site corresponding to Ser 9 in the Medicago truncatula CCaMK. CCaMK gene structures are similar, mostly containing six introns with a phase profile of 200200 and the exception was only noticed at the first exons. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that CCaMK lineage is likely to have diverged early from a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) gene in the ancestor of all nonvascular plant species. The SlCCaMK gene was widely and differently responsive to diverse pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, knock-down of SlCCaMK reduced tomato resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and decreased H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000 inoculation. Our results reveal that SlCCaMK positively regulates disease resistance in tomato via promoting H2O2 accumulation. SlCCaMK is the first CCaMK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance. PMID:26697034

  6. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  7. Radiative versus Jet Mode in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the local universe, the vast majority of radio-loud active galaxies show none of the conventional AGN apparatus of accretion disk, torus, corona, or broad/narrow-line regions. Instead such nuclear emission as they have appears to be completely dominated by emission directly from the jet; the accretion, which must be present to drive the jet, appears to be highly radiatively inefficient. However, the most radio-luminous objects in the universe are almost all quasars (type I or type II) which behave in the textbook manner, appearing as a normal radiatively efficient AGN with the addition of a jet. The past decade has seen a substantial evolution in our understanding of the physical origins of these differences, their relation to the host galaxy and environment, and their interpretation in terms of completely unified models of AGN, and I will review our current understanding of these issues in my talk.

  8. Observations of post-flare supra-arcade fans: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, Davina; Huang, Yi-Min.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Guo, Lijia

    Large eruptive flares often develop fans of hot, 10 MK, plasma above the flare arcade. Using SDO and STEREO images, we have investigated the structure of the arcade fans and in particular the formation of dark finger-like downflows, known as supra-arcade downflows (SADs). We find that certain SAD characteristics, such as forking at their heads and a tendency to start near the top of fan spikes, have close similarities to Rayleigh-Taylor fingers. 3-D resistive MHD simulations show that reconnection above the flare arcades produces a jet of low density plasma which when encountering the arcade plasma leads to instabilities at the jet head. We thus propose that SADs are the result of secondary instabilities of the Rayleigh -Taylor type at the head of reconnection jets.

  9. FLARE-ASSOCIATED TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND DYNAMICS OF THE EUV JET FROM SDO/AIA AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Naihwa; Ip, Wing-Huen; Innes, Davina E-mail: wingip@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2013-06-01

    We present a detailed description of the interrelation between the Type III radio bursts and energetic phenomena associated with the flare activities in active region AR11158 at 07:58 UT on 2011 February 15. The timing of the Type III radio burst measured by the radio wave experiment on Wind/WAVE and an array of ground-based radio telescopes coincided with an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet and hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI, respectively. There is clear evidence that the EUV jet shares the same source region as the HXR emission. The temperature of the jet, as determined by multiwavelength measurements by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, suggests that Type III emission is associated with hot, 7 MK, plasma at the jet's footpoint.

  10. MK-4101, a Potent Inhibitor of the Hedgehog Pathway, Is Highly Active against Medulloblastoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Filocamo, Gessica; Brunetti, Mirko; Colaceci, Fabrizio; Sasso, Romina; Tanori, Mirella; Pasquali, Emanuela; Alfonsi, Romina; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Saran, Anna; Lahm, Armin; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Steinkühler, Christian; Pazzaglia, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of many cancers, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In this study, using neonatally irradiated Ptch1(+/-) mice as a model of Hh-dependent tumors, we investigated the in vivo effects of MK-4101, a novel SMO antagonist, for the treatment of medulloblastoma and BCC. Results clearly demonstrated a robust antitumor activity of MK-4101, achieved through the inhibition of proliferation and induction of extensive apoptosis in tumor cells. Of note, beside antitumor activity on transplanted tumors, MK-4101 was highly efficacious against primary medulloblastoma and BCC developing in the cerebellum and skin of Ptch1(+/-) mice. By identifying the changes induced by MK-4101 in gene expression profiles in tumors, we also elucidated the mechanism of action of this novel, orally administrable compound. MK-4101 targets the Hh pathway in tumor cells, showing the maximum inhibitory effect on Gli1 MK-4101 also induced deregulation of cell cycle and block of DNA replication in tumors. Members of the IGF and Wnt signaling pathways were among the most highly deregulated genes by MK-4101, suggesting that the interplay among Hh, IGF, and Wnt is crucial in Hh-dependent tumorigenesis. Altogether, the results of this preclinical study support a therapeutic opportunity for MK-4101 in the treatment of Hh-driven cancers, also providing useful information for combination therapy with drugs targeting pathways cooperating with Hh oncogenic activity. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1177-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26960983

  11. The H3 Antagonist, Ciproxifan, Alleviates the Memory Impairment but Enhances the Motor Effects of MK-801 (Dizocilpine) in Rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bardgett, Mark E.; Points, Megan; Kleier, Jennifer; Blankenship, Meredith; Griffith, Molly S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antagonists of H3-type histamine receptors exhibit cognitive-enhancing properties in various memory paradigms as well as evidence of antipsychotic activity in normal animals. The present study determined if a prototypical H3 antagonist, ciproxifan, could reverse the behavioral effects of MK-801, a drug used in animals to mimic the hypoglutamatergic state suspected to exist in schizophrenia. Four behaviors were chosen for study, locomotor activity, ataxia, prepulse inhibition (PPI), and delayed spatial alternation, since their modification by dizocilpine (MK-801) has been well characterized. Adult male Long-Evans rats were tested after receiving a subcutaneous injection of ciproxifan or vehicle followed twenty minutes later by a subcutaneous injection of MK-801 or vehicle. Three doses of MK-801 (0.05, 0.1, & 0.3 mg/kg) increased locomotor activity. Each dose of ciproxifan (1.0 & 3.0 mg/kg) enhanced the effect of the moderate dose of MK-801, but suppressed the effect of the high dose. Ciproxifan (3.0 mg/kg) enhanced the effects of MK-801 (0.1 & 0.3 mg/kg) on fine movements and ataxia. Deficits in PPI were observed after treatment with MK-801 (0.05 & 0.1 mg/kg), but ciproxifan did not alter these effects. Delayed spatial alternation was significantly impaired by MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) at a longer delay, and ciproxifan (3.0 mg/kg) alleviated this impairment. These results indicate that some H3 antagonists can alleviate the impact of NMDA receptor hypofunction on some forms of memory, but may exacerbate its effect on other behaviors. PMID:20621107

  12. The Akt inhibitor MK-2206 enhances the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel (Taxol) and cisplatin in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Chen, Bert Yu-Hung; Lai, Wei-Ting; Wu, Shao-Fu; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway are commonly observed in human cancers and contribute to chemotherapy resistance. Combination therapy, involving the use of molecular targeted agents and traditional cytotoxic drugs, may represent a promising strategy to lower resistance and enhance cytotoxicity. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an Akt inhibitor, MK-2206, in increasing the cytotoxic effect of either paclitaxel (Taxol) or cisplatin against the ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 (with constitutively active Akt) and ES2 (with inactive Akt). Sequential treatment of Taxol or cisplatin, followed by MK-2206, induced a synergistic inhibition of cell proliferation and effectively promoted cell death, either by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream effectors 4E-BP1 and p70S6K in SKOV3 cells or by restoring p53 levels, which were downregulated after Taxol or cisplatin treatment, in ES2 cells. Combination treatment also downregulated the pro-survival protein Bcl-2 in both SKOV3 and ES2 cells, which may have contributed to cell death. In addition, we discovered that Taxol/MK-2206 or cisplatin/MK-2206 combination treatment resulted in significant enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by MK-2206, in both SKOV3 and ES2 cells; however, MK-2206-induced growth inhibition was reversed by a ROS scavenger only in ES2 cells. MK-2206 also suppressed DNA repair, particularly in SKOV3 cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Akt inhibitor MK-2206 enhances the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in both Akt-active and Akt-inactive ovarian cancer cells but through different mechanisms.

  13. A practical synthesis of renin inhibitor MK-1597 (ACT-178882) via catalytic enantioselective hydrogenation and epimerization of piperidine intermediate.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Carmela; Shultz, Scott; Roy, Amélie; Lau, Stephen; Trinh, Thao; Angelaud, Rémy; O'Shea, Paul D; Abele, Stefan; Cameron, Mark; Corley, Ed; Funel, Jacques-Alexis; Steinhuebel, Dietrich; Weisel, Mark; Krska, Shane

    2011-02-18

    A practical enantioselective synthesis of renin inhibitor MK-1597 (ACT-178882), a potential new treatment for hypertension, is described. The synthetic route provided MK-1597 in nine steps and 29% overall yield from commercially available p-cresol (7). The key features of this sequence include a catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation of a tetrasubstituted ene-ester, a highly efficient epimerization/saponification sequence of 4 which sets both stereocenters of the molecule, and a short synthesis of amine fragment 2.

  14. Prediction of the Localized Necking under Non-Proportional Strain Paths by M-K Theory and FE Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Deok Chan; Chung, Yang Jin; Won, Seong Yeon; Kim, Kwang Yuk

    2010-06-01

    The localized necking under non-proportional strain paths was investigated using M-K theory and finite element analyses. The strain paths were calculated from finite element simulations and used for input data in the prediction of necking with M-K model and Yld2000-2d yield function. For the verification, square cup drawing tests with a ferritic stainless steel sheet were carried out numerically and experimentally. The predicted results showed good agreement with experiments.

  15. MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, inhibits cyclooxygenase-1 activity and suppresses platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, Andreas; Siemoneit, Ulf; Northoff, Hinnak; Hofmann, Bettina; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2009-04-17

    MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP), potently suppresses leukotriene biosynthesis in intact cells and is frequently used to define a role of the 5-lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34) pathway in cellular or animal models of inflammation, allergy, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Here we show that MK-886 also interferes with the activities of cyclooxygenases (COX, EC 1.14.99.1). MK-886 inhibited isolated COX-1 (IC(50)=8 microM) and blocked the formation of the COX-1-derived products 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT) and thromboxane B(2) in washed human platelets in response to collagen as well as from exogenous arachidonic acid (IC(50)=13-15 microM). Isolated COX-2 was less affected (IC(50)=58 microM), and in A549 cells, MK-886 (33 microM) failed to suppress COX-2-dependent 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F(1alpha) formation. The distinct susceptibility of MK-886 towards COX-1 and -2 is apparent in automated molecular docking studies that indicate a preferred binding of MK-886 to COX-1 into the active site. MK-886 (10 microM) inhibited COX-1-mediated platelet aggregation induced by collagen or arachidonic acid whereas thrombin- or U-46619-induced (COX-independent) aggregation was not affected. Since leukotrienes and prostaglandins share (patho)physiological properties in the development and regulation of carcinogenesis, inflammation, and vascular functions, caution should be used when interpreting data where MK-886 is used as tool to determine the involvement of FLAP and/or the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in respective experimental models.

  16. Effects of MK-801 upon local cerebral glucose utilization in conscious rats and in rats anaesthetised with halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumaji, A.; McCulloch, J. )

    1989-12-01

    The effects of MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg i.v.), a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, upon local cerebral glucose utilization were examined in conscious, lightly restrained rats and in rats anaesthetised with halothane in nitrous oxide by means of the quantitative autoradiographic (14C)-2-deoxyglucose technique. In the conscious rats, MK-801 produced a heterogenous pattern of altered cerebral glucose utilization with significant increases being observed in 12 of the 28 regions of gray matter examined and significant decreases in 6 of the 28 regions. Pronounced increases in glucose use were observed after MK-801 in the olfactory areas and in a number of brain areas in the limbic system (e.g., hippocampus molecular layer, dentate gyrus, subicular complex, posterior cingulate cortex, and mammillary body). In the cerebral cortices, large reductions in glucose use were observed after administration of MK-801, whereas in the extrapyramidal and sensory-motor areas, glucose use remained unchanged after MK-801 administration in conscious rats. In the halothane-anaesthetised rats, the pattern of altered glucose use after MK-801 differed qualitatively and quantitatively from that observed in conscious rats. In anaesthetised rats, significant reductions in glucose use were noted after MK-801 in 10 of the 28 regions examined, with no area displaying significantly increased glucose use after administration of the drug. In halothane-anaesthetised rats, MK-801 failed to change the rates of glucose use in the olfactory areas, the hippocampus molecular layer, and the dentate gyrus.

  17. MK571 inhibits phase-2 conjugation of flavonols by Caco-2/TC7 cells, but does not specifically inhibit their apical efflux☆

    PubMed Central

    Barrington, Robert D.; Needs, Paul W.; Williamson, Gary; Kroon, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    MK571 is a multidrug resistance protein-2 (ABCC2, Mrp2) inhibitor and has been widely used to demonstrate the role of Mrp2 in the cellular efflux of drugs, xenobiotics and their conjugates. Numerous reports have described modulation of Caco-2 cellular efflux and transport of flavonoids in the presence of MK571. Since flavonoids are efficiently conjugated by Caco-2/TC7 cells, we investigated the effects of MK571 on the efflux of flavonoid conjugates. The flavonol aglycones kaempferol, quercetin and galangin were efficiently taken up, conjugated and effluxed by Caco-2/TC7 cells. Apically-applied MK571 caused significant reductions in both the apical and basolateral efflux of flavonol conjugates from Caco-2/TC7 monolayers. MK571 did not significantly alter the apical:basolateral efflux ratio for flavonol conjugates, however, which is not consistent with MK571 specifically inhibiting only apical Mrp2. Since MK571 decreased the total amounts of conjugates formed, and increased cellular flavonol aglycone concentrations, we explored the possibility that MK571 also inhibits phase-2 conjugation of flavonols. MK571 dose-dependently inhibited the intracellular biosynthesis of all flavonol glucuronides and sulphates by Caco-2 cells. MK571 significantly inhibited phase-2 conjugation of kaempferol by cell-free extracts of Caco-2, and production of kaempferol-4′-O-glucuronide was competitively inhibited. These data show that MK571, in addition to inhibiting MRP2, is a potential inhibitor of enterocyte phase-2 conjugation. PMID:25801004

  18. JetStar in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. Between May 21, 1981 and August of 1982, the JetStar completed roughly 45 research flights with three different propellers in varying configurations. Dryden engineers analyzed some of the resultant data, while they sent flight tapes to Hamilton Standard, Lewis, and Langley for analysis there. The results indicated a need for noise-reduction technology to keep the noise levels down to the project goals. An improved version of the advanced turboprop underwent flight testing in 1987 on a Gulfstream II over Georgia in 1987. These flight tests verified predictions of a 20- to 30-percent fuel savings. However, with the end of the energy crisis, the need for such savings disappeared, and the Advanced Turboprop Project did not lead to the expected industry-wide adoption of the new propeller systems on transport aircraft. In the 1960s, the same JetStar that was used to test the advanced turboprop had been equipped with an electronic variable-stability flight-control system. Called then a General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research, and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. Over the years, the JetStar has also been used for a variety of other flight research projects, including laminar-flow-control flight tests in the mid-1980s.

  19. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  20. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  1. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  2. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  3. The CME Rate over Four Solar Cycles: Filling the Final Gap with MLSO MK3 Observations [1989-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Flint, Q.; Quirk, C. A.; Burkepile, J.; Webb, D. F.; Lecinski, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were discovered in the early 1970's by the OSO-7 coronagraph, and large numbers were characterized for the first time by the Skylab ATM coronagraph. Since 1973 there has been only a single major gap in CME coverage in white light. Instruments that have contributed to estimates of the rate and properties of CMEs have included: Skylab ATM (1973-1974); Helios photometers (1974-1981); Solwind (1979-1985); SMM C/P (1980; 1984-1989); SOHO LASCO (1996-present); the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI, 2003-2011); and STEREO SECCHI (2006-present). We report here the first attempt to fill the 1989-1996 gap in the CME rate using the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's MK3 K-coronameter. The MK3 instrument observed routinely several hours most days beginning in 1980 until it was upgraded to MK4 in 1998. MK3 CMEs detected from 1980-1989 were compared with Solwind and SMM and reported by St. Cyr et al. (1999). Since spaceborne instruments have more complete duty cycles than a groundbased instrument at a single location, we have 'calibrated' the MK3-derived CME rate from 1989 with the SMM C/P coronagraph, and from 1996 with the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs. CME rate calculations have been documented in Webb & Howard (1994), St. Cyr et al. (2000) and Robbrecht et al. (2009). Here we provide the preliminary CME rate calculation for 1989-1996 using the MLSO MK3 coronameter.

  4. The excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist MK-801 prevents the hypersensitivity induced by spinal cord ischemia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, J.X.; Xu, X.J.; Aldskogius, H.; Seiger, A.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z. )

    1991-08-01

    Protection by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 against transient spinal cord ischemia-induced hypersensitivity was studied in rats. The spinal ischemia was initiated by vascular occlusion resulting from the interaction between the photosensitizing dye Erythrosin B and an argon laser beam. The hypersensitivity, termed allodynia, where the animals reacted by vocalization to nonnoxious mechanical stimuli in the flank area, was consistently observed during several days after induction of the ischemia. Pretreatment with MK-801 (0.1-0.5 mg/kg, iv) 10 min before laser irradiation dose dependently prevented the occurrence of allodynia. The neuroprotective effect of MK-801 was not reduced by maintaining normal body temperature during and after irradiation. There was a significant negative correlation between the delay in the administration of MK-801 after irradiation and the protective effect of the drug. Histological examination revealed slight morphological damage in the spinal cord in 38% of control rats after 1 min of laser irradiation without pretreatment with MK-801. No morphological abnormalities were observed in rats after pretreatment with MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg). The present results provide further evidence for the involvement of excitatory amino acids, through activation of the NMDA receptor, in the development of dysfunction following ischemic trauma to the spinal cord.

  5. Research on JET in view of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamela, Jerome; Ongena, Jef; Watkins, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Research on JET is focused on further development of the two ITER reference plasma scenarios. The ELMy H-Mode, has been extended to lower rho* at high and q_95=3, with simultaneously H_98=0.9, and f_GW=0.9 at I_p=3.5 MA. The dependence of confinement on beta and rho* has been found to be more favorable than given by the IPB98(y,2) scaling. Highlights in the development of Advanced Regimes with Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) and strong reversed shear (q_0=2-3, q_min=1.5-2.5) are : (i) operation at a core density close to the Greenwald limit and (ii) full current drive in 3T/1.8MA ITB plasmas extended to 20 seconds with a JET record injected energy of E≈ 330MJ; (iii) 7 keV Te≈ Ti ITB plasmas at low toroidal rotation, and (iv) wide radius ITB's (r/a=0.6). Furthermore, emphasis in JET is placed on (i) mitigating the impact of ELMs, (ii) understanding the phenomena leading to tritium retention and (iii) preparing burning plasma physics. Recent developments on JET in view of ITER are : (i) real-time control in both ELMy H-Mode and ITB plasmas and (ii) an upgrade of JET with: (a) increased NBI power (b) a new ELM-resilient ITER-like ICRH antenna (7MW) to be tested in 2006 (c) 16 new and upgraded diagnostics.

  6. Aging jets from low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.; Chen, W. P.

    1994-01-01

    An extended faint optical jet is associated with the compact emission region plus faint star known as HH 55. HH 55 is located in the Lupus 2 cloud 2 min SW of the well studied T Tauri star RU Lupi. The HH 55 jet extends 55 sec N and 35 sec S in PA 160 deg. The HH 55 star is an emission line star of spectral type M3.5. Its image in the emission lines of H-alpha and (S II) is slightly elongated by 2 sec - 3 sec to the S but in continuum light is symmetrical and pointlike ((full width at half maximum) (FWHM) = 1.7 sec). The star and jet have several features in common with the star and jet known as Sz 102 = Th 28 in the nearby Lupus 3 cloud. We suggest that these objects are representative of the late evolutionary stage of the HH jet-outflow phenomenon and point out that such objects may be quite common although difficult to detect. With L(sub bol) approximately = 0.005 solar luminosity, and log T(sub e) approximately = 3.5, the HH 55 star is close to the main sequence and evolutionary tracks suggest an age of 3 x 10(exp 7) yr.

  7. Midkine, a newly discovered regulator of the renin-angiotensin pathway in mouse aorta: significance of the pleiotrophin/midkine developmental gene family in angiotensin II signaling.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra, Laura; Herradon, Gonzalo; Nguyen, Trang; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Deuel, Thomas F

    2005-07-29

    We previously demonstrated that pleiotrophin (PTN the protein, Ptn the gene) highly regulates the levels of expression of the genes encoding the proteins of the renin-angiotensin pathway in mouse aorta. We now demonstrate that the levels of expression of these same genes are significantly regulated in mouse aorta by the PTN family member midkine (MK the protein, Mk the gene); a 3-fold increase in expression of renin, an 82-fold increase in angiotensinogen, a 6-fold decrease in the angiotensin converting enzyme, and a 6.5-fold increase in the angiotensin II type 1 and a 9-fold increase in the angiotensin II type 2 receptor mRNAs were found in Mk-/- mouse aorta in comparison with the wild type (WT, +/+). The results in Mk-/- mice are remarkably similar to those previously reported in Ptn-/- mouse aorta, with the single exception of that the levels of the angiotensinogen gene expression in Ptn-/- mice are equal to those in WT+/+ mouse aorta, and thus, in contrast to Mk gene expression unaffected by levels of Ptn gene expression. The data indicate that MK and PTN share striking but not complete functional redundancy. These data support potentially high levels importance of MK and the MK/PTN developmental gene family in downstream signals initiated by angiotensin II either in development or in the many pathological conditions in which MK expression levels are increased, such as atherosclerosis and many human neoplasms that acquire constitutive endogenous Mk gene expression by mutation during tumor progression and potentially provide a target through the renin-angiotensin pathway to treat advanced malignancies.

  8. Reversal of the anorectic effect of (+)-fenfluramine in the rat by the selective cholecystokinin receptor antagonist MK-329.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S J; Dourish, C T; Barber, D J

    1990-01-01

    1. Experiments were conducted to determine whether or not the effect of (+)-fenfluramine (3.0 mg kg-1, i.p.) on food intake can be antagonized by the selective cholecystokinin receptor antagonist MK-239 (formerly L364,718; (3S(-)-N-(2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-H-1,4-benzodiazepin++ +-3-yl)-1H- indole-2-carboxamide). Two feeding paradigms were employed. In the first, non-deprived rats were familiarized with eating a highly palatable, sweetened mash in a 30 min test. In the second, freely-feeding rats were trained to consume powdered chow in their home-cages, and their intake was monitored over the first 6 h of the night-period. 2. In doses of 30.0 and 100.0 micrograms kg-1, s.c., MK-329 almost completely blocked the anorectic effect of (+)-fenfluramine in the palatable food intake test. These doses of MK-329 have previously been reported to antagonize the anorectic effect produced by exogenous cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK8) in rats. Both doses of MK-329 were also effective in significantly attenuating the anorectic effect of (+)-fenfluramine in nocturnal free-feeding animals over a 6 h-period. 3. MK-329 (10.0-100.0 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) failed to antagonize the anorectic effect of either the specific dopamine D2-receptor agonist quinpirole (0.3 mg kg-1, s.c.) or the beta-carboline FG 7142 (10.0 mg kg-1, i.p.) in the palatable food intake test. 4. MK-329 (10.0-300.Opgkg-1, s.c.) had no effect, when administered alone, on the level of palatable food intake in non-deprived rats, even when substantial satiation was produced by a pre-feeding procedure. Furthermore, MK-329 had no effect, when administered alone, on nocturnal food intake in freelyfeeding rats. 5. In conclusion, not only was MK-329 a potent antagonist of the effect of CCK8 on food intake, it also blocked the effect of (+)-fenfluramine to a significant degree. The effect of MK-329 was selective in that the anorectic effects of either quinpirole or FG 7142 remained unaffected. Administered

  9. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  10. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  11. Neurobehavioral Differences Between Mice Receiving Distinct Neuregulin Variants as Neonates; Impact on Sensitivity to MK-801

    PubMed Central

    Kato, T.; Abe, Y.; Hirokawa, S.; Iwakura, Y.; Mizuno, M.; Namba, H.; Nawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is a well-recognized risk gene for schizophrenia and is often implicated in the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of this illness. Alternative splicing and proteolytic processing of the NRG1 gene produce more than 30 structural variants; however, the neuropathological roles of individual variants remain to be characterized. On the basis of the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia, we administered eNRG1 (0.1~1.0 µg/g), a core epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain common for all splicing NRG1 variants, to neonatal mice and compared their behavioral performance with mice challenged with a full mature form of type 1 NRG1 variant. During the neonatal stage, recombinant eNRG1 protein administrated from the periphery passed the blood-brain barrier and activated its receptor (ErbB4) in the brain. In adults, the mice receiving the highest dose exhibited lower locomotor activity and deficits in prepulse inhibition and tonedependent fear learning, although the hearing reduction of the eNRG1-treated mice may explain these behavioral deficits. Neonatal eNRG1 treatment also significantly potentiated MK-801-driven locomotor activity in an eNRG1 dose-dependent manner. In parallel eNRG1 treatment enhanced MK-801-driven c-Fos induction and decreased immunoreactivity for NMDA receptor subunits in adult brain. In contrast, mice that had been treated with the same molar dose of a full mature form of type 1 NRG1 as neonates did not exhibit hypersensitivity to MK-801. However, both animal models exhibited similar hypersensitivity to methamphetamine. Collectively, our findings suggest that aberrant peripheral NRG1 signals during neurodevelopment alter later behavioral traits and auditory functions in the NRG1 subtype-dependent manner. PMID:25817857

  12. IS FS Tau B DRIVING AN ASYMMETRIC JET?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien; Takami, Michihiro; Yan, Chi-Hung; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Walter, Frederick M.; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2012-04-10

    FS Tau B is one of the few T Tauri stars that possess a jet and a counterjet as well as an optically visible cavity wall. We obtained images and spectra of its jet-cavity system in the near-infrared H and K bands using the Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and detected the jet and the counterjet in the [Fe II] 1.644 {mu}m line for the first time. Within 2'' the blueshifted jet is brighter, whereas beyond {approx}5'' the redshifted counterjet dominates the [Fe II] emission. The innermost blueshifted knot is spectrally resolved to have a large line width of {approx}110 km s{sup -1}, while the innermost redshifted knot appears spectrally unresolved. The velocity ratio of the jet to the counterjet is {approx}1.34, which suggests that FS Tau B is driving an asymmetric jet, similar to those found in several T Tauri stars. Combining with optical observations in the literature, we showed that the blueshifted jet has a lower density and higher excitation than the redshifted counterjet. We suggest that the asymmetry in brightness and velocity is the manifestation of a bipolar outflow driving at different mass-loss rates, while maintaining balance of linear momentum. A full explanation of the asymmetry in the FS Tau B system awaits detail modeling and further investigation of the kinematic structure of the wind-associated cavity walls.

