Science.gov

Sample records for jet opening angles

  1. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  2. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-01

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in {N} = 4 SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dE jet /dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dE jet /dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening angle that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that {N} = 4 SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the {N} = 4 SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. We close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.

  3. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-17

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in N = 4SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dEjet/dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dEjet/dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening angle that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that N = 4SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the N = 4SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. In conclusion, we close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.

  4. ESTIMATING LONG GRB JET OPENING ANGLES AND REST-FRAME ENERGETICS

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Adam; Briggs, Michael S.; Burns, Eric

    2016-02-10

    We present a method to estimate the jet opening angles of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using the prompt gamma-ray energetics and an inversion of the Ghirlanda relation, which is a correlation between the time-integrated peak energy of the GRB prompt spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy in gamma-rays. The derived jet opening angles using this method and detailed assumptions match well with the corresponding inferred jet opening angles obtained when a break in the afterglow is observed. Furthermore, using a model of the predicted long GRB redshift probability distribution observable by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), we estimate the probability distributions for the jet opening angle and rest-frame energetics for a large sample of GBM GRBs for which the redshifts have not been observed. Previous studies have only used a handful of GRBs to estimate these properties due to the paucity of observed afterglow jet breaks, spectroscopic redshifts, and comprehensive prompt gamma-ray observations, and we potentially expand the number of GRBs that can be used in this analysis by more than an order of magnitude. In this analysis, we also present an inferred distribution of jet breaks which indicates that a large fraction of jet breaks are not observable with current instrumentation and observing strategies. We present simple parameterizations for the jet angle, energetics, and jet break distributions so that they may be used in future studies.

  5. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-17

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in N = 4SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dEjet/dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dEjet/dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening anglemore » that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that N = 4SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the N = 4SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. In conclusion, we close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.« less

  6. The faster the narrower: characteristic bulk velocities and jet opening angles of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Nava, L.; Burlon, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Melandri, A.

    2013-01-01

    The jet opening angle θjet and the bulk Lorentz factor Γ0 are crucial parameters for the computation of the energetics of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). From the ˜30 GRBs with measured θjet or Γ0 it is known that (i) the real energetic Eγ, obtained by correcting the isotropic equivalent energy Eiso for the collimation factor ˜ θ2jet, is clustered around 1050-1051 erg and it is correlated with the peak energy Ep of the prompt emission and (ii) the comoving frame E'p and E'γ are clustered around typical values. Current estimates of Γ0 and θjet are based on incomplete data samples and their observed distributions could be subject to biases. Through a population synthesis code we investigate whether different assumed intrinsic distributions of Γ0 and θjet can reproduce a set of observational constraints. Assuming that all bursts have the same E'p and E'γ in the comoving frame, we find that Γ0 and θjet cannot be distributed as single power laws. The best agreement between our simulation and the available data is obtained assuming (a) log-normal distributions for θjet and Γ0 and (b) an intrinsic relation between the peak values of their distributions, i.e. θjet2.5Γ0 = const. On average, larger values of Γ0 (i.e. the `faster' bursts) correspond to smaller values of θjet (i.e. the `narrower'). We predict that ˜6 per cent of the bursts that point to us should not show any jet break in their afterglow light curve since they have sin θjet < 1/Γ0. Finally, we estimate that the local rate of GRBs is ˜0.3 per cent of all local Type Ib/c supernova (SNIb/c) and ˜4.3 per cent of local hypernovae, i.e. SNIb/c with broad lines.

  7. SELECTION EFFECTS ON THE OBSERVED REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF GAMMA-RAY BURST JET OPENING ANGLES

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Ruijing; Wei Junjie; Liang Enwei; Qin Shufu

    2012-02-01

    An apparent redshift dependence of the jet opening angles ({theta}{sub j}) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is observed from the current GRB sample. We investigate whether this dependence can be explained with instrumental selection effects and observational biases by a bootstrapping method. Assuming that (1) the GRB rate follows the star formation history and the cosmic metallicity history and (2) the intrinsic distributions of the jet-corrected luminosity (L{sub {gamma}}) and {theta}{sub j} are a Gaussian or a power-law function, we generate a mock Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample by considering various instrumental selection effects, including the flux threshold and the trigger probability of BAT, the probabilities of a GRB jet pointing to the instrument solid angle, and the probability of redshift measurement. Our results reproduce the observed {theta}{sub j} - z dependence well. We find that in the case of L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to}{theta}{sup 2}{sub j} good consistency between the mock and observed samples can be obtained, indicating that both L{sub {gamma}} and {theta}{sub j} are degenerate for a flux-limited sample. The parameter set (L{sub {gamma}}, {theta}{sub j}) = (4.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg s{sup -1}, 0.054 rad) gives the best consistency for the current Swift GRB sample. Considering the beaming effect, the derived intrinsic local GRB rate is accordingly 2.85 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2} Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}, inferring that {approx}0.59% of Type Ib/c supernovae may be accompanied by a GRB.

  8. A Decade of Short-duration Gamma-Ray Burst Broadband Afterglows: Energetics, Circumburst Densities, and Jet Opening Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Zauderer, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a comprehensive catalog and analysis of broadband afterglow observations for 103 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), comprised of all short GRBs from 2004 November to 2015 March with prompt follow-up observations in the X-ray, optical, near-infrared (NIR), and/or radio bands. These afterglow observations have uncovered 71 X-ray detections, 30 optical/NIR detections, and 4 radio detections. Employing the standard afterglow synchrotron model, we perform joint probability analyses for a subset of 38 short GRBs with well-sampled light curves to infer the burst isotropic-equivalent energies and circumburst densities. For this subset, we find median isotropic-equivalent γ-ray and kinetic energies of Eγ,iso ≈ 2 × 1051 erg, and EK,iso ≈ (1-3) × 1051 erg, respectively, depending on the values of the model input parameters. We further find that short GRBs occur in low-density environments, with a median density of n ≈ (3-15) × 10-3 cm-3, and that ≈80%-95% of bursts have densities of n ≲ 1 cm-3. We investigate trends between the circumburst densities and host galaxy properties, and find that events located at large projected offsets of ≳10 effective radii from their hosts exhibit particularly low densities of n ≲ 10-4 cm-3, consistent with an intergalactic medium-like environment. Using late-time afterglow data for 11 events, we find a median jet opening angle of θj = 16 ± 10°. We also calculate a median beaming factor of fb ≈ 0.04, leading to a beaming-corrected total energy release of Etrue ≈ 1.6 × 1050 erg. Furthermore, we calculate a beaming-corrected event rate of {{R}}{{true}}={270}-180+1580 Gpc-3 yr-1, or ≈ {8}-5+47 yr-1 within a 200 Mpc volume, the Advanced LIGO/Virgo typical detection distance for NS-NS binaries.

  9. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  10. Influence of the opening angle of a conical supersonic nozzle on the structure of initial interval of non-isobaric jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetlutsky, V. N.; Ganimedov, V. L.; Muchnaya, M. I.

    2008-06-01

    The ideal gas exhaustion from an infinite volume into a gas at rest through a supersonic conical Laval nozzle is considered. The problem was solved numerically by steadying in time in a unified formulation for the regions inside the nozzle and in the ambient environment. In such a statement, the nozzle outlet section is no internal boundary of the region under consideration, and there is no need of specifying the boundary conditions here. Local subsonic zones arising in the flow lie inside the region under consideration, which eliminates the possibility of using a marching technique along one of the coordinates. The numerical solution is constructed by a unified algorithm for the entire flow region, which gives a possibility of obtaining a higher accuracy. The computations are carried out in the jet initial interval, where, according to monograph [1], the wave phenomena predominate over the viscous effects. The exhaustion process is described by the system of gas dynamics equations. Their solution is constructed with the aid of a finite difference Harten’s TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) scheme [2], which has the second approximation order in space. The second approximation order in time is achieved with the aid of a five-stage Runge-Kutta method. The solution algorithm has been parallelized in space and implemented on the multi-processor computer systems of the ITAM SB RAS and the MVS-128 of the Siberian Supercomputer Center of SB RAS. The influence of the semi-apex angle of the nozzle supersonic part and the pressure jump between the nozzle outlet section and the ambient environment on the flow in the initial interval of a non-isobaric jet is investigated in the work. A comparison with experimental data is presented. The computations are carried out for the semi-apex angles of the nozzle supersonic part from 0 (parallel flow) to 20 degrees. For all considered nozzles, the Mach number in the nozzle outlet section, which was computed from the one

  11. Primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Robert N; Khaw, Peng Tee

    2004-05-22

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy and, perhaps, the most common form of glaucoma. Because the disease is treatable, and because the visual impairment caused by glaucoma is irreversible, early detection is essential. Early diagnosis depends on examination of the optic disc, retinal nerve fibre layer, and visual field. New imaging and psychophysical tests can improve both detection and monitoring of the progression of the disease. Recently completed long-term clinical trials provide convincing evidence that lowering intraocular pressure prevents progression at both the early and late stages of the disease. The degree of protection is related to the degree to which intraocular pressure is lowered. Improvements in therapy consist of more effective and better-tolerated drugs to lower intraocular pressure, and more effective surgical procedures. New treatments to directly treat and protect the retinal ganglion cells that are damaged in glaucoma are also in development.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Jet angles and gamma-ray energetics estimations (Goldstein+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burns, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present a method to estimate the jet opening angles of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using the prompt gamma-ray energetics and an inversion of the Ghirlanda relation, which is a correlation between the time-integrated peak energy of the GRB prompt spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy in gamma-rays. The derived jet opening angles using this method and detailed assumptions match well with the corresponding inferred jet opening angles obtained when a break in the afterglow is observed. Furthermore, using a model of the predicted long GRB redshift probability distribution observable by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), we estimate the probability distributions for the jet opening angle and rest-frame energetics for a large sample of GBM GRBs for which the redshifts have not been observed. Previous studies have only used a handful of GRBs to estimate these properties due to the paucity of observed afterglow jet breaks, spectroscopic redshifts, and comprehensive prompt gamma-ray observations, and we potentially expand the number of GRBs that can be used in this analysis by more than an order of magnitude. In this analysis, we also present an inferred distribution of jet breaks which indicates that a large fraction of jet breaks are not observable with current instrumentation and observing strategies. We present simple parameterizations for the jet angle, energetics, and jet break distributions so that they may be used in future studies. (1 data file).

  13. Entrainment Characteristics for variable-angle plunging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Simulations based on an algebraic VoF method are used to study the entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent pool at angles ranging from 10 to 90 deg. with pool. Our previous study of shallow plunging jets (Deshpande et al. 2012) revealed a discernible frequency in the formation of large air cavities. This contrasts the well-documented chaotic entrainment at steeper inclinations, suggesting a different entrainment mechanism exists for shallow angles. Quantitatively, it is found that larger cavities and greater volume of entrained air occur at shallower angles (10, 12 deg.). A precursor to the formation of these large cavities is the presence of a stagnation region in the zone of impingement. Using a local mass and momentum balance, we show that this stagnation region deflects the incoming jet at wide angles producing large air cavities. Entrainment in shallow jets is similar to the initial impact of the jet with a pool, but it occurs periodically. The recurrence is a consequence of jet disruption by traveling waves on the pool. Qualitative analysis, supported with simulations, demonstrates linear scaling of entrainment period with Froude number.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry analysis of an angled impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irhoud, Alexandre; Benson, Michael; Verhulst, Claire; van Poppel, Bret; Elkins, Chris; Helmer, David

    2016-11-01

    Impinging jets are used to achieve high heat transfer rates in applications ranging from gas turbine engines to electronics. Despite the importance and relative simplicity of the geometry, simulations historically fail to accurately predict the flow behavior in the vicinity of the flow impingement. In this work, we present results from a novel experimental technique, Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV), which measures three-dimensional time-averaged velocity without the need for optical access. The geometry considered in this study is a circular jet angled at 45 degrees and impinging on a flat plate, with a separation of approximately seven jet diameters between the jet exit and the impingement location. Two flow conditions are considered, with Reynolds numbers of roughly 800 and 14,000. Measurements from the MRV experiment are compared to predictions from Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations, thus demonstrating the utility of MRV for validation of numerical analyses of impinging jet flow.

  15. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  16. Measurements in a large angle oblique jet impingement flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The flow field associated with the oblique impingement of an axisymmetric jet was investigated in the externally blown flap configuration for the STOL aircraft. The passive and active spreading characteristics of the shallow angle (a greater than or = approximately to 15 degrees) oblique impingement flow, the role of the initially azimuthal vorticity field, and the stagnation point region were studied, and compared to the large ( a = 45 degres) oblique jet impingement flow. A description of the characteristics of the large angle impingement flow is presented: A flow field near the plate as showing two distinct patterns, one near the location of the maximum surface pressure, and another about the geometric intersection of the jet axis with the plate; and turbulence in the region above the plate which is greater than the one accounted for by the convection of turbulence energy by the mean motion.

  17. Novel therapies for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wentz, Scott M.; Kim, Nathaniel J.; Wang, Jenny; Amireskandari, Annahita; Siesky, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Open-angle glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. It is an irreversible disease with no established cure. The only currently approved treatment is aimed at lowering intraocular pressure, the most significant risk factor known to date. However, it is now clear that there are other risk factors involved in glaucoma's pathophysiology. To achieve future improvements in glaucoma management, new approaches to therapies and novel targets must be developed. Such therapies may include new tissue targets for lowering intraocular pressure, molecules influencing ocular hemodynamics, and treatments providing neuroprotection of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, novel drug delivery systems are in development that may improve patient compliance, increase bioavailability, and decrease adverse side effects. PMID:25580256

  18. Sound Radiation from a Supersonic Jet Passing Through a Partially Open Exhaust Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    The radiation of sound from a perfectly expanded Mach 2.5 cold supersonic jet of 25.4 mm exit diameter flowing through a partially open rigid-walled duct with an upstream i-deflector has been studied experimentally. In the experiments, the nozzle is mounted vertically, with the nozzle exit plane at a height of 73 jet diameters above ground level. Relative to the nozzle exit plane (NEP), the location of the duct inlet is varied at 10, 5, and -1 jet diameters. Far-field sound pressure levels were obtained at 54 jet diameters above ground with the aid of acoustic sensors equally spaced around a circular arc of radius equal to 80 jet diameters from the jet axis. Data on the jet acoustic field for the partially open duct were obtained and compared with those with a free jet and with a closed duct. The results suggest that for the partially open duct the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) decreases as the distance between the NEP and the duct inlet plane decreases, while the opposite trend is observed for the closed duct. It is also concluded that the observed peak frequency in the partially open duct increases above the free jet value as the angle from the duct axis is increased, and as the duct inlet plane becomes closer to the NEP.

  19. Experimental Determination of Jet Boundary Corrections for Airfoil Tests in Four Open Wind Tunnel Jets of Different Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Harris, Thomas A

    1931-01-01

    This experimental investigation was conducted primarily for the purpose of obtaining a method of correcting to free air conditions the results of airfoil force tests in four open wind tunnel jets of different shapes. Tests were also made to determine whether the jet boundaries had any appreciable effect on the pitching moments of a complete airplane model. Satisfactory corrections for the effect of the boundaries of the various jets were obtained for all the airfoils tested, the span of the largest being 0.75 of the jet width. The corrections for angle of attack were, in general, larger than those for drag. The boundaries had no appreciable effect on the pitching moments of either the airfoils or the complete airplane model. Increasing turbulence appeared to increase the minimum drag and maximum lift and to decrease the pitching moment.

  20. Open cycle OTEC system with falling jet evaporator and condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, A.; Johnson, D. H.; Green, H. J.; Olson, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    A configuration for the open cycle (OC) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system is presented incorporating a countercurrent falling jet evaporator and a concurrent falling jet condenser. The parameters governing performance of the proposed configuration are discussed and the sizing of equipment for a 100-MWe net power output OC OTEC plant is performed, based on recent experimental falling jet heat and mass transfer results. The performance of an OC OTEC plant with falling jet evaporator-condenser is compared with the Westinghouse conceptual design that uses an open-channel evaporator and a surface condenser. Preliminary calculations indicate that falling jet heat and mass transfer, when applied in the proposed configuration, leads to a very simple and compact plant assembly resulting in substantial capital cost savings.

  1. Removal of Machine Oil from Metal Surface by Mesoplasma Jet under Open Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruki; Shiki, Hajime; Tsujii, Kenichi; Oke, Shinichiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Okawa, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shigenobu

    2009-08-01

    An attempt was made to employ the plasma-energized jet (PEN-jet) generated by pulsed arc discharge, one of the atmospheric-pressure mesoplasmas, for removal of machine oil from the surface of electrically-grounded aluminum (Al) alloy substrate under open atmosphere. Three types of nozzle configurations were examined; a metal nozzle, ceramic nozzle, and electrically-floated metal nozzle. Electric input power to the pulsed arc plasma discharge was 700 W constant. First, free-burning of the PEN-jet was observed as a function of air gas flow. When the PEN-jets were irradiated to the clean substrate, the PEN-jet with the metal nozzle caused substrate damage by the arc spot due to transferring arc discharge. Then the PEN-jet with the ceramic nozzle was irradiated to the oily substrate. The adhesion strength of sealant and water contact angle of the treated surface were then measured. As a result, these values of the oily substrate treated by the PEN-jet were almost the same as those of clean substrate. The treated surface was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and reflectance spectroscopy. Their spectral profiles clearly indicated oil removal from the surface by PEN-jet.

  2. Open Rotor: New Option for Jet Engines

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dale Van Zante describes how the open rotor propulsion system will be tested in a wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Open rotor aircraft engines use high-speed propellers and are c...

  3. Large optical field enhancement for nanotips with large opening angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sebastian; Wachter, Georg; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the dependence of the enhancement of optical near-fields at nanometric tips on the shape, size, and material of the tip. We confirm the strong dependence of the field enhancement factor on the radius of curvature. In addition, we find a surprisingly strong increase of field enhancement with increasing opening angle of the nanotips. For gold and tungsten nanotips in the experimentally relevant parameter range (radius of curvature ≥slant 5 nm at 800 nm laser wavelength), we obtain field enhancement factors of up to ∼ 35 for Au and ∼ 12 for W for large opening angles. We confirm this strong dependence on the opening angle for many other materials featuring a wide variety in their dielectric response. For dielectrics, the opening angle dependence is traced back to the electrostatic force of the induced surface charge at the tip shank. For metals, the plasmonic response strongly increases the field enhancement and shifts the maximum field enhancement to smaller opening angles.

  4. Effect of Jet Injection Angle and Number of Jets on Mixing and Emissions From a Reacting Crossflow at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.John, D.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The mixing of air jets into hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone is an important step in staged combustion. Often referred to as "quick quench," the mixing occurs with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. An experiment has been designed to simulate and study this process, and the effect of varying the entry angle (0 deg, 22.5 deg and 45 deg from normal) and number of the air jets (7, 9, and 11) into the main flow, while holding the jet-to-crossflow mass-low ratio, MR, and momentum-flux ratio, J, constant (MR = 2.5;J = 25). The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from orifices equally spaced around the perimeter. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture to a module containing air jet injection tubes that can be changed to vary orifice geometry. Species concentrations of O2, CO, CO2, NO(x) and HC were obtained one duct diameter upstream (in the rich zone), and primarily one duct radius downstream. From this information, penetration of the jet, the spatial extent of chemical reaction, mixing, and the optimum jet injection angle and number of jets can be deduced.

  5. Contact Angle Influence on Geysering Jets in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquid-free vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must be used to contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher-order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity.

  6. Velocity field of a round jet in a cross flow for various jet injection angles and velocity ratios. [Langley V/STOL tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Weston, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A subsonic round jet injected from a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature was investigated. Velocity and pressure measurements in planes perpendicular to the path of the jet were made for nominal jet injection angles of 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, 90 deg, and 105 deg and for jet/cross flow velocity ratios of four and eight. The velocity measurements were obtained to infer the properties of the vortex pair associated with a jet in a cross flow. Jet centerline and vortex trajectories were determined and fit with an empirical equation that includes the effects of jet injection angle, jet core length, and jet/cross flow velocity ratios.

  7. Canaloplasty versus Viscocanalostomy in Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wagdy, Faried Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of canaloplasty versus viscocanalostomy in management of uncontrolled primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) with medication. Methods Canaloplasty surgery was applied for thirty eyes of thirty patients (45–55 years) with a mean age of 48 years (Group A) and viscocanalostomy surgery was applied also for thirty eyes of thirty patients (43–54 years) with a mean age of 46 years (group B). All patients were with uncontrolled primary open angle glaucoma by maximally tolerated medical therapy. Results Intraocular pressure (IOP) in both surgeries was significantly reduced through follow up period (p < 0.0.001). Complete success was 86.6% in group A and 80% in group B. Visual field deterioration was in 2 cases (6%) in group A and in 4 cases (13%) in group B. Low incidence of postoperative complications was reported as Descemet’s membrane detachment (3% in group A and 8% in group B), ocular hypotony (2% in group A and 4% in group B) and hyphema (3% in group A and 5% in group B). Conclusion Canaloplasty was more effective and safer than viscocanalostomy in management of uncontrolled primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) with medication. PMID:28243422

  8. PULSAR BINARY BIRTHRATES WITH SPIN-OPENING ANGLE CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Kim, Chunglee E-mail: ckim@astro.lu.s

    2010-05-20

    One ingredient in an empirical birthrate estimate for pulsar binaries is the fraction of sky subtended by the pulsar beam: the pulsar beaming fraction. This fraction depends on both the pulsar's opening angle and the misalignment angle between its spin and magnetic axes. The current estimates for pulsar binary birthrates are based on an average value of beaming fractions for only two pulsars, i.e., PSRs B1913+16 and B1534+12. In this paper, we revisit the observed pulsar binaries to examine the sensitivity of birthrate predictions to different assumptions regarding opening angle and alignment. Based on empirical estimates for the relative likelihood of different beam half-opening angles and misalignment angles between the pulsar rotation and magnetic axes, we calculate an effective beaming correction factor, f{sub b,eff}, whose reciprocal is equivalent to the average fraction of all randomly selected pulsars that point toward us. For those pulsars without any direct beam geometry constraints, we find that f{sub b,eff} is likely to be smaller than 6, a canonically adopted value when calculating birthrates of Galactic pulsar binaries. We calculate f{sub b,eff} for PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545, applying the currently available constraints for their beam geometry. As in previous estimates of the posterior probability density function P(R) for pulsar binary birthrates R, PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545 still significantly contribute to, if not dominate, the Galactic birthrate of tight pulsar-neutron star (NS) and pulsar-white dwarf (WD) binaries, respectively. Our median posterior present-day birthrate predictions for tight PSR-NS binaries, wide PSR-NS binaries, and tight PSR-WD binaries given a preferred pulsar population model and beaming geometry are 89 Myr{sup -1}, 0.5 Myr{sup -1}, and 34 Myr{sup -1}, respectively. For long-lived PSR-NS binaries, these estimates include a weak (x1.6) correction for slowly decaying star formation in the galactic disk. For pulsars

  9. Numerical investigation on properties of attack angle for an opposing jet thermal protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai-Bo; Liu, Wei-Qiang

    2012-08-01

    The three-dimensional Navier—Stokes equation and the k-in viscous model are used to simulate the attack angle characteristics of a hemisphere nose-tip with an opposing jet thermal protection system in supersonic flow conditions. The numerical method is validated by the relevant experiment. The flow field parameters, aerodynamic forces, and surface heat flux distributions for attack angles of 0°, 2°, 5°, 7°, and 10° are obtained. The detailed numerical results show that the cruise attack angle has a great influence on the flow field parameters, aerodynamic force, and surface heat flux distribution of the supersonic vehicle nose-tip with an opposing jet thermal protection system. When the attack angle reaches 10°, the heat flux on the windward generatrix is close to the maximal heat flux on the wall surface of the nose-tip without thermal protection system, thus the thermal protection has failed.

  10. Measurements in a large angle oblique jet impingement flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Velocity and surface pressure measurements, in the flow field of an obliquely impinging jet, and their interpretation as regards the governing mechanics and the aerodynamic noise generation characteristics of such a flow are reported. A computer controlled probe positioning mechanism allowed the measurement of the velocity magnitude and direction in the plane parallel to the plate. The mean velocity and Reynolds stress components were recorded. Measures of the terms in the momentum equation reveal the character of the pressure gradients in the neighborhood of the stagnation point. The effects of the stagnation streamline location on the vorticity field and the vortex sound considerations are discussed in relationship to the aerodynamic noise generation effects of this flow.

  11. JETS AND WIDE-ANGLE OUTFLOWS IN CEPHEUS E: NEW EVIDENCE FROM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Grave, J. M. C. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: jgrave@astro.up.pt

    2011-11-01

    Outflows and jets are believed to play a crucial role in determining the mass of the central protostar and its planet-forming disk by virtue of their ability to transport energy, mass, and momentum of the surrounding material, and thus terminate the infall stage in star and disk formation. In some protostellar objects both wide-angle outflows and collimated jets are seen, while in others only one is observed. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features. Here, we use HiRes deconvolution to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands) and removing the contaminating sidelobes from bright sources. We apply this approach to study the jet and outflow features in Cep E, a young, energetic Class 0 protostar. In the reprocessed images we detect (1) wide-angle outflow seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details on at least 29 jet-driven bow shocks and jet heads or knots, (3) three compact features in 24 {mu}m continuum image as atomic/ionic line emission coincident with the jet heads, and (4) a flattened {approx}35'' size protostellar envelope seen against the interstellar background polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission as an absorption band across the protostar at 8 {mu}m. By separating the protostellar photospheric scattered emission in the wide-angle cavity from the jet emission we show that we can study directly the scattered light spectrum. We present the H{sub 2} emission line spectra, as observed in all IRAC bands, for 29 knots in the jets and bow shocks and use them in the IRAC color-color space as a diagnostic of the thermal gas in the shocks driven by the jets. The data presented here will enable detailed modeling of the individual shocks retracing the history of the episodic jet activity and the associated accretion on to the protostar. The Spitzer data analysis presented here shows the richness of its

  12. Radio jet propagation and wide-angle tailed radio sources in merging galaxy cluster environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loken, Chris; Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM) within merging clusters of galaxies is likely to be in a violent or turbulent dynamical state which may have a significant effect on the evolution of cluster radio sources. We present results from a recent gas + N-body simulation of a cluster merger, suggesting that mergers can result in long-lived, supersonic bulk flows, as well as shocks, within a few hundred kiloparsecs of the core of the dominant cluster. These results have motivated our new two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of jet propagation in such environments. The first set of simulations models the ISM/ICM transition as a contact discontinuity with a strong velocity shear. A supersonic (M(sub j) = 6) jet crossing this discontinuity into an ICM with a transverse, supersonic wind bends continuously, becomes 'naked' on the upwind side, and forms a distended cocoon on the downwind side. In the case of a mildly supersonic jet (M(sub j) = 3), however, a shock is driven into the ISM and ISM material is pulled along with the jet into the ICM. Instabilities excited at the ISM/ICM interface result in the jet repeatedly pinching off and reestablishing itself in a series of 'disconnection events.' The second set of simulations deals with a jet encountering a shock in the merging cluster environment. A series of relatively high-resolution two-dimensional calculations is used to confirm earlier analysis predicting that the jet will not disrupt when the jet Mach number is greater than the shock Mach number. A jet which survives the encounter with the shock will decrease in radius and disrupt shortly thereafter as a result of the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We also find, in disagreement with predictions, that the jet flaring angle decreases with increasing jet density. Finally, a three-dimensional simulation of a jet crossing an oblique shock gives rise to a morphology which resembles a wide-angle tailed radio source with the jet flaring at the shock and

  13. CFD study of Jet Impingement Test erosion using Ansys Fluent® and OpenFOAM®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Alejandro; Nicholls, William; Stickland, Matthew T.; Dempster, William M.

    2015-12-01

    The initial aim of this study was to compare OpenFoam and Ansys Fluent in order to verify OpenFoam's Lagrangian Library and erosion capabilities. However, it was found that previous versions of Fluent have been providing wrong results for the discrete phase and the differences with the latest version (Ansys Fluent 15) are shown. A Submerged Jet Impingement Test is an effective method for studying erosion created by solid particles entrained in a liquid. When considering low particle concentrations a Lagrangian modeling of the particulate phase is a reasonable approach. Proper linkage between OpenFOAM's Lagrangian library and the solver pimpleFoam for incompressible transient flows allows two-phase simulations to be undertaken for comparison with Ansys Fluent with the aim of verifying OpenFoam's accuracy. Steady state convergence for the fluid flow is first accomplished and the results are compared, confirming a good agreement between the two packages. A transient simulation was then set up and spherical particles incorporated into the fluid flow. An assessment of the two codes' discrete phase models was carried out, focusing on the differences between impact angles and velocities yielded at the impingement plate's surface employing a similar strategy to that outlined first by Hattori et al. (2008) and later by Gnanavelu et al. (2009, 2011). In the comparison of OpenFoam with the latest version of Fluent, the main differences between the injection models are highlighted and the coupling possibilities between phases are taken into consideration. Agreement between trends for both impact angles and velocities is satisfactory when the last version of the commercial package is considered and the average discrepancy between numerical values is very low, verifying OpenFoam's Lagrangian library. Two different Jet Impingement Test configurations are also compared and the differences highlighted.

  14. Mixing Characteristics of Turbulent Twin Impinging Axisymmetric Jets at Various Impingement Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Brian Donn

    An experimental study is first presented on the comparison between two commonly used velocity measurement techniques applied in experimental fluid dynamics: Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The comparison is performed in the near-field region of an axisymmetric circular turbulent jet where the flow field contains large scale turbulent structures. The comparison was performed for five Reynolds numbers, based on diameter, between 5,000 and 25,000. The Reynolds numbers selected cover the critical Reynolds number range, 10,000 to 20,000 where the characteristics of the flow transition to a fully developed turbulent mixing layer. A comparison between these two measurement techniques was performed in order to determine the differences between an intrusive (CTA) and non-intrusive (PIV) method when applied to a practical application. The results and observations obtained from the comparison between the two techniques were applied to better characterize the time-averaged characteristics of a single axisymmetric turbulent jet with a Reynolds number of 7,500. The mean and fluctuating velocities, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and vorticity were measured as a baseline case. Additionally, smoke visualization was utilized to determine the mixing characteristics of the transient start of an axisymmetric turbulent jet. The shedding frequencies, also known as, the `preferred mode were investigated for a single jet. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was also utilized to characterize the pre-and post-regions of the interaction region of two axisymmetric, incompressible turbulent jets at included angles: 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The Reynolds number selected (7,500) was within the range of critical Reynolds numbers and the geometrical distance to twin jet impingement, X0, remained constant at 10.33D for each impingement angle. The mean and fluctuating velocities, vorticity, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) were measured. Smoke Visualization

  15. Optical layouts for large infrared beamline opening angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Th; Westfahl, H.; de Oliveira Freitas, R.; Petroff, Y.; Dumas, P.

    2013-03-01

    The number of infrared beamlines at synchrotron facilities is expending worldwide. Due to the long wavelength of the radiation in the infrared region, the optimum collection of the emitted photons requires large opening angles, both vertically and horizontally (order of few tens of mrad). Most of the infrared beamlines use toroid shaped mirrors, or elliptical mirror to conjointly focus both the vertical and the horizontal source emission. However, such optical set ups produce distorted images due to the optical aberrations produced by the depth and the circular shape of the source. In this article, we propose a new optical layout consisting in two optimized shape mirrors, focusing independently the vertical and the horizontal source emission, and providing low aberration beams for large horizontal apertures. The setup has been used to design the new LNLS Brazilian synchrotron Infrared beamline.

  16. The inheritance of juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V; Somarajan, B I; Gupta, S; Chaurasia, A K; Kumar, S; Dutta, P; Gupta, V; Sharma, A; Tayo, B O; Nischal, K

    2016-10-25

    Juvenile onset open angle glaucoma (JOAG) affects patients before 40 years of age, who present with high intraocular pressure and deep steep cupping of the optic nerve head. While it was considered to be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, recent studies have shown an autosomal recessive pattern as well as sporadic occurrence of the disease in several families. In this review, we analyze the genetic basis of the disease along with common mutations and their association with JOAG. We also analyzed the inheritance patterns in a large group of unrelated JOAG patients (n = 336) from Northern India wherein the prevalence of familial occurrence was assessed and segregation analysis performed, to determine the mode of inheritance.

  17. Jet azimuthal angle correlations in the production of a Higgs boson pair plus two jets at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Junya; Baglio, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Azimuthal angle correlations of two jets in the process pp→ HHjj are studied. The loop induced O(α _s^4 α _{}^2) gluon fusion (GF) sub-process and the O(α _{}^4) weak boson fusion (WBF) sub-process are considered. The GF sub-process exhibits strong correlations in the azimuthal angles φ _{1,2}^{} of the two jets measured from the production plane of the Higgs boson pair and the difference between these two angles φ _1^{}-φ _2^{}, and a very small correlation in their sum φ _1^{}+φ _2^{}. Using a finite value for the mass of the loop running top quark in the amplitude is crucial for the correlations. The impact of a non-standard value for the triple Higgs self-coupling on the correlations is found small. The peak shifts of the azimuthal angle distributions reflect the magnitude of parity violation in the gg→ HH amplitude and the dependence of the distributions on parity violating phases is analytically clarified. The normalised distributions and the peak positions of the correlations are stable against the variation of factorisation and renormalisation scales. The WBF sub-process also produces correlated distributions and it is found that they are not induced by the quantum effect of the intermediate weak bosons but mainly by a kinematic effect. This kinematic effect is a characteristic feature of the WBF sub-process and is not observed in the GF sub-process. It is found that the correlations are different in the GF and in the WBF sub-processes. As part of the process dependent information, they will be helpful in the analyses of the process pp→ HHjj at the LHC.

  18. Numerical simulations of the bending of narrow-angle-tail radio jets by ram pressure or pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam; Sarazin, Craig L.; O'Dea, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations are used to study the bending of radio jets. The simulations are compared with observations of jets in narrow-angle-tail radio sources. Two mechanisms for the observed bending are considered: direct bending of quasi-continuous jets by ram pressure from intergalactic gas and bending by pressure gradients in the interstellar gas of the host galaxy, the pressure gradients themselves being the result of ram pressure by intergalactic gas. It is shown that the pressure gradients are much less effective in bending jets, implying that the jets have roughly 30 times lower momentum fluxes if they are bent by this mechanism. Ram-pressure bending produces jets with 'kidney-shaped' cross sections; when observed from the side, these jets appear to have diffuse extensions on the downstream side. On the other hand, pressure-gradient bending causes the jets to be densest near their upstream side.

  19. Current primary open-angle glaucoma treatments and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Beidoe, Gabriel; Mousa, Shaker A

    2012-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of blindness with no known cure. Management of the disease focuses on lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) with current classes of drugs like prostaglandin analogs, beta-blockers, alpha-agonists, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. These treatments have not helped all patients. Some patients continue to experience deterioration in the optic nerve even though their IOPs are within the normal range. New views have surfaced about other pathophysiological processes (such as oxidative stress, vascular dysfunction, and retinal cell apoptosis) being involved in POAG progression, and adjunctive treatments with drugs like memantine, bis(7)-tacrine, nimodipine, and mirtogenol are advocated. This review examines the current and proposed treatments for POAG. Some of the proposed drugs (bis(7)-tacrine, nimodipine, vitamin E, and others) have shown good promise, mostly as monotherapy in various clinical trials. It is recommended that both the current and proposed drugs be put through further robust trials in concurrent administration and evaluated. PMID:23118520

  20. Race, ethnicity and prevalence of primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Gong, Gordon; Haynatzki, Gleb; Wilson, M. Roy

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, some authors pooled data from studies on the Dutch, Australians and Americans of European origin in an attempt to predict the prevalence of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in the United States. PURPOSE: To examine potential ethnic diversity in the prevalence of POAG among populations of the "same race." Methods: Medical literature was searched, and 11 population-based studies on populations of African origin and five on populations of European origin were identified. RESULTS: The prevalence of POAG was significantly higher in white Australians than in the Dutch (p<0.001) and was significantly lower (p<0.001) among black populations in South Africa, Nigeria, Tanzania and the United States than in Ghana, St. Lucia or Barbados. Notably, the prevalence was significantly lower in Afro Caribbeans living in London than in St. Lucia or Barbados (p<0.001). There was, however, inconsistency in the definition of POAG among the different studies. CONCLUSIONS: There is a wide range in the prevalence of POAG among populations of the same "race," which might be attributed to the different methodology and definition of POAG; potential difference in social, behavioral and environmental factors; and/or genetic predisposition. Scrutiny is warranted when pooling data from different ethnic groups of the "same race" in meta-analyses. PMID:17052053

  1. Vascular and Autonomic Dysregulation in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Louis R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the review To discuss whether vascular dysfunction and autonomic dysfunction are related to primary open-angle glaucoma stratified by the intraocular pressure (IOP) level (the high tension glaucoma and normal tension glaucoma subtypes). Recent findings Patients with POAG across the spectrum of IOP exhibit a variety of ocular and non-ocular vascular abnormalities. Interestingly common genetic variation in NOS3 and the CAV1/CAV2 genomic regions, which code for proteins involved in setting vascular tone, are associated with POAG. These markers seem to stratify with POAG subtypes by sex or pattern of initial visual field loss. Overall it is clear that there is also cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in HTG and NTG but it is unclear if this dysfunction is more common in NTG compared to HTG. Summary Overall POAG is likely a heterogeneous disease but stratifying cases by IOP level associated with initial optic nerve damage may be less useful than using other endophenotype approaches. Embracing the evidence suggesting systemic endothelial and autonomic dysfunction are operative in POAG will help move beyond an IOP-centric view of the disease and facilitate “tearing down the wall” that divides treating physicians and a better understanding of POAG pathogenesis. PMID:26720776

  2. Highly Collimated Jets and Wide-angle Outflows in HH 46/47: New Evidence from Spitzer Infrared Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, William D.; Marsh, Kenneth. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present new details of the structure and morphology of the jets and outflows in HH 46/47 as seen in Spitzer infrared images from IRAC and MIPS, reprocessed using the 'HiRes' deconvolution technique. HiRes improves the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources. In addition to sharper views of previously reported bow shocks, we have detected (1) the sharply delineated cavity walls of the wide-angle biconical outflow, seen in scattered light on both sides of the protostar, (2) several very narrow jet features at distances approximately 400 AU to approximately 0.1 pc from the star, and (3) compact emissions at MIPS 24 m with the jet heads, tracing the hottest atomic/ionic gas in the bow shocks. Together the IRAC and MIPS images provide a more complete picture of the bow shocks, tracing both the molecular and atomic/ionic gases, respectively. The narrow width and alignment of all jet-related features indicate a high degree of jet collimation and low divergence (width of approximately 400 AU increasing by only a factor of 2.3 over 0.2 pc). The morphology of this jet, bow shocks, wide-angle outflows, and the fact that the jet is nonprecessing and episodic, constrain the mechanisms for producing the jet's entrained molecular gas, and origins of the fast jet, and slower wide-angle outflow.

  3. Clinical results of Trabectome surgery for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Takanori; Nishigaki, Shiro; Sato, Tomoki; Wakiyama, Harumi; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes when using Trabectome surgery and to evaluate factors associated with its effects in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and exfoliation glaucoma (EXG). Methods This was a prospective, non-randomized, observational, comparative cohort study in which Trabectome surgery was used alone in patients with POAG or EXG. Trabectome surgery was considered to have failed when at least one of the following three criteria was fulfilled: intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥21 mmHg and a <20% reduction below the baseline IOP on two consecutive follow-up visits 3 months or more after surgery; need for additional glaucoma surgery; and an increase in number of medications compared with baseline. Results The subjects were 32 males (34 eyes) and 46 females (48 eyes). POAG was observed in 43 eyes and EXG in 39 eyes. IOP after Trabectome surgery decreased significantly from 22.3±6.8 mmHg at baseline to 14.0±3.9 mmHg (23.0% reduction) at month 24 in all cases (P<0.0000). The success rate at 2 years was 51.2% for all cases (POAG, 50.9%; EXG, 49.2%). There was no significant difference in success rate between POAG and EXG (P=0.91). Preoperative IOP (P=0.033) and number of medications (P=0.041) were significant factors for surgical success/failure in multivariate logistic regression. No serious complications were observed. Conclusion Trabectome surgery achieved favorable IOP control and was equally effective in patients with POAG and those with EXG. Its effects were influenced by preoperative IOP and number of preoperative medications. PMID:26487799

  4. Screening of candidate genes for primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Xie, Lin; Ye, Jian; Liu, Yuewuyang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness in the world. To make progress in understanding POAG, it is necessary to identify more POAG-causing genes. Methods Using haplotype analysis, we found that mutational region is located on chromosome 2 in two families. Furthermore, we screened 11 candidate genes on chromosome 2 by protein–protein interaction (PPI) analysis, including mutS homolog 6 (MSH6), mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), v-rel reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog (REL), endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), vaccinia related kinase 2 (VRK2), F-box protein 11 (FBXO11), EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1), reticulon 4 (RTN4), RAB1A, member RAS oncogene family (RAB1A), ARP2 actin-related protein 2 homolog (ACTR2), and calmodulin 2 (phosphorylase kinase, delta; CALM2). These 11 genes are all predicted to be related to trabecular meshwork changes and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells in POAG patients. Results According to our study, FBXO11 and VRK2 may interact with tumor protein p53 to regulate mitochondrial membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane organization, and apoptosis. MSH2 is responsible for repairing DNA mismatches and RTN4 is for neuronal regeneration. Therefore, they are supposed to play a negative role in cellular process in POAG. CALM2 may be involved in retinal ganglion cell death and oxidative damage to cell communication. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the genes above may be associated with pathogenesis of POAG. PMID:22876139

  5. Retinal oximetry in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Olof Birna; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Gottfredsdottir, Maria Soffia; Harris, Alon; Stefánsson, Einar

    2011-08-16

    PURPOSE. To determine whether retinal vessel oxygen saturation is affected in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients. METHODS. Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with POAG was measured in retinal vessels with a spectrophotometric retinal oximeter in darkness, and visual fields were obtained. Oxygen tension (Po(2)) was calculated from oxygen saturation values. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation and Student's t-test. RESULTS. Mean oxygen saturation in venules was higher in persons with poor visual fields (68% ± 4%, mean ± SD) than in those with good visual fields (62% ± 3%; P = 0.0018). The mean arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was lower in persons with poor visual fields (30% ± 4%, n = 9) than in those with good visual fields (37% ± 4%; P = 0.0003; n = 12). No correlation was found between saturation in retinal arterioles and visual field mean defect (n = 31; r = -0.16; P = 0.38). Oxygen saturation in retinal venules correlated positively with worsening visual field mean defect (r = 0.43; P = 0.015). Arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation decreased significantly as the visual field mean defect worsened (r = -0.55; P = 0.0013). Mean Po(2) in venules was 38 ± 3 mm Hg. It was significantly higher in persons with poor visual field fields (40 ± 3 mm Hg) than in those with good visual fields (36 ± 2 mm Hg; P = 0.0016). CONCLUSIONS. Deeper glaucomatous visual field defects are associated with increased oxygen saturation in venules and decreased arteriovenous difference in retinal oxygen saturation. The data suggest that oxygen metabolism is affected in the glaucomatous retina, possibly related to tissue atrophy.

  6. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 2: Openings and Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Ever wondered how to use technology to teach angles? This article follows on from an earlier article published last year, providing a range of ideas for integrating technology and concrete materials with the teaching of angle concepts. The authors also provide a comprehensive list of free online games and learning objects that can be used to teach…

  7. Correlations between Preoperative Angle Parameters and Postoperative Unpredicted Refractive Errors after Cataract Surgery in Open Angle Glaucoma (AOD 500)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonseok; Bae, Hyoung Won; Lee, Si Hyung; Kim, Chan Yun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of intraocular lens (IOL) power prediction for cataract surgery with open angle glaucoma (OAG) and to identify preoperative angle parameters correlated with postoperative unpredicted refractive errors. Materials and Methods This study comprised 45 eyes from 45 OAG subjects and 63 eyes from 63 non-glaucomatous cataract subjects (controls). We investigated differences in preoperative predicted refractive errors and postoperative refractive errors for each group. Preoperative predicted refractive errors were obtained by biometry (IOL-master) and compared to postoperative refractive errors measured by auto-refractometer 2 months postoperatively. Anterior angle parameters were determined using swept source optical coherence tomography. We investigated correlations between preoperative angle parameters [angle open distance (AOD); trabecular iris surface area (TISA); angle recess area (ARA); trabecular iris angle (TIA)] and postoperative unpredicted refractive errors. Results In patients with OAG, significant differences were noted between preoperative predicted and postoperative real refractive errors, with more myopia than predicted. No significant differences were recorded in controls. Angle parameters (AOD, ARA, TISA, and TIA) at the superior and inferior quadrant were significantly correlated with differences between predicted and postoperative refractive errors in OAG patients (-0.321 to -0.408, p<0.05). Superior quadrant AOD 500 was significantly correlated with postoperative refractive differences in multivariate linear regression analysis (β=-2.925, R2=0.404). Conclusion Clinically unpredicted refractive errors after cataract surgery were more common in OAG than in controls. Certain preoperative angle parameters, especially AOD 500 at the superior quadrant, were significantly correlated with these unpredicted errors. PMID:28120576

  8. Association between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in eyes with narrow or open-angle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song-Feng; Wu, Ge-Wei; Chen, Chang-Xi; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in subjects with eyes with narrow or open-angle. METHODS The subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured with enhanced depth-imaging optical coherence tomography and anterior chamber parameters were measured with ultrasound biomicroscopy in one eye of 23 subjects with open-angle eyes and 38 subjects with narrow-angle eyes. The mean age was 59.52±7.04y for narrow-angle subjects and 60.76±7.23y for open-angle subjects (P=0.514). Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between choroidal thickness and narrow-angle parameters. RESULTS There were no differences in subfoveal choroidal thickness between open- and narrow-angle subjects (P=0.231). Anterior chamber parameters, including central anterior chamber depth, trabecular iris angle, iris thickness 500 µm from the scleral spur (IT500), and ciliary body thickness at 1 mm and 2 mm from the scleral spur (CBT1, CBT2) showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Subfoveal choroidal thickness showed negative correlation (β=-0.496, P=0.016) only with anterior chamber depth in the open-angle group and with age (β=-0.442, P=0.003) and IT500 (β=-0.399, P=0.008) in the narrow-angle group. However, subfoveal choroidal thickness was not correlated with trabecular iris angle, anterior chamber depth, ciliary body thickness, or central corneal thickness in the narrow-angle group. CONCLUSION Choroidal thickness does not differ in the two groups and has not correlated with anterior chamber parameters in narrow-angle subjects, suggesting a lack of relationship between choroidal thickness and primary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:27588269

  9. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JET

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeunier, M.-H.; Firdaouss, M.; Travere, J.-M.; Loarer, T.; Gauthier, E.; Martin, V.; Chabaud, D.; Humbert, E.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed.

  10. Simultaneous Cotton-Mouton and Faraday rotation angle measurements on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.; Murari, A.

    2006-10-15

    The change in the ellipticity of a laser beam that passes through plasma due to the Cotton-Mouton effect can provide additional information on the plasma density. This approach, complementary to the more traditional interferometric methods, has been implemented recently using the JET interferometer-polarimeter with a new setup. Routine Cotton-Mouton phase shift measurements are made on the vertical central chords simultaneously with the Faraday rotation angle data. These new data are used to provide robust line-integrated density measurements in difficult plasma scenarios, with strong Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) or pellets. These always affect interferometry, causing fringe jumps and preventing good control of the plasma density. A comparison of line-integrated density from polarimetry and interferometry measurements shows an agreement within 10%. Moreover, in JET the measurements can be performed close to a reactor relevant range of parameters, in particular, at high densities and temperatures. This provides a unique opportunity to assess the quality of the Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton phase shift measurements where both effects are strong and mutual nonlinear interaction between the two effects takes place.

  11. Experimental and Computational Induced Aerodynamics from Missile Jet Reaction Controls at Angles of Attack to 75 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Ashbury, Scott C.; Deere, Karen A.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine induced aerodynamic effects from jet reaction controls of an advanced air-to-air missile concept. The 75-percent scale model featured independently controlled reaction jets located near the nose and tail of the model. Aerodynamic control was provided by four fins located near the tail of the model. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.35 and 0.60, at angles of attack up to 75 deg and at nozzle pressure ratios up to 90. Jet-reaction thrust forces were not measured by the force balance but jet-induced forces were. In addition, a multiblock three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method was used to calculate the flowfield of the missile at angles of attack up to 40 deg. Results indicate that large interference effects on pitching moment were induced from operating the nose jets with the the off. Excellent correlation between experimental and computational pressure distributions and pitching moment were obtained a a Mach number of 0.35 and at angles of attack up to 40 deg.

  12. Effect of jet convergence angle on the performance of annular nozzles with semitoroidal concave plugs at Mach numbers up to 1.82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Results of an investigation at static conditions and at Mach numbers up to 1.82 are presented for 12 nozzle configurations which have jet convergence angle and jet throat area as geometric parameters. The variation of jet convergence angle from 15 to 40 deg had little effect on the performance of the nozzles having the large value of primary throat area; however, increasing jet convergence angle generally had an adverse effect on performance of the nozzles having the smaller value of primary throat area. The performance of the nozzle configurations with the larger primary throat area is competitive with nozzles designed for operation over the Mach number range.

  13. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  14. Thorough small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the instability of liquid micro-jets in air.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Benedetta; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Pérez, Javier; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Liquid jets are of interest, both for their industrial relevance and for scientific applications (more important, in particular for X-rays, after the advent of free-electron lasers that require liquid jets as sample carrier). Instability mechanisms have been described theoretically and by numerical simulation, but confirmed by few experimental techniques. In fact, these are mainly based on cameras, which is limited by the imaging resolution, and on light scattering, which is hindered by absorption, reflection, Mie scattering and multiple scattering due to complex air/liquid interfaces during jet break-up. In this communication it is demonstrated that synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can give quantitative information on liquid jet dynamics at the nanoscale, by detecting time-dependent morphology and break-up length. Jets ejected from circular tubes of different diameters (100-450 µm) and speeds (0.7-21 m s(-1)) have been explored to cover the Rayleigh and first wind-induced regimes. Various solvents (water, ethanol, 2-propanol) and their mixtures have been examined. The determination of the liquid jet behaviour becomes essential, as it provides background data in subsequent studies of chemical and biological reactions using SAXS or X-ray diffraction based on synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers.

  15. Electromagnetically driven, fast opening and closing gas jet valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Mourik, R. A.; Leemans, W. P.; Murphy, H.; Clover, M.

    2011-03-01

    The design and performance are presented of an electromagnetically driven gas valve [M. Krishnan, J. Wright, and T. Ma, Proceedings of the 13th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, Santa Cruz, CA, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1086 (AIP, New York, 2008)] that opens in <100μs, closes in <500μs, and can operate at pressures of ˜1000psia to drive supersonic nozzles. Such a valve has applications to laser-plasma accelerators, where the fast opening and closing would allow sharper edges to the flow and also allow higher rep-rate operation without loading the vacuum chamber. The valve action is effected by a flyer plate accelerated by the electromagnetic impulse of a low inductance, spiral wound, strip-line coil driven by a capacitor. Gas flows out of the valve when the seal between this flyer plate and the valve seat is broken. The electromagnetic force greatly exceeds the restoring forces provided by a spring and the gas pressure against the valve seat. Piezoresistive sensor and laser interferometer measurements of flow show that the valve opens in ˜100μs for all pressures up to 800 psia. The closing time is 500μs, set by the spring constant and mass. The prototype valve has been operated with helium at 0.5 Hz and at 500 psia for ˜1 hour at a time with no cooling.

  16. Slugs and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails: jets from an unconventional angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, D. E.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss some aspects of extragalactic jets originating from super massive black holes in the centres of active galaxies (and quasars). We start with a short review of sizes and flavors and then argue that the emission we detect across the electromagnetic spectrum does not come from the essence of the jet, but is rather a product of the jet. We go on to discuss some topics concerning synchrotron emission from jets, mainly aspects of knots. Finally we discuss the emission processes for the X-rays and describe a current experiment with LOFAR designed to test a requirement of inverse Compton models.

  17. Strategies for Choosing Descent Flight-Path Angles for Small Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong Gilbert; Green, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Three candidate strategies for choosing the descent flight path angle (FPA) for small jets are proposed, analyzed, and compared for fuel efficiency under arrival metering conditions. The strategies vary in operational complexity from a universally fixed FPA, or FPA function that varies with descent speed for improved fuel efficiency, to the minimum-fuel FPA computed for each flight based on winds, route, and speed profile. Methodologies for selecting the parameter for the first two strategies are described. The differences in fuel burn are analyzed over a year s worth of arrival traffic and atmospheric conditions recorded for the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) Airport during 2011. The results show that the universally fixed FPA strategy (same FPA for all flights, all year) burns on average 26 lbs more fuel per flight as compared to the minimum-fuel solution. This FPA is adapted to the arrival gate (direction of entry to the terminal) and various timespans (season, month and day) to improve fuel efficiency. Compared to a typical FPA of approximately 3 degrees the adapted FPAs vary significantly, up to 1.3 from one arrival gate to another or up to 1.4 from one day to another. Adapting the universally fixed FPA strategy to the arrival gate or to each day reduces the extra fuel burn relative to the minimum-fuel solution by 27% and 34%, respectively. The adaptations to gate and time combined shows up to 57% reduction of the extra fuel burn. The second strategy, an FPA function, contributes a 17% reduction in the 26 lbs of extra fuel burn over the universally fixed FPA strategy. Compared to the corresponding adaptations of the universally fixed FPA, adaptations of the FPA function reduce the extra fuel burn anywhere from 15-23% depending on the extent of adaptation. The combined effect of the FPA function strategy with both directional and temporal adaptation recovers 67% of the extra fuel relative to the minimum-fuel solution.

  18. Changing Concepts of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    Battista, Renaldo N.; Huston, Patricia; Davis, M. William L.

    1986-01-01

    The understanding of primary open-angle glaucoma has changed over the past 20 years and recommendations on early detection are being revised. In this paper the use of Shiotz tonometry is critically examined, and the problems encountered in instituting alternative screening techniques are reviewed. ImagesFigure 3c PMID:21267099

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Trabectome Surgery in Chinese Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky W.Y.; Yick, Doris W.F.; Tsang, Susanna; Yuen, Can Y.F.; Lai, Jimmy S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical outcome of the Trabectome in Chinese open-angle glaucoma (OAG). This prospective case series recruited pseudophakic glaucoma subjects with open-angle configuration. Trabeculectomy ab interno was performed using the Trabectome to 120° of the trabecular meshwork. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and medications were recorded preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively. Visual acuity was measured preoperatively and at 1 and 6 months postoperatively. One-way ANOVA with Tukey Multiple Comparison Test were used to measure the pre and postoperative parameters. In 19 eyes of 19 Chinese subjects, 26.3% were uveitic, 68.4% were primary open-angle glaucoma, and 5.3% had a history of chronic angle-closure glaucoma with open-angles after cataract extraction. The subjects’ mean age was 67.5 ± 14.4 years, with 4 females and 15 males. Two patients required secondary filtration procedure. At 6 months, the IOP reduced by 34.8% (24.4 ± 4.4 mm Hg to 15.9 ± 5.1 mm Hg, P < 0.0001). The number of types of antiglaucoma medications was reduced by 28.2% (3.9 ± 0.8–2.8 ± 1.6, P < 0.0001). The visual acuity was static at 1 and 6 months postoperatively (P = 0.4). There were no intraoperative complications. 26.3% of subjects had a transient IOP spike > 21 mm Hg, 1 had hyphema requiring washout, and 1 had reactivation of herpetic keratitis. The success rate at 6 months was 89.5%. Trabectome achieved a modest reduction in IOP and medications in the majority of pseudophakic Chinese OAG eyes. PMID:27082559

  20. Intraocular pressure fluctuation after water drinking test in primary angle-closure glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Yi-Chieh; Teng, Mei-Ching; Lin, Pei-Wen; Tsai, Jen-Chia; Lai, Ing-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Context: Only a few studies have assessed intraocular pressure (IOP) changes during the water drinking test (WDT) in patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG). Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate IOP changes during WDT in patients with PACG versus primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Settings and Design: This was a prospective and single tertiary center study. Materials and Methods: PACG and POAG patients (n = 15 each) without prior glaucoma surgery were enrolled and subjected to WDT, wherein they consumed an amount of water proportional to their body weight within 10 min. IOP was measured at baseline and every 15 min for 1 h after water intake. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup comparisons were performed using Mann–Whitney U-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used for comparisons of IOP before and after water intake in the two groups. Regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with IOP fluctuations during WDT. Results: IOP changes over 1 h after water intake showed no significant differences between groups. The mean maximum fluctuation from baseline was 3.61 ± 2.49 and 3.79 ± 1.91 mmHg, respectively, in the PACG and POAG groups. The mean peak IOP was 19.17 ± 4.32 and 19.87 ± 3.44 mmHg in the PACG and PAOG groups, respectively. The axial length and anterior chamber depth showed no correlations with IOP fluctuations. Conclusions: We found similar IOP fluctuation curves and peak IOP values in both PACG and POAG patients subjected to WDT. These findings suggest that WDT is a useful test to induce IOP peaks in both POAG and PACG patients. PMID:28112134

  1. Investigation of Blade Angle of an Open Cross-Flow Runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Iio, Shouichiro; Veerapun, Salisa; Uchiyama, Tomomi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a nano-hydraulic turbine utilizing drop structure in irrigation channels or industrial waterways. This study was focused on an open-type cross-flow turbine without any attached equipment for cost reduction and easy maintenance. In this study, the authors used an artificial indoor waterfall as lab model. Test runner which is a simple structure of 20 circular arc-shaped blades sandwiched by two circular plates was used The optimum inlet blade angle and the relationship between the power performance and the flow rate approaching theoretically and experimentally were investigated. As a result, the optimum inlet blade angle due to the flow rate was changed. Additionally, allocation rate of power output in 1st stage and 2nd stage is changed by the blade inlet angle.

  2. New drugs and preparations for open-angle glaucoma in adults.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Primary (or chronic) open-angle glaucoma (POAG or COAG) may be asymptomatic but causes progressive optic nerve damage with significant loss of visual field. Treatments aim to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) by reducing the production of aqueous humour and/or increasing its drainage. Here we update our previous articles to reflect new drugs, preservative-free preparations and fixed-dose drug combinations for POAG.

