Science.gov

Sample records for jet optimised shear

  1. The underexpanded jet Mach disk and its associated shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel; Honnery, Damon R.; Soria, Julio

    2014-09-01

    High resolution planar particle image velocimetry is used to measure turbulent quantities in the region downstream of the Mach disk in an axisymmetric underexpanded jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. The internal annular shear layer generated by the slip line emanating from the triple point is shown to persist across multiple shock cells downstream. A triple decomposition based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition shows that the external helical structure associated with the screech tone generated by the jet exerts a strong influence on velocity fluctuations in the initial region of the annular shear layer. This influence manifests as the external vortices producing oscillatory motion of the Mach disk, and thus a forcing of the internal annular shear layer. The internal shear layer is characterized by a number of azimuthal modes of varying wavenumber and type, including both helical and axisymmetric modes. Finally, the possibility of a previously hypothesized recirculation region behind the Mach disk is investigated, with no evidence found to support its existence.

  2. Cavitation Inception in Immersed Jet Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockett, R. D.; Ndamuso, N.; Price, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation inception occurring in immersed jets was investigated in a purpose-built mechanical flow rig. The rig utilized custom-built cylindrical and conical nozzles to direct high-velocity jets of variable concentration n-octane-hexadecane mixtures into a fused silica optically accessible receiver. The fluid pressure upstream and down-stream of the nozzles were manually controlled. The study employed a variety of acrylic and metal nozzles. The results show that the critical upstream pressure to downstream pressure ratio for incipient cavitation decreases with increasing n-octane concentration for the cylindrical nozzles, and increases with increasing n-octane concentration for the conical nozzle.

  3. Sheared Flow as a Stabilizing Mechanism in Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanex, Lucas F.

    2007-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that the sustained narrowness observed in the asymptotic cylindrical region of bipolar outflows from Young Stellar Objects (YSO) suggests that an intrinsic collimating mechanism is present in these jets. The jz × Bθ force observed in z-pinch plasmas is a possible explanation for these observations. However, z-pinch plasmas are subject to current driven instabilities (CDI). The interest in using z-pinches for controlled nuclear fusion has lead to an extensive theory on the stability of magnetically confined plasmas. Analytical, numerical, and experimental evidence from this field suggest that sheared flow in magnetized plasmas can reduce the growth rates of the sausage and kink instabilities. Here we propose the hypothesis that sheared helical flow can exert a similar stabilizing influence on CDI in YSO jets. Experimental, analytical, and numerical analysis of sheared flow in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas with and without helical magnetic fields is presented. The results support the hypothesis that sheared flow and sheared magnetic fields may impart a stabilizing influence in astrophysical jets. Future laboratory experiments are proposed that will provide enhanced support for this conclusion. Work supported by DOE/NNSA under UNR grant DE-FC52-01NV14050.

  4. Sheared Flow as a Stabilizing Mechanism in Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanex, Lucas F.; Tendeland, Erik

    2007-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the sustained narrowness observed in the asymptotic cylindrical region of bipolar outflows from Young Stellar Objects (YSO) indicates that these jets are magnetically collimated. The j z × B ϕ force observed in z-pinch plasmas is a possible explanation for these observations. However, z-pinch plasmas are subject to current driven instabilities (CDI). The interest in using z-pinches for controlled nuclear fusion has lead to an extensive theory of the stability of magnetically confined plasmas. Analytical, numerical, and experimental evidence from this field suggest that sheared flow in magnetized plasmas can reduce the growth rates of the sausage and kink instabilities. Here we propose the hypothesis that sheared helical flow can exert a similar stabilizing influence on CDI in YSO jets.

  5. On the linear stability of sheared and magnetized jets without current sheets - non-relativistic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2016-09-01

    In a prior paper, we considered the linear stability of magnetized jets that carry no net electric current and do not have current sheets. In this paper, in addition to physically well-motivated magnetic field structures, we also include the effects of jet shear. The jets we study have finite thermal pressure in addition to having realistic magnetic field structures and velocity shear. We find that shear has a strongly stabilizing effect on various modes of jet instability. Increasing shear stabilizes the fundamental pinch modes at long wavelengths and short wavelengths. Increasing shear also stabilizes the first reflection pinch modes at short wavelengths. Increasing shear has only a very modest stabilizing effect on the fundamental kink modes at long wavelengths; however, increasing shear does have a strong stabilizing effect on the fundamental kink modes at short wavelengths. The first reflection kink modes are strongly stabilized by increasing shear at shorter wavelengths. Overall, we find that the combined effect of magnetic field and shear stabilizes jets more than shear alone. In addition to the results from a formal linear stability analysis, we present a novel way of visualizing and understanding jet stability. This gives us a deeper understanding of the enhanced stability of sheared, magnetized jets. We also emphasize the value of our numerical approach in understanding the linear stability of jets with realistic structure.

  6. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of Shear Coaxial Jet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Essam A.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Walker, Nathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The instability and subsequent atomization of a viscous liquid jet emanated into a high-pressure gaseous surrounding is studied both computationally and experimentally. Liquid water issued into nitrogen gas at elevated pressures is used to simulate the flow conditions in a coaxial shear injector element relevant to liquid propellant rocket engines. The theoretical analysis is based on a simplified mathematical formulation of the continuity and momentum equations in their conservative form. Numerical solutions of the governing equations subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions are obtained via a robust finite difference scheme. The computations yield real-time evolution and subsequent breakup characteristics of the liquid jet. The experimental investigation utilizes a digital imaging technique to measure resultant drop sizes. Data were collected for liquid Reynolds number between 2,500 and 25,000, aerodynamic Weber number range of 50-500 and ambient gas pressures from 150 to 1200 psia. Comparison of the model predictions and experimental data for drop sizes at gas pressures of 150 and 300 psia reveal satisfactory agreement particularly for lower values of investigated Weber number. The present model is intended as a component of a practical tool to facilitate design and optimization of coaxial shear atomizers.

  7. Vertical shears in Saturn's eastward jets at cloud level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Melendo, Enrique; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Rojas, J. F.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the vertical shear of the zonal winds in the cloud-haze upper layer of Saturn using Cassini ISS images obtained in the filters MT2 (753 nm methane absorption band, sensitive to the upper haze) and CB2 (adjacent continuum, sensitive to the lower cloud). Our radiative transfer models indicate that at the eastward jet peaks these filters are sensing clouds at the respective ˜100 mbar and ˜350 mbar levels. We have found a systematic velocity difference between those filters of 15 to 20 m s -1 only in the eastward jets peaks (27° S, 42° S, 55° S and 70° S) which implies a vertical shear of ˜10-20 m s -1 H -1. Our overall results agree with those derived from the thermal-wind relationship using CIRS thermal data [Fletcher, L.N., and 13 colleagues, 2008. Science 319, 79-81] and with previous equatorial measurements [Sánchez-Lavega, A., Hueso, R., Pérez-Hoyos, S., 2007. Icarus 187, 510-519].

  8. Are windshear training aid recommendations appropriate for other than large jet transports? Pilot procedures: Shear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Information is given in vugraph form on pilot procedures in windshear, typical winds in a downburst, a downburst encounter at takeoff by a large jet transport and a light turboprop twin, and a comparison of pitch algorithms in an approach encounter with downburst shear. It is observed that the light turboprop appears no less tolerant of a downburst encounter than the large jet.