  13. The Discovery of Quinoxaline-Based Metathesis Catalysts from Synthesis of Grazoprevir (MK-5172).

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Kong, Jongrock; Chung, Cheol K; Brunskill, Andrew; Campeau, Louis-Charles; McLaughlin, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Olefin metathesis (OM) is a reliable and practical synthetic methodology for challenging carbon-carbon bond formations. While existing catalysts can effect many of these transformations, the synthesis and development of new catalysts is essential to increase the application breadth of OM and to achieve improved catalyst activity. The unexpected initial discovery of a novel olefin metathesis catalyst derived from synthetic efforts toward the HCV therapeutic agent grazoprevir (MK-5172) is described. This initial finding has evolved into a class of tunable, shelf-stable ruthenium OM catalysts that are easily prepared and exhibit unique catalytic activity.

  14. Discovery of MK-5172, a Macrocyclic Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4a Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A new class of HCV NS3/4a protease inhibitors containing a P2 to P4 macrocyclic constraint was designed using a molecular modeling-derived strategy. Building on the profile of previous clinical compounds and exploring the P2 and linker regions of the series allowed for optimization of broad genotype and mutant enzyme potency, cellular activity, and rat liver exposure following oral dosing. These studies led to the identification of clinical candidate 15 (MK-5172), which is active against genotype 1–3 NS3/4a and clinically relevant mutant enzymes and has good plasma exposure and excellent liver exposure in multiple species. PMID:24900473

  15. Discovery of MK-5172, a Macrocyclic Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4a Protease Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Harper, Steven; McCauley, John A; Rudd, Michael T; Ferrara, Marco; DiFilippo, Marcello; Crescenzi, Benedetta; Koch, Uwe; Petrocchi, Alessia; Holloway, M Katharine; Butcher, John W; Romano, Joseph J; Bush, Kimberly J; Gilbert, Kevin F; McIntyre, Charles J; Nguyen, Kevin T; Nizi, Emanuela; Carroll, Steven S; Ludmerer, Steven W; Burlein, Christine; DiMuzio, Jillian M; Graham, Donald J; McHale, Carolyn M; Stahlhut, Mark W; Olsen, David B; Monteagudo, Edith; Cianetti, Simona; Giuliano, Claudio; Pucci, Vincenzo; Trainor, Nicole; Fandozzi, Christine M; Rowley, Michael; Coleman, Paul J; Vacca, Joseph P; Summa, Vincenzo; Liverton, Nigel J

    2012-04-12

    A new class of HCV NS3/4a protease inhibitors containing a P2 to P4 macrocyclic constraint was designed using a molecular modeling-derived strategy. Building on the profile of previous clinical compounds and exploring the P2 and linker regions of the series allowed for optimization of broad genotype and mutant enzyme potency, cellular activity, and rat liver exposure following oral dosing. These studies led to the identification of clinical candidate 15 (MK-5172), which is active against genotype 1-3 NS3/4a and clinically relevant mutant enzymes and has good plasma exposure and excellent liver exposure in multiple species.

  16. Cell type-specific pharmacology of NMDA receptors using masked MK801

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunlei; Lee, Peter; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) are ion channels that are important for synaptic plasticity, which is involved in learning and drug addiction. We show enzymatic targeting of an NMDA-R antagonist, MK801, to a molecularly defined neuronal population with the cell-type-selectivity of genetic methods and the temporal control of pharmacology. We find that NMDA-Rs on dopamine neurons are necessary for cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation, demonstrating that cell type-specific pharmacology can be used to dissect signaling pathways within complex brain circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10206.001 PMID:26359633

  17. Conformational analysis of enalapril (MK-421) in solution by 1H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Oonishi, Isao; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1990-10-01

    The conformations of enalapril (MK-421, (-)-( N-(( S)-1-ethoxycarbonyl-3-phenylpropyl)- L-alanyl- L-proline), in CD 3OD, were investigated in order to account for their biological activity as inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). The ratio of trans to cis conformation around the amide bond is 3:2. The preferred optimum structures of the trans and cis forms are postulated. With reference to the proline ring the N-type trans isomer was more prevalent than the S-Type trans isomer.

  18. An atlas of southern MK standards from 5800 to 10200 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danks, Anthony C.; Dennefeld, Michel

    1994-01-01

    An atlas of stellar spectra covering the wavelength range from 5800 to 10,200 A is presented of 126 southern MK standard stars, covering the luminosity classes I, III, and V. Some peculiar stars are included for comparison purposes. The spectra were obtained at a resolution of 4.3 A per pixel using a Cassegrain-mounted Boller and Chivens spectrograph equipped with a Reticon detector. The quality and utility of the data are discussed and examples of the spectra are presented. The atlas is available in digital format through the NSSDC.

  19. The Discovery of Quinoxaline-Based Metathesis Catalysts from Synthesis of Grazoprevir (MK-5172).

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Kong, Jongrock; Chung, Cheol K; Brunskill, Andrew; Campeau, Louis-Charles; McLaughlin, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Olefin metathesis (OM) is a reliable and practical synthetic methodology for challenging carbon-carbon bond formations. While existing catalysts can effect many of these transformations, the synthesis and development of new catalysts is essential to increase the application breadth of OM and to achieve improved catalyst activity. The unexpected initial discovery of a novel olefin metathesis catalyst derived from synthetic efforts toward the HCV therapeutic agent grazoprevir (MK-5172) is described. This initial finding has evolved into a class of tunable, shelf-stable ruthenium OM catalysts that are easily prepared and exhibit unique catalytic activity. PMID:27123552

  20. AngioJet thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Singh, Varinder; Wilentz, James R; Makkar, Raj R

    2004-10-01

    The AngioJet rheolytic thrombectomy system is designed to remove thrombus with the Venturi-Bernoulli effect, with multiple high-velocity, high-pressure saline jets which are introduced through orifices in the distal tip of the catheter to create a localized low-pressure zone, resulting in a vacuum effect with the entrainment and dissociation of bulky thrombus. Rheolytic thrombectomy with the AngioJet catheter can reduce the thrombus burden in the setting of AMI and degenerated SVGs. The long-term follow-up appears to be favorable in patients treated with rheolytic thrombectomy in the setting of acute myocardial infarction over conventional primary angioplasty. PMID:15505358

  1. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  2. Subchronic Exposure to Arsenic Represses the TH/TRβ1-CaMK IV Signaling Pathway in Mouse Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Huai; Li, Shuangyue; Guo, Yanjie; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yi; Guo, Jinqiu; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Cong; Shang, Lixin; Piao, Fengyuan

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that arsenic (As) impaired learning and memory by down-regulating calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV) in mouse cerebellum. It has been documented that the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimer and thyroid hormone (TH) may be involved in the regulation of CaMK IV. To investigate whether As affects the TR/RXR heterodimer and TH, we determined As concentration in serum and cerebellum, 3,5,3’-triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4) levels in serum, and expression of CaMK IV, TR and RXR in cerebellum of mice exposed to As. Cognition function was examined by the step-down passive avoidance task and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Morphology of the cerebellum was observed by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining under light microscope. Our results showed that the concentrations of As in the serum and cerebellum of mice both increased with increasing As-exposure level. A significant positive correlation was found between the two processes. Adeficit in learning and memory was found in the exposed mice. Abnormal morphologic changes of Purkinje cells were observed in cerebellum of the exposed mice. Moreover, the cerebellar expressions of CaMK IV protein and the TRβ gene, and TRβ1 protein were significantly lower in As-exposed mice than those in controls. Subchronic exposure to As appears to increase its level in serum and cerebella of mice, impairing learning and memory and down-regulating expression of TRβ1 as well as down-stream CaMK IV. It is also suggested that the increased As may be responsible for down-regulation of TRβ1 and CaMK IV in cerebellum and that the down-regulated TRβ1 may be involved in As-induced impairment of learning and memory via inhibiting CaMK IV and its down-stream pathway. PMID:26821021

  3. Quantitative determination of MK-0767, a dual alpha/gamma peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist, in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Hengchang; Yan, Kerri; Xu, Xiaohui; Lo, Man-Wai

    2004-10-15

    5-[2,4-Dioxothiazolidin-5-yl)methyl]-2-methoxy-N-[[(4-trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]methyl]benzamide (I, MK-0767 or KRP-297, Fig. 1), is a dual alpha/gamma peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist. A LC-MS/MS method for the determination of I in human plasma has been successfully developed, validated and applied to clinical programs. The analyte and internal standard (II) are extracted from 0.05 mL plasma via solid phase extraction (SPE). HPLC is used for the separation of I and II from possible co-extracted endogenous and other compounds. Detection is by MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using a TurboIonSpray probe. The whole sample preparation is automated by using a Packard Multiprobe liquid handling system. The linear range is 4-2000 ng/mL in plasma. Recoveries were 71.1% and 69.4% for I and II, respectively. The method exhibited good linearity, reproducibility and sensitivity, selectivity and robustness when used for the analysis of clinical samples.

  4. Multiwavelength Observations of AGN Jets: Untangling the Coupled Problems of Emission Mechanism and Jet Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Avachat, Sayali S.; Clautice, Devon; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Cara, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of X-ray and optical emission from large numbers of AGN jets is one of the key legacies of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope. Several dozen optical and X-ray emitting jets are now known, most of which are seen in both bands as well as in the radio, where they were first discovered. Jets carry prodigious amounts of energy and mass out from the nuclear regions out to tens to hundreds of kiloparsecs distant from the central black hole, depositing it into the host galaxy and cluster. Interpreting their multiwavelength emissions has not been easy: while in most jets, the optical and radio emission in many objects is believed to emerge via the synchrotron process, due to its characteristic spectral shape and high radio polarization, the X-ray emission has been a tougher nut to crack. In less powerful, FR I jets, such as M87, the X-ray emission is believed to be synchrotron emission from the highest energy electrons, requiring in situ particle acceleration due to the short radiative lifetimes of the particles. However, in FR II and quasar jets, a variety of emission mechanisms are possible. Until the last few years, the leading interpretation had been inverse-Comptonization of Cosmic Microwave Background photons (the IC/CMB mechanism). This requires the jet to be relativistic out to hundreds of kiloparsecs from the nucleus, and requires an electron spectrum that extends to very low Lorentz factors. However, that now appears less likely, due to observed high optical polarizations in jets where the optical and X-ray emission appears to lie on the same spectral component, as well as limits derived from Fermi observations in the GeV gamma-rays. It now appears more likely that the X-rays must arise as synchrotron emission from a second, high energy electron population. With this revelation, we must tackle anew the coupling between jet structure and emission mechanisms. Multiwavelength imaging and polarimetry can give us clues to the

  5. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  6. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  7. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  8. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotkevych, V. V.; Milošević, M. V.; Bending, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial H3e-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6×6×7 mm3 space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields ⩾10 mG/Hz1/2. The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  9. Gray Box Optimization for Mk Landscapes (NK Landscapes and MAX-kSAT).

    PubMed

    Whitley, L Darrell; Chicano, Francisco; Goldman, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates Gray Box Optimization for pseudo-Boolean optimization problems composed of M subfunctions, where each subfunction accepts at most k variables. We will refer to these as Mk Landscapes. In Gray Box Optimization, the optimizer is given access to the set of M subfunctions. We prove Gray Box Optimization can efficiently compute hyperplane averages to solve non-deceptive problems in [Formula: see text] time. Bounded separable problems are also solved in [Formula: see text] time. As a result, Gray Box Optimization is able to solve many commonly used problems from the evolutional computation literature in [Formula: see text] evaluations. We also introduce a more general class of Mk Landscapes that can be solved using dynamic programming and discuss properties of these functions. For certain type of problems Gray Box Optimization makes it possible to enumerate all local optima faster than brute force methods. We also provide evidence that randomly generated test problems are far less structured than those found in real-world problems. PMID:27120114

  10. Species-dependent enantioselective plasma protein binding of MK-571, a potent leukotriene D4 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lin, J H; deLuna, F A; Ulm, E H; Tocco, D J

    1990-01-01

    The plasma protein binding of the enantiomers of MK-571 was stereoselective and the stereoselectivity was species dependent. The 12 mammalian species studied could be classified into three groups: those that bind the S-(+)-enantiomer to a greater extent than the R-(-)-enantiomer (human, baboon, monkey, cow, dog, and cat); those that bind the R-(-)-enantiomer more extensively (rat, guinea pig, and sheep); and those that show no stereoselectivity (rabbit, hamster, and mouse). The stereoselective binding appears to have no phylogenetic relationship. Using serum albumin instead of plasma, a similar degree of stereoselective binding was observed for human, dog, sheep, and rat, suggesting that albumin is the major binding component for MK-571 enantiomers, and that species differences in stereoselective binding are likely due to structural differences in the albumin molecule. Displacement studies with [14C] diazepam, [14C]warfarin, and [3H]digitoxin indicated that the enantioselective differences in protein binding are most likely due to the differences in binding affinity rather than to different binding sites. PMID:1976072

  11. Effect of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 on latent inhibition of fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Luis M; Ruiz, Gabriel; De la Casa, Luis G

    2012-10-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors seem to play a central role in learning and memory processes involved in Latent Inhibition (LI). In fact, MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, has proved its effectiveness as a drug for attenuating LI when administered before or after stimulus preexposure and conditioning stages. This paper presents three experiments designed to analyze the effect of MK-801 on LI when the drug is administered before (Experiment 1A) or after (Experiment 1B) preexposure and conditioning stages with a conditioned emotional response procedure. Additionally, we analyze the effect of the drug when it was administered before preexposure, before conditioning or before both phases (Experiment 2). The results show that the effect of the drug varied as a function of the dose (with only the highest dose being effective), the moment of administration (with only the drug administered before the experimental treatments being effective), and the phase of procedure (reducing LI when the drug was administered only at preexposure, and disrupting fear conditioning when administered at conditioning). These differences may be due to several factors ranging from the role played by NMDA receptors in the processing of stimuli of different sensorial modalities to the molecular processes triggered by drug administration.

  12. A CCaMK-CYCLOPS-DELLA Complex Activates Transcription of RAM1 to Regulate Arbuscule Branching.

    PubMed

    Pimprikar, Priya; Carbonnel, Samy; Paries, Michael; Katzer, Katja; Klingl, Verena; Bohmer, Monica J; Karl, Leonhard; Floss, Daniela S; Harrison, Maria J; Parniske, Martin; Gutjahr, Caroline

    2016-04-25

    Intracellular arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis between plants and glomeromycotan fungi leads to formation of highly branched fungal arbuscules that release mineral nutrients to the plant host. Their development is regulated in plants by a mechanistically unresolved interplay between symbiosis, nutrient, and hormone (gibberellin) signaling. Using a positional cloning strategy and a retrotransposon insertion line, we identify two novel alleles of Lotus japonicus REDUCED ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA1 (RAM1) encoding a GRAS protein. We confirm that RAM1 is a central regulator of arbuscule development: arbuscule branching is arrested in L. japonicus ram1 mutants, and ectopic expression of RAM1 activates genes critical for arbuscule development in the absence of fungal symbionts. Epistasis analysis places RAM1 downstream of CCaMK, CYCLOPS, and DELLA because ectopic expression of RAM1 restores arbuscule formation in cyclops mutants and in the presence of suppressive gibberellin. The corresponding proteins form a complex that activates RAM1 expression via binding of CYCLOPS to a cis element in the RAM1 promoter. We thus reveal a transcriptional cascade in arbuscule development that employs the promoter of RAM1 as integrator of symbiotic (transmitted via CCaMK and CYCLOPS) and hormonal (gibberellin) signals.

  13. PRE-084, a sigma selective PCP derivative, attenuates MK-801-induced impairment of learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Maurice, T; Su, T P; Parish, D W; Nabeshima, T; Privat, A

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the sigma selective PCP derivative PRE-084 on the impairment of learning induced in mice by the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist MK-801. Learning capacities were evaluated using the spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze test for spatial working memory, the step-down passive avoidance and the elevated plus-maze test for long-term memory. At doses about 1 mg/kg IP, PRE-084 significantly attenuated MK-801 (0.2 mg/kg IP) induced impairment of learning. The dose-response curve was bell-shaped which is typical for cognition enhancers. The effect of PRE-084 was antagonized by BMY-14802 (10 mg/kg IP) and suppressed by a chronic treatment with haloperidol (4 mg/kg/day SC for 7 days). Furthermore, PRE-084 did not affect scopolamine (1 mg/kg SC) induced amnesia but significantly attenuated mecamylamine (10 mg/kg IP) induced amnesia. These results show that sigma sites mediate a modulation of the NMDA receptor complex-dependent learning processes and may similarly affect the cholinergic nicotinic memory processes. Moreover, the PCP derivative PRE-084, acting selectively at sigma sites, reverses the amnesia induced by a drug acting at the PCP site.

  14. MK-801 and AP5 impair acquisition, but not retention, of the Morris milk maze.

    PubMed

    Heale, V; Harley, C

    1990-05-01

    The effects of the NMDA blockers, AP5 and MK-801, were assessed in two spatial tests. AP5 (10 micrograms in 2 microliters ICV, N = 6), or MK-801 (0.07 mg/kg IP, N = 6), significantly increased open-field activity in male Long-Evans rats in two 3-min tests (Days 1 and 2) compared to control groups receiving equal volume saline injections (N = 12). In the Morris milk maze, NMDA blockade significantly impaired acquisition performance on two blocks of six trials, which followed each open-field test. Only control animals showed evidence of acquisition on a drug-free retention test assessing latency to reach the expected platform area and number of crossings in the area on Day 4. Retention was tested in control animals under NMDA blockade on Day 6. There was no effect of NMDA blockade on retention in the Morris milk maze. These results support the hypothesis that NMDA receptors are critical for the initiation of synaptic modification underlying place learning, but are not necessary in synaptic transmission during retrieval of place information.

  15. Discovery of MK-8970: an acetal carbonate prodrug of raltegravir with enhanced colonic absorption.

    PubMed

    Walji, Abbas M; Sanchez, Rosa I; Clas, Sophie-Dorothee; Nofsinger, Rebecca; de Lera Ruiz, Manuel; Li, Jing; Bennet, Amrithraj; John, Christopher; Bennett, David Jonathan; Sanders, John M; Di Marco, Christina N; Kim, Somang Hope; Balsells, Jaume; Ceglia, Scott S; Dang, Qun; Manser, Kimberly; Nissley, Becky; Wai, John S; Hafey, Michael; Wang, Junying; Chessen, Gene; Templeton, Allen; Higgins, John; Smith, Ronald; Wu, Yunhui; Grobler, Jay; Coleman, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Developing new antiretroviral therapies for HIV-1 infection with potential for less frequent dosing represents an important goal within drug discovery. Herein, we present the discovery of ethyl (1-((4-((4-fluorobenzyl)carbamoyl)-1-methyl-2-(2-(5-methyl- 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-carboxamido)propan-2-yl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidin-5-yl)oxy)ethyl) carbonate (MK-8970), a highly optimized prodrug of raltegravir (Isentress). Raltegravir is a small molecule HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitor approved for the treatment of HIV infection with twice-daily administration. Two classes of prodrugs were designed to have enhanced colonic absorption, and derivatives were evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies, both in vitro and in vivo in different species, ultimately leading to the identification of MK-8970 as a suitable candidate for development as an HIV therapeutic with the potential to require less frequent administration while maintaining the favorable efficacy, tolerability, and minimal drug-drug interaction profile of raltegravir. PMID:25469982

  16. Gray Box Optimization for Mk Landscapes (NK Landscapes and MAX-kSAT).

    PubMed

    Whitley, L Darrell; Chicano, Francisco; Goldman, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates Gray Box Optimization for pseudo-Boolean optimization problems composed of M subfunctions, where each subfunction accepts at most k variables. We will refer to these as Mk Landscapes. In Gray Box Optimization, the optimizer is given access to the set of M subfunctions. We prove Gray Box Optimization can efficiently compute hyperplane averages to solve non-deceptive problems in [Formula: see text] time. Bounded separable problems are also solved in [Formula: see text] time. As a result, Gray Box Optimization is able to solve many commonly used problems from the evolutional computation literature in [Formula: see text] evaluations. We also introduce a more general class of Mk Landscapes that can be solved using dynamic programming and discuss properties of these functions. For certain type of problems Gray Box Optimization makes it possible to enumerate all local optima faster than brute force methods. We also provide evidence that randomly generated test problems are far less structured than those found in real-world problems.

  17. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  18. Dizocilpine (MK-801) arrests status epilepticus and prevents brain damage induced by Soman. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Sparenborg, S.; Brennecke, L.H.; Jaax, N.K.; Braitman, D.J.

    1992-12-31

    The involvement of the NMDA receptor in the neurotoxicity induced by soman, an organophosphorus compound which irreversibly inhibits cholinesterase, was studied in guinea pigs. The drug MK-801 (0.5, 1 or 5 mg/kg, i.p.) was given as a pretreatment before a convulsant dose of soman or as a post treatment (30, 100 or 300 micron g/kg, i.m.) 5 min after the development of soman-induced status epilepticus. Pyridostigmine, atropine and pralidoxime chloride were also given to each subject to counteract the lethality of soman. All subjects that were challenged with soman and given the vehicle for MK-801 (saline) exhibited severe convulsions and electrographic seizure activity. Neuronal necrosis was found in the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and the pyriform and cerebral cortices of those subjects surviving for 48 hr. Pretreatment with 0.5 or 1 mg/kg doses of MK-801 did not prevent nor delay the onset of seizure activity but did diminish its intensity and led to its early arrest. At the largest dose (5 mg/kg), MK-801 completely prevented the development of seizure activity and brain damage. Post treatment with MK-801 prevented, arrested or reduced seizure activity, convulsions and neuronal necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. The NMDA receptor may play a more critical role in the spread and maintenance, rather than the initiation of cholinergically-induced seizure activity....Seizure-related brain damage, Organophosphorus compound, Nerve agent, Cholinesterase inhibition, Excitotoxicity, Guinea pig.