  3. Flow Field Characterization of an Angled Supersonic Jet Near a Bluff Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.; Childs, Robert; Wernet, Mark P.; Shestopalov, Andrea; Melton, John E.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was performed to acquire data from a hot supersonic jet in cross flow for the purpose of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) turbulence modeling relevant to the Orion Launch Abort System. Hot jet conditions were at the highest temperature and pressure that could be acquired in the test facility. The nozzle pressure ratio was 28.5, and the nozzle temperature ratio was 3. These conditions are different from those of the flight vehicle, but sufficiently high to model the observed turbulence features. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) data and capsule pressure data are presented. Features of the flow field are presented and discussed

  4. Evaluation of the Faraday angle by numerical methods and comparison with the Tore Supra and JET polarimeter electronics.

    PubMed

    Brault, C; Gil, C; Boboc, A; Spuig, P

    2011-04-01

    On the Tore Supra tokamak, a far infrared polarimeter diagnostic has been routinely used for diagnosing the current density by measuring the Faraday rotation angle. A high precision of measurement is needed to correctly reconstruct the current profile. To reach this precision, electronics used to compute the phase and the amplitude of the detected signals must have a good resilience to the noise in the measurement. In this article, the analogue card's response to the noise coming from the detectors and their impact on the Faraday angle measurements are analyzed, and we present numerical methods to calculate the phase and the amplitude. These validations have been done using real signals acquired by Tore Supra and JET experiments. These methods have been developed to be used in real-time in the future numerical cards that will replace the Tore Supra present analogue ones.

  5. Jets.

    PubMed

    Rhines, Peter B.

    1994-06-01

    This is a discussion of concentrated large-scale flows in planetary atmospheres and oceans, argued from the viewpoint of basic geophysical fluid dynamics. We give several elementary examples in which these flows form jets on rotating spheres. Jet formation occurs under a variety of circumstances: when flows driven by external stress have a rigid boundary which can balance the Coriolis force, and at which further concentration can be caused by the beta effect; when there are singular lines like the line of vanishing windstress or windstress-curl, or the Equator; when compact sources of momentum, heat or mass radiate jet-like beta plumes along latitude circles; when random external stirring of the fluid becomes organized by the beta effect into jets; when internal instability of the mass field generates zonal flow which then is concentrated into jets; when bottom topographic obstacles radiate jets, and when frontogenesis leads to shallow jet formation. Essential to the process of jet formation in stratified fluids is the baroclinic life cycle described in geostrophic turbulence studies; there, conversion from potential to kinetic energy generates eddy motions, and these convert to quasibarotropic motions which then radiate and induce jet-like large-scale circulation. Ideas of potential vorticity stirring by eddies generalize the notion of Rossby-wave radiation, showing how jets embedded in an ambient potential vorticity gradient (typically due to the spherical geometry of the rotating planet) gain eastward momentum while promoting broader, weaker westward circulation. Homogenization of potential vorticity is an important limit point, which many geophysical circulations achieve. This well-mixed state is found in subdomains of the terrestrial midlatitude oceans, the high-latitude circumpolar ocean, and episodically in the middle atmosphere. Homogenization expels potential vorticity gradients vertically to the top and bottom of the fluid, and sideways to the edges of

  6. Cosmic Ray Energy Determination by the Reduced-Opening Angle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arthur E.; Gregory, John C.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the primary galactic cosmic ray species energy dependence in the regime beyond approx. 500 GeV/a is difficult due to the low flux and the limitations of energy measurement techniques. However, such observations are essential to resolve several questions of current interest such as: Is the enrichment of heavy species (Z greater that or equal to 6) cosmic rays first reported at higher energies by the proton satellite' and then later at lower energies real? The results from a previous deployment of the reduced opening angle technique are inconclusive but the authors do point to limitations in the previous techniques. Another intriguing puzzle is the energy dependence of silicon cosmic rays. Two independent experiments using different experimental techniques indicate that silicon is under-abundant. At present the observation is limited by statistics; it could still be a three sigma fluctuation. However, if confirmed the current models of acceleration and propagation which are species independent are seriously inadequate. To progress further the species and energy dependence must be accurately measured in a manner that is free from systematic uncertainty. In this report we show that the reduced opening angle method offers a simple and relatively inexpensive method to answer these questions. First we present the physics of the reduced opening angle and indicate the expected energy and charge resolution. The proposed detector design is then presented followed by the expected performance. Where ever possible simple phenomenological expressions that allow 'back of the envelope' estimates are given. More details are presented in the appendices. The limit of the energy resolution and the expected event rates for iron cosmic rays are calculated. Salient points are summarized in the conclusions.

  7. OVERFLOW Validation for Predicting Plume Impingement of Underexpanded Axisymmetric Jets onto Angled Flat Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry C.; Klopfer, Goetz

    2011-01-01

    This report documents how OVERFLOW, a computational fluid dynamics code, predicts plume impingement of underexpanded axisymmetric jets onto both perpendicular and inclined flat plates. The effects of the plume impinging on a range of plate inclinations varying from 90deg to 30deg are investigated and compared to the experimental results in Reference 1 and 2. The flow fields are extremely complex due to the interaction between the shock waves from the free jet and those deflected by the plate. Additionally, complex mixing effects create very intricate structures in the flow. The experimental data is very limited, so these validation studies will focus only on cold plume impingement on flat and inclined plates. This validation study will help quantify the error in the OVERFLOW simulation when applied to stage separation scenarios.

  8. Pit-like changes of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Radius, R. L.; Maumenee, A. E.; Green, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Six patients with open-angle glaucoma and acquired pit-like changes in the optic nerve head are presented. In 1 patient evolution of the pit-like defect is documented. In all 6 patients progression of associated visual field deficits is described. It is suggested that such pit-like changes in selected patients with glaucoma may not represent congenital lesions but rather local, progressive nerve head disease, occurring particularly in response to raised intraocular pressure. The management of patients with optic nerve head pitting and the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy are discussed with respect to this observation. Images PMID:666988

  9. Effect of collector configuration on test section turbulence levels in an open-jet wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, G. S.; Molloy, John K.; Barna, P. Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Flow quality studies in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel indicated periodic flow pulsation at discrete frequencies in the test section when the tunnel operated in an open-jet configuration. To alleviate this problem, experiments were conducted in a 1/24-scale model of the full-scale tunnel to evaluate the turbulence reduction potential of six collector configurations. As a result of these studies, the original bell-mouth collector of the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel was replaced by a collector with straight walls, and a slot was incorporated between the trailing edge of the collector and the entrance of the diffuser.

  10. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  11. [The effect of crystalline lens extraction on intraocular pressure in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Macarie, S; Macarie, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This issue presents the results of a study on patients with cataract and primary open angle glaucoma who suffered lens extraction for cataract. We analise the effects of the lens extraction on the level of intraocular pressure at this patients.

  12. iStent trabecular micro-bypass stent for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kim; Saheb, Hady

    2014-01-01

    Trabecular micro-bypass stents, commonly known as iStents, are micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) devices used to treat open-angle glaucoma. Like other MIGS procedures that enhance trabecular outflow, the iStent lowers intraocular pressure (IOP) by creating a direct channel between the anterior chamber and Schlemm’s canal. iStents are typically implanted at the time of phacoemulsification for patients with open-angle glaucoma and visually significant cataracts. This review summarizes the published data regarding the efficacy, safety, and cost considerations of trabecular micro-bypass stents. Most studies found statistically significant reductions in mean IOP and ocular medication use after combined phacoemulsification with single or double iStent implantation. The devices were found to be very safe, with a safety profile similar to that of cataract surgery. Complications were infrequent, with the most common complications being temporary stent obstruction or malposition, which resolved with observation or secondary procedures. Future studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and expanded indications. PMID:25284980

  13. Novel Pharmacologic Candidates for Treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Louise J.; Tsai, James C.; Liu, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (OAG) affects approximately 45 million people worldwide and more than 2.5 million people aged 40 years or older in the United States. Pharmacologic treatment for glaucoma is directed towards lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) to slow disease progression and delay visual field loss. Current medical treatment options for the lowering of IOP include the following classes of topical medications: beta-adrenergic antagonists, alpha-adrenergic agonists, cholinergic agonists, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and prostaglandin analogs. Issues with existing drugs include failure to achieve target IOP with monotherapy, drug-related side effects, and low patient compliance with multiple daily administration of eye drops. In recent years, the scientific and medical community has seen encouraging development of novel classes of drugs for primary OAG, the majority of which lower IOP by targeting the trabecular meshwork outflow pathway to increase aqueous humor outflow. Among the most promising new pharmacologic candidates are rho kinase inhibitors including ripasudil (K-115), netarsudil (AR-13324), and AMA0076; adenosine receptor agonists including trabodenoson (INO-8875); and modified prostaglandin analogs including latanoprostene bunod (LBN, BOL-303259-X) and ONO-9054. This study aims to systematically review and summarize the most recent developments in clinical trials for new pharmacologic options for the treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma. PMID:28356898

  14. Question on clinical efficiency and principles of diode laser radiation activity at a primary open-angle glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshunov, A. V.; Litvinova, G. G.; Ilyina, O. S.; Easakiva, A. L.; Fyodorov, A. A.; Poleva, R. P.

    1999-07-01

    The efficiency of a diode laser with a wavelength 0,81 microns in treatment of an open-angle glaucoma is investigated. The diode LTP is a pathogenesis oriented method of treatment of an open angle glaucoma: it gives in improvement of outflow of an intraocular fluid, stabilization and improvement of visual functions for patients with initial and developed stages of disease at term of observation up to 12 months.

  15. Aeroacoustic Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear in an Open Jet Facility Using FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida s open-jet acoustic facility known as UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver, FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions compare favorably with the measured data. Unsteady flowfield data obtained from the FUN3D code are used as input to a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the sound pressure levels at microphones placed in the farfield. Significant improvement in predicted noise levels is obtained when the flowfield data from the open jet UFAFF simulations is used as compared to the case using flowfield data from the closed-wall BART configuration.

  16. Jet maximization, axis minimization, and stable cone finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse

    2015-10-01

    Jet finding is a type of optimization problem, where hadrons from a high-energy collision event are grouped into jets based on a clustering criterion. As three interesting examples, one can form a jet cluster that (i) optimizes the overall jet four-vector, (ii) optimizes the jet axis, or (iii) aligns the jet axis with the jet four-vector. In this paper, we show that these three approaches to jet finding, despite being philosophically quite different, can be regarded as descendants of a mother optimization problem. For the special case of finding a single cone jet of fixed opening angle, the three approaches are genuinely identical when defined appropriately, and the result is a stable cone jet with the largest value of a quantity J . This relationship is only approximate for cone jets in the rapidity-azimuth plane, as used at the Large Hadron Collider, though the differences are mild for small radius jets.

  17. HIGH-EFFICIENCY PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION OF LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS: THE EFFECT OF THE VIEWING ANGLE

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2011-05-01

    We present the results of a numerical investigation of the spectra and light curves of the emission from the photospheres of long-duration gamma-ray burst jets. We confirm that the photospheric emission has high efficiency and show that the efficiency increases slightly with the off-axis angle. We show that the peak frequency of the observed spectrum is proportional to the square root of the photosphere's luminosity, in agreement with the Amati relation. However, a quantitative comparison reveals that the thermal peak frequency is too small for the corresponding total luminosity. As a consequence, the radiation must be out of thermal equilibrium with the baryons in order to reproduce the observations. Finally, we show that the spectrum integrated over the emitting surface is virtually indistinguishable from a Planck law, and therefore an additional mechanism has to be identified to explain the non-thermal behavior of the observed spectra at both high and low frequencies.

  18. Measure of electron cyclotron emission at multiple angles in high T{sub e} plasmas of JET

    SciTech Connect

    Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Farina, D.; Platania, P.; Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; De La Luna, E.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    The oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic installed at JET allows simultaneous analysis of the ECE spectra along three lines of sight (with toroidal angles of 0 deg., {approx}10 deg., and {approx}20 deg.) and two linear polarizations for each oblique line of sight. The diagnostic is capable of measuring EC emission over the band of 75-800 GHz with 5 ms time resolution and 7.5 GHz spectral resolution, and it is designed to investigate the features of ECE spectra related to electron distribution in the thermal velocity range. Instrumental accuracy was assessed using sources at different temperatures (77-900 K) and with plasma emission. ECE from high temperature plasmas and in the presence of fast ions has been compared to simulations performed with the modeling code SPECE, setting an upper limit to possible discrepancies from thermal emission.

  19. Adherence to treatment in patients with open-angle glaucoma and its related factors

    PubMed Central

    Movahedinejad, Tayebeh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lack of adherence to medical treatments typically lead to burdensome consequences such as progressive visual impairment, blindness, and disabilities. This study aimed to determine the adherence to medication in patients with open-angle glaucoma and related factors in patients referred to the Matini Ophthalmology Hospital in Kashan, Iran. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from 23 July 2015 to 20 January 2016 on all patients with open-angle glaucoma referred to the Matini Ophthalmology Hospital in Kashan, Iran. A questionnaire was used to gather data about patients’ demographics and factors affecting adherence to medical treatments. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used to evaluate the adherence to glaucoma medication. Results were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and logistic regression analysis were used. Results In total, 130 patients with a mean age of 55.36 ± 15.54 were studied. Only 34.6% of patients completely adhered to glaucoma medications. The chi-square test showed that age (p=0.007), education (p=0.01), life entourage (p=0.04), place of residence (p=0.06), average monthly income (p=0.005), the interval between medical visits (p=0.007), problem in scheduling the medical visits (p<0.001), number of medications (p<0.001), lifelong using and side-effects of medications (p<0.001), answers of the physician to the patient’s questions (p<0.001), financial and traveling problems (p<0.001), lack of skill in using eye drops (p<0.001), lack of awareness of glaucoma complications and symptoms (p<0.001), forgetting, fatigue, impatience, believing in uselessness of medications, and lack of support from family (p<0.001) were associated with patients’ adherence. Logistic regression showed that 89% of variance of patients’ adherence to glaucoma medications can be predicted by seven factors: problems in traveling and scheduling medical visits, the large number and side effects of medications

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and the Risk of Open-angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Vikas; Varma, Rohit; Francis, Brian A.; Wu, Joanne; Torres, Mina; Azen, Stanley P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the risk of having open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in an adult Latino population. Design Population-based cross-sectional study. Participants Latinos 40 years and older (n = 5894) from 6 census tracts in Los Angeles, California. Methods Participants from the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES), a large population-based study of self-identified adult Latinos, answered an interviewer-administered questionnaire and underwent a clinical and complete ocular examination, including visual field (VF) testing and stereo fundus photography. A participant was defined as having diabetes mellitus (DM) if she or he had a history of being treated for DM, the participant’s glycosylated hemoglobin was measured at 7.0% or higher, or the participant had random blood glucose of 200 mg% or higher. Type 2 DM was defined if the participant was 30 years or older when diagnosed with DM. Open-angle glaucoma was defined as the presence of an open angle and a glaucomatous VF abnormality and/or evidence of glaucomatous optic disc damage in at least one eye. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk of having OAG in persons with T2DM. Main Outcome Measure Prevalence of OAG. Results Of the 5894 participants with complete data, 1157 (19.6%) had T2DM and 288 (4.9%) had OAG. The prevalence of OAG was 40% higher in participants with T2DM than in those without T2DM (age/gender/intraocular pressure–adjusted odds ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–1.8; P = 0.03). Trend analysis revealed that a longer duration of T2DM (stratified into 5-year increments) was associated with a higher prevalence of OAG (P<0.0001). Conclusion The presence of T2DM and a longer duration of T2DM were independently associated with a higher risk of having OAG in the LALES cohort. The high prevalences of T2DM and OAG and their association in this fastest growing segment of the United States population have significant

  1. Linear theory of boundary effects in open wind tunnels with finite jet lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzoff, S; Gardner, Clifford S; Diesendruck, Leo; Eisenstadt, Bertram J

    1950-01-01

    In the first part, the boundary conditions for an open wind tunnel (incompressible flow) are examined with special reference to the effects of the closed entrance and exit sections. Basic conditions are that the velocity must be continuous at the entrance lip and that the velocities in the upstream and downstream closed portions must be equal. In the second part, solutions are derived for four types of two-dimensional open tunnels, including one in which the pressures on the two free surfaces are not equal. Numerical results are given for every case. In general, if the lifting element is more than half the tunnel height from the inlet, the boundary effect at the lifting element is the same as for an infinitely long open tunnel. In the third part, a general method is given for calculating the boundary effect in an open circular wind tunnel of finite jet length. Numerical results are given for a lifting element concentrate at a point on the axis.

  2. High-energy-density electron jet generation from an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T. P. Shao, F. Q.; Zou, D. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, W. Q.; Li, X. H.; Liu, J. X.; Ouyang, J. M.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Wang, J. W.; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-01-14

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we propose a scheme for strong coupling of a petawatt laser with an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasmas. When relevant parameters are properly chosen, most laser energy can be fully deposited inside the cone with only 10% leaving the tip opening. Due to the asymmetric ponderomotive acceleration by the strongly decayed laser pulse, high-energy-density electrons with net laser energy gain are accumulated inside the cone, which then stream out of the tip opening continuously, like a jet. The jet electrons are fully relativistic, with speeds around 0.98−0.998 c and densities at 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} level. The jet can keep for a long time over 200 fs, which may have diverse applications in practice.

  3. Molecular biomarkers in primary open-angle glaucoma: from noninvasive to invasive.

    PubMed

    Agnifili, Luca; Pieragostino, Damiana; Mastropasqua, Alessandra; Fasanella, Vincenzo; Brescia, Lorenza; Tosi, Gian Marco; Sacchetta, Paolo; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma, the first cause of irreversible blindness worldwide, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells. There are different subtypes of glaucoma, all expression of a common optic neuropathy; primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most diffuse subtype in western countries. To date, unfortunately, several questions still remain unsolved in the glaucoma management, such as the availability of powerful methods for screening high-risk populations, early diagnosis, timely detection of damage progression, and prediction of response to therapy. Over the last years, biomarkers have gained immense scientific and clinical interest to solve these issues, with countless molecules that have been candidate as potential biomarkers. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge about the most robust molecular biomarkers proposed in POAG, distinguishing noninvasive from minimally invasive, and invasive biomarkers, according to the procedure adopted to collect fluid samples.

  4. A common variant near TGFBR3 is associated with primary open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Allingham, R Rand; Nakano, Masakazu; Jia, Liyun; Chen, Yuhong; Ikeda, Yoko; Mani, Baskaran; Chen, Li-Jia; Kee, Changwon; Garway-Heath, David F; Sripriya, Sarangapani; Fuse, Nobuo; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Huang, Chukai; Namburi, Prasanthi; Burdon, Kathryn; Perera, Shamira A; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lin, Ying; Ueno, Morio; Ozaki, Mineo; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Krishnadas, Subbiah Ramasamy; Osman, Essam A; Lee, Mei Chin; Chan, Anita S Y; Tajudin, Liza-Sharmini A; Do, Tan; Goncalves, Aurelien; Reynier, Pascal; Zhang, Hong; Bourne, Rupert; Goh, David; Broadway, David; Husain, Rahat; Negi, Anil K; Su, Daniel H; Ho, Ching-Lin; Blanco, Augusto Azuara; Leung, Christopher K S; Wong, Tina T; Yakub, Azhany; Liu, Yutao; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Han, Jong Chul; Hon, Do Nhu; Shantha, Balekudaru; Zhao, Bowen; Sang, Jinghong; Zhang, NiHong; Sato, Ryuichi; Yoshii, Kengo; Panda-Jonas, Songhomita; Ashley Koch, Allison E; Herndon, Leon W; Moroi, Sayoko E; Challa, Pratap; Foo, Jia Nee; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Simmons, Cameron P; Bich Chau, Tran Nguyen; Sharmila, Philomenadin Ferdinamarie; Chew, Merwyn; Lim, Blanche; Tam, Pansy O S; Chua, Elaine; Ng, Xiao Yu; Yong, Victor H K; Chong, Yaan Fun; Meah, Wee Yang; Vijayan, Saravanan; Seongsoo, Sohn; Xu, Wang; Teo, Yik Ying; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Kang, Jae H; Haines, Jonathan L; Cheng, Ching Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Richards, Julia E; Ritch, Robert; Gaasterland, Douglas E; Pasquale, Louis R; Liu, Jianjun; Jonas, Jost B; Milea, Dan; George, Ronnie; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A; Mori, Kazuhiko; Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W; Girkin, Christopher A; Zhang, Mingzhi; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Vijaya, Lingam; Mackey, David A; Wong, Tien Yin; Craig, Jamie E; Sun, Xinghuai; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Wiggs, Janey L; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Yang, Zhenglin; Pang, Chi Pui; Wang, Ningli; Hauser, Michael A; Tashiro, Kei; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga N

    2015-07-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), a major cause of blindness worldwide, is a complex disease with a significant genetic contribution. We performed Exome Array (Illumina) analysis on 3504 POAG cases and 9746 controls with replication of the most significant findings in 9173 POAG cases and 26 780 controls across 18 collections of Asian, African and European descent. Apart from confirming strong evidence of association at CDKN2B-AS1 (rs2157719 [G], odds ratio [OR] = 0.71, P = 2.81 × 10(-33)), we observed one SNP showing significant association to POAG (CDC7-TGFBR3 rs1192415, ORG-allele = 1.13, Pmeta = 1.60 × 10(-8)). This particular SNP has previously been shown to be strongly associated with optic disc area and vertical cup-to-disc ratio, which are regarded as glaucoma-related quantitative traits. Our study now extends this by directly implicating it in POAG disease pathogenesis.

  5. A comparison of betaxolol and timolol in open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feghali, J G; Kaufman, P L; Radius, R L; Mandell, A I

    1988-04-01

    In a randomized, double-masked study, 41 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension were treated with betaxolol 0.5% or timolol 0.5% drops for 26 weeks. The average decrease in intraocular pressure (IOP) over the total study period was significant with both betaxolol (-6.3 mmHg) and timolol (-7.2 mmHg) in patients receiving no adjunctive therapy. There was no difference between betaxolol and timolol with respect to changes from baseline IOP. Significantly decreased mean brachial arterial pressure (MAP) was seen only with timolol, although the difference between the two groups was not significant. Pulse, pupil size, and basal tear secretion were unchanged in both groups. Burning upon instillation of the drops was more frequent with betaxolol.

  6. Modern Concepts of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mikelberg, Frederick S.

    1986-01-01

    Chronic open-angle glaucoma is an important cause of blindness in North America. It consists of the triad of elevated intraocular pressure, pathological cupping of the optic nerve head, and visual field loss. Sophisticated techniques have been developed to determine more accurately the health of the optic nerve head and the status of the visual field. Therapy is aimed at lowering intraocular pressure. This includes topical and systemic therapy followed by laser therapy if necessary. Surgery is indicated if laser and medical treatment fail. The family practitioner has an important role to play in screening individuals to detect this disease. The family practitioner should be aware of the systemic and topical side effects of anti-glaucoma medications. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3 PMID:21267101

  7. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, M K; Samples, J R; Kramer, P L; Rust, K; Topinka, J R; Yount, J; Koler, R D; Acott, T S

    1997-01-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. PMID:9012402

  9. A Relationship Between Constraint and the Critical Crack Tip Opening Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William M.; James, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Of the various approaches used to model and predict fracture, the Crack Tip Opening Angle (CTOA) fracture criterion has been successfully used for a wide range of two-dimensional thin-sheet and thin plate applications. As thicker structure is considered, modeling the full three-dimensional fracture process will become essential. This paper investigates relationships between the local CTOA evaluated along a three-dimensional crack front and the corresponding local constraint. Previously reported tunneling crack front shapes were measured during fracture by pausing each test and fatigue cycling the specimens to mark the crack surface. Finite element analyses were run to model the tunneling shape during fracture, with the analysis loading conditions duplicating those tests. The results show an inverse relationship between the critical fracture value and constraint which is valid both before maximum load and after maximum load.

  10. CRACK TIP OPENING DISPLACEMENT AND ANGLE FOR A GROWING CRACK IN CARBON STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    LAM, POH-SANG

    2005-01-18

    The crack tip opening displacements and angles (CTOD/CTOA) are calculated with finite element method based on the test data of a set of constraint-dependent J-R curves for A285 carbon steel. The values of the CTOD/CTOA are initially high at initiation, but rapidly decrease to a nearly constant value. When the common practice is adopted by using only the constant part of CTOD/CTOA as the fracture criterion, the crack growth behavior is shown to be severely underestimated. However, with a bilinear form of CTOD/CTOA fracture criterion which approximates the initial non-constant portion, the experimental load vs. crack extension curves can be closely predicted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the CTOD/CTOA is crack tip constraint dependent. The values of CTOD/CTOA for specimens with various ratios of crack length to specimen width (a/W) are reflected by the J-R curves and their slopes.

  11. A cohort study of duplex Doppler examinations of the carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmion, Vincent J; Aldoori, Munther I; Woodcock, John P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the possibility of pathological change in the common carotid artery at the bifurcation and in the internal carotid artery beyond the bifurcation which could contribute to a reduced diastolic pressure as observed in primary open angle glaucoma. Design Duplex ultrasonic examinations of carotid bifurcations were conducted on 80 patients. Carotid artery defects were allocated into three types: no demonstrable flow defects, internal carotid artery abnormalities and disease in the carotid bulb. Setting Bristol Royal Infirmary Vascular Laboratory. Participants Eighty patients (mean age 69.6 years) providing a total of 160 sides to the analysis. Main outcome measures An estimated central retinal artery pressure, intraocular pressure and field loss were recorded for each side measured. Results Doppler investigations revealed significant levels of pathological change in the internal carotid distinct from changes at the carotid bulb. The disease revealed in the internal carotid artery was significantly associated with intraocular pressure (p = 0.032), with an effect small to medium in magnitude. The Q2 measure, derived from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure, was also substantively associated with disease in the internal carotid artery. Both intraocular pressure and the Q2 measure effectively discriminated between groups, with field loss providing rather less discriminating capability. There was a strong trend towards a higher intraocular pressures and a greater visual field loss with internal carotid artery disease. Conclusions Pathological changes in the extra cranial carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma exceed those in the arteries classified as normal. The presence of disease specifically in the internal carotid artery emphasised the need for a mechanism for the evaluation of the internal carotid apart from the carotid bulb. A basis for clarifying the presence of an ischaemic zone is proposed. PMID:25289141

  12. The Association Between Primary Open Angle Glaucoma and Clustered Components of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Kasiri, Ali; Montazeri, Mahdi; Rashidi, Negin; Montazeri, Maryam; Montazeri, Mohammad; Hedayati, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : There is conflicting evidence whether components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) increase or decrease the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The aim of the present study was to determine the association between metabolic syndrome and primary open-angle glaucoma. Methods : A total of 200 participants comprising 100 controls and 100 patients with POAG documented by clinical tests and examined by an experienced ophthalmologist using standard ophthalmologic equipment were included in the study. MetS was defined and based on ATP III criteria and POAG was defined by the criteria of the International Society of Geographic and Epidemiological Ophthalmology (ISGEO). The data were entered into the SPSS software and analyzed. Results : The prevalence of MetS in the glaucoma group was 53% in comparison to 38% in the control group (p=0.037). MetS was associated with an increased odds ratio for an IOP higher than 21 mmHg (OR: 1.72; 95% CI 1.03-2.79; p=0.034). The mean IOP was 24.91±4.29 mmHg in the patients without MetS, and 27.23±4.81 mmHg in those with MetS (p=0.027). The mean values of CCT were 603.64±63.16 µm in MetS patients and 579.27±72.87 µm in controls (p=0.018). Conclusion : Data showed an increased prevalence of components of metabolic syndrome in patients with glaucoma. The mechanisms underlying these associations need to be established in future studies. Our results support the recommendation that patients with metabolic syndrome undergo regular ophthalmological exams to monitor for the onset or progression of glaucoma. PMID:26535072

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of metabolic syndrome-related genes in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    AIM To analyze single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of primary open angle glaucoma- and metabolic syndrome-related genes in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), in order to elucidate the roles of metabolic syndrome as a risk factor in POAG progress. METHODS SNP genotypes and alleles of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-6 receptor (IL-6R), dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2), beta-fibrinogen (FGB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ2 (PPARG), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), E-selectin (E-Sel), apolipoprotein A-5 (APOA5), C-reactive protein (CRP), ectonueleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1), hepatic lipase (LIPC), adiponectin (ADIPOQ), paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and serine protease inhibitor E (SERPINE1) genes in POAG (n=37) and normal control (n=100) groups were measured with ABI Prism 7900HT Fluorescence Quantitative PCR and TaqMan SNP Genotyping fluorescence probe kit. RESULTS Genotypes and allele frequencies of IL-6R, IL-6, FGB, CRP, ENPP1, LIPC, ADIPOQ, PON1, and SERPINE1 in total POAG group were significantly different compared to the control group. CONCLUSION Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for POAG may be associated with genotypes and allele frequencies of the related genes. The corresponding gene expression and function can affect POAG progress, including roles of SERPINE1 in extracellular matrix, ENPP1 in insulin inhibition, IL-6 in endogenous neuroprotection, IL-6, IL-6R and E-Sel in autoimmune response, LIPC and FGB in blood hyperviscosity syndrome, ADIPOQ in NOS/NO production, PON1 in vascular endothelial protection. PMID:22553514

  14. A study of the discharge coefficient of jets from angled slots and conical orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linfield, Kevin William

    2000-10-01

    Non-ideal flows through angled orifices occur often in engineering applications such as mass flow meters, blast-wave simulators, gas propulsion devices and projectile launchers. For such flows, a correction factor in the form of a discharge coefficient is required to facilitate good design and efficient operation. The discharge coefficient depends on many parameters including atmospheric to stagnation pressure ratio, gas specific heat ratio, exit to channel area ratio, orifice shape, wall angle and orifice edge rounding. The dependence on these parameters (except edge rounding) was studied numerically by developing a two-dimensional finite-difference computer program that solves the subsonic flowfield in the hodograph plane by a relaxation method and the attached supersonic flowfield, if present, in the physical plane by a method of characteristics, joined together at the sonic surface by matching stream function values. The discharge coefficient was also studied experimentally by developing and testing an experimental facility using a new technique based on the partial blowdown of a pressurized vessel through a short pipe ending with conical orifices of different area ratios, wall angles and orifice edge roundings. Numerical and experimental data from these studies and also from the literature are compared and discussed. A software package called the " Cd Algorithm" was developed to reproduce quickly the combined numerical and experimental discharge coefficients for the entire set of parameters, and it outperforms previous algorithms in accuracy, efficiency and comprehensiveness. This Cd Algorithm uses analytical, numerical and experimental results at the limits for incompressible, critical and choked flows, and other Cd values between these limits are reproduced by using piecewise cubic polynomial splines.

  15. Relativistic Jets and Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Woosley, S. E.

    2001-05-01

    In order to study the relativistic jets from collapsars, we have developed a special relativistic multiple-dimensional hydrodynamics code similar to the GENESIS code (Aloy et al., ApJS, 122, 151). The code is based on the PPM interpolation algorithm and Marquina's Riemann solver. Using this code, we have simulated the propagation of axisymmetric jets along the rotational axis of collapsed rotating stars (collapsars). Using the progenitors of MacFadyen, Woosley, and Heger, a relativistic jet is injected at a given inner boundary radius. This radius, the opening angle of the jet, its Lorentz factor, and its total energy are parameters of the problem. A highly collimated, relativistic outflow is observed at the surface of the star several seconds later. We will discuss the hydrodynamical focusing of the jet, it's break out properties, time evolution, and sensitivity to the adopted parameters.

  16. Tank-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) Gene and Open-Angle Glaucomas (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Fingert, John H.; Robin, Alan L.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Kwon, Young H.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert; Alward, Wallace L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) gene copy-number variations (ie, gene duplications and triplications) in the pathophysiology of various open-angle glaucomas. Methods In previous studies, we discovered that copy-number variations in the TBK1 gene are associated with normal-tension glaucoma. Here, we investigated the prevalence of copy-number variations in cohorts of patients with other open-angle glaucomas—juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (n=30), pigmentary glaucoma (n=209), exfoliation glaucoma (n=225), and steroid-induced glaucoma (n=79)—using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Results No TBK1 gene copy-number variations were detected in patients with juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, or steroid-induced glaucoma. A TBK1 gene duplication was detected in one (0.44%) of the 225 exfoliation glaucoma patients. Conclusions TBK1 gene copy-number variations (gene duplications and triplications) have been previously associated with normal-tension glaucoma. An exploration of other open-angle glaucomas detected a TBK1 copy-number variation in a patient with exfoliation glaucoma, which is the first example of a TBK1 mutation in a glaucoma patient with a diagnosis other than normal-tension glaucoma. A broader phenotypic range may be associated with TBK1 copy-number variations, although mutations in this gene are most often detected in patients with normal-tension glaucoma. PMID:27881886

  17. Analysis of the qualitative dermatoglyphics of the digito-palmar complex in patients with primary open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Novak-Laus, Katia; Milicić, Jasna; Tedeschi-Reiner, Eugenia; Iveković, Renata; Korsić, Jadranka; Zrinsćak, Ognjen; Mandić, Zdravko

    2006-03-01

    The primary open-angle glaucomas are a group of diseases that have in common characteristic morphological changes at the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer, progressive retinal ganglion cells death and characteristic visual field loss. The risk for primary open angle glaucoma rises continuously with the level of the intraocular pressure. The disease advances slowly and there are no symptoms. Primary open angle glaucoma is caused by abnormal aqueous humour outflow in the trabecular meshwork in the open angle. Etiopathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma is unclear. The increased risk of glaucoma in relatives has long been recognized. Frequency for manifestation of the disease is 10-30% in family members. The discovery of the specific gene loci responsible for the manifestation of glaucoma has helped us to understand its mechanism of origin and definitely confirmed the hereditary nature of this disease. Digito-palmar dermatoglyphs were already used to determine hereditary base of many diseases and it was the reason for investigation of their qualitative patterns in patients with glaucoma (22 males and 23 females), their immediate relatives (19 males and 23 females) in comparison to a group of phenotypically healthy population (52 males and 56 females). The results pointed a connection with the dermatoglyphic traits of the digito-palmar complex between patients with glaucoma and their immediate relatives. There is a possible discrimination of patients and their immediate relatives from phenotypically healthy population, too.

  18. Torque Enhancement, Spin Equilibrium, and Jet Power from Disk-Induced Opening of Pulsar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of a rotating star’s magnetic field with a surrounding plasma disk lies at the heart of many questions posed by neutron stars in X-ray binaries. We consider the opening of stellar magnetic flux due to differential rotation along field lines coupling the star and disk, using a simple model for the disk-opened flux, the torques exerted on the star by the magnetosphere, and the power extracted by the electromagnetic wind. We examine the conditions under which the system enters an equilibrium spin state, in which the accretion torque is instantaneously balanced by the pulsar wind torque alone. For magnetic moments, spin frequencies, and accretion rates relevant to accreting millisecond pulsars, the spin-down torque from this enhanced pulsar wind can be substantially larger than that predicted by existing models of the disk-magnetosphere interaction, and is in principle capable of maintaining spin equilibrium at frequencies less than 1 kHz. We speculate that this mechanism may account for the non-detection of frequency increases during outbursts of SAX J1808.4-3658 and XTE J1814-338, and may be generally responsible for preventing spin-up to sub-millisecond periods. If the pulsar wind is collimated by the surrounding environment, the resulting jet can satisfy the power requirements of the highly relativistic outflows from Cir X-1 and Sco X-1. In this framework, the jet power scales relatively weakly with accretion rate, {L}{{j}}\\propto {\\dot{M}}4/7, and would be suppressed at high accretion rates only if the stellar magnetic moment is sufficiently low.

  19. The Influence of Structure Heights and Opening Angles of Micro- and Nanocones on the Macroscopic Surface Wetting Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ling; Laustsen, Milan; Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the influence of surface structure, namely the height and opening angles of nano- and microcones on the surface wettability. We show experimental evidence that the opening angle of the cones is the critical parameter on sample superhydrophobicity, namely static contact angles and roll-off angles. The textured surfaces are fabricated on silicon wafers by using a simple one-step method of reactive ion etching at different processing time and gas flow rates. By using hydrophobic coating or hydrophilic surface treatment, we are able to switch the surface wettability from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic without altering surface structures. In addition, we show examples of polymer replicas (polypropylene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different wettability, fabricated by injection moulding using templates of the silicon cone-structures. PMID:26892169

  20. The Influence of Structure Heights and Opening Angles of Micro- and Nanocones on the Macroscopic Surface Wetting Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Ling; Laustsen, Milan; Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the influence of surface structure, namely the height and opening angles of nano- and microcones on the surface wettability. We show experimental evidence that the opening angle of the cones is the critical parameter on sample superhydrophobicity, namely static contact angles and roll-off angles. The textured surfaces are fabricated on silicon wafers by using a simple one-step method of reactive ion etching at different processing time and gas flow rates. By using hydrophobic coating or hydrophilic surface treatment, we are able to switch the surface wettability from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic without altering surface structures. In addition, we show examples of polymer replicas (polypropylene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different wettability, fabricated by injection moulding using templates of the silicon cone-structures.

  1. Trabecular-iris circumference volume in open angle eyes using swept-source fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Rigi, Mohammed; Blieden, Lauren S; Nguyen, Donna; Chuang, Alice Z; Baker, Laura A; Bell, Nicholas P; Lee, David A; Mankiewicz, Kimberly A; Feldman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To introduce a new anterior segment optical coherence tomography parameter, trabecular-iris circumference volume (TICV), which measures the integrated volume of the peripheral angle, and establish a reference range in normal, open angle eyes. Methods. One eye of each participant with open angles and a normal anterior segment was imaged using 3D mode by the CASIA SS-1000 (Tomey, Nagoya, Japan). Trabecular-iris space area (TISA) and TICV at 500 and 750 µm were calculated. Analysis of covariance was performed to examine the effect of age and its interaction with spherical equivalent. Results. The study included 100 participants with a mean age of 50 (±15) years (range 20-79). TICV showed a normal distribution with a mean (±SD) value of 4.75 µL (±2.30) for TICV500 and a mean (±SD) value of 8.90 µL (±3.88) for TICV750. Overall, TICV showed an age-related reduction (P = 0.035). In addition, angle volume increased with increased myopia for all age groups, except for those older than 65 years. Conclusions. This study introduces a new parameter to measure peripheral angle volume, TICV, with age-adjusted normal ranges for open angle eyes. Further investigation is warranted to determine the clinical utility of this new parameter.

  2. The Primary Open-Angle African-American Glaucoma Genetics (POAAGG) Study: Baseline Demographics

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, Emily S.; Sankar, Prithvi S.; Miller-Ellis, Eydie; Regina, Meredith; Fertig, Raymond; Salinas, Julia; Pistilli, Maxwell; Salowe, Rebecca J.; Rhodes, Allison L.; Merritt, William T.; Chua, Michael; Trachtman, Benjamin T.; Gudiseva, Harini V.; Collins, David W.; Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Nichols, Charles; Henderer, Jeffrey; Ying, Gui-shuang; Varma, Rohit; Jorgenson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the baseline characteristics of the Primary Open-Angle African-American Glaucoma Genetics (POAAGG) study cohort, the largest African-American primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) population recruited at a single institution (University of Pennsylvania, Department of Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute) to date. Design Population-based, cross-sectional, case-control study. Participants 2,520 African-American subjects 35 years and older, recruited from the greater Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area. Methods Each subject underwent a detailed interview and eye examination. The interview assessed demographic, behavioral, medical, and ocular risk factors. Current zip codes surrounding the University of Pennsylvania were recorded and United States census data were queried to infer socioeconomic status. The eye exam included measurement of visual acuity and intraocular pressure, a detailed anterior and posterior segment examination including gonioscopy, dilated fundus and optic disc examination, visual fields, stereo disc photography, optical coherence tomography imaging, and measurement of central corneal thickness. Main Outcome Measures The baseline characteristics of gender, age, and glaucoma diagnosis were collected. Body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes, and alcohol and tobacco use, as well as ocular conditions including blindness, cataract, non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and use of ocular medication and surgery, were examined. Median population density, income, education level, and other socioeconomic measures were determined for the study cohort. Results Of the 2,520 African-Americans recruited to the POAAGG study to date, 2,067 (82.0%) including 807 controls and 1,260 POAG cases met all inclusion criteria and completed the detailed clinical ocular exam. Cases were more likely to have a lower BMI (p<0.01) and report a history of blindness (visual acuity of 20/200 or worse, p<0.001), while controls

  3. Anti-Neurotrophic Effects from Autoantibodies in Adult Diabetes Having Primary Open Angle Glaucoma or Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zimering, Mark B.; Moritz, Thomas E.; Donnelly, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To test for anti-endothelial and anti-neurotrophic effects from autoantibodies in subsets of diabetes having open-angle glaucoma, dementia, or control subjects. Methods: Protein-A eluates from plasma of 20 diabetic subjects having glaucoma or suspects and 34 age-matched controls were tested for effects on neurite outgrowth in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells or endothelial cell survival. The mechanism of the diabetic glaucoma autoantibodies’ neurite-inhibitory effect was investigated in co-incubations with the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 or the sulfated proteoglycan synthesis inhibitor sodium chlorate. Stored protein-A eluates from certain diabetic glaucoma or dementia subjects which contained long-lasting, highly stable cell inhibitory substances were characterized using mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing. Results: Diabetic primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or suspects (n = 20) or diabetic dementia (n = 3) autoantibodies caused significantly greater mean inhibition of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells (p < 0.0001) compared to autoantibodies in control diabetic (n = 24) or non-diabetic (n = 10) subjects without glaucoma (p < 0.01). Neurite inhibition by the diabetic glaucoma autoantibodies was completely abolished by 10 μM concentrations of Y27632 (n = 4). It was substantially reduced by 30 mM concentrations of sodium chlorate (n = 4). Peak, long-lasting activity survived storage ×5 years at 0–4°C and was associated with a restricted subtype of Ig kappa light chain. Diabetic glaucoma or dementia autoantibodies (n = 5) caused contraction and process retraction in quiescent cerebral cortical astrocytes effects which were blocked by 5 μM concentrations of Y27632. Conclusion: These data suggest that autoantibodies in subsets of adult diabetes having POAG (glaucoma suspects) and/or dementia inhibit neurite outgrowth and promote a reactive astrocyte morphology by a mechanism which may involve

  4. Simulation analysis of the effects of an initial cone position and opening angle on a cone-guided implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagawa, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.

    2013-10-15

    In inertial confinement fusion, the implosion process is important in forming a high-density plasma core. In the case of a fast ignition scheme using a cone-guided target, the fuel target is imploded with a cone inserted. This scheme is advantageous for efficiently heating the imploded fuel core; however, asymmetric implosion is essentially inevitable. Moreover, the effect of cone position and opening angle on implosion also becomes critical. Focusing on these problems, the effect of the asymmetric implosion, the initial position, and the opening angle on the compression rate of the fuel is investigated using a three-dimensional pure hydrodynamic code.

  5. [Magnetotherapy designed to affect cervical sympathetic ganglia for the treatment of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Veselova, E V; Kamenskikh, T G; Raĭgorodkiĭ, Iu M; Kolbenev, I O; Myshkina, E S

    2010-01-01

    The traveling magnetic field was used to treat primary open-angle glaucoma. The field was applied to the projection of cervical sympathetic ganglia of the patients. Hemodynamic parameters of posterior short ciliary arteries and central retinal artery were analysed along with visual evoked potentials, visual field limits, and visual acuity. It was shown that magnetotherapy with the use of an AMO-ATOS apparatus produces better clinical results in patients with stage I and II primary open-angle glaucoma compared with medicamentous therapy (intake of trental tablets).

  6. Boundary interference assessment and correction for open jet wind tunnels using panel methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Wael Ahmed

    The presence of nearby boundaries in a wind tunnel can lead to aerodynamic measurements on a model in the wind tunnel that differ from those that would be made when the boundaries of the moving fluid were infinitely far away. The differences, referred to as boundary interference or wall interference, can be quite large, such as when testing aircraft models developing high lift forces, or whose wingspan is a large fraction of the wind tunnel width, or high drag models whose frontal area is a large fraction of the tunnel cross section. Correction techniques for closed test section (solid walled) wind tunnels are fairly well developed, but relatively little recent work has addressed the case of open jet tunnels specifically for aeronautical applications. A method to assess the boundary interferences for open jet test sections is introduced. The main objective is to overcome some of the limitations in the classical and currently used methods for aeronautical and automotive wind tunnels, particularly where the levels of interference are large and distortion of the jet boundary becomes significant. The starting point is to take advantage of two well-developed approaches used in closed wall test sections, namely the boundary measurement approach and adaptive wall wind tunnels. A low-order panel code is developed because it offers a relatively efficient approach from the computational point of view, within the required accuracy. It also gives the method more flexibility to deal with more complex model geometries and test section cross sections. The method is first compared to the method of images. Several lifting and non-lifting model representations are used for both two- and three-dimensional studies. Then the method is applied to results of a test of a full-scale Wright Flyer replica inside the Langley Full Scale Tunnel. The study is extended to include the effect of model representation and the test section boundaries (closed, open and 3/4 open) on the interference

  7. Numerical study of pressure fluctuations in different guide vanes' opening angle in pump mode of a pump turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. K.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-11-01

    A numerical model based on a pumped storage power station was built to develop the numerical simulation, to analyze the pressure fluctuations in a pump turbine in different guide vanes' opening angle. The different guide vanes' opening angles were simulated using the SST k-ω turbulence model and SIMPLEC Pressure-Velocity coupling scheme. The pressure sensor were placed in mainly three positions, they are: bottom ring between runner and the wicket gates, downstream and left side in the draft tube cone below the runner. All the peak to peak values of pressure fluctuation meet signal probability of 97%. The frequency is gained by Fast Fourier Transform. The pressure fluctuations in different positions of the model in pump condition were showed when the guide vanes' opening angels were different. The simulation results confirmed the results gained in model tests. The results show that pressure fluctuations in design opening angle were much lower than those in off design opening angle. The main source of pressure fluctuations between runner and guide vanes is rotor stator interaction. While a lower frequency is the main frequency of the pressure fluctuation in draft tube.

  8. What can we learn about extragalactic jets from galactic jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer; Biretta, John

    2002-05-01

    Jets are powerful features of extragalactic radio sources; yet jets are also seen in young stellar objects and X-ray binaries within our own galaxy. These occupy a very different parameter space from the extragalactic jets, and yet many are similar in appearance and nature to their powerful extragalactic cousins. In many cases far more information is available for the galactic jets, due to, e.g., rapid evolution and knowledge of emission line ratios and Doppler velocities. We review properties of galactic jets and speculate at implications they have for extragalactic ones. Specifically we consider central engine mass, jet opening angle and Mach number, the nature of the emission knots, the symmetry of the ejection process, and the source history.

  9. Literature review and meta-analysis of translaminar pressure difference in open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Siaudvytyte, L; Januleviciene, I; Daveckaite, A; Ragauskas, A; Bartusis, L; Kucinoviene, J; Siesky, B; Harris, A

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence in the literature regarding translaminar pressure difference's (TPD) role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. The optic nerve is exposed not only to intraocular pressure in the eye, but also to intracranial pressure (ICP), as it is surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space. Although pilot studies have identified the potential importance of TPD in glaucoma, limited available data currently prevent a comprehensive description of the role that TPD may have in glaucomatous pathophysiology. In this review, we present all available qualified data from a systematic review of the literature of the role of TPD in open-angle glaucoma (OAG). PubMed (Medline), OVID Medline, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, and all available library databases were reviewed and subsequent meta-analysis of pooled mean differences are presented where appropriate. Five papers including 396 patients met criteria for inclusion to the analysis. Importantly, we included all observational studies despite differences in ICP measurement methods, as there is no consensus regarding best-practice ICP measurements in glaucoma. Our results show that not only TPD is higher in glaucoma patients compared with healthy subjects, it is related to structural glaucomatous changes of the optic disc. Our analysis suggests further longitudinal prospective studies are needed to investigate the influence of TPD in OAG, with a goal of overcoming methodological weaknesses of previous studies. PMID:26183286

  10. Literature review and meta-analysis of translaminar pressure difference in open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Siaudvytyte, L; Januleviciene, I; Daveckaite, A; Ragauskas, A; Bartusis, L; Kucinoviene, J; Siesky, B; Harris, A

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence in the literature regarding translaminar pressure difference's (TPD) role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. The optic nerve is exposed not only to intraocular pressure in the eye, but also to intracranial pressure (ICP), as it is surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space. Although pilot studies have identified the potential importance of TPD in glaucoma, limited available data currently prevent a comprehensive description of the role that TPD may have in glaucomatous pathophysiology. In this review, we present all available qualified data from a systematic review of the literature of the role of TPD in open-angle glaucoma (OAG). PubMed (Medline), OVID Medline, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, and all available library databases were reviewed and subsequent meta-analysis of pooled mean differences are presented where appropriate. Five papers including 396 patients met criteria for inclusion to the analysis. Importantly, we included all observational studies despite differences in ICP measurement methods, as there is no consensus regarding best-practice ICP measurements in glaucoma. Our results show that not only TPD is higher in glaucoma patients compared with healthy subjects, it is related to structural glaucomatous changes of the optic disc. Our analysis suggests further longitudinal prospective studies are needed to investigate the influence of TPD in OAG, with a goal of overcoming methodological weaknesses of previous studies.

  11. Evaluation of Contrast Sensitivity, Chromatic Vision, and Reading Ability in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Güerri, Noemi; Cameo, Beatriz; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare contrast sensitivity, acquired color vision deficiency, and reading ability in patients with glaucoma at different stages of the disease and to establish correlations between visual field parameters and visual function scores. Methods. This prospective cross-sectional study included 121 glaucoma patients. Subjects with a diagnosis of chronic open angle glaucoma were recruited and classified according to Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson criteria. Patients with severe visual field defects were excluded because they were older, which could bias the interpretation of visual function tests. Contrast sensitivity was measured using the Pelli-Robson Chart and the CSV1000E test. Chromatic vision was evaluated using the Farnsworth-panel D15 and the L'Anthony D15 tests of Vision Color Recorder software. Reading ability was measured using Radner-Vissum test. Results. Contrast sensitivity (with photopic and mesopic luminance with glare) differed significantly between patients with early and moderate visual field defects (p < 0.05). Reading ability scores and results of the chromatic vision tests did not differ significantly between the two groups. Significant and moderate Spearman correlations between visual field indexes and contrast sensitivity tests were detected. Conclusions. Contrast sensitivity was significantly worse in patients with moderate glaucoma compared to those with early-stage glaucoma. Evaluation of visual function in clinical practice provides important information to address a glaucoma patient's vision complaints. PMID:27872754

  12. A common variant near TGFBR3 is associated with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Allingham, R. Rand; Nakano, Masakazu; Jia, Liyun; Chen, Yuhong; Ikeda, Yoko; Mani, Baskaran; Chen, Li-Jia; Kee, Changwon; Garway-Heath, David F.; Sripriya, Sarangapani; Fuse, Nobuo; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; Huang, Chukai; Namburi, Prasanthi; Burdon, Kathryn; Perera, Shamira A.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lin, Ying; Ueno, Morio; Ozaki, Mineo; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Krishnadas, Subbiah Ramasamy; Osman, Essam A.; Lee, Mei Chin; Chan, Anita S.Y.; Tajudin, Liza-Sharmini A.; Do, Tan; Goncalves, Aurelien; Reynier, Pascal; Zhang, Hong; Bourne, Rupert; Goh, David; Broadway, David; Husain, Rahat; Negi, Anil K.; Su, Daniel H; Ho, Ching-Lin; Blanco, Augusto Azuara; Leung, Christopher K.S.; Wong, Tina T.; Yakub, Azhany; Liu, Yutao; Nongpiur, Monisha E.; Han, Jong Chul; Hon, Do Nhu; Shantha, Balekudaru; Zhao, Bowen; Sang, Jinghong; Zhang, NiHong; Sato, Ryuichi; Yoshii, Kengo; Panda-Jonas, Songhomita; Ashley Koch, Allison E.; Herndon, Leon W.; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Challa, Pratap; Foo, Jia Nee; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Simmons, Cameron P.; Bich Chau, Tran Nguyen; Sharmila, Philomenadin Ferdinamarie; Chew, Merwyn; Lim, Blanche; Tam, Pansy O.S.; Chua, Elaine; Ng, Xiao Yu; Yong, Victor H.K.; Chong, Yaan Fun; Meah, Wee Yang; Vijayan, Saravanan; Seongsoo, Sohn; Xu, Wang; Teo, Yik Ying; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Kang, Jae H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Cheng, Ching Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Richards, Julia E.; Ritch, Robert; Gaasterland, Douglas E.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Liu, Jianjun; Jonas, Jost B.; Milea, Dan; George, Ronnie; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A.; Mori, Kazuhiko; Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zhang, Mingzhi; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Vijaya, Lingam; Mackey, David A.; Wong, Tien Yin; Craig, Jamie E.; Sun, Xinghuai; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Wiggs, Janey L.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Yang, Zhenglin; Pang, Chi Pui; Wang, Ningli; Hauser, Michael A.; Tashiro, Kei; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga N.

    2015-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), a major cause of blindness worldwide, is a complex disease with a significant genetic contribution. We performed Exome Array (Illumina) analysis on 3504 POAG cases and 9746 controls with replication of the most significant findings in 9173 POAG cases and 26 780 controls across 18 collections of Asian, African and European descent. Apart from confirming strong evidence of association at CDKN2B-AS1 (rs2157719 [G], odds ratio [OR] = 0.71, P = 2.81 × 10−33), we observed one SNP showing significant association to POAG (CDC7–TGFBR3 rs1192415, ORG-allele = 1.13, Pmeta = 1.60 × 10−8). This particular SNP has previously been shown to be strongly associated with optic disc area and vertical cup-to-disc ratio, which are regarded as glaucoma-related quantitative traits. Our study now extends this by directly implicating it in POAG disease pathogenesis. PMID:25861811

  13. Cytokine biomarkers in tear film for primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Divakar; Wen, Joanne C; Huebner, Janet L; Stinnett, Sandra; Kraus, Virginia B; Tseng, Henry C; Walsh, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the utility of tear film cytokines as biomarkers for early primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods Patients without POAG and eye drop-naïve patients with newly diagnosed POAG were recruited from an academic hospital-based glaucoma practice. Tear films of recruited patients were obtained and analyzed using a multiplex, high-sensitivity electrochemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for proinflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα). Results Mean concentrations of tear film cytokines were lower in the glaucoma group for 8 of 10 cytokines tested. IL-12p70 (3.94±2.19 pg/mL in control vs 2.31±1.156 pg/mL in POAG; P=0.035) was significantly lower in the tear film of patients with newly diagnosed POAG. Conclusion Proinflammatory cytokines were lower in eye drop-naïve newly diagnosed glaucoma patients. Tear film cytokine profiles may be used as biomarkers of early POAG. PMID:28260854

  14. Evaluation of brimonidine-timolol fixed combination in patients of primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sachin R; Akat, Pramod B; Ramanand, Jaiprakash B; Ramanand, Sunita J; Karande, Vitthal B; Jain, Suyog S

    2013-12-01

    The aim of present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of fixed combination of brimonidine and timolol with individual components used as monotherapy in patients of primary open angle glaucoma. Patients were randomly assigned to receive brimonidine or timolol or brimonidine-timolol fixed combination, with 30 patients in each group. The mean reduction in intraocular pressure in brimonidine, timolol, and brimonidine-timolol group were 4.29 ± 1.97 mm Hg, 4.34 ± 1.21 mm Hg, and 5.54 ± 1.87 mm Hg respectively at 2 weeks and 4.86 ± 1.16 mm Hg, 5.42 ± 1.50 mm Hg, and 7.36 ± 2.58 mm Hg respectively at 6 weeks. When values of mean reduction in intraocular pressure were compared between brimonidine-timolol fixed combination with brimonidine and timolol, it was found to be statistically significant ( P < 0.05) at 2 weeks and highly significant (0.001) at 6 weeks. The overall frequency of adverse effects was similar in all three groups.

  15. Short-term effects of relaxation music on patients suffering from primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bertelmann, Thomas; Strempel, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether additive relaxation music (RM) has an adjuvant short-term effect on physiological and psychological parameters in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. Methods Prospective, randomized clinical trial. Patients in the therapy group (TG) received a 30-minute RM via headphones, whereas members of the control group (CG) did not. Best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, visual field testing, short- and long-term mental states, and blood levels of different stress hormones were analyzed and compared. Results A total of 25 (61%)/16 (39%) patients were assigned to the TG/CG. Best corrected visual acuity, daily intraocular pressure, and short-term mental state (KAB) development were significantly better in the TG in comparison to controls. Visual field testing, long-term mental well-being (profile of mood states), and adrenalin, cortisol, and endothelin-I blood levels did not differ significantly between both groups. Conclusion Additive RM applied on a daily basis can positively impact various physiological and psychological parameters in the short term. PMID:26543350

  16. Open angle glaucoma in a case of Type IV Ehler Danlos syndrome: a rarely reported association.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Arijit; Ramakrishnan, R; Kader, Mohideen Abdul

    2014-08-01

    A 26-year-old male presented to us with defective vision in the left eye. He had best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of hand movement (HM) in right eye and 6/9 in left eye. He had ptosis with ectropion in both eyes and relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) in right eye. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was 46 and 44 mmHg in right and left eye, respectively. Fundus showed glaucomatous optic atrophy (GOA) in right eye and cup disc ratio (CDR) of 0.75 with bipolar rim thinning in left eye. Systemic examination showed hyperextensible skin and joints, acrogeria, hypodontia, high arched palate, and varicose veins. He gave history of easy bruising and tendency to fall and history of intestinal rupture 5 years ago for which he had undergone surgery. He was diagnosed as a case of Type IV Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with open angle glaucoma. He underwent trabeculectomy in both eyes. This is a rare case that shows glaucoma in a patient of EDS Type IV. Very few such cases have been reported in literature.