  9. Passive control of wall shear stress and mass transfer generated by submerged lobed impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodjavi, Kodjovi; Montagné, Brice; Meslem, Amina; Byrne, Paul; Serres, Laurent; Sobolik, Vaclav

    2016-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the flow field in an impinging lobed daisy hemispherical nozzle jet in comparison to its counterpart round jet, at a Reynolds number of 5620 based on the exit velocity and the equivalent diameter D e of the nozzle. The limitations of the PIV technique in the vicinity of the target wall due to the laser scattering were addressed by using the electrodiffusion (ED) technique to determine the wall shear rate distribution. The distribution of the mass transfer coefficient is also obtained using the ED technique. The target wall is placed at a distance H = 2 D e from the plane tangent to the nozzle, at the center of the orifice. The entrainment of ambient fluid in the free jet region, which is larger in the lobed jet compared to the round jet, feeds in turn the wall jet region. The maximum wall shear rate was found significantly higher in the daisy jet, with an excess of 93 % compared to the reference round jet. The maximum mass transfer is 35 % higher in the former compared to the latter. Therefore, the hemispherical daisy nozzle is an excellent candidate in passive strategies to enhance local skin-friction and the subsequent local mass transfer at a constant exit Reynolds number.

  10. Shear-layer acoustic radiation in an excited subsonic jet: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Vincent; Bailly, Christophe; Juvé, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The subharmonic acoustic radiation of a tone excited subsonic jet shear-layer has been investigated experimentally. Two jet velocities U=20 mṡs and U=40 mṡs were studied. For U=20 mṡs, the natural boundary-layer at the nozzle exit is laminar. When the perturbation is applied, the fluctuations of the first and the second subharmonics of the excitation frequency are detected in the shear-layer. In addition, the first subharmonic near pressure field along the spreading jet is constituted of two strong maxima of sinusoidal shape. The far-field directivity pattern displays two lobes separated by an extinction angle θ at around 85° from the jet axis. These observations follow the results of Bridges about the vortex pairing noise. On the other hand, for U=40 mṡs, the initial boundary-layer is transitional and only the first subharmonic is observed in the presence of the excitation. The near pressure field is of Gaussian shape in the jet periphery and the acoustic far-field is superdirective as observed by Laufer and Yen. The state of the initial shear-layer seems to be the key feature to distinguish these two different radiation patterns. To cite this article: V. Fleury et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  11. Jet transport performance in thunderstorm wind shear conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.; Blick, E. F.; Bensch, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Several hours of three dimensional wind data were collected in the thunderstorm approach-to-landing environment, using an instrumented Queen Air airplane. These data were used as input to a numerical simulation of aircraft response, concentrating on fixed-stick assumptions, while the aircraft simulated an instrument landing systems approach. Output included airspeed, vertical displacement, pitch angle, and a special approach deterioration parameter. Theory and the results of approximately 1000 simulations indicated that about 20 percent of the cases contained serious wind shear conditions capable of causing a critical deterioration of the approach. In particular, the presence of high energy at the airplane's phugoid frequency was found to have a deleterious effect on approach quality. Oscillations of the horizontal wind at the phugoid frequency were found to have a more serious effect than vertical wind. A simulation of Eastern flight 66, which crashed at JFK in 1975, served to illustrate the points of the research. A concept of a real-time wind shear detector was outlined utilizing these results.

  12. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  13. Characteristic modes and evolution processes of shear-layer vortices in an elevated transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Lan, Jen

    2005-03-01

    Characteristics and evolution processes of the traveling coherent flow structure in the shear layer of an elevated round jet in crossflow are studied experimentally in an open-loop wind tunnel. Streak pictures of the smoke flow patterns illuminated by the laser-light sheet in the median and horizontal planes are recorded with a high speed digital camera. Time histories of the instantaneous velocity of the vortical flows in the shear layer are digitized by a hot-wire anemometer through a high-speed data acquisition system. By analyzing the streak pictures of the smoke flow visualization, five characteristic flow structures, mixing-layer type vortices, backward-rolling vortices, forward-rolling vortices, swing-induced mushroom vortices, and jet-type vortices, are identified in the shear layer evolving from the up-wind edge of the jet exit. The behaviors and mechanisms of the vortical flow structure in the bent shear layer are prominently distinct in different flow regimes. The frequency characteristics, Strouhal number, power-spectrum density functions, autocorrelation coefficient, as well as the time and length scales of the coherent structure and the Lagrangian integral scales are obtained by processing the measured instantaneous velocity data. The Strouhal number is found to decay exponentially with the increase of the jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio. The autocorrelation coefficients provide the information for calculating the statistical time scales of the coherent structure and the integral time scales of turbulence fluctuations. The corresponding length scales of the vortical structure and the integral length scales of turbulence in the shear layer are therefore obtained and discussed.

  14. Microturbulence and Flow Shear in High-performance JET ITB Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; A. Andre; A. Bicoulet; C. Challis; G.D. Conway; W. Dorland; D.R. Ernst; T.S. Hahm; T.C. Hender; D. McCune; G. Rewoldt; S.E. Sharapov

    2001-12-05

    The transport, flow shear, and linear growth rates of microturbulence are studied for a Joint European Torus (JET) plasma with high central q in which an internal transport barrier (ITB) forms and grows to a large radius. The linear microturbulence growth rates of the fastest growing (most unstable) toroidal modes with high toroidal mode number are calculated using the GS2 and FULL gyrokinetic codes. These linear growth rates, gamma (subscript lin) are large, but the flow-shearing rates, gamma (subscript ExB) (dominated by the toroidal rotation contribution) are also comparably large when and where the ITB exists.

  15. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. This volume contains tabulated data for each of the data runs cited in Volume 1. Baseline characteristics, mixing modifications (subsonic and supersonic, heated and unheated) and miscellaneous charts are included.

  16. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 1: Results and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. The conclusions derived were: (1) intrusive probes can produce significant errors in the measurements of the velocity of jets if they are large in diameter and penetrate beyond the jet center; (2) rectangular jets without tabs, compared to circular jets of the same exit area, provide faster jet mixing; and (3) further mixing enhancement is possible by using mechanical tabs.

  17. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, M.; Assoum, H. H.; Martinuzzi, R.; Sobolik, V.; Abed-Meraim, K.; Sakout, A.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the large-scale vortical structures on the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet is investigated experimentally for a Reynolds number of 1260. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and polarographic measurements are performed simultaneously. It is found that the instantaneous wall shear stress is strongly dependent on the vortex dynamics, particularly for different parts of the transverse vortex. The influence of the vortex ring, the secondary and tertiary vortices on the ejection/sweep process near the wall is the main mechanism involved in the wall shear stress variation. In the region of the boundary layer separation, the wall shear stress amplitude increases just upstream of the separation and dramatically decreases in the recirculation zone downstream from the separation. The interaction between primary and secondary structures and their pairing process with the tertiary structure affects the sweep/ejection process near the wall and subsequently the wall shear stress variation. A comparison between the Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) method and the phase average technique is performed. It is shown that both methods describe the flow dynamics in the impinging region of the vortex ring. However, the FTLE method is more suitable for describing the unsteady separation of the boundary layer.