  19. Qualification campaign of the 50 mK hybrid sorption-ADR cooler for SPICA/SAFARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, J.-M.; Duband, L.; Attard, A.

    2015-12-01

    SAFARI (SpicA FAR-infrared Instrument) is an infrared instrument planned to be part of the SPICA (SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) Satellite. It will offer high spectral resolution in the 30 - 210 μm frequency range. SAFARI will benefit from the cold telescope of SPICA and to obtain the required detectors sensitivity, a temperature of 50 mK is required. This temperature is reached thanks to the use of a hybrid sorption - ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) cooler presented here. This cooler provides respectively 14 μW and 0.4 μW of cooling power at 300 mK and 50 mK. The cooler is planned to advantageously use two thermal interfaces of the instrument at 1.8 and 4.9 K. One of the challenges discussed in this paper is the low power available at each intercept. A dedicated laboratory electronic is being designed based on previous development with a particular focus on the 50 mK readout. Temperature regulation at 50 mK is also discussed. This cooler has been designed following flight constraints and will reach a high TRL, including mechanical and environmental tests at the end of the on-going qualification campaign.

  20. Identification of Novel Mutations Responsible for Resistance to MK-2048, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Magen, Tamara; Sloan, Richard D.; Donahue, Daniel A.; Kuhl, Björn D.; Zabeida, Alexandra; Xu, Hongtao; Oliveira, Maureen; Hazuda, Daria J.; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    MK-2048 represents a prototype second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) developed with the goal of retaining activity against viruses containing mutations associated with resistance to first-generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). Here, we report the identification of mutations (G118R and E138K) which confer resistance to MK-2048 and not to RAL or EVG. These mutations were selected in vitro and confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis. G118R, which appeared first in cell culture, conferred low levels of resistance to MK-2048. G118R also reduced viral replication capacity to approximately 1% that of the isogenic wild-type (wt) virus. The subsequent selection of E138K partially restored replication capacity to ≈13% of wt levels and increased resistance to MK-2048 to ≈8-fold. Viruses containing G118R and E138K remained largely susceptible to both RAL and EVG, suggesting a unique interaction between this second-generation INSTI and the enzyme may be defined by these residues as a potential basis for the increased intrinsic affinity and longer “off” rate of MK-2048. In silico structural analysis suggests that the introduction of a positively charged arginine at position 118, near the catalytic amino acid 116, might decrease Mg2+ binding, compromising enzyme function and thus leading to the significant reduction in both integration and viral replication capacity observed with these mutations. PMID:20610719

  1. AC-3933, a benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist, improves memory performance in MK-801-induced amnesia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Iwamura, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, is a drug candidate for cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We have previously reported that AC-3933 enhances acetylcholine release in the rat hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment and age-related cognitive decline in both rats and mice. In this study, we further evaluated the procognitive effect of AC-3933 on memory impairment induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, in mice. Unlike the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist FG-7142, oral administration of AC-3933 significantly ameliorated MK-801-induced memory impairment in the Y-maze test and in the object location test. Interestingly, the procognitive effects of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment were not affected by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil, although this was not the case for the beneficial effects of AC-3933 on scopolamine-induced memory deficit. Moreover, the onset of AC-3933 ameliorating effect on scopolamine- or MK-801-induced memory impairment was different in the Y-maze test. Taken together, these results indicate that AC-3933 improves memory deficits caused by both cholinergic and glutamatergic hypofunction and suggest that the ameliorating effect of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment is mediated by a mechanism other than inverse activation of the benzodiazepine receptor.

  2. The FvMK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase gene regulates conidiation, pathogenesis, and fumonisin production in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueping; Choi, Yoon-E; Zou, Xuexiao; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2011-02-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is one of the most important fungal pathogens to cause destructive diseases of maize worldwide. Fumonisins produced by the fungus are harmful to human and animal health. To date, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with pathogenicity and fumonisin biosynthesis in F. verticillioides is limited. Because MAP kinase pathways have been implicated in regulating diverse processes important for plant infection in phytopathogenic fungi, in this study we identified and functionally characterized the FvMK1 gene in F. verticillioides. FvMK1 is orthologous to FMK1 in F. oxysporum and GPMK1 in F. graminearum. The Fvmk1 deletion mutant was reduced in vegetative growth and production of microconidia. However, it was normal in sexual reproduction and increased in the production of macroconidia. In infection assays with developing corn kernels, the Fvmk1 mutant was non-pathogenic and failed to colonize through wounding sites. It also failed to cause stalk rot symptoms beyond the inoculation sites on corn stalks, indicating that FvMK1 is essential for plant infection. Furthermore, the Fvmk1 mutant was significantly reduced in fumonisin production and expression levels of FUM1 and FUM8, two genes involved in fumonisin biosynthesis. The defects of the Fvmk1 mutant were fully complemented by re-introducing the wild type FvMK1 allele. These results demonstrate that FvMK1 plays critical roles in the regulation of vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, fumonisin biosynthesis, and pathogenicity. PMID:20887797

  3. Strain and colony differences in the neurotoxic sequelae of MK-801 visualized with the amino-cupric-silver method.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Adrian; de Olmos, Soledad; Manzini, Fernando; Desmond, Nancy L; de Olmos, Jose

    2003-11-01

    The strain and sex of a species under investigation may influence the animal's physiological response to a variety of stimuli. Strain and sex differences are important considerations when evaluating animal models. In the rodent MK-801 model of schizophrenia, degenerative changes occur widely in the main olfactory system and in a number of cortical brain regions. In the present report, we compare the effects of MK-801 neurotoxicity in two strains of female rats and also two lines within each strain. The magnitude and regional extent of the neurodegeneration detected with the amino-cupric-silver method varied markedly both between the Sprague-Dawley and Wistar rat strains and also between two lines derived from each strain. For example, terminal degeneration occurred in layer VI of somatosensory cortex and the central extended amygdala in Sprague-Dawley but not Wistar rats. Moreover, MK-801 treatment led to somatodendritic degeneration in the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala in Wistar rats from Charles River Laboratories but not those from Ferreyra Institute. There are thus both strain and intrastrain differences in the magnitude of the neurodegenerative response to MK-801 treatment. The differing neurotoxicity of MK-801 between rat strains and between lines within a strain may reflect genetic variation and/or differences in hepatic biotransformation and thus the bioavailability of the drug between strains and lines within a strain.

  4. Impairment of the Anterior Thalamic Head Direction Cell Network Following Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801

    PubMed Central

    Housh, Adam A.; Berkowitz, Laura E.; Ybarra, Isaac; Kim, Esther U.; Lee, Brian R.; Calton, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Head direction (HD) cells, found in the rodent Papez circuit, are thought to form the neural circuitry responsible for directional orientation. Because NMDA transmission has been implicated in spatial tasks requiring directional orientation, we sought to determine if the NMDA antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) would disrupt the directional signal carried by the HD network. Anterior thalamic HD cells were isolated in female Long-Evans rats and initially monitored for baseline directional activity while the animals foraged in a familiar enclosure. The animals were then administered MK-801 at a dose of .05 mg/kg or 0.1 mg/kg, or isotonic saline, and cells were re-examined for changes in directional specificity and landmark control. While the cells showed no changes in directional specificity and landmark control following administration of saline or the lower dose of MK-801, the higher dose of MK-801 caused a dramatic attenuation of the directional signal, characterized by decreases in peak firing rates, signal to noise, and directional information content. While the greatly attenuated directional specificity of cells in the high dose condition usually remained stable relative to the landmarks within the recording enclosure, a few cells in this condition exhibited unstable preferred directions within and between recording sessions. Our results are discussed relative to the possibility that the findings explain the effects of MK-801 on the acquisition and performance of spatial tasks. PMID:25307435

  5. The FvMK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase gene regulates conidiation, pathogenesis, and fumonisin production in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueping; Choi, Yoon-E; Zou, Xuexiao; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2011-02-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is one of the most important fungal pathogens to cause destructive diseases of maize worldwide. Fumonisins produced by the fungus are harmful to human and animal health. To date, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with pathogenicity and fumonisin biosynthesis in F. verticillioides is limited. Because MAP kinase pathways have been implicated in regulating diverse processes important for plant infection in phytopathogenic fungi, in this study we identified and functionally characterized the FvMK1 gene in F. verticillioides. FvMK1 is orthologous to FMK1 in F. oxysporum and GPMK1 in F. graminearum. The Fvmk1 deletion mutant was reduced in vegetative growth and production of microconidia. However, it was normal in sexual reproduction and increased in the production of macroconidia. In infection assays with developing corn kernels, the Fvmk1 mutant was non-pathogenic and failed to colonize through wounding sites. It also failed to cause stalk rot symptoms beyond the inoculation sites on corn stalks, indicating that FvMK1 is essential for plant infection. Furthermore, the Fvmk1 mutant was significantly reduced in fumonisin production and expression levels of FUM1 and FUM8, two genes involved in fumonisin biosynthesis. The defects of the Fvmk1 mutant were fully complemented by re-introducing the wild type FvMK1 allele. These results demonstrate that FvMK1 plays critical roles in the regulation of vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, fumonisin biosynthesis, and pathogenicity.

  6. Prostaglandin D2 signaling mediated by the CRTH2 receptor is involved in MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Yusuke; Shintani, Norihito; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Kanoh, Takuya; Ago, Yukio; Matsuda, Toshio; Hashimoto, Ryota; Ohi, Kazutaka; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Kin-Ya; Nakamura, Masataka; Kasai, Atsushi; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Asao; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 cells (CRTH2), which is a second receptor for prostaglandin (PG) D2, is involved in inflammatory responses in peripheral tissue; however, its role in cognitive function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRTH2 is involved in cognitive function using a well-established animal model of cognitive dysfunction induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of CRTH2 suppressed MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction. Pharmacological inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1, a rate-limiting enzyme in PG synthesis, also suppressed MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction. Moreover, an MK-801-induced increase in c-Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was abolished in the CRTH2-deficient mice. Together, these results suggest that PGD2-CRTH2 signaling is involved in both MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction and neuronal activity regulation in the PVN. Furthermore, genetic association studies suggest that CRTH2 is weakly associated with cognitive function in humans. Our study provides evidence that PGD2-CRTH2 signaling is involved in cognitive function and may represent a potential therapeutic target for cognitive dysfunction in patients with psychiatric disorders.

  7. Invariant-mass distribution of jet pairs produced in association with a W boson in pp ¯ collisions at √s =1.96 TeV using the full CDF Run II data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Vázquez, F.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We report on a study of the dijet invariant-mass distribution in events with one identified lepton, a significant imbalance in the total event transverse momentum, and two jets. This distribution is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a W boson, where the boson decays leptonically. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy collected by the Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.9 fb-1. The data are found to be consistent with standard model expectations, and a 95% confidence level upper limit is set on the production cross section of a W boson in association with a new particle decaying into two jets.

  8. On the stability and energy dissipation in magnetized radio galaxy jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    It is commonly accepted that the relativistic jets observed in radio galaxies are launched magnetically and are powered by the rotational energy of the central supermassive black hole. Such jets carry most of their energy in the form of electromagnetic Poynting flux. However by the time the ejecta reach the emission zone most of that energy is transferred to relativistic motions of the jet material with a large fraction given to non-thermal particles, which calls for an efficient dissipation mechanism to work within the jet without compromising its integrity. Understanding the energy dissipation mechanisms and stability of Poynting flux dominated jets is therefore crucial for modeling these astrophysical objects. In this talk I will present the first self consistent 3D simulations of the formation and propagation of highly magnetized (σ ˜25), relativistic jets in a medium. We find that the jets develop two types of instability: i) a local, "internal" kink mode which efficiently dissipates half of the magnetic energy into heat, and ii) a global "external" mode that grows on longer time scales and causes the jets to bend sideways and wobble. Low power jets propagating in media with flat density profiles, such as galaxy cluster cores, are susceptible to the global mode, and develop FRI like morphology. High power jets remain stable as they cross the cores, break out and accelerate to large distances, appearing as FRII jets. Thus magnetic kink instability can account for both the magnetic energy dissipation and the population dichotomy in radio galaxy jets.

  9. W/Z+ jets and Z p_t measurements at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.S.; /Rochester U.

    2006-10-01

    The authors present a measurement of W/Z boson + jets production and Z p{sub T} measurement in the p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The CDF II measures W + jets production based on 320 pb{sup -1} and the D0 Run II measures Z + jets with 950 pb{sup -1} data. The measurement of Z p{sub T} is performed with D0 Run II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 960 pb{sup -1}. The measurement of W + jets is compared to the Leading Order Alpgen + Pythia prediction and the Z + jets is compared to Sherpa and Pythia Monte Carlo. The Z p{sub T} measurement is also compared to Resbos + Photos predictions.

  10. Expression of the heparin-binding cytokines, midkine (MK) and HB-GAM (pleiotrophin) is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during fetal development and organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, T A; Salmivirta, M; Muramatsu, T; Muramatsu, H; Rauvala, H; Lehtonen, E; Jalkanen, M; Thesleff, I

    1995-01-01

    Midkine (MK) and heparin binding-growth associated molecule (HB-GAM or pleiotrophin), constitute a new family of heparin-binding proteins implicated in the regulation of growth and differentiation (T. Muramatsu (1993) Int. J. Dev. Biol. 37, 183-188). We used affinity-purified antibodies against MK and HB-GAM to analyze their distribution during mouse embryonic development. From 9 to 14.5 day post-coitum (dpc), both proteins were detected in central and peripheral nervous systems, facial processes, limb buds, sense organs, respiratory, digestive, urogenital, and skeletal systems. MK and HB-GAM were often localized on the surface of differentiating cells and in basement membranes of organs undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. The level of MK protein decreased considerably in the 16.5 dpc embryo, whereas HB-GAM staining persisted in many tissues. Our in situ hybridization results revealed a widespread expression of MK transcripts that was not always consistent with the distribution of MK protein in developing tissues. In many epithelio-mesenchymal organs MK and HB-GAM were codistributed with syndecan-1, a cell surface proteoglycan. In limb buds and facial processes, MK, HB-GAM, and syndecan-1 were localized to the apical epithelium and the adjacent proliferating mesenchyme. Both MK and HB-GAM bound syndecan-1 in solid-phase assays in a heparan sulfate-dependent manner. The biological effects of MK and HB-GAM on limb and facial mesenchyme were studied in vitro by application of beads preloaded with the proteins. Neither MK nor HB-GAM stimulated mesenchymal cell proliferation or induced syndecan-1 expression. Taken together these results indicate that MK and HB-GAM may play regulatory roles in differentiation and morphogenesis of the vertebrate embryo, particularly in epithelio-mesenchymal organs, and suggest molecular interactions with syndecan-1.

  11. MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, elicits circling behavior in the genetically inbred Balb/c mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Burket, Jessica A; Cannon, William R; Jacome, Luis F; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2010-11-20

    The Balb/c mouse is behaviorally hypersensitive to effects of MK-801 (dizocilpine), a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, and displays impaired sociability. In the current investigation, MK-801-elicited circling behavior in the genetically inbred Balb/c mouse strain that was either not or only minimally observed in similarly treated outbred Swiss-Webster mice. The ability of compounds to attenuate the intensity of MK-801-elicited circling behavior in the Balb/c mouse strain may serve as a preclinical screening paradigm for identifying effective NMDA receptor agonist interventions in the intact animal; ideally, these compounds would have therapeutic value in neuropsychiatric disorders associated with impaired sociability, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

  12. Midkine (MK), the product of a retinoic acid responsive gene, and pleiotrophin constitute a new protein family regulating growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, T

    1993-03-01

    Using mouse teratocarcinoma system, we found a novel retinoic acid responsive gene. Midkine (MK), the product of the gene is a secreted, heparin-binding protein of molecular weight 14,000. MK gene is intensely expressed in the midgestation period, and in the adult mouse, the kidney is the principal site of its expression. MK and pleiotrophin have 50% sequence identity and constitute a new protein family regulating growth and differentiation. They share neurite outgrowth activity; other activities, either specific for one or common to both, have been reported. Furthermore, MK is of significant interest in cancer biology.

  13. Models comparison for JET polarimeter data

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzotta, C.; Orsitto, F. P.; Giovannozzi, E.; Boboc, A.; Tudisco, O.; Zabeo, L.; Brombin, M.; Murari, A.

    2008-03-12

    A complete comparison between the theory and the measurements in polarimetry was done by using the Far Infrared Polarimeter at JET. More than 300 shots were analyzed, including a wide spectrum of JET scenarios in all critical conditions for polarimetry: high density, high and very low fields, high temperatures.This work is aimed at the demonstration of the robustness of the theoretical models for the JET polarimeter measurements in the perspective of using these models for ITER like plasma scenarios . In this context, an assessment was performed on how the line-integrated plasma density along the central vertical chord of FIR polarimeter could be evaluated using the Cotton-Mouton effect and its possible concrete use to correct fringe jumps of the interferometer.The models considered are: i) the rigorous numerical solution of the Stokes propagation equations, using dielectric tensor evaluated from JET equilibrium and Thomson scattering [1,2]; ii) two types of approximated solutions [2,3] and iii) the Guenther empirical model [4] that considers the mutual effect between Cotton-Mouton and Faraday rotation angle. The model calculations have been compared with polarimeter measurements for the Cotton-Mouton phase shift.The agreement with theory is satisfactory within the limits of experimental errors [3].

  14. Competitive (AP7) and non-competitive (MK-801) NMDA receptor antagonists differentially alter glucose utilization in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, D.W.; Lee, S.J.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of D,L-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7), a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, on regional brain metabolism were studied in unanesthetized, freely moving rats by using the quantitative {sup 14}C2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic procedure. AP7 (338 or 901 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent decrease of metabolic activity throughout most of the regions studied including sensory, motor, and limbic cortices. In contrast, MK-801 (0.1 or 1.0 mg/kg) resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of metabolic activity in sensory cortices, and an increase in limbic regions such as the hippocampal stratum lacunosum moleculare and entorhinal cortex. MK-801 also produced a biphasic response in agranular motor cortex, whereby the low dose increased while the high dose decreased labeling. In addition, MK-801 produced heterogeneous effects on regional cerebral metabolism in sensory cortices. Metabolic activity decreased in layer IV relative to layer Va following MK-801 treatment in primary somatosensory (SI) and visual (VI) cortices, suggesting a shift in activity from afferent fibers innervating layer IV to those innervating layer Va. MK-801 administration also decreased metabolic activity in granular SI relative to dysgranular SI, and in VI relative to secondary visual cortex (VII), thus providing a relative sparing of activity in dysgranular SI and VII. Thus, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist suppressed activity from extrinsic neocortical sources, enhancing relative intracortical activity and stimulating limbic regions, while the competitive NMDA antagonist depressed metabolic activity in all cortical regions.

  15. Thermal ink jet: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanka, Ivan

    1992-05-01

    The first public demonstration of thermal ink jet printing was done by Canon in 1981 and the first thermal ink jet product, ThinkJet, was introduced by the Hewlett-Packard Company in 1984. Since then, this powerful printing technology has assumed a strong presence in the market. In this discussion, we will first briefly review the printer market, the increasing role thermal ink jet is playing in this arena, as well as the reasons for its success. The technology discussion will follow, and will focus on several highlights in thermal ink jet physics, materials, and printing. We will conclude with our comments on future thermal ink jet developments.

  16. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  17. Status on the Michigan-MIT ultra-cold polarized hydrogen jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppov, V. G.; Blinov, B. B.; Bywater, J. A.; Chin, S.; Churakov, V. V.; Court, G. R.; Kaufman, W. A.; Kleppner, D.; Krisch, A. D.; Melnik, Yu. M.; Muldavin, J. B.; Nurushev, T. S.; Price, J. S.; Prudkoglyad, A. F.; Raymond, R. S.; Shutov, V. B.; Stewart, J. A.

    1995-07-01

    Progress on the Mark-II ultra-cold polarized atomic hydrogen gas Jet target for the experiments NEPTUN-A and NEPTUN at UNK is presented. We describe the performance and the present status of different components of the jet.

  18. Haemodynamic interactions of medetomidine and the peripheral alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 during step infusions in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Johanna; del Castillo, Jérôme R E; Salla, Kati; Troncy, Eric; Raekallio, Marja R; Vainio, Outi M

    2014-11-01

    The haemodynamic interactions of a step infusion with medetomidine (MED) and the peripherally acting alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 (MK) were compared with MED infused alone in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs. Eight purposely-bred Beagles were used in a randomised crossover study. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol intravenously (IV) and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Dogs received 1.25 µg/kg MED as a 1 min loading dose IV, along with a step-down MED infusion at rates of 8.0 µg/kg/h (step 1: 0-20 min), 5.5 µg/kg/h (step 2: 20-40 min) and 4.0 µg/kg/h (step 3: 40-95 min). Five minutes after starting the MED infusion, the dogs received MK-467 in a step-up infusion at rates of 100 µg/kg/h (step 1: 5-35 min), 200 µg/kg/h (step 2: 35-65 min) and 500 µg/kg/h (step 3: 65-95 min). Heart rate (HR), systolic (SAP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressures and arteriovenous oxygen content differences (a-vO2 diff) were calculated. Plasma drug concentrations were analysed. Repeated-measures general linear mixed models with Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analyses. MED infusion alone increased SAP maximally by 24.9%, MAP by 34.7% and a-vO2 diff by 222.5%, and reduced HR by 32.3%, but these changes were significantly attenuated by MK-467. Most MED effects returned to baseline during step 2 of MK-467 infusion and step 3 of MED infusion (MED/MK-467 ratio 1:18 to 1:50). Plasma concentrations of MED tended to be lower with the addition of MK-467. The use of step infusions helped to narrow down the therapeutic range for the MED/MK-467 infusion dose ratio during isoflurane anaesthesia in dogs.

  19. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  20. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  1. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  2. Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.; Gilbride, J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model to estimate the shielding of noise emitted from a point noise source has been developed assuming the shielding jet to be a cylinder of constant radius with uniform flow across the cross section. Comparison to experiment indicated that the model overestimates diffraction of sound around the jet in the far downstream region. The shielding jet model is modified to include widening downstream of the nozzle exit. This not only represents a more realistic model of the jet, but is also expected to improve the shielding estimate downstream. The modified jet model incorporates a Mach number dependent widening rate, a corresponding decrease in flow velocity downstream and an equivalent slug flow evaluation to retain the locally parallel flow approximation of the model development. The shielding analysis with modified jet model is compared to measured data for a subsonic isothermal air jet and a simulated hot subsonic jet. Improvement of the shielding estimate is discussed.

  3. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  4. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at energy √s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrandrea, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    to provide collisions for the experiments at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 • 1032cm-2s-1 peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + $b\\bar{b}$ are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - PT jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

  5. Digitalización de espectros fotográficos de standards MK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se digitalizaron 70 espectros fotográficos de estrellas standards de clasificación MK con tipos espectrales comprendidos entre O3 y A2 y diferentes clases de luminosidad. Las observaciones utilizadas consisten en espectrogramas cuya dispersión recíproca es de 43 Å~mm-1, obtenidos con el telescopio de 1m de Cerro Tololo y su espectrógrafo Cassegrain, durante los años 1982 a 1985. Los trazados digitales se obtuvieron con el instrumento Grant de la Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas de La Plata y posteriormente fueron calibrados en longitud de onda y rectificados utilizando rutinas comprendidas dentro del paquete de procesamiento de imágenes IRAF. El material resultante puede utilizarse como ayuda para la clasificación de espectros obtenidos con similar configuración instrumental.

  6. Mechanical suppression: Modern technology applied to an old art. [MK 12 motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockford, W. H.; Durney, T. E.; Scott, D. E.; Condon, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Various suppressor configurations were analyzed and evaluated in an effort to reduce combustion instability and improved ballistic reproducibility of the MK 12 motor. A static firing test series of eight field return boosters featured two baseline motor firings with the existing suppressor in each motor, followed by two tests each of two different prototype suppressor designs. Results were analyzed and used to generate the design for the final two firings. Acoustic pressure pulsers were utilized to measure the damping effectiveness of the final design. The reduction in motor vibration and acoustic pressure levels between the baseline tests and the final two improved lightweight tests was significant. The average acceleration level of the motors equipped with flightweight rods was reduced to only 5% of the level in the unmodified motors; the average acoustic pressure level was reduced to 20%; maximum values were reduced to 6% for acceleration and 23% for pressure.