  17. Open angle glaucoma in a case of Type IV Ehler Danlos syndrome: A rarely reported association

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Arijit; Ramakrishnan, R.; Kader, Mohideen Abdul

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male presented to us with defective vision in the left eye. He had best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of hand movement (HM) in right eye and 6/9 in left eye. He had ptosis with ectropion in both eyes and relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) in right eye. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was 46 and 44 mmHg in right and left eye, respectively. Fundus showed glaucomatous optic atrophy (GOA) in right eye and cup disc ratio (CDR) of 0.75 with bipolar rim thinning in left eye. Systemic examination showed hyperextensible skin and joints, acrogeria, hypodontia, high arched palate, and varicose veins. He gave history of easy bruising and tendency to fall and history of intestinal rupture 5 years ago for which he had undergone surgery. He was diagnosed as a case of Type IV Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with open angle glaucoma. He underwent trabeculectomy in both eyes. This is a rare case that shows glaucoma in a patient of EDS Type IV. Very few such cases have been reported in literature. PMID:25230966

  18. Fascicular Visual Field Defects in Open-Angle Glaucoma: Evaluation with Microperimetry

    PubMed Central

    Fratipietro, Manuela; Malagola, Romualdo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Use of microperimetry (Mp-1), correlating with Humphrey perimetry (30-2 program), in patients affected by primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) with perimetric defects, in order to obtain an evaluation of the accuracy of the results obtained by Mp-1. Materials and Methods. In this study 40 eyes of 25 patients affected by POAG with perimetric defects were included. All patients underwent microperimetry test by Nidek Mp-1 (NAVIS software version 1.7.2, Nidek Technologies). Mean sensitivity values expressed in decibel (dB) of all tested dots and mean values for each quadrant obtained by microperimetric test were correlated with corresponding quadrants obtained by static perimetry analysis. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Results. Interpolated data showed that mean sensitivity values in all spots tested by Mp-1 (11.98 dB, SD 4.31) may be significantly correlated with mean total values obtained by Humphrey 30-2 perimetry (17.95, SD 4.32), with correlation coefficient of 0.556. Conclusions. Topographic visualization of the perimetric alteration by microperimetry allows retesting areas with reduced sensitivity which are topographically visualized and displayable on the ocular fundus examination, avoiding worsening of the functional defect by better modulation of the antiglaucoma therapy and therefore it allows better monitoring of the pathologic functional damage. PMID:27366329

  19. Electrophysiological and psychophysical flicker sensitivity in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Holopigian, K; Seiple, W; Mayron, C; Koty, R; Lorenzo, M

    1990-09-01

    Temporal sensitivity was assessed in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Three measures of flicker sensitivity were obtained: psychophysical modulation thresholds, visual-evoked potentials (VEPs), and focal electroretinograms (FERGs). We found elevated psychophysical thresholds at higher temporal frequencies (30-50 Hz) in patients with POAG, relative to thresholds for age-matched controls. The OHT patients had elevated psychophysical thresholds only at 50 Hz. On the other hand, VEP amplitudes in POAG patients were reduced at all temporal frequencies, with the magnitude of the loss increasing with temporal frequency. The OHT patients, however, showed no reductions in VEP amplitude at any temporal frequency. Finally, POAG patients' FERG amplitudes were reduced at 30-50 Hz; whereas FERG amplitudes in the OHT patients were normal at all temporal frequencies. These results indicate that OHT patients can exhibit psychophysical threshold losses at high temporal frequencies which are not observed in the suprathreshold electrophysiological amplitude measures. On the other hand, patients with POAG show both psychophysical and VEP losses across a range of temporal frequencies. In addition, the decreases in FERG amplitudes in POAG patients suggest changes in the functioning of the outer retina in this disease.

  20. Red blood cell plasmalogens and docosahexaenoic acid are independently reduced in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Acar, Niyazi; Berdeaux, Olivier; Juaneda, Pierre; Grégoire, Stéphane; Cabaret, Stéphanie; Joffre, Corinne; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bretillon, Lionel; Bron, Alain M

    2009-12-01

    Among several theories involved in the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the vascular theory considers the disease to be a consequence of reduced ocular blood flow associated with red blood cell abnormalities. Red blood cell membrane structure and function are influenced by their phospholipid composition. We investigated whether specific lipid entities that may affect the membrane physiology, namely, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and plasmalogens, are modified in POAG and whether these potential variations are related to the stage of glaucoma. Blood samples were collected from 31 POAG patients and 10 healthy individuals. The stage of glaucoma was determined according to the Hodapp and Parrish classification. Lipids were extracted from red blood cell membranes and individual phospholipid species were quantified by liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry using triple quadrupole technology. POAG patients had reduced erythrocyte levels of phosphatidyl-choline (PC) carrying docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). POAG patients also displayed lower levels of choline plasmalogens (PlsC) carrying PUFAs other than DHA. These differences were greater as the severity of the disease increased. Linear regressions predicted that red blood cell PlsC levels would decrease years before clinical symptoms, whereas the levels of PC carrying DHA were linearly correlated to visual field loss. Our data demonstrate the selective loss of some individual phospholipid species in red blood cell membranes, which may partly explain their loss of flexibility in POAG.

  1. Cosmic Ray Energy Determination by the Reduced-Opening Angle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1998-01-01

    The reduced opening angle technique offers a simple way with minimal model dependence to measure cosmic ray energies over a broad range with out any normalization uncertainties. The emulsion film and CR39 detectors proposed are well established techniques and should perform adequately. The analysis method depends on accurate automatic scanning of the CR39 plates. UAH have developed such a capability. With the proposed geometry energy measurements to approx. 5 TeV/a can be made. The expected iron event rate (E greater than or equal to 500 GeV/a) is 10/sq m day. The expected energy resolution, from accelerator calibrations at 200 GeV/a, is -50% to +80%. Since the absolute flux has some sensitivity to the assumed power law index it is essential that good energy resolution is obtained. The expected charge resolution is approx. 0.3 charge units for the CNO group falling to approx. 1 charge unit for the iron group. A suitable event trigger would be a measurable (greater than 2 micrometer) deflected heavy (Z greater than 2) fragment. One potential background is electromagnetic dissociation that predominantly couples to individual protons or alphas. Although the cross- sections can be appreciable such events will not pass the event trigger.

  2. Aging changes of the optic nerve head in relation to open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Garway-Heath, D; Wollstein, G; Hitchings, R

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the age related changes in optic nerve head structure in a group of normal subjects and assess the significance of any changes in relation to those found in open angle glaucoma.
METHODS—A group of 88 white volunteers and friends and spouses of patients with a normal visual field and normal intraocular pressure was studied. Two different imaging and measurement devices were used (computer assisted planimetry and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy), and the results from each were compared. Measurements were made of the optic disc, optic cup, and neuroretinal rim areas, and the vertical optic disc diameter and cup/disc diameter ratio.
RESULTS—Neuroretinal rim area declined at the rate of between 0.28% and 0.39% per year. Vertical optic cup diameter and optic cup area increased with age. The mean cup/disc diameter ratio increased by about 0.1 between the ages of 30 and 70 years.
CONCLUSIONS—Age related changes are significant and measurable, and should be taken into account when assessing the glaucoma suspect, and when estimating the rate of progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy in patients with established disease.

 PMID:9486023

  3. Applying the recent clinical trials on primary open angle glaucoma: the developing world perspective.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ravi; Kumar, Rajesh S; Chandrasekhar, G; Parikh, Rajul

    2005-08-01

    Recent clinical trials have provided scientific guidelines for the treatment of ocular hypertension and primary open angle glaucoma. The developing world need to apply these trials in a sensible and cost effective manner. The number needed to treat (NNT) attempts to tailor treatment to the individual patient. The NNT for the average ocular hypertensive is 20. Those with intraocular pressure > or =26 mm Hg have an NNT of 6. Restricting treatment to those with lower central corneal thickness and or high cup disc ratios can further lower NNT and make treatment more cost effective. The NNT for the average patient with early POAG is 5. Targeting those at higher risk for progression, (bilateral POAG, higher IOP and or pseudo-exfoliation) can further reduce NNT. As far as the modality of treatment is concerned, provided quality can be ensured, collaborative initial glaucoma treatment study (CIGTS) could be interpreted to justify primary surgery in the developing world context. Population attributable risk percentage (PAR), a measure that reflects the public health importance of a disease was used to extrapolate results to the overall population. Ocular hypertension has an "effective" PAR of 8.5%, a value not considered high enough to warrant public health intervention. POAG had an "effective" PAR of 16%, perhaps high enough to be considered a public health problem and justify inclusion as a target disease in the Vision 2020 program. However the logistics and opportunity costs of diagnosis and treatment would probably prevent inclusion of POAG in public health budgets of most developing countries.

  4. Assessment of polygenic effects links primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Wang, Jie Jin; Vote, Brendan J; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L; Isaacs, Timothy; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A; Constable, Ian J; Mitchell, Paul; Hewitt, Alex W; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-05-31

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are leading causes of irreversible blindness. Several loci have been mapped using genome-wide association studies. Until very recently, there was no recognized overlap in the genetic contribution to AMD and POAG. At genome-wide significance level, only ABCA1 harbors associations to both diseases. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture of POAG and AMD using genome-wide array data. We estimated the heritability for POAG (h(2)g = 0.42 ± 0.09) and AMD (h(2)g = 0.71 ± 0.08). Removing known loci for POAG and AMD decreased the h(2)g estimates to 0.36 and 0.24, respectively. There was evidence for a positive genetic correlation between POAG and AMD (rg = 0.47 ± 0.25) which remained after removing known loci (rg = 0.64 ± 0.31). We also found that the genetic correlation between sexes for POAG was likely to be less than 1 (rg = 0.33 ± 0.24), suggesting that differences of prevalence among genders may be partly due to heritable factors.

  5. Comparison of canaloplasty and trabeculectomy for open angle glaucoma: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhong-Jing; Xu, Shuo; Huang, Shou-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Zhong, Yi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the advantage of canaloplasty compared to trabeculectomy for patients with open angle glaucoma. METHODS Potentially relevant studies were systematically searched using various databases from inception until December 2015. The outcome analyses performed automatically using Revman 5.3 included intraocular pressure reduction (IOPR), postoperative success rate, anti-glaucoma medications reduction and the incidence of adverse events. RESULTS We included four qualified studies incorporating a total of 215 eyes for quantitative synthesis. The weighted mean difference (WMD) of IOPR between canaloplasty and trabeculectomy from baseline to 12mo was -2.33 (95%CI: -4.00, -0.66). There was not significant improvement in the complete or qualified success rate (OR: 0.58, 95%CI: 0.26, 1.31; OR: 0.50, 95%CI: 0.10, 2.44, respectively). Similarly, no statistically significance was observed in anti-glaucoma mediations reduction (WMD: -0.54, 95%CI: -1.18, 0.09). Sensitivity analysis of the primary outcome estimate confirmed the stability of the Meta-analysis result. CONCLUSION Trabeculectomy seems to be more effective in lowering IOP up to 12mo when comparing with canaloplasty. Canaloplasty does not seem to be inferior to trabeculectomy considering the postoperative success rate or the number of postoperative anti-glaucoma medications. Meanwhile, it has an advantage of less bleb related complications. PMID:28003985

  6. Assessment of polygenic effects links primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Wang, Jie Jin; Vote, Brendan J.; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L.; Isaacs, Timothy; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A.; Constable, Ian J.; Mitchell, Paul; Hewitt, Alex W.; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are leading causes of irreversible blindness. Several loci have been mapped using genome-wide association studies. Until very recently, there was no recognized overlap in the genetic contribution to AMD and POAG. At genome-wide significance level, only ABCA1 harbors associations to both diseases. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture of POAG and AMD using genome-wide array data. We estimated the heritability for POAG (h2g = 0.42 ± 0.09) and AMD (h2g = 0.71 ± 0.08). Removing known loci for POAG and AMD decreased the h2g estimates to 0.36 and 0.24, respectively. There was evidence for a positive genetic correlation between POAG and AMD (rg = 0.47 ± 0.25) which remained after removing known loci (rg = 0.64 ± 0.31). We also found that the genetic correlation between sexes for POAG was likely to be less than 1 (rg = 0.33 ± 0.24), suggesting that differences of prevalence among genders may be partly due to heritable factors. PMID:27241461

  7. [Effects of nootropic agents on visual functions and lacrimal antioxidative activity in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Davydova, N G; Kuznetsova, T P; Borisova, S A; Abdulkadyrova, M Zh

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an investigation of the effect of the nootropic agents pantogam and nooclerine on visual functions in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. These agents have been found to have a beneficial effect on the functional activity of the retina and optic nerve, light sensitivity, hemo- and hydrodynamics of the eye.

  8. Effect of nozzle lateral spacing, engine interfairing shape, and angle of attack on the performance of a twin-jet afterbody model with cone plug nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    Twin-jet afterbody models were investigated by using two balances to measure separately the thrust minus total axial force and the afterbody drag at Mach numbers from 0 to 1.3. Angle of attack was varied from minus 2 deg to 8.5 deg. Translating shroud cone plug nozzles were tested at dry-power and maximum-afterburning-power settings with a high-pressure air system used to provide jet total-pressure ratios up to 9.0. Two nozzle lateral spacings were studied by using afterbodies with several interfairing shapes. The close- and wide-spaced afterbodies had identical cross-sectional area distributions when similar interfairings were installed on each. The results show that the highest overall performance was obtained with the close-spaced afterbody and basic interfairings. Increasing angle of attack decreased performance for all configurations and conditions investigated.

  9. Longitudinal Analysis of Serum Autoantibody-Reactivities in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma and Optic Disc Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Keilani, Munir M.; Wasielica-Poslednik, Joanna; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of our current investigation was to analyze the autoantibody-reactivities of primary open angle glaucoma patients with optic disc hemorrhage as possibly correlated to disease progression by means of a protein microarray approach. Methods Sera of patients with primary open angle glaucoma and optic disc hemorrhage (n = 16) were collected directly after study inclusion (0 weeks) and after 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 12 weeks. As a control group patients with primary open angle glaucoma (n = 18) were used (0 weeks and 12 weeks). Microarrays were incubated and occurring antibody-antigen-reactions were visualized with fluorescence labeled anti-human-IgG secondary antibodies. To detect changes in autoantibodies spot intensities were digitized and compared. Results With respect to the immunoreactivity at 0 weeks level increment of anti-adaptor protein 1 complex subunit mu-1 antibodies and anti-SPRY domain-containing SOCS box protein 3 antibodies in sera of primary open angle patients with optic disc hemorrhage was detected. Linear trend analysis revealed a positive correlation with r ≥ 0.8 between antibody-level and time course. Control group show no relevant changes in the same period. Significant changes were found in time point 4 comparison between patient groups in anti-adaptor protein 1 complex subunit mu-1-level (p = 0.01). No significant changes in visual acuity were found. Conclusion With this approach we were able to detect autoimmune reactivities in sera of patients with primary open angle glaucoma and optic disc hemorrhage compared to patients without optic disc hemorrhage. These antibodies could give further insights into the pathogenesis and the autoimmune component of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. PMID:28030545

  10. Open-loop GPS signal tracking at low elevation angles from a ground-based observation site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, Georg; Zus, Florian

    2017-01-01

    A 1-year data set of ground-based GPS signal observations aiming at geometric elevation angles below +2° is analysed. Within the "GLESER" measurement campaign about 2600 validated setting events were recorded by the "OpenGPS" open-loop tracking receiver at an observation site located at 52.3808° N, 13.0642° E between January and December 2014. The measurements confirm the feasibility of open-loop signal tracking down to geometric elevation angles of -1 to -1.5° extending the corresponding closed-loop tracking range by up to 1°. The study is based on the premise that observations of low-elevation events by a ground-based receiver may serve as test cases for space-based radio occultation measurements, even if the latter proceed at a significantly faster temporal scale. The results support the conclusion that the open-loop Doppler model has negligible influence on the derived carrier frequency profile for strong signal-to-noise density ratios above about 30 dB Hz. At lower signal levels, however, the OpenGPS receiver's dual-channel design, which tracks the same signal using two Doppler models differing by 10 Hz, uncovers a notable bias. The repeat patterns of the GPS orbit traces in terms of azimuth angle reveal characteristic signatures in both signal amplitude and Doppler frequency with respect to the topography close to the observation site. Mean vertical refractivity gradients, extracted from ECMWF meteorological fields, correlate weakly to moderately with observed signal amplitude fluctuations at geometric elevation angles between +1 and +2°. Results from multiple phase screen simulations support the interpretation that these fluctuations are at least partly produced by atmospheric multipath; at negative elevation angles diffraction at the ground surface seems to contribute.

  11. Association of primary open-angle glaucoma with mitochondrial variants and haplogroups common in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gudiseva, Harini V.; Trachtman, Benjamin; Bowman, Anita S.; Sagaser, Anna; Sankar, Prithvi; Miller-Ellis, Eydie; Lehman, Amanda; Addis, Victoria; O'Brien, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the population frequencies of all common mitochondrial variants and ancestral haplogroups among 1,999 subjects recruited for the Primary Open-Angle African American Glaucoma Genetics (POAAGG) Study, including 1,217 primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) cases and 782 controls, and to identify ancestral subpopulations and mitochondrial mutations as potential risk factors for POAG susceptibility. Methods Subject classification by characteristic glaucomatous optic nerve findings and corresponding visual field defects, as defined by enrolling glaucoma specialists, stereo disc photography, phlebotomy, extraction of total DNA from peripheral blood or saliva, DNA quantification and normalization, PCR amplification of whole mitochondrial genomes, Ion Torrent deep semiconductor DNA sequencing on DNA pools (“Pool-seq”), Sanger sequencing of 3,479 individual mitochondrial DNAs, and bioinformatic analysis. Results The distribution of common African haplogroups within the POAAGG study population was broadly similar to prior surveys of African Americans. However, the POAG case population was found to be enriched in L1c2 haplogroups, which are defined in part by missense mutations m.6150G>A (Val83Ile, odds ratio [OR] 1.8, p=0.01), m.6253C>T (Met117Thr, rs200165736, OR 1.6, p=0.04), and m.6480G>A (Val193Ile, rs199476128, OR 4.6, p=0.04) in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (MT-CO1) gene and by a variant, m.2220A>G (OR 2.0, p=0.01), in MT-RNR2, which encodes the mitochondrial ribosomal 16s RNA gene. L2 haplogroups were predicted to be overrepresented in the POAG case population by Pool-seq, and the difference was confirmed to be significant with Sanger sequencing, that targeted the L2-associated variants m.2416T>C (rs28358580, OR 1.2, p=0.02) and m.2332C>T (OR 1.2, p=.02) in MT-RNR2. Another variant within MT-RNR2, m.3010G>A (rs3928306), previously implicated in sensitivity to the optic neuropathy-associated antibiotic linezolid, and arising on D4 and J1

  12. Real-time data processing and magnetic field pitch angle estimation of the JET motional Stark effect diagnostic based on Kalman filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, R.; Alves, D. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Associacao Euratom Hawkes, N.; Brix, M. [Euratom Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-15

    A novel technique for the real-time measurement of the magnetic field pitch angle in JET discharges using the motional Stark effect diagnostic is presented. Kalman filtering techniques are adopted to estimate the amplitude of the avalanche photodiode signals' harmonics that are relevant for the pitch angle calculation. The proposed technique {l_brace}for extended technical details of the generic algorithm see [R. Coelho and D. Alves, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 37, 164 (2009)]{r_brace} is shown to be much more robust and provides less noisy estimates than an equivalent lock-in amplifier scheme, in particular when dealing with edge localized modes.

  13. Real-time data processing and magnetic field pitch angle estimation of the JET motional Stark effect diagnostic based on Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Coelho, R; Alves, D; Hawkes, N; Brix, M

    2009-06-01

    A novel technique for the real-time measurement of the magnetic field pitch angle in JET discharges using the motional Stark effect diagnostic is presented. Kalman filtering techniques are adopted to estimate the amplitude of the avalanche photodiode signals' harmonics that are relevant for the pitch angle calculation. The proposed technique {for extended technical details of the generic algorithm see [R. Coelho and D. Alves, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 37, 164 (2009)]} is shown to be much more robust and provides less noisy estimates than an equivalent lock-in amplifier scheme, in particular when dealing with edge localized modes.

  14. The mechanical paradox of low-angle normal faults: Current understanding and open questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano

    2011-10-01

    Low-angle normal faults, LANF, (dip < 30°) have been proposed as key-structures for accommodating crustal extension. In contrast, frictional fault reactivation theory predicts that slip on LANF is extremely unlikely: this prediction is consistent with the absence of moderate-to-large earthquakes on normal faults dipping less than 30°. In order to discuss this discrepancy I will analyse and integrate: 1) geological data from 9 LANF, 2) the dip-range of earthquake-ruptures in extensional environments, and 3) frictional fault mechanics. LANF fault zone structure is represented by two end members: a) a thick mylonitic shear zone superposed by cataclastic processes and some localization; 2) a discrete fault core separating hangingwall and footwall blocks affected by brittle processes. LANF act as preferential channels for fluid flow and in some cases they promoted fluid overpressure. Fluid-rock interactions along some detachments favour the development of phyllosilicates that in general are characterised by low frictional strength, μ < 0.4, and inherently stable, velocity-strengthening frictional behaviour. The low friction coefficient of the phyllosilicates can explain movements on LANF and the velocity strengthening behaviour of the phyllosilicates implies fault creep and therefore can be used to explain the absence of moderate-to-large earthquakes on LANF in seismological records. However in my view, the integration of the three datasets does not provide a simple mechanical solution for the LANF paradox since it leaves two important open questions. First a widespread development of phyllosilicates does not seem to be a common feature for most of the exhumed LANF that on the contrary show the typical fault rocks of the brittle and seismogenic crust. Second, although some brittle detachments reactivated pre-existing ductile shear zones, others formed as gently dipping structures within a brittle crust characterised by a vertical σ 1: a well constrained mechanical

  15. Tag SNPs detect association of the CYP1B1 gene with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Mitchell, Paul; Craig, Jamie E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The cytochrome p450 family 1 subfamily B (CYP1B1) gene is a well known cause of autosomal recessive primary congenital glaucoma. It has also been postulated as a modifier of disease severity in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), particularly in juvenile onset families. However, the role of common variation in the gene in relation to POAG has not been thoroughly explored. Methods Seven tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including two coding variants (L432V and N543S), were genotyped in 860 POAG cases and 898 examined normal controls. Each SNP and haplotype was assessed for association with disease. In addition, a subset of 396 severe cases and 452 elderly controls were analyzed separately. Results There was no association of any individual SNP in the full data set. Two SNPs (rs162562 and rs10916) were nominally associated under a dominant model in the severe cases (p<0.05). A common haplotype (AGCAGCC) was also found to be nominally associated in both the full data set (p=0.048, OR [95%CI]=0.83 [0.69–0.90]) and more significantly in the severe cases (p=0.004, OR [95%CI]=0.68 [0.52–0.89]) which survives correction for multiple testing. Conclusions Although no major effect of common variation at the CYP1B1 locus on POAG was found, there could be an effect of SNPs tagged by rs162562 and represented on the AGCAGCC haplotype. PMID:21139974

  16. Discovery and Functional Annotation of SIX6 Variants in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Allingham, R. Rand; Whigham, Benjamin T.; Havens, Shane; Garrett, Melanie E.; Qiao, Chunyan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Oh, Edwin C.; Hauser, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common subtype and is a complex trait with multigenic inheritance. Genome-wide association studies have previously identified a significant association between POAG and the SIX6 locus (rs10483727, odds ratio (OR) = 1.32, p = 3.87×10−11). SIX6 plays a role in ocular development and has been associated with the morphology of the optic nerve. We sequenced the SIX6 coding and regulatory regions in 262 POAG cases and 256 controls and identified six nonsynonymous coding variants, including five rare and one common variant, Asn141His (rs33912345), which was associated significantly with POAG (OR = 1.27, p = 4.2×10−10) in the NEIGHBOR/GLAUGEN datasets. These variants were tested in an in vivo Danio rerio (zebrafish) complementation assay to evaluate ocular metrics such as eye size and optic nerve structure. Five variants, found primarily in POAG cases, were hypomorphic or null, while the sixth variant, found only in controls, was benign. One variant in the SIX6 enhancer increased expression of SIX6 and disrupted its regulation. Finally, to our knowledge for the first time, we have identified a clinical feature in POAG patients that appears to be dependent upon SIX6 genotype: patients who are homozygous for the SIX6 risk allele (His141) have a statistically thinner retinal nerve fiber layer than patients homozygous for the SIX6 non-risk allele (Asn141). Our results, in combination with previous SIX6 work, lead us to hypothesize that SIX6 risk variants disrupt the development of the neural retina, leading to a reduced number of retinal ganglion cells, thereby increasing the risk of glaucoma-associated vision loss. PMID:24875647

  17. Primary Open Angle Glaucoma is Associated with MR Biomarkers of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mercieca, Karl; Cain, John; Hansen, Thomas; Steeples, Laura; Watkins, Amy; Spencer, Fiona; Jackson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study tests the hypotheses that: 1) glaucoma is associated with evidence of cerebral small vessel disease; 2) that imaging biomarkers of cerebral small vessel disease in POAG and NTG will show different characteristics. 12 normal controls, 7 patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and 9 patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) were recruited. Ophthalmological clinical assessment and MR imaging of the brain were performed. MR imaging was used to quantify white matter lesion load, frequency of dilated perivascular spaces (PVS) and abnormalities in cerebral hydrodynamics. Patients with POAG had significantly greater white matter lesion load (p < 0.05), more PVS in the centrum semiovale (p < 0.05) and had higher overall PVS scores than controls (p < 0.05). In the POAG group, optic cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) was positively correlated with deep white matter hyperintensities (R2 = 0.928, p < 0.01). Mean deviation on the Humphrey visual field assessment was negatively correlated with deep white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.840, p < 0.01), total white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.928, p < 0.01) and total PVS (R2 = −0.820, p < 0.01). MR evidence of cerebral small vessel disease is strongly associated with a diagnosis of POAG and with the severity of abnormalities in CDR and visual field. PMID:26923106

  18. Corneal changes after a single session of selective laser trabeculoplasty for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J W Y; Chan, J C H; Chang, R T; Singh, K; Liu, C C L; Gangwani, R; Wong, M O M; Lai, J S M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the changes in endothelial cell count, central corneal thickness (CCT), and refractive error after a session of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) for open angle glaucoma (OAG). Methods This prospective cohort study recruited 111 eyes of 66 consecutive subjects with OAG. Subjects received SLT to 360° of the trabecular meshwork. Endothelial cell count, CCT, and spherical equivalent were measured at baseline before SLT as well as at 1 week and 1 month post SLT. A repeated measure nested ANOVA with Tukey's multiple comparison test was performed to compare the outcome measures before and after SLT. Results In 111 eyes of 66 subjects, the mean number of laser applications per treatment was 166.9±41.4 with a mean energy level of 1.0±0.07 mJ. The mean endothelial cell count decreased significantly from 2465.0±334.0 cells/mm2 at baseline to 2355.0±387.0 cells/mm2 at 1 week (P=0.0004) but increased to baseline levels at 1 month post SLT (2424.0±379.4 cells/mm2, P=0.3). The CCT, which decreased from a baseline of 549.4±37.6 to 543.9±40.2 μm at 1 week post SLT (P=0.02), also returned to the baseline level by 1 month (P=0.2). The spherical equivalent was static from baseline. A positive correlation was found between total laser energy and CCT at 1 month post treatment (r=0.3, P=0.005). Conclusion The transient reductions in endothelial cell count and CCT following SLT returned to baseline levels 1 month after the procedure. Patients undergoing SLT should be aware of the risk of potential corneal changes. PMID:24136571

  19. Comparison of Prelaminar Thickness between Primary Open Angle Glaucoma and Normal Tension Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youn Hea; Park, Hae-Young L.; Jung, Kyoung In; Park, Chan Kee

    2015-01-01

    Main Objective The thinning of prelaminar tissue and prelamina cupping is known to occur by ischemia, as we see in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. Since normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is thought to be more related to vascular factor than in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), we hypothesized that prelamina thinning may occur prominently in NTG patients. This study investigated the difference in prelaminar tissue thickness between patients with POAG and NTG and verified the factors related to prelaminar thinning. Methods Complete ophthalmic examination including standard automatic perimetry was performed in all patients. The prelaminar tissue thickness was measured in all patients by performing enhanced depth imaging with a Heidelberg Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography. The retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve head parameters were obtained using the Heidelberg Retina Tomography II and Cirrus Optical Coherence Tomography. Various ocular factors and their relationships with prelaminar thickness were analyzed. Results The mean prelaminar tissue thickness was significantly thinner in patients with POAG than in those with NTG. The difference in the prelaminar thickness between patients with POAG and those with NTG was greater in the early field defect group than in the moderate and severe field groups. In multivariate analysis, the mean prelaminar thickness was related to the intraocular pressure, mean deviation, cup-disc ratio, and cup volume. Conclusions The prelaminar tissue was thinner in patients with POAG than in patients with NTG, and intraocular pressure had a strong influence on the prelaminar thickness in both POAG and NTG. This may indicate that mechanical compression is the main pathogenic factor in both POAG and NTG. PMID:25793734

  20. Dementia is associated with open-angle glaucoma: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S-D; Ho, J-D; Chen, C-H; Lin, H-C; Tsai, M-C; Sheu, J-J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous epidemiologic studies that focused on the association between open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and dementia showed inconsistent results. In the present study, we explored the association between OAG and dementia in an ethnic Chinese (ie, Taiwanese) population using a population-based data set. Methods We retrieved data on study subjects for this case-control study from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We identified 7770 patients who had a diagnosis of dementia as cases, and 7770 subjects matched in terms of sex and age, which were randomly extracted as controls. A conditional logistic regression conditioned on age group, sex, and index year was used to assess the association of dementia with previously diagnosed OAG among the sampled patients. Results Of 15 540 patients, 1.70% had prior OAG, including 2.02% of the dementia group and 1.38% of the controls. After adjusting for patient socioeconomic characteristics and comorbid medical disorders, dementia patients were more likely to have had prior OAG than controls (odds ratio (OR): 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–1.85; P<0.01). In addition, female dementia patients were more likely to have had prior OAG than controls (OR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.35–2.77; P<0.001), whereas no statistical difference in prior OAG between male dementia patients and controls was found. Conclusions Female dementia patients were associated with a higher proportion of prior OAG than were the controls. PMID:26160529

  1. Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT): 1-year results in early and advanced open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Schlote, Torsten; Kynigopoulos, Myron

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in eyes with early and more advanced stages of open angle glaucoma within 1 year of follow-up. Retrospective chart review in a consecutive series of patients treated by SLT to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) or decrease number of topical medications in cases of discomfort and allergy. The cup-to-disc ratio of the optic nerve and the GSS 2 (glaucoma staging system 2) was used to differentiate between early (group 1) and more advanced (group 2) stages of glaucoma. At the time of SLT treatment, no new signs of glaucoma progression were seen. Only the first treated eye of every patient was included in the analysis. In group 1 (early glaucoma), 27 eyes were included. IOP reduction <21 mmHg/>20 % of the preoperative IOP-value and reduction of medication were achieved in 17 eyes (62.96 %). Successful re-treatment was necessary in 2 eyes (7.4 %). In group 2 (advanced glaucoma), 44 eyes underwent SLT. In eight eyes (18.18 %), filtrating surgery was necessary after initial SLT. In the remaining 36 eyes, IOP reduction <21 mmHg/>20 % of the baseline IOP was achieved in 26 eyes (59.09 % of 44 eyes) and IOP reduction <18 mmHg/> 30 % of the baseline IOP in 22 eyes (50 % of 44 eyes). SLT was safe and effective in nearly 2/3 of early glaucoma patients and also in 50 % of advanced glaucoma patients using stronger criteria of success. Failure of SLT in advanced glaucoma should lead to immediate filtrating surgery, which seems not to be associated with higher risk of fibrosis.

  2. Stab Incision Glaucoma Surgery: A Modified Guarded Filtration Procedure for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Soosan; Figus, Michele; Ashok Kumar, Dhivya; Areeckal Incy, Saijimol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To describe a modified guarded filtration surgery, stab incision glaucoma surgery (SIGS), for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. This prospective, interventional case series included patients with POAG (IOP ≥21 mmHg with glaucomatous visual field defects). After sliding superior conjunctiva down over limbus, 2.8 mm bevel-up keratome was used to create conjunctival entry and superficial corneoscleral tunnel in a single step starting 1.5 mm behind limbus. Lamellar corneoscleral tunnel was carefully dissected 0.5–1 mm into cornea and anterior chamber (AC) was entered. Kelly Descemet's punch (1 mm) was slid along the tunnel into AC to punch internal lip of the tunnel, thereby compromising it. Patency of ostium was assessed by injecting fluid in AC and visualizing leakage from tunnel. Conjunctival incision alone was sutured. Results. Mean preoperative IOP was 27.41 ± 5.54 mmHg and mean postoperative IOP was 16.47 ± 4.81 mmHg (n = 17). Mean reduction in IOP was 38.81 ± 16.55%. There was significant reduction of IOP (p < 0.000). 64.7% had IOP at final follow-up of <18 mmHg without medication and 82.35% had IOP <18 mmHg with ≤2 medications. No sight threatening complications were encountered. Conclusion. Satisfactory IOP control was noted after SIGS in interim follow-up (14.18 ± 1.88 months). PMID:27144015

  3. Stab Incision Glaucoma Surgery: A Modified Guarded Filtration Procedure for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Soosan; Figus, Michele; Ashok Kumar, Dhivya; Agarwal, Ashvin; Agarwal, Amar; Areeckal Incy, Saijimol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To describe a modified guarded filtration surgery, stab incision glaucoma surgery (SIGS), for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. This prospective, interventional case series included patients with POAG (IOP ≥21 mmHg with glaucomatous visual field defects). After sliding superior conjunctiva down over limbus, 2.8 mm bevel-up keratome was used to create conjunctival entry and superficial corneoscleral tunnel in a single step starting 1.5 mm behind limbus. Lamellar corneoscleral tunnel was carefully dissected 0.5-1 mm into cornea and anterior chamber (AC) was entered. Kelly Descemet's punch (1 mm) was slid along the tunnel into AC to punch internal lip of the tunnel, thereby compromising it. Patency of ostium was assessed by injecting fluid in AC and visualizing leakage from tunnel. Conjunctival incision alone was sutured. Results. Mean preoperative IOP was 27.41 ± 5.54 mmHg and mean postoperative IOP was 16.47 ± 4.81 mmHg (n = 17). Mean reduction in IOP was 38.81 ± 16.55%. There was significant reduction of IOP (p < 0.000). 64.7% had IOP at final follow-up of <18 mmHg without medication and 82.35% had IOP <18 mmHg with ≤2 medications. No sight threatening complications were encountered. Conclusion. Satisfactory IOP control was noted after SIGS in interim follow-up (14.18 ± 1.88 months).

  4. A model for analysis of the temperature field downstream of a heated jet injected into an isothermal crossflow at an angle of 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, V. L.; Eckert, E. R. G.; Goldstein, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The temperature distribution downstream of a heated jet entering an isothermal crossflow at an angle of 90 deg is predicted using two conduction models with energy sources above the point of injection, in one case a point source and in the second a line source. The models use effective turbulent diffusivities that are determined empirically from previous measurements. Temperatures predicted by the models are compared to experimental results.

  5. Studying the effect of flap angle on the noise of interaction of a high-bypass jet with a swept wing in a co-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. V.; Zaytsev, M. Yu.; Kopiev, V. F.; Ostrikov, N. N.; Faranosov, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    Jet-flap interaction noise for a small-scale swept wing model of a trendsetter plane has been studied experimentally, with a double-stream nozzle installed nearby. The effect of the flap angle on the noise of jet-wing interaction has been analyzed. It has been discovered that the flap angle considerably affects the interaction noise in a wide frequency range in such a way that the noise intensity in each frequency band grows exponentially as the flap edge approaches the shear-layer boundary (on a logarithmic scale, this corresponds to linear scaling of the spectrum depending on the flap angle). The exponential noise reduction as the flap angle decreases agrees with the known theoretical simplified-configuration models that are based on the effect of interaction of the near field of instability wave with the edge. Not only does this agreement show that noise increase/reduction mechanism may be associated with similar processes, it also provides an effective tool for controlling the interaction noise.

  6. Alleviation of Facility/Engine Interactions in an Open-Jet Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Emami, Saied

    2001-01-01

    Results of a series of shakedown tests to eliminate facility/engine interactions in an open-jet scramjet test facility are presented. The tests were conducted with the NASA DFX (Dual-Fuel eXperimental scramjet) engine in the NASA Langley Combustion Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) in support of the Hyper-X program, The majority of the tests were conducted at a total enthalpy and pressure corresponding to Mach 5 flight at a dynamic pressure of 734 psf. The DFX is the largest engine ever tested in the CHSTF. Blockage, in terms of the projected engine area relative to the nozzle exit area, is 81% with the engine forebody leading edge aligned with the upper edge of the facility nozzle such that it ingests the nozzle boundary layer. The blockage increases to 95% with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. down in the core flow. Previous engines successfully tested in the CHSTF have had blockages of no more than 51%. Oil flow studies along with facility and engine pressure measurements were used to define flow behavior. These results guided modifications to existing aeroappliances and the design of new aeroappliances. These changes allowed fueled tests to be conducted without facility interaction effects in the data with the engine forebody leading edge positioned to ingest the facility nozzle boundary layer. Interaction effects were also reduced for tests with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. into the core flow, however some interaction effects were still evident in the engine data. A new shroud and diffuser have been designed with the goal of allowing fueled tests to be conducted with the engine forebody leading edge positioned in the core without facility interaction effects in the data. Evaluation tests of the new shroud and diffuser will be conducted once ongoing fueled engine tests have been completed.

  7. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Mittal, R; Bielamowicz, S

    2011-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called "Coanda effect" in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection.

  8. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier–Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called “Coanda effect” in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  9. Comparison of self-measured diurnal intraocular pressure profiles using rebound tonometry between primary angle closure glaucoma and primary open angle glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shaoying; Baig, Nafees; Hansapinyo, Linda; Jhanji, Vishal; Wei, Shihui; Tham, Clement C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To document the diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) profile with rebound tonometry performed by primary glaucoma patients in non-clinic environment. Patients and methods Fifty-three medically-treated eyes of 31 primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) and 22 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients with no previous eye surgery were recruited. Diurnal IOP was measured 5 times per day at four-hourly intervals from 08:00 to 24:00 for 1 week in patients’ study eye using rebound tonometry in a non-clinic environment. The diurnal IOP profiles were compared between PACG and POAG eyes. Results For both PACG and POAG eyes, mean patient-measured IOP was highest in the morning, gradually decreased over the course of a day, and was lowest by midnight (p < 0.001). The diurnal IOP fluctuation ± 1 standard deviation (SD), as documented by SD in daily IOP values, was lower in PACG group (1.6 ± 1.1 mmHg) than in POAG group (2.0 ± 1.2 mmHg; p = 0.049). The mean trough IOP ± 1 SD was higher in PACG group (12.9 ± 2.8 mmHg), compared to POAG group (11.5 ± 3.8 mmHg; p = 0.041). The mean IOP level at midnight ± 1 SD in PACG group (14.0 ± 3.2 mmHg) was higher than that in POAG group (12.1 ± 3.7 mmHg; p = 0.013). Conclusions IOP in primary glaucoma patients was highest in the morning, and decreased over the course of a day in non-clinic environment. Treated diurnal IOP fluctuation seemed to be greater in POAG than PACG eyes. PMID:28333942

  10. Patient-Reported Vision-Related Quality-of-Life Differences between Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chao-Yu; Chen, Yu-Jing; Chen, Mei-Ju; Ko, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Nicole; Liu, Catherine Jui-ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the different impacts on patient-reported vision-related quality of life (pVRQOL) outcomes in patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma(PACG) and primary open-angle glaucoma(POAG). Methods Prospective cross-sectional study. PACG and POAG patients who had a best-corrected visual acuity(BCVA) in the better eye equal to or better than 20/60, intraocular pressure controlled at or below 25 mmHg and reliable visual field test were invited to participate. The control group included patients with BCVA in the better eye equal to or better than 20/60 and who did not have major eye disease. A validated Taiwanese version of the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25(T)) was performed to assess pVRQOL. The association between each domain of NEI VFQ-25(T) among 3 groups was determined using multivariable linear regression analysis. Results A total of 106 PACG, 186 POAG, and 95 controls were enrolled. In multivariable regression analysis of all three groups(PACG/POAG/controls), compared to POAG, PACG showed a weakly positive association with social functioning (R2 = 0.13, β = 0.22, P = 0.04). PACG showed no significantly negative impact on pVRQOL compared to controls. Taking only glaucoma patients into consideration, PACG patients had a higher score on social functioning compared to POAG (R2 = 0.16, β = 0.27, P = 0.01). The results of other domains of NEI VFQ-25(T) between the two groups did not differ significantly(p>0.05). Conclusions In patients with controlled disease, the impact of PACG and POAG on most domains of NEI VFQ-25(T) were similar, except for better social functioning in PACG compared to POAG. PMID:27690232

  11. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  13. Identification of a novel MYOC mutation, p.(Trp373), in a family with open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Crawford, April; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Agar, Ashish; Ridge, Bronwyn; Dubowsky, Andrew; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E

    2014-07-25

    MYOC gene variants are associated with autosomal dominant primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). In this study, we describe a previously unreported MYOC variant segregating with a POAG phenotype in an Australian family. Two individuals affected with POAG and three unaffected individuals from the same family were recruited through the Australian and New Zealand Registry of Advanced Glaucoma (ANZRAG). Direct sequencing of all MYOC coding exons identified the novel heterozygous single nucleotide transition MYOC:c.1119G>A, p.(Trp373), predicted to encode an aberrant truncated MYOC protein in two affected siblings. Two unaffected siblings and an unaffected niece were negative for the MYOC sequence variant.

  14. Integral indicatrix of light scattering from {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} spherical particles in the region of small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, V.N.; Shapovalov, K.A.

    1995-05-01

    The integral indicatrix of light scattering from a {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} spherical particle is studied as a function of the phase shift. It is shown analytically in the WKB approximation and numerically on the basis of the Mie theory and the WKB approximation that the dependence of the integral indicatrix on the phase shift is similar to that for the factor of light scattering efficiency. Asymptotic expressions for the integral indicatrix are obtained for large diffraction parameters in the limiting cases of small and large phase shifts in the region of small angles. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  15. A model function for jet noise events at aft angles and what it says about the statistical relationships of the events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney-Fischer, M.

    2015-03-01

    Previous works have shown that subsonic jet noise radiating to aft angles can be described as a succession of independent large fluctuations (i.e. events). Building on these previous works, a model function is found that can accurately reproduce the observed spectra for jets whose aft angle noise is well described the Large-scale Similarity Spectrum (LSS). The selection of the model function is informed by the LSS and autocorrelation analysis of experimental data. It is determined that the model function should be a bipolar pulse with zero mean in order to reproduce the LSS over low to midrange frequencies (i.e. frequencies much higher than the spectral peak frequency are not considered). It is also found that, without sacrificing much fidelity in terms of the resulting spectrum, the model function can be antisymmetric leading to a compact analytical expression with a minimal number of parameters. Along with the statistical parameters and distributions extracted from the data, it is shown that this model function for the events can reproduce the measured spectral characteristics quite well. The model function is then used to explore the link between the event distributions and parameters and the resulting spectrum.

  16. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase α1–Deficient Mice: A Novel Murine Model for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Emmanuel S.; Ko, Yu-Chieh; Alt, Clemens; Hayton, Sarah R.; Jones, Alexander; Tainsh, Laurel T.; Ren, Ruiyi; Giani, Andrea; Clerté, Maeva; Abernathy, Emma; Tainsh, Robert E. T.; Oh, Dong-Jin; Malhotra, Rajeev; Arora, Pankaj; de Waard, Nadine; Yu, Binglan; Turcotte, Raphael; Nathan, Daniel; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Kang, Jae H.; Lin, Charles P.; Gong, Haiyan; Rhee, Douglas J.; Brouckaert, Peter; Wiggs, Janey L.; Gregory, Meredith S.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ksander, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The molecular signaling involved in the pathogenesis of POAG remains unknown. Here, we report that mice lacking the α1 subunit of the nitric oxide receptor soluble guanylate cyclase represent a novel and translatable animal model of POAG, characterized by thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer and loss of optic nerve axons in the context of an open iridocorneal angle. The optic neuropathy associated with soluble guanylate cyclase α1–deficiency was accompanied by modestly increased intraocular pressure and retinal vascular dysfunction. Moreover, data from a candidate gene association study suggests that a variant in the locus containing the genes encoding for the α1 and β1 subunits of soluble guanylate cyclase is associated with POAG in patients presenting with initial paracentral vision loss, a disease subtype thought to be associated with vascular dysregulation. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis and genetics of POAG and suggest new therapeutic strategies for POAG. PMID:23527308

  17. Brinzolamide/brimonidine: a review of its use in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L; Deeks, Emma D

    2015-03-01

    Brinzolamide 1 %/brimonidine 0.2 % ophthalmic suspension (Simbrinza(®)) is a fixed-combination of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor and an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is indicated for the reduction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension in both the USA and EU (with the EU indication restricted to patients for whom monotherapy provides insufficient IOP reduction). In phase III randomized trials, both three-times-daily and twice-daily administration of brinzolamide/brimonidine provided significantly greater IOP-lowering efficacy over 3-6 months than either of its individual components alone, and twice-daily brinzolamide/brimonidine was noninferior to concomitant administration of brinzolamide plus brimonidine over 6 months in this regard. Brinzolamide/brimonidine was generally well tolerated, with a tolerability profile that was consistent with its individual components and with no unexpected safety findings. Therefore, brinzolamide/brimonidine is an effective treatment option for patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension, providing a convenient alternative for those patients who require multiple IOP-lowering medications. Brinzolamide/brimonidine is the first available fixed-combination that does not contain timolol, and maybe particularly suited to patients with comorbidities that restrict treatment with β-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

  18. Open-loop GPS signal tracking at low elevation angles from a ground-based observation site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, Georg; Zus, Florian

    2016-04-01

    For more than a decade space-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) observations are used by meteorological services world-wide for their numerical weather prediction models. In addition, climate studies increasingly rely on validated GNSS-RO data sets of atmospheric parameters. GNSS-RO profiles typically cover an altitude range from the boundary layer up to the upper stratosphere; their highest accuracy and precision, however, are attained at the tropopause level. In the lower troposphere, multipath ray propagation tend to induce signal amplitude and frequency fluctuations which lead to the development and implementation of open-loop signal tracking methods in GNSS-RO receiver firmwares. In open-loop mode the feed-back values for the carrier tracking loop are derived not from measured data, but from a Doppler frequency model which usually is extracted from an atmospheric climatology. In order to ensure that this receiver-internal parameter set, does not bias the carrier phase path observables, dual-channel open-loop GNSS-RO signal tracking was suggested. Following this proposal the ground-based "GLESER" (GPS low-elevation setting event recorder) campaign was established. Its objective was to disproof the existence of model-induced frequency biases using ground-based GPS observations at very low elevation angles. Between January and December 2014 about 2600 validated setting events, starting at geometric elevation angles of +2° and extending to -1°… - 1.5°, were recorded by the single frequency "OpenGPS" GPS receiver at a measurement site located close to Potsdam, Germany (52.3808°N, 13.0642°E). The study is based on the assumption that these ground-based observations may be used as proxies for space-based RO measurements, even if the latter occur on a one order of magnitude faster temporal scale. The "GLESER" data analysis shows that the open-loop Doppler model has negligible influence on the derived frequency profile

  19. Anisotropy of partially self-absorbed jets and the jet of Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Paul, Debdutta; Osborne, Ruaraidh; Rao, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the angular dependence of the flux from partially synchrotron self-absorbed conical jets (proposed by Blandford & Königl). We consider the jet viewed from either a side or close to on axis, and in the latter case, either from the jet top or bottom. We derive analytical formulae for the flux in each of these cases, and find the exact solution for an arbitrary angle numerically. We find that the maximum of the emission occurs when the jet is viewed from top on-axis, which is contrast to a previous result, which found the maximum at some intermediate angle and null emission on-axis. We then calculate the ratio of the jet-to-counterjet emission for this model, which depends on the viewing angle and the index of power-law electrons. We apply our results to the black hole binary Cyg X-1. Given the jet-to-counterjet flux ratio of ≳ 50 found observationally and the current estimates of the inclination, we find the jet velocity to be ≳0.8c. We also point out that when the projection effect is taken into account, the radio observations imply the jet half-opening angle of ≲ 1°, a half of the value given before. When combined with the existing estimates of Γj, the jet half-opening angle is low, ≪1/Γj, and much lower than values observed in blazars, unless Γj is much higher than currently estimated.

  20. Inner jet kinematics and the viewing angle towards the γ-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Lars; Karamanavis, Vassilis; Komossa, Stefanie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Schulz, Robert; Kreikenbohm, Annika; Kadler, Matthias; Myserlis, Ioannis; Ros, Eduardo; Nestoras, Ioannis; Zensus, J. Anton

    2016-11-01

    Near-Eddington accretion rates onto low-mass black holes are thought to be a prime driver of the multi-wavelength properties of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Orientation effects have repeatedly been considered as another important factor involved, but detailed studies have been hampered by the lack of measured viewing angles towards this type of AGN. Here we present multi-epoch, 15 GHz VLBA images (MOJAVE program) of the radio-loud and Fermi/LAT-detected NLS1 galaxy 1H 0323+342. These are combined with single-dish, multi-frequency radio monitoring of the source's variability, obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m and IRAM 30-m telescopes, in the course of the F-GAMMA program. The VLBA images reveal six components with apparent speeds of ˜ 1-7 c, and one quasi-stationary feature. Combining the obtained apparent jet speed (β app) and variability Doppler factor (D var) estimates together with other methods, we constrain the viewing angle θ towards 1H 0323+342 to θ ≤ 4°-13°. Using literature values of βapp and D var, we also deduce a viewing angle of ≤ 8°-9° towards another radio- and γ-ray-loud NLS1, namely SBS 0846+513.

  1. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying

    2013-09-30

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  2. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying; Bao, Wenting

    2013-09-01

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  3. Particle multiplicity in jets and subjets with jet axis from color current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Wolfgang; Ramos, Redamy Pérez

    2008-08-01

    We study the particle multiplicity in a jet or subjet as derived from an energy-multiplicity 2-particle correlation. This definition avoids the notion of a globally fixed jet axis and allows for the study of smaller jet cone openings in a more stable way. The results are sensitive to the mean color current ⟨C⟩A0 in the jet from primary parton A0, which takes into account intermediate partonic processes in the subjet production where CF<⟨C⟩A0jet axis definition is computed for multiplicities in subjets with different opening angles and energies by including contributions from the modified LLA and next-to-modified LLA to the leading order QCD results.

  4. Association of Myopic Deformation of Optic Disc with Visual Field Progression in Paired Eyes with Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Hangai, Masanori; Ishikawa, Makoto; Yoshitomi, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The influence of myopia on glaucoma progression remains unknown, possibly because of the multifactorial nature of glaucoma and difficulty in assessing a solo contribution of myopia. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of myopia with visual field (VF) progression in glaucoma using a paired-eye design to minimize the influence of confounding systemic factors that are diverse among individuals. Methods This retrospective study evaluated 144 eyes of 72 subjects with open-angle glaucoma, with similar intra-ocular pressure between paired eyes, spherical equivalent (SE) ≤ -2 diopter (D), and axial length ≥ 24 mm. Paired eyes with faster and slower VF progression were grouped separately, according to the global VF progression rate assessed by automated pointwise linear regression analysis. The SE, axial length, tilt ratio and torsion angle of optic discs, Bruch’s membrane (BM) opening area, and gamma zone parapapillary atrophy (PPA) width were compared between the two groups. Factors associated with faster VF progression were determined by logistic regression analysis. Results The mean follow-up duration was 8.9 ± 4.4 years. The mean value of SE and axial length were -6.31 ± 1.88 D and 26.05 ± 1.12 mm, respectively. The mean global visual field progression rate was -0.32 ± 0.38 dB/y. Tilt ratio, BM opening area, and gamma zone PPA width were significantly greater in the eyes with faster VF progression than those with slower progression. In multivariate analysis, these factors were significantly associated with faster VF progression (all P < 0.05), while SE and axial length were not associated with it. Conclusion In myopic glaucoma subjects, tilt of the optic disc and temporal shifting and enlargement of the BM opening were associated with faster rate of VF progression between paired eyes. This suggests that myopia influences VF progression in glaucomatous eyes via optic disc deformations rather than via refractive error itself

  5. Recent Developments in Understanding the Role of Aqueous Humor Outflow in Normal and Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Hann, Cheryl R.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is the second leading cause of blindness in the world's rapidly aging population. POAG is characterized by progressive degeneration of neural structures in the posterior segment, often associated with a concomitant elevation of intraocular pressure. Changes in IOP are believed to be caused by a disruption in the normal outflow of aqueous humor. This article reviews recent research associated with normal and POAG aqueous humor outflow. Novel findings elucidating biochemical and pathological changes in the ocular tissues affected in POAG are presented. Stem cell research, identification of lymphatic markers, and increased use of mouse models give researchers exciting new tools to understand aqueous humor outflow, changes associated with POAG and identify underlying causes of the disease. PMID:26236568

  6. [The effect of parenteral citicoline on visual functions and life quality of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Frolov, M A; Gonchar, P A; Barashkov, V I; Kumar, V; Morozova, N S; Frolov, A M; Kazakova, K A

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nootropic drug citicoline on visual functions, perimetric indexes of static automated perimetry, morphometric characteristics of retinal tomography and life quality of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) stage I-III and normalized intraocular pressure (IOP) was studied. 40 patients aged 46-78 years old with POAG stage I-III and normalized IOP were treated with citicoline. Among them there were 24 female and 16 male. The patients were divided into 2 equal groups--experimental and control. Patients of both groups were treated with intravenous citicoline for 10 days. The dose of citicoline in experimental group was 1000 mg/day, in control--500 mg/day. After treatment in both groups visual functions, perimetric indexes of static automated perimetry, morphometric characteristics of retinal tomography and life quality showed improvement. Citicoline has significant neuroprotective effect preventing apoptosis.

  7. Mapping of a gene for autosomal dominant juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 1 q

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.E.; Lichter, P.R.; Torrez, D.; Wong, D.; Johnson, A.T.; Boehnke, M.; Uro, J.L.A. )

    1994-01-01

    A large Caucasian family is presented, in which a juvenile-onset form of open-angle glaucoma is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Sixteen affected family members were identified from 31 at-risk individuals descended from the affected founder. Affected patients developed high intraocular pressures (sometimes >40 mm Hg) within the first 2 decades of life. Linkage analysis between the disease phenotype and 12 microsatellite repeat markers located on chromosome 1 q gave a maximum lod score of 8.38 at a recombination fraction of zero for marker D1S210. Analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggests a total inclusion region of about 14 cM between markers D1S194 and D1S218 at 1q21-q31. This represents the second juvenile-glaucoma family, in which the disease has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 1. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Selective laser trabeculoplasty compared with medical treatment for the initial management of open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Efraín; Rada, Gabriel; Maul, Eugenio

    2015-12-16

    Selective laser trabeculoplasty is a relatively new therapeutic alternative for the management of open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. On the other hand, medical treatment has robust data supporting its efficacy and has progressed in last decades with the introduction of prostaglandin analogues. To compare these two therapies, we searched Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, and identified four systematic reviews including four randomized and one non-randomized clinical trial. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded that selective laser trabeculoplasty leads to a smaller absolute intraocular pressure reduction than medical treatment. However, it is not clear if there are differences in treatment success rate or need of additional antiglaucomatous interventions, because the quality of the evidence is low.

  9. Constraining the Lifetime and Opening Angle of Quasars using Fluorescent Lyman α Emission: The Case of Q0420-388

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Elena; Lilly, Simon J.; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rakic, Olivera; Worseck, Gabor

    2016-10-01

    A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by its lifetime. The model is then applied to the distribution of high-equivalent-width Lyα emitters (with rest-frame equivalent widths above 100 Å, threshold used in, e.g., Trainor & Steidel) identified in a deep narrow-band 36 × 36 arcmin2 image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420-388. These emitters are found near the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, the two most distant objects require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60° or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum of 30°. However, some other expected signatures of boosted fluorescence are not seen at the current survey limits, e.g., a fall off in Lyα brightness, or equivalent width, with distance. Furthermore, to have most of the Lyα emission of the two distant sources to be fluorescently boosted would require the quasar to have been significantly brighter in the past. This suggests that these particular sources may not be fluorescent, invalidating the above lifetime constraints. This would cast doubt on the use of this relatively low equivalent width threshold and thus also on the lifetime analysis in Trainor and Steidel.

  10. Assessing the Association of Mitochondrial Genetic Variation With Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Using Gene-Set Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Anthony P.; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Kang, Jae Hee; Allingham, R. Rand; Hauser, Michael A.; Brilliant, Murray; Budenz, Donald L.; Christen, William G.; Fingert, John; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Kraft, Peter; Lee, Richard K.; Lichter, Paul R.; Liu, Yutao; Medeiros, Felipe; Moroi, Syoko E.; Richards, Julia E.; Realini, Tony; Ritch, Robert; Schuman, Joel S.; Scott, William K.; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J.; Vollrath, Douglas; Wollstein, Gadi; Zack, Donald J.; Zhang, Kang; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Weinreb, Robert N.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Wiggs, Janey L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies indicate that mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). In this study, we examined the association between POAG and common variations in gene-encoding mitochondrial proteins. Methods We examined genetic data from 3430 POAG cases and 3108 controls derived from the combination of the GLAUGEN and NEIGHBOR studies. We constructed biological-system coherent mitochondrial nuclear-encoded protein gene-sets by intersecting the MitoCarta database with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. We examined the mitochondrial gene-sets for association with POAG and with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and high-tension glaucoma (HTG) subsets using Pathway Analysis by Randomization Incorporating Structure. Results We identified 22 KEGG pathways with significant mitochondrial protein-encoding gene enrichment, belonging to six general biological classes. Among the pathway classes, mitochondrial lipid metabolism was associated with POAG overall (P = 0.013) and with NTG (P = 0.0006), and mitochondrial carbohydrate metabolism was associated with NTG (P = 0.030). Examining the individual KEGG pathway mitochondrial gene-sets, fatty acid elongation and synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, both lipid metabolism pathways, were significantly associated with POAG (P = 0.005 and P = 0.002, respectively) and NTG (P = 0.0004 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Butanoate metabolism, a carbohydrate metabolism pathway, was significantly associated with POAG (P = 0.004), NTG (P = 0.001), and HTG (P = 0.010). Conclusions We present an effective approach for assessing the contributions of mitochondrial genetic variation to open-angle glaucoma. Our findings support a role for mitochondria in POAG pathogenesis and specifically point to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism pathways as being important. PMID:27661856

  11. Novel and known MYOC exon 3 mutations in an admixed Peruvian primary open-angle glaucoma population

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Reinoso, Veronica; Guevara-Fujita, Maria L.; Fernández, Silvia; Vargas, Enrique; Castillo-Herrera, Wilder; Perez-Grossmann, Rodolfo; Lizaraso-Caparó, Frank; Richards, Julia E.; Fujita, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to characterize a representative sample of the Peruvian population suffering open-angle glaucoma (OAG) with respect to the myocilin gene (MYOC) mutations, glaucoma phenotype, and ancestry for future glaucoma risk assessment. Methods DNA samples from 414 unrelated Peruvian subjects, including 205 open-angle glaucoma cases (10 juvenile glaucoma [JOAG], 19 normal-tension glaucoma [NTG], and 176 POAG) and 209 randomly sampled controls, were screened for nucleotide changes in MYOC exon 3 by conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) and mutation screening. Results We identified a probable causative novel MYOC missense mutation, Gly326Ser, in one POAG case and found a consistent genotype-phenotype correlation in eight of his relatives. We also found the known causative MYOC mutation Trp286Arg in one JOAG case and one POAG case. A known causative single base MYOC deletion, T1357, was found in one POAG case. Two previously reported silent polymorphisms, Thr325Thr and Tyr347Tyr, were found in both the case and the control populations. A novel missense variant, Met476Arg, was identified in two unrelated controls. Conclusions The screening of exon 3 of MYOC in a representative sample of 205 independent POAG patients from Peru and 209 matched controls identified novel and previously reported mutations (both pathogenic and nonpathogenic) from other global regions. These results reflect the complex admixture of Amerindian and Old World ancestry in urban populations of Latin America, in general, and in Peru, in particular. It will be important to gather information about the ancestral origin of MYOC and other POAG gene mutations to develop screening panels and risk assessment for POAG in Peru. PMID:22879734

  12. Measurement of the azimuthal angle dependence of inclusive jet yields in Pb+Pb collisions at √(sNN)=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Zivković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2013-10-11

    Measurements of the variation of inclusive jet suppression as a function of relative azimuthal angle, Δφ, with respect to the elliptic event plane provide insight into the path-length dependence of jet quenching. ATLAS has measured the Δφ dependence of jet yields in 0.14 nb(-1) of √(s(NN))=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC for jet transverse momenta p(T)>45 GeV in different collision centrality bins using an underlying event subtraction procedure that accounts for elliptic flow. The variation of the jet yield with Δφ was characterized by the parameter, v(2)(jet), and the ratio of out-of-plane (Δφ~π/2) to in-plane (Δφ~0) yields. Nonzero v(2)(jet) values were measured in all centrality bins for p(T)<160 GeV. The jet yields are observed to vary by as much as 20% between in-plane and out-of-plane directions.