  18. Breakup dynamics and dripping-to-jetting transition in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Liu, Zhou; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-01-01

    The breakup dynamics in non-Newtonian multiphase microsystems is associated with a variety of industrial applications such as food production and biomedical engineering. In this study, we numerically and experimentally characterize the dripping-to-jetting transition under various flow conditions in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem. Our work can help to predict the formation of undesirable satellite droplets, which is one of the challenges in dispensing non-Newtonian fluids. We also demonstrate the variations in breakup dynamics between shear-thinning and Newtonian fluids under the same flow conditions. For shear-thinning fluids, the droplet size increases when the capillary number is smaller than a critical value, while it decreases when the capillary number is beyond the critical value. The variations highlight the importance of rheological effects in flows with a non-Newtonian fluid. The viscosity of shear-thinning fluids significantly affects the control over the droplet size, therefore necessitating the manipulation of the shear rate through adjusting the flow rate and the dimensions of the nozzle. Consequently, the droplet size can be tuned in a controlled manner. Our findings can guide the design of novel microdevices for generating droplets of shear-thinning fluids with a predetermined droplet size. This enhances the ability to fabricate functional particles using an emulsion-templated approach. Moreover, elastic effects are also investigated experimentally using a model shear-thinning fluid that also exhibits elastic behaviors: droplets are increasingly deformed with increasing elasticity of the continuous phase. The overall understanding in the model multiphase microsystem will facilitate the use of a droplet-based approach for non-Newtonian multiphase applications ranging from energy to biomedical sciences. PMID:25316203

  19. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  20. Experimental Optimisation of the Thermal Performance of Impinging Synthetic Jet Heat Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marron, Craig; Persoons, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Zero-net-mass flow synthetic jet devices offer a potential solution for energy- efficient cooling of medium power density electronic components. There remains an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these flows with extended surfaces, which prevents the wider implementation of these devices in the field. This study examines the effect of the main operating parameters on the heat transfer rate and electrical power consumption for a synthetic jet cooled heat sink. Three different heat sink geometries are tested. The results find that a modified sink with a 14 × 14 pin array with the central 6 × 6 pins removed provides superior cooling to either a fully pinned sink or flat plate. Furthermore each heat sink is found to have its own optimum jet orifice-to-sink spacing for heat transfer independent of flow conditions. The optimum heat transfer for the modified sink is H = 34 jet diameters. The effect of frequency on heat transfer is also studied. It is shown that heat transfer increases superlinearly with frequency at higher stroke lengths. The orientation of the impingement surface with respect to gravity has no effect on the heat transfer capabilities of the tested device. These tests are the starting point for further investigation into enhanced synthetic jet impingement surfaces. The equivalent axial fan cooled pinned heat sink (Malico Inc. MFP40- 18) has a thermal resistance of 1.93K/W at a fan power consumption of 0.12W. With the modified pinned heat sink, a synthetic jet at Re = 911, L0/D = 10, H/D = 30 provides a thermal resistance of 2.5K/W at the same power consumption.

  1. Refraction of Sound Emitted Near Solid Boundaries from a Sheared Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Oyedrian, Ayo A.; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the sound emitted from an arbitrary point within a turbulent flow near solid boundaries. A unidirectional, transversely sheared mean flow is assumed, and the cross-section of the cold jet is of arbitrary shape. The analysis begins with Lilley's formulation of aerodynamic noise and, depending upon the specific model of turbulence used, leads via Fourier analysis to an expression for the spectral density of the intensity of the far-field sound emitted from a unit volume of turbulence. The expressions require solution of a reduced Green's function of Lilley's equation as well as certain moving axis velocity correlations of the turbulence. Integration over the entire flow field is required in order to predict the sound emitted by the complete flow. Calculations are presented for sound emitted from a plugflow jet exiting a semi-infinite flat duct. Polar plots of the far-field directivity show the dependence upon frequency and source position within the duct. Certain model problems are suggested to investigate the effect of duct termination, duct geometry, and mean flow shear upon the far-field sound.

  2. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  3. Fluid Mechanics Optimising Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leivadarou, Evgenia; Dalziel, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    The Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) is a new ``green'' approach in the synthesis of organic chemicals with many industrial applications in biodiesel generation, cosmetics, protein folding and pharmaceutical production. The VFD is a rapidly rotating tube that can operate with a jet feeding drops of liquid reactants to the base of the tube. The aim of this project is to explain the fluid mechanics of the VFD that influence the rate of reactions. The reaction rate is intimately related to the intense shearing that promotes collision between reactant molecules. In the VFD, the highest shears are found at the bottom of the tube in the Rayleigh and the Ekman layer and at the walls in the Stewardson layers. As a step towards optimising the performance of the VFD we present experiments conducted in order to establish the minimum drop volume and maximum rotation rate for maximum axisymmetric spreading without fingering instability. PhD candidate, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

  4. Noise measurements in a free-jet, flight simulation facility - Shear layer refraction and facility-to-flight corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfey, C. L.; Tester, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    The conversion of free-jet facility into equivalent flyover results is discussed. The essential problem is to 'calibrate out' the acoustic influence of the outer free-jet shear layer on the measurement, since this is absent in the flight case. Results are presented which illustrate the differences between current simplified models (vortex-sheet and geometric acoustics), and a more complete model based on the Lilley equation. Finally, the use of geometric acoustics for facility-to-flight data conversion is discussed.

  5. Jetting Activity and Thermal Emission across the South Polar Terrain of Enceladus: Observations and Comparisons with Shear-Heating Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C.; DiNino, D.; Nimmo, F.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Helfenstein, P.; Roatsch, T.; Mitchell, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction: Cassini ISS Enceladus images reveal a forest of jets of fine icy particles erupting from the moon's south polar terrain (SPT) and feeding a giant plume that extends thousands of kilometers into space [1] eventually forming Saturn's E ring. Cassini infrared spectrometer (CIRS) observations have also shown the SPT to be anomalously warm [2], and the comparison of high resolution images of the SPT with the highest resolution thermal measurements has shown a coincidence between the hottest measured temperatures in the SPT and the "tiger stripe" fractures which straddle the region [1,2]. The most plausible mechanism for heat production on the fractures is tidally driven frictional heating along faults due to cyclical shearing. The time-averaged absolute shear stress on each fracture segment can be calculated [3] and will be affected by location and orientation, and proportional to the local frictional heat production rate (assuming a constant coefficient of friction). Initial triangulation measurements of the jets seen in ISS images spanning 1.3 years (from late 2005 to early 2007) and taken over a broad range of image scales (1 to 14 km/pixel), phase angles (148° to 178°), and viewing directions with respect to the surface revealed the source locations for the 8 most prominent jets [4]. All 8 fell, within 2σ measurement uncertainties, on the fractures, and about half of these sources were found to be coincident, within uncertainties, with the CIRS hot spots initially reported in 2006. Moreover, ISS jet locations were used to successfully predict the discovery of additional hot spots [4]: eg, the prominent hot spot on Baghdad Sulcus near Jet #I. Results: We have taken new, more precise jet positional measurements in the 62 highest resolution images (down to 40 m/pixel spatial scale) taken from late 2005 to early 2011 at phase angles of 130° to 165°. We now find over 80 distinct, measureable jets. Nearly all of them fall on one of the four main

  6. Application of Shear Plate Interferometry to Jet Diffusion Flame Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; OBrien, Chris J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1997-01-01