  7. A change in the X-ray spectrum of MK 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    HEAO-1 experiment A-2 observations of the BL Lac object MK421 in May 1978 show a marked spectral change from the OSO-8 observations of May 1977. The source was not detected above 10 keV in May 1978. The 2-10 keV spectrum could be well fit by a power law of energy slope 2.2 is less than or minus 4.2; thermal bremsstrahlung models with T less than 2 X 10 to the 7th power deg K are also acceptable. There was no indication of any low energy turnover, so that the inferred column density N sub H is less than 7 X 10 to the 21st power at/sq cm. The total flux is consistent with an extrapolation of the UV data from IUE, but the slope is not consistent with the UV slope. Possible models for the origin of the spectral transition are discussed.

  8. A Study on L-Asparaginase of Nocardia levis MK-VL_113

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Alapati; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva

    2012-01-01

    An enzyme-based drug, L-asparaginase, was produced by Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 isolated from laterite soils of Guntur region. Cultural parameters affecting the production of L-asparaginase by the strain were optimized. Maximal yields of L-asparaginase were recorded from 3-day-old culture grown in modified asparagine-glycerol salts broth with initial pH 7.0 at temperature 30°C. Glycerol (2%) and yeast extract (1.5%) served as good carbon and nitrogen sources for L-asparaginase production, respectively. Cell-disrupting agents like EDTA slightly enhanced the productivity of L-asparaginase. Ours is the first paper on the production of L-asparaginase by N. levis. PMID:22619604

  9. A study on L-asparaginase of Nocardia levis MK-VL_113.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva

    2012-01-01

    An enzyme-based drug, L-asparaginase, was produced by Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 isolated from laterite soils of Guntur region. Cultural parameters affecting the production of L-asparaginase by the strain were optimized. Maximal yields of L-asparaginase were recorded from 3-day-old culture grown in modified asparagine-glycerol salts broth with initial pH 7.0 at temperature 30°C. Glycerol (2%) and yeast extract (1.5%) served as good carbon and nitrogen sources for L-asparaginase production, respectively. Cell-disrupting agents like EDTA slightly enhanced the productivity of L-asparaginase. Ours is the first paper on the production of L-asparaginase by N. levis. PMID:22619604

  10. Cohort vision study of Apache AH Mk1 pilots: protocol and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Braithwaite, Malcolm G.; Crowley, John S.; Rash, Clarence E.; van de Pol, Corina; Ranchino, Daniel J.; Statz, William K.; Eke, Allison J.

    2002-08-01

    A collaborative occupational health study has been undertaken by Headquarters Director Army Aviation, Middle Wallop, UK, and the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Fort Rucker, Alabama, to determine if the use of the monocular helmet-mounted display in the Apache AH Mk 1 attack helicopter has any long-term (10-year) effect on visual performance. This paper describes the protocol, methodology, development and initial execution phase of this study. The test methodology consists primarily of a battery of vision tests selected to capture changes in visual performance (with an emphasis on binocular visual functions) of Apache aviators over their flight career. It is anticipated that the number of Apache aviators will level out to approximately 70 by the end of the first three years of the study. Non-Apache aviators will serve as a control group.

  11. A study on L-asparaginase of Nocardia levis MK-VL_113.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva

    2012-01-01

    An enzyme-based drug, L-asparaginase, was produced by Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 isolated from laterite soils of Guntur region. Cultural parameters affecting the production of L-asparaginase by the strain were optimized. Maximal yields of L-asparaginase were recorded from 3-day-old culture grown in modified asparagine-glycerol salts broth with initial pH 7.0 at temperature 30°C. Glycerol (2%) and yeast extract (1.5%) served as good carbon and nitrogen sources for L-asparaginase production, respectively. Cell-disrupting agents like EDTA slightly enhanced the productivity of L-asparaginase. Ours is the first paper on the production of L-asparaginase by N. levis.

  12. Chronic intermittent toluene inhalation in adolescent rats alters behavioural responses to amphetamine and MK801.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Jhodie Rubina; Gibbs, Sarah Jane; Lawrence, Andrew John

    2014-03-01

    Abuse of toluene-containing inhalants is common during adolescence, with ongoing chronic misuse associated with adverse outcomes and increased risk for addictive behaviours in adulthood. However, the mechanisms mediating the adaptive processes related to these outcomes are not well defined. To model human abuse patterns we exposed male adolescent Wistar rats (postnatal day 27) to chronic intermittent inhaled toluene (CIT, 10,000 ppm) or air (control) for 1h/day, three times/week for 3 weeks. The effects of CIT on behaviour and recovery were monitored. Locomotor activity was recorded following two consecutive injections of amphetamine (1mg/kg, i.p.) 72 and 96 h after the last exposure. This was followed with injection of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) 20 days after the last exposure. CIT resulted in a significant and persistent retardation in weight gain during the exposure period and abstinence (p<0.05). Repeated exposure resulted in tolerance to the onset of toluene-induced behaviours and recovery latency. There was a reduction in the acute stimulant effects of amphetamine in CIT-exposed animals and an increase in the magnitude of locomotor activity (p<0.0125) following a subsequent exposure when compared to the responses observed in controls; this was associated with altered locomotor responses to MK801. Repeated exposure to CIT during adolescence alters parameters of growth, as measured by body weight, and leads to tolerance, indicating that increasing concentrations of the compound may be needed to reach the same behavioural state. Toluene during this period also alters responses to a psychostimulant which may be related to long-term glutamatergic dysfunction.

  13. Enhanced control and sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Harvey, H.W.

    1998-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot`s performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B&R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding.

  14. Enhanced control & sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Harvey, H.W.

    1997-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot`s performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B&R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding.

  15. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  16. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes.

  17. Hypersonic jet control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.; Smith, A. J.

    The present study aims to identify some of the parameters which determine the upstream extent and the lateral spreading of the separation front around an under-expanded transverse jet on a slender blunted cone. The tests were conducted in the Cranfield hypersonic facility at M∞ = 8.2, Re∞ /cm = 4.5 to 9.0 × 104 and at M∞ = 12.3, Re∞ /cm = 3.3 × 104. Air was used as the working gas for both the freestream and the jet. Schlieren pictures were used for the visualisation of the three-dimensional structures around the jet. Pressure, normal force and pitching moment measurements were conducted to quantitatively study the interaction region and its effects on the vehicle. An analytical algorithm has been developed to predict the shape of the separation front around the body.

  18. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  19. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  20. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  1. Measurement of inclusive jet cross sections in Z/gamma*(-->e+e-) + jets production in pp[over ] collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-03-14

    Inclusive jet cross sections in Z/gamma* events, with Z/gamma* decaying into an electron-positron pair, are measured as a function of jet transverse momentum and jet multiplicity in pp[over ] collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab in run II, based on an integrated luminosity of 1.7 fb(-1). The measurements cover the rapidity region |y(jet)|<2.1 and the transverse momentum range p(T)(jet)>30 GeV/c. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions are in good agreement with the measured cross sections.

  2. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhenbin

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5 fb-1 of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator POWHEG is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include s-channel, t-channel, and Wt-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53} (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})$ pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\ ± 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of $|V_{tb}|>0.78$ at the 95% credibility level.

  3. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  4. Multiwavelength study of 20 jets that emanate from the periphery of active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Tripathi, Durgesh; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen

    2016-05-01

    T [K] = 6.2/6.3 (~2 MK). In addition, we derived an emission measure and a lower limit of electron density at the location of the spire (jet 1: log EM = 28.6, Ne = 1.3 × 1010 cm-3; jet 2: log EM = 28.0, Ne = 8.6 × 109 cm-3) and the footpoint (jet 1 - log EM = 28.6, Ne = 1.1 × 1010 cm-3; jet 2: log EM = 28.1, Ne = 8.4 × 109 cm-3). These results are in agreement with those obtained earlier by studying individual active region jets. Conclusions: The observation of flux cancellation, the association with HXR emission and emission of nonthermal type-III radio bursts, suggest that the initiation and therefore, heating is taking place at the base of the jet. This is also supported by the high temperature plasma revealed by the DEM analysis in the jet footpoint (peak in the DEM at log T [K] = 6.5). Our results provide substantial constraints for theoretical modeling of the jets and their thermodynamic nature. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Multiple Plasma Ejections and Intermittent Nature of Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Chromospheric Anemone Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Isobe, H.; Nishizuka, N.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.

    2012-11-01

    The recent discovery of chromospheric anemone jets with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode has shown an indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere. However, the basic nature of magnetic reconnection in chromosphere is still unclear. We studied nine chromospheric anemone jets from SOT/Hinode using Ca II H filtergrams, and we found multiple bright, plasma ejections along the jets. In most cases, the major intensity enhancements (larger than 30% relative to the background intensity) of the loop correspond to the timing of the plasma ejections. The typical lifetime and size of the plasma ejecta are about 20-60 s and 0.3-1.5 Mm, respectively. The height-time plot of jet shows many sub-structures (or individual jets) and the typical lifetime of the individual jet is about one to five minutes. Before the onset of the jet activity, a loop appears in Ca II H and gradually increases in size, and after few minutes several jets are launched from the loop. Once the jet activity starts and several individual jets are launched, the loop starts shrinking with a speed of ~4 km s-1. In some events, a downward moving blob with a speed of ~35 km s-1 was observed, associated with the upward moving plasma along one of the legs of the loop hosting the jets. The upward moving plasma gradually developed into jets. Multiple plasma ejections in chromospheric anemone jet show the strongly time-dependent as well as intermittent nature of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  6. MULTIPLE PLASMA EJECTIONS AND INTERMITTENT NATURE OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.; Isobe, H.; Nishizuka, N. E-mail: nishida@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: isobe@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-11-01

    The recent discovery of chromospheric anemone jets with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode has shown an indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere. However, the basic nature of magnetic reconnection in chromosphere is still unclear. We studied nine chromospheric anemone jets from SOT/Hinode using Ca II H filtergrams, and we found multiple bright, plasma ejections along the jets. In most cases, the major intensity enhancements (larger than 30% relative to the background intensity) of the loop correspond to the timing of the plasma ejections. The typical lifetime and size of the plasma ejecta are about 20-60 s and 0.3-1.5 Mm, respectively. The height-time plot of jet shows many sub-structures (or individual jets) and the typical lifetime of the individual jet is about one to five minutes. Before the onset of the jet activity, a loop appears in Ca II H and gradually increases in size, and after few minutes several jets are launched from the loop. Once the jet activity starts and several individual jets are launched, the loop starts shrinking with a speed of {approx}4 km s{sup -1}. In some events, a downward moving blob with a speed of {approx}35 km s{sup -1} was observed, associated with the upward moving plasma along one of the legs of the loop hosting the jets. The upward moving plasma gradually developed into jets. Multiple plasma ejections in chromospheric anemone jet show the strongly time-dependent as well as intermittent nature of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  7. MAGNETIC UNTWISTING IN SOLAR JETS THAT GO INTO THE OUTER CORONA IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2015-06-10

    We study 14 large solar jets observed in polar coronal holes. In EUV movies from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), each jet appears similar to most X-ray jets and EUV jets that erupt in coronal holes; but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R{sub Sun} in images from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO)/C2 coronagraph. From AIA He ii 304 Å movies and LASCO/C2 running-difference images of these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R{sub Sun} at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most of the jets display measureable swaying and bending of a few degrees in amplitude; in three jets the swaying is discernibly oscillatory with a period of order 1 hr. These characteristics suggest that the driver in these jets is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is basically a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfvén wave that is put into the reconnected open field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts. From the measured spinning and swaying, we estimate that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R{sub Sun}. We point out that the torsional waves observed in Type-II spicules might dissipate in the corona in the same way as the magnetic-untwisting waves in our big jets, and thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  8. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Comparison of MK-0929 and Placebo in the Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivkin, Anna; Alexander, Robert C.; Knighton, Jennifer; Hutson, Pete H.; Wang, Xiaojing J.; Snavely, Duane B.; Rosah, Thomas; Watt, Alan P.; Reimherr, Fred W.; Adler, Lenard A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Preclinical models, receptor localization, and genetic linkage data support the role of D4 receptors in the etiology of ADHD. This proof-of-concept study was designed to evaluate MK-0929, a selective D4 receptor antagonist as treatment for adult ADHD. Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted…

  9. Starmind: A Fuzzy Logic Knowledge-Based System for the Automated Classification of Stars in the MK System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manteiga, M.; Carricajo, I.; Rodríguez, A.; Dafonte, C.; Arcay, B.

    2009-02-01

    Astrophysics is evolving toward a more rational use of costly observational data by intelligently exploiting the large terrestrial and spatial astronomical databases. In this paper, we present a study showing the suitability of an expert system to perform the classification of stellar spectra in the Morgan and Keenan (MK) system. Using the formalism of artificial intelligence for the development of such a system, we propose a rules' base that contains classification criteria and confidence grades, all integrated in an inference engine that emulates human reasoning by means of a hierarchical decision rules tree that also considers the uncertainty factors associated with rules. Our main objective is to illustrate the formulation and development of such a system for an astrophysical classification problem. An extensive spectral database of MK standard spectra has been collected and used as a reference to determine the spectral indexes that are suitable for classification in the MK system. It is shown that by considering 30 spectral indexes and associating them with uncertainty factors, we can find an accurate diagnose in MK types of a particular spectrum. The system was evaluated against the NOAO-INDO-US spectral catalog.

  10. White matter injuries induced by MK-801 in a mouse model of schizophrenia based on NMDA antagonism.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Yun; Kong, Xiang-Ru; Zhang, Lei; Qiu, Xuan; Chao, Feng-Lei; Peng, Chao; Gao, Yuan; Huang, Chun-Xia; Wang, San-Rong; Tang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia (SZ) is complex and largely unknown. Neuroimaging and postmortem studies have suggested white matter disturbances in SZ. In the present study, we tested the white matter deficits hypothesis of SZ using a mouse model of SZ induced by NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. We found that mice with repeated chronic MK-801 administration showed increased locomotor activity in the open field test, less exploration of a novel environment in the hole-board test, and increased anxiety in the elevated plus maze but no impairments were observed in coordination or motor function on accelerating rota-rod. The total white matter volume and corpus callosum volume in mice treated with MK-801 were significantly decreased compared to control mice treated with saline. Myelin basic protein and 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase were also significantly decreased in the mouse model of SZ. Furthermore, we observed degenerative changes of myelin sheaths in the mouse model of SZ. These results provide further evidence of white matter deficits in SZ and indicate that the animal model of SZ induced by MK-801 is a useful model to investigate mechanisms underlying white matter abnormalities in SZ.

  11. Conformation constraint of anilides enabling the discovery of tricyclic lactams as potent MK2 non-ATP competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Palani, Anandan; Huang, Xianhai; Sofolarides, Michael; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Xiao; Aslanian, Robert; Guo, Zhuyan; Fossetta, James; Tian, Fang; Trivedi, Prashant; Spacciapoli, Peter; Whitehurst, Charles E; Lundell, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Conformation restriction of linear N-alkylanilide MK2 inhibitors to their E-conformer was developed. This strategy enabled rapid advance in identifying a series of potent non-ATP competitive inhibitors that exhibited cell based activity in anti-TNFα assay.

  12. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  13. Stationary relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with vz≈ c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialised code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres and elucidated the nature of radial oscillations of steady-state jets.

  14. Jets and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Soper, Davison E.

    2013-06-01

    An essential element of the development of the strong interaction component of the Standard Model of particle physics, QCD, has been the evolving understanding of the "jets" of particles that appear in the final states of high energy particle collisions. In this chapter we provide a historical outline of those developments...

  15. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  16. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  17. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  18. High pt jets and photons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; /Illinois U., Chicago

    2005-09-01

    The authors present recent results on high p{sub T} jets and photon production in {bar p}p collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The measurements were performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations using between 150 and 300 pb{sup -1} of data taken during Run II at the Tevatron.

  19. Comparison of gaseous exhaust indices of the F109 turbofan using three different blends of petroleum-based Jet-A and camelina-based Jet-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Brian John

    This research project focused on the collection and comparison of gaseous exhaust emissions of the F109 turbofan engine using petroleum-based Jet-A and two different blends of camelina-based Jet-A. Simulated landing and takeoff cycles were used to collect gaseous exhaust emissions. Unburned hydrocarbon (HC), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon moNOxide (CO) exhaust indices (EIm) were calculated using ICAO Annex 16 Volume II formulae. Statistical analyses were performed on the Elm data. There was no significant difference in HC EIm and CO EI m among the three fuels at takeoff thrust. There were significant differences among the fuels for NOx EIm. 50% Jet-A 50% camelina produced the highest NOx EIm, then 75% Jet-A 25% camelina and finally Jet-A. At climb thrust, both blends of camelina fuel produced higher NOx EIm but no difference in CO EIm and HC EIm as Jet-A. At approach thrust, both blends of camelina fuel produced higher NOx EIm, lower CO EIm, and no difference in HC EIm as Jet-A. At idle thrust, there was no significant difference among the fuels for NOx EIm. There were significant differences among the fuels for HC EIm. Jet-A and 50% Jet-A 50% both produced higher HC EIm as 75% Jet-A 25% camelina. There were significant differences among the fuels for CO EI m. Jet-A produced the highest CO EIm, then 75% Jet-A 25% camelina and finally 50% Jet-A 50% camelina.

  20. Knockout of NMDA-receptors from parvalbumin interneurons sensitizes to schizophrenia-related deficits induced by MK-801

    PubMed Central

    Bygrave, A M; Masiulis, S; Nicholson, E; Berkemann, M; Barkus, C; Sprengel, R; Harrison, P J; Kullmann, D M; Bannerman, D M; Kätzel, D

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that a functional deficit in NMDA-receptors (NMDARs) on parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons (PV-NMDARs) is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Supportive evidence come from examination of genetically modified mice where the obligatory NMDAR-subunit GluN1 (also known as NR1) has been deleted from PV interneurons by Cre-mediated knockout of the corresponding gene Grin1 (Grin1ΔPV mice). Notably, such PV-specific GluN1 ablation has been reported to blunt the induction of hyperlocomotion (a surrogate for psychosis) by pharmacological NMDAR blockade with the non-competitive antagonist MK-801. This suggests PV-NMDARs as the site of the psychosis-inducing action of MK-801. In contrast to this hypothesis, we show here that Grin1ΔPV mice are not protected against the effects of MK-801, but are in fact sensitized to many of them. Compared with control animals, Grin1ΔPVmice injected with MK-801 show increased stereotypy and pronounced catalepsy, which confound the locomotor readout. Furthermore, in Grin1ΔPVmice, MK-801 induced medial-prefrontal delta (4 Hz) oscillations, and impaired performance on tests of motor coordination, working memory and sucrose preference, even at lower doses than in wild-type controls. We also found that untreated Grin1ΔPVmice are largely normal across a wide range of cognitive functions, including attention, cognitive flexibility and various forms of short-term memory. Taken together these results argue against PV-specific NMDAR hypofunction as a key starting point of schizophrenia pathophysiology, but support a model where NMDAR hypofunction in multiple cell types contribute to the disease. PMID:27070406

  1. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 impairs learning but not memory fixation or expression of classical fear conditioning in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Davis, R E

    1992-04-01

    The amnestic effects of the noncompetitive antagonist MK-801 on visually mediated, classic fear conditioning in goldfish (Carassius auratus) was examined in 5 experiments. MK-801 was administered 30 min before the training session on Day 1 to look for anterograde amnestic effects, immediately after training to look for retrograde amnestic effects, and before the training or test session, or both, to look for state-dependence effects. The results showed that MK-801 produced anterograde amnesia at doses that did not produce retrograde amnesia or state dependency and did not impair the expression of conditioned or unconditioned branchial suppression responses (BSRs) to the conditioned stimulus. The results indicate that MK-801 disrupts the mechanism of learning of the conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus relation. Evidence is also presented that the learning processes that are disrupted by MK-801 occur during the initial stage of BSR conditioning.

  2. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  3. Tracing Massive Protostellar Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, A.

    2014-09-01

    We present new spectroscopy and imaging of four protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in the Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude larger than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (around 2 - 8 solar masses) protostars. Velocities from new proper motion and spectroscopic measurements fall among the velocities typically measured in lower-luminosity sources (100 - 200 km/s). We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exist in a feedback-dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to 8 solar masses form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  4. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E.; Custódio, José B.A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  5. Interacting jets from binary protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, G. C.; Lery, T.; O'Sullivan, S.; Spicer, D.; Bacciotti, F.; Rosen, A.

    2008-02-01

    Aims: We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. Methods: We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. Results: We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. Conclusions: While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly parallel, as in most observed cases, we show that the magnetic field can help the collimation and refocusing of both of the two jets.

  6. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  7. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  8. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    PubMed

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  9. TREAT MK III Loop Thermoelastoplastic Stress Analysis for the L03 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, James M.

    1981-03-01

    The STRAW code was used to analyze the static response of a TREAT MK III loop subjected to thermal and mechanical loadings arising from an accident situation for the purpose of determining the defiections and stresses. This analysis provides safety support for the L03 reactivity accident study. The analysis was subdivided into two tasks: (1) an analysis of a flow blockage accident (Cases A and B), where all the energy is assumed deposited in the test leg, resulting in a temperature increase from 530°F to 1720°F, with a small internal pressure throughout the loop and (2) an analysis of a second flow blockage accident (Cases C and D), where again, all the energy is assumed to he deposited in the test leg, resulting in a temperature rise from 530°F to 1845°F, with a small internal pressure throughout the loop. The purpose of these two tasks was to determine if loop failure can occur with the thermal differential across the pump and test legs. Also of interest is whether an undesirable amount of loop lateral deflection will be caused by the thermal differential. A two dimensional analysis of the TREAT MK III loop was performed. The analysis accounted for material nonlinearities, both as a function of temperature and stress, and geometric nonlinearities arising from large deflections. Straight beam elements with annular cross sections were used to model the loop. The analyses show that the maximum strains are less than 21% of their failure strains for all subcases of Cases A and B. For all subcases of cases C and D, the maximum strains are less than 53% of their failure strains. The failure strain is 27.9% for the material at 530°F, 38.1% at 1720°F and 17.8% at 1845°F. Large lateral deflections are observed when the loop is not constrained except at its clamped support--as much as 8.6 inches. However, by accounting for the constraint of the concrete biological shield, the maximum lateral deflection was reduced to less than 0.05 inches at the points of concern.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Solar Spicule Jets at a Magnetic Null-Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, V.; Konkol, P. M.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Murawski, K.

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of jet-like structures in the solar atmosphere are performed. These structures result from a pressure pulse that is launched at the null point of a potential magnetic arcade. The plasma jet exhibits a double structure with two components: (a) dense, cool, and short vertical stream and (b) a less dense, hot and tall part of the jet. The upper part of the hot and tall jet may represent a direct response of the system to the pressure pulse launched at the null point, and the second, slower cool and dense part of the jet is formed later through the stretching up of the stream as a result of plasma evacuation from the top of the magnetic arcade. Numerical results show that jet-like structures mimic some properties of both type I and type II spicules, according to the classification provided by De Pontieu et al. (Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 59, S655, 2007).

  11. A parallel-arm phase I trial of the humanised anti-IGF-1R antibody dalotuzumab in combination with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206, the mTOR inhibitor ridaforolimus, or the NOTCH inhibitor MK-0752, in patients with advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Brana, I; Berger, R; Golan, T; Haluska, P; Edenfield, J; Fiorica, J; Stephenson, J; Martin, L P; Westin, S; Hanjani, P; Jones, M B; Almhanna, K; Wenham, R M; Sullivan, D M; Dalton, W S; Gunchenko, A; Cheng, J D; Siu, L L; Gray, J E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two strategies to interrogate the insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) pathway were investigated: vertical inhibition with dalotuzumab and MK-2206 or ridaforolimus to potentiate PI3K pathway targeting and horizontal cross-talk inhibition with dalotuzumab and MK-0752 to exert effects against cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and stem cell propagation. Methods: A phase I, multi-cohort dose escalation study was conducted in patients with advanced solid tumours. Patients received dalotuzumab (10 mg kg–1) and escalating doses of MK-2206 (90–200 mg) or escalating doses of dalotuzumab (7.5–10 mg kg–1) and MK-0752 (1800 mg) weekly. Upon maximum tolerated dose determination, patients with low-RAS signature, high-IGF1 expression ovarian cancer were randomised to dalotuzumab/MK-2206 versus dalotuzumab/ridaforolimus, whereas patients with high IGF1/low IGF2 expression colorectal cancer received dalotuzumab/MK-0752. Results: A total of 47 patients were enrolled: 29 in part A (18 in the dalotuzumab/MK-2206 arm and 11 in the dalotuzumab/MK-0752 arm) and 18 in part B (6 in each arm). Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) for dalotuzumab/MK-2206 included grade 4 neutropenia and grade 3 serum sickness-like reaction, maculopapular rash, and gastrointestinal inflammation. For dalotuzumab/MK-0752, DLTs included grade 3 dehydration, rash, and diarrhoea. Seven patients remained on study for >4 cycles. Conclusions: Dalotuzumab/MK-2206 and dalotuzumab/MK-0752 combinations were tolerable. Further developments of prospectively validated predictive biomarkers to aid in patient selection for anti-IGF-1R therapies are needed. PMID:25290091

  12. Searches in photon and jet states

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, A.; /UC, Davis

    2007-06-01

    The authors present recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D0 experiments using data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. New physics may appear in events with high transverse momentum objects, including photons and quark or gluon jets. The results described here are of signature-based searches and model-based searches probing supersymmetry, leptoquarks, 4th generation quarks, and large extra dimensions.