  13. Acoustic-seismic coupling for a wide range of angles of incidence and frequencies using signals of jet-aircraft overflights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Altmann, Jürgen

    2016-12-01

    We present the excitation of soil vibration at the surface and at depths to 0.6 m caused by the sound of jet-aircraft overflights. By evaluating a multitude of overflight events we show that the coupling coefficient between soil velocity and sound pressure is only dependent on the angle of incidence of the acoustic wave and the frequency and thus can be averaged over the events. While previous publications presented only pointwise measurements we present signals for a wide range of angles of incidence and frequencies. In the seismic signal we found frequency bands of increased and decreased soil velocity caused by interference of the directly excited seismic wave with waves propagating in the ground and reflected at an underground boundary and at the surface. We use this seismic response to the broadband acoustic excitation to estimate soil characteristics e.g. P-wave velocity and depth of the boundary. The behaviour at depths > 0 m can be explained by an additional reflection at the surface. Here the reflection coefficient from theory was used successfully. The reflection coefficient of the P wave at that boundary - where insufficient information is available for its derivation from theory - was estimated from amplitude ratios at the surface.

  14. Bouncing Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-11-01

    Contrary to common intuition, free jets of fluid can ``bounce'' off each other on collision in mid-air, through the effect of a lubricating air film that separates the jets. We have developed a simple experimental setup to stably demonstrate and study the non-coalescence of jets on collision. We present the results of an experimental investigation of oblique collision between two silicone oil jets, supported by a simple analytical explanation. Our focus is on elucidating the role of various physical forces at play such as viscous stresses, capillary force and inertia. A parametric study conducted by varying the nozzle diameter, jet velocity, angle of inclination and fluid viscosity reveals the scaling laws for the quantities involved such as contact time. We observed a transition from bouncing to coalescence with an increase in jet velocity and inclination angle. We propose that a balance between the contact time of jets and the time required for drainage of the trapped air film can provide a criterion for transition from non-coalescence to coalescence.

  15. Glaucoma, Open-Angle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Courier services use: Rockville, MD 20852) 301-451-2020 Research at NEI Office of the Scientific Director ... Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and Aging ...

  16. Phacoemulsification combined with deep sclerectomy augmented with mitomycin and amniotic membrane implantation in chronic primary open angle glaucoma with cataract

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Hazem

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of combined phacoemulsification plus Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation with deep sclerectomy augmented with mitomycin C (MMC) and sub-flap implantation of amniotic membrane for the management of uncontrolled, chronic, primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Methods This prospective study included 41 patients with chronic, primary, open-angle glaucoma and cataract uncontrolled with medical treatment who underwent combined phacoemulsification augmented with mitomycin C (MMC) application and amniotic membrane implantation under the scleral flap. Intraocular pressure (IOP), visual acuity, glaucoma medications, stabilization of visual field, complications, and viability of the success rate were assessed a 36-month follow-up period. Results The mean age of cases was 54.8 ± 5.3 years. Sixty-one percent of cases were males, and 39% were females. The mean IOP decreased from 23.8 ± 1.8 mmHg preoperatively to 16.8 ± 2.3 mmHg postoperatively. The overall success rate was 97.5, 95, and 92.7% in the first, second, and third year, respectively. The overall success rate was 90% in the first year, but that decreased to 85.3 and 78% in the second and third year, respectively. Qualified success was 7.5, 10, and 14.7% in the first, second, and third year, respectively. Failure was recorded as 2.5, 5, and 7.3% in the first, second, and third year, respectively. IOP reduction was sustained through the follow-up period. Visual acuity improved from 0.13 ± 0.06 to 0.9 ± 0.07 (p < 0.001). The visual field improved significantly in the first assessment, from 14.0 ± 2.7 preoperatively to 12.6 ± 2.6 at three months postoperatively (p < 0.001), after which it became stable for the remainder of the follow-up period. One hundred percent of cases were on three anti-glaucoma drugs preoperatively, while postoperatively, 12.2% were on three drugs, 4.2% were on two drugs, and 82.9% were controlled without anti

  17. Common variants near ABCA1, AFAP1 and GMDS confer risk of primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Rhys; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W.; Martin, Sarah; Law, Matthew H.; Cremin, Katie; Bailey, Jessica N. Cooke; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hauser, Michael A.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; McGuffin, Peter; Topouzis, Fotis; Foster, Paul J.; Graham, Stuart L; Casson, Robert J; Chehade, Mark; White, Andrew J; Zhou, Tiger; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Landers, John; Fitzgerald, Jude T; Klebe, Sonja; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Goldberg, Ivan; Healey, Paul R; Mills, Richard A.; Wang, Jie Jin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Radford-Smith, Graham; Whiteman, David C.; Brown, Matthew A.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Mackey, David A; Mitchell, Paul; MacGregor, Stuart; Craig, Jamie E.

    2014-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a major cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. We performed a genome-wide association study in an Australian discovery cohort comprising 1,155 advanced POAG cases and 1,992 controls. Association of the top SNPs from the discovery stage was investigated in two Australian replication cohorts (total 932 cases, 6,862 controls) and two US replication cohorts (total 2,616 cases, 2,634 controls). Meta-analysis of all cohorts revealed three novel loci associated with development of POAG. These loci are located upstream of ABCA1 (rs2472493 [G] OR=1.31, P= 2.1 × 10−19), within AFAP1 (rs4619890 [G] OR=1.20, P= 7.0 × 10−10) and within GMDS (rs11969985 [G] OR=1.31, and P= 7.7 × 10−10). Using RT-PCR and immunolabelling, we also showed that these genes are expressed within human retina, optic nerve and trabecular meshwork and that ABCA1 and AFAP1 are also expressed in retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25173105

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cells restore function in a human cell loss model of open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-03-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option.

  19. Micro-Bypass Implantation for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Combined with Phacoemulsification: 4-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Fea, Antonio Maria; Consolandi, Giulia; Zola, Marta; Pignata, Giulia; Cannizzo, Paola; Lavia, Carlo; Rolle, Teresa; Grignolo, Federico Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the long-term follow-up results in patients with cataract and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) randomly assigned to cataract surgery combined with micro-bypass stent implantation or phacoemulsification alone. Methods. 36 subjects with cataract and POAG were randomized in a 1 : 2 ratio to either iStent implantation and cataract surgery (combined group) or cataract surgery alone (control group). 24 subjects agreed to be evaluated again 48 months after surgery. Patients returned one month later for unmedicated washout assessment. Results. At the long-term follow-up visit we reported a mean IOP of 15,9 ± 2,3 mmHg in the iStent group and 17 ± 2,5 mmHg in the control group (p = NS). After washout, a 14,2% between group difference in favour of the combined group was statistically significant (p = 0,02) for mean IOP reduction. A significant reduction in the mean number of medications was observed in both groups compared to baseline values (p = 0,005 in the combined group and p = 0,01 in the control group). Conclusion. Patients in the combined group maintained low IOP levels after long-term follow-up. Cataract surgery alone showed a loss of efficacy in controlling IOP over time. Both treatments reduced the number of ocular hypotensive medications prescribed. This trial is registered with: NCT00847158. PMID:26587282

  20. Elevated Plasma Endothelin-1 Levels in Normal Tension Glaucoma and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengjie; Zhang, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this meta-analysis was to clarify the association between the plasma endothelin-1 level and the risks of normal tension glaucoma (NTG) and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. Relevant publications were collected from three databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and the Web of Science through December 31, 2015. In this study, the terms “(endothelin OR ET) AND glaucoma” were searched. Review Manager 5.2 was used to process the data. Results. Seven studies (212 cases, 164 controls) were included for the NTG analysis. The mean plasma endothelin-1 level in the NTG subjects was 0.60 pg/mL (p = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.17–1.04) higher than that of the healthy controls. Six studies (160 cases, 174 controls) were included for the POAG analysis, and the endothelin-1 level was 0.63 pg/mL (p = 0.007, 95% CI: 0.12–1.15) higher in the POAG subjects than in the healthy controls. Additionally, two studies influenced the meta-analysis results regarding the association of plasma endothelin-1 with POAG by sensitivity analysis, and the probability of publication bias was low. Conclusions. The observation that NTG and POAG subjects showed significantly elevated endothelin-1 plasma concentrations suggests that a higher plasma level of endothelin-1 might increase the risk of NTG and POAG development. PMID:27965889

  1. Differential Association of Metabolic Risk Factors with Open Angle Glaucoma according to Obesity in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Han, Kyungdo; Lee, Yun-Ah; Choi, Jin A; Park, Yong-Moon

    2016-01-01

    The associations of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) with intraocular pressure and primary open angle glaucoma (OAG) have been reported. This study aimed to determine whether a difference in association exists between OAG and metabolic risk factors according to obesity status among Korean adults. A total of 8,816 participants (≥40 years) in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were classified into obese, body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 and non-obese, BMI < 25 kg/m2. The prevalence of MetS was 40.1% in non-obese OAG and 66.0% in obese OAG. The prevalence of OAG increased with increasing number components for MetS in total population and in non-obese subjects (P < 0.001, respectively), while the prevalence of OAG was not associated with number of components for MetS in obese subjects (P = 0.14). In non-obese individuals, subjects with high triglycerides, high blood pressure (BP), and MetS were more likely to have OAG compared with those without high triglycerides, high BP, and MetS after adjusting for potential confounders. However, MetS or its components exhibited no significant association with glaucoma status in obese individuals. Our study provides understanding on the differences in association of OAG with MetS and its components according to obesity status. PMID:28004731

  2. Medical management of primary open-angle glaucoma: Best practices associated with enhanced patient compliance and persistency

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sadhana V; Damji, Karim F; Buys, Yvonne M

    2008-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy often requiring lifelong treatment. Patient compliance, adherence and persistence with therapy play a vital role in improved outcomes by reducing morbidity and the economic consequences that are associated with disease progression. A literature review including searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, PubMed, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of identified articles reveals the enormous public health burden in various populations due to the impact of glaucoma associated visual impairment on the overall quality of life eg, fear of blindness, inability to work in certain occupations, driving restrictions, motor vehicle accidents, falls, and general health status. Providing specific definitions for the frequently misunderstood terms “compliance, persistence and adherence” with reference to medication use is central not only for monitoring patients’ drug dosing histories and clinical outcomes but also for subsequent research. In this review article, a summary of the advantages/disadvantages including cost-effectiveness of various medical approaches to glaucoma treatment, techniques employed for measuring patient compliance and actual patient preferences for therapy are outlined. We conclude by identifying the key barriers to ongoing treatment and suggest some best practices to enhance compliance and persistence. PMID:19920977

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Restore Function in a Human Cell Loss Model of Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option. Stem Cells 2015;33:751–761 PMID:25377070

  4. Association of Common Variants in eNOS Gene with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Dong, Yi; Li, Xuan; Tang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To clarify the association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. After a systematic literature search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science databases, all relevant studies evaluating the association between the polymorphisms (rs2070744 and rs1799983) of eNOS gene and POAG were screened and included. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in five genetic models were estimated using fixed-effect model if I2 < 50% in the test for heterogeneity; otherwise the random-effects model was used. Results. Thirty-one records were obtained, with five being suitable for meta-analysis. The overall results showed that both TT genotype in rs2070744 and GG genotype in rs1799983 are associated with decreased risk of POAG susceptibility. Stratified analysis based on ethnicity showed that the association of rs2070744 with POAG remained only in Caucasians. Results of subgroup analysis by sex indicated association between both polymorphisms and POAG in female group, but not in male group. Conclusions. TT genotype and/or T-allele in rs2070744, as well as GG genotype and/or G-allele in rs1799983, was associated with decreased risk for POAG overall and in female group. PMID:27242919

  5. Predicting Clinical Binary Outcome Using Multivariate Longitudinal Data: Application to Patients with Newly Diagnosed Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Miller, J Philip; Beiser, Julia A; Xiong, Chengjie; Gordon, Mae O

    2015-10-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a chronic, progressive, irreversible, and potentially blinding optic neuropathy. The risk of blindness due to progressive visual field (VF) loss varies substantially from patient to patient. Early identification of those patients destined to rapid progressive visual loss is crucial to prevent further damage. In this article, a latent class growth model (LCGM) was developed to predict the binary outcome of VF progression using longitudinal mean deviation (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD). Specifically, the trajectories of MD and PSD were summarized by a functional principal component (FPC) analysis, and the estimated FPC scores were used to identify subgroups (latent classes) of individuals with distinct patterns of MD and PSD trajectories. Probability of VF progression for an individual was then estimated as weighted average across latent classes, weighted by posterior probability of class membership given baseline covariates and longitudinal MD/PSD series. The model was applied to the participants with newly diagnosed POAG from the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS), and the OHTS data was best fit by a model with 4 latent classes. Using the resultant optimal LCGM, the OHTS participants with and without VF progression could be accurately differentiated by incorporating longitudinal MD and PSD.

  6. Fluctuation in systolic blood pressure is a major systemic risk factor for development of primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Young; Jung, Younhea; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Chan Kee

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the risk of development of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in terms of variability in BP using a nationwide, population-based, 11-year longitudinal study using the Korean National Health Insurance Research Database. We included patients who underwent health care examinations more than twice between January 2002 and December 2006. We divided all subjects by the quartiles of variability in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and the difference between SBP and DBP. Of the total of 80,021 included subjects, 910 were diagnosed with POAG between January 2007 and December 2013. Both the Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank test data indicated that patients with higher-level BP variability developed POAG significantly more frequently than did patients with lower-level variability (P < 0.001). On multivariate Cox’s regression modeling including gender, age, sex, household income, smoking status, level of alcohol intake, extent of exercise, diabetes mellitus status, dyslipidemia status, SBP, and DBP; the hazard ratios among the highest and lowest quartiles of SD SBP and CV SBP were 1.256 and 1.238, respectively. Our findings suggest that subjects in the highest quartile of SBP variability were significantly more likely to develop POAG in our population-based sample of Korean adults. PMID:28262703

  7. Intraocular Pressure, Central Corneal Thickness, and Prevalence of Open-Angle Glaucoma: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Brian A.; Varma, Rohit; Chopra, Vikas; Lai, Mei-Ying; Shtir, Corina; Azen, Stanley P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and intraocular pressure (IOP) and the impact of central corneal thickness (CCT) on this relationship. Design Population based cross-sectional study. Methods The study cohort consisted of 5970 participants from the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES) with no history of glaucoma treatment and with complete ophthalmic examination data. The relationship between the prevalence of OAG and IOP was contrasted across persons with CCT designated as thin, normal or thick. Results Prevalence of OAG was exponentially related to IOP. When stratified by CCT, persons with thin CCT had a significantly higher prevalence of OAG than did those with normal or thick CCT’s at all levels of IOP. Adjusting each IOP individually for CCT did not impact significantly the relationship between the prevalence of OAG and IOP. Conclusions These findings suggest that adjusting for the impact of CCT on IOP by correction algorithms is not necessary in a population analysis of glaucoma prevalence; CCT and other associated corneal properties, however, are important independent risk factors for the prevalence of OAG. PMID:18672218

  8. Prediction of stable tearing of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy using the crack-tip opening angle approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) approach was incorporated into a damage growth finite element program, MADGIC (Micromechanics Analysis and Damage Growth in Composites), and was used to predict stable tearing in a middle-crack tension 2024-T3 aluminum alloy specimen. The MADGIC code is a displacement based finite element program implemented with an incremental elastic-plastic algorithm used to model elastic-plastic behavior and a nodal splitting and nodal force relaxation algorithm used to generate crack surfaces. Predictions of the applied stress as a function of crack extension and applied stress as a function of load-line displacement were in good agreement with experiments and with similar predictions made using an existing finite element program, ZIP2D. In addition, path integrals, namely, the J-integral and T*-integral, were also evaluated and compared with the CTOA approach. There appears to be a weak relationship between the CTOA and the T*-integral evaluated on a specific integration path during crack extension beyond maximum applied stress. This study further verifies that the CTOA can be used as an effective elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter to predict crack growth.

  9. Comparison of Newly Diagnosed Ocular Hypertension and Open-Angle Glaucoma: Ocular Variables, Risk Factors, and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Yvonne M.; Harasymowycz, Paul; Gaspo, Rania; Kwok, Kenneth; Hutnik, Cindy M. L.; Blondeau, Pierre; Birt, Catherine M.; Piemontesi, Robert L. G.; Gould, Lisa F.; Lesk, Mark R.; Ahmed, Iqbal K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the distribution of ocular variables, risk factors, and disease severity in newly diagnosed ocular hypertension (OH) or open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Methods. Eligible subjects underwent a complete history and examination. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) obtained from multiple logistic regression models were used to compare OAG to OH and advanced to early/moderate OAG. Results. 405 subjects were enrolled: 292 (72.1%) with OAG and 113 (27.9%) with OH. 51.7% had early, 27.1% moderate, and 20.9% advanced OAG. The OR for OAG versus OH was 8.19 (P < 0.0001) for disc notch, 5.36 (P < 0.0001) for abnormal visual field, 1.45 (P = 0.001) for worsening mean deviation, 1.91 (P < 0.0001) for increased cupping, 1.03 for increased age (P = 0.030), and 0.36 (P = 0.010) for smoking. Conclusions. Increased age was a risk for OAG, and smoking decreased the risk of OAG compared to OH. Almost half of the OAG subjects had moderate/advanced disease at diagnosis. PMID:21869921

  10. Whipping of electrified liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R.; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally. PMID:25201984

  11. Whipping of electrified liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-09-23

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally.

  12. PRE-OPERATIVE PLANNING AND SURGICAL TECHNIQUE OF THE OPEN WEDGE SUPRACONDYLAR OSTEOTOMY FOR CORRECTION OF VALGUS KNEE AND FIXATION WITH A FIXED-ANGLE IMPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen

    2015-01-01

    The step-by-step preoperative planning for supracondylar opening wedge osteotomy of the femur for precise correction of the load axis of the lower limb using a fixed-angle implant (95° AO blade plate) is presented. The surgical technique and the use of a bone graft from the same site for filling in the defect are also presented. PMID:27026976

  13. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  14. Early Postoperative Effects of Cataract Surgery on Anterior Segment Parameters in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Pseudoexfoliation Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Elgin, Ufuk; Şen, Emine; Şimşek, Tülay; Tekin, Kemal; Yılmazbaş, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effect of cataract surgery on anterior segment parameters measured by optical biometry in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PXG). Materials and Methods: Twenty-five eyes of 25 patients with POAG and 29 eyes of 29 patients with PXG who had uncomplicated phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation surgery were included to our prospective study. Central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and axial length (AL) were measured with an optical biometer preoperatively and at 1 month postoperatively. The pre- and postoperative values of intraocular pressure (IOP) and the anterior segment parameters and the differences between POAG and PXG were compared statistically by paired t, independent t and chi-square tests. Results: The mean values of preoperative CCT (p=0.042) and ACD (p=0.012) were significantly lower in the PXG than in the POAG group. In the PXG group, IOP decreased (p=0.001) but CCT (p=0.03) and ACD (p=0.001) increased significantly postoperatively; AL did not change significantly. In the POAG group, IOP decreased (p=0.01) and ACD (p=0.004) increased significantly postoperatively, while AL and CCT did not change significantly. There were no significant differences in the pre- to postoperative changes in IOP (p=0.76), AL (p=0.44) and CCT (p=0.52) values between the two groups. However, the postoperative increase in ACD was larger in the PXG group (p=0.03). Conclusion: Cataract surgery may cause some changes in IOP and anterior segment parameters like ACD and CCT postoperatively in eyes with POAG and PXG, and these changes may differ between eyes with PXG and POAG. PMID:27800269

  15. Clinical evaluation of a trabecular microbypass stent with phacoemulsification in patients with open-angle glaucoma and cataract

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Tanner J; Berdahl, John P; Schweitzer, Justin A; Sudhagoni, Ramu G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the iStent trabecular microbypass stent in combination with cataract surgery in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Methods Retrospective, consecutive case series from October 2012 to December 2015 with no exclusion criteria. The series comprised of 350 eyes with OAG and cataract. Data were collected both preoperatively and postoperatively at day 1 week 1, months 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24. Data included intraocular pressure (IOP), number of glaucoma medications, visual acuity, the incidence of postoperative IOP pressure spikes of greater than ≥15 mmHg at any time point, and need for additional surgery. Results The mean preoperative IOP was 19.13±6.34 mmHg. At 2 years postoperation, mean IOP was 15.17±3.53 mmHg (P<0.0001). The mean number of glaucoma medications was 1.19±1.00 preoperatively and 0.61±0.96 (P<0.0001) at 2 years postoperation. At 1 day postoperatively, 31 eyes (12.4%) experienced an IOP increase of 15 mmHg above their baseline IOP that responded to topical therapy. Two patients required additional tube shunt surgery. Conclusion The insertion of the iStent trabecular microbypass stent in combination with cataract surgery effectively lowers IOP in OAG patients. The magnitude of IOP reduction was more significant in patients with higher preoperative pressure. Medication use was also significantly reduced postoperatively. The safety profile appears favorable with a low rate of IOP spikes and only two eyes (<1%) requiring additional surgery. PMID:27695280

  16. Estimated Cerebrospina Fluid Pressure and the 5-Year Incidence of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Tao, Yijin; Yuan, Yuansheng; Pan, Chen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to assess the longitudinal association between baseline estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and 5-year incident primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in a population-based sample of Bai Chinese living in rural China. Methods Among the 2133 Bai Chinese aged 50 years or older who had participated in the baseline examination of the Yunnan Minority Eye Study, 1520 (71.3%) attended the follow-up examination after five years and 1485 were at risk of developing POAG. Participants underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations at both baseline and follow-up surveys. CSFP in mmHg was estimated as 0.55 × body mass index (kg/m2) + 0.16 × diastolic blood pressure (mmHg)-0.18 × age (years)-1.91. Glaucoma was defined using the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology Classification criteria. Multivariate logistic regression models were established to determine the association between baseline CSFP and incident POAG. Results After a mean follow-up time of 5 years, 19 new cases of POAG were detected, with an incidence rate of 1.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.7–1.9%). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, education, intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, hypertension and diabetes, no significant associations, nor any trends, were evident between baseline estimated CSFP and incident POAG. The association between estimated CSFP per mmHg increase in baseline and 5-year incidence of POAG was also non-significant, with adjusted relative risk of 0.96 (P = 0.11) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions This longitudinal cohort study does not support previously observed cross-sectional association between estimated CSFP and POAG in population-based studies. PMID:27611879

  17. Examining the wake structure in Saturn's rings from microwave observations over varying ring opening angles and wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, David E.; de Pater, Imke; Molnar, Lawrence A.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last 15 to 20 years several high quality, high resolution data have been taken with the very large array (VLA). These data exhibit a wide range of ring opening angles ( |B|=0 to 26°) and wavelengths ( λ=0.7 to 20 cm). At these wavelengths the primary flux from the rings is scattered saturnian thermal emission, with a small contribution coming from the ring particles' own thermal emission. Much of the data do show signs of asymmetries due to wakes either on the ansae or the portion of the rings which occult the planet. As in previous work, we use our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code including idealized wakes [Dunn, D.E., Molnar, L.A., Fix, J.D., 2002. Icarus 160, 132-160; Dunn, D.E., Molnar, L.A., Niehof, J.T., de Pater, I., Lissauer, J.L., 2004. Icarus 171, 183-198] to model the relative contributions of the scattered and thermal radiation emanating from the rings and compare the results to that seen in the data. Although the models do give satisfactory fits to all of our data, we find that no single model can simulate the data at all different |B| and λ. We find that one model works best for moderate and low |B| and another one at higher |B|. The main difference between these models is the ratio of the wake width to their separation. We similarly find that the 2 cm data require higher density wakes than the longer wavelength data, perhaps caused by a preponderance of somewhat smaller ring material in the wakes. We further find evidence for an increase in the physical temperature of the rings with increasing |B|. Continuous observations are required to determine whether the above results regarding variations in wake parameters with |B| and λ are indeed caused by these parameters, or instead by changes over time.

  18. Linkage analysis of primary open-angle glaucoma excludes the juvenile glaucoma region on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Acott, T.S.; Samples, J.R. |

    1994-09-01

    The gene for one form of juvenile glaucoma has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. This raises the possibility of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) also mapping to this region if the same defective gene causes both diseases. To ask this question linkage analysis was performed on a large POAG kindred. Blood samples or skin biopsies were obtained from 40 members of this family. Individuals were diagnosed as having POAG if they met two or more of the following criteria: (1) Visual field defects compatible with glaucoma on automated perimetry; (2) Optic nerve head and/or nerve fiber layer analysis compatible with glaucomatous damage; (3) high intraocular pressures (> 20 mm Hg). Patients were considered glaucoma suspects if they only met one criterion. These individuals were excluded from the analysis. Of the 40 members, seven were diagnosed with POAG; four were termed suspects. The earliest age of onset was 38 years old, while the average age of onset was 65 years old. We performed two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, using five markers which encompass the region 1q21-q31; specifically, D1S194, D1S210, D1S212, D1S191 and LAMB2. Two-point lod scores excluded tight linkage with all markers except D1S212 (maximum lod score of 1.07 at theta = 0.0). In the multipoint analysis, including D1S210-D1S212-LAMB2 and POAG, the entire 11 cM region spanned by these markers was excluded for linkage with POAG; that is, lod scores were < -2.0. In conclusion, POAG in this family does not map to chromosome 1q21-q31 and, thus, they carry a gene that is distinct from the juvenile glaucoma gene.

  19. Expression profile of the matricellular protein osteopontin in primary open-angle glaucoma and the normal human eye.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Uttio Roy; Jea, Seung-Youn; Oh, Dong-Jin; Rhee, Douglas J; Fautsch, Michael P

    2011-08-16

    PURPOSE. To characterize the role of osteopontin (OPN) in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and normal eyes. METHODS. OPN quantification was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in aqueous humor (AH) obtained from human donor eyes (POAG and normal) and surgical samples (POAG and elective cataract removal). OPN expression and localization in whole eye tissue sections and primary normal human trabecular meshwork (NTM) cells were studied by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Latanoprost-free acid (LFA)-treated NTM cells were analyzed for OPN gene and protein expression. Intraocular pressure was measured by tonometry, and central corneal thickness was measured by optical coherence tomography in young OPN(-/-) and wild-type mice. RESULTS. OPN levels were significantly reduced in donor POAG AH compared with normal AH (0.54 ± 0.18 ng/μg [n = 8] vs. 0.77 ± 0.23 ng/μg [n = 9]; P = 0.039). A similar trend was observed in surgical AH (1.05 ± 0.31 ng/μg [n = 20] vs. 1.43 ± 0.88 ng/μg [n = 20]; P = 0.083). OPN was present in the trabecular meshwork, corneal epithelium and endothelium, iris, ciliary body, retina, vitreous humor, and optic nerve. LFA increased OPN gene expression, but minimal change in OPN protein expression was observed. No difference in intraocular pressure (17.5 ± 2.0 mm Hg [n = 56] vs. 17.3 ± 1.9 mm Hg [n = 68]) but thinner central corneal thickness (91.7 ± 3.6 μm [n = 50] vs. 99.2 ± 5.5 μm [n = 70]) was noted between OPN(-/-) and wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS. OPN is widely distributed in the human eye and was found in lower concentrations in POAG AH. Reduction of OPN in young mice does not affect IOP.

  20. Comparison of Pattern Electroretinography and Optical Coherence Tomography Parameters in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tiryaki Demir, Semra; Oba, Mehmet Ersin; Erdoğan, Ezgi Tuna; Odabaşı, Mahmut; Dirim, Ayşe Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Can, Efe; Kara, Orhan; Yekta Şendül, Selam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the correlation of visual field (VF), pattern electroretinography (PERG) and Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) results in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and early primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Materials and Methods: The study included 72 eyes of 37 patients with early POAG, 76 eyes of 38 patients with OHT, and 60 eyes of 30 controls. All subjects underwent full ophthalmologic examination, VF assessment with 24-2 Humphrey standard automated perimetry (Swedish Interactive Thresholding Algorithm (SITA)-Standard), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness measurement with FD-OCT, and PERG P50 and N95 wave latency and amplitude measurements with electroretinography (Nihon Kohden). Results: With the exception of the nasal quadrant, all GCC parameters and RNFL results were significantly lower in the POAG group compared to the OHT and control groups. There was no statistically significant difference between the OHT and control group. PERG amplitudes were lower in the POAG and OHT groups than in the control group. Reduction in N95 amplitude was greater than that of P50 amplitude. No difference was detected in PERG latencies among groups. GCC was significantly correlated with VF and RNFL in the POAG group. Conclusion: Significant thinning of the GCC and RNFL occurs in addition to VF pathologies in patients with early POAG, and these examinations should be concomitantly evaluated. During diagnostic assessment of patients with early POAG, GCC and RNFL analysis by FD-OCT are highly effective. GCC is as reliable as RNLF in the early diagnosis of glaucoma and there is a highly significant correlation between them. Dysfunction of ganglion cells in patients with OHT may be detected earlier using PERG amplitude analysis. PMID:27800239

  1. Oxygen saturation measurements of the retinal vasculature in treated asymmetrical primary open-angle glaucoma using hyperspectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mordant, D J; Al-Abboud, I; Muyo, G; Gorman, A; Harvey, A R; McNaught, A I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether there are differences in retinal vascular oxygen saturation measurements, estimated using a hyperspectral fundus camera, between normal eyes and treated eyes of subjects with asymmetrical primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods A noninvasive hyperspectral fundus camera was used to acquire spectral images of the retina at wavelengths between 556 and 650 nm in 2-nm increments. In total, 14 normal eyes and both eyes of 11 treated POAG subjects were imaged and analyzed using algorithms that use the spectral variation of the optical densities of blood vessels to estimate the oxygen saturation of blood within the retinal vasculature. In the treated POAG group, each of the eyes were categorized, based on the mean deviation of the Humphrey visual-field analyzer result, as either more-advanced or less-advanced, glaucomatous eyes. Unpaired t-tests (two-tailed) with Welch's correction were used to compare the mean oxygen saturation between the normal subjects and the treated POAG subgroups. Results In less-advanced and more-advanced-treated POAG eyes, mean retinal venular oxygen saturations (48.2±21.6% and 42.6±18.8%, respectively) were significantly higher than in normal eyes (27.9±9.9% P=0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Arteriolar oxygen saturation was not significantly different between normal eyes and treated POAG eyes. Conclusions The increased oxygen saturation of the retinal venules in advanced-treated POAG eyes may indicate reduced metabolic consumption of oxygen in the inner retinal tissues. PMID:25060843

  2. Color Doppler Imaging Analysis of Retrobulbar Blood Flow Velocities in Primary Open-Angle Glaucomatous Eyes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Nana; Zhang, Ping; Huang, Huadong; Ma, Jinlan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Hao; Qu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background To analyze the diagnostic value of color Doppler imaging (CDI) of blood flow in the retrobulbar vessels of eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods Pertinent publications were retrieved from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed and the ISI Web of Knowledge up to October 2012. Changes in peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV) and resistive index (RI) of the ophthalmic artery (OA), central retinal artery (CRA) and short posterior ciliary artery (SPCA) of POAG eyes and normal controls were evaluated by CDI. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to whether patients received IOP-lowering drugs treatment and were defined as treated and untreated. Results PSV and EDV were statistically significantly reduced in the OA of POAG eyes (P = 0.0002; P<0.00001; respectively), with significant heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 94%; Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 85%; respectively). Similar results were demonstrated for the CRA (P<0.00001; respectively) and SPCA (P = 0.005; P<0.00001; respectively), with significant heterogeneities for both the CRA (Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 81%; Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 98%; respectively) and the SPCA (Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 96%; Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 93%; respectively). Significant increases in RI were found in all retrobulbar vessels (P<0.00001; respectively), with significant heterogeneities (Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 95%; Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 94%; Pheterogeneity<0.00001, I2 = 97%; respectively). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that CDI is a potential diagnostic tool for POAG. PMID:23675419

  3. The Relationship between Central Visual Field Damage and Motor Vehicle Collisions in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Kenya; Asaoka, Ryo; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between visual field (VF) damage and history of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in subjects with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods MVC history and driving habits were recorded using patient questionnaires in 247 POAG patients. Patients' driving attitudes (carefulness) were estimated using Rasch analysis. The relationship between MVC outcomes and 52 total deviation (TD) values of integrated binocular VF (IVF), better and worse visual acuities (VAs), age and gender was analyzed using principal component analysis and logistic regression. Results 51 patients had the history of MVCs. Significant difference was observed between patients with and without history of MVCs only for: better VA, a single TD value in the superior-right VF, and the typical distance driven in a week (unpaired t-test, p = 0.002, 0.015 and 0.006, respectively). There was not a significant relationship between MVCs and mean deviation (MD) of IVF (p = 0.41, logistic regression). None of the principal components were significantly correlated with MVC outcome (p>0.05, polynomial logistic regression analysis). There was a significant relationship between IVF MD and Rasch derived Person parameter (R2 = 0.023, p = 0.0095). There was also a significant positive relationship between MVCs and the distance driven in a week (p = 0.005, logistic regression). Conclusions In this study of POAG patients, MVCs were not related to central binocular VF damage. These results suggest the relationship between visual function and driving is not straightforward, and careful consideration should be given when predicting patients' driving ability using their VF. PMID:25545660

  4. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Kearns, Lisa S; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W; Mackey, David A; Trounce, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function.

  5. Albuminuria Is Associated with Open-Angle Glaucoma in Nondiabetic Korean Subjects: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gyu Ah; Park, Se Hee; Ko, Jaesang; Lee, Si Hyung; Bae, Hyoung Won; Seong, Gong Je; Kim, Chan Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systemic vascular dysfunction has been suggested to contribute to glaucomatous damage. Albuminuria is a surrogate marker of endothelial injury, including vessels. However, their relationship is not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the association between albuminuria and the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in nondiabetic subjects. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 4186 nondiabetic participants aged 19 years or older from the 2011–2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. OAG was defined based on the criteria of the International Society for Geographic and Epidemiologic Ophthalmology. Urinary albumin excretion was assessed by the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between albuminuria and OAG. Results Among the subjects, 124 had OAG. The weighted prevalences of microalbuminuria (UACR of 30–299 mg/g creatinine [Cr]) and macroalbuminuria (UACR ≥ 300 mg/g Cr) were 3.2 ± 0.3% and 0.4 ± 0.1%, respectively. The percentages of OAG increased in accordance with increasing UACR tertiles. Compared with subjects in the lower UACR tertile, those in the upper tertile showed an increased prevalence of OAG (odds ratio, 1.963; 95% confidence interval 1.072–3.595, P = 0.029) after adjusting for demographic factors, laboratory parameters, kidney function, and intraocular pressure. Furthermore, even after excluding 155 subjects with microalbuminuria and 19 subjects with macroalbuminuria, a positive association persisted between the upper UACR tertile (low-grade albuminuria) and an increased prevalence of OAG (odds ratio, 2.170; 95% confidence interval, 1.174–4.010, P = 0.014). Conclusion Albuminuria, even low-grade, was significantly associated with OAG in nondiabetic subjects. This result implies the role of vascular endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenic mechanism of OAG and suggests that careful monitoring of

  6. [Effectiveness of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid derivatives in complex treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Tur, E V; Soliannikova, O V; Rykun, V S; Sumina, M S; Dmitrienko, V N; Berdnikova, E V

    2012-01-01

    Prospective, placebo-controlled, single-blind, randomized clinical investigation of the influence of domestic 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid derivatives (emoxipin, reamberin, mexidol) on the effectiveness of a complex treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) has been performed in a group of patients. It is established that intravenous infusion of 3-hydroxypyridine derivatives (emoxipin and mexidol) for two weeks, beginning 14 days after the start of POAG treatment, produced a retinoprotective action, with three months postponed changes in the central retinal artery (CRA) blood velocity. The retinoprotective effect of emoxipin (single dose, 150 mg) was manifested by reduction in the horizontal size of blind spot in two weeks, with the subsequent reduction of the CRA end-diastolic blood velocity observed three months after finish of the infusion therapy. The administration of mexidol (single dose, 300 mg) after 14 days of treatment led to widening of the summarized field of vision (test-object square, 16 mm), accompanied by a decrease in the electrosensitivity threshold of the optic nerve and the intensity of POAG-associated hypothymia. All indices of CRA blood velocity increased three months after termination of mexidol infusions. Reamberin (single dose, 400 ml 1,5% solution of reamberine, containing polyelectrolyte and meglumine succinate mixture) did not show retinoprotective action, but caused proatherogenic changes of blood lipids and 3 months postponed CRA end-diastolic blood velocity increase. The effect of mexidol (which is a derivative of both 3- hydroxypyridine and succinic acid) exceeds that of separate 3-hydroxypyridine (emoxipin) and succinic acid (reamberin) derivatives in the degree of retinoprotection and positive effect on the optic nerve condition and mood of POAG patients.

  7. Crack-tip-opening angle measurements and crack tunneling under stable tearing in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The stable tearing behavior of thin sheets 2024-T3 aluminum alloy was studied for middle crack tension specimens having initial cracks that were: flat cracks (low fatigue stress) and 45 degrees through-thickness slant cracks (high fatigue stress). The critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) values during stable tearing were measured by two independent methods, optical microscopy and digital image correlation. Results from the two methods agreed well. The CTOA measurements and observations of the fracture surfaces showed that the initial stable tearing behavior of low and high fatigue stress tests is significantly different. The cracks in the low fatigue stress tests underwent a transition from flat-to-slant crack growth, during which the CTOA values were high and significant crack tunneling occurred. After crack growth equal to about the thickness, CTOA reached a constant value of 6 deg and after crack growth equal to about twice the thickness, crack tunneling stabilized. The initial high CTOA values, in the low fatigue crack tests, coincided with large three-dimensional crack front shape changes due to a variation in the through-thickness crack tip constraint. The cracks in the high fatigue stress tests reach the same constant CTOA value after crack growth equal to about the thickness, but produced only a slightly higher CTOA value during initial crack growth. For crack growth on the 45 degree slant, the crack front and local field variables are still highly three-dimensional. However, the constant CTOA values and stable crack front shape may allow the process to be approximated with two-dimensional models.

  8. Optic Disc Perfusion in Primary Open Angle and Normal Tension Glaucoma Eyes Using Optical Coherence Tomography-Based Microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Joanne C.; Zhang, Qinqin; Xin, Chen; Gupta, Divakar; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate optic disc perfusion differences in normal, primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and normal tension glaucoma (NTG) eyes using optical microangiography (OMAG) based optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography technique. Design Cross-sectional, observational study. Subjects Twenty-eight normal, 30 POAG, and 31 NTG subjects. Methods One eye from each subject was scanned with a 68 kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5,000-based OMAG prototype system centered at the optic nerve head (ONH) (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA). Microvascular images were generated from the OMAG dataset by detecting the differences in OCT signal between consecutive B-scans. The pre-laminar layer (preLC) was isolated by a semi-automatic segmentation program. Main Outcome Measures Optic disc perfusion, quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux (flux normalized by the vessel area) within the ONH. Results Glaucomatous eyes had significantly lower optic disc perfusion in preLC in all three perfusion metrics (p<0.0001) compared to normal eyes. The visual field (VF) mean deviation (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD) were similar between the POAG and NTG groups, and no differences in optic disc perfusion were observed between POAG and NTG. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlation between optic disc perfusion and VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in both POAG and NTG groups (p≤0.0288). However, normalized optic disc perfusion was correlated with some structural measures (retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and ONH cup/disc ratio) only in POAG eyes. Conclusions Optic disc perfusion detected with OMAG was significantly reduced in POAG and NTG groups compared to normal controls, but no difference was seen between POAG and NTG groups with similar levels of VF damage. Disc perfusion was significantly correlated with VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in glaucomatous eyes. Vascular changes at the optic disc as measured using OMAG may provide useful information for

  9. Modeling a decrease in hydraulic losses during turbulent flow in a U-bend channel with a circular cavern with a large opening angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Kalinin, E. I.; Tereshkin, A. A.; Usachov, A. E.

    2015-03-01

    The Reynolds equations for incompressible viscous fluid, closed using the Menter shear-stress-transfer model modified with allowance for the curvature of flow lines, have been numerically solved using multiblock computational technologies. The obtained solution has been used to calculate the turbulent flow in a U-bend channel containing a circular cavern with a variable opening angle. Predictions based on the results of numerical simulations agree well with the experimental data of Savelsberg and Castro at moderate cavern opening angles. It is established that hydraulic losses in a U-bend channel with completely open cavern are significantly (by ˜25%) decreased as compared to those in a smooth channel at Re = 105.

  10. The effects of the stellar wind and orbital motion on the jets of high-mass microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass microquasar jets propagate under the effect of the wind from the companion star, and the orbital motion of the binary system. The stellar wind and the orbit may be dominant factors determining the jet properties beyond the binary scales. Aims: This is an analytical study, performed to characterise the effects of the stellar wind and the orbital motion on the jet properties. Methods: Accounting for the wind thrust transferred to the jet, we derive analytical estimates to characterise the jet evolution under the impact of the stellar wind. We include the Coriolis force effect, induced by orbital motion and enhanced by the wind's presence. Large-scale evolution of the jet is sketched, accounting for wind-to-jet thrust transfer, total energy conservation, and wind-jet flow mixing. Results: If the angle of the wind-induced jet bending is larger than its half-opening angle, the following is expected: (i) a strong recollimation shock; (ii) bending against orbital motion, caused by Coriolis forces and enhanced by the wind presence; and (iii) non-ballistic helical propagation further away. Even if disrupted, the jet can re-accelerate due to ambient pressure gradients, but wind entrainment can weaken this acceleration. On large scales, the opening angle of the helical structure is determined by the wind-jet thrust relation, and the wind-loaded jet flow can be rather slow. Conclusions: The impact of stellar winds on high-mass microquasar jets can yield non-ballistic helical jet trajectories, jet partial disruption and wind mixing, shocks, and possibly non-thermal emission. Among other observational diagnostics, such as radiation variability at any band, the radio morphology on milliarcsecond scales can be informative on the wind-jet interaction.

  11. Jet outflow and open field line measurements on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheftman, D.; Gupta, D.; Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Marsili, P.; Moreno, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy along open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma. An overview of the diagnostic methods used to perform measurements on the open field line plasma on C-2U is presented, including passive Doppler impurity spectroscopy, microwave interferometry, and triple Langmuir probe measurements. Results of these measurements provide the jet ion temperature and axial velocity, electron density, and high frequency density fluctuations.

  12. High frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Effect of cerebral blood flow in patients after open heart surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pittet, J.F.; Forster, A.; Suter, P.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Attenuation of ventilator-synchronous pressure fluctuations of intracranial pressure has been demonstrated during high frequency ventilation in animal and human studies, but the consequences of this effect on cerebral blood flow have not been investigated in man. We compared the effects of high frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation on CBF in 24 patients investigated three hours after completion of open-heart surgery. The patients were investigated during three consecutive periods with standard sedation (morphine, pancuronium): a. IPPV; b. HFJV; c. IPPV. Partial pressure of arterial CO{sub 2} (PaCO{sub 2}: 4.5-5.5 kPa) and rectal temperature (35.5 to 37.5{degree}C) were maintained constant during the study. The CBF was measured by intravenous {sup 133}Xe washout technique. The following variables were derived from the cerebral clearance of {sup 133}Xe: the rapid compartment flow, the initial slope index, ie, a combination of the rapid and the slow compartment flows, and the ratio of fast compartment flow over total CBF (FF). Compared to IPPV, HFJV applied to result in the same mean airway pressure did not produce any change in pulmonary gas exchange, mean systemic arterial pressure, and cardiac index. Similarly, CBF was not significantly altered by HFJV. However, important variations of CBF values were observed in three patients, although the classic main determinants of CBF (PaCO{sub 2}, cerebral perfusion pressure, Paw, temperature) remained unchanged. Our results suggest that in patients with normal systemic hemodynamics, the effects of HFJV and IPPV on CBF are comparable at identical levels of mean airway pressure.

  13. A prospective 3-year follow-up trial of implantation of two trabecular microbypass stents in open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Donnenfeld, Eric D; Solomon, Kerry D; Voskanyan, Lilit; Chang, David F; Samuelson, Thomas W; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K; Katz, L Jay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate 3-year safety and intraocular pressure (IOP) following two trabecular microbypass stents in phakic and pseudophakic subjects with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on preoperative medication. Patients and methods In this prospective pilot study, phakic or pseudophakic subjects with OAG and IOP between 18 mmHg and 30 mmHg on one preoperative topical ocular hypotensive medication underwent medication washout. Thirty-nine qualified subjects with preoperative unmedicated IOP ≥22 mmHg and ≤38 mmHg received two stents. Postoperative examinations were scheduled at Day 1, Week 1, Months 1, 3, 6, and 12, and semiannually through Month 60. Ocular hypotensive medication was considered if postoperative IOP exceeded 21 mmHg. IOP, medication use, and safety were assessed at each visit. Subject follow-up through Month 36 was completed. Results Thirty-six eyes (92.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 79.1%, 98.4%) achieved the primary efficacy end point of Month 12 reduction in IOP ≥20% from baseline (unmedicated IOP) without ocular hypotensive medication. Four subjects required medication during the Month 36 follow-up period. Mean IOP at 36 months for subjects not taking medication was 15.2 mmHg. At 36 months, subjects sustained mean IOP decrease of 9.1±2.7 mmHg (95% CI 8.0 mmHg, 10.14 mmHg), or 37% IOP reduction, from unmedicated baseline IOP. Compared to preoperative medicated IOP, subjects had mean reduction at Month 36 of 5.5±2.7 mmHg (95% CI 4.5 mmHg, 6.6 mmHg), or 26% reduction. Both measures of IOP reduction were highly significant (P<0.001). Other than one case of early postoperative hyphema that resolved at 1 week, no postoperative adverse events were attributed to stent implantation. Conclusion In a pilot study, two trabecular microbypass stents to treat OAG subjects on one preoperative medication provided statistically significant, sustained, and safe reduction of IOP to ≤15 mmHg without medication through 36 months. PMID:26604675

  14. Topical Ocular Sodium 4-Phenylbutyrate Rescues Glaucoma in a Myocilin Mouse Model of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Zode, Gulab S.; Bugge, Kevin E.; Mohan, Kabhilan; Grozdanic, Sinisa D.; Peters, Joseph C.; Koehn, Demelza R.; Anderson, Michael G.; Kardon, Randy H.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Mutations in the myocilin gene (MYOC) are the most common known genetic cause of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The purpose of this study was to determine whether topical ocular sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) treatment rescues glaucoma phenotypes in a mouse model of myocilin-associated glaucoma (Tg-MYOCY437H mice). Methods. Tg-MYOCY437H mice were treated with PBA eye drops (n = 10) or sterile PBS (n = 8) twice daily for 5 months. Long-term safety and effectiveness of topical PBA (0.2%) on glaucoma phenotypes were examined by measuring intraocular pressure (IOP) and pattern ERG (PERG), performing slit lamp evaluation of the anterior chamber, analyzing histologic sections of the anterior segment, and comparing myocilin levels in the aqueous humor and trabecular meshwork of Tg-MYOCY437H mice. Results. Tg-MYOCY437H mice developed elevated IOP at 3 months of age when compared with wild-type (WT) littermates (n = 24; P < 0.0001). Topical PBA did not alter IOP in WT mice. However, it significantly reduced elevated IOP in Tg-MYOCY437H mice to the level of WT mice. Topical PBA-treated Tg-MYOCY437H mice also preserved PERG amplitudes compared with vehicle-treated Tg-MYOCY437H mice. No structural abnormalities were observed in the anterior chamber of PBA-treated WT and Tg-MYOCY437H mice. Analysis of the myocilin in the aqueous humor and TM revealed that PBA significantly improved the secretion of myocilin and reduced myocilin accumulation as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the TM of Tg-MYOCY437H mice. Furthermore, topical PBA reduced IOP elevated by induction of ER stress via tunicamycin injections in WT mice. Conclusions. Topical ocular PBA reduces glaucomatous phenotypes in Tg-MYOCY437H mice, most likely by reducing myocilin accumulation and ER stress in the TM. Topical ocular PBA could become a novel treatment for POAG patients with myocilin mutations. PMID:22328638

  15. Trends in Utilization of Ancillary Glaucoma Tests for Patients with Open-Angle Glaucoma from 2001 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.; Talwar, Nidhi; Laverne, Alejandra; Nan, Bin; Lichter, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess trends in the use of ancillary diagnostic tests in the evaluation of patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and glaucoma suspects over the past decade. Design Retrospective longitudinal cohort analysis. Participants 169,917 individuals with OAG and 395,721 with suspected glaucoma age ≥40 enrolled in a national United States managed care network between 2001–2009. Methods Claims data were analyzed to assess trends in visual field (VF) testing, fundus photography (FP), and other ocular imaging (OOI) testing for patients with OAG or suspected glaucoma in 2001–2009. Repeated measures logistic regression was performed to identify differences in the odds of undergoing these procedures in 2001, 2005, and 2009 and whether differences exist for patients under the exclusive care of optometrists versus ophthalmologists. Main Outcome Measures Odds and annual probabilities of undergoing VF testing, FP, and OOI for OAG from 2001–2009. Results For patients with OAG, the odds of undergoing VF testing decreased by 36% from 2001 to 2005, 12% from 2005 to 2009, and 44% from 2001 to 2009. By comparison, the odds of having OOI increased by 100% from 2001 to 2005, 24% from 2005 to 2009, and 147% from 2001 to 2009. Probabilities of undergoing FP were relatively low (13–25%) for both provider types and remained fairly steady over the decade. For patients cared for exclusively by optometrists, the probability of VF testing decreased from 66% in 2001 to 44% in 2009. Among those seen exclusively by ophthalmologists, the probability of VF testing decreased from 65% in 2001 to 51% in 2009. The probability of undergoing OOI increased from 26% in 2001 to 47% in 2009 for patients of optometrists and from 30% in 2001 to 46% in 2009 for patients of ophthalmologists. By 2008, patients with OAG receiving care exclusively by optometrists had a higher probability of undergoing OOI than VF testing. Conclusion During 2001–2009 OOI rose dramatically whereas VF testing

  16. Retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma subjects by multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gai-yun; Al-wesabi, Samer abdo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in oxygen supply to the optic nerve head (ONH) from the retinal and choroidal vascular layers in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) using multispectral imaging (MSI).This ia an observational, cross-sectional study. Multispectral images were acquired from 38 eyes of 19 patients with POAG, and 42 healthy eyes from 21 matched volunteers with Annidis’ RHA multispectral digital ophthalmoscopy. Superficial and deeper oxygen saturation of the optic disc was represented by the mean gray scale values on the retinal and choroidal oxy-deoxy maps, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed to detect differences in ONH oxygen saturation between the 2 groups. Oxygen saturation levels in the eyes of POAG patients with severe glaucoma were compared to those of fellow eyes from the same subjects. Linear correlation analysis was performed to assess the association between ONH oxygen saturation and systemic and ocular parameters. No statistical difference was found in retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation between the POAG and control groups. In the glaucoma patients, retinal oxygen saturation was lower for eyes with worse visual fields than in those with good visual fields (t = 4.009, P = 0.001). In POAG patients, retinal oxygen saturation was dependent on mean defect of visual field and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) (r = 0.511, 0.504, P = 0.001, 0.001, respectively), whereas the choroid vasculature oxygen saturation was inversely related to RNFLT (r = −0.391, P = 0.015). An age-dependent increase in retinal oxygen saturation was found for both the POAG and control groups (r = 0.473, 0.410, P = 0.007, 0.003, respectively). MSI revealed a significant correlation between functional and structural impairments in glaucoma and retinal oxygen saturation. MSI could provide objective assessments of perfusion impairments of the glaucomatous ONH

  17. A Common Variant in MIR182 Is Associated With Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma in the NEIGHBORHOOD Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yutao; Bailey, Jessica Cooke; Helwa, Inas; Dismuke, W. Michael; Cai, Jingwen; Drewry, Michelle; Brilliant, Murray H.; Budenz, Donald L.; Christen, William G.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Fingert, John H.; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Gordon, Mae O.; Igo, Robert P.; Kang, Jae H.; Kass, Michael A.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, Richard K.; Lichter, Paul; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Realini, Anthony; Richards, Julia E.; Ritch, Robert; Schuman, Joel S.; Scott, William K.; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J.; Song, Yeunjoo E.; Vollrath, Douglas; Weinreb, Robert; Medeiros, Felipe; Wollstein, Gadi; Zack, Donald J.; Zhang, Kang; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Gonzalez, Pedro; Stamer, W. Daniel; Kuchtey, John; Kuchtey, Rachel W.; Allingham, R. Rand; Hauser, Michael A.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wiggs, Janey L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. We aimed to identify common variants in miRNA coding genes (MIR) associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods Using the NEIGHBORHOOD data set (3853 cases/33,480 controls with European ancestry), we first assessed the relation between 85 variants in 76 MIR genes and overall POAG. Subtype-specific analyses were performed in high-tension glaucoma (HTG) and normal-tension glaucoma subsets. Second, we examined the expression of miR-182, which was associated with POAG, in postmortem human ocular tissues (ciliary body, cornea, retina, and trabecular meshwork [TM]), using miRNA sequencing (miRNA-Seq) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Third, miR-182 expression was also examined in human aqueous humor (AH) by using miRNA-Seq. Fourth, exosomes secreted from primary human TM cells were examined for miR-182 expression by using miRNA-Seq. Fifth, using ddPCR we compared miR-182 expression in AH between five HTG cases and five controls. Results Only rs76481776 in MIR182 gene was associated with POAG after adjustment for multiple comparisons (odds ratio [OR] = 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–1.42, P = 0.0002). Subtype analysis indicated that the association was primarily in the HTG subset (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.08–1.47, P = 0.004). The risk allele T has been associated with elevated miR-182 expression in vitro. Data from ddPCR and miRNA-Seq confirmed miR-182 expression in all examined ocular tissues and TM-derived exosomes. Interestingly, miR-182 expression in AH was 2-fold higher in HTG patients than nonglaucoma controls (P = 0.03) without controlling for medication treatment. Conclusions Our integrative study is the first to associate rs76481776 with POAG via elevated miR-182 expression. PMID:27579667

  18. Associations of sleep duration with open angle glaucoma in the Korea national health and nutrition examination survey

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Ah; Han, Kyungdo; Min, Jung Ah; Choi, Jin A

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between sleep duration and glaucoma, stratified by obesity status. This study was conducted using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V 2010 to 2012. Open-angle glaucoma was diagnosed according to the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology criteria. Subjects were divided into subgroups based on those who were overweight (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 or <25 kg/m2) or with abdominal obesity (based on waist circumference). Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to estimate the magnitude of the association between sleep duration (<7 h, 7–<9, or ≥9 hours) and prevalence of glaucoma in the total population and in the subgroups. Individuals who slept <5 hours per night had the highest prevalence of glaucoma (5.55 ± 1.09%), followed by those who slept ≥9 hours per night (4.56 ± 0.10%), and then by those who slept 5 to <6 hours per night (4.15 ± 0.68%), which revealed a U-shaped pattern (P for trend = 0.072). Among overweight individuals, subjects who slept <7 hours and those who slept ≥9 hours were significantly more likely to have glaucoma compared with subjects who slept 7 to <9 hours after adjusting for survey year, age, sex, smoking, drinking, exercise, education level, household income, hypertension, intraocular pressure, stress, and depression (odds ratio, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.14–5.03). Unlike for overweight individuals, sleep duration in nonoverweight individuals was not statistically significantly associated with glaucoma. Our results reveal a U-shaped association between sleep duration and the prevalence of glaucoma. An effect of sleep duration on glaucoma was present in the subgroup of overweight patients. PMID:28033268

  19. Risk Factors for Motor Vehicle Collisions in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Kenya; Awano-Tanabe, Sachiko; Ono, Takeshi; Shiba, Daisuke; Murata, Hiroshi; Asaoka, Ryo; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the incidence rate of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in patients with no ocular pathology other than primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and determine the putative risk factors for MVCs in this group of patients. Methods We designed a prospective cohort study across three centers utilizing a consecutive sampling method to identify all patients with POAG between the ages of 40 and 80 years old. Patients with glaucoma were consecutively screened for eligibility. All study participants answered a questionnaire about motor vehicle collisions at baseline, and answered the questionnaire again every 12 months (± 1 month) after baseline for three years. A binocular integrated visual field was calculated for each patient by merging a patient’s monocular Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) visual fields (VFs), using the ‘best sensitivity’ method. Patients with incident MVCs were defined as the “MVC+” group and patients without incident MVCs were defined as the “MVC-" group. Adjusted odds ratios for the incidence of MVCs were estimated with a logistic regression model. Results One hundred and ninety-one Japanese POAG patients were analyzed in this study. The age of the participants was 63.7 ± 10.2 [mean ± standard deviation]. A total of 28 participants experienced a MVC during the follow up period of three years (4.9% per year). Ten patients (5.2%) experienced a MVC in the first year, 13 patients (6.8%) in the second year, and 11 patients (5.8%) in the third year (some patients experienced multiple MVCs over different years). Best corrected visual acuity in the worst eye was significantly worse in the MVC+ group (0.03 ± 0.01, mean ± standard deviation, LogMar) compared with the MVC- group (0.01 ± 0.003, p = 0.01), and was the only variable identified as a significant predictor of future MVCs in the multiple logistic regression model [odds ratio: 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1 to 1.4]. Conclusion Deterioration in visual acuity in the

  20. Retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma subjects by multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Gai-Yun; Al-Wesabi, Samer Abdo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in oxygen supply to the optic nerve head (ONH) from the retinal and choroidal vascular layers in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) using multispectral imaging (MSI).This ia an observational, cross-sectional study.Multispectral images were acquired from 38 eyes of 19 patients with POAG, and 42 healthy eyes from 21 matched volunteers with Annidis' RHA multispectral digital ophthalmoscopy. Superficial and deeper oxygen saturation of the optic disc was represented by the mean gray scale values on the retinal and choroidal oxy-deoxy maps, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed to detect differences in ONH oxygen saturation between the 2 groups. Oxygen saturation levels in the eyes of POAG patients with severe glaucoma were compared to those of fellow eyes from the same subjects. Linear correlation analysis was performed to assess the association between ONH oxygen saturation and systemic and ocular parameters.No statistical difference was found in retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation between the POAG and control groups. In the glaucoma patients, retinal oxygen saturation was lower for eyes with worse visual fields than in those with good visual fields (t = 4.009, P = 0.001). In POAG patients, retinal oxygen saturation was dependent on mean defect of visual field and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) (r = 0.511, 0.504, P = 0.001, 0.001, respectively), whereas the choroid vasculature oxygen saturation was inversely related to RNFLT (r = -0.391, P = 0.015). An age-dependent increase in retinal oxygen saturation was found for both the POAG and control groups (r = 0.473, 0.410, P = 0.007, 0.003, respectively).MSI revealed a significant correlation between functional and structural impairments in glaucoma and retinal oxygen saturation. MSI could provide objective assessments of perfusion impairments of the glaucomatous ONH. This is a

  1. Associations of sleep duration with open angle glaucoma in the Korea national health and nutrition examination survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Ah; Han, Kyungdo; Min, Jung Ah; Choi, Jin A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between sleep duration and glaucoma, stratified by obesity status.This study was conducted using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V 2010 to 2012. Open-angle glaucoma was diagnosed according to the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology criteria. Subjects were divided into subgroups based on those who were overweight (body mass index ≥25 kg/m or <25 kg/m) or with abdominal obesity (based on waist circumference). Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to estimate the magnitude of the association between sleep duration (<7 h, 7-<9, or ≥9 hours) and prevalence of glaucoma in the total population and in the subgroups.Individuals who slept <5 hours per night had the highest prevalence of glaucoma (5.55 ± 1.09%), followed by those who slept ≥9 hours per night (4.56 ± 0.10%), and then by those who slept 5 to <6 hours per night (4.15 ± 0.68%), which revealed a U-shaped pattern (P for trend = 0.072). Among overweight individuals, subjects who slept <7 hours and those who slept ≥9 hours were significantly more likely to have glaucoma compared with subjects who slept 7 to <9 hours after adjusting for survey year, age, sex, smoking, drinking, exercise, education level, household income, hypertension, intraocular pressure, stress, and depression (odds ratio, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-5.03). Unlike for overweight individuals, sleep duration in nonoverweight individuals was not statistically significantly associated with glaucoma.Our results reveal a U-shaped association between sleep duration and the prevalence of glaucoma. An effect of sleep duration on glaucoma was present in the subgroup of overweight patients.