    The recent ban on the production of bromotrifluoromethane (CF3Br) because of its high stratospheric ozone depletion potential has led to interest in finding alternative agents for fire extinguishing applications. Some of the promising alternatives are fluorinated hydrocarbons. A clear understanding of the effects of CF3Br and alternative chemical suppressants on diffusion flames is therefore necessary in the selection of alternative suppressants for use in normal and microgravity. The flame inhibition effects of halogen compounds have been studied extensively in premixed systems. The effect of addition of halocarbons (carbon-halogen compounds) to diffusion flames has been studied experimentally in coflow configurations and in counterflow gaseous and liquid-pool flames. Halogenated compounds are believed to inhibit combustion by scavenging hydrogen radicals to form the relatively unreactive compound HF, or through a catalytic recombination cycle involving HBr to form H2. Comparisons between halogens show that bromine inhibition is significantly more effective than chlorine or fluorine. Although fluorinated compounds are only slightly more effective inhibitors on a mass basis than nitrogen, they are more effective on a volume basis and are easily stored in liquid form. The objectives of this study are (a) to determine the stability limits of laminar jet diffusion flames with respect to inhibitor concentration in both normal and microgravity, and (b) to investigate the structure of halocarbon-inhibited flames. In the initial phase of this project, visual diagnostics were used to observe the structure and behavior of normal and microgravity flames. The initial observations showed significant changes in the structure of the flames with the addition of halocarbons to the surrounding environment, as discussed below. Furthermore, the study established that the flames are more stable relative to the addition of halocarbons in microgravity than in normal gravity. Visual

  7. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  8. Application of jet-shear-layer mixing and effervescent atomization to the development of a low-NO(x) combustor. Ph.D. Thesis - Purdue Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Renato Olaf

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop appropriate technologies for a low-NO(x), liquid-fueled combustor. The combustor incorporates an effervescent atomizer used to inject fuel into a premixing duct. Only a fraction of the combustion air is used in the premixing process to avoid autoignition and flashback problems. This fuel-rich mixture is introduced into the remaining combustion air by a rapid jet-shear-layer-mixing process involving radial fuel-air jets impinging on axial air jets in the primary combustion zone. Computational analysis was used to provide a better understanding of the fluid dynamics that occur in jet-shear-layer mixing and to facilitate a parametric analysis appropriate to the design of an optimum low-NO(x) combustor. A number of combustor configurations were studied to assess the key combustor technologies and to validate the modeling code. The results from the experimental testing and computational analysis indicate a low-NO(x) potential for the jet-shear-layer combustor. Key parameters found to affect NO(x) emissions are the primary combustion zone fuel-air ratio, the number of axial and radial jets, the aspect ratio and radial location of the axial air jets, and the radial jet inlet hole diameter. Each of these key parameters exhibits a low-NO(x) point from which an optimized combustor was developed. Using the parametric analysis, NO(x) emissions were reduced by a factor of 3 as compared with the emissions from conventional, liquid-fueled combustors operating at cruise conditions. Further development promises even lower NO(x) with high combustion efficiency.

  9. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xu, M.; Pollard, A.; Mi, J.

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/De < 40, where De denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50 000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number Rλ varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=mt+(lnγ-0.0173)1/2, where mt denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions.

  10. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Xu, M; Pollard, A; Mi, J

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/D(e) < 40, where D(e) denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50,000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number R(λ) varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=m(t)+(lnγ(-0.0173))(1/2), where m(t) denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions. PMID:23767622

  11. Shear layer structure of a low speed jet. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 28 Jun. 1974 - 31 Dec. 1975; [measurements of field pressure and turbulent velocity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A series of measurements of near field pressures and turbulent velocity fluctuations were made in a low speed jet with a Reynolds number near 50,000 in order to investigate more quantitatively the character and behavior of the large scale structures and their interactions with each other. The near field measurements were modelled according to the vortex pairing hypothesis to deduce the distribution of pairings along the jet axis and the variances about the mean locations. The hodograph plane description of turbulence was explored in some detail, and a complex correlation quantity was synthesized which has useful properties for turbulence in the presence of mean shear.

  12. On the vertical wind shear of Saturn's Equatorial Jet at cloud level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.

    2005-08-01

    With the aim of retrieving the altitude of cloud features used as zonal wind tracers in Saturn's atmosphere, we have reanalyzed three different sets of photometric and calibrated data corresponding to the Voyager epoch 1979-1981 (ground-based in 1979, Voyager 2 PPS and ISS observations in 1981), and we have analyze a new set of Hubble Space Telescope images for 2004. This analysis is put in the perspective of our previous HST study for 1994-2003 (Pérez-Hoyos et al., Icarus, 176, 155. 2005). A common result is found that the individual cloud tracers are embedded within a variable tropospheric haze. According to our models, the Voyager 2 ISS images locate the cloud tracers moving with zonal velocities of 455 to 465 (± 2) m/s at a pressure level of 360 ± 140 mbar. For HST observations, the cloud tracers moving with zonal wind speeds of 280 ± 10 m/s, locate at a pressure level of about 50 ± 10 mbar. All these values are calculated in the latitude 3 deg North. The speed difference, if interpreted as a vertical wind shear (Porco et al., Science, 307, 1226. 2005), requires a change of 90 m/s per scale height, two times greater than that estimated from Cassini CIRS data (Flasar et al., Science, 307, 1247, 2005). We also perform an initial guess on Cassini ISS vertical sounding levels, retrieving values compatible with the HST ones but not with Voyager wind measurements. We conclude that the wind speed velocity differences measured between 1979-81 and 2004 in the upper troposphere cannot be solely explained as a wind shear effect and demand dynamical processes. We discuss the possible action of Rossby waves or an intrinsic circulation change in the ammonia cloud layer and above, following a large period of equatorial storm activity. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by MCYT AYA2003-03216, FEDER, and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. S.P.-H. acknowledges a PhD fellowship from the Spanish MEC and R. H. a post-doc contract from Gobierno Vasco.

  13. Effect of wind turbulence and shear on landing performance of jet transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blick, E. F.; Mccarthy, J.; Bensch, R. R.; Sarabudla, N. R.

    1978-01-01

    Computer simulations of a Boeing 727 class aircraft landing in turbulence were developed by programming the longitudinal aircraft equations of motion into a digital computer with various input values of vertical and horizontal wind speeds. Turbulent wind data was fed to the computer in one-second intervals. The computer computed in one-second intervals the aircraft speed, altitude, horizontal distance traveled, rate-of-descent, pitch attitude, glide path angle (from edge of runway) and elevator angle. All computer runs were made in the 'stick-fixed' mode. The RMS values of altitude and velocity perturbations (from equilibrium) were found to be large when horizontal wind gusts had sinusoidal components at or near the phugoid (long period) frequency. Maximum RMS altitude deviations occurred when the vertical wind had sinusoidal components which were 1/10 to 1/5 of the phugoid frequency. When real wind data (obtained from NCAR Queen Air) were used as input winds good correlations were found to exist between RMS velocity perturbations and both horizontal and vertical wind shears.