  13. Radiant Energy Power Source for Jet Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Doellner, O.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report beings with a historical overview on the origin and early beginnings of Radiant Energy Power Source for Jet Aircraft. The report reviews the work done in Phase I (Grant DE-FG01-82CE-15144) and then gives a discussion of Phase II (Grant DE-FG01-86CE-15301). Included is a reasonably detailed discussion of photovoltaic cells and the research and development needed in this area. The report closes with a historical perspective and summary related to situations historically encountered on projects of this nature. 15 refs.

  14. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  15. Coronal Jets in Closed Magnetic Regions on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter Fraser; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Coronal jets are dynamic, collimated structures observed in solar EUV and X-ray emission. They appear predominantly in the open field of coronal holes, but are also observed in areas of closed field, especially active regions. A common feature of coronal jets is that they originate from the field above a parasitic polarity of opposite sign to the surrounding field. Some process - such as instability onset or flux emergence - induces explosive reconnection between the closed “anemone” field and the surrounding open field that generates the jet. The lesser number of coronal jets in closed-field regions suggests a possible stabilizing effect of the closed configuration with respect to coronal jet formation. If the scale of the jet region is small compared with the background loop length, as in for example type II spicules, the nearby magnetic field may be treated as locally open. As such, one would expect that if a stabilizing effect exists it becomes most apparent as the scale of the anemone region approaches that of the background coronal loops.To investigate if coronal jets are indeed suppressed along shorter coronal loops, we performed a number of simulations of jets driven by a rotation of the parasitic polarity (as in the previous open-jet calculations by Pariat et. al 2009, 2010, 2015) embedded in a large-scale closed bipolar field. The simulations were performed with the state of the art Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver. We will report here how the magnetic configuration above the anemone region determines the nature of the jet, when it is triggered, and how much of the stored magnetic energy is released. We show that regions in which the background field and the parasitic polarity region are of comparable scale naturally suppress explosive energy release. We will also show how in the post-jet relaxation phase a combination of confined MHD waves and weak current layers are generated by the jet along the background coronal loops, both of which

  16. A Minor-Merger Interpretation for NGC 1097's ``Jets''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, James L.; Wallin, John F.

    2003-03-01

    while passing through NGC 1097's disk, accounting for the jets' lack of H I and H II. The remnants' (B-V) color would still agree with observations even after ~3 Gyr of passive evolution, provided the cannibalized dwarf was low-metallicity and dominated by young stars at impact.

  17. Nature or Nurture: the peculiar HH 900 jet and outflow system in the Carina nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Kiminki, Megan M.; Bally, John

    2015-01-01

    We present new optical and IR spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope imaging of HH 900, a peculiar protostellar outflow in the Carina nebula. Previous Hα imaging from HST revealed an unusually broad, bipolar outflow emerging from a small, tadpole-shaped globule that is illuminated by the many O-type stars in nearby Trumpler 16. Near-IR narrowband [Fe II] images reveal a symmetric, collimated jet that bisects the broad outflow traced by Hα. In a giant H II region like Carina, [Fe II] emission traces dense gas that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars, but is excited by non-ionizing FUV photons that penetrate the ionization front within the jet. New Gemini AO images of near-IR H2 emission show that molecules survive in the outflow, and follow the Hα morphology. Position-velocity diagrams of the three lines also reveal very different kinematics. [Fe II] traces steady, jet-like velocities that are faster than those observed in H2 emission. Most strikingly, Hα velocities resemble the Hubble wedges seen in the position-velocity diagrams of some molecular outflows, but few other protostellar jets. We propose that [Fe II] emission traces the protostellar jet itself while H2 emission reveals the molecules that (briefly) survive in the outflow, and Hα traces the ionized skin of the outflow sheath entrained by the jet. The high estimated mass-loss rate of the jet requires a high accretion rate, implying that the unseen driving source is an intermediate-mass (~2-8 Msun) protostar. We propose that HH 900 provides a bridge between molecular outflows driven by deeply embedded sources, and jets from unobscured low-mass protostars because external irradiation from nearby O-type stars illuminates both the collimated atomic jet core and the material it sweeps up.

  18. Minkowski's Object: A Starburst Triggered by a Radio Jet, Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; van Breugel, W; de Vries, W; Dopita, M; Martin, C; Morganti, R; Neff, S; Oosterloo, T; Schiminovich, D; Stanford, S A; van Gorkom, J

    2006-02-07

    We present neutral hydrogen, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopic observations of Minkowski's Object (MO), a star forming system at the end of a radio jet associated with NGC541 at the center of a cluster of galaxies, Abell 194. The observations strengthen the evidence, first presented in 1985, that MO is a small, peculiar galaxy in which the star formation has been triggered by the radio jet. Key new results are the discovery of a double H I cloud with a mass of 4.9 x 10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}} straddling the radio jet downstream from MO at the location where the jet changes direction and decollimates; a strong detection of MO at near- and far-UV wavelengths and in H{alpha}, both of which also show a double structure; and what appear to be numerous H II regions and associated clusters in MO. The UV morphology of MO along the radio jet resembles the radio-aligned, rest-frame UV morphologies seen in many high redshift radio galaxies, which are also thought to be caused by jet-induced star formation. The UV, optical, and near-IR data show that the stellar population is dominated by a 7.5Myr-old instantaneous burst, with a total stellar mass of 1.9 x 10{sup 7} M{sub {circle_dot}}.

  19. Jet Signatures in the Spectra of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O' Riordan, Michael; Pe'er, Asaf; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2016-03-01

    Jets are observed as radio emission in active galactic nuclei and during the low/hard state in X-ray binaries (XRBs), but their contribution at higher frequencies has been uncertain. We study the dynamics of jets in XRBs using the general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code HARM. We calculate the high-energy spectra and variability properties using a general-relativistic radiative transport code based on grmonty. We find the following signatures of jet emission: (i) a significant γ-ray peak above ˜1022 Hz, (ii) a break in the optical/UV spectrum, with a change from ν {L}ν ˜ {ν }0 to ν {L}ν ˜ ν , followed by another break at higher frequencies where the spectrum roughly returns to ν {L}ν ˜ {ν }0, and (iii) a pronounced synchrotron peak near or below ˜1014 Hz indicates that a significant fraction of any observed X-ray emission originates in the jet. We investigate the variability during a large-scale magnetic field inversion in which the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) jet is quenched and a new transient hot reconnecting plasmoid is launched by the reconnecting field. The ratio of the γ-rays to X-rays changes from {L}γ /{L}{{X}}\\gt 1 in the BZ jet to {L}γ /{L}{{X}}\\lt 1 during the launching of the transient plasmoid.

  20. Relaxation Oscillations in Josephson STM Junctions at mK Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Roychowdhurry, Anita; Dana, Rami; Li, Wanting; Liao, Shu-Chu

    2015-03-01

    Small Josephson junctions can exhibit relaxation oscillations between the superconducting and normal state. The switching time depends on the charging time of the junction capacitance and the R-L time constant of the electrical connections, usually in the μs range. We observed similar oscillations in the tunnel current between a Nb sample and a Nb tip in our STM operated at 30 mK. The oscillations occur in two forms, either of which is triggered by lowering the gap resistance. The first type occurs in voltage ranges where the I(V) curves show negative differential conductance, which in turn is caused by coupling to the electrical environment [4]. The oscillations span only a fraction of the superconducting gap and run at maximum frequencies below 10 kHz. The possible existence of ``minor'' loops was already mentioned in the original article, though thought to be a result of an applied in plane magnetic field. The second type appears at lower gap resistances and affects the whole bias range. The frequency was too high to be determined by our current setup, and thus could be due to a conventional relaxation oscillation.Our results will be discussed in detail. Partially funded by NSF.

  1. Learning impairments induced by glutamate blockade using dizocilpine (MK-801) in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Harder, J A; Aboobaker, A A; Hodgetts, T C; Ridley, R M

    1998-11-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801) on learning ability in a non-human primate. Acquisition and reversal learning of visual discrimination tasks and acquisition of visuo-spatial discrimination tasks were assessed in marmosets using the Wisconsin General Test Apparatus. Dizocilpine impaired acquisition of visuo-spatial (conditional) tasks requiring spatial responses to coloured objects, and perceptually difficult visual discrimination tasks in which stimulus objects are painted black. Dizocilpine did not, however, impair either acquisition or reversal of a simple visual discrimination task using easily discriminated, coloured objects. 2. Motor effects of dizocilpine treatment, which have been seen in other primates, were examined by observation of the marmosets in their home cages, using both an automated locomotor activity monitor and 'blind', subjective counting of the number of abnormal movements in a given time period. Locomotor activity, assessed using the automated monitor, was not significantly affected at any of the doses tested. Incoordination, assessed by human observation of abnormal movements, was significantly increased only at a dose of 30 microg kg(-1) i.m., which was twice the highest dose used to assess the effects of dizocilpine on cognition. 3. We have, therefore, found an effect of dizocilpine on acquisition and reversal of some types of cognitive task, at a dose which does not cause significant motor effects. This demonstration of a cognitive deficit associated with glutamatergic blockade in a primate may be useful in understanding the contribution of glutamatergic dysfunction to cognitive decline in neurodegenerative disease, especially Alzheimer's disease.

  2. The thermal conductivity of high modulus Zylon fibers between 400 mK and 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectalí; Hertel, Scott A.; Leman, Steven W.; McCarthy, Kevin A.; Rutherford, John M.

    2008-11-01

    Zylon is a synthetic polyurethane polymer fiber featuring very high mechanical strength. Measurements of the thermal conductivity λZ(T) of high modulus Zylon fibers at temperatures between 400 mK and 4 K were performed to assess if they can be successfully employed in the design of high performance suspension systems for cold stages of adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. The linear mass density of the yarn used in these measurements amounts to 3270 dtex, which is also a measure for the yarn's cross section. The experimental data for the thermal conductivity was fitted to a function of the form λZ=(1010±30)·TpWmmdtexK. This result was normalized to the breaking strength of the fibers and compared with Kevlar. It shows that Kevlar outperforms Zylon in the investigated temperature range. At 1.5 K, the thermal conductivity integral of Zylon yarn is twice as high as the thermal conductivity integral of Kevlar yarn with the same breaking strength. A linear mass density of 1 tex is equivalent to a yarn mass of 1 g/km. High modulus Zylon has a density of 1.56 g/cm 3.

  3. Verification of JUPITER Standard Analysis Method for Upgrading Joyo MK-III Core Design and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Ito, Chikara; Sekine, Takashi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, loading of irradiation test rigs causes a decrease in excess reactivity because the rigs contain less fissile materials than the driver fuel. In order to carry out duty operation cycles using as many irradiation rigs as possible, it is necessary to upgrade the core performance to increase its excess reactivity and irradiation capacity. Core modification plans have been considered, such as the installation of advanced radial reflectors and reduction of the number of control rods. To implement such core modifications, it is first necessary to improve the prediction accuracy in core design and to optimize safety margins. In the present study, verification of the JUPITER fast reactor standard analysis method was conducted through a comparison between the calculated and the measured Joyo MK-III core characteristics, and it was concluded that the accuracy for a small sodium-cooled fast reactor with a hard neutron spectrum was within 5 % of unity. It was shown that, the performance of the irradiation bed core could be upgraded by the improvement of the prediction accuracy of the core characteristics and optimization of safety margins.

  4. Position-Dependent Optical Response of a Superconducting Resonator at 15 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, K. D.; Hertzberg, J. B.; Hoffman, J. E.; Grover, J. A.; Lee, J.; Solano, P.; Budoyo, R. P.; Ballard, C.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the optical and dielectric response of a translatable thin-film lumped-element superconducting Al microwave resonator cooled to 15 mK. The resonator has a resonance frequency of 6.14 GHz, a quality factor Q of 2.59 x 105and is mounted inside a superconducting aluminum 3D cavity. A tapered optical fiber enters and exits the 3D cavity through two small holes in opposite sides of the cavity, placed so that the fiber can pass close to the resonator. The 3D cavity is mounted on an x-z piezo-translation stage that allows us to change the relative position of the lumped-element resonator and fiber. When the resonator is brought near to the fiber, we observe a shift in resonance frequency due to the presence of the fiber dielectric. When light is sent through the fiber, Rayleigh scattering causes a position-dependent illumination of the resonator, generating quasiparticles and thereby affecting its resonance frequency and Q. Our model of the resonator response includes the generation, diffusion, and recombination of quasiparticles in the resonator and shows that the frequency response allows us to track the position of the fiber in situ. Work supported by NSF through the Physics Frontier Center at the Joint Quantum Institute, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Maryland.

  5. Invited review article: A 10 mK scanning probe microscopy facility.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Jae; Otte, Alexander F; Shvarts, Vladimir; Zhao, Zuyu; Kuk, Young; Blankenship, Steven R; Band, Alan; Hess, Frank M; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2010-12-01

    We describe the design, development and performance of a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) facility operating at a base temperature of 10 mK in magnetic fields up to 15 T. The microscope is cooled by a custom designed, fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible dilution refrigerator (DR) and is capable of in situ tip and sample exchange. Subpicometer stability at the tip-sample junction is achieved through three independent vibration isolation stages and careful design of the dilution refrigerator. The system can be connected to, or disconnected from, a network of interconnected auxiliary UHV chambers, which include growth chambers for metal and semiconductor samples, a field-ion microscope for tip characterization, and a fully independent additional quick access low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) system. To characterize the system, we present the cooling performance of the DR, vibrational, tunneling current, and tip-sample displacement noise measurements. In addition, we show the spectral resolution capabilities with tunneling spectroscopy results obtained on an epitaxial graphene sample resolving the quantum Landau levels in a magnetic field, including the sublevels corresponding to the lifting of the electron spin and valley degeneracies.

  6. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  7. Differential effects of MK-801 on cerebrocortical neuronal injury in C57BL/6J, NSA, and ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Brosnan-Watters, G; Ogimi, T; Ford, D; Tatekawa, L; Gilliam, D; Bilsky, E J; Nash, D

    2000-08-01

    1. Antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate (Glu) receptor, including [(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate], dizocilpine maleate (MK-801), injure pyramidal neurons in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial (PC/RS) cortex when administered systemically to adult rats and mice. 2. These results have, to our knowledge, only been reported previously in Harlan Sprague Dawley albino rats and International Cancer Research (ICR) mice, an outbred albino strain. 3. Male Non-Swiss Albino (NSA) mice, an albino outbred strain, and male C57BL/6J (B6) mice, a pigmented inbred strain, were injected systemically with 1 mg/kg of MK-801 in the first experiment. This dose of MK-801 reliably produces cytoplasmic vacuoles in neurons in layers III and IV of the PC/RS cortex in 100% of ICR mice treated 4. There was a significant difference in the number of vacuolated neurons in B6 and NSA mice, as assessed by ANOVA. The NSA were not significantly different than previously examined ICR mice, but the B6 had fewer vacuolated neurons than either of the two outbred strains. 5. In the second experiment, male NSA, ICR, and B6 mice were injected systemically with a high dose, 10 mg/kg, of MK-801. This dose has been demonstrated to result in necrosis in the same population of neurons injured by lower doses of MK-801. 6. An ANOVA indicated that there was a significant difference among the three strains of mice, and a Fisher's protected t revealed that the B6 mice were significantly different from both the NSA and ICR, but that, with our test, those two strains were indistinguishable. 7. Male ICR, NSA, and B6 mice were tested in the holeboard food search task 5 hours after 1 mg/kg of MK-801. There were significant differences between the strains in performance both pre and posttreatment. The effect of the drug was not statistically significant. 8. These results suggest that there may be a genetically mediated difference in the reaction to NMDA

  8. Age-related differences in MK-801 induced behaviors in dopamine D3 receptor knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Iarkov, Alex V; Der, Terry C; Joyce, Jeffrey N

    2010-02-10

    It is not known if age plays an important role in the D(3) receptor regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist induced hyperactivity. Wild type (WT) and dopamine D(3) receptor mutant (D(3)R KO) mice were divided into young (under 7 months) and middle age (over 12 months) groups and tested for dizocilpine (MK-801)-induced hyperactivity and rearing. Mice were administered vehicle (saline, 1 ml/100g body weight, i.p.), or dopamine D(3) receptor preferring antagonists 3aR,9bS)-N[4-(8-cyano-1,3a,4,9b-tetrahydro-3H-benzopyrano[3,4-c]pyrrole-2-yl)-butyl] (4-phenyl) benzamide) (S33084, 1.0mg/kg, i.p.) and 5,6-dimethoxy-2(dipropylamino)indan (U99194A, 5.0 mg/kg i.p.), and immediately placed into the open field apparatus. Horizontal and vertical activity counts were recorded for 30 min, followed by injection of vehicle or MK801 (0.15 or 0.30 mg/kg i.p.) and mice returned to the open field for an additional 55 min. Young D(3)R KO mice showed the highest level of locomotor and rearing activity during the 1st 30 min and 2nd 55 min session after vehicle treatment. At the lower dose of MK-801 horizontal activity was significantly higher in Young-D(3)R KO mice than in the other groups. At the higher dose of MK-801 horizontal activity was elevated to an equal extent in all groups. In response to S33084 and U99194A, MK-801 hyperactivity was reduced the most in the Middle Age-D(3)R KO and the least in the Young-D(3)R KO mice. Rearing showed pronounced age-related but not genotype effects. The results demonstrate that MK-801 induced-hyperactivity, novelty-induced behavioral activity and rearing are affected by age and D(3) receptor genotype.

  9. Phenomenology of photon-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of collider physics is to unambiguously associate detector-based objects with the corresponding elementary physics objects. A particular example is the association of calorimeter-based objects such as “jets,” identified with a standard (IR-safe) jet algorithm, with the underlying physics objects, which may be QCD-jets (arising from a scattered parton), electrons, photons or, as discussed here, photon-jets (a group of collinear photons). This separation is especially interesting in the context of Higgs search, where the signal includes events with two photons (in the Standard Model) as well as events with two photon-jets (in a variety of Beyond the Standard Model scenarios), while QCD provides ever-present background. Here we describe the implementation of techniques from the rapidly evolving area of jet substructure studies, not only to enhance the more familiar photon-QCD separation, but also to separately distinguish photon-jets, i.e., to separate usual jets into three categories: single photons, photon-jets and QCD-jets. The efficacy of these techniques for separation is illustrated through studies of simulated data.

  10. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  11. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  12. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  13. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  14. Behavior of Electrospinning Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Han; Reneker, Darrell

    2002-03-01

    During the electrospinning of jets of polymer solutions such as polyethylene oxide in water, interference colors similar to those seen in the walls of soap bubbles are seen if the proper illumination is provided. The colors can be seen both in the straight part of the jet and in the loops formed by the electrically driven bending instability. The colors were correlated with measurements of the diameter of segments of a particular color. The path of a slowly moving jet of polyisobutylene in a mixture of acetone and paraffin oil was recorded. A well-developed expanding spiral that moved downward was observed. The downward velocity of a typical segment was .13 m/s, and the radial velocity of the same segment was .23m/s. The development of the second bending instability occurred 180 ms after the first, and a third bending instability occurred 280 ms after the first. The growth of the bending instability clearly demonstrated its self-similar, fractal nature. A network of electrospun polyisobutylene fibers was collected in an isopropyl alcohol precipitation bath.

  15. Phosphorylation of S344 in the calmodulin-binding domain negatively affects CCaMK function during bacterial and fungal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Routray, Pratyush; Miller, J Benjamin; Du, Liqun; Oldroyd, Giles; Poovaiah, B W

    2013-10-01

    Calcium and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) plays a critical role in the signaling pathway that establishes root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Calcium-dependent autophosphorylation is central to the regulation of CCaMK, and this has been shown to promote calmodulin binding. Here, we report a regulatory mechanism of Medicago truncatula CCaMK (MtCCaMK) through autophosphorylation of S344 in the calmodulin-binding/autoinhibitory domain. The phospho-ablative mutation S344A did not have significant effect on its kinase activities, and supports root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, indicating that phosphorylation at this position is not required for establishment of symbioses. The phospho-mimic mutation S344D show drastically reduced calmodulin-stimulated substrate phosphorylation, and this coincides with a compromised interaction with calmodulin and its interacting partner, IPD3. Functional complementation tests revealed that the S344D mutation blocked root nodule symbiosis and reduced the mycorrhizal association. Furthermore, S344D was shown to suppress the spontaneous nodulation associated with a gain-of-function mutant of MtCCaMK (T271A), revealing that phosphorylation at S344 of MtCCaMK is adequate for shutting down its activity, and is epistatic over previously identified T271 autophosphorylation. These results reveal a mechanism that enables CCaMK to 'turn off' its function through autophosphorylation.

  16. 7-Nitroindazole and methylene blue, inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase, block MK-801-elicited behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, S I; Rosse, R B; Paul, S M; Tomasino, V; Koetzner, L; Morn, C B; Mastropaolo, J

    1996-07-01

    We examined the abilities of 7-nitroindazole and methylene blue, inhibitors of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity respectively, to attenuate explosive episodic jumping behavior(s) ("popping") elicited by MK-801 in mice. MK-801, like phencyclidine (PCP), is a high-affinity, noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor. We have postulated that MK-801-elicited popping behavior in mice represents an animal model of schizophrenia, because popping behavior is markedly inhibited/antagonized by both typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs. In the present study, popping behavior induced by MK-801 was measured using an automated detection system that quantifies vertical displacements on the testing platform. 7-Nitroindazole (100 mg/kg) and methylene blue (32 and 100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the number and force of MK-801-elicited popping behavior. Mouse rotorod performance did not differ between animals receiving 7-nitroindazole, methylene blue, or their respective vehicles, suggesting that attenuation of MK-801-elicited popping behavior was not due to either sedation or ataxia caused by 7-nitroindazole or methylene blue. Our findings suggest that nitric oxide may, in part, mediate behaviors induced by NMDA receptor antagonists, like MK-801, and that inhibitors of NOS may have antipsychotic actions.

  17. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Choi, David; Allison, Michael; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed study of the cloud features in the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 S planetographic latitude. To understand the apparent variations in average zonal wind jet velocity at this latitude [e.g.. 1,2,3], we have searched for variations iIi both feature latitude and velocity with longitude and time. In particular, we focused on the repetitive chevron-shaped dark spots visible on most dates and the more transient large anticyclonic system known as the South Equatorial Disturbance (SED). These small dark spots are interpreted as cloud holes, and are often used as material tracers of the wind field.

  18. Possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801(dizocilpine), a NMDA receptor antagonist in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-03-01

    L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling pathway involved in depression. With this information, the present study aimed to study the involvement of this signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of MK-801 (dizocilpine; N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) in the mouse forced-swim test. Total immobility period was recorded in mouse forced swim test for 6 min. MK-801 (5-25 microg/kg., ip) produced a U-shaped curve in reducing the immobility period. The antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was prevented by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, ip) [substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS)]. Pretreatment of mice with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg, ip) [a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor] produced potentiation of the action of subeffective dose of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip). In addition, treatment of mice with methylene blue (10 mg/kg, ip) [direct inhibitor of both nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase] potentiated the effect of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip) in the forced-swim test. Further, the reduction in the immobility period elicited by MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was also inhibited by pretreatment with sildenafil (5 mg/kg, ip) [phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor]. The various modulators used in the study and their combination did not produce any changes in locomotor activity per se and in combination with MK-801. MK-801 however, at higher doses (25 microg/kg, ip) produced hyperlocomotion. The results demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 in mouse forced-swim test.