  2. Association between primary open angle glaucoma and genetic polymorphisms GSTM1/GSTT1 in patients from Goiânia Central-West Region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, C T X; Costa, N B; Silva, K S F; Silva, R E; Moura, K K V O

    2014-10-31

    In this study, we evaluated the genotype profile of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms in patient carriers of primary open-angle glaucoma in the population of Goiânia, GO, Brazil. This case-control study included 100 Brazilian patients with glaucoma and 53 patients without glaucoma. Blood samples were genotyped for polymorphisms in GST genes using polymerase chain reaction-based methods. Polymorphism frequencies were compared using the X(2) test and odds ratio (α = 0.05). The GSTM1-present genotype was 40% in the glaucoma group and 71.6% in the control group, while the GSTM1 null genotype was 60 and 28.3% in the same groups, respectively. The GSTT1-present genotype was 52% in the primary open-angle glaucoma group and 66% in the control group; the null genotype was 48% in the case group and 34% in the control group. The GSTM1 null genotype was more frequent in the glaucoma group than in the control group (P = 0.0004; odds ratio = 6.7; 95% confidence interval = 2.7- 20.3). The combined GSTM1 null and GSTT1-present genotypes were more frequent in the primary open-angle glaucoma group compared to the control group (P = 0.02; odds ratio = 3.1; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-7.9).

  3. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Å snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ~ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  4. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  5. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  6. HST Multicolor (255-1042 nm) Photometry of Saturn's Main Rings. 1; Radial Profiles, Phase and Opening Angle Variations, and Regional Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; French, Richard G.; Dones, Luke; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main rings of Saturn were observed with the Planetary Camera of the WFPC2 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) from September 1996 to August 2000 as the'ring opening angle to Earth and Sun increased from 4 deg to 24 deg, with a spread of phase angles between 0.3 deg and 6 deg at each opening angle. The rings were routinely observed in the five HST wideband UBVRI filters (F336W, F439W, F555W, F675W, and F814W) and occasionally in the F255W, F785LP, and F1042M filters. The emphasis in this series of papers will be on radial color (implying compositional) variations. In this first paper we describe the analysis technique and calibration procedure, note revisions in a previously published Voyager ring color data analysis, and present new results based on over 100 HST images. In the 300-600 nm spectral range where the rings are red, the 555nm/336nm ratio increases by about 14% as the phase angle increases from 0.3 deg to 6 deg. This effect, never reported previously for the rings, is significantly larger than the phase reddening which characterizes other icy objects, primarily because of the redness of the rings. However, there is no discernible tendency for color to vary with ring opening angle at a given phase angle, and there is no phase variation of color where the spectrum is flat. We infer from this combination of facts that multiple intraparticle scattering, either in a regolith or between facets of an unusually rough surface, is important in these geometries, but that multiple interparticle scattering in a vertically extended layer is not. Voyager color ratios at a phase angle of 14 deg are compatible with this trend, but calibration uncertainties prevent their use in quantitative modeling. Overall ring-average spectra are compatible with those of earlier work within calibration uncertainties, but ring spectra vary noticeably with region. We refine and subdivide the regions previously defined by others. The variation seen between radial profiles of

  7. The Georgi algorithms of jet clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng

    2015-05-01

    We reveal the direct link between the jet clustering algorithms recently proposed by Howard Georgi and parton shower kinematics, providing firm foundation from the theoretical side. The kinematics of this class of elegant algorithms is explored systematically for partons with arbitrary masses and the jet function is generalized to J {/β ( n)} with a jet function index n in order to achieve more degrees of freedom. Based on three basic requirements that, the result of jet clustering is process-independent and hence logically consistent, for softer subjets the inclusion cone is larger to conform with the fact that parton shower tends to emit softer partons at earlier stage with larger opening angle, and that the cone size cannot be too large in order to avoid mixing up neighbor jets, we derive constraints on the jet function parameter β and index n which are closely related to cone size cutoff. Finally, we discuss how jet function values can be made invariant under Lorentz boost.

  8. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  9. JET COLLIMATION IN THE EJECTA OF DOUBLE NEUTRON STAR MERGERS: A NEW CANONICAL PICTURE OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Ioka, Kunihito

    2014-04-01

    The observations of jet breaks in the afterglows of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) indicate that the jet has a small opening angle of ≲ 10°. The collimation mechanism of the jet is a longstanding theoretical problem. We numerically analyze the jet propagation in the material ejected by a double neutron star (NS) merger, and demonstrate that if the ejecta mass is ≳ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}, the jet is well confined by the cocoon and emerges from the ejecta with the required collimation angle. Our results also suggest that there are some populations of choked (failed) SGRBs or new types of events with low luminosity. By constructing a model for SGRB 130603B, which is associated with the first kilonova/macronova candidate, we infer that the equation of state of NSs would be soft enough to provide sufficient ejecta to collimate the jet, if this event is associated with a double NS merger.

  10. Jet Collimation in the Ejecta of Double Neutron Star Mergers: A New Canonical Picture of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Ioka, Kunihito

    2014-04-01

    The observations of jet breaks in the afterglows of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) indicate that the jet has a small opening angle of <~ 10°. The collimation mechanism of the jet is a longstanding theoretical problem. We numerically analyze the jet propagation in the material ejected by a double neutron star (NS) merger, and demonstrate that if the ejecta mass is >~ 10-2 M ⊙, the jet is well confined by the cocoon and emerges from the ejecta with the required collimation angle. Our results also suggest that there are some populations of choked (failed) SGRBs or new types of events with low luminosity. By constructing a model for SGRB 130603B, which is associated with the first kilonova/macronova candidate, we infer that the equation of state of NSs would be soft enough to provide sufficient ejecta to collimate the jet, if this event is associated with a double NS merger.

  11. Relativistic jet models for the BL Lacertae object Mrk 421 during three epochs of observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Hutter, D. J.; Kondo, Y.; Wisniewski, W. Z.

    1988-01-01

    Coordinated observation of the nearby BL Lacertae object Mrk 421 obtained during May 1980, January 1984, and March 1984 are described. These observations give a time-frozen picture of the continuous spectrum of Mrk 421 at X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and radio wavelengths. The observed spectra have been fitted to an inhomogeneous relativistic jet model. In general, the models reproduce the data well. Many of the observed differences during the three epochs can be attributed to variations in the opening angle of the jet and in the angle that the jet makes to the line of sight. The jet models obtained here are compared with the homogeneous, spherically symmetric, synchrotron self-Compton models for this source. The models are also compared with the relativistic jet models obtained for other active galactic nuclei.

  12. Using Support Vector Machines to Automatically Extract Open Water Signatures from POLDER Multi-Angle Data Over Boreal Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, J.; Diaz-Barrios, M.; Pinzon, J.; Ustin, S. L.; Shih, P.; Tournois, S.; Zarco-Tejada, P. J.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Perry, G. L.; Brass, James A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This study used Support Vector Machines to classify multiangle POLDER data. Boreal wetland ecosystems cover an estimated 90 x 10(exp 6) ha, about 36% of global wetlands, and are a major source of trace gases emissions to the atmosphere. Four to 20 percent of the global emission of methane to the atmosphere comes from wetlands north of 4 degrees N latitude. Large uncertainties in emissions exist because of large spatial and temporal variation in the production and consumption of methane. Accurate knowledge of the areal extent of open water and inundated vegetation is critical to estimating magnitudes of trace gas emissions. Improvements in land cover mapping have been sought using physical-modeling approaches, neural networks, and active microwave, examples that demonstrate the difficulties of separating open water, inundated vegetation and dry upland vegetation. Here we examine the feasibility of using a support vector machine to classify POLDER data representing open water, inundated vegetation and dry upland vegetation.

  13. A single gene for juvenile and middle-age onset open-angle glaucomas confined within a small interval on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, V.; Dumont, M.; Plante, M.

    1994-09-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) encompasses a complex of ocular disease entities characterized by an optic neuropathy causing progressive loss of the visual fields and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. POAG can be subdivided into two groups according to age of onset: (1) the more prevalent middle to late-age onset chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after age 40 and (2) the less common form, juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG), which occurs between 3 years of age and early adulthood. Susceptibility to either COAG or JOAG has been found to be inherited. We studied 141 members of a huge multigeneration French Canadian family affected with an autosomal dominant form of POAG. Both JOAG and COAG were diagnosed in 43 patients. To first position the disease gene, AFM microsatellites markers specific to chromosome 1q21-q31 were selected since linkage of JOAG to this region was recently demonstrated in two Caucasian families. Tight linkage was observed between the JOAG/COAG phenotype and 7 microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 at {theta}=0 was obtained with AFM278ye5. Using a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect, a characteristic JOAG/COAG haplotype spanning 12 cM was next recognized between loci D1S196 and D1S212. Two key recombination events in affected patients further confined the disease locus within a 5 cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S452/D1S210. These results are the first to demonstrate that JOAG and one adult form of POAG map at a single locus on chromosome 1q23-q25. They also provide members of this family with a new diagnostic tool to identify the at-risk individuals.

  14. Common variants near CAV1 and CAV2 are associated with primary open-angle glaucoma in Caucasians from the USA.

    PubMed

    Wiggs, Janey L; Kang, Jae Hee; Yaspan, Brian L; Mirel, Daniel B; Laurie, Cathy; Crenshaw, Andrew; Brodeur, Wendy; Gogarten, Stephanie; Olson, Lana M; Abdrabou, Wael; DelBono, Elizabeth; Loomis, Stephanie; Haines, Jonathan L; Pasquale, Louis R

    2011-12-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a genetically complex common disease characterized by progressive optic nerve degeneration that results in irreversible blindness. Recently, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for POAG in an Icelandic population identified significant associations with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the CAV1 and CAV2 genes on chromosome 7q31. In this study, we confirm that the identified SNPs are associated with POAG in our Caucasian US population and that specific haplotypes located in the CAV1/CAV2 intergenic region are associated with the disease. We also present data suggesting that associations with several CAV1/CAV2 SNPs are significant mostly in women.

  15. A "Boosted Fireball" Model for Structured Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a model for relativistic jets which generates a particular angular distribution of Lorentz factor and energy per solid angle. We consider a fireball with specific internal energy E/M launched with bulk Lorentz factor γ B . In its center-of-momentum frame the fireball expands isotropically, converting its internal energy into radially expanding flow with asymptotic Lorentz factor η0 ~ E/M. In the lab frame the flow is beamed, expanding with Lorentz factor Γ = 2η0γ B in the direction of its initial bulk motion and with characteristic opening angle θ0 ~ 1/γ B . The flow is jet-like with Γθ0 ~ 2η0 such that jets with Γ > 1/θ0 are naturally produced. The choice η0 ~ γ B ~ 10 yields a jet with Γ ~ 200 on-axis and angular structure characterized by opening angle θ0 ~ 0.1 of relevance for cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while γ B >~ 1 may be relevant for low-luminosity GRBs. The model produces a family of outflows, of relevance for different relativistic phenomena with structures completely determined by η0 and γ B . We calculate the energy per unit solid angle for the model and use it to compute light curves for comparison with the widely used top-hat model. The jet break in the boosted fireball light curve is greatly subdued when compared to the top-hat model because the edge of the jet is smoother than for a top-hat. This may explain missing jet breaks in afterglow light curves.

  16. Camouflage of a high-angle skeletal Class II open-bite malocclusion in an adult after mini-implant failure during treatment.

    PubMed

    Franzotti Sant'Anna, Eduardo; Carneiro da Cunha, Amanda; Paludo Brunetto, Daniel; Franzotti Sant'Anna, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    The treatment of skeletal anterior open-bite malocclusion requires complex orthodontic planning that considers its multifactorial etiology, treatment limitations, and high relapse rates. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach for a skeletal high-angle Class II malocclusion in an adult with a severe open bite. The treatment consisted of a high-pull headgear therapy after mini-implants failure during fixed orthodontic therapy. Adequate esthetics and function were achieved. Despite its low probability, the unexpected event of mini-implant loosening during complex treatments should be considered. Therefore, classic orthodontic mechanics should be established, especially when treating patients for whom invasive procedures such as miniplates or orthognathic surgery are not available options.

  17. Effect of Angle of Attack and Exit Nozzle Design on the Performance of a 16-inch Ram Jet at Mach Numbers from 1.5 to 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Eugene; Wilcox, Fred; Pennington, Donald

    1951-01-01

    An investigation of the performance of a 16-inch ram jet engine having a single oblique-shock all-external compression inlet designed for a flight Mach number of 1.8, was conducted in the NACA Lewis 8-by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 1.5 to 2.0 and angles of attack from 0 degrees to 10 degrees. Three exit nozzles were used; a cylindrical extension of the combustion chamber, a 4 degrees half-angle converging nozzle with a 0.71 contraction ratio, and a graphite converging-diverging nozzle having a 0.71 contraction ratio plus reexpansion to essentially major body diameter.

  18. Field of Flow About a Jet and Effect of Jets on Stability of Jet-Propelled Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1946-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on jet-induced flow deviation. Analysis is given of flow inclination induced outside cold and hot jets and jet deflection caused by angle of attack. Applications to computation of effects of jet on longitudinal stability and trim are explained. Effect of jet temperature on flow inclination was found small when thrust coefficient is used as criterion for similitude. The average jet-induced downwash over tail plane was obtained geometrically.

  19. Reconfinement shocks in relativistic AGN jets

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Sikora, Marek

    2008-12-24

    Stationary knots observed in many AGN jets can be explained in terms of a reconfinement shock that forms when relativistic flow of the jet matter collides with the external medium. The position of these knots can be used, together with information on external pressure profile, to constrain dynamical parameters of the jet. We present a semi-analytical model for the dynamical structure of reconfinement shocks, taking into account exact conservation laws both across the shock surface and in the zone of the shocked jet matter. We show that, due to the transverse pressure gradient in the shock zone, the position of the reconfinement is larger than predicted by simple models. A portion of kinetic energy is converted at the shock surface to internal energy, with efficiency increasing strongly with both bulk Lorentz factor of the jet matter and the jet half-opening angle. Our model may be useful as a framework for modeling non-thermal radiation produced within the stationary features.

  20. First-line treatment for elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) associated with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: focus on bimatoprost

    PubMed Central

    Law, Simon K

    2007-01-01

    The goal of treatment for open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension is to improve quality of life through reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) to preserve visual function. Prostaglandins, as a newer class of ocular hypotensive agents, have been shown to be effective in IOP reduction by the primary mechanism of action of increase the uveoscleral outflow. Bimatoprost is a member this class, but different from the other members by having an ethyl amide group rather than an isopropyl ester at the C-1 carbon of the alpha chain. Bimatoprost used once daily has been shown to be more effect in IOP reduction than other classes of topical ocular hypotensive agents including beta-blockers, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and alpha agonists. Comparing with other topical prostaglandins, bimatoprost may be slightly more effective in IOP reduction, but the clinical significance is uncertain. The commonly reported adverse events associated with bimatoprost are localized to the eye and include conjunctival hyperemia, changes in the pigmentation of the periocular skin and iris, and eyelash darkening and growth. It is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Commission (EC) for first-line therapy for the reduction of elevated IOP in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. PMID:19668476

  1. Simulation of the Turbulent air Flow Over a Circular Cavity with a Variable Opening Angle in an U-Shaped Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Usachov, A. E.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Vysotskaya, A. A.; Malyshkin, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    A numerical investigation of the influence of the opening angle of a circular cavity in an U-shaped channel and the Reynolds number of a fluid fl ow in this channel on the local characteristics and turbulence of this fl ow has been performed based on the solution of the Reynolds equations, closed by the old and new Menter shear-stress transfer models and two variants of this model accounting for the curvature of streamlines, with the use of multiblock computational technologies realized in the VP2/3 package. The results of calculations were compared with each other and with experimental data of I. Castro and R. Savelsberg. This comparison has shown that the best agreement between the numerical predictions and experiments is obtained in the case where calculations are performed within the framework of the Leshtsiner-Rody-Isaev approach with correction for the eddy viscosity of the fluid fl ow. It was established that with increase in the Reynolds number and in the opening angle of the cavity the circulation flow in the near-wall layer of the vortex trapped in the cavity intensifies at a practically constant vorticity in the core of the vortex.

  2. Examining Delay Intervals in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in an Egyptian Population and Its Impact on Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Abu Hussein, Nahla B.; Habib, Ahmed E.; El Sayed, Yasmine M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To examine causes as well as extent of delay in diagnosis and treatment of primary open angle glaucoma patients in a sample of Egyptians. Patients and Methods. 440 patients with primary open angle glaucoma were interviewed to evaluate delay in their diagnosis and treatment. The extent and cause of delay were investigated. The total delay interval, if any, was correlated with socioeconomic and other factors. Results. The median total delay was one year, with 50% of patients having a total delay of 1 year or less, of which 25% exhibited zero total delay. 25% of patients had a delay ranging from 1 to 3 years, and 25% had a total delay ranging from 3 to 27 years. Diagnostic delay accounted for 43.03% of cases. Longer delays were met in patients with certain socioeconomic factors. Patients with a positive family history of glaucoma displayed shorter delay periods. Conclusion. Significant delay in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma was found. Poor socioeconomic status seems to hinder timely diagnosis and treatment of POAG. Certain socioeconomic factors seem to correlate with the extent of delay. More effort is thus needed to subsidize the cost of investigations and treatment for glaucoma patients. PMID:28116140

  3. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ∼270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (∼100 km s{sup –1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (≲ 10 km s{sup –1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  4. Large bouncing jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, Karl; Weislogel, Mark

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the phenomena of large jet rebound (bounce), a mode of fluid transfer following oblique jet impacts on hydrophobic surfaces. We initially seek to describe the regimes of such jet bounce in tests conducted in the weightless environment of a drop tower. A parametric study reveals the dependence of the rebound mode on the relevant dimensionless groups such as Weber number We⊥ defined on the velocity component perpendicular to the surface. We show that significantly larger diameter jets behave similarly as much smaller jets demonstrated during previous terrestrial investigations when We⊥ 1 . For We⊥ > 1 , large jet impacts create fishbone-like structures. We also explore rebounds from nonplanar substrates. Improving our understanding of such jet rebound opens avenues for unique transport capabilities. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A.

  5. Common variants near CAV1 and CAV2 are associated with primary open-angle glaucoma in Caucasians from the USA

    PubMed Central

    Wiggs, Janey L.; Hee Kang, Jae; Yaspan, Brian L.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Laurie, Cathy; Crenshaw, Andrew; Brodeur, Wendy; Gogarten, Stephanie; Olson, Lana M.; Abdrabou, Wael; DelBono, Elizabeth; Loomis, Stephanie; Haines, Jonathan L.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2011-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a genetically complex common disease characterized by progressive optic nerve degeneration that results in irreversible blindness. Recently, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for POAG in an Icelandic population identified significant associations with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the CAV1 and CAV2 genes on chromosome 7q31. In this study, we confirm that the identified SNPs are associated with POAG in our Caucasian US population and that specific haplotypes located in the CAV1/CAV2 intergenic region are associated with the disease. We also present data suggesting that associations with several CAV1/CAV2 SNPs are significant mostly in women. PMID:21873608

  6. Genetic heterogeneity of primary open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension: linkage to GLC1A associated with an increased risk of severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Brézin, A P; Béchetoille, A; Hamard, P; Valtot, F; Berkani, M; Belmouden, A; Adam, M F; Dupont de Dinechin, S; Bach, J F; Garchon, H J

    1997-01-01

    The GLC1A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile and middle age onset primary open angle glaucoma (OAG) has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. OAG, however, is a heterogeneous disease. We tested linkage of OAG and ocular hypertension (OHT), a major risk factor for OAG, to GLC1A in eight French families with multiple cases of juvenile and middle age onset OAG. There was strong evidence of genetic heterogeneity, four families being linked to GLC1A and two or three others being unlinked, depending on whether the complete OAG phenotype was analysed alone or jointly with OHT. Peak intraocular pressure (IOP) did not differ significantly between the two groups of families, while linkage to GLC1A conferred a highly increased risk of developing OAG and of having severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Testing linkage of familial OAG to GLC1A may therefore have prognostic value too. PMID:9222961

  7. Determination of Serum Ceruloplasmin Concentration in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma with Cataract and Patients with Cataract Only: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat-Kucharczyk, Monika; Rokicki, Wojciech; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Pojda-Wilczek, Dorota; Mrukwa-Kominek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this article was to describe the role of ceruloplasmin and to report preliminary results of ceruloplasmin concentrations in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) with cataract and in patients with only cataract. Glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease, is a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), their axons, progressive optic nerve damage, and visual field deterioration. Material/Methods The POAG group included 30 patients and the cataract group included 25 patients. Results Ceruloplasmin plays an essential role in iron metabolism and inactivating free radicals. In the presented pilot study, serum ceruloplasmin level was lower in the POAG group in comparison to the group with only cataract. Conclusions In treating persistent inflammation in the course of glaucoma, antiglaucoma drugs may increase the permeability of the blood-ocular barrier, which may be connected with the lower concentration of serum ceruloplasmin in the glaucoma patients group. PMID:27109647

  8. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. EP3/FP dual receptor agonist ONO-9054 administered morning or evening to patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: results of a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Michael S; Rowe-Rendleman, Cheryl; Ahmed, Ike; Ross, Douglas T; Fujii, Akifumi; Ouchi, Takafumi; Quach, Christine; Wood, Andrew; Ward, Caroline L

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims The novel prostaglandin E (EP) 3 and prostaglandin F (FP) receptor agonist ONO-9054 is effective in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with ocular hypertension and open-angle glaucoma when administered once daily. This study compares the effects of morning (AM) versus evening (PM) dosing of ONO-9054 on tolerability and IOP lowering. Methods This was a single-centre, randomised, double-masked, two-sequence, placebo-controlled crossover study in 12 subjects with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Two 14-day crossover regimens were separated by a 2-week washout: ONO-9054 (1 drop to each eye) in the morning (07:00) and vehicle in the evening (19:00) and vice versa. IOP was measured multiple times during select days. Ocular examinations also evaluated safety and tolerability. Results Mild ocular hyperaemia, reported by six subjects with PM dosing, was the most frequent adverse event. Mild to moderate dryness was also slightly more frequent after PM dosing. Maximum IOP reduction from baseline occurred on day 2 with decreases from baseline of −7.4 mm Hg (−30.8%) for AM dosing and −9.1 mm Hg, (−38.0%) for PM dosing; after 14 days, mean reduction in IOP was −6.8 mm Hg (−28.6%) for AM dosing and −7.5 mm Hg (−31.0%) for PM dosing. Conclusions PM dosing of ONO-0954 was associated with a slightly increased frequency of mild hyperaemia and mild to moderate dryness. Both dosing schedules provided sustained reduction in IOP. Trial registration number NCT01670266. PMID:26453641

  10. Identification of Mutations in Myocilin and Beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase 3 Genes in a Chinese Family with Primary Open-angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Rong-Feng; Zhong, Zi-Lin; Ye, Min-Jie; Han, Li-Yun; Ye, Dong-Qing; Chen, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glaucoma is a major cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. There is evidence showing that a subset of the disease is genetically determined. In this study, we screened for mutations in chromosome 1q-linked open-angle glaucoma (GLC1A) in a Chinese family with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods: A total of 23 members from five generations of a family were enrolled and underwent thorough ophthalmologic examinations. In addition, 200 unrelated healthy Chinese controls were also recruited as normal control. GLC1A gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing was performed to screen for mutations. Results: Six members were diagnosed as POAG, with severe clinical manifestations, and history of high intraocular pressures. The mean age of disease onset was 26.3 years. However, the others were asymptomatic. In six affected and three asymptomatic members, gene sequencing revealed a mutation c.C1456T in exon 3 of myocilin gene (MYOC). Furthermore, we also identified a novel mutation c.G322A in beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase 3 (B4GALT3) gene in all six affected and three asymptomatic members, which was not reported previously in POAG patients. The two newly identified variants were absent in other family members as well as controls. Conclusion: The mutations c.1456C

  11. GRB Jets with Time Variable Central Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.; Lazzati, D.; Begelman, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    We study the long-term evolution of relativistic jets in collapsars and examine the effects of time variable energy input on the subsequent gamma ray bursts. We carry out a series of high-resolution simulations of a jet propagating through a stellar envelope in 2D cylindrical coordinates using the FLASH relativistic hydrodynamics module. We carry out a series of simulations of central engines that vary on long time periods, comparable to the breakout time of the jet, short time periods (0.1s) much less than the breakout time, and that decay as a powerlaw at late times. Long period simulations show the opening angle of the jet rapidly adjusts to changes in input energy, in about 0.1s. For short period variability, the structure of the jet is not significantly effected by changes of the central engine output, but the signature of these changes is clearly visible in the energy flux seen by an observer. Short period changes are preserved from the central engine to well outside the star, indicating that short timescale fluctuation seen in prompt GRB emission can be due to central engine activity and will reflect the history of that activity. Models with a decaying energy input have a constant opening angle at late times. This is significant because it allows energy to escape from the central engine to a large radius even with a small energy input at late times, indicating that the central engine could be responsible for the shallow decay seen in X-ray afterglow lightcurves and for X-ray flares. A simulation of a flare from the central engine during the decay phase produces a flare of energy with a sharp rise and decay that is not significantly modified by passing through the stellar envelope.

  12. Influence of surgical implantation angle of left ventricular assist device outflow graft and management of aortic valve opening on the risk of stroke in heart failure patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, V. Keshav; McGah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony; Beckman, Jennifer; Mokadam, Nanush; Mahr, Claudius; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    Flow in the aortic vasculature may impact stroke risk in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) due to severely altered hemodynamics. Patient-specific 3D models of the aortic arch and great vessels were created with an LVAD outflow graft at 45, 60 and 90° from centerline of the ascending aorta, in order to understand the effect of surgical placement on hemodynamics and thrombotic risk. Intermittent aortic valve opening (once every five cardiac cycles) was simulated and the impact of this residual native output investigated for the potential to wash out stagnant flow in the aortic root region. Unsteady CFD simulations with patient-specific boundary conditions were performed. Particle tracking for 10 cardiac cycles was used to determine platelet residence times and shear stress histories. Thrombosis risk was assessed by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian metrics and a newly developed thrombogenic potential metric. Results show a strong influence of LVAD outflow graft angle on hemodynamics in the ascending aorta and consequently on stroke risk, with a highly positive impact of aortic valve opening, even at low frequencies. Optimization of LVAD implantation and management strategies based on patient-specific simulations to minimize stroke risk will be presented

  13. Efficacy and safety of benzalkonium chloride-free fixed-dose combination of latanoprost and timolol in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Purvi; Sodimalla, Kalyani; Paul, Chandrima; Pandav, Surinder S; Raman, Ganesh V; Ramakrishnan, Rengappa; Joshi, Abhijeet; Raut, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Background Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is a common preservative in topical ocular preparations; however, prolonged use may lead to deleterious effects on the ocular surface, affecting quality of life and reducing adherence to treatment and overall outcomes. This study compared the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy and safety of a novel once-daily, BAK-free, fixed-dose combination of latanoprost plus timolol with latanoprost or timolol administered as monotherapy or concomitantly. Methods This was a 6-week, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, active-controlled study in patients aged ≥18 years with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. A total of 227 patients were randomized to either a once-daily, BAK-free, fixed-dose combination of latanoprost 0.005%/timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution or concomitant administration of once-daily latanoprost 0.005% plus twice-daily timolol 0.5% or once-daily latanoprost 0.005% monotherapy, or twice-daily timolol 0.5% monotherapy. Efficacy end points were assessed at three time points on visits at weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 versus baseline. Results The IOP-lowering efficacy of the fixed-dose combination of latanoprost/timolol was similar to that of latanoprost plus timolol administered concomitantly at all time points (mean IOP difference and 95% confidence interval within ±1.5 mmHg; P=0.4223 to P=0.9981). The fixed-dose combination of latanoprost/timolol demonstrated significantly better IOP-lowering efficacy than timolol monotherapy at all time points (P=0.001 to P<0.0001) and significantly better IOP-lowering efficacy than latanoprost monotherapy at all time points. Responder rates on at least one time point and on at least two time points with fixed-dose combination latanoprost/timolol were similar to those with concomitant latanoprost plus timolol (85.5% versus 82.1%, P=0.6360; 78.2% versus 75%, P=0.6923), but significantly better than either latanoprost or timolol monotherapy (68.5%, P=0.0355; 55.4%, P=0.0005; 57

  14. Preservative-free bimatoprost 0.03% in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Pillunat, Lutz E; Eschstruth, Peter; Häsemeyer, Stefan; Thelen, Ulrich; Foja, Christian; Leaback, Richard; Pfennigsdorf, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering medications for primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension commonly contain preservatives that can cause ocular surface damage in many patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of, and compliance to, preservative-free (PF) bimatoprost 0.03% in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (IOP ≥18 mmHg) in a clinical practice setting. Methods This open-label study observed patients who were switched to PF bimatoprost 0.03% for medical reasons. IOP was measured at baseline and ~12 weeks later at the final visit, and the change in IOP was calculated. Tolerability and continuation of therapy were assessed at two follow-up visits. Results A total of 1,830 patients were included in the study, and complete IOP data were available for 1,543 patients. Mean IOP was reduced by 23% from 21.64 mmHg to 16.59 mmHg (P<0.0001). In subgroup analyses, the mean IOP was significantly reduced compared with baseline, regardless of prior therapy, including those previously treated with PF monotherapy. A total of 85.7% of physicians reported the IOP-lowering efficacy of PF bimatoprost 0.03% to be as expected or better than expected. Adverse events (AEs) were experienced by 5.7% of patients, and there were no serious AEs reported. The most common AEs were eye irritation (1.7%) and hyperemia (1.4%). Physician-reported treatment compliance was reported as better than (48.7%) or equal to (43.6%) prior treatment in most patients. Most patients (82%) were expected to continue PF bimatoprost 0.03% after the end of the study. Conclusion This observational study showed that, in clinical practice, switching to PF bimatoprost 0.03% was associated with a significant IOP reduction from baseline. There was a low AE rate. PF bimatoprost 0.03% may, therefore, be an effective treatment option for patients who are intolerant of preservatives or have an inadequate response to prior IOP

  15. Localization of the fourth locus (GLC1E) for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to the 10p15-p14 region.

    PubMed Central

    Sarfarazi, M; Child, A; Stoilova, D; Brice, G; Desai, T; Trifan, O C; Poinoosawmy, D; Crick, R P

    1998-01-01

    One of the major causes of blindness is primary open-angle glaucoma, which affects millions of elderly people worldwide. Genetic studies have so far mapped three loci for the adult-onset form of this condition to the 2cen-q13, 3q21-q24, and 8q23 regions. Herein, we report the localization of a fourth locus, to the 10p15-p14 region, in one large British family with a classical form of normal-tension open-angle glaucoma. Of the 42 meioses genotyped in this pedigree, 39 subjects (16 affected) inherited a haplotype compatible with their prior clinical designation, whereas the remaining 3 were classified as unknown. Although a maximum LOD score of 10.00 at a recombination fraction of straight theta=.00 was obtained with D10S1216, 21 other markers provided significant values, varying between 3.77 and 9.70. When only the affected meioses of this kindred were analyzed, LOD scores remained statistically significant, ranging from 3.16 (D10S527) to 3.57 (D10S506). Two critical recombinational events in the affected subjects positioned this new locus to a region of approximately 21 cM, flanked by D10S1729 and D10S1664. However, an additional recombination in a 59-year-old unaffected female suggests that this locus resides between D10S585 (or D10S1172) and D10S1664, within a genetic distance of 5-11 cM. However, the latter minimum region must be taken cautiously, because the incomplete penetrance has previously been documented for this group of eye conditions. A partial list of genes that positionally are considered as candidates includes NET1, PRKCT, ITIH2, IL2RA, IL15RA, IT1H2, hGATA3, the mRNA for open reading frame KIAA0019, and the gene for D123 protein. PMID:9497264

  16. Relativistic HD and MHD modelling for AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Porth, O.; Monceau-Baroux, R.; Walg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic hydro and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provide a continuum fluid description for plasma dynamics characterized by shock-dominated flows approaching the speed of light. Significant progress in its numerical modelling emerged in the last two decades; we highlight selected examples of modern grid-adaptive, massively parallel simulations realized by our open-source software MPI-AMRVAC (Keppens et al 2012 J. Comput. Phys. 231 718). Hydrodynamical models quantify how energy transfer from active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets to their surrounding interstellar/intergalactic medium (ISM/IGM) gets mediated through shocks and various fluid instability mechanisms (Monceau-Baroux et al 2012 Astron. Astrophys. 545 A62). With jet parameters representative for Fanaroff-Riley type-II jets with finite opening angles, we can quantify the ISM volumes affected by jet injection and distinguish the roles of mixing versus shock-heating in cocoon regions. This provides insight in energy feedback by AGN jets, usually incorporated parametrically in cosmological evolution scenarios. We discuss recent axisymmetric studies up to full 3D simulations for precessing relativistic jets, where synthetic radio maps can confront observations. While relativistic hydrodynamic models allow one to better constrain dynamical parameters like the Lorentz factor and density contrast between jets and their surroundings, the role of magnetic fields in AGN jet dynamics and propagation characteristics needs full relativistic MHD treatments. Then, we can demonstrate the collimating properties of an overal helical magnetic field backbone and study differences between poloidal versus toroidal field dominated scenarios (Keppens et al 2008 Astron. Astrophys. 486 663). Full 3D simulations allow one to consider the fate of non-axisymmetric perturbations on relativistic jet propagation from rotating magnetospheres (Porth 2013 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 429 2482). Self-stabilization mechanisms related to the detailed

  17. On plane submerged laminar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α <129o in a limited range of Reynolds numbers 0 <=Re <=Rec (α) (e.g. Rec = 1 . 43 for α = π / 2). It is reasoned that an alternative solution, driven by a fraction of the momentum flux of the feed stream, may also exist for all values of Re and α, including a near-centerline Bickley jet, a surrounding Taylor potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  18. WOBBLING AND PRECESSING JETS FROM WARPED DISKS IN BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2015-12-01

    We present results of the first ever three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the accretion–ejection structure. We investigate the 3D evolution of jets launched symmetrically from single stars but also jets from warped disks in binary systems. We have applied various model setups and tested them by simulating a stable and bipolar symmetric 3D structure from a single star–disk–jet system. Our reference simulation maintains a good axial symmetry and also a bipolar symmetry for more than 500 rotations of the inner disk, confirming the quality of our model setup. We have then implemented a 3D gravitational potential (Roche potential) due by a companion star and run a variety of simulations with different binary separations and mass ratios. These simulations show typical 3D deviations from axial symmetry, such as jet bending outside the Roche lobe or spiral arms forming in the accretion disk. In order to find indications of precession effects, we have also run an exemplary parameter setup, essentially governed by a small binary separation of only ≃200 inner disk radii. This simulation shows a strong indication that we observe the onset of a jet precession caused by the wobbling of the jet-launching disk. We estimate the opening angle of the precession cone defined by the lateral motion of the jet axis to be about 4° after about 5000 dynamical time steps.

  19. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  20. Structural and functional brain changes in early- and mid-stage primary open-angle glaucoma using voxel-based morphometry and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming-Ming; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Shi, Chang-Zheng; Chen, Jian; Huang, Xiang-He

    2017-03-01

    To investigate structural and functional brain changes in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) by using voxel-based morphometry based on diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (VBM-DARTEL) and blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI), respectively.Thirteen patients diagnosed with POAG and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. For each participant, high-resolution structural brain imaging and blood flow imaging were acquired on a 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Structural and functional changes between the POAG and control groups were analyzed. An analysis was carried out to identify correlations between structural and functional changes acquired in the previous analysis and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL).Patients in the POAG group showed a significant (P < 0.001) volume increase in the midbrain, left brainstem, frontal gyrus, cerebellar vermis, left inferior parietal lobule, caudate nucleus, thalamus, precuneus, and Brodmann areas 7, 18, and 46. Moreover, significant (P < 0.001) BOLD signal changes were observed in the right supramarginal gyrus, frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left cuneus, and left midcingulate area; many of these regions had high correlations with the RNFL.Patients with POAG undergo widespread and complex changes in cortical brain structure and blood flow. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02570867).

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies TXNRD2, ATXN2 and FOXC1 as susceptibility loci for primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Kang, Jae H.; Allingham, R. Rand; Gharahkhani, Puya; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Aschard, Hugues; Chasman, Daniel I.; Igo, Robert P.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Glastonbury, Craig A.; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Brilliant, Murray; Brown, Andrew A.; Budenz, Donald L.; Buil, Alfonso; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Choi, Hyon; Christen, William G.; Curhan, Gary; De Vivo, Immaculata; Fingert, John H.; Foster, Paul J.; Fuchs, Charles; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Hewitt, Alex W.; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Lee, Richard K.; Li, Zheng; Lichter, Paul R.; Mackey, David A.; McGuffin, Peter; Mitchell, Paul; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Perera, Shamira A.; Pepper, Keating W.; Qi, Qibin; Realini, Tony; Richards, Julia E.; Ridker, Paul M; Rimm, Eric; Ritch, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn; Schuman, Joel S.; Scott, William K.; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J.; Song, Yeunjoo E.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Topouzis, Fotis; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Verma, Shefali Setia; Vollrath, Douglas; Wang, Jie Jin; Weisschuh, Nicole; Wissinger, Bernd; Wollstein, Gadi; Wong, Tien Y.; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zack, Donald J.; Zhang, Kang; Weinreb, Robert N.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Small, Kerrin; Hammond, Christopher J.; Aung, Tin; Liu, Yutao; Vithana, Eranga N.; MacGregor, Stuart; Craig, Jamie E.; Kraft, Peter; Howell, Gareth; Hauser, Michael A.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wiggs, Janey L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of blindness world-wide. To identify new susceptibility loci, we meta-analyzed GWAS results from 8 independent studies from the United States (3,853 cases and 33,480 controls) and investigated the most significant SNPs in two Australian studies (1,252 cases and 2,592 controls), 3 European studies (875 cases and 4,107 controls) and a Singaporean Chinese study (1,037 cases and 2,543 controls). A meta-analysis of top SNPs identified three novel loci: rs35934224[T] within TXNRD2 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, P = 4.05×10−11 encoding a mitochondrial protein required for redox homeostasis; rs7137828[T] within ATXN2 (OR = 1.17, P = 8.73×10−10), and rs2745572[A] upstream of FOXC1 (OR = 1.17, P = 1.76×10−10). Using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, we show TXNRD2 and ATXN2 expression in retinal ganglion cells and the optic nerve head. These results identify new pathways underlying POAG susceptibility and suggest novel targets for preventative therapies. PMID:26752265

  2. Sensory stimulation for lowering intraocular pressure, improving blood flow to the optic nerve and neuroprotection in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Rom, Edith

    2013-12-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is a group of optic neuropathies that can lead to irreversible blindness. Sensory stimulation in the form of acupuncture or ear acupressure may contribute to protecting patients from blindness when used as a complementary method to orthodox treatment in the form of drops, laser or surgery. The objective of this article is to provide a narrative overview of the available literature up to July 2012. It summarises reported evidence on the potential beneficial effects of sensory stimulation for glaucoma. Sensory stimulation appears to significantly enhance the pressure-lowering effect of orthodox treatments. Studies suggest that it may also improve blood flow to the eye and optic nerve head. Furthermore, it may play a role in neuroprotection through regulating nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and their receptors, thereby encouraging the survival pathway in contrast to the pathway to apoptosis. Blood flow and neuroprotection are areas that are not directly influenced by orthodox treatment modalities. Numerous different treatment protocols were used to investigate the effect of sensory stimulation on intraocular pressure, blood flow or neuroprotection of the retina and optic nerve in the animal model and human pilot studies. Objective outcomes were reported to have been evaluated with Goldmann tonometry, Doppler ultrasound techniques and electrophysiology (pattern electroretinography, visually evoked potentials), and supported with histological studies in the animal model. Taken together, reported evidence from these studies strongly suggests that sensory stimulation is worthy of further research.

  3. No association of genetic polymorphisms in CYP1B1 with primary open-angle glaucoma: a meta- and gene-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shuqian; Yang, Jingyun; Yu, Weihong; Kota, Pravina; Xia, Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450, subfamily 1, polypeptide 1 (C1P1B1) on primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods A systematic literature search was performed, and random-effects meta-analyses were used to evaluate genetic polymorphisms in CYP1B1 with POAG. A gene-based analysis was conducted to investigate the cumulative effects of genetic polymorphisms in CYP1B1. Results A total of six studies from published papers were included in our analysis. Random-effects meta-analyses failed to detect any significant association of POAG with genetic polymorphisms in CYP1B1, including rs180040, rs1056836, rs10012, rs1056827, rs1056837, and rs2567206. The gene-based analysis indicated that the cumulative effect of genetic polymorphisms in CYP1B1 is not associated with POAG (p>0.50). Conclusions We did not find any evidence of strong association of POAG with CYP1B1 genetic polymorphisms and their cumulative effect. PMID:22509109

  4. Recombinational and physical mapping of the locus for primary open-angle glaucoma (GLC1A) on chromosome 1q23-q25

    SciTech Connect

    Belmouden, A.; Adam, M.F.; De Dinechin, S.D. |

    1997-02-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in industrialized countries. A locus for juvenile-onset POAG, GLC1A, has been mapped to 1q21-q31 in a 9-cM interval. With recombinant haplotypes, we have now reduced the GLC1A interval to a maximum of 3 cM, between the D1S452/NGA1/D1S210 and NGA5 loci. These loci are 2.8 Mb apart on a 4.7-Mb contig that we have completed between the D1S2851 and D1S218 loci and that includes 96 YAC clones and 48 STSs. The new GLC1A interval itself is now covered by 25 YACs, 30 STSs, and 16 restriction enzyme site landmarks. The lack of a NotI site suggests that the region has few CpG islands and a low gene content. This is compatible with its predominant cytogenetic location on the 1q24 G-band. Finally, we have excluded important candidate genes, including genes coding for three ATPases (AMB1, ATP2B4, ATPlA2), an ion channel (VDAC4), antithrombine III (AT3), and prostaglandin synthase (PTGS2). Our results provide a basis to identify the GLC1A gene. 59 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Recombinational and physical mapping of the locus for primary open-angle glaucoma (GLC1A) on chromosome 1q23-q25.

    PubMed

    Belmouden, A; Adam, M F; Dupont de Dinechin, S; Brézin, A P; Rigault, P; Chumakov, I; Bach, J F; Garchon, H J

    1997-02-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in industrialized countries. A locus for juvenile-onset POAG, GLC1A, has been mapped to 1q21-q31 in a 9-cM interval. With recombinant haplotypes, we have now reduced the GLC1A interval to a maximum of 3 cM, between the D1S452/NGA1/D1S210 and NGA5 loci. These loci are 2.8 Mb apart on a 4.7-Mb contig that we have completed between the D1S2851 and D1S218 loci and that includes 96 YAC clones and 48 STSs. The new GLC1A interval itself is now covered by 25 YACs, 30 STSs, and 16 restriction enzyme site landmarks. The lack of a NotI site suggests that the region has few CpG islands and a low gene content. This is compatible with its predominant cytogenetic location on the 1q24 G-band. Finally, we have excluded important candidate genes, including genes coding for three ATPases (ATP1B1, ATP2B4, ATP1A2), an ion channel (VDAC4), antithrombine III (AT3), and prostaglandin synthase (PTGS2). Our results provide a basis to identify the GLC1A gene.

  6. A Major QTL, Which Is Co-located with cly1, and Two Minor QTLs Are Associated with Glume Opening Angle in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, XinZhong; Guo, BaoJian; Lan, GuoFang; Li, HongTao; Lin, Shen; Ma, Jun; Lv, Chao; Xu, RuGen

    2016-01-01

    Cleistogamous and chasmogamous are two opposing phenomena for flowering in barley. Cleistogamy limits the rate of outcrossing, and increases the cost of producing hybrid barley seeds. Selecting chasmogamous lines with a large glume opening angle (GOA) is essential for the utilization of barley heterosis. In the current study, 247 DH lines derived from a cross between Yangnongpi7 and Yang0187 were used to identify and validate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with the GOA in different environments using SSR markers. Three QTLs associated with barley GOA were mapped on chromosomes 2H and 7H. The major QTL QGOA-2H-2 was mapped on chromosome 2H with the flanking markers of KDH and GBM1498, explaining 63.92% of the phenotypic variation. The marker KDH was developed from the gene Cly1, which was the candidate gene for QGOA-2H-2. This new marker can be used to identify barley chasmogamous lines with a large GOA. The two minor QTLs were validated at all three locations across two seasons after removing DH lines carrying the candidate gene Cly1 of QGOA-2H-2. PMID:27822223

  7. Ultra-high resolution profiles of macular intra-retinal layer thicknesses and associations with visual field defects in primary open angle glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Huang, Shenghai; Ma, Qingkai; Lin, Huiling; Pan, Mengmeng; Liu, Xinting; Lu, Fan; Shen, Meixiao

    2017-02-01

    The structural characteristics of the outer retinal layers in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) are still controversial, and these changes, along with those in the inner retinal layers, could have clinical and/or pathophysiological significance. A custom-built ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) combined with an automated segmentation algorithm can image and measure the eight intra-retinal layers. The purpose of this study is to determine the thickness characteristics of the macular intra-retinal layers, especially the outer layers, in POAG patients. Thirty-four POAG patients (56 eyes) and 33 normal subjects (63 eyes) were enrolled. Thickness profiles of the eight intra-retinal layers along a 6-mm length centred on the fovea at the horizontal and vertical meridians were obtained and the regional thicknesses were compared between two groups. The associations between the thicknesses of each intra-retinal layer and the macular visual field (VF) sensitivity were then analysed. POAG affected not only the inner retinal layers but also the photoreceptor layers and retinal pigment epithelium of the outer retina. However, the VF loss was correlated mainly with the damage of the inner retinal layers. UHR-OCT with automated algorithm is a useful tool in detecting microstructural changes of macula with respect to the progression of glaucoma.

  8. Structural and functional brain changes in early- and mid-stage primary open-angle glaucoma using voxel-based morphometry and functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming-Ming; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Shi, Chang-Zheng; Chen, Jian; Huang, Xiang-He

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To investigate structural and functional brain changes in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) by using voxel-based morphometry based on diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (VBM-DARTEL) and blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI), respectively. Thirteen patients diagnosed with POAG and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. For each participant, high-resolution structural brain imaging and blood flow imaging were acquired on a 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Structural and functional changes between the POAG and control groups were analyzed. An analysis was carried out to identify correlations between structural and functional changes acquired in the previous analysis and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Patients in the POAG group showed a significant (P < 0.001) volume increase in the midbrain, left brainstem, frontal gyrus, cerebellar vermis, left inferior parietal lobule, caudate nucleus, thalamus, precuneus, and Brodmann areas 7, 18, and 46. Moreover, significant (P < 0.001) BOLD signal changes were observed in the right supramarginal gyrus, frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left cuneus, and left midcingulate area; many of these regions had high correlations with the RNFL. Patients with POAG undergo widespread and complex changes in cortical brain structure and blood flow. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02570867). PMID:28248867

  9. Genome-wide association analysis identifies TXNRD2, ATXN2 and FOXC1 as susceptibility loci for primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Loomis, Stephanie J; Kang, Jae H; Allingham, R Rand; Gharahkhani, Puya; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Burdon, Kathryn P; Aschard, Hugues; Chasman, Daniel I; Igo, Robert P; Hysi, Pirro G; Glastonbury, Craig A; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Brilliant, Murray; Brown, Andrew A; Budenz, Donald L; Buil, Alfonso; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Choi, Hyon; Christen, William G; Curhan, Gary; De Vivo, Immaculata; Fingert, John H; Foster, Paul J; Fuchs, Charles; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Hewitt, Alex W; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J; Khawaja, Anthony P; Lee, Richard K; Li, Zheng; Lichter, Paul R; Mackey, David A; McGuffin, Peter; Mitchell, Paul; Moroi, Sayoko E; Perera, Shamira A; Pepper, Keating W; Qi, Qibin; Realini, Tony; Richards, Julia E; Ridker, Paul M; Rimm, Eric; Ritch, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn; Schuman, Joel S; Scott, William K; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J; Song, Yeunjoo E; Tamimi, Rulla M; Topouzis, Fotis; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Verma, Shefali Setia; Vollrath, Douglas; Wang, Jie Jin; Weisschuh, Nicole; Wissinger, Bernd; Wollstein, Gadi; Wong, Tien Y; Yaspan, Brian L; Zack, Donald J; Zhang, Kang; Study, Epic-Norfolk Eye; Weinreb, Robert N; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Small, Kerrin; Hammond, Christopher J; Aung, Tin; Liu, Yutao; Vithana, Eranga N; MacGregor, Stuart; Craig, Jamie E; Kraft, Peter; Howell, Gareth; Hauser, Michael A; Pasquale, Louis R; Haines, Jonathan L; Wiggs, Janey L

    2016-02-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed meta-analysis on genome-wide association study (GWAS) results from eight independent studies from the United States (3,853 cases and 33,480 controls) and investigated the most significantly associated SNPs in two Australian studies (1,252 cases and 2,592 controls), three European studies (875 cases and 4,107 controls) and a Singaporean Chinese study (1,037 cases and 2,543 controls). A meta-analysis of the top SNPs identified three new associated loci: rs35934224[T] in TXNRD2 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, P = 4.05 × 10(-11)) encoding a mitochondrial protein required for redox homeostasis; rs7137828[T] in ATXN2 (OR = 1.17, P = 8.73 × 10(-10)); and rs2745572[A] upstream of FOXC1 (OR = 1.17, P = 1.76 × 10(-10)). Using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, we show TXNRD2 and ATXN2 expression in retinal ganglion cells and the optic nerve head. These results identify new pathways underlying POAG susceptibility and suggest new targets for preventative therapies.

  10. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Variant in EFEMP1 Co-Segregating in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Donna S.; Bennett, Thomas M.; Shiels, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of progressive vision loss as a result of retinal ganglion cell death. Here we have utilized trio-based, whole-exome sequencing to identify the genetic defect underlying an autosomal dominant form of adult-onset POAG segregating in an African-American family. Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.418C>T, p.Arg140Trp) in exon-5 of the gene coding for epidermal growth factor (EGF) containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) that co-segregated with disease in the family. Linkage and haplotype analyses with microsatellite markers indicated that the disease interval overlapped a known POAG locus (GLC1H) on chromosome 2p. The p.Arg140Trp substitution was predicted in silico to have damaging effects on protein function and transient expression studies in cultured cells revealed that the Trp140-mutant protein exhibited increased intracellular accumulation compared with wild-type EFEMP1. In situ hybridization of the mouse eye with oligonucleotide probes detected the highest levels of EFEMP1 transcripts in the ciliary body, cornea, inner nuclear layer of the retina, and the optic nerve head. The recent finding that a common variant near EFEMP1 was associated with optic nerve-head morphology supports the possibility that the EFEMP1 variant identified in this POAG family may be pathogenic. PMID:26162006

  11. Ultra-high resolution profiles of macular intra-retinal layer thicknesses and associations with visual field defects in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Huang, Shenghai; Ma, Qingkai; Lin, Huiling; Pan, Mengmeng; Liu, Xinting; Lu, Fan; Shen, Meixiao

    2017-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the outer retinal layers in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) are still controversial, and these changes, along with those in the inner retinal layers, could have clinical and/or pathophysiological significance. A custom-built ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) combined with an automated segmentation algorithm can image and measure the eight intra-retinal layers. The purpose of this study is to determine the thickness characteristics of the macular intra-retinal layers, especially the outer layers, in POAG patients. Thirty-four POAG patients (56 eyes) and 33 normal subjects (63 eyes) were enrolled. Thickness profiles of the eight intra-retinal layers along a 6-mm length centred on the fovea at the horizontal and vertical meridians were obtained and the regional thicknesses were compared between two groups. The associations between the thicknesses of each intra-retinal layer and the macular visual field (VF) sensitivity were then analysed. POAG affected not only the inner retinal layers but also the photoreceptor layers and retinal pigment epithelium of the outer retina. However, the VF loss was correlated mainly with the damage of the inner retinal layers. UHR-OCT with automated algorithm is a useful tool in detecting microstructural changes of macula with respect to the progression of glaucoma. PMID:28169283

  12. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2015-06-01

    We study 14 large solar jets observed in polar coronal holes. In EUV movies from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), each jet appears similar to most X-ray jets and EUV jets that erupt in coronal holes; but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R Sun in images from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO)/C2 coronagraph. From AIA He ii 304 Å movies and LASCO/C2 running-difference images of these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R Sun at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most of the jets display measureable swaying and bending of a few degrees in amplitude; in three jets the swaying is discernibly oscillatory with a period of order 1 hr. These characteristics suggest that the driver in these jets is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is basically a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfvén wave that is put into the reconnected open field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts. From the measured spinning and swaying, we estimate that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R Sun. We point out that the torsional waves observed in Type-II spicules might dissipate in the corona in the same way as the magnetic-untwisting waves in our big jets, and thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  13. MAGNETIC UNTWISTING IN SOLAR JETS THAT GO INTO THE OUTER CORONA IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2015-06-10

    We study 14 large solar jets observed in polar coronal holes. In EUV movies from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), each jet appears similar to most X-ray jets and EUV jets that erupt in coronal holes; but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R{sub Sun} in images from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO)/C2 coronagraph. From AIA He ii 304 Å movies and LASCO/C2 running-difference images of these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R{sub Sun} at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most of the jets display measureable swaying and bending of a few degrees in amplitude; in three jets the swaying is discernibly oscillatory with a period of order 1 hr. These characteristics suggest that the driver in these jets is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is basically a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfvén wave that is put into the reconnected open field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts. From the measured spinning and swaying, we estimate that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R{sub Sun}. We point out that the torsional waves observed in Type-II spicules might dissipate in the corona in the same way as the magnetic-untwisting waves in our big jets, and thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  14. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  15. Association of Myopic Optic Disc Deformation with Visual Field Defects in Paired Eyes with Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yu; Hangai, Masanori; Ishikawa, Makoto; Yoshitomi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of myopia with the visual field (VF) defects in open-angle glaucoma (OAG) using paired eyes to eliminate the effect of unknown confounding factors that are diverse among individuals. Methods One hundred eighteen eyes of 59 subjects with myopia (spherical equivalent [SE] ≥ -2 diopter [D] and axial length ≥ 24.0 mm) whose intra-ocular pressure between paired eyes was similar and the mean deviation (MD) of the Humphrey VF test differed by more than 6 dB were included. Refractive errors (SE, axial length) and parameters associated with the papillary and parapapillary myopic deformation (tilt ratio, torsion angle, and β-zone parapapillary atrophy [PPA] area without Bruch’s membrane) were measured in each eye. The paired eyes were divided into worse and better eyes according to the MD of the VF, and parameters were compared between them. Further, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the correlation of the difference in various parameters with the MD difference between paired eyes. Results The SE of all eyes was -6.39 ± 2.15 D (mean ± standard deviation) and axial length was 26.42 ± 1.07 mm. MD of the worse and better VF eyes were -13.56 ± 6.65 dB and -4.87 ± 5.32 dB, respectively. Eyes with worse VFs had significantly greater SE, axial length, tilt ratio, and PPA area without Bruch’s membrane than those with better VFs (all P < 0.05). In multiple linear regression analysis, the difference of the MD between paired eyes was significantly correlated with the difference in the tilt ratio and PPA area without Bruch’s membrane. Conclusion The myopic papillary and parapapillary deformations, but not refractive error itself, were related to the worse VF in paired eyes with OAG. This suggests that myopia influences the severity of the glaucomatous VF defects via structural deformation. PMID:27571303

  16. The Properties of Short Gamma-Ray Burst Jets Triggered by Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murguia-Berthier, Ariadna; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Montes, Gabriela; De Colle, Fabio; Rezzolla, Luciano; Rosswog, Stephan; Takami, Kentaro; Perego, Albino; Lee, William H.