  14. On the behavior of a shear-coaxial jet, spanning sub- to supercritical pressures, with and without an externally imposed transverse acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Dustin Wayne

    In the past, liquid rocket engines (LRE) have experienced high-frequency combustion instability, which impose an acoustic field in the combustion chamber. The acoustic field interacts with the fluid jets issuing from the injectors, thus altering the behavior of the jet compared to that of stable operation of the LRE. It is possible that this interaction could be a substantial feed back mechanism driving the combustion instability. In order to understand the problem of combustion instability, it is necessary to understand the interaction of the jet with the acoustic waves. From past combustion instability studies of the liquid oxygen and hydrogen propellant combination in a shear-coaxial injector configuration, a design guideline of outer-to-inner jet velocity ratio greater than about ten was proposed in order to avoid high-frequency acoustic combustion instability problems. However, no satisfactory physical explanation was provided. To promote this understanding, a cold-flow experimental investigation of a shear-coaxial jet interacting with a high-amplitude non-linear acoustic field was undertaken under chamber pressures extending into the supercritical regime. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) flowed from the inner tube of a coaxial injector while gaseous nitrogen (GN2) issued from its annular region. The injector fluids were directed into a chamber pressurized with gaseous nitrogen. The acoustic excitation was provided by an external driver capable of delivering acoustic field amplitudes up to 165 dB. The resonant modes of the chamber governed the two frequencies studied here, with the first two modes being about 3 and 5.2 kHz. High-speed images of the jet were taken with a Phantom CMOS camera. The so-called "dark core" of the jet is among the most salient features in the acquired images, and therefore, was defined and measured. The core length was found to decrease with increasing velocity and momentum flux ratio. Because of the ability of the camera to capture thousands of

  15. Fixed-base simulation study of decoupled longitudinal controls during approach and landing of a medium jet transport in the presence of wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The use of decoupled longitudinal controls during the approach and landing of a typical twin-engine jet transport in the presence of wind shear was studied. The simulation included use of a localizer and flight director to capture and maintain a 3 deg glide slope. The pilot then completed the landing by using visual cues provided below an altitude of 200 m by closed-circuit television and a terrain model. The decoupled controls used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The use of the decoupled control system improved pilot performance during the approach and at touchdown in the presence of wind shears. The pilots preferred the decoupled controls and rated the task 1 to 3 increments better on a pilot rating scale, depending on wind conditions, than was the case when conventional controls were used.

  16. Evaluation of Aortic Stenosis Severity using 4D Flow Jet Shear Layer Detection for the Measurement of Valve Effective Orifice Area

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Markl, Michael; Schnell, Susanne; Allen, Bradley; Entezari, Pegah; Mahadevia, Riti; Malaisrie, S Chris; Pibarot, Philippe; Carr, James; Barker, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of 4D flow MRI to assess valve effective orifice area (EOA) in patients with aortic stenosis as determined by the jet shear layer detection (JSLD) method. Methods and Results An in-vitro stenosis phantom was used for validation and in-vivo imaging was performed in 10 healthy controls and 40 patients with aortic stenosis. EOA was calculated by the JSLD method using standard 2D phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) and 4D flow MRI measurements (EOAJSLD-2D and EOAJSLD-4D, respectively). As a reference standard, the continuity equation was used to calculate EOA (EOACE) with the 2D PC-MRI velocity field and compared to the EOAJSLD measurements. The in-vitro results exhibited excellent agreement between flow theory (EOA=0.78 cm2) and experimental measurement (EOAJSLD-4D=0.78±0.01 cm2) for peak velocities ranging from 0.9 to 3.7 m/s. In-vivo results showed good correlation and agreement between EOAJSLD-2D and EOACE (r=0.91, p<0.001; bias: −0.01±0.38cm2; agreement limits: 0.75 to −0.77cm2), and between EOAJSLD-4D and EOACE (r=0.95, p<0.001; bias: −0.09±0.26cm2; limits: 0.43 to −0.62cm2). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring EOAJSLD using 4D flow MRI. The technique allows for optimization of the EOA measurement position by visualizing the 3D vena contracta, and avoids potential sources of EOACE measurement variability. PMID:24865143

  17. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  18. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  19. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  20. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  1. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of shear flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  2. Numerical simulations of mixing under supercritical pressures of a shear coaxial injector using a high-order method: effect of outer jet temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, H.; Koshi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation of N2/H2 mixing for a coaxial injector under a supercritical pressure of 10 MPa is conducted using a highorder numerical method. Two outer H2 jets with injection temperatures of approximately 52 and 462 K are applied while an inner N2 jet with an injection temperature of approximately 97 K is applied. The mean and fluctuation properties and instantaneous flow fields are discussed in order to characterize the detailed mixing features for the two injection conditions. A clear dependence of dense-core length on the momentum flux ratio is also demonstrated.

  3. Strategic Forcing of Jets in Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitian, Juliett; Rodriguez, Edson; M'closkey, Robert; Karagozian, Ann

    2007-11-01

    This presentation will describe recent experiments that explore the response of a gaseous jet in crossflow to alternative methods of acoustic forcing. Building on an extensive prior exploration of transverse jet upstream shear layer instabilitiesootnotetextMegerian, Davitian, Alves, and Karagozian, JFM, to appear., the present studies employ alternative temporal waveforms for jet forcing, depending on the jet-to- crossflow velocity ratio R, through which transverse jet behavior may be strategically controlled. Smoke visualization is used to observe jet response to forcing. Jets that are injected both flush and elevated with respect to the wind tunnel surface are considered. For values of R > 3.5, prior studies show that the jet's shear layer instabilities appear convective in nature, and hence low to moderate sinusoidal jet forcing can impact jet shear layer response and spread. In contrast, for relatively low values of R (below 3.5 for the flush jet and below 1.2 for the elevated jet), strong natural shear layer instabilities are generated, hence even high amplitude sinusoidal forcing has little effect. At these low R conditions, much higher amplitude square wave forcing is required to produce a jet response, necessitating the introduction of a characteristic time scale associated with vorticity generation.

  4. Measuring soil erodibility using a laboratory "mini" JET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Typically the erosion rate of cohesive soils is quantified using an excess shear stress equation, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress and the erodibility coefficient. A submerged jet test (JETJet Erosion Test) is one method that has been developed for measuring the...

  5. Turbulent Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Perry, T. S.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Gittings, M. L.; Coker, R. F.; Keiter, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Drake, R. P.; Remington, B. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Campbell, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2003-10-01

    Over the last few years we have fielded numerous supersonic jet experiments on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers and Sandia's pulsed-power Z-machine in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. These experiments are being conducted to help validate our radiation-hydrodynamic codes, especially the newly developing ASC codes. One of the outstanding questions is whether these types of jets should turn turbulent given their high Reynolds number. Recently we have modified our experiments to have more Kelvin-Helmholtz shear, run much later in time and therefore have a better chance of going turbulent. In order to diagnose these large (several mm) jets at very late times ( 1000 ns) we are developing point-projection imaging on both the OMEGA laser, the Sandia Z-Machine, and ultimately at NIF. Since these jets have similar Euler numbers to jets theorized to be produced in supernovae explosions, we are also collaborating with the astrophysics community to help in the validation of their new codes. This poster will present a review of the laser and pulsed-power experiments and a comparison of the data to simulations by the codes from the various laboratories. We will show results of simulations wherein these jets turn highly 3-dimensional and show characteristics of turbulence. With the new data, we hope to be able to validate the sub-grid-scale turbulent mix models (e. g. BHR) that are being incorporated into our codes.*This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, Sandia National Laboratories under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Astrophysical Theory Grant.