  19. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  20. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines. II - Analysis of Turbine Performance of the 19B-8 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Richard P.; Suozzi, Frank L.

    1947-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the turbine in the 19B-8 jet propulsion engine were determined from an investigation of the complete engine in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The investigation covered a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet and flight Mach numbers from 0.05 to 0.46 for various tail-cone positions over the entire operable range of engine speeds. The characteristics of the turbine are presented as functions of the total-pressure ratio across the turbine and the turbine speed and the gas flow corrected to NACA standard atmospheric conditions at sea level. The effect of changes in altitude, flight Mach number, and tail-cone position on turbine performance is discussed. The turbine efficiency with the tail cone in varied from a maximum of 80.5 percent to minimum of 75 percent over a range of engine speeds from 7500 to 17,500 rpm at a flight Mach number of 0.055. Turbine efficiency was unaffected by changes in altitude up to 15,000 feet but was a function of tail-cone position and flight Mach number. Decreasing the tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area 21 percent reduced the turbine efficiency between 2 and 4.5 percent. The turbine efficiency increased between 1.5 and 3 percent as the flight Mach number changed from 0.055 to 0.297.

  1. An innovative blazar classification based on radio jet kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervet, O.; Boisson, C.; Sol, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Blazars are usually classified following their synchrotron peak frequency (νF(ν) scale) as high, intermediate, low frequency peaked BL Lacs (HBLs, IBLs, LBLs), and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), or, according to their radio morphology at large scale, FR I or FR II. However, the diversity of blazars is such that these classes seem insufficient to chart the specific properties of each source. Aims: We propose to classify a wide sample of blazars following the kinematic features of their radio jets seen in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Methods: For this purpose we use public data from the MOJAVE collaboration in which we select a sample of blazars with known redshift and sufficient monitoring to constrain apparent velocities. We selected 161 blazars from a sample of 200 sources. We identify three distinct classes of VLBI jets depending on radio knot kinematics: class I with quasi-stationary knots, class II with knots in relativistic motion from the radio core, and class I/II, intermediate, showing quasi-stationary knots at the jet base and relativistic motions downstream. Results: A notable result is the good overlap of this kinematic classification with the usual spectral classification; class I corresponds to HBLs, class II to FSRQs, and class I/II to IBLs/LBLs. We deepen this study by characterizing the physical parameters of jets from VLBI radio data. Hence we focus on the singular case of the class I/II by the study of the blazar BL Lac itself. Finally we show how the interpretation that radio knots are recollimation shocks is fully appropriate to describe the characteristics of these three classes.

  2. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  3. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  4. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  5. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  6. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  7. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  8. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  9. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  10. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  11. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  12. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of a MK2 Inhibitor by Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling for Study in Werner Syndrome Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Mark C.; Baashen, Mohammed; Chuckowree, Irina; Dwyer, Jessica E.; Kipling, David; Davis, Terence

    2015-01-01

    Microwave-assisted Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions have been employed towards the synthesis of three different MAPKAPK2 (MK2) inhibitors to study accelerated aging in Werner syndrome (WS) cells, including the cross-coupling of a 2-chloroquinoline with a 3-pyridinylboronic acid, the coupling of an aryl bromide with an indolylboronic acid and the reaction of a 3-amino-4-bromopyrazole with 4-carbamoylphenylboronic acid. In all of these processes, the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction was fast and relatively efficient using a palladium catalyst under microwave irradiation. The process was incorporated into a rapid 3-step microwave-assisted method for the synthesis of a MK2 inhibitor involving 3-aminopyrazole formation, pyrazole C-4 bromination using N-bromosuccinimide (NBS), and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of the pyrazolyl bromide with 4-carbamoylphenylboronic acid to give the target 4-arylpyrazole in 35% overall yield, suitable for study in WS cells. PMID:26046488

  13. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from blazar jets - III. Compton-dominant blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, William J.; Cotter, Garret

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we develop the extended jet model of Potter & Cotter to model the simultaneous multiwavelength spectra of six Compton-dominant blazars. We include an accelerating parabolic base transitioning to a slowly decelerating conical jet with a geometry set by observations of M87 and consistent with simulations and theory. We investigate several jet models and find that the optically thick to thin synchrotron break in the radio spectrum requires the jet to first come into equipartition at large distances along the jet, consistent with the observed transition from parabolic to conical at 105Rs in the jet of M87. We confirm this result analytically and calculate the expected frequency core-shift relations for the models under consideration. We find that a parabolic jet transitioning to a ballistic conical jet at 105Rs, which starts in equipartition and becomes more particle dominated at larger distances, fits the multiwavelength data of the six blazars well, whilst an adiabatic equipartition conical section requires very large bulk Lorentz factors to reproduce the Compton dominance of the blazars. We find that all these blazars require high power (>1039 W), high bulk Lorentz factor (>20) jets observed close to the line of sight (<2°) as we expect from the blazar sequence and consistent with the results from Paper II. The inverse-Compton emission in our fits is due to inverse-Compton scattering of high-redshift cosmic microwave background photons at large distances along the jet due to the high bulk Lorentz factors of the jets. We postulate a new interpretation of the blazar sequence based on the radius of the transition region of the jet (where the jet is brightest in synchrotron emission) scaling linearly with black hole mass.

  14. The effects of the stellar wind and orbital motion on the jets of high-mass microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass microquasar jets propagate under the effect of the wind from the companion star, and the orbital motion of the binary system. The stellar wind and the orbit may be dominant factors determining the jet properties beyond the binary scales. Aims: This is an analytical study, performed to characterise the effects of the stellar wind and the orbital motion on the jet properties. Methods: Accounting for the wind thrust transferred to the jet, we derive analytical estimates to characterise the jet evolution under the impact of the stellar wind. We include the Coriolis force effect, induced by orbital motion and enhanced by the wind's presence. Large-scale evolution of the jet is sketched, accounting for wind-to-jet thrust transfer, total energy conservation, and wind-jet flow mixing. Results: If the angle of the wind-induced jet bending is larger than its half-opening angle, the following is expected: (i) a strong recollimation shock; (ii) bending against orbital motion, caused by Coriolis forces and enhanced by the wind presence; and (iii) non-ballistic helical propagation further away. Even if disrupted, the jet can re-accelerate due to ambient pressure gradients, but wind entrainment can weaken this acceleration. On large scales, the opening angle of the helical structure is determined by the wind-jet thrust relation, and the wind-loaded jet flow can be rather slow. Conclusions: The impact of stellar winds on high-mass microquasar jets can yield non-ballistic helical jet trajectories, jet partial disruption and wind mixing, shocks, and possibly non-thermal emission. Among other observational diagnostics, such as radiation variability at any band, the radio morphology on milliarcsecond scales can be informative on the wind-jet interaction.

  15. Radiation-Driven Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-10-01

    Radiative winds and jets from luminous accretion disks/tori are reviewed. Among various models of astrophysical jets, plasma outflows emanating from accretion disks/tori and accelerated by the radiation pressure is the most promising one. Here explained are the roles of radiation pressure force and radiation drag force. Rise and fall of a torus model are also discussed, following its revenge. Finally, the millennium jet model, where the multistage acceleration takes place, is proposed.

  16. Novel ATP competitive MK2 inhibitors with potent biochemical and cell-based activity throughout the series.

    PubMed

    Oubrie, Arthur; Kaptein, Allard; de Zwart, Edwin; Hoogenboom, Niels; Goorden, Rianne; van de Kar, Bas; van Hoek, Maaike; de Kimpe, Vera; van der Heijden, Ruud; Borsboom, Judith; Kazemier, Bert; de Roos, Jeroen; Scheffers, Michiel; Lommerse, Jos; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Barf, Tjeerd

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of our previously described pyrrolopiperidone series led to the identification of a new benzamide sub-series, which exhibits consistently high potency in biochemical and cell-based assays throughout the series. Strong inhibition of LPS-induced production of the cytokine TNFα is coupled to the regulation of HSP27 phosphorylation, indicating that the observed cellular effects result from the inhibition of MK2. X-ray crystallographic and computational analyses provide a rationale for the high potency of the series.

  17. MK-801-induced deficits in social recognition in rats: reversal by aripiprazole, but not olanzapine, risperidone, or cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Serena; Watanabe, Akihito; Yamasaki, Yuki; Amada, Naoki; Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Stott, Colin; Riedel, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    Deficiencies in social activities are hallmarks of numerous brain disorders. With respect to schizophrenia, social withdrawal belongs to the category of negative symptoms and is associated with deficits in the cognitive domain. Here, we used the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) for induction of social withdrawal in rats and assessed the efficacy of several atypical antipsychotics with different pharmacological profiles as putative treatment. In addition, we reasoned that the marijuana constituent cannabidiol (CBD) may provide benefit or could be proposed as an adjunct treatment in combination with antipsychotics. Hooded Lister rats were tested in the three-chamber version for social interaction, with an initial novelty phase, followed after 3 min by a short-term recognition memory phase. No drug treatment affected sociability. However, distinct effects on social recognition were revealed. MK-801 reduced social recognition memory at all doses (>0.03 mg/kg). Predosing with aripiprazole dose-dependently (2 or 10 mg/kg) prevented the memory decline, but doses of 0.1 mg/kg risperidone or 1 mg/kg olanzapine did not. Intriguingly, CBD impaired social recognition memory (12 and 30 mg/kg) but did not rescue the MK-801-induced deficits. When CBD was combined with protective doses of aripiprazole (CBD-aripiprazole at 12 :  or 5 : 2 mg/kg) the benefit of the antipsychotic was lost. At the same time, activity-related changes in behaviour were excluded as underlying reasons for these pharmacological effects. Collectively, the combined activity of aripiprazole on dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT1A receptors appears to provide a significant advantage over risperidone and olanzapine with respect to the rescue of cognitive deficits reminiscent of schizophrenia. The differential pharmacological properties of CBD, which are seemingly beneficial in human patients, did not back-translate and rescue the MK-801-induced social memory deficit.

  18. Production of L-arabinose from corn hull arabinoxylan by Arthrobacter aurescens MK5 α-L-arabinofuranosidase.

    PubMed

    Kurakake, Masahiro; Takao, Jyunpei; Asano, Osamu; Tanimoto, Hiroko; Komaki, Toshiaki

    2011-03-01

    Arabinoxylans, which are comprised of a xylan backbone to which are attached glycosyl units that are primarily L-arabinofuranosyl units, are ubiquitous among plant species where it is a constituent of the cell wall. Arabinoxylan has attracted much attention as a potential biomass resource and L-arabinose has recently been reported to possess functional properties that are effective in the treatment of diabetes. Here, we report an α-L-arabinofuranohydrolase, isolated from the soil microbe Arthrobacter aurescens strain MK5, effective in releasing L-arabinose from corn hull arabinoxylan. When A. aurescens strain MK5 was grown in a liquid medium, corn hull arabinoxylan, which has a higher arabinose content (Ara/Xyl = 0.6) than oat spelts xylan (Ara/Xyl = 0.12), induced more efficient arabinoxylan hydrolase production. Analysis of enzyme activity in the culture broth revealed that arabinoxylan hydrolase activity was high, and α-L-arabinofuranosidase and β-xylosidase activities were low. The optimum pH of the MK5 arabinoxylan hydrolase at 40 °C was around 7 and enzyme activity was relatively stable at an alkaline pH up to 9.5. The optimum temperature at pH 7 was around 50 °C and enzyme activity was stable under 50 °C. During the hydrolysis of corn hull arabinoxylan, only L-arabinose was released and 45.1% maximum sugar recovery was achieved. The A. aurescens MK5 enzyme was a typical arabinoxylan α-L-arabinofuranohydrolase and was most effective at releasing L-arabinose from corn hull arabinoxylan, which has a high arabinose content. This enzyme may have important industrial applications.

  19. Oscillations in solar jets observed with the SOT of Hinode: viscous effects during reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Transverse oscillatory motions and recurrence behavior in the chromospheric jets observed by Hinode/SOT are studied. A comparison is considered with the behavior that was noticed in coronal X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. A jet like bundle observed at the limb in Ca II H line appears to show a magnetic topology that is similar to X-ray jets (i.e., the Eiffel tower shape). The appearance of such magnetic topology is usually assumed to be caused by magnetic reconnection near a null point. Transverse motions of the jet axis are recorded but no clear evidence of twist is appearing from the highly processed movie. The aim is to investigate the dynamical behavior of an incompressible magnetic X-point occurring during the magnetic reconnection in the jet formation region. The viscous effect is specially considered in the closed line-tied magnetic X-shape nulls. We perform the MHD numerical simulation in 2-D by solving the visco-resistive MHD equations with the tracing of velocity and magnetic field. A qualitative agreement with Hinode observations is found for the oscillatory and non-oscillatory behaviors of the observed solar jets in both the chromosphere and the corona. Our results suggest that the viscous effect contributes to the excitation of the magnetic reconnection by generating oscillations that we observed at least inside this Ca II H line cool solar jet bundle.

  20. Proper Motion of the Irradiated Jet HH 399 in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Biretta, J.; Wardle, M.

    2005-05-01

    HH 399 is one of the first Herbig-Haro flows recognized to be irradiated by the UV radiation of the massive O7.5 star in the Trifid Nebula. We present the proper motion of the first irradiated jet, based on two epochs of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of HH 399 separated by nearly 5 yr, using Hα and [S II] line filters. High proper motion with continuous velocities between 200+/-55 and 528+/-24 km s-1 is detected in both lines along the 18" extent of the jet axis. The irradiated fully ionized jet consists of numerous knots along the jet but also shows evidence for a number of isolated blob like structures running immediately outside the jet with lower transverse velocities. The transverse velocities combined with radial velocity measurements indicate that the jet axis lies away from the plane of the sky by only a few degrees. We argue that the jet is fully ionized, based on a [S II]/Hα line ratio, as well as radio continuum emission detected from the full extent of the jet at a 3.6 cm wavelength. The stellar mass-loss rate producing HH 399 is estimated to be ~2×10-6 Msolar yr-1.

  1. Electromagnetic Models of Extragalactic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, M.; Blandford, R.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-22

    Relativistic jets may be confined by large-scale, anisotropic electromagnetic stresses that balance isotropic particle pressure and disordered magnetic field. A class of axisymmetric equilibrium jet models will be described and their radiative properties outlined under simple assumptions. The partition of the jet power between electromagnetic and mechanical forms and the comoving energy density between particles and magnetic field will be discussed. Current carrying jets may be recognized by their polarization patterns. Progress and prospects for measuring this using VLBI and GLAST observations will be summarized.

  2. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  3. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  4. Phosphorylation of Tristetraprolin by MK2 Impairs AU-Rich Element mRNA Decay by Preventing Deadenylase Recruitment▿

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Sandra L.; Scheckel, Claudia; Stoecklin, Georg; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    mRNA turnover is a critical step in the control of gene expression. In mammalian cells, a subset of mRNAs regulated at the level of mRNA turnover contain destabilizing AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3′ untranslated regions. These transcripts are bound by a suite of ARE-binding proteins (AUBPs) that receive information from cell signaling events to modulate rates of ARE mRNA decay. Here we show that a key destabilizing AUBP, tristetraprolin (TTP), is repressed by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated kinase MK2 due to the inability of phospho-TTP to recruit deadenylases to target mRNAs. TTP is tightly associated with cytoplasmic deadenylases and promotes rapid deadenylation of target mRNAs both in vitro and in cells. TTP can direct the deadenylation of substrate mRNAs when tethered to a heterologous mRNA, yet its ability to do so is inhibited upon phosphorylation by MK2. Phospho-TTP is not impaired in mRNA binding but does fail to recruit the major cytoplasmic deadenylases. These observations suggest that phosphorylation of TTP by MK2 primarily affects mRNA decay downstream of RNA binding by preventing recruitment of the deadenylation machinery. Thus, TTP may remain poised to rapidly reactivate deadenylation of bound transcripts to downregulate gene expression once the p38 MAPK pathway is deactivated. PMID:21078877

  5. Latent inhibition in rats neonatally treated chronically with MK-801: differential effects on conditioned taste aversion and conditioned emotional response.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Ryo; Nozawa, Takashi; Yamada, Kazuo; Kato, Katsunori; Ichitani, Yukio

    2015-04-15

    Chronic neonatal blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors produces various abnormal behaviors in adulthood animals. This study investigated the effects of neonatal treatment chronically with MK-801 in rats on the preexposure-induced retardation of CS-US association, i.e. latent inhibition (LI), of two aversive classical conditioning tasks in adulthood. In conditioned taste aversion (CTA) using sucrose taste and LiCl, neonatal chronic MK-801 (0.4 mg/kg twice/day) treatment attenuated the inhibitory effect of sucrose preexposure on the aversive conditioning, although the treatment did not affect CTA conditioning itself. On the other hand, in conditioned emotional response (CER) using tone and electrical foot shock, rats neonatally treated with MK-801 showed the same degree of inhibitory effect of tone preexposure on the aversive conditioning compared with neonatally vehicle-treated rats, and also showed the same level of CER conditioning itself. Thus, the effect of chronic neonatal blockade of NMDA receptors on the LI of classical conditioning in adulthood was differentiated by the task employed. Results suggest that LI of CTA paradigm compared with that of CER is more sensitive to abnormal development after chronic neonatal blockade of NMDA receptors as an index of cognitive/attentional deficits caused by the treatment.

  6. Effect of clozapine on locomotor activity and anxiety-related behavior in the neonatal mice administered MK-801.

    PubMed

    Pınar, Neslihan; Akillioglu, Kubra; Sefil, Fatih; Alp, Harun; Sagir, Mustafa; Acet, Ahmet

    2015-08-11

    Atypical antipsychotics have been used to treat fear and anxiety disturbance that are highly common in schizophrenic patients. It is suggested that disruptions of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated transmission of glutamate may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The present study was conducted to analyze the effectiveness of clozapine on the anxiety-related behavior and locomotor function of the adult brain, which had previously undergone NMDA receptor blockade during a developmental period. In order to block the NMDA receptor, male mice were administered 0.25 mg/kg of MK-801 on days 7 to 10 postnatal. In adulthood, they were administered intraperitoneally 0.5 mg/kg of clozapine and tested with open-field and elevated plus maze test, to assess their emotional behavior and locomotor activity. In the group receiving MK-801 in the early developmental period the elevated plus maze test revealed a reduction in the anxiety-related behavior (p<0.05), while the open-field test indicated a decrease in locomotor activity (p<0.01). Despite these reductions, clozapine could not reverse the NMDA receptor blockade. Also, as an atypical antipsychotic agent, clozapine could not reverse impairment in the locomotor activity and anxiety-related behavior, induced by administration of the MK-801 in neonatal period.

  7. Galanthamine, an acetylcholine inhibitor, prevents prepulse inhibition deficits induced by adolescent social isolation or MK-801 treatment.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shuang; Li, Man; Du, Wei; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2014-11-17

    Adolescence is a critical period for neurodevelopment. MK-801 treatment and social isolation are important animal models for various neurodevelopmental disorders. Dysfunctions in the central cholinergic system are involved in creating the cognitive deficits observed in neurological diseases. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galanthamine could reverse pre-cognitive prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficits and spatial learning deficits of adult rats in the Morris water maze. We induced these effects using either adolescent MK-801 treatment or social isolation from postnatal day (PND) 38-51. Our results showed that both adolescent social isolation and MK-801 treatment impaired PPI in adult rats, but neither had an effect on spatial learning. Furthermore, galanthamine injections over 7 days significantly enhanced PPI of normal rats and improved PPI disruption induced by adolescent pharmacological and rearing interventions. The results suggest that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as galanthamine, might have the potential to improve pre-cognition in neurodevelopmental diseases by improving auditory sensory gating. PMID:25281804

  8. Isolation, characterization and biological evaluation of bioactive metabolites from Nocardia levis MK-VL_113.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Narasimhulu, Manchala; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Rao, Karanam Venkateswara; Raju, Venkata Balaraju Subba

    2010-03-31

    An Actinomycete isolate found to be prominent in the laterite soils of Acharya Nagarjuna University (ANU) Campus, Guntur was identified as Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 by 16S rRNA analysis. Cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics of the strain were recorded. Screening of secondary metabolites obtained from 4-day old culture broth of the strain led to the isolation of two fractions active against a wide variety of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The structure of the first active fraction was elucidated using FT-IR, EI-MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra and identified as 1-phenylbut-3-ene-2-ol which is first time reported as a natural product. The compound exhibited good antimicrobial potential against the opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The antifungal activity of the strain and its metabolite were further confirmed with in vitro and in vivo studies. Evidence for the antagonism of the strain against Fusarium oxysporum, causing wilt disease in sorghum was demonstrated by the formation of inhibition zone in in vitro plate assay and reduction in the incidence of wilt of sorghum plants by using a green house trial. Analysis of the rhizosphere soil extracts by high performance liquid chromatography also demonstrated the production of the compound by the strain under in vivo conditions. As compared to the commercial fungicide mancozeb, the bioactive compound, 1-phenylbut-3-ene-2-ol was highly effective in controlling wilt of sorghum. Besides, the partially purified second fraction (PPF) subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of phenylethyl alcohol, dibutyl phthalate and 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 3-nitro. PMID:19577444

  9. Isolation, characterization and biological evaluation of bioactive metabolites from Nocardia levis MK-VL_113.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Narasimhulu, Manchala; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Rao, Karanam Venkateswara; Raju, Venkata Balaraju Subba

    2010-03-31

    An Actinomycete isolate found to be prominent in the laterite soils of Acharya Nagarjuna University (ANU) Campus, Guntur was identified as Nocardia levis MK-VL_113 by 16S rRNA analysis. Cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics of the strain were recorded. Screening of secondary metabolites obtained from 4-day old culture broth of the strain led to the isolation of two fractions active against a wide variety of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The structure of the first active fraction was elucidated using FT-IR, EI-MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra and identified as 1-phenylbut-3-ene-2-ol which is first time reported as a natural product. The compound exhibited good antimicrobial potential against the opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The antifungal activity of the strain and its metabolite were further confirmed with in vitro and in vivo studies. Evidence for the antagonism of the strain against Fusarium oxysporum, causing wilt disease in sorghum was demonstrated by the formation of inhibition zone in in vitro plate assay and reduction in the incidence of wilt of sorghum plants by using a green house trial. Analysis of the rhizosphere soil extracts by high performance liquid chromatography also demonstrated the production of the compound by the strain under in vivo conditions. As compared to the commercial fungicide mancozeb, the bioactive compound, 1-phenylbut-3-ene-2-ol was highly effective in controlling wilt of sorghum. Besides, the partially purified second fraction (PPF) subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of phenylethyl alcohol, dibutyl phthalate and 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 3-nitro.

  10. Field of Flow About a Jet and Effect of Jets on Stability of Jet-Propelled Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1946-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on jet-induced flow deviation. Analysis is given of flow inclination induced outside cold and hot jets and jet deflection caused by angle of attack. Applications to computation of effects of jet on longitudinal stability and trim are explained. Effect of jet temperature on flow inclination was found small when thrust coefficient is used as criterion for similitude. The average jet-induced downwash over tail plane was obtained geometrically.

  11. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  12. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  13. Lifted turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jay A.

    Experiments were conducted on lifted, turbulent jet diffusion flames. An automated technique using a linear photodiode array was implemented to measure the temporal history of the liftoff height h. The measurements enabled accurate determination of the mean liftoff height [...] under a wide range of flow conditions, including several fuels, nozzle diameters, and exit velocities [...]. The results showed an approximately linear relationship between [...] and [...], with a slight dependence on Reynolds number. A strain-rate model for liftoff, based on far-field scaling of turbulent jets, provides an explanation for the linear dependence of [...] on [...]. Measurements were also made in which the nozzle fluid contained varying amounts of air, where it was found that the slope of the [...] vs. [...] line increases faster than predicted by far-field scaling of turbulent jets. The discrepancy is attributed to near-field effects.The amplitudes of the fluctuations in h were found to be of the order of the local large scale of the jet. There is a slight increase in normalized fluctuation level [...] with [...], and there is some variation of [...] with fuel type. The time scales of the fluctuations of h were found to be considerably longer than the local large-scale time of the turbulence [...]. By using fuels of different chemical times to vary [...], the measured correlation time [...] normalized by [...] was found to collapse with Richardson number [...]. Experiments in which the nozzles were oriented horizontally showed no change in [...], however. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate alternative explanations for the variation of [...] with [...]. These experiments included measuring the flame length L simultaneously with h, and measuring the visible radiation I simultaneously with h. L(t) was found to be nearly uncorrelated with h(t), dismissing the possibility that a feedback mechanism from L to h controls the fluctuations of h. Although I(t) is highly

  14. Ooishi's Observation: Viewed in the Context of Jet Stream Discovery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John M.