    2017-02-01

    The most popular model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) involves the coalescence of binary neutron stars. Because the progenitor is actually hidden from view, we must consider under which circumstances such merging systems are capable of producing a successful sGRB. Soon after coalescence, winds are launched from the merger remnant. In this paper, we use realistic wind profiles derived from global merger simulations in order to investigate the interaction of sGRB jets with these winds using numerical simulations. We analyze the conditions for which these axisymmetric winds permit relativistic jets to break out and produce an sGRB. We find that jets with luminosities comparable to those observed in sGRBs are only successful when their half-opening angles are below ≈20°. This jet collimation mechanism leads to a simple physical interpretation of the luminosities and opening angles inferred for sGRBs. If wide, low-luminosity jets are observed, they might be indicative of a different progenitor avenue such as the merger of a neutron star with a black hole. We also use the observed durations of sGRB to place constraints on the lifetime of the wind phase, which is determined by the time it takes the jet to break out. In all cases we find that the derived limits argue against completely stable remnants for binary neutron star mergers that produce sGRBs.

  17. Jets of SS 433 on scales of dozens of parsecs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panferov, Alexander A.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The radio nebula W 50 harbours the relativistic binary system SS 433, which is a source of powerful wind and jets. The origin of W 50 is wrapped in the interplay of the wind, supernova remnant, and jets. The evolution of the jets of SS 433 on the scale of the nebula W 50 is a Rosetta stone for its origin. Aims: To disentangle the roles of these components, we study the physical conditions of the propagation of the jets of SS 433 inside W 50 and determine the deceleration of the jets. Methods: We analysed the morphology and parameters of the interior of W 50 using the available observations of the eastern X-ray lobe, which trace the jet. In order to estimate deceleration of this jet, we devised a simplistic model of the viscous interaction of a jet, via turbulence, with the ambient medium. This model fits mass entrainment from the ambient medium into the jets of the radio galaxy 3C 31, the well-studied case of continuously decelerating jets. Results: X-ray observations suggest that the eastern jet is hollow, persists through W50, and is recollimated to the opening angle of 30°. From the thermal emission of the eastern X-ray lobe, we determine a pressure of P 3 × 10-11 erg/cm3 inside W 50. In the frame of a theory of the dynamics of radiative supernova remnants and stellar wind bubbles, in combination with other known parameters this pressure restricts the origin of W 50 to a supernova occuring 100 000 yr ago. Also, this pressure in our entrainment model gives a deceleration of the jet by 60% in the bounds of the spherical component of W 50, of radius 40 pc. In this case, the age of the jet should be ≪27 000 yr so as to satisfy the sphericity of W 50. The entrainment model comes to the viscous stress in a jet of a form σ = αP, where the viscosity parameter α is predefined by the model.

  18. Asymptotic theory of relativistic, magnetized jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2011-01-15

    The structure of a relativistically hot, strongly magnetized jet is investigated at large distances from the source. Asymptotic equations are derived describing collimation and acceleration of the externally confined jet. Conditions are found for the transformation of the thermal energy into the fluid kinetic energy or into the Poynting flux. Simple scalings are presented for the jet collimation angle and Lorentz factors.

  19. Asymptotic theory of relativistic, magnetized jets.

    PubMed

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The structure of a relativistically hot, strongly magnetized jet is investigated at large distances from the source. Asymptotic equations are derived describing collimation and acceleration of the externally confined jet. Conditions are found for the transformation of the thermal energy into the fluid kinetic energy or into the Poynting flux. Simple scalings are presented for the jet collimation angle and Lorentz factors.

  20. Clinical effectiveness of brinzolamide 1%–brimonidine 0.2% fixed combination for primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sourabh; Trikha, Sameer; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2015-01-01

    The main first-line treatment strategy for glaucoma is to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) by topical ocular hypotensive medications, but many patients require multiple medications for adequate IOP control. Fixed-combination therapies provide several benefits, including simplified treatment regimens, theoretical improved treatment adherence, elimination of the potential for washout of the first drug by the second, and the reduction in ocular exposure to preservatives. β-Adrenoceptor antagonists (particularly 0.5% timolol) are the most commonly used agents in combination with other classes of drugs as fixed-combination eyedrops, but they are contraindicated in many patients, owing to local allergy or systemic side effects. A fixed-combination preparation without a β-blocker is therefore warranted. This paper reviews the clinical effectiveness of brinzolamide 1% and brimonidine 0.2% fixed combination (BBFC) for use in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. We searched PubMed and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry, and identified three randomized controlled trials comparing BBFC vs its constituents (brimonidine vs brinzolamide), and one comparing BBFC with unfixed brimonidine and brinzolamide. All of the studies demonstrated mean diurnal IOP to be statistically significantly lower in the BBFC group compared with constituent groups and noninferior to that with the concomitant group using two separate bottles. The safety profile of BBFC was consistent with that of its individual components, the most common ocular adverse events being ocular hyperemia, visual disturbances, and ocular allergic reactions. Common systemic adverse effects included altered taste sensation, oral dryness, fatigue, somnolence, and decreased alertness. BBFC seems to be a promising new fixed combination for use in glaucoma patients. However, long-term effects of BBFC on IOP, treatment adherence, and safety need to be determined. PMID:26648686

  1. Fixed combination of travoprost and timolol maleate reduces intraocular pressure in Japanese patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: analysis by prostaglandin analogue

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tadashi; Mizoue, Shiro; Fuse, Nobuo; Iwase, Aiko; Matsumoto, Shun; Yoshikawa, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Background We have shown a decrease in mean intraocular pressure (IOP) by switching to travoprost/timolol fixed combination (TTFC) in subjects receiving prostaglandin analogue (PGA) monotherapy and requiring additional medication in a previous report. For analyzing factors affecting IOP reduction, baseline IOP and preceding PGA were selected as statistically and clinically significant factors. In this report, we examine IOP-lowering effect and adverse drug reactions by preceding PGA. Methods Patients with primary open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension who received monotherapy with one of four PGAs (travoprost, latanoprost, tafluprost, or bimatoprost) for at least 3 months at 26 institutions and were determined to require additional medication by their primary physician were included. IOP reduction and adverse events were examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks for each of four PGAs after switching to TTFC. Results In total, 157 patients who could be followed up for at least 4 weeks after switching to TTFC were included in the efficacy analysis. Multiple regression analysis was performed, and baseline IOP and PGA were found to be significant factors to IOP reduction. IOP reduction at week 12, adjusted with the regression model, was −3.5, −1.8, and −1.4 mmHg in the tafluprost, latanoprost, and travoprost groups, whereas it was −0.5 mmHg in the bimatoprost group. Along with differences in baseline IOP between groups, an IOP-lowering effect of >1 mmHg was noted in the tafluprost, latanoprost, and travoprost groups after the switch. IOP was maintained at 13.8–14.8 mmHg throughout the follow-up period. No serious adverse events or noteworthy issues were observed in any group after the switch. Conclusion Clinically significant IOP-reducing effects of TTFC were observed in the latanoprost, travoprost, and tafluprost groups when switching from each PGA monotherapy, while there were some differences in effects between groups, with minimal safety concerns. PMID:28053501

  2. Comparison of vision-related quality of life in primary open-angle glaucoma and dry-type age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz Ugurlu, S; Kocakaya Altundal, A E; Altin Ekin, M

    2017-03-01

    PurposeTo compare quality of life (QoL) in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and dry-type age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with similar best-corrected visual acuity.MethodsAge-, sex-, and visual acuity-matched POAG and dry AMD patients were included in the study. Each patient performed 24-2 and 10-2 SITA standard visual field tests. Contrast sensitivity was evaluated with CSV-1000 HGT instrument. The 25 item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25) was used to analyze QoL. Overall and subscale scores were converted to scores between 0 and 100, the higher scores indicating better vision-related QoL.ResultsOverall NEI-VFQ-25 scores were 86.44 and 84.66 in glaucoma and AMD groups, respectively (P=0.244). The highest scores were obtained in 'vision-related dependency' subgroup in glaucoma and 'color and peripheral vision' in AMD group, whereas the lowest scores were noted 'in peripheral vision' in both glaucoma and AMD patients. Glaucoma patients had significantly lower scores in ocular pain, color vision, and peripheral vision subgroups compared with the AMD group, whereas AMD patients had lower scores in near and distance vision activities, vision-related social activity, and dependency subgroups. Contrast sensitivity results and mean defect values showed correlation with NEI-VFQ-25 scores in both groups.ConclusionsGlaucoma and AMD patients with similar visual acuity experienced similar overall impairment in QoL. However, glaucoma patients described more difficulty with peripheral vision and ocular pain, whereas AMD patients complained more about near and distance vision and dependency items.

  3. Genetic Variants Associated with Optic Nerve Vertical Cup-to-Disc Ratio Are Risk Factors for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in a US Caucasian Population

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bao Jian; Wang, Dan Yi; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Genetically complex disorders, such as primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), may include highly heritable quantitative traits as part of the overall phenotype, and mapping genes influencing the related quantitative traits may effectively identify genetic risk factors predisposing to the complex disease. Recent studies have identified SNPs associated with optic nerve area and vertical cup-to-disc ratio (VCDR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between these SNPs and POAG in a US Caucasian case-control sample. Methods. Five SNPs previously associated with optic disc area, or VCDR, were genotyped in 539 POAG cases and 336 controls. Genotype data were analyzed for single SNP associations and SNP interactions with VCDR and POAG. Results. SNPs associated with VCDR rs1063192 (CDKN2B) and rs10483727 (SIX1/SIX6) were also associated with POAG (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.0043 for rs1063192 and rs10483727, respectively). rs1063192, associated with smaller VCDR, had a protective effect (odds ratio [OR] = 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58–0.90), whereas rs10483727, associated with larger VCDR, increased POAG risk (OR = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.08–1.65). POAG risk associated with increased VCDR was significantly influenced by the C allele of rs1900004 (ATOH7), associated with increased optic nerve area (P-interaction = 0.025; OR = 1.89; 95% CI, 1.22–2.94). Conclusions. Genetic variants influencing VCDR are associated with POAG in a US Caucasian population. Variants associated with optic nerve area are not independently associated with disease but can influence the effects of VCDR variants suggesting that increased optic disc area can significantly contribute to POAG risk when coupled with risk factors controlling VCDR. PMID:21398277

  4. A randomised, controlled comparison of latanoprostene bunod and latanoprost 0.005% in the treatment of ocular hypertension and open angle glaucoma: the VOYAGER study

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, Robert N; Ong, Tuyen; Scassellati Sforzolini, Baldo; Vittitow, Jason L; Singh, Kuldev; Kaufman, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the efficacy and safety of latanoprostene bunod (LBN) compared with latanoprost 0.005%, and to determine the optimum drug concentration(s) of LBN in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) in subjects with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Methods Randomised, investigator-masked, parallel-group, dose-ranging study. Subjects instilled one drop of study medication in the study eye once daily each evening for 28 days and completed five study visits. The primary efficacy endpoint was the reduction in mean diurnal IOP at Day 28. Results Of the 413 subjects randomised (LBN 0.006%, n=82; LBN 0.012%, n=85; LBN 0.024%, n=83; LBN 0.040%, n=81; latanoprost, n=82), 396 subjects completed the study. Efficacy for LBN was dose-dependent reaching a plateau at 0.024%–0.040%. LBN 0.024% led to significantly greater reductions in diurnal IOP compared with latanoprost at the primary endpoint, Day 28 (p=0.005), as well as Days 7 (p=0.033) and 14 (p=0.015). The incidence of adverse events, mostly mild and transient, was numerically higher in the LBN treatment groups compared with the latanoprost group. Hyperaemia was similar across treatments. Conclusions LBN 0.024% dosed once daily was the lower of the two most effective concentrations evaluated, with significantly greater IOP lowering and comparable side effects relative to latanoprost 0.005%. LBN dosed once daily for 28 days was well tolerated. Clinical trial number NCT01223378. PMID:25488946

  5. Efficacy of Garcinia kola 0.5% Aqueous Eye Drops in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Adefule-Ositelu, Adebukunola O.; Adegbehingbe, Bernice O.; Adefule, Adebayo K.; Adegbehingbe, Olayinka O.; Samaila, Elsie; Oladigbolu, Kehinde

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering efficacy of Garcinia kola 0.5% aqueous solution eye drops in patients with newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (POAG/OH). Materials and Methods: A randomized, double-masked, multicenter, active-controlled prospective study. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned in equal numbers to receive Timolol 0.5% eye drops as a control medication (A = Group 1 eyes) or Garcinia kola 0.5% eye drops as the study medication (B = Group 2 eyes). All drops were instilled at 6 am and 6 pm daily. Goldman applanation tonometry was performed at 9 am, 12 pm and 3 pm at baseline, week-6, week-12 and week-24 visits. Voluntary and actively elicited reports of adverse events were documented. The mean change in IOP over 24 weeks was the primary outcome measure. Both groups were compared for statistically significant differences at all visits. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 178 patients were randomly assigned to G. kola and Timolol groups. At baseline there were no differences in mean IOP between groups, based on age, sex, or diagnosis. At the end of the study period (24th week), the mean (± SD) reduction in IOP was 12.93 ± 2.3 mmHg (47.8% ± 0.8% reduction) in G. Kola group and 13.09 ± 2.8 mm Hg (48.2% ± 1.03% reduction) in the Timolol group (P > 0.05). Adverse events were mild in nature with no statistically significant differences between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Garcinia kola ophthalmic solution significantly reduces IOP as compared to baseline. The IOP lowering effect of both treatments was equivalent. PMID:20543944

  6. Choroidal area assessment in various fundus sectors of patients at different stages of primary open-angle glaucoma by using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu; Yan, Xiao-Qin; Song, Yin-Wei; Guo, Jing-Min; Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To compare the choroidal area in different eye fundus sectors of subjects with normal eyes, early-stage primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) eyes, and 10° tubular visual field POAG eyes using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Twenty-five normal, 25 early-stage POAG, and 25 ten-degree tubular visual field POAG eyes were recruited. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography was used to measure the choroidal area in different fundus sectors (fovea; 10° superior, inferior, temporal, and 24° superior, inferior, temporal, nasal to the fovea) and the peripapillary sector. There were neither significant differences in the choroidal area at any of the 8 measured fundus sectors, nor significant differences in the percentage change between the choroidal area of the fovea and other 7 measured fundus sectors among the 3 groups (all P > 0.05). For the total peripapillary choroidal area, no significant difference was found among the 3 groups (P > 0.05); however, the temporal peripapillary choroidal area of 10° tubular visual field POAG eyes was significantly thicker than that of normal eyes (4,46,213 ± 1,16,267 vs 3,74,164 ± 1,21,658 μm2; P = 0.048). Our study showed that there was no significant difference in the choroidal area of the 8 measured fundus sectors among normal, early-stage POAG, and 10° tubular visual field POAG eyes, suggesting that there might be no blood redistribution from the peripheral choroid to the subfoveal choroid. However, the thicker temporal peripapillary choroidal area might play a role in the central visual acuity protection in patients with POAG. PMID:28272255

  7. Polymorphism of CYP46A1 and PPARγ2 Genes in Risk Prediction of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma Among North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Anu; Abbas, Shania; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Singh, Luxmi; Rizvi, Saliha; Mahdi, Farzana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness and the second most common cause of all blindness after cataracts. This study investigates the association of polymorphism in the CYP46A1 and PPARγ2 genes and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 122 POAG cases (POAG group) and 112 cases of nonglaucomatous patients (control group). Polymorphisms of the CYP46A1 gene and PPARγ2 gene were evaluated with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in both groups. Results: The mean ages were 49.88 ± 12.34 years and 53.74 ± 11.87 years for the POAG group and control group, respectively. The CYP46A1 gene CC, CT, TT genotype frequencies were 13.93%, 58.2%, 27.87% in the POAG group and 19.6%, 40.19%, 40.19% in the control group, respectively. The PPARγ2 gene CC, CG, GG genotype frequencies were 16.83%, 54.45%, 28.71% in cases and 3.92%, 28.43%, 67.64% in the control group, respectively. Statistically, significant differences in the frequencies of CYP46A1 CC, CT, TT and PPARγ2 CC, CG, GG (P < 0.05) genotype were found between groups (P < 0.05, all comparisons). Conclusion: Findings of this study suggest that CYP46A1 gene and PPARγ2 gene polymorphisms can be a predictive marker for early identification of population at risk of POAG, although a larger sample size is required to determine the role of these polymorphisms in the pathogenesis and course of POAG. PMID:27162448

  8. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CYP1B1 gene with the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Li, M; Li, L; Sun, H; Lin, X Y

    2015-12-17

    Mutations in the CYP1B1 gene were detected in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients. However, the association between these mutations and the incidence of POAG remains to be elucidated. Here, we have conducted a meta-analysis to analyze this correlation, using relevant studies obtained from an extensive search of various electronic databases, including EMBase, Web of Science, and PubMed. The extracted studies were selected for the meta-analysis based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of each included study was assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS), and the I2 value was calculated to evaluate the heterogeneity between studies. The combined effect size was presented as the odds ratio (OR), and confidence intervals (CI) were used to assess the association between POAG and CYP1B1 mutations. Eight studies, each with a high NOS score, were included in the analysis. Compared to the mutant allele, the wild-type allele of the rs180040 polymorphism in POAG patients showed a 12% decrease in OR (OR = 0.88, 95%CI = 0.76- 1.00); also, the wild-type allele of rs1056827 showed a 23% decrease in OR of the incidence of POAG (OR = 0.77, 95%CI = 0.60-0.99). However, the latter result was controversial. Polymorphisms at rs1056836, rs10012, and rs1056837 were not correlated with the incidence of POAG (using any evaluation model). In conclusion, three of the tested SNPs in the CYP1B1 gene were correlated with POAG; however, the SNPs rs180040 and rs1056827 showed an association with risk of POAG. These results must be further validated with larger-scale evaluations.

  9. Properties of pattern standard deviation in open-angle glaucoma patients with hemi-optic neuropathy and bi-optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Dong Won; Kim, Kyoung Nam; Lee, Min Woo; Lee, Sung Bok; Kim, Chang-sik

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the properties of pattern standard deviation (PSD) according to localization of the glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Methods We enrolled 242 eyes of 242 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, with a best-corrected visual acuity ≥ 20/25, and no media opacity. Patients were examined via dilated fundus photography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and Humphrey visual field examination, and divided into those with hemi-optic neuropathy (superior or inferior) and bi-optic neuropathy (both superior and inferior). We assessed the relationship between mean deviation (MD) and PSD. Using broken stick regression analysis, the tipping point was identified, i.e., the point at which MD became significantly associated with a paradoxical reversal of PSD. Results In 91 patients with hemi-optic neuropathy, PSD showed a strong correlation with MD (r = −0.973, β = −0.965, p < 0.001). The difference between MD and PSD (“−MD−PSD”) was constant (mean, −0.32 dB; 95% confidence interval, −2.48~1.84 dB) regardless of visual field defect severity. However, in 151 patients with bi-optic neuropathy, a negative correlation was evident between “−MD−PSD” and MD (r2 = 0.907, p < 0.001). Overall, the MD tipping point was −14.0 dB, which was close to approximately 50% damage of the entire visual field (p < 0.001). Conclusions Although a false decrease of PSD usually begins at approximately 50% visual field damage, in patients with hemi-optic neuropathy, the PSD shows no paradoxical decrease and shows a linear correlation with MD. PMID:28249022

  10. Comparison of Risk Factor Profiles for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Subtypes Defined by Pattern of Visual Field Loss: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae H.; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We explored whether risk factor associations differed by primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) subtypes defined by visual field (VF) loss pattern (i.e., paracentral or peripheral). Methods. We included 77,157 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and 42,773 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS 1986–2010), and incident medical record confirmed cases of paracentral (n = 440) and peripheral (n = 865) POAG subtypes. We evaluated African heritage, glaucoma family history, body mass index (BMI), mean arterial blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, physical activity, smoking, caffeine intake, and alcohol intake. We used competing risk Cox regression analyses modeling age as the metameter and stratified by age, cohort, and event type. We sequentially identified factors with the least significant differences in associations with POAG subtypes (“stepwise down” approach with P for heterogeneity [P-het] < 0.10 as threshold). Results. Body mass index was more inversely associated with the POAG paracentral VF loss subtype than the peripheral VF loss subtype (per 10 kg/m2; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.52, 0.86] versus HR = 0.93 [95% CI: 0.78, 1.10]; P-het = 0.03) as was smoking (per 10 pack-years; HR = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.87, 0.98] versus HR = 0.98 [95% CI: 0.94, 1.01]; P-het = 0.09). These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses using a “stepwise up” approach (identify factors that showed the most significant differences). Nonheterogeneous (P-het > 0.10) adverse associations with both POAG subtypes were observed with glaucoma family history, diabetes, African heritage, greater caffeine intake, and higher mean arterial pressure. Conclusions. These data indicate that POAG with early paracentral VF loss has distinct as well as common determinants compared with POAG with peripheral VF loss. PMID:25758813

  11. A comparison of the diagnostic ability of vessel density and structural measurements of optical coherence tomography in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Zia S.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Riyazuddin, Mohammed; Dasari, Srilakshmi; Venugopal, Jayasree P.; Puttaiah, Narendra K.; Rao, Dhanaraj A. S.; Devi, Sathi; Mansouri, Kaweh; Webers, Carroll A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic abilities of vessel density measurements of the optic nerve head (ONH), peripapillary and macular regions on optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) with that of the ONH rim area, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and the macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness measurements. Methods In a cross sectional study, 78 eyes of 50 control subjects and 117 eyes of 67 POAG patients underwent vessel density and structural measurements with spectral domain OCT. POAG was diagnosed based on the masked evaluation of optic disc stereo photographs. Area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and sensitivities at fixed specificities of vessel densities in ONH, peripapillary and macular regions were compared with rim area, RNFL and GCC thickness. Results The AUC (sensitivity at 95% specificity) of average vessel densities within the ONH, peripapillary and macular region were 0.77 (31%), 0.85 (56%) and 0.70 (18%) respectively. The same of ONH rim area, average RNFL and GCC thickness were 0.94 (83%), 0.95 (72%) and 0.93 (62%) respectively. AUCs of vessel densities were significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of the corresponding structural measurements. Pre-treatment IOP (coefficient: 0.08) affected (p<0.05) the AUC of ONH vessel density but not of any other vessel density or structural measurements. Conclusions Diagnostic abilities of ONH, peripapillary and the macular vessel densities in POAG were significantly lower than ONH rim area, peripapillary RNFL and macular GCC measurements respectively. At fixed levels of glaucoma severity, the diagnostic ability of the ONH vessel density was significantly greater in eyes with higher pre-treatment IOP. PMID:28288185

  12. Three Toxic Heavy Metals in Open-Angle Glaucoma with Low-Teen and High-Teen Intraocular Pressure: A Cross-Sectional Study from South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Hyung; Kang, Eun Min; Kim, Gyu Ah; Kwak, Seung Woo; Kim, Joon Mo; Bae, Hyoung Won; Seong, Gong Je; Kim, Chan Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between heavy metal levels and open-angle glaucoma (OAG) with low- and high-teen baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) using a population-based study design. Methods This cross-sectional study included 5,198 participants older than 19 years of age who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2008 to 2012 and had blood heavy metal levels available. The OAG with normal baseline IOP (IOP ≤ 21 mmHg) subjects were stratified into low-teen OAG (baseline IOP ≤ 15 mmHg) and high-teen OAG (15 mmHg < baseline IOP ≤ 21 mmHg), and the association between blood lead, mercury, and cadmium levels and glaucoma prevalence was assessed for low- and high-teen OAG. Results The adjusted geometric mean of blood cadmium levels was significantly higher in subjects with low-teen OAG than that of the non-glaucomatous group (P = 0.028), whereas there were no significant differences in blood lead and mercury levels. After adjusting for potential confounders, the low-teen OAG was positively associated with log-transformed blood cadmium levels (OR, 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03–1.93; P = 0.026). For high-teen OAG, log-transformed blood levels of the three heavy metals were not associated with disease prevalence. The association between log-transformed blood cadmium levels and low-teen OAG was significant only in men (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.48; P = 0.016), and not in women (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.66–1.85; P = 0.709). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that cadmium toxicity could play a role in glaucoma pathogenesis, particularly in men and in OAG with low-teen baseline IOP. PMID:27768724

  13. The impact of chronic use of prostaglandin analogues on the biomechanical properties of the cornea in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Roman; Wang, Qianqian; Paoloni, David; Harasymowycz, Paul; Brunette, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Aims To determine the influence of prostaglandin analogues (PGAs) on corneal biomechanical properties in patients undergoing chronic treatment for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods Prospective, interventional case–control study. 70 eyes from 35 patients with POAG on chronic PGA therapy were recruited. One eye per patient underwent PGA cessation for 6 weeks while the contralateral eye continued to receive the treatment. Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOP) (IOPcc), central corneal thickness (CCT) and Goldmann tonometry (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland) IOP (IOPGAT) were measured at baseline (visit 1), 6 weeks after PGA cessation (visit 2) and 6 weeks after PGAs reinitiation (visit 3) and were analysed using a linear mixed-effect model. The discrepancy between IOPcc and IOPGAT was defined as IOP bias (IOPcc—IOPGAT). Results Baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. In the study eyes, significant increases (p<0.0001) were detected at visit 2 in CH (9.0±1.8 vs 10.3±1.7 mm Hg), CRF (10.5±2.1 vs 11.7±2.1 mm Hg), CCT (541.8±43.2 vs 551.9±41.9 μm) and IOPGAT (15.4±3.0 vs 18.4±3.8 mm Hg). IOP bias in this group was significantly lowered at visit 2 (p<0.0001). These effects were reversed at visit 3. The control eyes did not demonstrate any significant changes over the study period. Conclusion Topical PGAs induce reversible reduction in CH, CRF and CCT in patients with POAG. These changes contribute to underestimation of the IOP measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry and warrant caution when assessing response to treatment. Trial registration number NCT02388360, Results. PMID:27162226

  14. 2013 Problem 8: Jet and Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Pei; Chen, Lan; Zhu, Kejing

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we investigate the interaction between the water jet and soap film under different jet speeds and incident angles. We consider two different phenomena- penetrating and non-penetrating, and their corresponding conditions. In the case of penetration, we seek for the relationship between the parameters of incident jet and emergent jet, calculate the shape of the film under specific occasions. In the case of non-penetration the jet may adhere to the surface of the film or bounce off the film several times. Depending on the incident angle and velocity of the jet, the film will be found in stable and unstable patterns. We calculate the shape of the jet and the film under different conditions and found the patterns in experimental observations. Finally we portrait a `phase diagram' illustrating the conditions for different forms of jet and film interaction.

  15. Global hydromagnetic simulations of a planet embedded in a dead zone: Gap opening, gas accretion, and formation of a protoplanetary jet

    SciTech Connect

    Gressel, O.; Nelson, R. P.; Turner, N. J.; Ziegler, U. E-mail: r.p.nelson@qmul.ac.uk E-mail: uziegler@aip.de

    2013-12-10

    We present global hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with mesh refinement of accreting planets embedded in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). The magnetized disk includes Ohmic resistivity that depends on the overlying mass column, leading to turbulent surface layers and a dead zone near the midplane. The main results are: (1) the accretion flow in the Hill sphere is intrinsically three-dimensional for HD and MHD models. Net inflow toward the planet is dominated by high-latitude flows. A circumplanetary disk (CPD) forms. Its midplane flows outward in a pattern whose details differ between models. (2) The opening of a gap magnetically couples and ignites the dead zone near the planet, leading to stochastic accretion, a quasi-turbulent flow in the Hill sphere, and a CPD whose structure displays high levels of variability. (3) Advection of magnetized gas onto the rotating CPD generates helical fields that launch magnetocentrifugally driven outflows. During one specific epoch, a highly collimated, one-sided jet is observed. (4) The CPD's surface density is ∼30 g cm{sup −2}, small enough for significant ionization and turbulence to develop. (5) The accretion rate onto the planet in the MHD simulation reaches a steady value 8 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ⊕} yr{sup –1} and is similar in the viscous HD runs. Our results suggest that gas accretion onto a forming giant planet within a magnetized PPD with a dead zone allows rapid growth from Saturnian to Jovian masses. As well as being relevant for giant planet formation, these results have important implications for the formation of regular satellites around gas giant planets.

  16. Jetting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Szarka, D.D.; Schwegman, S.L.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes an apparatus for hydraulically jetting a well tool disposed in a well, the well tool having a sliding member. It comprises positioner means for operably engaging the sliding member of the well tool; and a jetting means, connected at a rotatable connection to the positioner means so that the jetting means is rotatable relative to the positioner means and the well tool, for hydraulically jetting the well tool as the jetting means is rotated relative thereto.

  17. Observations of the Structure and Dynamics of the Inner M87 Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. Craig; Hardee, Philip E.; Davies, Fred; Ly, Chun; Junor, William; Mertens, Florent; Lobanov, Andrei

    2016-10-01

    M87 is the best source in which to study a jet at high resolution in gravitational units because it has a very high mass black hole and is nearby. The angular size of the black hole is second only to Sgr A*, which does not have a strong jet. The jet structure is edge brightened with a wide opening angle base and a weak counterjet. We have roughly annual observations for 17 years plus intensive monitoring at three week intervals for a year and five day intervals for 2.5 months made with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz. The inner jet shows very complex dynamics, with apparent motions both along and across the jet. Speeds from zero to over 2c are seen, with acceleration observed over the first 3 milli-arcseconds. The counterjet decreases in brightness much more rapidly than the main jet, as is expected from relativistic beaming in an accelerating jet oriented near the line-of-sight. Details of the structure and dynamics are discussed. The roughly annual observations show side-to-side motion of the whole jet with a characteristic time scale of about 9 years.

  18. Prospective unmasked randomized evaluation of the iStent inject® versus two ocular hypotensive agents in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fea, Antonio M; Belda, Jose I; Rękas, Marek; Jünemann, Anselm; Chang, Lydia; Pablo, Luis; Voskanyan, Lilit; Katz, L Jay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of subjects with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on one medication who underwent either implantation of two iStent inject® trabecular micro-bypass devices or received medical therapy consisting of a fixed combination of latanoprost/timolol. Patients and methods Of 192 subjects who qualified for the study and were enrolled, 94 were randomized to surgery with implantation of two iStent inject® devices in the treated eye and 98 to receive medical therapy. Results At the month 12 visit, 94.7% of eyes (89/94) in the stent group reported an unmedicated intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction of ≥20% versus baseline unmedicated IOP, and 91.8% of eyes (88/98) in the medical therapy group reported an IOP reduction ≥20% versus baseline unmedicated IOP. A 17.5% between-group treatment difference in favor of the iStent inject group was statistically significant (P=0.02) at the ≥50% level of IOP reduction. An IOP ≤18 mmHg was reported in 92.6% of eyes (87/94) in the iStent inject group and 89.8% of eyes (88/98) in the medical therapy group. Mean (standard deviation) IOP decreases from screening of 8.1 (2.6) mmHg and 7.3 (2.2) mmHg were reported in the iStent inject and medical therapy groups, respectively. A high safety profile was also noted in this study in both the iStent inject and medical therapy groups, as measured by stable best corrected visual acuity, cup-to-disc ratio, and adverse events. Conclusion These data show that the use of iStent inject is at least as effective as two medications, with the clinical benefit of reducing medication burden and assuring continuous treatment with full compliance to implant therapy as well as having a highly favorable safety profile. PMID:24855336

  19. Prospective, randomized study of one, two, or three trabecular bypass stents in open-angle glaucoma subjects on topical hypotensive medication

    PubMed Central

    Katz, L Jay; Erb, Carl; Carceller, Guillamet Amadeu; Fea, Antonio M; Voskanyan, Lilit; Wells, Jeffrey M; Giamporcaro, Jane Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of one, two, or three trabecular microbypass stents in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on ocular hypotensive medication. A total of 119 subjects were followed for 18 months postoperatively. Materials and methods Subjects with medicated intraocular pressure (IOP) 18–30 mmHg and postmedication-washout baseline IOP 22–38 mmHg were randomized to implantation of one, two, or three stents. Ocular hypotensive medication was to be used if postoperative IOP exceeded 18 mmHg. Results A total of 38 subjects were implanted with one stent, 41 subjects with two stents, and 40 subjects with three stents. Both month 12 IOP reduction ≥20% without ocular hypotensive medication vs baseline unmedicated IOP and month 12 unmedicated IOP ≤18 mmHg were achieved by 89.2%, 90.2%, and 92.1% of one-, two-, and three-stent eyes, respectively. Furthermore, 64.9%, 85.4%, and 92.1% of the three respective groups achieved unmedicated IOP ≤15 mmHg. Over the 18-month follow-up period, medication was required in seven one-stent subjects, four two-stent subjects, and three three-stent subjects. At 18 months, mean unmedicated IOP was 15.9±0.9 mmHg in one-stent subjects, 14.1±1.0 mmHg in two-stent subjects, and 12.2±1.1 mmHg in three-stent subjects. Month 18 IOP reduction was significantly greater (P<0.001) with implantation of each additional stent, with mean differences in reduction of 1.84 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.96–2.73) for three-stent vs two-stent groups and 1.73 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.83–2.64) for two-stent vs one-stent groups. Adverse events through 18 months were limited to cataract progression with best-corrected visual acuity loss and subsequent cataract surgery. Conclusion In this series, implantation of each additional stent resulted in significantly greater IOP reduction with reduced medication use. Titratability of stents as a sole procedure was shown to be effective and safe, with

  20. Global variations and time trends in the prevalence of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG): a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanakis, Venediktos V; Chan, Michelle P Y; Foster, Paul J; Cook, Derek G; Owen, Christopher G; Rudnicka, Alicja R

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of published population based surveys to examine the relationship between primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) prevalence and demographic factors. A literature search identified population-based studies with quantitative estimates of POAG prevalence (to October 2014). Multilevel binomial logistic regression of log-odds of POAG was used to examine the effect of age and gender among populations of different geographical and ethnic origins, adjusting for study design factors. Eighty-one studies were included (37 countries, 216 214 participants, 5266 POAG cases). Black populations showed highest POAG prevalence, with 5.2% (95% credible interval (CrI) 3.7%, 7.2%) at 60 years, rising to 12.2% (95% CrI 8.9% to 16.6%) at 80 years. Increase in POAG prevalence per decade of age was greatest among Hispanics (2.31, 95% CrI 2.12, 2.52) and White populations (1.99, 95% CrI 1.86, 2.12), and lowest in East and South Asians (1.48, 95% CrI 1.39, 1.57; 1.56, 95% CrI 1.31, 1.88, respectively). Men were more likely to have POAG than women (1.30, 95% CrI 1.22, 1.41). Older studies had lower POAG prevalence, which was related to the inclusion of intraocular pressure in the glaucoma definition. Studies with visual field data on all participants had a higher POAG prevalence than those with visual field data on a subset. Globally 57.5 million people (95% CI 46.4 to 73.1 million) were affected by POAG in 2015, rising to 65.5 million (95% CrI 52.8, 83.2 million) by 2020. This systematic review provides the most precise estimates of POAG prevalence and shows omitting routine visual field assessment in population surveys may have affected case ascertainment. Our findings will be useful to future studies and healthcare planning. PMID:26286821

  1. [Genetic variants of CYP1B1 and WDR36 in the patients with primary congenital glaucoma and primary open angle glaucoma from Saint-Petersburg].

    PubMed

    Motushchuk, A E; Komarova, T Iu; Grudinina, N A; Rakhmanov, V V; Mandel'shtam, M Iu; Astakhov, Iu S; Vasil'ev, V B

    2009-12-01

    In 32 patients with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), a search for mutations in the myocilin (MYOC), cytochrome P450B1 (CYP1B1), and WDR36 genes was performed. The Q368X mutation in myocilin gene, typical of the patients with adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), was not detected in the PCG patients. Screening of the CYP1B1 introns 2 and 3 for the presence of mutations in PCG patients revealed only six DNA polymorphisms, including IVS1-12ntT>C (g.3793 T>C), A119S (g.4160 G>T; GCC>TCC), G188G (g.4369 C>A; GGC>GGA), L432V (G.8131 C>G; CTG>GTG), D449D (g.8184 C>T; GAC>GAT), and N453S (g.8195 A>G; AAC>AGC) (nucleotide numbering is given in accordance with the GenBank sequence U56438). In the groups of PCG patients and donors without eye diseases, the frequencies of these variants were not statistically significantly different, pointing to the neutrality of these polymorphisms. Furthermore, the CYP1B1 polymorphism L432V, considered to be associated with POAG in some world populations, was not associated with this disease in the patients from St. Petersburg. DNA collections obtained from the POAG and PCG patients and from the control group were tested for the carriage of the worldwide distributed mutations of the WRD36 gene, D658G, R529Q, A449T, and N355S. D658G variant was found with equally low frequencies in the groups of POAG and PCG patients, as well as in the control group. Mutations A449T and R529Q were found only once each, while mutation N355S was not detected in any of the groups examined. Our results indicate that the WDR36 variants make no substantial contribution to the development of POAG and PCG in the patients from St. Petersburg and represent normal DNA polymorphism. It is likely that in most of the PCG patients from the population examined the disease is not associated with the CYP1B1 gene defects.

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of First-line Medications for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma – A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianjing; Lindsley, Kristina; Rouse, Benjamin; Hong, Hwanhee; Shi, Qiyuan; Friedman, David S.; Wormald, Richard; Dickersin, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Topic Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a highly prevalent condition worldwide and the most common cause of irreversible sight loss. The objective is to assess the comparative effectiveness of first line medical treatments in patients with POAG or ocular hypertension through a systematic review and network meta-analysis, and to provide relative rankings of these treatments. Clinical Relevance Treatment for POAG currently relies completely on lowering the intraocular pressure (IOP). While topical drops, lasers, and surgeries can be considered in the initial treatment of glaucoma, most patients elect to start treatment with eye drops. Methods We included randomized controlled trials that compared a single active topical medication with no treatment/placebo or another single topical medication. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Food and Drug Administration's website. Two individuals independently assessed trial eligibility, abstracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. We performed Bayesian network meta-analyses. Results We included 114 randomized controlled trials with data from 20,275 participants. The overall risk of bias of the included trials is mixed. The mean reductions (95% credible intervals) in IOP in mmHg at 3 months, ordered from the most to least effective drugs were: bimatoprost 5·61 (4·94; 6·29), latanoprost 4·85 (4·24; 5·46), travoprost 4·83 (4·12; 5·54), levobunolol 4·51 (3·85; 5·24), tafluprost 4·37 (2·94; 5·83), timolol 3·7 (3·16; 4·24), brimonidine 3·59 (2·89; 4·29), carteolol 3·44 (2·42; 4·46), levobetaxolol 2·56 (1·52; 3·62), apraclonidine 2·52 (0·94; 4·11), dorzolamide 2·49 (1·85; 3·13), brinzolamide 2·42 (1·62; 3·23), betaxolol 2·24 (1·59; 2·88), and unoprostone 1·91 (1·15; 2·67). Conclusions All active first-line drugs are effective compared to placebo in reducing IOP at 3 months. Bimatoprost, latanoprost, and travoprost are among the most efficacious drugs, although the within class

  3. Efficacy of two trabecular micro-bypass stents combined with topical travoprost in open-angle glaucoma not controlled on two preoperative medications: 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David F; Donnenfeld, Eric D; Katz, L Jay; Voskanyan, Lilit; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K; Samuelson, Thomas W; Giamporcaro, Jane Ellen; Hornbeak, Dana M; Solomon, Kerry D

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect and safety parameters following treatment with two trabecular micro-bypass stents and topical prostaglandin in phakic eyes with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on two preoperative medications. Methods This prospective, single-arm, unmasked study enrolled 39 qualified phakic eyes with OAG not controlled on 2 medications, preoperative medicated IOP of 18–30 mmHg, and IOP following medication washout of 22–38 mmHg. Two trabecular micro-bypass stents were implanted as a standalone procedure, and travoprost was started on postoperative day 1. Evaluations included IOP, best-corrected visual acuity, medication use, fundus and slit-lamp examinations, visual field, cup:disc ratio, central corneal thickness, and ocular complications. Data through 18 months were summarized previously. Thirty-seven of the original 39 subjects have been followed for 3 years postoperatively; follow-up is continuing for 5 years. Results At 3 years postoperative, 97% of eyes had achieved an IOP reduction of ≥20% from baseline with a reduction of 1 medication. Eighty-six percent of eyes had IOP of ≤18 mmHg with a reduction of 1 medication. Mean medicated IOP decreased to 14.0±2.6 mmHg on 1 medication versus 22.4±2.3 mmHg on 2 medications preoperatively. The mean unmedicated IOP decreased to 17.7±1.7 mmHg at 37 months from 25.3±1.9 mmHg preoperatively. Long-term postoperative adverse events included cataract surgery in 3 eyes due to cataract progression, and trabeculectomy in 1 eye due to uncontrolled IOP of 23 mmHg. No intraoperative or device-related adverse events occurred. Conclusion Significant and sustained reduction in IOP and medications with a favorable safety profile was shown through 3 years after implantation of 2 trabecular micro-bypass stents combined with postoperative travoprost in phakic OAG eyes uncontrolled on 2 preoperative medications. These findings demonstrate the long

  4. Baseline factors predicting the risk of conversion from ocular hypertension to primary open-angle glaucoma during a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Salvetat, M L; Zeppieri, M; Tosoni, C; Brusini, P

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the ability of baseline clinical, morphological, and functional factors to predict the conversion to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in ocular hypertensive (OHT) patients.MethodsThis single-center prospective longitudinal observational study included 116 eyes of 116 OHT patients followed for a 10-year period. All patients had intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥24 mm Hg in one eye and >21 mm Hg in the other eye, normal visual fields (VFs) and normal optic disc (OD) appearance in both eyes at baseline. All OHT patients were untreated at baseline with subsequent treatment upon need according to clinical judgement. Only one eye per subject was randomly selected. Patient age, gender, IOP, central corneal thickness (CCT), and ibopamine test results were collected at baseline. All patients underwent standard automated perimetry, short-wavelength automated perimetry (SWAP), frequency-doubling technology, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO), and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) at baseline and every 6 months thereafter. Main outcome measure was the conversion to POAG, defined as the development of reproducible VF and/or OD abnormalities attributable to glaucoma. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify the baseline factors predictive of POAG conversion.ResultsDuring the 10-year follow-up, 25% of eyes converted to POAG. In multivariate Cox models, baseline factors that were significant predictors of POAG development included: older age (hazard ratio (HR) 1.0, 99% confidence intervals (CIs) 1.0-1.2, per 1 year older); SWAP Glaucoma Hemifield test 'outside normal limits' (HR 4.3, 99% CIs 1.2-17.9); greater SLP 'Inter-eye Symmetry' (HR 1.1, 99% CIs 0.4-3.0, per 1 unit lower); lower CSLO Rim Volume (HR 1.1, 99% CIs 0.3-3.2, per 0.1 mm(3) lower); and greater CSLO cup-to-disc ratio (HR 6.0, 99% CIs 3.6-16.8, per 0.1 unit greater).ConclusionsThe baseline parameters that proved to be useful in assessing the likelihood of an OHT

  5. Factors Influencing the Placebo Effect in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: An Analysis of Two Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Taichi; Sato, Izumi; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore factors related to the placebo effect in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) or ocular hypertension (OH). Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with POAG and patients with OH who were treated with placebo. The patients’ data were extracted from two randomized, double-masked, parallel, multicenter clinical trials (trial 1 and trial 2) in Japan. We explored the baseline factors that were associated with the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect of placebo ophthalmic solution after 4 weeks of instillation treatment at two time points by using multivariable models. The time points were Hour 0 (between 08:30 and 10:30 before instillation) and Hour 2 (within 1.5 to 2.5 h after instillation and by 12:30) at the baseline date and after 4 weeks. The changes in IOP from baseline to 4 weeks at the two time points were evaluated for the IOP-lowering effect induced by placebo instillation. Results Of the 330 patients included in the two trials, 89 patients were eligible for the analysis. The results of the multivariable analysis for Hour 0 indicated a high IOP at the baseline date (coefficient: 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.02 to 0.46, P = 0.03), and the magnitude of the IOP fluctuation at the baseline date (coefficient: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.90, P = 0.001) was associated with the IOP-lowering effect after 4 weeks. With respect to Hour 2, the trial type was associated with the IOP-lowering effect (coefficient: -1.15, 95% CI: -2.14 to -0.16, P = 0.02). Conclusions A large fluctuation in IOP during the day is associated with the IOP-lowering effect induced by placebo in patients with POAG or OH. This finding would be helpful to researchers when designing studies related to glaucoma in the early stages of clinical development of drugs. PMID:27254076

  6. Distribution of COL8A2 and COL8A1 gene variants in Caucasian primary open angle glaucoma patients with thin central corneal thickness

    PubMed Central

    Desronvil, T.; Logan-Wyatt, D.; Abdrabou, W.; Triana, M.; Jones, R.; Taheri, S.; Del Bono, E.; Pasquale, L.R.; Olivier, M.; Haines, J.L.; Fan, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose One approach to identify genes that contribute to common complex ocular disorders such as primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is to study the genetic determinates of endophenotypes that are defined by underlying pre-disposing heritable quantitative traits such as central corneal thickness (CCT). Collagen VIII is a major component of Descemet’s membrane and studies in mice have indicated that targeted inactivation of the genes encoding the collagen type 8 alpha1 (Col8a1) and collagen type 8 alpha2 (Col8a2) subunits (COL8A1 and COL8A2) results in thinning of the corneal stroma and of Descemet’s membrane. The purpose of this study is to evaluate COL8A1 and COL8A2 as candidate genes for thin CCT in human POAG patients. Methods 100 Caucasian POAG patients were enrolled in this study. The entire COL8A1 and COL8A2 coding sequence was determined in 8 patients with CCT<513 µm (one standard deviation (36 microns) below the mean (550 microns) and 8 patients with CCT>586 µm (one standard deviation above the mean). Selected COL8A2 exons containing variants of interest were sequenced in the full POAG cohort. Association and quantitative trait analyses were performed. Results Three patients with CCT less than 513 µm and advanced POAG were found to have missense changes in COL8A2; two patients had a previously identified mutation, R155Q and one had a novel change, P678L (p=0.0035, Fisher’s exact test). Missense changes were not found in any of the patients with CCT>513 µm and missense changes in the COL8A1 gene were not found in any patient. One common COL8A2 SNP, rs274754 was also statistically associated with CCT (p=0.018). Conclusions In this study we have identified COL8A2 missense changes in a group of Caucasian patients with very thin CCT and advanced POAG. These results suggest that DNA sequence variants in the COL8A2 gene may be associated with thin corneas in some glaucoma patients. Further study of COL8A2 variants in other patient populations, especially

  7. Age at natural menopause genetic risk score in relation to age at natural menopause and primary open-angle glaucoma in a US-based sample

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Louis R.; Aschard, Hugues; Kang, Jae H.; Bailey, Jessica N. Cooke; Lindström, Sara; Chasman, Daniel I.; Christen, William G.; Allingham, R. Rand; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Lee, Richard K.; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Fingert, John; Budenz, Donald L.; Realini, Tony; Gaasterland, Terry; Gaasterland, Douglas; Scott, William K.; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J.; Igo, Robert P.; Song, Yeunjoo E.; Hark, Lisa; Ritch, Robert; Rhee, Douglas J.; Gulati, Vikas; Havens, Shane; Vollrath, Douglas; Zack, Donald J.; Medeiros, Felipe; Weinreb, Robert N.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Liu, Yutao; Kraft, Peter; Richards, Julia E.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Hauser, Michael A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wiggs, Janey L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Several attributes of female reproductive history, including age at natural menopause (ANM), have been related to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). We assembled 18 previously reported common genetic variants that predict ANM to determine their association with ANM or POAG. Methods: Using data from the Nurses’ Health Study (7,143 women), we validated the ANM weighted genetic risk score in relation to self-reported ANM. Subsequently, to assess the relation with POAG, we used data from 2,160 female POAG cases and 29,110 controls in the National Eye Institute Glaucoma Human Genetics Collaboration Heritable Overall Operational Database (NEIGHBORHOOD), which consists of 8 datasets with imputed genotypes to 5.6+ million markers. Associations with POAG were assessed in each dataset, and site-specific results were meta-analyzed using the inverse weighted variance method. Results: The genetic risk score was associated with self-reported ANM (P = 2.2 × 10–77) and predicted 4.8% of the variance in ANM. The ANM genetic risk score was not associated with POAG (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.002; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.998, 1.007; P = 0.28). No single genetic variant in the panel achieved nominal association with POAG (P ≥0.20). Compared to the middle 80 percent, there was also no association with the lowest 10th percentile or highest 90th percentile of genetic risk score with POAG (OR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.47, 1.21; P = 0.23 and OR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.69; P = 0.65, respectively). Conclusions: A genetic risk score predicting 4.8% of ANM variation was not related to POAG; thus, genetic determinants of ANM are unlikely to explain the previously reported association between the two phenotypes. PMID:27760082

  8. A VLBA movie of the jet launch region in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Junor, William; Walker, Robert C; Ly, Chun; Hardee, Philip J

    2008-01-01

    M87 has one of the largest angular size black holes known. It also has a bright jet that is well resolved across the jet near the core using high frequency VLBI. As such it is the best object to observe to study the launch region of jets where the physical sizes of structures of interest scale with the gravitational radius. Modern numerical simulations suggest that the jet formation extends over 100-1000 R{sub s}. M87 has been observed with a resolution of about 60 R{sub s} at 43 GHz with the VLBA every 3 weeks through 2007, and every 5 days between January and April 2008. A preliminary movie, made from the first 11 observations in 2007, shows fast (thicksim2c) and complex motions in an edge brightened structure with a wide opening angle at the base.

  9. Structure of gamma-ray burst jets: intrinsic versus apparent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Nappo, F.

    2015-07-01

    With this paper we introduce the concept of apparent structure of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet, as opposed to its intrinsic structure. The latter is customarily defined specifying the functions ɛ(θ) (the energy emitted per jet unit solid angle) and Γ(θ) (the Lorentz factor of the emitting material); the apparent structure is instead defined by us as the isotropic equivalent energy Eiso(θv) as a function of the viewing angle θv. We show how to predict the apparent structure of a jet given its intrinsic structure. We find that a Gaussian intrinsic structure yields a power-law apparent structure: this opens a new viewpoint on the Gaussian (which can be understood as a proxy for a realistic narrow, well-collimated jet structure) as a possible candidate for a quasi-universal GRB jet structure. We show that such a model (a) is consistent with recent constraints on the observed luminosity function of GRBs; (b) implies fewer orphan afterglows with respect to the standard uniform model; (c) can break out the progenitor star (in the collapsar scenario) without wasting an unreasonable amount of energy; (d) is compatible with the explanation of the Amati correlation as a viewing angle effect; (e) can be very standard in energy content, and still yield a very wide range of observed isotropic equivalent energies.

  10. Resolving the Geometry of the Innermost Relativistic Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algaba, J. C.; Nakamura, M.; Asada, K.; Lee, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    In the current paradigm, it is believed that the compact VLBI radio core of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) represents the innermost upstream regions of relativistic outflows. These regions of AGN jets have generally been modeled by a conical outflow with a roughly constant opening angle and flow speed. Nonetheless, some works suggest that a parabolic geometry would be more appropriate to fit the high energy spectral distribution properties and it has been recently found that, at least in some nearby radio galaxies, the geometry of the innermost regions of the jet is parabolic. We compile here multi-frequency core sizes of archival data to investigate the typically unresolved upstream regions of the jet geometry of a sample of 56 radio-loud AGNs. Data combined from the sources considered here are not consistent with the classic picture of a conical jet starting in the vicinity of the super-massive black hole (SMBH), and may exclude a pure parabolic outflow solution, but rather suggest an intermediate solution with quasi-parabolic streams, which are frequently seen in numerical simulations. Inspection of the large opening angles near the SMBH and the range of the Lorentz factors derived from our results support our analyses. Our result suggests that the conical jet paradigm in AGNs needs to be re-examined by millimeter/sub-millimeter VLBI observations.

  11. Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Jets in a Stratified External Medium: Dynamics, Afterglow Light Curves, Jet Breaks, and Radio Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-05-01

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets during the afterglow phase is most reliably and accurately modeled using hydrodynamic simulations. All published simulations so far, however, have considered only a uniform external medium, while a stratified external medium is expected around long duration GRB progenitors. Here, we present simulations of the dynamics of GRB jets and the resulting afterglow emission for both uniform and stratified external media with ρextvpropr -k for k = 0, 1, 2. The simulations are performed in two dimensions using the special relativistic version of the Mezcal code. Common to all calculations is the initiation of the GRB jet as a conical wedge of half-opening angle θ0 = 0.2 whose radial profile is taken from the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. The dynamics for stratified external media (k = 1, 2) are broadly similar to those derived for expansion into a uniform external medium (k = 0). The jet half-opening angle is observed to start increasing logarithmically with time (or radius) once the Lorentz factor Γ drops below θ-1 0. For larger k values, however, the lateral expansion is faster at early times (when Γ > θ-1 0) and slower at late times with the jet expansion becoming Newtonian and slowly approaching spherical symmetry over progressively longer timescales. We find that, contrary to analytic expectations, there is a reasonably sharp jet break in the light curve for k = 2 (a wind-like external medium), although the shape of the break is affected more by the viewing angle (for θobs <= θ0) than by the slope of the external density profile (for 0 <= k <= 2). Steeper density profiles (i.e., increasing k values) are found to produce more gradual jet breaks while larger viewing angles cause smoother and later appearing jet breaks. The counterjet becomes visible as it becomes sub-relativistic, and for k = 0 this results in a clear bump-like feature in the light curve. However, for larger k values the jet decelerates more

  12. Wind-tunnel Investigation of External-flow Jet-augmented Double Slotted Flaps on a Rectangular Wing at an Angle of Attack of 0 Degree to High Momentum Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, Edwin E

    1957-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been made to determine the characteristics of external-flow jet-augmented double slotted flaps which appear suitable for application to airplanes with pod-mounted engines. The investigation included tests of the rectangular wing with an aspect ratio of 6 over a momentum-coefficient range from 0 to 28. Lift coefficients larger than the jet reaction in the lift direction were obtained with the external-flow jet-augmented double slotted flaps.

  13. HST/WFC3 imaging of protostellar jets in Carina: [Fe II] emission tracing massive jets from intermediate-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    We present narrow-band Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)-UVIS and WFC3-IR images of four externally irradiated protostellar jets in the Carina nebula: HH 666, HH 901, HH 902 and HH 1066. These massive jets are unusual because they are bathed in UV radiation from dozens of nearby O-type stars, but despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of the jet remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, far-ultraviolet radiation or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates on to their driving protostars, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (˜2-8 M⊙) stars. Indeed, the IR driving sources of two of these outflows have luminosities that require intermediate-mass protostars (the other two are so deeply embedded that their luminosity is uncertain). All four of these HH jets are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to those observed in low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in wide-angle molecular outflows associated with intermediate- and high-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable in the harsh radiative environment of the Carina nebula. In more quiescent environments, this atomic core remains invisible, and outflows traced by shock-excited molecules in the outflow cavity give the impression that these outflows have a wider opening angle. Thus, the externally irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars and offer strong additional evidence

  14. Association of dietary nitrate intake with primary open-angle glaucoma: a prospective analysis from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae H.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard; Buys, Emmanuel; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Nitric oxide (NO) signaling alterations in outflow facility and retinal blood flow autoregulation are implicated in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). NO donation has emerged as a POAG therapeutic target. An exogenous source of NO is dietary nitrates. Objective We evaluated the association between dietary nitrate intake, derived mainly from green leafy vegetables, and POAG. Design, Setting, Participants We followed biennially participants of the prospective cohorts, Nurses' Health Study (63,893 women; 1984-2012) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (41,094 men; 1986-2012); at each 2-year risk period, eligible participants were 40+ years old, free of POAG, and reported eye examinations. Exposure Dietary nitrate intake. Information on diet and potential confounders were updated with validated questionnaires. Main outcome measure Incidence of POAG and POAG subtypes; 1,483 cases were confirmed with medical records and classified into subtypes defined by intraocular pressure (IOP) (≥ or < 22 mm Hg) or by visual field (VF) loss pattern at diagnosis (peripheral loss only or early paracentral loss). Cohort-specific and pooled multivariable rate ratios (MVRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Results Compared with the lowest quintile of dietary nitrate intake (Q1;∼80 mg/day), the pooled MVRR for the highest quintile (Q5;∼240 mg/day) was 0.79 (95%CI, 0.66,0.93; p for trend [p-trend]=0.02). The dose-response was stronger (p for heterogeneity [p-het]=0.01) for POAG with early paracentral VF loss (433 cases; Q5 vs. Q1 MVRR=0.56; 95%CI, 0.40,0.79; p-trend=0.0003) than for POAG with peripheral VF loss only (835 cases; Q5 vs. Q1 MVRR=0.85; 95%CI, 0.68,1.06; p-trend=0.50). The association did not differ (p-het=0.75) by POAG subtypes defined by IOP (997 cases with IOP≥22 mm Hg: Q5 vs. Q1 MVRR=0.82; 95%CI, 0.67,1.01; p-trend=0.11 vs. 486 cases with IOP<22 mm Hg: Q5 vs. Q1 MVRR=0.71; 95%CI, 0.53,0.96; p-trend=0.12). Green leafy vegetables

  15. Fuzzy jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  16. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; ...