  6. Optimisation by hierarchical search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zintchenko, Ilia; Hastings, Matthew; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Finding optimal values for a set of variables relative to a cost function gives rise to some of the hardest problems in physics, computer science and applied mathematics. Although often very simple in their formulation, these problems have a complex cost function landscape which prevents currently known algorithms from efficiently finding the global optimum. Countless techniques have been proposed to partially circumvent this problem, but an efficient method is yet to be found. We present a heuristic, general purpose approach to potentially improve the performance of conventional algorithms or special purpose hardware devices by optimising groups of variables in a hierarchical way. We apply this approach to problems in combinatorial optimisation, machine learning and other fields.

  7. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  8. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  9. Investigation of two plane parallel jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, H.; Gahin, S.; Rashed, M. I. I.

    1983-07-01

    Flow measurements made downstream from two air jets are reported. The exit Re was 20,000 and turbulence was kept to 1 pct. X-wire constant temperature anemometers were employed to measure the mean velocities and the three component turbulent intensities. Data were gathered on the flowfield of both a single jet and from two jets. A velocity profile from two jets was found to be similar to that of a single jet, with the combined jets width spreading linearly downstream as a single jet, but with a slightly lower spread angle. The turbulent velocity fluctuations were, however, dissimilar up to 120 nozzle diameters downstream. Finally, the maximum shear stress was nearly the same with two jets as with one jet.

  10. Comparison with Analytical Solution: Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2000-01-01

    An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer resulting in sound radiating away from the shear layer. Solve the linearized Euler equations to predict the sound radiation outside of the jet. The jet static pressure is assumed to be constant. The jet flow is parallel and symmetric about the x-axis. Use a symmetry boundary condition along the x-axis.

  11. Deriving parameters of a fundamental detachment model for cohesive soils from flume and jet erosion tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive soils is commonly quantified using the excess shear stress equation, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress and the erodibility coefficient. A submerged jet test (JETJet Erosion Test) is one method that has been developed for measuring thes...

  12. Optimisation in general radiography

    PubMed Central

    Martin, CJ

    2007-01-01

    Radiography using film has been an established method for imaging the internal organs of the body for over 100 years. Surveys carried out during the 1980s identified a wide range in patient doses showing that there was scope for dosage reduction in many hospitals. This paper discusses factors that need to be considered in optimising the performance of radiographic equipment. The most important factor is choice of the screen/film combination, and the preparation of automatic exposure control devices to suit its characteristics. Tube potential determines the photon energies in the X-ray beam, with the selection involving a compromise between image contrast and the dose to the patient. Allied to this is the choice of anti-scatter grid, as a high grid ratio effectively removes the larger component of scatter when using higher tube potentials. However, a high grid ratio attenuates the X-ray beam more heavily. Decisions about grids and use of low attenuation components are particularly important for paediatric radiography, which uses lower energy X-ray beams. Another factor which can reduce patient dose is the use of copper filtration to remove more low-energy X-rays. Regular surveys of patient dose and comparisons with diagnostic reference levels that provide a guide representing good practice enable units for which doses are higher to be identified. Causes can then be investigated and changes implemented to address any shortfalls. Application of these methods has led to a gradual reduction in doses in many countries. PMID:21614270

  13. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  14. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  15. Shock structure in non-circular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; Bhat, Thonse R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The shock-cell structure of supersonic jets with non-circular exit geometry is modeled using a linearized analysis. The model takes into account the finite thickness of the jet shear layer using realistic velocity and density profiles. The effects of the shear layer turbulence are included by incorporating eddy-viscosity terms. A finite-difference numerical method is used to solve the steady linearized equations of motion. A body-fitted coordinate system is used to describe the shear layer. The variation of the pressure fluctuation with downstream distance is given for circular jets and for an elliptic jet of aspect ratio 2.0. Comparisons with experimental data are made. Difficulties with the numerical technique are also discussed.

  16. Launching jets from accretion belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-05-01

    We propose that sub-Keplerian accretion belts around stars might launch jets. The sub-Keplerian inflow does not form a rotationally supported accretion disk, but it rather reaches the accreting object from a wide solid angle. The basic ingredients of the flow are a turbulent region where the accretion belt interacts with the accreting object via a shear layer, and two avoidance regions on the poles where the accretion rate is very low. A dynamo that is developed in the shear layer amplifies magnetic fields to high values. It is likely that the amplified magnetic fields form polar outflows from the avoidance regions. Our speculative belt-launched jets model has implications on a rich variety of astrophysical objects, from the removal of common envelopes to the explosion of core collapse supernovae by jittering jets.

  17. A Visual Study of Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Debora A.; Stadnicki, John

    1997-11-01

    A jet which issues from a small hole in a flow surface, pitched and skewed relative to the crossflow, creates a single streamwise vortex which resembles the flow downstream of a half-delta-wing vortex generator. The term ``vortex generator jet'' (VGJ) has been used to describe such a flow. Investigators of jet-generated vortices have recognized their applicability to active control and their flexibility in terms of being activated and deactivated. We have installed a spanwise array of VGJ's in a turbulent boundary layer in the zero-pressure-gradient test section of the 12" × 36" boundary layer wind tunnel at Boston University. The Reynolds number based on jet diameter is in the range 4000 < Re < 10000. Our experimental investigations include flow visualization of a single pitched and skewed jet in crossflow, as well as wall shear stress measurements downstream of the array of jets. To capture still images of a cross-section of the jet flow, a light sheet formed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used to illuminate smoke-tagged jet fluid. The wall shear stress measurements are made using an oil-film interferometry technique. Parameters varied include jet velocity and angles of jet pitch and skew.

  18. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  19. Control of jet flowfield dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibens, V.; Wlezien, R. W.

    1984-02-01

    Passive control of shear layer turbulence was investigated experimentally for low subsonic velocity jets from circular nozzles by studying effects of modifying nozzle exit geometry. Indeterminate origin (I.O.) nozzles used, including slanted, stepped and crenelated exit geometries, were so designated because streamwise location of the nozzle lip varies with azimuthal position, unlike standard nozzles for which the entire termination is at the same streamwise location. Flow visualization and detailed hot-wire measurements were used to observe development and interaction of large-scale turbulent structures in shear layers originating from various sectors of the I.O. nozzles, to determine the influence of instability wave patterns on ensuing flowfield characteristics and to relate observed evolution of three-dimensional large-scale turbulent structures to global properties of the jet flowfield such as velocity profiles and shear layer spreading rates as a function of streamwise distance and azimuthal angle. Results showed pronounced asymmetries in shear layer growth rates, which could be controlled by varying nozzle parameters. The asymmetries were also confirmed by measurements of azimuthal variation of shear layer turbulent energy as well as mean-velocity profiles. Detailed features of energy transfer from the mean flow into successively larger flow structures were traced by spectral mapping techniques and by mapping energy levels contained in subharmonics of the shear-layer instability frequency at various azimuthal flow sectors.