    2003-03-01

    Although aircraft encounters with strong westerly winds during World War II provided the stimulus for postwar research on the jet stream, Wasaburo Ooishi observed these winds in the 1920s. Ooishi's work is reviewed in the context of earlier work in upperair observation and postwar work on the jet stream. An effort is made to reconstruct Ooishi's path to the directorship of Japan's first upper-air observatory by reliance on historical studies and memoirs from the Central Meteorological Observatory.Archival records from Japan's Aerological Observatory have been used to document Ooishi's upperair observations. The first official report from the observatory (written in 1926 and in the auxiliary language of Esperanto) assumes a central role in the study. In this report, data are stratified by season and used to produce the mean seasonal wind profiles. The profile for winter gives the first known evidence of the persistent strong westerlies over Japan that would later become known as the jet stream.

  15. SYSTEMATIC MOTION OF FINE-SCALE JETS AND SUCCESSIVE RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JET OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE/HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.; Isobe, H.

    2012-11-20

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A {lambda}-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets ({approx}1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  16. Systematic Motion of Fine-scale Jets and Successive Reconnection in Solar Chromospheric Anemone Jet Observed with the Solar Optical Telescope/Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Isobe, H.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A λ-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets (~1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  17. Comparison of the amnestic effects of NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors: L-NAME and L-NOARG in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Boshoven, W; Lombardo, B; Spranger, J

    1998-08-01

    Investigations indicate that the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) may be mediated by postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and that the maintenance of LTP may be initiated by nitric oxide (NO), a retrograde messenger carrying signals backward from the postsynaptic to the presynaptic neuron. The present study compared amnestic effects of dizocilpine maleate (MK-801), an NMDA receptor antagonist, and nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) and N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), nitric oxide (NO) inhibitors, in goldfish, using active-avoidance conditioning as the learning paradigm. The results showed that MK-801 and NO inhibitors produced anterograde amnesia at doses that did not impair performance processes necessary for learning to occur. Furthermore, MK-801 did not produce retrograde amnesia, whereas L-NAME did, suggesting that MK-801 impaired learning whereas NO inhibitors impaired memory consolidation and possibly also learning.

  18. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from pp¯ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.

  19. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from pp¯ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale withmore » integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.« less

  20. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  1. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  4. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  5. Gluon jets from heavy paraquarkonium

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, A.N.; Kodaira, J.; Muta, T.

    1982-02-01

    The GGG and qq-barG jets in the decay of very heavy paraquarkonia are analyzed in perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The thrust distributions are calculated and the result is compared with the thrust distributions in the orthoquarkonium decay and in e/sup +/e/sup -/..-->..qq-barG jets.

  6. Different MK-801 administration schedules induce mild to severe learning impairments in an operant conditioning task: role of buspirone and risperidone in ameliorating these cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano

    2013-11-15

    Blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) by the noncompetitive NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801 produces behavioral abnormalities and alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning. Due to the critical role of the PFC in operant conditioning task learning, we evaluated the effects of acute, repeated postnatal injections of MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) on learning performance. We injected Long-Evans rats i.p. with MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) using three different administration schedules: injection 40 min before beginning the task (during) (n=12); injection twice daily for six consecutive days prior to beginning the experimental procedures (prior) (n=12); or twice daily subcutaneous injections from postnatal day 7 to 11 (postnatal) (n=12). Next, we orally administered risperidone (serotonin receptor 2A and dopamine receptor 2 antagonist, 1mg/kg) or buspirone (serotonin receptor 1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg) to animals treated with the MK-801 schedule described above. The postnatal and prior administration schedules produced severe learning deficits, whereas injection of MK-801 just before training sessions had only mild effects on acquisition of an operant conditioning. Risperidone was able to reverse the detrimental effect of MK-801 in the animals that were treated with MK-801 during and prior training sessions. In contrast, buspirone was only effective at mitigating the cognitive deficits induced by MK-801 when administered during the training procedures. The data demonstrates that NMDA antagonism disrupts basic mechanisms of learning in a simple PFC-mediated operant conditioning task, and that buspirone and risperidone failed to attenuate the learning deficits when NMDA neurotransmission was blocked in the early stages of the postnatal period.

  7. Pharmacodynamic responses to combined treatment regimens with the calcium sensing receptor antagonist JTT-305/MK-5442 and alendronate in osteopenic ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John E; Scott, Kevin; Wei, Nan; Zhao, Jing Z; Cusick, Tara; Tijerina, Monica; Karanam, Bindhu; Duong, Le; Glantschnig, Helmut

    2012-06-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the anabolic standard of care for patients with severe osteoporosis. The CaSR allosteric antagonist JTT-305/MK-5442, a PTH secretagogue, could offer an oral osteoanabolic treatment alternative for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Here we disclose the pharmacokinetic profile of JTT-305/MK-5442 and its activity on bone remodeling in ovariectomized (OVX) osteopenic rats. Daily treatments (0.3 to 2.4 mg/kg/d) for 12 weeks resulted in plateaued BMD increases (3.8 to 5.3%) at axial and appendicular skeletal sites. However, treatment effects were not statistically significant, in agreement with effects seen in animals treated with low dose PTH (1-84) (5 μg/kg/d). In a consecutive study we tested JTT-305/MK-5442 effects on bone formation in OVX-rats challenged with combined alendronate (ALN) treatment paradigms. At 7 month, JTT-305/MK-5442 treatment significantly increased BMD in lumbar vertebrae (LV), while no change in BMD was observed in femora or tibiae. ALN add-on co-treatment produced incremental increases in LV, distal femur (DF) and proximal tibia (PT) BMD over the respective ALN control. Histological analyses confirmed modest increases in mineralized surface (MS/BS) and bone formation rate (30.5±1.9%) on trabecular surfaces by JTT-305/MK-5442. As expected, ALN administration profoundly reduced bone formation, however, JTT-305/MK-5442 significantly stimulated MS/BS and BFR in ALN treated groups. In summary, JTT-305/MK-5442 acts as a PTH secretagogue in the osteopenic OVX-rat, eliciting consistent, though modest effects on remediation of BMD due to estrogen depletion. Induction of bone formation by JTT-305/MK-5442 at trabecular bone surfaces appears to be resilient to ALN-mediated suppression of bone formation. This study provides for the first time, a mechanistic evaluation of combination treatment of a PTH secretagogue with ALN.

  8. In vivo analysis of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor humanized monoclonal antibody MK-0646 and small molecule kinase inhibitor OSI-906 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leiphrakpam, Premila D; Agarwal, Ekta; Mathiesen, Michelle; Haferbier, Katie L; Brattain, Michael G; Chowdhury, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    The development and characterization of effective anticancer drugs against colorectal cancer (CRC) is of urgent need since it is the second most common cause of cancer death. The study was designed to evaluate the effects of two IGF-1R antagonists, MK-0646, a recombinant fully humanized monoclonal antibody and OSI-906, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor on CRC cells. Xenograft study was performed on IGF-1R-dependent CRC cell lines for analyzing the antitumor activity of MK-0646 and OSI-906. Tumor proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using Ki67 and TUNEL assays, respectively. We also performed in vitro characterization of MK-0646 and OSI-906 treatment on CRC cells to identify mechanisms associated with drug-induced cell death. Exposure of the GEO and CBS tumor xenografts to MK-0646 or OSI-906 led to a decrease in tumor growth. TUNEL analysis showed an increase of approximately 45-55% in apoptotic cells in both MK-0646 and OSI-906 treated tumor samples. We report the novel finding that treatment with IGF-1R antagonists led to downregulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) protein involved in cell survival and inhibition of cell death. In conclusion, IGF-1R antagonists (MK-0646 and OSI-906) demonstrated single agent inhibition of subcutaneous CRC xenograft growth. This was coupled to pro-apoptotic effects resulting in downregulation of XIAP and inhibition of cell survival. We report a novel mechanism by which MK-0646 and OSI-906 elicits cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, these results indicate that MK-0646 and OSI-906 may be potential anticancer candidates for the treatment of patients with IGF-1R-dependent CRC. PMID:24173770

  9. Stress-dependent phosphorylation of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A) by the p38MAPK/MK2 axis

    PubMed Central

    Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Kotlyarov, Alexey; Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A) is a known actin-regulated transcriptional coactivator of serum response factor (SRF). Stimulation of actin polymerization activates MRTF-A by releasing it from G-actin and thus allowing it to bind to and activate SRF. Here, we compared protein phosphorylation in MK2/3-deficient cells rescued or not by ectopic expression of MK2 in two independent phosphoproteomic approaches using anisomycin-treated MEF cells and LPS-stimulated mouse macrophages, respectively. Two MRTF-A sites, Ser351 (corresponding to Ser312 in human) and Ser371 (Ser333 in human), showed significantly stronger phosphorylation (12-fold and 6-fold increase) in the cells expressing MK2. MRTF-A is phosphorylated at these sites in a stress-, but not in a mitogen-induced manner, and p38MAPK/MK2 catalytic activities are indispensable for this phosphorylation. MK2-mediated phosphorylation of MRTF-A at Ser312 and Ser333 was further confirmed in an in vitro kinase assay and using the phospho-protein kinase-D (PKD)-consensus motif antibody (anti-LXRXXpS/pT), the p38MAPK inhibitor BIRB-796, MK2/3-deficient cells and MRTF-A phospho-site mutants. Unexpectedly, dimerization, subcellular localization and translocation, interaction with actin, SRF or SMAD3 and transactivating potential of MRTF-A seem to be unaffected by manipulating the p38MAPK/MK2-dependent phosphorylations. Hence, MRTF-A is stress-dependently phosphorylated by MK2 at Ser312 and Ser333 with so far undetected functional and physiological consequences. PMID:27492266

  10. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  11. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from 14 exceptionally high-reaching large solar jets observed in the polar coronal holes. EUV movies from SDO/AIA show that each jet is similar to many other similar-size and smaller jets that erupt in coronal holes, but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most other jets, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R(sub Sun) in images from the SOHO/LASCO/C2 coronagraph. For these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun) at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most jets display oscillatory swaying having an amplitude of a few degrees and a period of order 1 hour. We conclude that these jets are magnetically driven, propose that the driver is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is grossly a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfven wave that is put into the reconnected open magnetic field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts, and estimate from the measured spinning and swaying that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun). From these results for these big jets, we reason that the torsional magnetic waves observed in Type-II spicules should dissipate in the corona in the same way and could thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  12. Observations of Multiple Blobs in Homologous Solar Coronal Jets in Closed Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Ji, H. S.; Su, Y. N.

    2016-03-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) and jets are ubiquitous small-scale brightenings that are often associated with each other. We here report our multiwavelength observations of two groups of homologous jets. The first group was observed by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) onboard the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) Behind spacecraft in 171 Å and 304 Å on 2014 September 10, from a location where no data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) could be obtained. The jets (J1 - J6) recurred for six times with intervals of 5 - 15 minutes. They originated from the same primary CBP (BP1) and propagated in the northeast direction along large-scale, closed coronal loops. Two of the jets (J3 and J6) produced sympathetic CBPs (BP2 and BP3) after reaching the remote footpoints of the loops. The time delays between the peak times of BP1 and BP2 (BP3) are 240±75 s (300±75 s). The jets were not coherent. Instead, they were composed of bright and compact blobs. The sizes and apparent velocities of the blobs are 4.5 - 9 Mm and 140 - 380 km s-1. The arrival times of the multiple blobs in the jets at the far end of the loops indicate that the sympathetic CBPs are caused by jet flows and not by thermal conduction fronts. The second group was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard SDO in various wavelengths on 2010 August 3. Similar to the first group, the jets originated from a short-lived BP at the boundary of Active Region 11092 and propagated along a small-scale, closed loop before flowing into the active region. Several tiny blobs with sizes of ˜1.7 Mm and an apparent velocity of ˜238 km s^{-1} were identified in the jets. We carried out differential emission measure (DEM) inversions to investigate the temperatures of the blobs, finding that the blobs were multithermal with an average temperature of 1.8 - 3.1 MK. The estimated number densities of the blobs were (1.7 - 2.8)×109 cm^{-3}.

  13. Magnetically driven jets and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Berk, H. L.; Contopoulos, J.

    1991-01-01

    Four equations for the origin and propagation of nonrelativistic jets and winds are derived from the basic conservation laws of ideal MHD. The axial current density is negative in the vicinity of the axis and positive at larger radii; there is no net current because this is energetically favored. The magnetic field is essential for the jet solutions in that the zz-component of the magnetic stress acts, in opposition to gravity, to drive matter through the slow magnetosonic critical point. For a representative self-consistent disk/jet solution relevant to a protostellar system, the reaction of the accreted mass expelled in the jets is 0.1, the ratio of the power carried by the jets to the disk luminosity is 0.66, and the ratio of the boundary layer to disk luminosities is less than about 0.13. The star's rotation rate decreases with time even for rotation rates much less than the breakup rate.

  14. Nucleosynthesis in Jets from Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    2008-05-21

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside magnetically driven jets ejected from collapsars, or rotating magnetized stars collapsing to a black hole, based on two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the collapsars during the core collapse. We follow the evolution of the abundances of about 4000 nuclides from the collapse phase to the ejection phase using a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates only in the energetic jets (>10{sup 51} erg), so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly, even when the collapsars have a relatively small magnetic field (10{sup 10} G) and a moderately rotating core before the collapse. The abundance patterns inside the jets are similar to that of the r-elements in the solar system. The higher energy jets have larger amounts of {sup 56}Ni. Less energetic jets, which have small amounts of {sup 56}Ni, could induce GRB without supernova, such as GRB060505 and GRB060614.

  15. Combined Inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (Dinaciclib) and AKT (MK-2206) Blocks Pancreatic Tumor Growth and Metastases in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaoxin; Dadon, Tikva; Chenna, Venugopal; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Bannerji, Rajat; Booher, Robert; Strack, Peter; Azad, Nilofer; Nelkin, Barry D; Maitra, Anirban

    2015-07-01

    KRAS is activated by mutation in the vast majority of cases of pancreatic cancer; unfortunately, therapeutic attempts to inhibit KRAS directly have been unsuccessful. Our previous studies showed that inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) reduces pancreatic cancer growth and progression, through blockage of the centrally important RAL effector pathway, downstream of KRAS. In the current study, the therapeutic effects of combining the CDK inhibitor dinaciclib (SCH727965; MK-7965) with the pan-AKT inhibitor MK-2206 were evaluated using orthotopic and subcutaneous patient-derived human pancreatic cancer xenograft models. The combination of dinaciclib (20 mg/kg, i.p., three times a week) and MK-2206 (60 mg/kg, orally, three times a week) dramatically blocked tumor growth and metastasis in all eight pancreatic cancer models examined. Remarkably, several complete responses were induced by the combination treatment of dinaciclib and MK-2206. The striking results obtained in these models demonstrate that the combination of dinaciclib with the pan-AKT inhibitor MK-2206 is promising for therapeutic evaluation in pancreatic cancer, and strongly suggest that blocking RAL in combination with other effector pathways downstream from KRAS may provide increased efficacy in pancreatic cancer. Based on these data, an NCI-CTEP-approved multicenter phase I clinical trial for pancreatic cancer of the combination of dinaciclib and MK-2206 (NCT01783171) has now been opened. PMID:25931518

  16. Collimation and Stability of Three Dimensional Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, P. E.; Clarke, D. A.; Howell, D. A.

    1993-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of cylindrical jets established in equilibrium with a surrounding uniform medium have been performed. Large scale structures such as helical twisting of the jet, elliptical distortion and bifurcation of the jet, and triangular distortion and trifurcation of the jet have been seen in the simulations. The grid resolution has been sufficient to allow the development of structures on smaller scales and has revealed higher order distortions of the jet surface and complex structure internal to the jet. However, smaller scale surface distortion and internal jet structure do not significantly modify the large scale dynamics. It is the large scale surface distortions and accompanying filamentation that dominate the jet dynamics. Decollimation occurs as the jet bifurcates or trifurcates. Jets with density less than the immediately surrounding medium rapidly decollimate and expand as the jet filaments into multiple streams leading to shock heating and mass entrainment. The resulting morphology resembles a turbulent plume and might be relevant to some FRI type radio sources. Jet densities higher than the immediately surrounding medium are required to produce FRII type radio source jet morphology and protostellar jet morphology. Thus, while jets may be denser or lighter than the external medium through which they propagate, it is the conditions in the cocoon or lobe around the jet that governs the dynamics far behind the jet front. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-8919180, EPSCoR grant EHR-9108761 and NSF-REU grant AST-9300413.

  17. Inclusive jet cross sections and jet shapes at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Wainer, N.

    1991-09-01

    The inclusive jet cross section and jet shapes at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV have been measured by CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. results are compared to recent next-to-leading order QCD calculations, which predict variation of the cross section with cone size, as well as variation of the jet shape with energy. A lower limit on the parameter {Lambda}{sub c}, which characterize a contact interaction associated with quark sub-structure is determined to be 1400 GeV at the 95% confidence level. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Rotary-Jet Thrust Augmentor with Jet-Flapped Blades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Stephane Jean

    The concepts and the mechanisms of thrust augmentation are analyzed. The theoretical performance of different types of thrust augmentors is discussed with an emphasis on the Rotary-Jet ejector. The application of thrust augmentors to STOVL aircrafts and the merits of the ejector in this application are discussed where the theoretical performance of the Rotary-Jet is shown to be particularly attractive. A review of previous steady-flow and Rotary-Jet ejector experimental data shows equivalent performance levels. Recent experimental work on the Rotary-Jet is analyzed and several factors adversely affecting performance are identified and discussed. To address these problems a new configuration is proposed where the rotor is fitted with blades, allowing better control of the primary/secondary interaction. The jet sheet exiting at the trailing edge of the foil forms a jet flap. A two-dimensional analysis of the aerodynamics around a jet-flapped airfoil is performed for the first time using a fluid finite element code. Whereas in previous models the presence of the pressure gradient across the jet sheet is an assumption, its presence is predicted by the present method. Results of a test run show good agreement with experimental results by others. This method is applied to the geometry of blade model #10. An original three-dimensional model of the self -driven, jet-flapped bladed rotor is presented which, given set geometrical parameters and operating conditions, solves at each section for the jet and blade angle and calculates the rotor thrust augmentation. The results of parametric runs identify favorable design trends which are applied to the design of prototype test models. An experimental test program has been performed. Flow visualization and local flow velocity and pressure measurements were used to identify favorable jet sheet characteristics. The presence of losses in the spinning rotor are evidenced. Seven blade models were tested in a parametric study. Rotor

  19. Multiple jet study data correlations. [data correlation for jet mixing flow of air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Eberhardt, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Correlations are presented which allow determination of penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets injected normal to a ducted subsonic heated primary air stream. Correlations were obtained over jet-to-primary stream momentum flux ratios of 6 to 60 for locations from 1 to 30 jet diameters downstream of the injection plane. The range of geometric and operating variables makes the correlations relevant to gas turbine combustors. Correlations were obtained for the mixing efficiency between jets and primary stream using an energy exchange parameter. Also jet centerplane velocity and temperature trajectories were correlated and centerplane dimensionless temperature distributions defined. An assumption of a Gaussian vertical temperature distribution at all stations is shown to result in a reasonable temperature field model. Data are presented which allow comparison of predicted and measured values over the range of conditions specified above.

  20. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  1. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  2. Commercial jet transport crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widmayer, E.; Brende, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a study to identify areas of research and approaches that may result in improved occupant survivability and crashworthiness of transport aircraft are given. The study defines areas of structural crashworthiness for transport aircraft which might form the basis for a research program. A 10-year research and development program to improve the structural impact resistance of general aviation and commercial jet transport aircraft is planned. As part of this program parallel studies were conducted to review the accident experience of commercial transport aircraft, assess the accident performance of structural components and the status of impact resistance technology, and recommend areas of research and development for that 10-year plan. The results of that study are also given.

  3. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  4. Upgrading jet turbine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a joint government/industry program that is developing a new breed of turbine components, including bearings, blades, and seals, to double the propulsion capacity of both military and commercial jet engines. Although the tensions of the Cold War have receded with the demise of the Soviet Union, the US continually seeks to improve the operational readiness of its weapon systems. The challenge facing the Pentagon today is maintaining US technological superiority in the face of post-Cold War budget cuts. A model program for doing so is the joint government/industry Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology program, or IHPTET (pronounced ip-tet). The goal of the IHPTET program is to develop technologies that will double the propulsion capability of military turbine engines by the turn of the century.

  5. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  6. Hemiasterlin derivative (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and Akt inhibitor MK-2206 synergistically inhibit SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Ting; Cheng, Kai-Lin; Baruchello, Riccardo; Rondanin, Riccardo; Marchetti, Paolo; Simoni, Daniele; Lee, Ray M; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2016-08-01

    We reported previously that a hemiasterlin derivative BF65 is a potent anticancer agent that can inhibit microtubule assembly. Here we show that a more potent stereospecific diastereomer (R)(S)(S)-BF65 can synergize with an allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206 to suppress the growth of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells with constitutively active Akt. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 induced mitotic arrest and MK-2206 caused G0/G1 arrest, while the combination of both induced simultaneous G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 induced phosphorylation and inactivation of Bcl-2, and downregulated Mcl-1, consequently may lead to apoptosis. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which may stimulate cell proliferation upon activation. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 also induced DNA damage after long-term treatment. MK-2206 is known to inhibit phosphorylation and activation of Akt and suppress cancer cell growth. The combination of (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and MK-2206 also inhibited the Akt pathway. Interestingly, MK-2206 upregulated Bcl-2 and induced activation of MAPKs in SKOV3 cells; however, when combined with (R)(S)(S)-BF65, these prosurvival effects were reversed. The combination also more significantly decreased Mcl-1 protein, increased PARP cleavage, and induced γ-H2AX, a DNA damage marker. Remarkably, MK-2206 enhanced the microtubule depolymerization effect of (R)(S)(S)-BF65. The combination of (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and MK-2206 also markedly inhibited cell migration. Thus, MK-2206 synergizes with (R)(S)(S)-BF65 to inhibit SKOV3 cell growth via downregulating the Akt signaling pathway, and enhancing the microtubule disruption effect of (R)(S)(S)-BF65. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 in turn suppresses Bcl-2 and MAPKs induced by MK-2206. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and MK-2206 compensate each other leading to increased apoptosis and enhanced cytotoxicity, and may also suppress cancer cell invasion.