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variablesmore » in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  17. Comparison of the effects of bimatoprost and timolol on intraocular pressure and pulsatile ocular blood flow in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma: A prospective, open-label, randomized, two-arm, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Vetrugno, Michele; Cardascia, Nicola; Cantatore, Francesco; Sborgia, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background: The current objective of antiglaucomatous therapy is to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP), and thus to preserve visual function. Many ophthalmologists believe this objective is best achieved by methods that improve ocular blood flow to the optic nerve head. Beta-blockers are effective ocular hypotensive agents, but they can reduce choroidal blood flow. Bimatoprost, a new prostamide analogue, has been shown to have a better IOP-lowering effect compared with the nonselective beta-adrenergic receptor blocker timolol maleate, but little is known about its effects on the vascular bed of the eye. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of bimatoprost and timolol on IOP and choroidal blood flow (as measured using pulsatile ocular blood flow [pOBF]) in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods: This prospective, open-label, randomized, 2-arm, parallel-group study was conducted at the Glaucoma Research Centre, Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Bari, Bari, Italy. Patients with POAG having well-controlled IOP (<16 mm Hg) on monotherapy with timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution (2 drops per affected eye BID) for ≥12 months but with a progressive decrease in pOBF during the same time period were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups. One group continued monotherapy with timolol, 2 drops per affected eye BID. The other group was switched (without washout) to bimatoprost 0.3% ophthalmic solution (2 drops per affected eye QD [9 pm]). Treatment was given for 180 days. IOP and pOBF were assessed at the diagnostic visit (pre-timolol), baseline (day 0), and treatment days 15, 30, 60, 90, and 180. Primary adverse effects (AEs) (ie, conjunctival hyperemia, conjunctival papillae, stinging, burning, foreign body sensation, and pigmentation of periorbital skin) were monitored throughout the study. Results: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled (22 men, 16 women; mean [SD] age, 51.7 [4.8] years; 19 patients per

  18. THE STRUCTURE AND LINEAR POLARIZATION OF THE KILOPARSEC-SCALE JET OF THE QUASAR 3C 345

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, David H.; Wardle, John F. C.; Marchenko, Valerie V.

    2013-02-01

    Deep Very Large Array imaging of the quasar 3C 345 at 4.86 and 8.44 GHz has been used to study the structure and linear polarization of its radio jet on scales ranging from 2 to 30 kpc. There is a 7-8 Jy unresolved core with spectral index {alpha} {approx_equal} -0.24 (I{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). The jet (typical intensity 15 mJy beam{sup -1}) consists of a 2.''5 straight section containing two knots, and two additional non-co-linear knots at the end. The jet's total projected length is about 27 kpc. The spectral index of the jet varies over -1.1 {approx}< {alpha} {approx}< -0.5. The jet diverges with a semi-opening angle of about 9 Degree-Sign , and is nearly constant in integrated brightness over its length. A faint feature northeast of the core does not appear to be a true counter-jet, but rather an extended lobe of this FR-II radio source seen in projection. The absence of a counter-jet is sufficient to place modest constraints on the speed of the jet on these scales, requiring {beta} {approx}> 0.5. Despite the indication of jet precession in the total intensity structure, the polarization images suggest instead a jet re-directed at least twice by collisions with the external medium. Surprisingly, the electric vector position angles in the main body of the jet are neither longitudinal nor transverse, but make an angle of about 55 Degree-Sign with the jet axis in the middle while along the edges the vectors are transverse, suggesting a helical magnetic field. There is no significant Faraday rotation in the source, so that is not the cause of the twist. The fractional polarization in the jet averages 25% and is higher at the edges. In a companion paper, Roberts and Wardle show that differential Doppler boosting in a diverging relativistic velocity field can explain the electric vector pattern in the jet.

  19. Unifying Black Hole Jets: The Connection between Blazars and Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemmen, Rodrigo

    2012-07-01

    Radio-loud AGNs and gamma-ray bursts produce powerful relativistic jets and their central engines share the same basic astrophysical ingredients, despite the vastly different mass scales. An outstanding question is how the jet physics scales from GRBs up to AGNs. Using Fermi and Swift observations as well as data obtained with several other observatories, we show that the jets produced by blazars and long-duration GRBs exhibit similar correlations between the kinetic power and apparent gamma-ray luminosity, with AGNs and GRBs lying at the low and high-luminosity end, respectively, of the trend. After carrying out the beaming correction for these two populations, we find evidence that blazars and GRBs follow the same correlation between the intrinsic gamma-ray luminosity and kinetic power. This result implies that jet production and energy dissipation mechanisms are remarkably similar across over 9 orders of magnitude in jet power, establishing a physical analogy between AGN and GRBs. Our results indicate that these jets convert their internal energy into radiation with efficiencies exceeding 10%. We will discuss the implications of these results in terms of the properties of the central engines of AGNs and GRBs, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor, jet opening angles and mass accretion rates.

  20. Unifying Black Hole Jets: The Connection between radio-loud AGNs and Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemmen, Rodrigo

    2012-07-01

    Radio-loud AGNs and gamma-ray bursts produce powerful relativistic jets and their central engines share the same basic astrophysical ingredients, despite the vastly different mass scales. An outstanding question is how the jet physics scales from GRBs up to AGNs.Using Fermi and Swift observations as well as data obtained with several other observatories, we show that the jets produced by blazars and long-duration GRBs exhibit similar correlations between the kinetic power and apparent gamma-ray luminosity, with AGNs and GRBs lying at the low and high-luminosity end, respectively, of the trend. After carrying out the beaming correction for these two populations, we find evidence that blazars and GRBs follow the same correlation between the intrinsic gamma-ray luminosity and kinetic power. This result implies that jet production and energy dissipation mechanisms are remarkably similar across over 9 orders of magnitude in jet power, establishing a physical analogy between AGN and GRBs. Our results indicate that these jets convert their internal energy into radiation with efficiencies exceeding 10%. We will discuss the implications of these results in terms of the properties of the central engines of AGNs and GRBs, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor, jet opening angles and mass accretion rates.

  1. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  2. [Fe II] Emission Tracing Massive, Irradiated Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    We present new spectroscopy and HST and ground-based AO imaging of five protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars, but is excited by non-ionizing FUV photons that penetrate the ionization front within the jet. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude higher than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (~2-8 Msun) protostars. For two of the sources, mid-IR luminosities of the driving sources are clearly consistent with intermediate-mass protostars, while the other two driving sources are more deeply embedded and require imaging at longer wavelengths with high spatial resolution to confirm their luminosity. Tangential velocities from new proper motion measurements exceed velocities typical for lower-luminosity sources (100-200 km/s). In addition, these outflows are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exists in a feedback dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to ~8 Msun form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  3. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  4. Comparison of timolol 0.5% + brimonidine 0.2% + dorzolamide 2% versus timolol 0.5% + brimonidine 0.2% in a Mexican population with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Baiza-Durán, Leopoldo Martín; Llamas-Moreno, Juan Francisco; Ayala-Barajas, Clotilde

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of two fixed combinations, ie, timolol 0.5% + brimonidine 0.2% + dorzolamide 2% (TBD) versus timolol 0.5% + brimonidine 0.2% (TB) in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Methods We performed a 3-month, randomized, double-blind study in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension and an intraocular pressure of 21–30 mmHg. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one drop of TBD or TB twice a day. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in intraocular pressure after 3 months of treatment. Safety measures were assessed by the presence of adverse events. Results Mean baseline intraocular pressure was similar at 8 am and 4 pm in the treatment groups (TBD 22.3 ± 0.9 mmHg, TB 22.4 ± 1.8 mmHg, P = 0.558; TBD 19.02 ± 1.3, TB 19.08 ± 1.2, P = 0.536, respectively). At the end of the study, the mean intraocular pressure was significantly lower in the TBD group at both 8 am (16.19 ± 2.0 mmHg versus 18.35 ± 1.4 mmHg, P = 0.000) and 4 pm (14.74 ± 2.4 mmHg versus 16.77 ± 1.4 mmHg, P = 0.000). Conclusion Fixed-combination TBD was more effective than fixed-combination TB for reducing IOP in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. PMID:22848147

  5. Glaukos iStent inject® Trabecular Micro-Bypass Implantation Associated with Cataract Surgery in Patients with Coexisting Cataract and Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: A Long-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-de-la-Casa, Jose Maria; Diaz-Valle, David; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Fernandez-Perez, Cristina; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of the iStent inject device (Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA) combined with phacoemulsification in patients with coexistent cataract and open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (OHT). Methods. A prospective, uncontrolled, nonrandomized, interventional case series study was conducted in patients with both mild or moderate open-angle glaucoma or OHT and cataract. Patients underwent cataract surgery along with the implant of two iStent inject devices. Outcome measures were intraocular pressure (IOP), topical hypotensive medications required, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Results. 20 patients were enrolled. Mean follow-up was 47.4 ± 18.46 months. Mean baseline IOP was 19.95 ± 3.71 mmHg with medication and 26 ± 3.11 mmHg after washout. Mean end-follow-up IOP was 16.25 ± 1.99 mmHg, representing an IOP decrease of 36.92%, 9.74 ± 3.14 mmHg (P < 0.001), from baseline washout IOP. The mean number of medications was significantly reduced from 1.3 ± 0.66 to 0.75 ± 0.79 (P = 0.017). 45% of patients were medication-free by the end of follow-up. Mean log⁡MAR BCVA improved significantly from 0.42 ± 0.16 to 0.18 ± 0.16 (P < 0.001). No complications of surgery were observed. Conclusion. The iStent inject device combined with cataract surgery served to significantly reduce both IOP and medication use in the long term in patients with coexistent open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (OHT) and cataract. PMID:27882243

  6. Ejector Noise Suppression with Auxiliary Jet Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Charles H.; Andersen, Otto P., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental program to reduce aircraft jet turbulence noise investigated the interaction of small auxiliary jets with a larger main jet. Significant reductions in the far field jet noise were obtained over a range of auxiliary jet pressures and flow rates when used in conjunction with an acoustically lined ejector. While the concept is similar to that of conventional ejector suppressors that use mechanical mixing devices, the present approach should improve thrust and lead to lower weight and less complex noise suppression systems since no hardware needs to be located in the main jet flow. A variety of auxiliary jet and ejector configurations and operating conditions were studied. The best conditions tested produced peak to peak noise reductions ranging from 11 to 16 dB, depending on measurement angle, for auxiliary jet mass flows that were 6.6% of the main jet flow with ejectors that were 8 times the main jet diameter in length. Much larger reductions in noise were found at the original peak frequencies of the unsuppressed jet over a range of far field measurement angles.

  7. Jet impact on a soap film.

    PubMed

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale.

  8. Measuring foraging activity in a deep-diving bird: comparing wiggles, oesophageal temperatures and beak-opening angles as proxies of feeding.

    PubMed

    Hanuise, Nicolas; Bost, Charles-André; Huin, William; Auber, Arnaud; Halsey, Lewis G; Handrich, Yves

    2010-11-15

    Quantification of prey consumption by marine predators is key to understanding the organisation of ecosystems. This especially concerns penguins, which are major consumers of southern food webs. As direct observation of their feeding activity is not possible, several indirect methods have been developed that take advantage of miniaturised data logging technology, most commonly: detection of (i) anomalies in diving profiles (wiggles), (ii) drops in oesophageal temperature and (iii) the opening of mouth parts (recorded with a Hall sensor). In the present study, we used these three techniques to compare their validity and obtain information about the feeding activity of two free-ranging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). Crucially, and for the first time, two types of beak-opening events were identified. Type A was believed to correspond to failed prey-capture attempts and type B to successful attempts, because, in nearly all cases, only type B was followed by a drop in oesophageal temperature. The number of beak-opening events, oesophageal temperature drops and wiggles per dive were all correlated. However, for a given dive, the number of wiggles and oesophageal temperature drops were lower than the number of beak-opening events. Our results suggest that recording beak opening is a very accurate method for detecting prey ingestions by diving seabirds at a fine scale. However, these advantages are counterbalanced by the difficulty, and hence potential adverse effects, of instrumenting birds with the necessary sensor/magnet, which is in contrast to the less accurate but more practicable methods of measuring dive profiles or, to a lesser extent, oesophageal temperature.

  9. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  10. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  11. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  12. GRB 011121: Jet, wind and supernova -- all in one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Scholz, R. D.; Sterken, C.; Gorosabel, J.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A.; Grinkov, V.; Andersen, M. I.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fruchter, A.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Kaper, L.; Kouveliotou, C.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Salamanca, I.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van den Heuvel, E.

    2004-06-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of ˜9°. The jet origin of this break is supported by the achromatic spectral energy distribution. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law decline, interpreted as light from an underlying supernova. The deduced parameters for the decay slope as well as the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e. an outflow into a circum-burst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive GRB progenitor. Due to its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 is the so far best example for the GRB-supernova connection, and provides compelling evidence for a circum-burster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star.

  13. Heat flux reduction mechanism induced by a combinational opposing jet and cavity concept in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Yan-ping; Yan, Li; Liu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The thermal protection on the surface of hypersonic vehicles attracts an increasing attention worldwide, especially when the vehicle enters the atmosphere at high speed. In the current study, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the Menter's shear stress transport (SST) model have been employed to investigate the heat flux reduction mechanism induced by the variations of the cavity configuration, the jet pressure ratio and the injectant molecular weight in the combinational opposing jet and cavity concept. The length of the cavity is set to be 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm in order to make sure that the cavity configuration is the "open" cavity, and the jet pressure ratio is set to be 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 in order to make sure that the flow field is steady. The injectant is set to be nitrogen and helium. The obtained results show that the aft angle of the cavity only has a slight impact on the heat flux reduction, and the heat flux peak decreases with the decrease of the length of the cavity. The design of the thermal protection system for the hypersonic blunt body is a multi-objective design exploration problem, and the heat flux distribution depends on the jet pressure ratio, the aft wall of the cavity and the injectant molecular weight. The heat flux peak decreases with the increase of the jet pressure ratio when the aft angle of the cavity is large enough, and this value is 45°.

  14. Numerical study of active flow control over a hypersonic backward-facing step using supersonic jet in near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang-ming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Near space has been paid more and more attentions in recent years due to its militarily application value. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) which is one of the most successful particle simulation methods in treating rarefied gas dynamics is employed to investigate the flow characteristics of a hypersonic backward-facing step (BFS) under active flow control using supersonic jet in near space. The numerical tool is validated by an experimental flow of dual cusped-plate model, shock wave structures from the numerical simulation are shown in quite good agreement with the experimental result. The influence of altitude and active flow control on BFS flow are then studied in detail. Three parameters, i.e. boundary layer thickness, recirculation region length, and lean angle of the primary recirculation region that is first defined to describe recirculation region shape, are used to evaluate the flow characteristics of every case computed. The numerical results indicate that the main effect of vertical jet upstream of the step is the enhancement of boundary layer thickness downstream of the jet slot, then, it shows a weak influence on recirculation region length and a negligible effect on lean angle. Conversely, the horizontal jet near the step edge can greatly change the recirculation region length by adjusting jetting angle, but it only has a weak influence both on boundary layer thickness and on lean angle for every jetting angle considered. A significant finding is that the recirculation region length is decreased severely in near space compared with experimental and numerical results presented in the open literature.

  15. A NARROW SHORT-DURATION GRB JET FROM A WIDE CENTRAL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Duffell, Paul C.; Quataert, Eliot; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2015-11-01

    We use two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic numerical calculations to show that highly collimated relativistic jets can be produced in neutron star merger models of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) without the need for a highly directed engine or a large net magnetic flux. Even a hydrodynamic engine generating a very wide sustained outflow on small scales can, in principle, produce a highly collimated relativistic jet, facilitated by a dense surrounding medium that provides a cocoon surrounding the jet core. An oblate geometry to the surrounding gas significantly enhances the collimation process. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the merger of two neutron stars produces an oblate, expanding cloud of dynamical ejecta. We show that this gas can efficiently collimate the central engine power much like the surrounding star does in long-duration GRB models. For typical short-duration GRB central engine parameters, we find jets with opening angles of an order of 10° in which a large fraction of the total outflow power of the central engine resides in highly relativistic material. These results predict large differences in the opening angles of outflows from binary neutron star mergers versus neutron star–black hole mergers.

  16. A Narrow Short-duration GRB Jet from a Wide Central Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.; Quataert, Eliot; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2015-11-01

    We use two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic numerical calculations to show that highly collimated relativistic jets can be produced in neutron star merger models of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) without the need for a highly directed engine or a large net magnetic flux. Even a hydrodynamic engine generating a very wide sustained outflow on small scales can, in principle, produce a highly collimated relativistic jet, facilitated by a dense surrounding medium that provides a cocoon surrounding the jet core. An oblate geometry to the surrounding gas significantly enhances the collimation process. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the merger of two neutron stars produces an oblate, expanding cloud of dynamical ejecta. We show that this gas can efficiently collimate the central engine power much like the surrounding star does in long-duration GRB models. For typical short-duration GRB central engine parameters, we find jets with opening angles of an order of 10° in which a large fraction of the total outflow power of the central engine resides in highly relativistic material. These results predict large differences in the opening angles of outflows from binary neutron star mergers versus neutron star-black hole mergers.

  17. Assessment of Current Jet Noise Prediction Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craid A.; Bridges, James E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    An assessment was made of the capability of jet noise prediction codes over a broad range of jet flows, with the objective of quantifying current capabilities and identifying areas requiring future research investment. Three separate codes in NASA s possession, representative of two classes of jet noise prediction codes, were evaluated, one empirical and two statistical. The empirical code is the Stone Jet Noise Module (ST2JET) contained within the ANOPP aircraft noise prediction code. It is well documented, and represents the state of the art in semi-empirical acoustic prediction codes where virtual sources are attributed to various aspects of noise generation in each jet. These sources, in combination, predict the spectral directivity of a jet plume. A total of 258 jet noise cases were examined on the ST2JET code, each run requiring only fractions of a second to complete. Two statistical jet noise prediction codes were also evaluated, JeNo v1, and Jet3D. Fewer cases were run for the statistical prediction methods because they require substantially more resources, typically a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution of the jet, volume integration of the source statistical models over the entire plume, and a numerical solution of the governing propagation equation within the jet. In the evaluation process, substantial justification of experimental datasets used in the evaluations was made. In the end, none of the current codes can predict jet noise within experimental uncertainty. The empirical code came within 2dB on a 1/3 octave spectral basis for a wide range of flows. The statistical code Jet3D was within experimental uncertainty at broadside angles for hot supersonic jets, but errors in peak frequency and amplitude put it out of experimental uncertainty at cooler, lower speed conditions. Jet3D did not predict changes in directivity in the downstream angles. The statistical code JeNo,v1 was within experimental uncertainty predicting noise from cold subsonic

  18. Numerical investigation and optimization on mixing enhancement factors in supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Huang, Wei; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tian-tian

    2016-10-01

    Sufficient mixing between the supersonic airstream and the injectant is critical for the design of scramjet engines. The information in the two-dimensional supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow field has been explored numerically and theoretically, and the numerical approach has been validated against the available experimental data in the open literature. The obtained results show that the extreme difference analysis approach can obtain deeper information than the variance analysis method, and the optimal strategy can be generated by the extreme difference analysis approach. The jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio is the most important influencing factor for the supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow field, following is the injection angle, and all the design variables have no remarkable impact on the separation length and the height of Mach disk in the range considered in the current study.

  19. Gas-Jet Meniscus Control in Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Vonroos, O.

    1983-01-01

    Gas jet used to control shape of meniscus and thus to regulate ribbon thickness in vertical silicon-ribbon growth. Gas jet also cools ribbon, increasing maximum possible pull speed for silicon, contact angle of 11 degrees plus or minus 1 degree required for constant thickness ribbon growth. Cooling effect of gas jet increases maximum possible pull speed.

  20. Powerful jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, N.

    2014-01-01

    The Carina nebula hosts the largest known population of powerful HH jets driven by intermediate-mass stars in a single region. These jets are externally irradiated by dozens of O-type stars in Carina that illuminate unshocked material in the jet, allowing for a more complete census of the mass-loss. Despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of these jets remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, FUV radiation, or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. New proper motion measurements using Halpha images with a ~4.25 year baseline reveal tangential velocities of >200 km/s, in some cases exceeding velocities typical for jets from low-mass stars. In addition, these outflows are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of jets from intermediate-mass protostars that demonstrate that they are as collimated as their low-mass counterparts, but support higher densities and velocities, leading to higher mass-loss rates. This scaling of phenomena seen in low-mass star formation offers strong additional evidence that stars up to ~8 Msun form by the same accretion mechanism as low-mass stars.

  1. Development of an Empirical Methods for Predicting Jet Mixing Noise of Cold Flow Rectangular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James W.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents an empirical method for predicting the jet mixing noise levels of cold flow rectangular jets. The report presents a detailed analysis of the methodology used in development of the prediction method. The empirical correlations used are based on narrow band acoustic data for cold flow rectangular model nozzle tests conducted in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory. There were 20 separate nozzle test operating conditions. For each operating condition 60 Hz bandwidth microphone measurements were made over a frequency range from 0 to 60,000 Hz. Measurements were performed at 16 polar directivity angles ranging from 45 degrees to 157.5 degrees. At each polar directivity angle, measurements were made at 9 azimuth directivity angles. The report shows the methods employed to remove screech tones and shock noise from the data in order to obtain the jet mixing noise component. The jet mixing noise was defined in terms of one third octave band spectral content, polar and azimuth directivity, and overall power level. Empirical correlations were performed over the range of test conditions to define each of these jet mixing noise parameters as a function of aspect ratio, jet velocity, and polar and azimuth directivity angles. The report presents the method for predicting the overall power level, the average polar directivity, the azimuth directivity and the location and shape of the spectra for jet mixing noise of cold flow rectangular jets.

  2. Jet Formation and Dynamics: Comparison of Quasars and Microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    Quasars and Microquasars share the following properties: (i) They have similar, elongated morphologies - reminiscent of being driven by supersonic beams - consisting of cores, knots, and heads, with jet-opening angles <~ 10^-2, and no beam branching; (ii) core/lobe power ratios of 10^2 +/- 2; (iii) fluctuating, broad and hard core spectra; (iv) (occasional) sidedness; (v) (occasional) superluminal growth. In all cases, the central engine is thought to be a rotating magnet whose reconnecting magnetic fields generate the relativistic pair plasma - of typical Lorentz factor 10^3 +/- 2 - which rams the jet channels and blows the cocoons (subsonically) after having been stalled in a head. The supersonic jets form on passing a central deLaval nozzle, first proposed by Blandford and Rees in 1974, which forms naturally due to the huge density contrast of 10^-8.3T_4 with respect to the ambient medium (of temperature T, T_4:=T/10^4 K). Beam stability and narrowness are likewise guaranteed by the density contrast (of jet fluid and CSM). Observed are both the (thermal) radiation of the rammed channel-wall material, and the synchrotron radiation of the deflected beam particles.

  3. Twin Jet Effects on Noise of Round and Rectangular Jets: Experiment and Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic aircraft concepts proposed by NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program have asymmetric, integrated propulsion systems. The asymmetries in the exhaust of these propulsion systems create an asymmetric acoustic field. The asymmetries investigated in the current study are from twin jets and rectangular nozzles. Each effect produces its own variation of the acoustic field. An empirical model was developed to predict the acoustic field variation from round twin jets with twin jet spacing from 2.6 to 5.6, where s is the center-to-center spacing over the jet diameter. The model includes parameters to account for the effects of twin jet spacing, jet static temperature ratio, flight Mach number, frequency, and observer angle (both polar and azimuthal angles). The model was then applied to twin 2:1 and 8:1 aspect ratio nozzles to determine the impact of jet aspect ratio. For the round and rectangular jets, the use of the model reduces the average magnitude of the error over all frequencies, observation angles, and jet spacings by approximately 0.5dB when compared against the assumption of adding two jets incoherently.

  4. Radio crickets: chirping jets from black hole binaries entering their gravitational wave inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We study a novel electromagnetic signature of supermassive black hole (BH) binaries whose inspiral starts being dominated by gravitational wave (GW) emission. Recent simulations suggest that the binary's member BHs can continue to accrete gas from the circumbinary accretion disc in this phase of the binary's evolution, all the way until coalescence. If one of the binary members produces a radio jet as a result of accretion, the jet precesses along a biconical surface due to the binary's orbital motion. When the binary enters the GW phase of its evolution, the opening angle widens, the jet exhibits milliarcsecond-scale wiggles, and the conical surface of jet precession is twisted due to apparent superluminal motion. The rapidly increasing orbital velocity of the binary gives the jet an appearance of a `chirp'. This helical chirping morphology of the jet can be used to infer the binary parameters. For binaries with mass 107-1010 M⊙ at redshifts z < 0.5, monitoring these features in current and archival data will place a lower limit on sources that could be detected by Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Pulsar Timing Arrays. In the future, microarcsecond interferometry with the Square Kilometre Array will increase the potential usefulness of this technique.

  5. Improving Jet Reactor Configuration for Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povitsky, Alex

    2000-01-01

    The jet mixing reactor has been proposed for the industrial production of fullerene carbon nanotubes. Here we study the flowfield of this reactor using the SIMPLER algorithm. Hot peripheral jets are used to enhance heating of the central jet by mixing with the ambiance of reactor. Numerous configurations of peripheral jets with various number of jets, distance between nozzles, angles between the central jet and a peripheral jets, and twisted configuration of nozzles are considered. Unlike the previous studies of jet mixing, the optimal configuration of peripheral jets produces strong non-uniformity of the central jet in a cross-section. The geometrical shape of reactor is designed to obtain a uniform temperature of a catalyst.

  6. SDC solenoidal detector notes: Jets in the forward region

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D. . Inst. for Fundamental Theory); Barnett, M. ); White, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    We examine jet shapes in the forward region, {eta}(jet) > 4, of 40 TeV proton-proton collisions and compare them with 90{degree} jets. In the laboratory, forward jets are Lorentz contracted into thin disks.'' For example, a jet which at {theta}{sub cm}(jet) = 90{degree} would have its particles located within a cone'' with angular widths {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = {Delta}{phi} = 28{degree} (i.e., 0.5 radians), if boosted'' to {eta}(jet) = 4 ({theta}{sub cm} = 2{degree}) becomes a disk'' with an angular width of {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = 1{degree} Jet shapes are roughly invariant when plotted versus pseudorapidity, {eta}, and azimuthal angle, {phi}. In addition, we examine how well the electromagnetic component (i.e., photons and electrons) of a jet tracks'' the true position of the jet.

  7. SDC solenoidal detector notes: Jets in the forward region

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Barnett, M.; White, A.

    1991-12-31

    We examine jet shapes in the forward region, {eta}(jet) > 4, of 40 TeV proton-proton collisions and compare them with 90{degree} jets. In the laboratory, forward jets are Lorentz contracted into thin ``disks.`` For example, a jet which at {theta}{sub cm}(jet) = 90{degree} would have its particles located within a ``cone`` with angular widths {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = {Delta}{phi} = 28{degree} (i.e., 0.5 radians), if ``boosted`` to {eta}(jet) = 4 ({theta}{sub cm} = 2{degree}) becomes a ``disk`` with an angular width of {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = 1{degree}! Jet shapes are roughly invariant when plotted versus pseudorapidity, {eta}, and azimuthal angle, {phi}. In addition, we examine how well the electromagnetic component (i.e., photons and electrons) of a jet ``tracks`` the true position of the jet.

  8. Jet flow in steadily swimming adult squid.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Erik J; Grosenbaugh, Mark A

    2005-03-01

    important than L/D to predict jet structure. Average jet velocities in steadily swimming squid ranged from 19.9 to 85.8 cm s(-1) (0.90-2.98 L(m) s(-1)) and were always greater in magnitude than swimming speed. Maximum instantaneous fluid speeds within squid jets ranged from 25.6 to 136.4 cm s(-1). Average jet thrust determined both from jet velocity and from three-dimensional approximations of momentum change in successive jet visualizations showed some differences and ranged from 0.009 to 0.045 N over the range of swimming speeds observed. The fraction by which the average jet velocity exceeded the swimming speed, or 'slip', decreased with increasing swimming speed, which reveals higher jet propulsive efficiency at higher swimming speeds. Jet angle, subtended from the horizontal, decreased from approximately 29 degrees to 7 degrees with increasing swimming speed. Jet frequency ranged from 0.6 to 1.3 Hz in the majority of swimming sequences, and the data suggest higher frequencies at the lowest and highest speeds. Jet velocity, angle, period and frequency exhibited increased variability at speeds between 0.6 and 1.4 L(m) s(-1). This suggests that at medium speeds squid enjoy an increased flexibility in the locomotive strategies they use to control their dynamic balance.

  9. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  10. Measurement of the k(T) Distribution of Particles in Jets Produced in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-11-01

    We present a measurement of the transverse momentum with respect to the jet axis (k{sub T}) of particles in jets produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Results are obtained for charged particles within a cone of opening angle 0.5 radians around the jet axis in events with dijet invariant masses between 66 and 737 GeV/c{sup 2}. The experimental data are compared to theoretical predictions obtained for fragmentation partons within the framework of resummed perturbative QCD using the modified leading log and next-to-modified leading log approximations. The comparison shows that trends in data are successfully described by the theoretical predictions, indicating that the perturbative QCD stage of jet fragmentation is dominant in shaping basic jet characteristics.

  11. Computational Study of Air Entrainment by Plunging Jets-Influence of Jet Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2012-11-01

    The process of air entrainment by a continuous liquid jet plunging into a quiescent liquid pool is studied computationally. Our earlier study [APS2011] focused on shallow impacts and the discernible periodicity of air cavity formation. Here, we consider the effect of jet angle. For steep impacts, we see a chaotic formation of small cavities, in agreement with the literature. To explain the difference, we track evolution of the flow from initial impact to quasi-stationary state, for different jet inclinations. The initial impact always yields a large air cavity, regardless of jet angle. Difference emerges in the quasi-stationary state where shallow jets demonstrate the periodicity but the steep jets do not. We show that this is a manifestation of the air entrainment being a function of flow disturbance. For shallow jets, the disturbance originates from strong wavelike motion of the cavity which results in a total disruption of the jet. Thus, the resulting cavities are large and occur periodically. For the steep jets, entrainment happens by collapse of a thin gas film uniformly enshrouding the submerged jet. Such a thin film is very sensitive to the local flow disturbances. Thus, its collapse occurs stochastically all around the jet causing chaotic entrainment of small air pocket.

  12. Focusing of cylindrical liquid jets into droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Kristen; McCleney, Amy; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Upward angled water jets discharging in quiescent air are studied experimentally with time varying forcing. The jets issue from a 2 mm diameter tube, while highly controllable forcing is accomplished with a magnetic linear motor coupled with an arbitrary waveform generator. In particular, regimes of jet focusing are generated at various injection rates. The jets result in large droplets that can be created at various elevations. This type of flow mimics the spray generated by an Archer fish. Actual forcing functions were monitored using LDT.

  13. FRAME DRAGGING, DISK WARPING, JET PRECESSING, AND DIPPED X-RAY LIGHT CURVE OF Sw J1644+57

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-01-10

    The X-ray transient source Sw J1644+57 recently discovered by Swift is believed to be triggered by tidal disruption of a star by a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH). For such events, the outer disk is very likely misaligned with respect to the equatorial plane of the spinning SMBH, since the incoming star before disruption most likely has an inclined orbital plane. The tilted disk is subject to the Lense-Thirring torque, which tends to twist and warp due to the Bardeen-Petterson effect. The inner disk tends to align with the SMBH spin, while the outer region tends to remain in the stellar orbital plane, with a transition zone around the Bardeen-Petterson radius. The relativistic jet launched from the spinning SMBH would undergo precession. The 5-30 day X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 shows a quasi-periodic (2.7 day) variation with noticeable narrow dips. We numerically solve a warped disk and propose a jet-precessing model by invoking a Blandford-Znajek jet collimated by a wind launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius. Through simulations, we show that the narrow dips in the X-ray light curve can be reproduced for a range of geometric configurations. From the data we infer that the inclination angle of the initial stellar orbit is in the range of 10 Degree-Sign -20 Degree-Sign from the SMBH equatorial plane, that the jet should have a moderately high Lorentz factor, and that the inclination angle, jet opening angle, and observer's viewing angle are such that the duty cycle of the line of sight sweeping the jet cone is somewhat less than 0.5.

  14. Jet Noise Scaling in Dual Stream Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    Power spectral laws in dual stream jets are studied by considering such flows a superposition of appropriate single-stream coaxial jets. Noise generation in each mixing region is modeled using spectral power laws developed earlier for single stream jets as a function of jet temperature and observer angle. Similarity arguments indicate that jet noise in dual stream nozzles may be considered as a composite of four single stream jets representing primary/secondary, secondary/ambient, transition, and fully mixed zones. Frequency filter are designed to highlight spectral contribution from each jet. Predictions are provided at an area ratio of 2.0--bypass ratio from 0.80 to 3.40, and are compared with measurements within a wide range of velocity and temperature ratios. These models suggest that the low frequency noise in unheated jets is dominated by the fully mixed region at all velocity ratios, while the high frequency noise is dominated by the secondary when the velocity ratio is larger than 0.80. Transition and fully mixed jets equally dominate the low frequency noise in heated jets. At velocity ratios less than 0.50, the high frequency noise from primary/bypass becomes a significant contributing factor similar to that in the secondary/ambient jet.

  15. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  16. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  17. Experimental investigation of effects of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Tabular data are presented for an experimental study of the effects of jet decay rate on the jet-induced pressure distribution on a flat plate for a single jet issuing at right angle to the flat plate into a uniform crossflow. The data are presented in four sections: (1) presents the static nozzle calibration data; (2) lists the plate surface static pressure data and integrated loads; (3) lists the jet centerline trajectory data; and (4) lists the centerline dynamic pressure data.

  18. Measurement of charged-particle multiplicities in gluon and quark jets in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlsmith, D; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Friedman, J; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, T; Litvintsev, D O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plunkett, R; Pompo, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Poukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Vaiciulis, T; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worm, S; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2005-05-06

    We report the first largely model independent measurement of charged particle multiplicities in quark and gluon jets, Nq and Ng, produced at the Fermilab Tevatron in pp collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV and recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The measurements are made for jets with average energies of 41 and 53 GeV by counting charged particle tracks in cones with opening angles of theta(c) = 0.28, 0.36, and 0.47 rad around the jet axis. The corresponding jet hardness Q = Ejet theta c varies in the range from 12 to 25 GeV. At Q = 19.2 GeV, the ratio of multiplicities r = Ng/Nq is found to be 1.64+/-0.17, where statistical and systematic uncertainties are added in quadrature. The results are in agreement with resummed perturbative QCD calculations.

  19. Measurement of four-jet differential cross sections in √s = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2015-12-16

    Differential cross sections for the production of at least four jets have been measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider using the ATLAS detector. Events are selected if the four anti-k t R = 0.4 jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT) within the rapidity range |y| < 2.8 are well separated (ΔR 4j min > 0.65), all have pT > 64 GeV, and include at least one jet with pT > 100 GeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. As a result, the cross sections, corrected for detectormore » effects, are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order calculations as a function of the jet momenta, invariant masses, minimum and maximum opening angles and other kinematic variables.« less

  20. Ophthalmic and Glaucoma Treatment Characteristics Associated with Changes in Health-Related Quality of Life Before and After Newly Diagnosed Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma in Nurses Health Study Participants

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Lucy A.; Okereke, Olivia I.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Cioffi, George A.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Kang, Jae H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify attributes related to glaucoma diagnosis or early glaucoma treatment patterns that are associated with changes in health-related quality of life among those with newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma. Methods Among Nurses’ Health Study participants with incident medical record-confirmed primary open-angle glaucoma diagnosed in 1992–2000, we included 317 women who completed the Short-Form 36 Health Survey pre- and post-diagnosis. The two primary outcomes were 4-year changes (1992–1996 or 1996–2000) in the physical and mental component summary scores. Multiple regression models were used to estimate differences in score changes by early treatment pattern history and characteristics as of diagnosis (i.e., number of eyes affected, history of cataract, macular degeneration, cup-to-disc ratio, intraocular pressure, visual field loss type). Results In multivariable models, no ophthalmologic characteristics were associated with physical component score change. However, compared to treatment with eye drops or pills only, laser trabeculoplasty treatment (concomitant with history of treatment with eye drops or pills in 84%) was associated with a worse mental component score change over four years (-2.5 units; 95% confidence interval: −4.6, −0.3); this association was stronger with a family history of glaucoma (p-interaction=0.04) or with bilateral disease (p-interaction=0.001). Conclusions Among patients with incident glaucoma, no major factors were associated with change in physical well-being. However, compared to medical treatment only, a history of laser trabeculoplasty, which was commonly accompanied with a history of medical treatment and likely represented the need for a second line of treatment, was associated with a worse decline in mental well-being. PMID:26125994

  1. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  2. Periodic Excitation for Jet Vectoring and Enhanced Spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    1999-01-01

    The effects of periodic excitation on the evolution of a turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit and excitation was introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet. The introduction of high amplitude periodic excitation at the jet exit enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Vectoring is achieved by applying the excitation over a fraction of the circumference of the circular jet, enhancing its spreading rate on the excited side and its tendency to reattach to that side. Static deflection studies demonstrate that the presence of the wide-angle diffuser increases the effectiveness of the added periodic momentum due to a favorable interaction between the excitation, the jet shear-layer and the diffuser wall. This point was further demonstrated by the evolution of a wave packet that was excited in the jet shear-layer. Strong amplification of the wave packet was measured with a diffuser attached to the jet exit. The turbulent jet responds quickly (10-20 msec) to step changes in the level of the excitation input. The response scales with the jet exit velocity and is independent of the Reynolds number. Jet deflection angles were found to be highly sensitive to the relative direction between the excitation and the jet flow and less sensitive to the excitation frequency. The higher jet deflection angles were obtained for a diffuser length of about two diameters and for diffusers with half-angles greater than 15 degrees.

  3. A Reconnection Switch to Trigger gamma-Ray Burst Jet Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2012-03-14

    Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission requires some mechanism to dissipate an ultrarelativistic jet. Internal shocks or some form of electromagnetic dissipation are candidate mechanisms. Any mechanism needs to answer basic questions, such as what is the origin of variability, what radius does dissipation occur at, and how does efficient prompt emission occur. These mechanisms also need to be consistent with how ultrarelativistic jets form and stay baryon pure despite turbulence and electromagnetic reconnection near the compact object and despite stellar entrainment within the collapsar model. We use the latest magnetohydrodynamical models of ultrarelativistic jets to explore some of these questions in the context of electromagnetic dissipation due to the slow collisional and fast collisionless reconnection mechanisms, as often associated with Sweet-Parker and Petschek reconnection, respectively. For a highly magnetized ultrarelativistic jet and typical collapsar parameters, we find that significant electromagnetic dissipation may be avoided until it proceeds catastrophically near the jet photosphere at large radii (r {approx} 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14}cm), by which the jet obtains a high Lorentz factor ({gamma} {approx} 100-1000), has a luminosity of L{sub j} {approx} 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg s{sup -1}, has observer variability timescales of order 1s (ranging from 0.001-10s), achieves {gamma}{theta}{sub j} {approx} 10-20 (for opening half-angle {theta}{sub j}) and so is able to produce jet breaks, and has comparable energy available for both prompt and afterglow emission. A range of model parameters are investigated and simplified scaling laws are derived. This reconnection switch mechanism allows for highly efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy into prompt emission and associates the observed prompt GRB pulse temporal structure with dissipation timescales of some number of reconnecting current sheets embedded in the jet. We hope this work helps motivate the

  4. Propagation of Relativistic, Hydrodynamic, Intermittent Jets in a Rotating, Collapsing GRB Progenitor Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jin-Jun; Zhang, Bing; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    The prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is characterized by rapid variabilities, which may be a direct reflection of the unsteady central engine. We perform a series of axisymmetric 2.5-dimensional simulations to study the propagation of relativistic, hydrodynamic, intermittent jets through the envelope of a GRB progenitor star. A realistic rapidly rotating star is incorporated as the background of jet propagation, and the star is allowed to collapse due to the gravity of the central black hole. By modeling the intermittent jets with constant-luminosity pulses with equal on and off durations, we investigate how the half period, T, affects the jet dynamics. For relatively small T values (e.g., 0.2 s), the jet breakout time t bo depends on the opening angle of the jet, with narrower jets more penetrating and reaching the surface at shorter times. For T ≤ 1 s, the reverse shock (RS) crosses each pulse before the jet penetrates through the stellar envelope. As a result, after the breakout of the first group of pulses at t bo, several subsequent pulses vanish before penetrating the star, causing a quiescent gap. For larger half periods (T = 2.0 and 4.0 s), all the pulses can successfully penetrate through the envelope, since each pulse can propagate through the star before the RS crosses the shell. Our results may interpret the existence of a weak precursor in some long GRBs, given that the GRB central engine injects intermittent pulses with a half period T ≤ 1 s. The observational data seem to be consistent with such a possibility.

  5. VLBA Reveals Formation Region of Giant Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Astronomers have gained their first glimpse of the mysterious region near a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy, where a powerful stream of subatomic particles spewing outward at nearly the speed of light is formed into a beam, or jet, that then goes nearly straight for thousands of light-years. The astronomers used radio telescopes in Europe and the U.S., including the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most detailed images ever of the center of the galaxy M87, some 50 million light-years away. "This is the first time anyone has seen the region in which a cosmic jet is formed into a narrow beam," said Bill Junor of the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque. "We had always speculated that the jet had to be made by some mechanism relatively near the black hole, but as we looked closer and closer to the center, we kept seeing an already-formed beam. That was becoming embarrassing, because we were running out of places to put the formation mechanism that we knew had to be there." Junor, along with John Biretta and Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute, in Baltimore, MD, now have shown that M87's jet is formed within a few tenths of a light-year of the galaxy's core, presumed to be a black hole three billion times more massive than the sun. In the formation region, the jet is seen opening widely, at an angle of about 60 degrees, nearest the black hole, but is squeezed down to only 6 degrees a few light-years away. "The 60-degree angle of the inner part of M87's jet is the widest such angle yet seen in any jet in the universe," said Junor. "We found this by being able to see the jet to within a few hundredths of a light-year of the galaxy's core -- an unprecedented level of detail." The scientists reported their findings in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature. At the center of M87, material being drawn inward by the strong gravitation of the black hole is formed into a rapidly-spinning flat

  6. A Visual Study of Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Debora A.; Stadnicki, John

    1997-11-01

    A jet which issues from a small hole in a flow surface, pitched and skewed relative to the crossflow, creates a single streamwise vortex which resembles the flow downstream of a half-delta-wing vortex generator. The term ``vortex generator jet'' (VGJ) has been used to describe such a flow. Investigators of jet-generated vortices have recognized their applicability to active control and their flexibility in terms of being activated and deactivated. We have installed a spanwise array of VGJ's in a turbulent boundary layer in the zero-pressure-gradient test section of the 12" × 36" boundary layer wind tunnel at Boston University. The Reynolds number based on jet diameter is in the range 4000 < Re < 10000. Our experimental investigations include flow visualization of a single pitched and skewed jet in crossflow, as well as wall shear stress measurements downstream of the array of jets. To capture still images of a cross-section of the jet flow, a light sheet formed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used to illuminate smoke-tagged jet fluid. The wall shear stress measurements are made using an oil-film interferometry technique. Parameters varied include jet velocity and angles of jet pitch and skew.

  7. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  8. Tangential synthetic jets for separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Monir, H.; Tadjfar, M.; Bakhtian, A.

    2014-02-01

    A numerical study of separation control has been made to investigate aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA23012 airfoil with a tangential synthetic jet. Simulations are carried out at the chord Reynolds number of Re=2.19×106. The present approach relies on solving the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The turbulence model used in the present computation is the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model. All computations are performed with a finite volume based code. Stall characteristics are significantly improved by controlling the formation of separation vortices in the flow. We placed the synthetic jet at the 12% chord, xj=0.12c, where we expected the separation to occur. Two distinct jet oscillating frequencies: Fj+=0.159 and Fj+=1 were considered. We studied the effect of blowing ratio, Vj/U∞, where it was varied from 0 to 5. The inclined angle of the synthetic jet was varied from αj=0° up to αj=83°. For the non-zero inclined angles, the local maximum in the aerodynamic performance, Cl/Cd, of 6.89 was found for the inclined angle of about 43°. In the present method, by means of creating a dent on the airfoil, linear momentum is transferred to the flow system in tangential direction to the airfoil surface. Thus the absolute maximum of 11.19 was found for the tangential synthetic jet at the inclined angle of the jet of 0°. The mechanisms involved for a tangential jet appear to behave linearly, as by multiplying the activation frequency of the jet by a factor produces the same multiplication factor in the resulting frequency in the flow. However, the mechanisms involved in the non-zero inclined angle cases behave nonlinearly when the activation frequency is multiplied.

  9. Experiment on performance of adjustable jet pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. M.; Long, X. P.; Zhang, S. B.; Lu, X.

    2012-11-01

    When the water level of upper or lower reaches of hydraulic power station changes, the adjustable jet pump which is different from traditional fixed jet pump can maintain stable pressure and flow rate for the system of technical water supply of hydraulic power plant. The model test indicates that the efficiency of the adjustable jet pump is slightly lower than fixed jet pump near rating operation point. With the decrease of opening degree, both efficiencies are more and more close to each other. The fundamental performance of I-type adjustable jet pump is better than II-type and the cavitation performance of I-type adjustable jet pump is worse than II-type. Test data also indicate that the performance of adjustable jet pump is very different from fixed jet pump, so the theory of fixed jet pump is not able to be copied to adjustable jet pump. It is necessary to farther study on the performance of the adjustable jet pump. This paper has reference value for analogous design of system of circulation water supply to turbine units in hydraulic power station.

  10. Effects of momentum ratio and Weber number on spray half angles of liquid controlled pintle injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Min; Yu, Kijeong; Koo, Jaye; Kwon, Oh Chae; Kim, Jeong Soo

    2015-02-01

    A pintle injector is advantageous for throttling a liquid rocket engine and reducing engine weight. This study explores the effects of momentum ratio and Weber number at various injection conditions on spray characteristics of the pintle injector for liquid-gas propellants. A liquid sheet is injected from a center pintle nozzle and it is broken by a gas jet from an annular gap. The pressure drops of propellants, and the pintle opening distance were considered as control variables; using 0.1 ˜1.0 as a bar for the pressure drop of the liquid injection, a 0.01˜0.2 bar for the pressure drop of gas jet and a 0.2˜ 1.0 mm for the pintle opening distance. The discharge coefficient was decreased linearly before the pintle opening distance of 0.75 mm and then, the coefficient was slightly increased. Spray images were captured by a CMOS camera with high resolution. Then, the shadow and reflected images were analyzed. Spray distributions were measured by a patternator with an axial distance of 50 mm from a pintle tip. Finally, the spray half angles had an exponentially decreasing correlation as a momentum ratio divided by the Weber number. Also, the spray half angles from the spray distribution were underestimated compared to those measured from the captured images.

  11. Two-particle momentum correlations in jets produced in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopolou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-05-01

    We present the first measurement of two-particle momentum correlations in jets produced in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV. Results are obtained for charged particles within a restricted cone with an opening angle of 0.5 radians around the jet axis and for events with dijet masses between 66 and 563GeV/c2. A comparison of the experimental data to theoretical predictions obtained for partons within the framework of resummed perturbative QCD in the next-to-leading log approximation shows that the parton momentum correlations survive the hadronization stage of jet fragmentation, giving further support to the hypothesis of local parton-hadron duality. The extracted value of the next-to-leading-log-approximation parton shower cutoff scale Qeff set equal to ΛQCD is found to be (1.4-0.7+0.9)×100MeV.

  12. The radio afterglow of Swift J1644+57 reveals a powerful jet with fast core and slow sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.; Metzger, B. D.; Aloy, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    We model the non-thermal transient Swift J1644+57 as resulting from a relativistic jet powered by the accretion of a tidally disrupted star on to a supermassive black hole. Accompanying synchrotron radio emission is produced by the shock interaction between the jet and the dense circumnuclear medium, similar to a gamma-ray burst afterglow. An open mystery, however, is the origin of the late-time radio re-brightening, which occurred well after the peak of the jetted X-ray emission. Here, we systematically explore several proposed explanations for this behaviour by means of multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations coupled to a self-consistent radiative transfer calculation of the synchrotron emission. Our main conclusion is that the radio afterglow of Swift J1644+57 is not naturally explained by a jet with a one-dimensional top-hat angular structure. However, a more complex angular structure comprised of an ultrarelativistic core (Lorentz factor Γ ˜ 10) surrounded by a slower (Γ ˜ 2) sheath provides a reasonable fit to the data. Such a geometry could result from the radial structure of the super-Eddington accretion flow or as the result of jet precession. The total kinetic energy of the ejecta that we infer of ˜ few 1053 erg requires a highly efficient jet launching mechanism. Our jet model providing the best fit to the light curve of the on-axis event Swift J1644+57 is used to predict the radio light curves for off-axis viewing angles. Implications for the presence of relativistic jets from tidal disruption events (TDEs) detected via their thermal disc emission, as well as the prospects for detecting orphan TDE afterglows with upcoming wide-field radio surveys and resolving the jet structure with long baseline interferometry, are discussed.

  13. Multiple Mode Actuation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2001-01-01

    The effects of multiple mode periodic excitation on the evolution of a circular turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit. Streamwise and cross-stream excitations were introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet on opposing sides of the jet. The introduction of high amplitude, periodic excitation in the streamwise direction enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Cross-stream excitation applied over a fraction of the jet circumference can deflect the jet away from the excitation slot. The two modes of excitation were combined using identical frequencies and varying the relative phase between the two actuators in search of an optimal response. It is shown that, for low and moderate periodic momentum input levels, the jet deflection angles depend strongly on the relative phase between the two actuators. Optimum performance is achieved when the phase difference is pi +/- pi/6. The lower effectiveness of the equal phase excitation is attributed to the generation of an azimuthally symmetric mode that does not produce the required non-axisymmetric vectoring. For high excitation levels, identical phase becomes more effective, while phase sensitivity decreases. An important finding was that with proper phase tuning, two unsteady actuators can be combined to obtain a non-linear response greater than the superposition of the individual effects.

  14. THE MICROARCSECOND STRUCTURE OF AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JET VIA INTERSTELLAR SCINTILLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Macquart, J.-P.; Godfrey, L. E. H.; Bignall, H. E.

    2013-03-10

    We describe a new tool for studying the structure and physical characteristics of ultracompact active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets and their surroundings with {mu}as precision. This tool is based on the frequency dependence of the light curves observed for intra-day variable radio sources, where the variability is caused by interstellar scintillation. We apply this method to PKS 1257-326 to resolve the core-shift as a function of frequency on scales well below {approx}12 {mu}as. We find that the frequency dependence of the position of the scintillating component is r{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.1{+-}0.24} (99% confidence interval) and the frequency dependence of the size of the scintillating component is d{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.64{+-}0.006}. Together, these results imply that the jet opening angle increases with distance along the jet: d{proportional_to}r{sup n{sub d}} with n{sub d} > 1.8. We show that the flaring of the jet, and flat frequency dependence of the core position is broadly consistent with a model in which the jet is hydrostatically confined and traversing a steep pressure gradient in the confining medium with p{proportional_to}r{sup -n{sub p}} and n{sub p} {approx}> 7. Such steep pressure gradients have previously been suggested based on very long baseline interferometry studies of the frequency dependent core shifts in AGNs.

  15. Development of Jet Noise Power Spectral Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    High-quality jet noise spectral data measured at the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at NASA Glenn is used to develop jet noise scaling laws. A FORTRAN algorithm was written that provides detailed spectral prediction of component jet noise at user-specified conditions. The model generates quick estimates of the jet mixing noise and the broadband shock-associated noise (BBSN) in single-stream, axis-symmetric jets within a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. Shock noise is emitted when supersonic jets exit a nozzle at imperfectly expanded conditions. A successful scaling of the BBSN allows for this noise component to be predicted in both convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles. Configurations considered in this study consisted of convergent and convergent- divergent nozzles. Velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise were evaluated as a function of observer angle and jet temperature. Similar intensity laws were developed for the broadband shock-associated noise in supersonic jets. A computer program called sJet was developed that provides a quick estimate of component noise in single-stream jets at a wide range of operating conditions. A number of features have been incorporated into the data bank and subsequent scaling in order to improve jet noise predictions. Measurements have been converted to a lossless format. Set points have been carefully selected to minimize the instability-related noise at small aft angles. Regression parameters have been scrutinized for error bounds at each angle. Screech-related amplification noise has been kept to a minimum to ensure that the velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise remain free of amplifications. A shock-noise-intensity scaling has been developed independent of the nozzle design point. The computer program provides detailed narrow-band spectral predictions for component noise (mixing noise and shock associated noise), as well as the total noise. Although the methodology is confined to single

  16. The role of coherent structures in the generation of noise for subsonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Whitaker, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were made in the 'near' (r/D 60, x/D 60) field for high Reynolds number (184,000 to 262,000) axisymmetric cold air jets exhausting at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were in conjunction with an investigation which characterized the large scale coherent structure in the flow field of Mach number 0.6 to 0.8 jets. Natural jets as well as artificially excited jets were studied. Directivity plots were made for both natural jets and jets excited at various frequencies. Overall noise radiated by the jets reached a maximum value around 30 deg from the jet axis. However, individual frequencies emitted maximum sound pressure level at different angles from the jet axis. As the angle from the jet axis increased, the spectra of the noise shifted to higher frequencies.

  17. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  18. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  19. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  20. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  1. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  2. GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES FROM A LORENTZ-BOOSTED SIMULATION FRAME AND THE SHAPE OF THE JET BREAK

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-04-20

    The early stages of decelerating gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow jets have been notoriously difficult to resolve numerically using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations even at very high resolution, due to the extreme thinness of the blast wave and high outflow Lorentz factors. However, these resolution issues can be avoided by performing the simulations in a boosted frame, which makes it possible to calculate afterglow light curves from numerically computed flows in sufficient detail to accurately quantify the shape of the jet break and the post-break steepening of the light curve. Here, we study afterglow jet breaks for jets with opening angles of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 radians decelerating in a surrounding medium of constant density, observed at various angles ranging from on-axis to the edge of the jet. A single set of scale-invariant functions describing the time evolution of afterglow synchrotron spectral break frequencies and peak flux, depending only on jet opening angle and observer angle, are all that is needed to reconstruct light curves for arbitrary explosion energy, circumburst density and synchrotron particle distribution power law slope p. These functions are presented in the paper. Their time evolutions change directly following the jet break, although an earlier reported temporary post-break steepening of the cooling break is found to have been resolution-induced. We compare synthetic light curves to fit functions using sharp power law breaks as well as smooth power law transitions. We confirm our earlier finding that the measured jet break time is very sensitive to the angle of the observer and can be postponed significantly. We find that the difference in temporal indices across the jet break is larger than theoretically anticipated and is about -(0.5 + 0.5p) below the cooling break and about -(0.25 + 0.5p) above the cooling break, both leading to post-break slopes of roughly about 0.25 - 1.3p, although different observer angles, jet opening

  3. Failed Collapsar Jets to Explain Low Luminosity GRB Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidani, Hamid; Umeda, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koh

    Using the collapsar scenario for long GRBs [1], we present series of numerical simulations to investigate properties of expanding jets, driven by engines deploying the same total energy (1052 erg), differently. We include a wide range of engine durations (Tinj), from 0.1 to 100 s, as well as different initial opening angles (θ0) for the deployed energy. We employ an AMR 2D special relativistic hydrodynamical code, using a 25 solar mass Wolf-Rayet star as the progenitor [2]. We analyze the effect of the engine duration on the jet's hydrodynamic properties, and discuss the implications on GRB and SN emissions. Our results show that the expanding jet's hydrodynamical properties significantly differ, in particular outflow collimation and relativistic acceleration. The implication of this is that brief engines (with Tinj < Tbreakout, either due to a short Tinj or to a large θ0) represent excellent systems to explain the debated low-luminosity GRBs (llGRBs), displaying two of llGRBs peculiar features: i) the estimated llGRBs rate at least about 100 times higher than that of GRBs [3,4,5], and ii) potentially energetic SN emission [6]. We find that these two features only arise from brief engines. The conclusion is that brief engines dominate collapsars, at least at low redshift.

  4. Jet Flight Patterns of Linear Shaped Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokbin

    2016-01-01

    A typical jet flight pattern of linear shaped charges (LSCs) is studied, and analytical expressions are built for two important parameters of the angle of liner collapse line φ and jet projection angle ω. In order to simplify the nonlinear nature of the liner collapse behavior of LSCs, important assumptions are made, including (1) a constant jet projection velocity at the given standoff distance and (2) the liner collapse occurs in a steady-state fashion, generating a single straight collapse line during the detonation. Based on the assumptions, analytical expressions are derived and the result is compared with side-view images of LSC jet flight to evaluate accuracy and applicability. The analytical approach delivers reasonable accuracy in a given range and is applicable to a short range of standoff distances.

  5. Hydro-Jet technology in urologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shekarriz, Bijan

    2005-05-01

    Hydro-Jet technology utilizes an extremely thin, high-pressure stream of water. This technology has been routinely used in industry as a cutting tool for different materials such as metal, ceramic, wood and glass. Recently, Hydro-Jet technology has been used for dissection and resection during open and laparoscopic surgical procedures. A high-pressure jet of water allows selective dissection and isolation of vital structures such as blood vessels and nerves. This has resulted in improved dissection and decreased complication rate in recent experimental and clinical studies. This technology has been successfully applied during open and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, cholecystecomy and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy.

  6. Efficacy and Tolerability of Travoprost 0.004%/Timolol 0.5% Fixed-Dose Combination for the Treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension Inadequately Controlled with Beta-Blocker Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Ho; Hubatsch, Douglas A.; Erichev, Valeriy; Paczka, Jose A.; Roberts, Timothy V.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of travoprost 0.004%/timolol 0.5% fixed-dose combination (TTFC) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT) inadequately controlled on beta-blocker monotherapy. Methods. In this phase IV, open-label study, 156 patients on beta-blocker monotherapy with mean intraocular pressure (IOP) between 18 and 32 mmHg were randomized (no washout period) to receive TTFC for 8 weeks (TTFC group) or to continue beta-blocker monotherapy for 4 weeks followed by TTFC for the remaining 4 weeks (beta-blocker group). Results. The mean IOP (±standard deviation) at baseline in the TTFC and beta-blocker groups was 22.5 ± 2.5 mmHg and 22.2 ± 2.3 mmHg, respectively, and at weeks 4 and 8, was 16.7 ± 3.1 mmHg and 16.1 ± 3.1 mmHg, respectively, in TTFC group and 21.1 ± 3.1 mmHg and 16.1 ± 2.8 mmHg, respectively, in the beta-blocker group. There was a significant least squares mean difference between TTFC and beta-blocker in 8 a.m. IOP at week 4 (−4.6 mmHg; one-sided 95% confidence interval [−inf, −3.9]; p < 0.0001 [primary endpoint]); the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval was within the prespecified limit (<0). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion. Superior IOP control was achieved with TTFC in patients with OAG or OHT previously uncontrolled with beta-blockers. No new safety findings were identified. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02003391. PMID:28239491

  7. Efficacy and Tolerability of Travoprost 0.004%/Timolol 0.5% Fixed-Dose Combination for the Treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension Inadequately Controlled with Beta-Blocker Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Simon Fabian; Park, Ki Ho; Hubatsch, Douglas A; Erichev, Valeriy; Paczka, Jose A; Roberts, Timothy V

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of travoprost 0.004%/timolol 0.5% fixed-dose combination (TTFC) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT) inadequately controlled on beta-blocker monotherapy. Methods. In this phase IV, open-label study, 156 patients on beta-blocker monotherapy with mean intraocular pressure (IOP) between 18 and 32 mmHg were randomized (no washout period) to receive TTFC for 8 weeks (TTFC group) or to continue beta-blocker monotherapy for 4 weeks followed by TTFC for the remaining 4 weeks (beta-blocker group). Results. The mean IOP (±standard deviation) at baseline in the TTFC and beta-blocker groups was 22.5 ± 2.5 mmHg and 22.2 ± 2.3 mmHg, respectively, and at weeks 4 and 8, was 16.7 ± 3.1 mmHg and 16.1 ± 3.1 mmHg, respectively, in TTFC group and 21.1 ± 3.1 mmHg and 16.1 ± 2.8 mmHg, respectively, in the beta-blocker group. There was a significant least squares mean difference between TTFC and beta-blocker in 8 a.m. IOP at week 4 (-4.6 mmHg; one-sided 95% confidence interval [-inf, -3.9]; p < 0.0001 [primary endpoint]); the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval was within the prespecified limit (<0). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion. Superior IOP control was achieved with TTFC in patients with OAG or OHT previously uncontrolled with beta-blockers. No new safety findings were identified. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02003391.