  20. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  1. Flow and mixing characteristics of an elevated pulsating transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Hsu, Ching M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow-evolution processes as well as the penetration, spread, and dispersion characteristics of elevated pulsating transverse jets were studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. Jet pulsations were induced by means of acoustic excitation. Streak pictures of the smoke-flow patterns, illuminated by a laser-light sheet in the median plane, were recorded by a high-speed digital camera. A hot-wire anemometer was used to digitize instantaneous velocities of instabilities in the flow. Penetration height and spread width were obtained through a binary edge identification technique. Tracer-gas concentrations were measured to provide information on jet dispersions and trajectories. Three characteristic flow modes (synchronized flapping jet, transition, and synchronized shear-layer vortices) were identified in the domain of the jet-to-crossflow momentum-flux ratio and the excitation Strouhal number. At low excitation Strouhal numbers, the jet column near the tube exit flapped back-and-forth periodically at the excitation frequency and induced large up-down motions of the deflected jet. The penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet increased drastically compared with the non-excited jet because the up-down oscillating motions of the deflected jet transformed the axial momentum into oscillating lateral momentum. Forcing the jet into the transition and synchronized shear-layer vortices regimes caused the vortices to appear along the upwind shear layer of the deflected jet. Under these conditions, the penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet presented insignificant increases because the entrainment effect induced by the shear-layer vortices was not as large as that produced by the jet oscillating motions in the synchronized flapping jet regime.

  2. Water Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  3. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  4. Optimised transdermal delivery of pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Burger, Cornel; Gerber, Minja; du Preez, Jan L; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-12-30

    Wiechers' programme "Formulating for Efficacy" initiated a new strategy to optimise the oil phase of topical formulations in order to achieve optimal transdermal drug delivery. This new approach uses the "Delivery Gap Theory" on any active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to test if it could enhance transdermal drug delivery. The aim of the study was to formulate six different semi-solid formulations (three creams and three emulgels) with 2% pravastatin as the API in order to investigate the "Delivery Gap Principle", by determining which formulation would deliver pravastatin best to the target-site (system circulation). The three cream- and three emulgel formulations had different polarities, i.e. a formulation with polarity equal to that of the stratum corneum (optimised), a non-polar (lipophilic)- and a polar (hydrophilic)-formulation. Franz cell diffusion studies were executed over 12h and the optimised emulgel (2.578μg/cm(2)) had the highest median amount per area obtained. Tape stripping followed the diffusion studies and in the stratum corneum-epidermis, the hydrophilic emulgel (1.448μg/ml) contained the highest median pravastatin concentration and the epidermis-dermis the optimised emulgel (0.849μg/ml) depicted the highest pravastatin concentration. During this study, it was observed that when both emulgel and cream formulations were compared; the emulgels enhanced the delivery of pravastatin more than the creams. PMID:26505148

  5. Streamline curvature in supersonic shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibens, V.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation in which a curved shear layer was generated between supersonic flow from a rectangular converging/diverging nozzle and the freestream in a series of open channels with varying radii of curvature are reported. The shear layers exhibit unsteady large-scale activity at supersonic pressure ratios, indicating increased mixing efficiency. This effect contrasts with supersonic flow in a straight channel, for which no large-scale vortical structure development occurs. Curvature must exceed a minimum level before it begins to affect the dynamics of the supersonic shear layer appreciably. The curved channel flows are compared with reference flows consisting of a free jet, a straight channel, and wall jets without sidewalls on a flat and a curved plate.

  6. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  7. Metallurgical examination of recovered copper jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1995-11-30

    A shaped charge (81 mm, 42{degrees}, OFHC copper cone) was fired into a ``soft` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 gm, of which 184 gm was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g. dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work we present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet we find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  8. Supersonic Jet Noise Reductions Predicted with Increased Jet Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, predictions are made of noise radiation from single, supersonic, axisymmetric jets. We examine the effects of changes in operating conditions and the effects of simulated enhanced mixing that would increase the spreading rate of the jet shear layer on radiated noise levels. The radiated noise in the downstream direction is dominated by mixing noise and it is well described by the instability wave noise radiation analysis. A numerical prediction scheme is used for the mean flow providing an efficient method to obtain the mean flow development for various operating conditions and to simulate the enhanced mixing. Using far field radiated noise measurements as a reference, the calculations predict that enhanced jet spreading results in a reduction of radiated noise.

  9. Site-scale variability of streambank fluvial erodibility parameters as measured with a jet erosion test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive streambanks is typically modeled using the excess shear stress equation, dependent on two erodibility parameters: critical shear stress and erodibility coefficient. The Jet Erosion Test (JET) has become the most common method for estimating these erodibility parameters ...

  10. Jet flow in steadily swimming adult squid.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Erik J; Grosenbaugh, Mark A

    2005-03-01

    Although various hydrodynamic models have been used in past analyses of squid jet propulsion, no previous investigations have definitively determined the fluid structure of the jets of steadily swimming squid. In addition, few accurate measurements of jet velocity and other jet parameters in squid have been reported. We used digital particle imaging velocimetry (DPIV) to visualize the jet flow of adult long-finned squid Loligo pealei (mantle length, L(m)=27.1+/-3.0 cm, mean +/-S.D.) swimming in a flume over a wide range of speeds (10.1-59.3 cm s(-1), i.e. 0.33-2.06 L(m) s(-1)). Qualitatively, squid jets were periodic, steady, and prolonged emissions of fluid that exhibited an elongated core of high speed flow. The development of a leading vortex ring common to jets emitted from pipes into still water often appeared to be diminished and delayed. We were able to mimic this effect in jets produced by a piston and pipe arrangement aligned with a uniform background flow. As in continuous jets, squid jets showed evidence of the growth of instability waves in the jet shear layer followed by the breakup of the jet into packets of vorticity of varying degrees of coherence. These ranged from apparent chains of short-lived vortex rings to turbulent plumes. There was some evidence of the complete roll-up of a handful of shorter jets into single vortex rings, but steady propulsion by individual vortex ring puffs was never observed. Quantitatively, the length of the jet structure in the visualized field of view, L(j), was observed to be 7.2-25.6 cm, and jet plug lengths, L, were estimated to be 4.4-49.4 cm using average jet velocity and jet period. These lengths and an average jet orifice diameter, D, of 0.8 cm were used to calculate the ratios L(j)/D and L/D, which ranged from 9.0 to 32.0 and 5.5 to 61.8, respectively. Jets emitted from pipes in the presence of a background flow suggested that the ratio between the background flow velocity and the jet velocity was more

  11. Effects of density, velocity gradient, and compressibility on side-jet formation in round jets with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Akinori

    2013-11-01

    When a low density gas compared with the ambient gas is discharged from a round nozzle, side jets that are radial ejections of jet fluid are generated at the initial region of the jet. The density ratio between the jet fluid and the ambient fluid is a main parameter for the side-jet formation. Since the side-jet formation is also related to the instability of shear layer, it depends on the velocity gradient of the shear layer in the jet. The velocity gradient is evaluated by a ratio of the momentum thickness and the nozzle diameter at the nozzle exit. Compressibility suppresses the instability and the generation of the side jets. The compressibility is evaluated by a Mach number, which is a ratio defined by an issuing velocity of the jet and a sound velocity in the ambient fluid. Influence of these three parameters on the side-jet formation was examined experimentally. The density ratio and momentum thickness ratio were varied from 0.14 to 1.53, and from 14 to 155, respectively. The Mach number was varied to 0.7. Existence of side jets was confirmed by flow visualization using a laser sheet. Domains for the side-jet formation by the density ratio, the momentum thickness ratio, and the Mach number were determined.

  12. Robust optimisation of railway crossing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chang; Markine, Valeri; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for improving the crossing (frog) geometry through the robust optimisation approach, wherein the variability of the design parameters within a prescribed tolerance is included in the optimisation problem. Here, the crossing geometry is defined by parameterising the B-spline represented cross-sectional shape and the longitudinal height profile of the nose rail. The dynamic performance of the crossing is evaluated considering the variation of wheel profiles and track alignment. A multipoint approximation method (MAM) is applied in solving the optimisation problem of minimising the contact pressure during the wheel-rail contact and constraining the location of wheel transition at the crossing. To clarify the difference between the robust optimisation and the normal deterministic optimisation approaches, the optimisation problems are solved in both approaches. The results show that the deterministic optimum fails under slight change of the design variables; the robust optimum, however, has improved and robust performance.