  7. Hemiasterlin derivative (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and Akt inhibitor MK-2206 synergistically inhibit SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Ting; Cheng, Kai-Lin; Baruchello, Riccardo; Rondanin, Riccardo; Marchetti, Paolo; Simoni, Daniele; Lee, Ray M; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2016-08-01

    We reported previously that a hemiasterlin derivative BF65 is a potent anticancer agent that can inhibit microtubule assembly. Here we show that a more potent stereospecific diastereomer (R)(S)(S)-BF65 can synergize with an allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206 to suppress the growth of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells with constitutively active Akt. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 induced mitotic arrest and MK-2206 caused G0/G1 arrest, while the combination of both induced simultaneous G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 induced phosphorylation and inactivation of Bcl-2, and downregulated Mcl-1, consequently may lead to apoptosis. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which may stimulate cell proliferation upon activation. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 also induced DNA damage after long-term treatment. MK-2206 is known to inhibit phosphorylation and activation of Akt and suppress cancer cell growth. The combination of (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and MK-2206 also inhibited the Akt pathway. Interestingly, MK-2206 upregulated Bcl-2 and induced activation of MAPKs in SKOV3 cells; however, when combined with (R)(S)(S)-BF65, these prosurvival effects were reversed. The combination also more significantly decreased Mcl-1 protein, increased PARP cleavage, and induced γ-H2AX, a DNA damage marker. Remarkably, MK-2206 enhanced the microtubule depolymerization effect of (R)(S)(S)-BF65. The combination of (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and MK-2206 also markedly inhibited cell migration. Thus, MK-2206 synergizes with (R)(S)(S)-BF65 to inhibit SKOV3 cell growth via downregulating the Akt signaling pathway, and enhancing the microtubule disruption effect of (R)(S)(S)-BF65. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 in turn suppresses Bcl-2 and MAPKs induced by MK-2206. (R)(S)(S)-BF65 and MK-2206 compensate each other leading to increased apoptosis and enhanced cytotoxicity, and may also suppress cancer cell invasion. PMID:27328368

  8. Jet control carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikake, K.; Idota, Y.; Ohsawa, K.; Sugiyama, K.

    1982-06-29

    A jet control type carburetor according to the present invention includes an intake pipe having an intake passage formed in an inner wall thereof, the intake passage allowing an intake air to flow therethrough; a venturi provided in the intake pipe, for controlling flow velocity and pressure of the intake air in the intake passage; a fuel nozzle opened into the intake passage and connected to a fuel supply source through a fuel passage for sucking the fuel within the intake passage from the fuel nozzle in order to introduce the mixture of air and fuel within the intake passage; a throttle valve provided downstream of the venturi, for controlling the flow rate of the mixture of intake air and fuel; a control air nozzle opened into the intake passage and connected to an air supply source through a control air passage for jetting the flow of the control air to the fuel spurted from the fuel nozzle to afford the kinetic energy of the control air to the fuel; and a throttle means provided upstream of the control air nozzle in the control air passage, for controlling the flow rate of the control air. The control air nozzle has a predetermined inner diameter (da) and is provided at a portion apart from the fuel nozzle with a predetermined spacing (w), and a dimensional relationship of the spacing W between the fuel nozzle and the control air nozzle to the inner diameter (da) of the control air nozzle is set as follows: w/da < or = 20.

  9. Performance of jets at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Matthias; CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The calibration and reconstruction of jets critically relies on the performance of the calorimeters. Extending out to large pseudorapidities, the measurements depend on the interplay between forward calorimeters, central calorimeters, and the tracking system. The high number of additional pile-up interactions poses further complications. In CMS, these difficulties are overcome using the 'particle-flow' approach, which aims at reconstructing individually each particle in the event prior to the jet clustering. Measurements of the jet energy scale and the procedure for jet energy calibration in CMS are reviewed, which are performed with dijet, photon + jet, and Z+jet data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1. The effect of pile-up interactions and the state of the art mitigation techniques used in CMS as well as the main sources of uncertainty of the jet energy calibration are also presented.

  10. Measurement of the top quark mass in lepton+jets events with secondary vertex tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Robert Duane

    2007-02-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton + jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events with single isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), exactly four calorimeter jets, and significant missing transverse energy are selected. Probabilities used to discriminate between signal and background are assumed to be proportional to differential cross-sections, calculated using event kinematics and folding in object resolutions and parton distribution functions. The event likelihoods constructed using these probabilities are varied with the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the jet energy scale, JES, to give the smallest possible combined statistical + JES uncertainty.

  11. Experimental 'jet lag' causes sympathoexcitation via oxidative stress through AT1 receptor in the brainstem.

    PubMed

    Kishi, T; Sunagawa, K

    2011-01-01

    Circadian disruptions through frequent transmeridian travel, rotating shift work, and poor sleep hygiene are associated with an array of physical and mental health maladies, including the abnormal autonomic nervous system. We have demonstrated that the oxidative stress through AT(1) receptor in the brain activates sympathetic nervous system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether experimental 'jet lag' causes sympathoexcitation via oxidative stress through AT(1) receptor in the cardiovascular center of the brainstem (rostral ventrolateral medulla; RVLM) or not. Experimental 'jet lag' was made to normotensive (Wister-Kyoto rat; WKY rat) and hypertensive rats (stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats; SHRSP) by the exposure to a 12 hour phase advance for 5 days. In WKY, 'jet lag' increases blood pressure and the activity of sympathetic nervous system via oxidative stress through angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the RVLM for 2 days only, and the changes are improved at 3 day after the initiation of 'jet lag'. In SHRSP, 'jet lag' also increases blood pressure and the activity of sympathetic nervous system via oxidative stress through angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the RVLM, and the changes are greater compared to those in WKY, and are maintained for the period of 'jet lag'. These results suggest that experimental 'jet lag' causes sympathoexcitation via oxidative stress through AT(1) receptor in the brain, especially in hypertension. PMID:22254719

  12. The Kinematics of the HH 399 Jet in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, M.; Esteban, C.; Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; García López, R. J.

    1999-12-01

    We have studied the kinematics of the HH 399 jet, which was recently discovered in the Trifid Nebula. The data were obtained in the [N II] 6583 Å line with a scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer (TAURUS-2) and in the [S II] 6717, 6731 Å lines with an echelle spectrograph. The analysis of the radial velocities measured along the jet indicates that its axis lies almost perpendicular to the line of sight. We resolve two kinematical components along the jet that differ in radial velocity by about 15 km s-1, and we identify the bow shock associated with the jet. We find that the brightest kinematic component has an electron density similar to the surrounding interstellar medium (100-340 cm-3), while the second velocity component has much higher densities (1000-7500 cm-3). We discuss different models that can explain the observational data. The more suitable ones identify the second velocity component with the jet material and imply a jet-to-ambient density ratio η=nj/namb ranging from 8 to up to 70. However, the lack of theoretical work on the kinematics of jets immersed in a fully ionized medium complicates the interpretation of HH 399.

  13. Mammalian cell killing by ultrasoft X rays and high-energy radiation: an extension of the MK model.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Roland B

    2006-08-01

    An alternate formulation of the microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model is presented that applies to irradiation of mammalian cells with ultrasoft X rays as well as high-energy radiations of variable linear energy transfer (LET). Survival and DNA double-strand break measurements for V79 cells from the literature are examined to illustrate application of the model. It is demonstrated that the linear component of the linear-quadratic survival relationship (alpha) is enhanced because repairable potentially lethal lesions formed from a single ultrasoft X-ray energy deposition event, when closer on average than for a single high-energy radiation event, are more likely to combine to form a lethal lesion. The quadratic component (beta) of the linear-quadratic survival relationship is increased because the potentially lethal lesions formed by ultrasoft X rays are created with greater efficiency than those of high-energy radiation. In addition, potentially lethal lesions from very low-energy carbon K-shell X rays may be enriched in structural forms that favor combination to form lethal lesions instead of repair. These features account for the increased effectiveness of killing of V79 cells by ultrasoft X rays compared to cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The importance of pairwise combination of potentially lethal lesions to form exchange chromosome aberrations that become lethal lesions is discussed. The extended MK model explains and reconciles differences between the MK model and the theory of dual radiation action on the one hand, and on the other, the view that variation in the RBE with radiation quality is explained by differences in energy deposition in nanometer- rather than micrometer-size volumes.

  14. The myelinated fiber loss in the corpus callosum of mouse model of schizophrenia induced by MK-801.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Yun; Kong, Xiang-ru; Zhang, Lei; Qiu, Xuan; Gao, Yuan; Huang, Chun-xia; Chao, Feng-lei; Wang, San-rong; Tang, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) investigations have shown that the white matter volume and fractional anisotropy (FA) were decreased in schizophrenia (SZ), which indicated impaired white matter integrity in SZ. However, the mechanism underlying these abnormalities has been less studied. The current study was designed to investigate the possible reasons for white matter abnormalities in the mouse model of SZ induced by NMDA receptor antagonist using the unbiased stereological methods and transmission electron microscope technique. We found that the mice treated with MK-801 demonstrated a series of schizophrenia-like behaviors including hyperlocomotor activity and more anxiety. The myelinated fibers in the corpus callosum (CC) of the mice treated with MK-801 were impaired with splitting lamellae of myelin sheaths and segmental demyelination. The CC volume and the total length of the myelinated fibers in the CC of the mice treated with MK-801 were significantly decreased by 9.4% and 16.8% when compared to those of the mice treated with saline. We further found that the loss of the myelinated fibers length was mainly due to the marked loss of the myelinated nerve fibers with the diameter of 0.4-0.5 μm. These results indicated that the splitting myelin sheaths, demyelination and the loss of myelinated fibers with small diameter might provide one of the structural bases for impaired white matter integrity of CC in the mouse model of SZ. These results might also provide a baseline for further studies searching for the treatment of SZ through targeting white matter.

  15. Measurement of the ratio of differential cross sections σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet) in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.

    2013-05-28

    We measure the ratio of cross sections, σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet), for associated production of a Z boson with at least one jet. The ratio is also measured as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum, jet transverse momentum, jet pseudorapidity, and the azimuthal angle between the Z boson with respect to the highest pT b tagged jet. These measurements use data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of Fermilab’s Tevatron pp̄ Collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb⁻¹. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading order calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators.

  16. Measurement of the ratio of differential cross sections σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet) in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; et al

    2013-05-28

    We measure the ratio of cross sections, σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet), for associated production of a Z boson with at least one jet. The ratio is also measured as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum, jet transverse momentum, jet pseudorapidity, and the azimuthal angle between the Z boson with respect to the highest pT b tagged jet. These measurements use data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of Fermilab’s Tevatron pp̄ Collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb⁻¹. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading order calculationsmore » and various Monte Carlo event generators.« less

  17. Novel ATP competitive MK2 inhibitors with potent biochemical and cell-based activity throughout the series.

    PubMed

    Oubrie, Arthur; Kaptein, Allard; de Zwart, Edwin; Hoogenboom, Niels; Goorden, Rianne; van de Kar, Bas; van Hoek, Maaike; de Kimpe, Vera; van der Heijden, Ruud; Borsboom, Judith; Kazemier, Bert; de Roos, Jeroen; Scheffers, Michiel; Lommerse, Jos; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Barf, Tjeerd

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of our previously described pyrrolopiperidone series led to the identification of a new benzamide sub-series, which exhibits consistently high potency in biochemical and cell-based assays throughout the series. Strong inhibition of LPS-induced production of the cytokine TNFα is coupled to the regulation of HSP27 phosphorylation, indicating that the observed cellular effects result from the inhibition of MK2. X-ray crystallographic and computational analyses provide a rationale for the high potency of the series. PMID:22119462

  18. Bifurcation and exact traveling wave solutions of a modified nonlinearly dispersive mK (m,n,k) equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jianming

    2013-10-01

    Bifurcation and exact solutions of the modified nonlinearly dispersive mK (m,n,k) equation with nonlinear dispersion um-1ut+a(un)x+b(uk)xxx = 0,nk≠0 are investigated in this paper. As a result, under different parameter conditions, abundant compactons, peakons and solitary solutions including not only some known results but also some new ones are obtained. We also point out the original reason of the existence of the non-smooth traveling wave solutions. The approach we used here is also suitable for the study of traveling wave solutions of some other nonlinear equations.

  19. The aeroacoustics of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1995-01-01

    This research project was a joint experimental/computational study of noise in supersonic jets. The experiments were performed in a low to moderate Reynolds number anechoic supersonic jet facility. Computations have focused on the modeling of the effect of an external shroud on the generation and radiation of jet noise. This report summarizes the results of the research program in the form of the Masters and Doctoral theses of those students who obtained their degrees with the assistance of this research grant. In addition, the presentations and publications made by the principal investigators and the research students is appended.

  20. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  1. Fibrillar Chromospheric Spicule-Like Counterparts to an EUV and Soft X-Ray Blowout Coronal Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louise K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    We observe an erupting jet feature in a solar polar coronal hole, using data from Hinode/SOT, EIS, and XRT, with supplemental data from STEREO/EUVI. From EUV and soft X-ray (SXR) images we identify the erupting feature as a blowout coronal jet: in SXRs it is a jet with bright base, and in EUV it appears as an eruption of relatively cool (approximately 50,000 K) material of horizontal size scale approximately 30" originating from the base of the SXR jet. In SOT Ca II H images the most pronounced analog is a pair of thin (approximately 1") ejections, at the locations of either of the two legs of the erupting EUV jet. These Ca II features eventually rise beyond 45", leaving the SOT field of view, and have an appearance similar to standard spicules except that they are much taller. They have velocities similar to that of "type II" spicules, approximately 100 kilometers per second, and they appear to have spicule-like substructures splitting off from them with horizontal velocity approximately 50 kilometers per second, similar to the velocities of splitting spicules measured by Sterling et al. (2010). Motions of splitting features and of other substructures suggest that the macroscopic EUV jet is spinning or unwinding as it is ejected. This and earlier work suggests that a sub-population of Ca II type II spicules are the Ca II manifestation of portions of larger-scale erupting magnetic jets. A different sub-population of type II spicules could be blowout jets occurring on a much smaller horizontal size scale than the event we observe here.

  2. Jet stream related observations by MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the jet stream and its observation by MST radar is presented. The climatology and synoptic and mesoscale structure of jet streams is briefly reviewed. MST radar observations of jet stream winds, and associated waves and turbulence are then considered. The possibility of using a network of ST radars to track jet stream winds in near real time is explored.

  3. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of shear flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  4. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of sheer flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  5. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  6. Effect of 3-Bromopyruvate and Atovaquone on Infection during In Vitro Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii and LLC-MK2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Loyze Paola O.; Seabra, Sergio H.; Carneiro, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection can be severe during pregnancy and in immunocompromised patients. Current therapies for toxoplasmosis are restricted to tachyzoites and have little or no effect on bradyzoites, which are maintained in tissue cysts. Consequently, new therapeutic alternatives have been proposed as the use of atovaquone has demonstrated partial efficacy against tachyzoites and bradyzoites. This work studies the effect of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a compound that is being tested against cancer cells, on the infection of LLC-MK2 cells with T. gondii tachyzoites, RH strain. No effect of 3-BrPA on host cell proliferation or viability was observed, but it inhibited the proliferation of T. gondii. The incubation of cultures with lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) showed the development of cystogenesis, and an ultrastructural analysis of parasite intracellular development confirmed morphological characteristics commonly found in tissue cysts. Moreover, the presence of degraded parasites and the influence of 3-BrPA on endodyogeny were observed. Infected cultures were alternatively treated with a combination of this compound plus atovaquone. This resulted in a 73% reduction in intracellular parasites after 24 h of treatment and a 71% reduction after 48 h; cyst wall formation did not occur in these cultures. Therefore, we conclude that the use of 3-BrPA may serve as an important tool for the study of (i) in vitro cystogenesis; (ii) parasite metabolism, requiring a deeper understanding of the target of action of this compound on T. gondii; (iii) the alternative parasite metabolic pathways; and (iv) the molecular/cellular mechanisms that trigger parasite death. PMID:26077255

  7. Jet Measurements for Development of Jet Noise Prediction Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The primary focus of my presentation is the development of the jet noise prediction code JeNo with most examples coming from the experimental work that drove the theoretical development and validation. JeNo is a statistical jet noise prediction code, based upon the Lilley acoustic analogy. Our approach uses time-average 2-D or 3-D mean and turbulent statistics of the flow as input. The output is source distributions and spectral directivity.

  8. MK-2206 co-treatment with 5-fluorouracil or doxorubicin enhances chemosensitivity and apoptosis in gastric cancer by attenuation of Akt phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Piaopiao; Wong, Chi Chun; Mei, Sibin; He, Xingkang; Qian, Yun; Sun, Leimin

    2016-01-01

    The anticancer effect of MK-2206, an Akt inhibitor, has been explored in some types of cancers, but its effect on gastric cancer is unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate its anticancer effect in gastric cancer cells. Cell viability and colony formation assays showed that MK-2206 effectively inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 and MKN45 cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration values after 24, 48, and 72 hours’ treatment were 22.92, 13.68, and 8.55 μM in SGC-7901 cells and 19.21, 13.10, and 9.11 μM in MKN45 cells, respectively. Treatment with MK-2206 induced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells as indicated by flow cytometry assay. The combination indexes of MK-2206 and doxorubicin were 0.59 in SGC-7901 cells and 0.57 in MKN45 cells, whereas for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) the indexes were 0.17 in SGC-7901 cells and 0.73 in MKN45 cells, indicating that MK-2206 could work synergistically with doxorubicin or 5-FU to inhibit cell growth. Furthermore, a small dose (1 μM) of MK-2206 co-treatment with doxorubicin or 5-FU was sufficient for complete inhibition of chemotherapeutic alteration of phosphorylated Akt expression and significant enhancement of pro-apoptosis effect through the activation of caspase pathway. Therefore, MK-2206 effectively inhibits gastric cancer cell growth by attenuation of Akt phosphorylation and synergistically enhances the antitumor effect of doxorubicin and 5-FU via caspase-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27499633

  9. Crystal structure of human cyclin-dependent kinase-2 complex with MK2 inhibitor TEI-I01800: insight into the selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Aiko; Fukushima, Kei; Kubota, Takaharu; Kosugi, Tomomi; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2 or MAPKAP-K2) is a Ser/Thr kinase from the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway and plays an important role in inflammatory diseases. The crystal structure of the MK2–TEI-I01800 complex has been reported; its Gly-rich loop was found to form an α-helix, not a β-sheet as has been observed for other Ser/Thr kinases. TEI-I01800 is 177-fold selective against MK2 compared with CDK2; in order to understand the inhibitory mechanism of TEI-I01800, the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) complex structure with TEI-I01800 was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Interestingly, the Gly-rich loop of CDK2 formed a β-sheet that was different from that of MK2. In MK2, TEI-I01800 changed the secondary structure of the Gly-rich loop from a β-sheet to an α-helix by collision between Leu70 and a p-ethoxyphenyl group at the 7-position and bound to MK2. However, for CDK2, TEI-I01800 bound to CDK2 without this structural change and lost the interaction with the substituent at the 7-position. In summary, the results of this study suggest that the reason for the selectivity of TEI-I01800 is the favourable conformation of TEI-I01800 itself, making it suitable for binding to the α-form MK2. PMID:24121337

  10. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  11. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  12. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    PubMed

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-01

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  13. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic jets are associated with extreme astrophysical phenomena, like the core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the accretion on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetized rotation of a central compact object (black hole or neutron star). However, how the jets produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of relativistic, Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetized central object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a global, external kink mode that grows on long time-scales. It bodily twists the jet, reducing its propagation velocity. We show analytically that in flat density profiles, like the ones associated with galactic cores, the external mode grows and may stall the jet. In the steep profiles of stellar envelopes the external kink weakens as the jet propagates outward. (ii) a local, internal kink mode that grows over short time-scales and causes small-angle magnetic reconnection and conversion of about half of the jet electromagnetic energy flux into heat. We suggest that internal kink instability is the main dissipation mechanism responsible for powering GRB prompt emission.

  14. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  15. Investigations of a thermal plasma jet structure by generalized correlation dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Hlína, J.; Šonský, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of thermal plasma jets is characterized by significant turbulent phenomena influencing various technological applications. In two types of experiments, we have analysed (i) tomographical reconstructions of plasma jet radiation captured from four sides by photodiode arrays in two planes perpendicular to the jet axis and (ii) recordings of the jet radiation acquired by a high-speed CCD camera. The analysis was based on the method of generalized correlation dimension stemming from the correlation dimension estimates by the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm common in the domain of nonlinear dynamic systems. Our results map spatial distributions of complexity within recorded data including their temporal evolution and provide more information about the jet dynamics than, e.g., calculations of standard deviations. The most stable region of the plasma jet was identified at a small distance from the jet axis and the most turbulent region about 4 mm from the plasma torch nozzle. Signs of short-time collective rotational movement of the jet core were also identified.

  16. ^4He Crystals in Reduced Gravity Obtained by Parabolic Flights of a Jet Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Nomura, Ryuji; Okuda, Yuichi

    2016-11-01

    ^4He crystals usually sink to the bottom of the container in a superfluid and are deformed into a flat shape by gravity when their size is much larger than the capillary length of 1 mm. When gravity is reduced to zero, the capillary length diverges and the gravity-flattened crystals are expected to relax into an equilibrium crystal shape determined by the interfacial free energy at low enough temperatures where the relaxation time is very short. We performed a reduced gravity experiment on ^4He crystals at ultralow temperatures by developing a specially designed ^3He-^4He dilution refrigerator compatible with the experimental restrictions in a small jet plane. ^4He crystals relaxed to the equilibrium crystal shape below 600 mK during a reduced gravity period of 20 s produced by a parabolic flight. The equilibrium crystal shape, however, was metastable in most cases, governed by the boundary conditions imposed by the wall. Utilizing acoustic radiation pressure, we deformed the crystal enough to allow it to escape from the metastable shape below 150 mK. After this large deformation, the crystal relaxed to a shape completely different from its initial shape, showing three types of facets, viz., c-, a-, and s-facets, which was concluded to be the lowest energy equilibrium shape.

  17. How to calibrate the jet energy scale?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakeyama, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-01-01

    Top quarks dominantly decay into b-quark jets and W bosons, and the W bosons often decay into jets, thus the precise determination of the jet energy scale is crucial in measurements of many top quark properties. I present the strategies used by the CDF and D0 collaborations to determine the jet energy scale. The various cross checks performed to verify the determined jet energy scale and evaluate its systematic uncertainty are also discussed.

  18. Latest jet results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Darren D.

    2010-05-01

    A brief overview of the latest status of jet physics studies at the Tevatron in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. In particular, measurements of the inclusive jet production cross-section, dijet production and searches for new physics, the ratio of the 3-jet to 2-jet production cross-sections, and the three-jet mass are discussed.

  19. Uncovering Nature’s 100 TeV Particle Accelerators in the Large-Scale Jets of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Sparks, William B.; Perlman, Eric S.; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Anderson, Jay; Sohn, S. Tony; Biretta, John A.; Norman, Colin Arthur; Chiaberge, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Since the first jet X-ray detections sixteen years ago the adopted paradigm for the X-ray emission has been the IC/CMB model that requires highly relativistic (Lorentz factors of 10-20), extremely powerful (sometimes super-Eddington) kpc scale jets. R I will discuss recently obtained strong evidence, from two different avenues, IR to optical polarimetry for PKS 1136-135 and gamma-ray observations for 3C 273 and PKS 0637-752, ruling out the EC/CMB model. Our work constrains the jet Lorentz factors to less than ~few, and leaves as the only reasonable alternative synchrotron emission from ~100 TeV jet electrons, accelerated hundreds of kpc away from the central engine. This refutes over a decade of work on the jet X-ray emission mechanism and overall energetics and, if confirmed in more sources, it will constitute a paradigm shift in our understanding of powerful large scale jets and their role in the universe. Two important findings emerging from our work will also discussed be: (i) the solid angle-integrated luminosity of the large scale jet is comparable to that of the jet core, contrary to the current belief that the core is the dominant jet radiative outlet and (ii) the large scale jets are the main source of TeV photon in the universe, something potentially important, as TeV photons have been suggested to heat up the intergalactic medium and reduce the number of dwarf galaxies formed.

  20. Transient gas jets into liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jane Ming-Chin

    An experimental investigation of the development of high velocity, impulsively initiated gas jets into liquid was conducted in an effort to understand some of the physical processes that occur for a jet of very light fluid into a dense ambient atmosphere. Four gases, refrigerants 12 and 22, nitrogen, and helium were injected into water at nozzle exit Mach numbers from 1.0 to 2.2.The study showed that a gas jet into water develops in at least three stages: startup, transition, and global steady state. The startup is characterized by bubble growth; the growth rate is well predicted by classical bubble-growth theory. Jet transition is marked by axially directed flow, which penetrates through the startup bubble and which forms a cylindrical protrusion along the axis of symmetry. A combination of strong recirculating flow and liquid entrainment causes the startup bubble to deflate and to lift off and move downstream. In the steady state, instantaneous photographs show small-scale fluctuations of the jet boundary, but time-averaged photographs show the expected conical spreading of the steady jet; the measured spreading angles range from 18-25 degrees.However, the most significant finding of this study is that under some conditions, the gas jet into liquid never reaches the global steady state. Instead, the jet boundary exhibits chugging: large nonlinear oscillations which lead to irregular collapses of the gas column followed by explosive outward bursts of gas. The unsteadiness observed is much more violent than the familiar fluctuations typical of constant-density jets. The length scale of the motion is generally on the order of several jet diameters; the time scale is on the order of the period for bubble collapse.It was found that the amplitude and frequency of chugging are strongly dependent on the ratio of the liquid density to the gas density, the jet Mach number, and the operating pressure ratio. The conditions under which unsteadiness occurs were determined