  8. Blowout Jets: Hinode X-Ray Jets that Don't Fit the Standard Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly half of all H-alpha macrospicules in polar coronal holes appear to be miniature filament eruptions. This suggests that there is a large class of X-ray jets in which the jet-base magnetic arcade undergoes a blowout eruption as in a CME, instead of remaining static as in most solar X-ray jets, the standard jets that fit the model advocated by Shibata. Along with a cartoon depicting the standard model, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures expected of blowout jets in coronal X-ray images. From Hinode/XRT movies and STEREO/EUVI snapshots in polar coronal holes, we present examples of (1) X-ray jets that fit the standard model, and (2) X-ray jets that do not fit the standard model but do have features appropriate for blowout jets. These features are (1) a flare arcade inside the jet-base arcade in addition to the small flare arcade (bright point) outside that standard jets have, (2) a filament of cool (T is approximately 80,000K) plasma that erupts from the core of the jetbase arcade, and (3) an extra jet strand that should not be made by the reconnection for standard jets but could be made by reconnection between the ambient unipolar open field and the opposite-polarity leg of the filament-carrying flux-rope core field of the erupting jet-base arcade. We therefore infer that these non-standard jets are blowout jets, jets made by miniature versions of the sheared-core-arcade eruptions that make CMEs

  9. Effect of Microjet Injection on Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Podboy, G. G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of microjet (jet) injection on the noise from supersonic jets is investigated. Three convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles and one convergent nozzle, all having the same exit diameters, are used in the study. The jets are injected perpendicular to the primary jet close to the nozzle lip from six equally-spaced ports having a jet-to-primary-jet diameter ratio of 0.0054. Effects in the over-expanded, fully expanded as well as underexpanded flow regimes are explored. Relative to the effect on subsonic jets, larger reductions in the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) are achieved in most supersonic conditions. The largest reductions are typically associated with suppression of screech and transonic tones. For a shock-free, fully expanded case, the OASPL reductions achieved are comparable to that in the subsonic case; the same correlation, found for subsonic jet noise reduction at shallow observation angle, applies.

  10. Behavior of turbulent gas jets in an axisymmetric confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The understanding of the mixing of confined turbulent jets of different densities with air is of great importance to many industrial applications, such as gas turbine and Ramjet combustors. Although there have been numerous studies on the characteristics of free gas jets, little is known of the behavior of gas jets in a confinement. The jet, with a diameter of 8.73 mm, is aligned concentrically in a tube of 125 mm diameter, thus giving a confinement ratio of approximately 205. The arrangement forms part of the test section of an open-jet wind tunnel. Experiments are carried out with carbon dioxide, air and helium/air jets at different jet velocities. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one-color, one-component laser Doppler velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. Measurements show that the jets are highly dissipative. Consequently, equilibrium jet characteristics similar to those found in free air jets are observed in the first two diameters downstream of the jet. These results are independent of the fluid densities and velocities. Decay of the jet, on the other hand, is a function of both the jet fluid density and momentum. In all the cases studied, the jet is found to be completely dissipated in approximately 30 jet diameters, thus giving rise to a uniform flow with a very high but constant turbulence field across the confinement.

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Two Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stents as the Sole Procedure in Japanese Patients with Medically Uncontrolled Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Pilot Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Shingo; Yaguchi, Saori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate efficacy and safety of a trabecular micro-bypass stent system when used as the sole procedure in Japanese patients with medically uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Design. Prospective nonrandomized interventional pilot study. Methods. Ten eyes of 10 Japanese patients with medically uncontrolled POAG taking three ocular hypotensive medications were treated using only the implantation of two iStent trabecular micro-bypass stents. Each patient continued to take the same ocular hypotensive medications used preoperatively throughout the study. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and endothelial cell density (ECD) were determined at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured at baseline and 6 months after surgery. Results. Mean IOP was 22.0 ± 3.0 mmHg at baseline and 16.9 ± 3.6 mmHg at 6 months, which represented a mean reduction of 5.1 mmHg or 23.2%. No significant changes were observed in the ECD and BCVA. Complications that occurred during the early postoperative period included hyphema, peripheral anterior synechiae, and occlusion of the stent by the iris. Conclusion. Implantation of two trabecular micro-bypass stents as the sole procedure in Japanese POAG patients effectively reduced IOP and exhibited a favorable safety profile. Clinical Trials Registration number is UMIN000004002. PMID:28265466

  12. Size of the Optic Nerve Head and Its Relationship with the Thickness of the Macular Ganglion Cell Complex and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Nobuko; Anraku, Ayako; Ishida, Kyoko; Takeyama, Asuka; Yagi, Fumihiko; Tomita, Goji

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationships among the optic nerve head (ONH) area, macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC) thickness, circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness, and visual field defects in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. This retrospective study included 90 eyes of 90 patients with POAG. The ONH area, rim area, mGCC thickness, and cpRNFL thickness were measured using optical coherence tomography. Mean deviation (MD) was measured using standard automated perimetry. The relationships among clinical factors including age, refraction, the ONH area, the rim area, the mGCC thickness, the cpRNFL thickness, and MD were evaluated using correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses. Results. The significant correlation of the ONH area with refraction (r = 0.362, P < 0.001), the mGCC thickness (r = 0.225, P = 0.033), and the cpRNFL thickness (r = 0.253, P = 0.016) was found. Multiple regression analysis showed that the ONH area, rim area, and MD were selected as significant contributing factors to explain the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness. No factor was selected to explain MD. Conclusions. The ONH area, in other words, the disc size itself may affect the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness in POAG patients. PMID:26339503

  13. Reconnection and Spire Drift in Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    It is observed that there are two morphologically-different kinds of X-ray/EUV jets in coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. In both kinds: (1) in the base of the jet there is closed magnetic field that has one foot in flux of polarity opposite that of the ambient open field of the coronal hole, and (2) in coronal X-ray/EUV images of the jet there is typically a bright nodule at the edge of the base. In the conventional scenario for jets of either kind, the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade, the downward product of interchange reconnection of closed field in the base with impacted ambient open field, and the upper product of this reconnection is the jet-outflow spire. It is also observed that in most jets of either kind the spire drifts sideways away from the bright nodule. We present the observed bright nodule and spire drift in an example standard jet and in two example blowout jets. With cartoons of the magnetic field and its reconnection in jets, we point out: (1) if the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade made by interchange reconnection, then the spire should drift toward the bright nodule, and (2) if the bright nodule is instead a compact flare arcade made, as in a filament-eruption flare, by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting sheared-field core of a lobe of the closed field in the base, then the spire, made by the interchange reconnection that is driven on the outside of that lobe by the lobe’s internal convulsion, should drift away from the bright nodule. Therefore, from the observation that the spire usually drifts away from the bright nodule, we infer: (1) in X-ray/EUV jets of either kind in coronal holes the interchange reconnection that generates the jet-outflow spire usually does not make the bright nodule; instead, the bright nodule is made by reconnection inside erupting closed field in the base, as in a filament eruption, the eruption being either a confined eruption for a standard jet or a blowout eruption (as

  14. Dilution jet mixing program, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Myers, G.; White, C.

    1985-01-01

    The main objectives for the NASA Jet Mixing Phase 3 program were: extension of the data base on the mixing of single sided rows of jets in a confined cross flow to discrete slots, including streamlined, bluff, and angled injections; quantification of the effects of geometrical and flow parameters on penetration and mixing of multiple rows of jets into a confined flow; investigation of in-line, staggered, and dissimilar hole configurations; and development of empirical correlations for predicting temperature distributions for discrete slots and multiple rows of dilution holes.

  15. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  16. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  17. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  18. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  19. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  20. Transient gas jets into liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jane Ming-Chin

    An experimental investigation of the development of high velocity, impulsively initiated gas jets into liquid was conducted in an effort to understand some of the physical processes that occur for a jet of very light fluid into a dense ambient atmosphere. Four gases, refrigerants 12 and 22, nitrogen, and helium were injected into water at nozzle exit Mach numbers from 1.0 to 2.2.The study showed that a gas jet into water develops in at least three stages: startup, transition, and global steady state. The startup is characterized by bubble growth; the growth rate is well predicted by classical bubble-growth theory. Jet transition is marked by axially directed flow, which penetrates through the startup bubble and which forms a cylindrical protrusion along the axis of symmetry. A combination of strong recirculating flow and liquid entrainment causes the startup bubble to deflate and to lift off and move downstream. In the steady state, instantaneous photographs show small-scale fluctuations of the jet boundary, but time-averaged photographs show the expected conical spreading of the steady jet; the measured spreading angles range from 18-25 degrees.However, the most significant finding of this study is that under some conditions, the gas jet into liquid never reaches the global steady state. Instead, the jet boundary exhibits chugging: large nonlinear oscillations which lead to irregular collapses of the gas column followed by explosive outward bursts of gas. The unsteadiness observed is much more violent than the familiar fluctuations typical of constant-density jets. The length scale of the motion is generally on the order of several jet diameters; the time scale is on the order of the period for bubble collapse.It was found that the amplitude and frequency of chugging are strongly dependent on the ratio of the liquid density to the gas density, the jet Mach number, and the operating pressure ratio. The conditions under which unsteadiness occurs were determined

  1. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  2. Modeling X-Ray Emission of a Straight Jet: PKS 0920-397

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    and with the jet at an angle 2◦to 4◦from our line of sight. Keywords: Quasar jets; X–ray jets; jet emission mechanisms. In t. J. M od . P hy s. D...detection of the jet in the quasar PKS 0637–7513 during the very first pointed observation. While X–ray jet emission from FR I radio galaxies is normally...explained via the synchrotron mechanism, the quasar jets initially presented a puz- zle. Observations, or upper limits, to optical emission from quasar

  3. Wicket gate trailing-edge blowing: A method for improving off-design hydroturbine performance by adjusting the runner inlet swirl angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.; Cimbala, J. M.; Wouden, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    At their best efficiency point (BEP), hydroturbines operate at very high efficiency. However, with the ever-increasing penetration of alternative electricity generation, it has become common to operate hydroturbines at off-design conditions in order to maintain stability in the electric power grid. This paper demonstrates a method for improving hydroturbine performance during off-design operation by injecting water through slots at the trailing edges of the wicket gates. The injected water causes a change in bulk flow direction at the inlet of the runner. This change in flow angle from the wicket gate trailing-edge jets provides the capability of independently varying the flow rate and swirl angle through the runner, which in current designs are both determined by the wicket gate opening angle. When properly tuned, altering the flow angle results in a significant improvement in turbine efficiency during off-design operation.

  4. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  5. The formation of interstellar jets by the convergence of supersonic conical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canto, J.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of a stellar wind with a nonuniform environment leads, under the assumption of steady state, to the formation of an ovoidal cavity with acute ending tips. The stellar wind recollected by the walls of the cavity ends up being deposited at the tips. Here, it is shown that this focusing effect leads to the formation of a narrow cylindrical stream or 'jet' of reshocked stellar wind matter moving directly away from the star with a large velocity. A 'typical' T Tauri star may produce jets with densities of 1000-10,000/cu cm, velocities about 100 km/s, widths about 0.00001-0.001 pc over a length of 0.001-0.01 pc. The opening angles are 7 deg or less.

  6. Static Investigation of Paddle Vane Oscillating in Jet of 1,300-Pound-Thrust Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, Wade E.

    1958-01-01

    The results of a static investigation conducted to measure the normal forces on the entire jet-vane assembly and the hinge moments on the jet vane produced by a paddle vane oscillating in the jet of a 1,500-pound-thrust rocket motor are presented for vane-deflection angles from -5 deg to 25 deg. A maximum average normal force of 71 pounds with a corresponding value for maximum average hinge moment of 228 inch-pounds was obtained with the maximum area of jet vane immersed at a jet-vane angle of 25 deg decrease in thrust caused by immersion of the jet vane varied from a maximum loss of about 58 pounds, or approximately 5 percent at maximum jet-vane angle of 25 deg, to zero loss at jet-vane angles less than approximately 10 deg.

  7. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, M.; Uzol, O.; Akmandor, I. S.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack.

  8. A comparison of the sensitivity of EQ-5D, SF-6D and TTO utility values to changes in vision and perceived visual function in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Economic viability of treatments for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) should be assessed objectively to prioritise health care interventions. This study aims to identify the methods for eliciting utility values (UVs) most sensitive to differences in visual field and visual functioning in patients with POAG. As a secondary objective, the dimensions of generic health-related and vision-related quality of life most affected by progressive vision loss will be identified. Methods A total of 132 POAG patients were recruited. Three sets of utility values (EuroQoL EQ-5D, Short Form SF-6D, Time Trade Off) and a measure of perceived visual functioning from the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25) were elicited during face-to-face interviews. The sensitivity of UVs to differences in the binocular visual field, visual acuity and visual functioning measures was analysed using non-parametric statistical methods. Results Median utilities were similar across Integrated Visual Field score quartiles for EQ-5D (P = 0.08) whereas SF-6D and Time-Trade-Off UVs significantly decreased (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively). The VFQ-25 score varied across Integrated Visual Field and binocular visual acuity groups and was associated with all three UVs (P ≤ 0.001); most of its vision-specific sub-scales were associated with the vision markers. The most affected dimension was driving. A relationship with vision markers was found for the physical component of SF-36 and not for any dimension of EQ-5D. Conclusions The Time-Trade-Off was more sensitive than EQ-5D and SF-6D to changes in vision and visual functioning associated with glaucoma progression but could not measure quality of life changes in the mildest disease stages. PMID:22909264

  9. Positional and Curvature Difference of Lamina Cribrosa According to the Baseline Intraocular Pressure in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography (SS-OCT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Woo; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Park, Ki Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the variation of lamina cribrosa (LC) structure based on the baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and healthy individuals using swept-source optical coherence tomography. Methods A total of 108 eyes with POAG and 61 healthy eyes were recruited. Based on the baseline IOP, the POAG eyes were divided into higher-baseline IOP (HTG; baseline IOP > 21 mmHg, n = 38 eyes) and lower-baseline IOP (NTG; baseline IOP ≤ 21 mmHg, n = 70 eyes). The anterior laminar insertion depth (ALID), mean LC depth (mLCD), and the LC curvature index (mLCD–ALID) were measured, and compared among the three groups. The regional variation of LC structure was evaluated by vertical-horizontal ALID difference. Results The mLCD and LC curvature index were greatest in HTG eyes (520.3 ± 123.0 and 80.9 ± 30.7 μm), followed by NTG (463.2 ± 110.5 and 64.5 ± 30.7 μm) and healthy eyes (382.9 ± 107.6 and 47.6 ± 25.7 μm, all P < 0.001). However, there were no significant difference in ALID between HTG and NTG eyes. The vertical-horizontal ALID difference was larger in NTG eyes (72.8 ± 56.2 μm) than in HTG (32.7 ± 61.4 μm, P = 0.004) and healthy eyes (25.5 ± 34.8 μm, P < 0.001). Conclusions Lamina cribrosa position and curvature differed in POAG eyes with low and high IOP. This would support the theory that IOP induced biomechanical effects on the optic play a role on glaucoma. PMID:27611970

  10. A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of 2 and 4 Weeks of Twice-Daily Ocular Trabodenoson in Adults with Ocular Hypertension or Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Kenneth N.; DuBiner, Harvey; Slomowitz, Natanya; McVicar, William; Rich, Cadmus C.; Baumgartner, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the safety and ocular hypotensive efficacy of 4 trabodenoson doses administered twice daily over 14 or 28 days in subjects with ocular hypertension or primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation Phase 2 study, patients received unilateral topical twice-daily trabodenoson (50, 100, or 200 mcg) or placebo for 14 days, or 500 mcg trabodenoson or placebo for 28 days. Ocular and systemic safety and tolerability were assessed by examinations, clinical and laboratory studies. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was assessed using Goldmann tonometry. Results: Trabodenoson was well tolerated; no clinically meaningful ocular or systemic side effects were identified. Trabodenoson produced a dose-dependent IOP reduction. IOP reductions in the 500 mcg group were significantly greater than placebo at all time points at Day 28. Mean IOP reductions from diurnal baseline ranged from −3.5 to −5.0 mmHg with a mean change of −4.1 mmHg in the 500 mcg group compared −1.0 to −2.5 mmHg with a mean change of −1.6 mmHg for the placebo group, and the Day 28 drop was significantly greater than at Day 14 (P = 0.0163) indicating improvement in IOP lowering with longer treatment time. IOP remained significantly reduced 24 h after the final 500 mcg dose (P = 0.048). Conclusion: Twice-daily ocular doses of trabodenoson, from 50 to 500 mcg, were well tolerated and showed a dose-related decrease in IOP that was statistically significant and clinically relevant at 500 mcg in patients with ocular hypertension or POAG. PMID:27002298

  11. Jet noise modification by the 'whistler nozzle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. A. Z.; Islam, O.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The farfield noise characteristics of a subsonic whistler nozzle jet are measured as a function of Mach number (0.25, 0.37, and, 0.51), emission angle, and excitation mode. It is shown that a whistler nozzle has greater total and broadband acoustic power than an excited contraction nozzle; and that the intensity of far-field noise is a function of emission angle, Mach number, and whistler excitation stage. The whistler nozzle excitation produces broadband noise amplification with constant spectral shape; the broadband noise amplification (without associated whistler tones and harmonics) increases omnidirectionally with emission angle at all Mach numbers; and the broadband amplification factor decreases as Mach number and emission angle increase. Finally the whistler nozzle is described as a very efficient but inexpensive siren with applications in not only jet excitation but also acoustics.

  12. Modeling of Accurate Variable Slope Angles in Open-Pit Mine Design Using Spline Interpolation / Modelowanie Zmiennego Kąta Nachylenia Stoku W Projektowaniu Kopalni Odkrywkowych Za Pomocą Interpolacji Funkcjami Sklejającymi (Metodą Spline'Ów)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishvan, Masoud Soleymani; Sattarvand, Javad

    2012-12-01

    In this paper a new method of modeling variable slope angles has been presented based on the spline interpolation method. Slope angle modeling and defining precedency of the blocks are the vital parts of almost any open pit optimization algorithm. Traditionally heuristic patterns such as 1:5 or 1:9 have been used to generate slope angles. Cone template based models were later employed in developing variable slope angles. They normally use a linear interpolation process for determination of slope angles between the given directions which leads to sharp and non-realistic pits. The other elliptical alternatives suffer from having limitations in defining slope angles in non-geographical directions. The method is capable to consider any number of slope angles in any desired direction as well as creating quite accurate and realistic pit shapes. Three major types of the spline interpolation including cubic, quadratic and cardinal are tested, however, the cubic form is preferred due to more realistic outcomes. Main steps of the method are described through a numerical case study.

  13. The Accelerating Jet of 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, S. D.; Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the proper motions of the subparsec scale jet of the quasar 3C 279 at 15 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array shows significant accelerations in four of nine superluminal features. Analysis of these motions is combined with the analysis of flux density light curves to constrain values of Lorentz factor and viewing angle (and their derivatives) for each component. The data for each of these components are consistent with significant changes to the Lorentz factor, viewing angle, and azimuthal angle, suggesting jet bending with changes in speed. We see that for these observed components Lorentz factors are in the range Γ = 10-41, viewing angles are in the range thetav = 0.°1-5.°0, and intrinsic (source frame) flux density is in the range, F ν, int = 1.5 × 10-9-1.5 × 10-5 Jy. Considering individual components, the Lorentz factors vary from Γ = 11-16 for C1, Γ = 31-41 for C5, Γ = 29-41 for C6, and Γ = 9-12 for C8, indicating that there is no single underlying flow speed to the jet and likely we are seeing pattern speeds from shocks in the jet. The viewing angles vary in time from 0.°6 to 1.°5 in the case of C1 (the least extreme example), from 0.°5 to 5.°0 in the case of C8, and from 0.°1 to 0.°9 for C5 (the last two being the most extreme examples). The intrinsic flux density varies by factors from 1.4 for C8 and 430 for C5. Theoretical analysis of the accelerations also indicates potential jet bending. In addition, for one component, C5, polarization measurements also set limits to the trajectory of the jet.

  14. Into Mesh Lubrication of Spur Gears with Arbitrary Offset Oil Jet. I: For Jet Velocity Less than or Equal to Gear Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis was conducted for into mesh oil jet lubrication with an arbitrary offset and inclination angle from the pitch point for the case where the oil jet velocity is equal to or less than pitch line velocity. The analysis includes the case for the oil jet offset from the pitch point in the direction of the pinion and where the oil jet is inclined to intersect the common pitch point. Equations were developed for the minimum oil jet velocity required to impinge on the pinion or gear and the optimum oil jet velocity to obtain the maximum impingement depth.

  15. Into mesh lubrication of spur gears with arbitrary offset oil jet. I - For jet velocity less than or equal to gear velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis was conducted for into mesh oil jet lubrication with an arbitrary offset and inclination angle from the pitch point for the case where the oil jet velocity is equal to or less than pitch line velocity. The analysis includes the case for the oil jet offset from the pitch point in the direction of the pinion and where the oil jet is inclined to intersect the common pitch point. Equations were developed for the minimum oil jet velocity required to impinge on the pinion or gear and the optimum oil jet velocity to obtain the maximum impingement depth.

  16. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guanglong; Xu, Yi; Cao, Yunjiu; Mi, Yiming; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Lili; Boldarev, A. S.; Geng, Xiaotao; Kim, Dong Eon

    2015-10-15

    The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized d{sub eq} in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  17. Evaluation of reconstruction errors and identification of artefacts for JET gamma and neutron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, Teddy Tiseanu, Ion; Zoita, Vasile; Murari, Andrea; Kiptily, Vasily; Sharapov, Sergei; Lupelli, Ivan; Fernandes, Ana; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB

    2016-01-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET) neutron profile monitor ensures 2D coverage of the gamma and neutron emissive region that enables tomographic reconstruction. Due to the availability of only two projection angles and to the coarse sampling, tomographic inversion is a limited data set problem. Several techniques have been developed for tomographic reconstruction of the 2-D gamma and neutron emissivity on JET, but the problem of evaluating the errors associated with the reconstructed emissivity profile is still open. The reconstruction technique based on the maximum likelihood principle, that proved already to be a powerful tool for JET tomography, has been used to develop a method for the numerical evaluation of the statistical properties of the uncertainties in gamma and neutron emissivity reconstructions. The image covariance calculation takes into account the additional techniques introduced in the reconstruction process for tackling with the limited data set (projection resampling, smoothness regularization depending on magnetic field). The method has been validated by numerically simulations and applied to JET data. Different sources of artefacts that may significantly influence the quality of reconstructions and the accuracy of variance calculation have been identified.

  18. Evaluation of reconstruction errors and identification of artefacts for JET gamma and neutron tomography.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, Teddy; Murari, Andrea; Kiptily, Vasily; Lupelli, Ivan; Fernandes, Ana; Sharapov, Sergei; Tiseanu, Ion; Zoita, Vasile

    2016-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) neutron profile monitor ensures 2D coverage of the gamma and neutron emissive region that enables tomographic reconstruction. Due to the availability of only two projection angles and to the coarse sampling, tomographic inversion is a limited data set problem. Several techniques have been developed for tomographic reconstruction of the 2-D gamma and neutron emissivity on JET, but the problem of evaluating the errors associated with the reconstructed emissivity profile is still open. The reconstruction technique based on the maximum likelihood principle, that proved already to be a powerful tool for JET tomography, has been used to develop a method for the numerical evaluation of the statistical properties of the uncertainties in gamma and neutron emissivity reconstructions. The image covariance calculation takes into account the additional techniques introduced in the reconstruction process for tackling with the limited data set (projection resampling, smoothness regularization depending on magnetic field). The method has been validated by numerically simulations and applied to JET data. Different sources of artefacts that may significantly influence the quality of reconstructions and the accuracy of variance calculation have been identified.

  19. Inclusive b-jet and bb¯-dijet production at the LHC via Reggeized gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleev, V. A.; Shipilova, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    We study inclusive b-jet and bb¯-dijet production at the CERN LHC invoking the hypothesis of gluon Reggeization in t-channel exchanges at high energy. The b-jet cross section includes contributions from open b-quark production and from b-quark production via gluon-to-bottom-pair fragmentation. The transverse-momentum distributions of inclusive b-jet production measured with the ATLAS detector at the CERN LHC in different rapidity ranges are calculated both within multi-Regge kinematics and quasi-multi-Regge kinematics. The bb¯-dijet cross section is calculated within quasi-multi-Regge kinematics as a function of the dijet invariant mass Mjj, the azimuthal angle between the two jets Δϕ, and the angular variable χ. At the numerical calculation, we adopt the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin and Blümlein prescriptions to derive unintegrated gluon distribution function of the proton from its collinear counterpart for which we use the Martin-Roberts-Stirling-Thorne set. We find good agreement with measurements by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC at the hadronic c.m. energy of S=7TeV.

  20. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  1. Structure of the jet from a generic catheter tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2006-10-01

    A generic feature of a wide variety of central venous catheters, which are typically located within the superior vena cava (SVC), is a jet from a side hole of the catheter tip. Particle image velocimetry is employed in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, in order to characterize the structure of the jet as a function of dimensionless hole diameter and jet velocity ratio. Quantitative patterns in the radial and crossflow planes of the catheter-SVC system define the jet evolution. It has distinctive features, relative to the classical jet in a crossflow, which issues from a small opening in a planar surface into a region of large extent.

  2. Tidal Control of Jet Eruptions Observed by Cassini ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Helfenstein, P.; Spitale, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Observations by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) of Enceladus' south polar region at high phase angles has revealed jets of material venting into space. Observations by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) have also shown that the south polar region is anomalously warm with hotspots associated with geological features called the Tiger Stripes. The Tiger Stripes are large rifts near the south pole of Enceladus, which are typically about 130 km in length, 2 km wide, with a trough 500 m deep, and are l1anked on each side by 100m tall ridges. Preliminary triangulation of jets as viewed at different times and with different viewing geometries in Cassini ISS images taken between 2005 and 2007 have constrained the locations of eight major eruptions of material and found all of them associated with the south polar fractures unofficially the 'Tiger Stripes', and found four of them coincident with the hotspots reported in 2006 by CIRS. While published ISS observations of jet activity suggest that individual eruption sites stay active on the timescale of years, any shorter temporal variability (on timescales of an orbital period, or 1.3 Earth days, for example) is more difficult to establish because of the spotty temporal coverage and the difficulty of visually isolating one jet from the forest of many seen in a typical image. Consequently, it is not known whether individual jets are continuously active, randomly active, or if they erupt on a predictable, periodic schedule. One mechanism that may control the timing of eruptions is diurnal tidal stress, which oscillates between compression/tension as well as right and left lateral shear at any given location throughout Enceladus' orbit and may allow the cracks to open and close regularly. We examine the stresses on the Tiger Stripe regions to see how well diurnal tidal stress caused by Enceladus' orbital eccentricity may possibly correlate with and thus control the observed eruptions. We then identify

  3. Progress Toward Improving Jet Noise Predictions in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Kenzakowski, Donald C.

    2007-01-01

    An acoustic analogy methodology for improving noise predictions in hot round jets is presented. Past approaches have often neglected the impact of temperature fluctuations on the predicted sound spectral density, which could be significant for heated jets, and this has yielded noticeable acoustic under-predictions in such cases. The governing acoustic equations adopted here are a set of linearized, inhomogeneous Euler equations. These equations are combined into a single third order linear wave operator when the base flow is considered as a locally parallel mean flow. The remaining second-order fluctuations are regarded as the equivalent sources of sound and are modeled. It is shown that the hot jet effect may be introduced primarily through a fluctuating velocity/enthalpy term. Modeling this additional source requires specialized inputs from a RANS-based flowfield simulation. The information is supplied using an extension to a baseline two equation turbulence model that predicts total enthalpy variance in addition to the standard parameters. Preliminary application of this model to a series of unheated and heated subsonic jets shows significant improvement in the acoustic predictions at the 90 degree observer angle.

  4. Impact of Air Injection on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Norum, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this viewgraph presentation is to review the program to determine impact of core fluidic chevrons on noise produced by dual stream jets (i.e., broadband shock noise - supersonic, and mixing noise - subsonic and supersonic). The presentation reviews the sources of jet noise. It shows designs of Generation II Fluidic Chevrons. The injection impacts shock structure and stream disturbances through enhanced mixing. This may impact constructive interference between acoustic sources. The high fan pressures may inhibit mixing produced by core injectors. A fan stream injection may be required for better noise reduction. In future the modification of Gen II nozzles to allow for some azimuthal control: will allow for higher mass flow rates and will allow for shallower injection angles A Flow field study is scheduled for spring, 2008 The conclusions are that injection can reduce well-defined shock noise and injection reduces mixing noise near peak jet noise angle

  5. Observational Features of Equatorial Coronal Hole Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-10

    It is usually assumed that a jet is the result of magnetic re- connection happening in the solar corona between the large- scale open unipolar...plasma jets in the solar corona , Solar Phys., 190: 167-184,1999. Cirtain, J. W., Golub, L., Lundquist, L., Ballegooijen van, A., Savcheva, A., Shimojo, M...T.: The magnetic structure of Hα Macruspicules in solar corona holes, The Astrophysical J., 605: 511-520, 2004. Yokoyama, T. and Shibata, K

  6. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  7. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, Jack D.; Kadlec, Emil G.; Klimas, Paul C.

    1985-01-01

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the ends thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby inducing stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  8. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, J.D.; Kadlec, E.G.; Klimas, P.C.

    1983-09-15

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the end thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby including stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  9. On the use of relative velocity exponents for jet engine exhaust noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of flight on jet engine exhaust noise has often been presented in terms of a relative velocity exponent, n, as a function of radiation angle. The value of n is given by the OASPL reduction due to relative velocity divided by 10 times the logarithm of the ratio of relative jet velocity to absolute jet velocity. In such terms, classical subsonic jet noise theory would result in a value of n being approximately 7 at 90 degree angle to the jet axis with n decreasing, but remaining positive, as the inlet axis is approached and increasing as the jet axis is approached. However, flight tests have shown a wide range of results, including negative values of n in some cases. In this paper it is shown that the exponent n is positive for pure subsonic jet mixing noise and varies, in a systematic manner, as a function of flight conditions and jet velocity.

  10. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  11. HiRes deconvolved Spitzer images of 89 protostellar jets and outflows: New data on the evolution of the outflow morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Thompson, T. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-03-01

    To study the role of protosellar jets and outflows in the time evolution of the parent cores and the protostars, the astronomical community needs a large enough database of infrared images of protostars at the highest spatial resolution possible to reveal the details of their morphology. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features, however, its spatial resolution is limited by its 0.85 m mirror. Here, we use a high-resolution deconvolution algorithm, 'HiRes,' to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources in a sample of 89 protostellar objects. These reprocessed images are useful for detecting (1) wide-angle outflows seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details of H{sub 2} emission in jets and bow shocks, and (3) compact features in MIPS 24 μm images as protostar/disk and atomic/ionic line emission associated with the jets. The HiRes FITS image data of such a large homogeneous sample presented here will be useful to the community in studying these protostellar objects. To illustrate the utility of this HiRes sample, we show how the opening angle of the wide-angle outflows in 31 sources, all observed in the HiRes-processed Spitzer images, correlates with age. Our data suggest a power-law fit to opening angle versus age with an exponent of ∼0.32 and 0.02, respectively, for ages ≤8000 yr and ≥8000 yr.

  12. Role of CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN and OPTC genes in adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma: predominance of CYP1B1 mutations in Indian patients

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, Manjunath G.; Gupta, Santosh K.; Qamar, Imteyaz; Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Bajaj, Vineeta; Ramesh, T.K.; Prakash, D. Ravi; Shetty, Jyoti S.; Dorairaj, Syril K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN, and WDR36 genes result in glaucoma. Given its expression in the optic nerve, it is likely a mutation in the OPTC gene is also involved in initiating glaucoma. This study was designed to evaluate the involvement of the CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN, and OPTC genes in the etiology of adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) found in 251 Indian patients. Methods Blood samples were obtained from individuals for DNA isolation. A combination of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism, allele-specific PCR, and DNA sequencing techniques were used to detect mutations in four genes. Four microsatellite markers from the CYP1B1 candidate region and three intragenic CYP1B1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to determine the origin of the most common CYP1B1 mutations. Results Three previously known mutations (Pro193Leu, Glu229Lys, and Arg368His) and one novel (Met292Lys) mutation were found in the CYP1B1 gene. Frequencies of the most common mutations, Glu229Lys and Arg368His, in patients were 5.12% and 3.98%, respectively. The Glu229Lys and Arg368His mutations were also found in normal controls at frequencies of 5% and 2%, respectively, suggesting that these mutations might be polymorphic variants in our population. The absence of allele sharing for D2S177, D2S1346, D2S2974, and D2S2331 markers and three intragenic CYP1B1 SNPs in patients suggested multiple origins for the Glu229Lys and Arg368His variants. Two of 251 (0.8%) patients had the Gln48His mutation in MYOC. There was no difference in the frequency of a MYOC -83G>A promoter polymorphism between patients and controls. A novel OPTN mutation, Thr202Arg, was detected in one of 251 (0.4%) patients. The OPTN variant Met98Lys was detected in similar frequencies in patients and controls. No mutation was detected in OPTC. Taken together, 3.59% (9/251) of our POAG patients had mutations in the CYP1B1, MYOC, and OPTN genes. Conclusions This is the

  13. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  14. Stability of Shallow Jovian Atmospheric Zonal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Dowling, T. E.; Showman, A. P.

    2007-10-01

    Jupiter's cloud-level zonal jets are remarkably steady in time despite their sharp curvature (i.e., second latitudinal derivative of the zonal wind profile). The stable jets must be supported by a proper sub-cloud wind and thermal structure; however, the large-scale deep structure of the zonal jets and temperature remain a major unknown in the gas-giant planet atmospheres. Past studies suggest two end-point scenarios of deep wind structures that allow stable cloud-level jets. The first shows that the jets are stable if they penetrate through the molecular hydrogen layer (Ingersoll and Pollard, 1982), although they do not address how the deep flow may be coupled to the cloud-level wind. Many other studies, though they may not directly address the shear instabilities, support this "deep jet” scenario (e.g. Heimpel and Aurnou, 2007); however, they do not rule out the possibility that the jets are shallow. Gierasch (2004) introduced a notable alternative to this "deep” picture. Through linear stability analysis, he showed that an isolated eastward jet that reaches a point of zero motion at 100-bar level, with Jupiter-like speeds and widths at the top, can be stable under certain conditions. However, his analysis contained several untested assumptions, and whether such flows are actually stable in a more realistic setting remains an open question. The possibility of stable shallow zonal jets on Jupiter remains largely unexplored, and this possibility deserves a thorough consideration. We present full-3D nonlinear simulations that test the stability of shallow zonal jets. We use Richardson number as a measure of vertical flow scale, and aim to show whether shallow jets are consistent with the observed jets and place theoretical constraints on the sub-cloud wind structure. Our study uses the EPIC model (Dowling et al., 1998, 2006). The research has been supported by NASA Planetary Atmosphere grants to APS and TED.

  15. Analysis of flowfield characteristics for equal polygon opposing jet on different freeflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-bin; Wang, Zhen-guo; Huang, Wei; Yan, Li

    2017-04-01

    Drag and heat flux reduction efficiency induced by the equal polygon opposing jet could be higher than the one issuing from conventional circular orifice. The two-equation SST k-w turbulence model has been utilized to study the detailed information of flow field, and the numerical method has been validated against the available experimental data in the open literature. At last, the effects of angle of attack (α), angle of sideslip (β) and angle of jet flow (δ) on the aerodynamic characteristics have been investigated numerically in the current study. The obtained results show that the drag force increases with a higher absolute value of α and the Stanton number (St) reaches its maximum when α=-10°. Moreover, the peak St appears when α=5°. The influence of β on drag reduction shows similarity with that of α, and the maximum Cc appears when |β|=10°. More severe aero-heating occurs on the upper surface when |α| or |β| changes from 0° to 15°. The δ can reduce the maximum heat flux (Qmax) in the whole flow field and improve the thermal protection characteristics. The Qmax can reduce 22.5% and 9.3% at most when δ is -5° and 5° respectively.

  16. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  17. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  18. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  19. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  20. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  1. Dynamics and control of coherent structure in turbulent jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1992-01-01

    Current understanding of coherent structure dynamics in incompressible turbulent jets as explained by the nonlinear stability theory is reviewed, focusing on nonswirling turbulent jets. Topics addressed include hydrodynamic stability theory and coherent structures; dynamics of energy transfers among different scales of motion; nonlinear development of amplitude; development of single-frequency coherent mode; fundamental-subharmonic interaction and vortex pairing; and reversal of Reynolds stresses. Attention is also given to the effect of initial phase-difference angle between fundamental and subharmonic, conditions for resonance interaction, modulation of spreading rate by controlling coherent structure, turbulence enhancement or suppression due to excitation, 3D effects, jet noise, and swirling jets.

  2. Tone-excited jet: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Lepicovsky, J.; Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.; Burrin, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study to understand the phenomenon of broadband jet-noise amplification produced by upstream discrete-tone sound excitation has been carried out. This has been achieved by simultaneous acquisition of the acoustic, mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and instability-wave pressure data. A 5.08 cm diameter jet has been tested for this purpose under static and also flight-simulation conditions. An open-jet wind tunnel has been used to simulate the flight effects. Limited data on heated jets have also been obtained. To improve the physical understanding of the flow modifications brought about by the upstream discrete-tone excitation, ensemble-averaged schlieren photographs of the jets have also been taken. Parallel to the experimental study, a mathematical model of the processes that lead to broadband-noise amplification by upstream tones has been developed. Excitation of large-scale turbulence by upstream tones is first calculated. A model to predict the changes in small-scale turbulence is then developed. By numerically integrating the resultant set of equations, the enhanced small-scale turbulence distribution in a jet under various excitation conditions is obtained. The resulting changes in small-scale turbulence have been attributed to broadband amplification of jet noise. Excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiments. It has also shown that the relative velocity effects are the same for the excited and the unexcited jets.

  3. Effects of velocity profile and inclination on dual-jet-induced pressures on a flat plate in a crosswind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakubowski, A. L.; Schetz, J. A.; Moore, C. L.; Joag, R.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine surface pressure distributions on a flat plate with dual subsonic, circular jets exhausting from the surface into a crossflow. The jets were arranged in both side-by-side and tandem configurations and were injected at 90 deg and 60 deg angles to the plate, with jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 2.2 and 4. The major objective of the study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform (vs uniform) jet velocity profile, simulating the exhaust of a turbo-fan engine. Nonuniform jets with a high-velocity outer annulus and a low-velocity core induced stronger negative pressure fields than uniform jets with the same mass flow rate. However, nondimensional lift losses (lift loss/jet thrust lift) due to such nonuniform jets were lower than lift losses due to uniform jets. Changing the injection angle from 90 deg to 60 deg resulted in moderate (for tandem jets) to significant (for side-by-side jets) increases in the induced negative pressures, even though the surface area influenced by the jets tended to reduce as the angle decreased. Jets arranged in the side-by-side configuration led to significant jet-induced lift losses exceeding, in some cases, lift losses reported for single jets.

  4. Effect of an Adjacent Plate on Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Mora, Pablo; Baier, Florian; Kailasanath, Kailas; Johnson, Ryan; Viswanath, Kamal; University of Cincinnati Collaboration; Naval Research Laboratory Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A flat plate was installed parallel to Md = 1.5 circular and rectangular (AR=2) jets. Flow structures, from high speed shadowgraphs, and acoustic far-field at design, overexpanded and underexpanded conditions are compared between the free jets and the jets with the plate at different distances from the jet axis, 0.5-3De. The circular and rectangular jets had similar far field acoustics except that the latter had stronger screech tones. The free jet exhibited strong flapping mode and screech when overexpanded and broadband shock associated noise at all NPRs. When the plate was at the nozzle lip, the jet was stabilized and screech and BBSN were suppressed. Flapping and screech reappeared when the plate was moved away from the jet and at the largest stand off distance they were amplified. In the shielded region behind the plate, noise levels at all frequencies except the very low ones were significantly reduced for all plate positions. Conversely, reflection at the azimuthal angle above the plate enhanced OASPL magnitudes across all conditions. Mixing noise dominant in the downstream angle was affected by the plat location at the side azimuthal angle. The measurements were compared with LES computations of the SPL spectra and the OASPL and excellent agreement was shown.

  5. General review of flashing jet studies.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Geanette; Holdø, Arne Erik; Munday, George

    2010-01-15

    The major concern on the management of superheated liquids, in industrial environments, is the large potential hazards involved in cases of any accidental release. There is a possibility that a violent phase change could take place inside the fluid released generating a flashing jet. This violent phase change might produce catastrophic consequences, such as explosions, fires or toxic exposure, in the installations and in the surroundings. The knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms involved in those releases become an important issue in the prevention of these consequences and the minimization of their impact. This work presents a comprehensive review of information about flashing processes. The review begins with a description of the single phase jet followed by a description of the two-phase flashing jet. The concepts and implications of the thermodynamic and mechanical effects on the behaviour of the jets are considered at the beginning of the review. Following the review is devoted to the classification of the different study approaches used to understand flashing processes in the past, highlighting various critical parameters on the behaviour and the hazard consequences of flashing jets. The review also contains an extensive compilation of experimental, theoretical and numerical data relating to these phenomena, which includes information on the distinct characteristics of the jet, since type of jet, velocity distribution, expansion angle and mass phase change all require individual estimation.

  6. Bouncing and Merging of Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Li, Minglei; Law, Chung K.

    2014-11-01

    Collision of two fluid jets is a technique that is utilized in many industrial applications, such as in rocket engines, to achieve controlled mixing, atomization and sometimes liquid phase reactions. Thus, the dynamics of colliding jets have direct impact on the performance, efficiency and reliability of such applications. In analogy with the dynamics of droplet-droplet collision, in this work we have experimentally demonstrated, for n-alkane hydrocarbons as well as water, that with increasing impact inertia obliquely colliding jets also exhibit the same nonmonotonic responses of merging, bouncing, merging again, and merging followed by disintegration; and that the continuous entrainment of the boundary layer air over the jet surface into the colliding interfacial region leads to two distinguishing features of jet collision, namely: there exists a maximum impact angle beyond which merging is always possible, and that merging is inhibited and then promoted with increasing pressure. These distinct response regimes were mapped and explained on the bases of impact inertia, deformation of the jet surface, viscous loss within the jet interior, and the thickness and pressure build-up within the interfacial region in order to activate the attractive surface van der Waals force to effect merging.

  7. Jets propagation through a hadron-string medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konchakovski, V. P.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Gorenstein, M. I.

    2010-09-15

    Di-jet correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied within the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach taking into account the reaction of the medium on the jet energy loss nonperturbatively. A comparison with the STAR and PHENIX data in central Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy {radical}(s)=200 GeV is performed differentially (i.e., with respect to correlations in azimuthal angle {Delta}{phi} and pseudorapidity {Delta}{eta}). The HSD results do not show enough suppression for the 'away-side' jets in accordance with earlier perturbative studies. Furthermore, the 'Mach-cone' structure for the angle distribution in the away-side jet as well as 'ridge' long-range rapidity correlations in the 'near-side' jet - observed by the STAR, PHENIX, and PHOBOS Collaborations - are not seen in the HSD results, thus suggesting a partonic origin.

  8. Impact of Fluidic Chevrons on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Kinzie, Kevin W.; Whitmire, Julia; Abeysinghe, Amal

    2005-01-01

    The impact of alternating fluidic core chevrons on the production of jet noise is investigated. Core nozzles for a representative 1/9th scale, bypass ratio 5 model system were manufactured with slots cut near the trailing edges to allow for air injection into the core and fan streams. The injectors followed an alternating pattern around the nozzle perimeter so that the injection alternated between injection into the core stream and injection into the fan stream. For the takeoff condition and a forward flight Mach number of 0.10, the overall sound pressure levels at the peak jet noise angle decrease with increasing injection pressure. Sound pressure levels increase for observation angles less than 110o at higher injection pressures due to increases in high frequency noise. Greater increases in high frequency noise are observed when the number of injectors increases from 8 to 12. When the forward flight Mach number is increased to 0.28, jet noise reduction (relative to the baseline) is observed at aft angles for increasing injection pressure while significant increases in jet noise are observed at forward observation angles due to substantial acoustic radiation at high frequencies. A comparison between inflow and alternating injectors shows that, for equal mass injection rates, the inflow nozzle produces greater low frequency noise reduction (relative to the baseline) than the alternating injectors at 90o and aft observation angles and a forward flight Mach number of 0.28. Preliminary computational fluid dynamic simulations indicate that the spatial decay rate of the hot potential core flow is less for the inflow nozzle than for the alternating nozzles which indicates that gentle mixing may be preferred over sever mixing when fluidic chevrons are used for jet noise reduction.

  9. Experimental investigation of cross-over jets in a rib-roughened trailing-edge cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Fei

    Increasing the rotor inlet temperature can dramatically increase the efficiency and power output of the gas turbine engine. However, the melting point of turbine blade material limits the realistic upper bound of the rotor inlet temperature. As a result, the development of high temperature turbine blade material and advanced turbine blade cooling technology determines the future of turbine blade engine. Adding impingement jet holes and rib turbulators in the inner cooling channel of the gas turbine blades are two effective ways to enhance the cooling effects. The purpose of this study is to figure out the influence of different combinations of jet holes and rib turbulators on the heat transfer efficiency. A tabletop scale test model is used in the study to simulate the cooling cavity of trailing edge and its feed channel in a real gas turbine blade. The Dimensional Analysis Theory is used in the study to eliminate the influence of scaling. Two different crossover slots are tested with 5 different rib arrangements, and each of the test geometries is tested for 6 jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 36,000. The two different crossover slots are the crossover slots with 0 and 5 degree tilt angles. The four different rib arrangements are ribs with 0 degree, 45 degree, 90 degree and 135 degree angles of attack with respect to the flow direction. Furthermore, a smooth test section (no ribs) was also tested. The steady state liquid crystal thermography is used to quantify the heat transfer performance of the target areas. The variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number is plotted for each of the 10 geometries. Also, the variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number are compared for different rib angles of attack with the same crossover slot tilt angle, and between different crossover slots tilt angles with the same rib angle. The results show that, the area-weighted average Nusselt number increases monotonically with the Reynolds number; the target

  10. More Macrospicule Jets in On-Disk Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the magnetic structure and dynamics of multiple jets found in coronal holes close to or on disk center. All data are from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We report on observations of about ten jets in an equatorial coronal hole spanning 2011 February 27 and 28. We show the evolution of these jets in AIA 193 A, examine the magnetic field configuration and flux changes in the jet area, and discuss the probable trigger mechanism of these events. We reported on another jet in this same coronal hole on 2011 February 27, (is) approximately 13:04 UT (Adams et al 2014, ApJ, 783: 11). That jet is a previously-unrecognized variety of blowout jet, in which the base-edge bright point is a miniature filament-eruption flare arcade made by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting field. In contrast, in the presently-accepted 'standard' picture for blowout jets, the base-edge bright point is made by interchange reconnection of initially-closed erupting jet-base field with ambient open field. This poster presents further evidence of the production of the base-edge bright point in blowout jets by internal reconnection. Our observations suggest that most of the bigger and brighter EUV jets in coronal holes are blowout jets of the new-found variety.

  11. Transverse Velocity Shifts in Protostellar Jets: Rotation or Velocity Asymmetries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Cerqueira, Adriano H.; Riera, Angels

    2016-12-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction that have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could originate from rotation in the flow, or from side-to-side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (˜100-200 km s-1), an asymmetry ≳10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three-dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing, and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts (TVSs). Our analysis indicates that side-to-side velocitiy asymmetries could represent an important contribution to TVSs, being the most important contributor for large jet inclination angles (with respect the the plane of the sky), and cannot be neglected when interpreting the observations.

  12. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David; Robe, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T is approximately 105 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division

  13. The IRS 1 circumstellar disk, and the origin of the jet and CO outflow in B5.

    PubMed

    Langer, W D; Velusamy, T; Xie, T

    1996-09-01

    We report the discovery of the inner edge of the high velocity CO outflow associated with the bipolar jet originating from IRS 1 in Barnard 5 and the first ever resolution of its circumstellar disk in the 2.6 mm dust continuum and C18O. From high spatial resolution observations made with the Owens Valley Millimeter Array we are able to locate the origin of the outflow to within approximately 500 AU on either side of IRS 1 and apparently at the edge of, or possibly within, its circumstellar disk. The orientation of the continuum disk is perpendicular to the highly collimated jet outflow recently seen in optical emission at much farther distances. The disk has been detected in C18O giving a disk mass approximately 0.16 M (solar). Our HCO+ and HCN maps indicate significant chemical differentiation in the circumstellar region on small scales with HCO+ tracing an extended disk of material. The 12CO interferometer maps of the outflow show two conelike features originating at IRS 1, the blue one fanning open to the northeast and the red one to the southwest. The vertices of the cones are on either side of the circumstellar disk and have a projected opening angle of about 90 degrees. The intrinsic opening angle is in the range of 60 degrees-90 degrees which leads to significant interaction between outflow and infall.

  14. Turbulent jet manipulation using two unsteady azimuthally separated radial minijets.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Zhou, Y; So, R M C; Liu, Y

    2016-07-01

    The active manipulation of a turbulent round jet is experimentally investigated based on the injection of two radial unsteady minijets, prior to the issue of the main jet. The parametric study is conducted for the mass flow ratio Cm of the minijets to the main jet, and the ratio fe/f0 of the minijet frequency to the preferred-mode frequency of the main jet. It is found that the decay rate of the jet centreline mean velocity could be greatly increased if the two minijets are separated azimuthally by an angle θ=60°, instead of by θ=180°. This increase is a consequence of the flapping motion of the jet column, and the formation process and generation mechanism of this flapping motion are unveiled by careful analysis of the experimental data.

  15. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  16. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  17. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  18. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  19. Parsec-scale jet properties of the quasar PG 1302-102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, P.; An, T.; Frey, S.; Mangalam, A.; Gabányi, K. É.; Kun, E.

    2016-12-01

    The quasar PG 1302-102 is believed to harbour a supermassive binary black hole (SMBBH) system. Using the available 15 GHz and 2-8 GHz, multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array data, we constrain the pc-scale jet properties based on the inferred mean proper motion, including a bulk Lorentz factor ≥5.1 ± 0.8, jet inclination angle ≤11.4° ± 1.7°, projected position angle = 31.8°, intrinsic half opening angle ≤0.9° ± 0.1° and a mean 2-8 GHz spectral index of 0.31. A general relativistic helical jet model is presented and applied to predict quasi-periodic oscillations of ˜10 d, power-law power spectrum shape and a contribution of up to ˜53 per cent to the observed variable core flux density. The model is used to make a case for high resolution, moderately sampled, long duration radio interferometric observations to reveal signatures due to helical knots and distinguish them from those due to SMBBH orbital activity including a phase difference ˜π and an amplitude ratio (helical light-curve amplitude/SMBBH light-curve amplitude) of 0.2-3.3. The prescription can be used to identify helical kinematic signatures from quasars, providing possible candidates for further studies with polarization measurements. It can also be used to infer promising SMBBH candidates for the study of gravitational waves if there are systematic deviations from helical signatures.

  20. Jet-Front Speed and the Origin of Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Cirtain, Jonathan; Suess, Steve; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    The area-average strength of the open magnetic field in the polar coronal holes can be estimated from the radial component of the magnetic field measured by Ulysses in the solar wind, the fraction of the solar sphere covered by the polar coronal holes, and the fraction of the heliosphere filled by the fast solar wind from the polar coronal holes. For the present minimum phase of the solar cycle, the estimated strength is approximately 10 G. Using this strength for the ambient open field in the standard reconnection model for jets in coronal holes, we obtain for any given jet-front speed a lower bound on the initial temperature of the expanding jet-front plasma, and an upper bound on the ambient plasma density at the reconnection site. These two bounds indicate the following. For jet-front speeds of approximately 1000 km/s, (1) the reconnection site has to be in the low corona or upper transition region (n(e) is less than 10(exp 9) cm(exp -3)), not in the lower transition region or chromosphere, (2) the jet-front plasma is initially heated to T greater than approximately 10(exp 7) K, and (3) hence a compact X-ray flare is produced at the base of the jet. For jet-front speeds less than approximately 100 km/s, (1) the jet can be produced by reconnection in the lower transition region (approximately 10(exp 9) less than n(e) less than approximately 10(exp 10) cm(exp-3)) or upper chromosphere (approximately 10(exp 10) less than n(e) less than approximately 10(exp 12) cm-3), (2) the initial temperature of the jet-front plasma can be less than 10(exp 6) K, and (3) hence some EUV and H(alpha) jet-type macrospicules may be produced with no detectable X-ray emission.

  1. Radio Interferometric Observations of Rotating CO Jets in Comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, F.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Wink, J.

    2000-10-01

    We have observed comet Hale-Bopp on October 5 and 25, 1996 and from March 6 to March 22, 1997 with the IRAM interferometer at Plateau de Bure. Millimeter lines of HCN, HNC, CO, H2CO, CH3OH, H2S, CS and SO were mapped with spatial resolutions of 1.5-3.5 arcsec. The observations presented here are those of the 2-1 transition of CO. They have been performed on March 11, 1997, producing 60x60 arcsec maps with a spectral resolution of 0.11 km/s. Interferometric observations were interrupted every hour for short on-off observations in single-dish mode. Asymmetrical patterns are noticed in the maps. They cannot be explained only by the elliptical instrumental beam. They are evidence of the anisotropy of the gas emission, due to the existence of gas jets. The spectral analysis of the maps shows that the blueshifted line side is stronger than the redshifted one. This proves the existence of a gas jet toward the Earth. The disturbances in the redshifted signal show that there may be other jets. The on-off spectra show that the mean velocity of the line is moving from blue to red velocities with a period which is that of the nucleus rotation (11.4 h): we are observing here a jet rotating in a plane almost perpendicular to the plane of the sky. Jets of dust or radicals were already observed in comets in the visible. But it is the first time that rotating jets are observed for parent molecules. The interpretation of these interferometric data is tricky because two rotations are involved: the comet rotation itself and the Earth rotation. We are developping a 3-d model of gas jets where the comet outgassing is an isotropic distribution plus a conical jet of given orientation and opening angle. Then, visibilities are computed for the real antenna configuration. And maps are synthetised with the same procedures as that used for the observations of comet Hale-Bopp. We will present here a comparison of the observations with the first results of this model.

  2. The plasma footprint of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a flat polymer substrate and its relation to surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyshchenko, Iuliia; Nikiforov, Anton Yu.; De Geyter, Nathalie; Morent, Rino

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to show the correlation between the plasma propagation in the footprint of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a flat polymer surface and the plasma treatment impact on the polymer properties. An argon plasma jet working in open air is used as plasma source, while PET thin films are used a substrates for plasma treatment. Light emission photographs are taken with an ICCD camera to have a close look at the generated structures in the plasma jet footprint on the surface. Water contact angle (WCA) measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis are also performed to obtain information about the impact of the plasma treatment on the PET surface characteristics. A variation in ICCD camera gate duration (1 µs, 100 µs, 50 ms) results in the photographs of the different plasma structures occurring during the plasma propagation on the flat PET surface. Contact angle measurements provide results on improvement of the PET hydrophilic character, while XPS analysis shows the distribution of atomic elements on the treated substrate surface. Light emission images help explaining the obtained WCA and XPS results. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  3. Glottal jet inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of an inertive contribution of the glottal jet to glottal aerodynamic resistance is presented. Given that inertance of the flow in a constriction can be expressed in terms of the kinetic energy of the flow, and that a jet is a maximum kinetic energy flow pattern, it is argued that the glottal jet possesses its own inertance which is at least as large as that of the vocal tract. These arguments are supported by estimates of inertance obtained from simulations of an unsteady flow through an axisymmetric orifice, and of a compliant constriction with the approximate shape and mechanical properties of the vocal folds. It is further shown that the inertive effect of the glottal jet depends on the jet path and jet mixing, with a slowly diffusing, symmetric jet showing higher inertance than an asymmetric jet which rapidly mixes with supraglottal air. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  4. Initial Evolution of GRB Jets with Different Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Hardee, Phil; Hartmann, Dieter; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Sol, Helene; Gomez, Jose L.; Nordlund, Aake; Dutan, Ioana; Mizuno, Yosuke; Meli, Athina; Peer, Asaf; Frederiksen, Jacob

    2016-07-01

    In the study of GRB jets one of the key open questions is their interaction with the environment. Here, we study the initial evolution of both electron-proton and electron-positron relativistic jets injected, focusing on their lateral interaction with ambient plasma. We follow the evolution of toroidal magnetic fields generated by both the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz (kKH) and Mushroom instabilities (MI). For an electron-proton jet, the induced magnetic field collimates the jet and electrons are perpendicularly accelerated. As the instabilities saturate and subsequently weaken, the magnetic polarity switches from clockwise to counter-clockwise in the middle of jet. For an electron-positron jet, we find strong mixing of electrons and positrons with the ambient plasma, resulting in the creation of a bow shock. The merging of current filaments generates density inhomogeneities which initiate a forward shock. Strong jet ambient plasma mixing prevents a full development of the jet (on the scale studied), revealing evidence for both jet collimation and particle acceleration in the forming bow shock. Differences in the magnetic field structure generated by different jets may contribute to the polarization properties of the observed emission in gamma ray bursts. The different electron acceleration mechanisms in different jets may affect the light-curves in GRB observations.

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    DOE PAGES

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; ...

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generatedmore » by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.« less