  13. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  14. Propagation of sound through a sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, J. P.; Smith, C. A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sound generated in a moving fluid must propagate through a shear layer in order to be measured by a fixed instrument. These propagation effects were evaluated for noise sources typically associated with single and co-flowing subsonic jets and for subcritical flow over airfoils in such jets. The techniques for describing acoustic propagation fall into two categories: geometric acoustics and wave acoustics. Geometric acoustics is most convenient and accurate for high frequency sound. In the frequency range of interest to the present study (greater than 150 Hz), the geometric acoustics approach was determined to be most useful and practical.

  15. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  16. Development of the mean velocity distribution in rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Swan, D. H.; Deotte, R. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The mean flowfield of 1 x 2 and 1 x 4 aspect ratio rectangular jets has been measured using a laser Doppler anemometer system. The development of the downstream velocity distribution is analyzed with respect to centerline velocity decay, shear layer growth, axis switching, and velocity profile development. Comparisons are made with axisymmetric, planar, and other rectangular jets.

  17. Structure and Mixing Characterization of Variable Density Transverse Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkyan, Levon

    This dissertation describes an experimental study of the structural and mixing characteristics of transverse jets, or jets in crossfiow (JICF). Hot-wire anemometry, stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV), and acetone planar laser-induced fiuorescence (PLIF) measurements were utilized to illuminate and quantify the wind-ward (upstream) jet shear layer instability characteristics and their relationship to the velocity field evolution, as well as the effect of the overall velocity field on the scalar field distribution and resulting mixing characteristics. Transverse jets of various jet-to-crossfiow momentum flux ratios in the range 41 ≥ J ≥ 2, and jet-to-crossfiow density ratios in the range 1.00 ≥ S ≥ 0.35, were generated using mixtures of helium and nitrogen in the jet fluid. Jets were injected from one of three different injectors explored: a convergent nozzle with circular geometry which was mounted flush with the wind tunnel floor, another convergent nozzle with circular geometry whose exit plane lies above the crossfiow boundary layer, and a flush-mounted straight pipe injector with a circular orifice. Jet Reynolds number was kept constant for the majority of the mixing and structural exploration experiments at Rej = 1900, except when the effect of Reynolds number on cross-sectional jet structure was explored. Previous hot-wire based measurements at UCLA suggest that the upstream jet shear layer transitions from convective instability to absolute instability, giving rise to self-excited nonlinear states, as either the momentum flux ratio is lowered below J ≈10, or the density ratio is lowered below S ≈ 0.45 for the JICF injected from the flush nozzle injector. A similar transition to absolute instability when lowering momentum flux ratio was found in this work for the flush-mounted pipe injector. Cross-sectional PLIF measurements in the present studies suggested clear correspondence between the formation of a symmetric counter-rotating vortex pair

  18. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

  19. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  20. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  1. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  2. Supersonic Coaxial Jets: Noise Predictions and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Papamoschou, Dimitri; Hixon, Ray

    1998-01-01

    The noise from perfectly expanded coaxial jets was measured in an anechoic chamber for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow, and exit area. The shape of the measured noise spectrum at different angles to the jet axis was found to agree with spectral shapes for single, axisymmetric jets. Based on these spectra, the sound was characterized as being generated by large turbulent structures or fine-scale turbulence. Modeling the large scale structures as instability waves, a stability analysis was conducted for the coaxial jets to identify the growing and decaying instability waves in each shear layer and predict their noise radiation pattern outside the jet. When compared to measured directivity, the analysis identified the region downstream of the outer potential core, where the two shear layers were merging, as the source of the peak radiated noise where instability waves, with their origin in the inner shear layer, reach their maximum amplitude. Numerical computations were also performed using a linearized Euler equation solver. Those results were compared to both the results from the instability wave analysis and to measured data.

  3. The free jet as a simulator of forward velocity effects on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Tester, B. J.; Tanna, H. K.

    1978-01-01

    A thorough theoretical and experimental study of the effects of the free-jet shear layer on the transmission of sound from a model jet placed within the free jet to the far-field receiver located outside the free-jet flow was conducted. The validity and accuracy of the free-jet flight simulation technique for forward velocity effects on jet noise was evaluated. Transformation charts and a systematic computational procedure for converting measurements from a free-jet simulation to the corresponding results from a wind-tunnel simulation, and, finally, to the flight case were provided. The effects of simulated forward flight on jet mixing noise, internal noise and shock-associated noise from model-scale unheated and heated jets were established experimentally in a free-jet facility. It was illustrated that the existing anomalies between full-scale flight data and model-scale flight simulation data projected to the flight case, could well be due to the contamination of flight data by engine internal noise.

  4. Effects of the Kelvin-Helmholtz surface instability on supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    An exact numerical calculation is provided for of linear growth and phase velocity of Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable wave modes on a supersonic jet of cylindrical cross section. An expression for the maximally unstable wavenumber of each wave mode is found. Provided a sharp velocity discontinuity exists all wave modes are unstable. A combination of rapid jet expansion and velocity shear across a jet can effectively stabilize all wave modes. The more likely case of slow jet expansion and of velocity shear at the jet surface allows wave modes with maximally unstable wavelength longer than or on the order of the jet radius to grow. The relative energy in different wave modes and effect on the jet is investigated. Energy input into a jet resulting from surface instability is discussed.

  5. Fast ion JET diagnostics: confinement and losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Syme, D. B.; Cecconello, M.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Yavorskij, V.; Johnson, T.; Murari, A.; Reich, M.; Gorini, G.; Zoita, V.

    2008-03-12

    A study of magnetically confined fast ions in tokamaks plays an important role in burning plasma research. To reach ignition and steady burning of a reactor plasma an adequate confinement of energetic ions produced by NBI heating, accelerated with ICRF and born in fusion reactions is essential to provide efficient heating of the bulk plasma. Thus, investigation of the fast ion behaviour is an immediate task for present-day large machines, such as JET, in order to understand the main mechanisms of slowing down, redistribution and losses, and to develop optimal plasma scenarios. Today's JET has an enhanced suite of fast ion diagnostics both of confined and lost ions that enable to significantly contribute to this important area of research. Fast ion populations of p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, made with ICRF, NBI, and fusion reactions have been investigated in experiments on JET with sophisticated diagnostics in conventional and shear-reversed plasmas, exploring a wide range of effects. This paper will introduce to the JET fast-ion diagnostic techniques and will give an overview of recent observations. A synergy of the unique diagnostic set was utilised in JET, and studies of the response of fast ions to MHD modes (e.g. tornado modes, sawtooth crashes), fast {sup 3}He-ions behaviour in shear-reversed plasmas are impressive examples of that. Some results on fast ion losses in JET experiments with various levels of the toroidal field ripple will be demonstrated.

  6. Numerical simulations of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttner, Gerhard; Smith, Michael D.; Yorke, Harold W.; Zinnecker, Hans

    Molecular jets announce the successful birth of a protostar. We develop here a model for the jets and their environments, adapting a multi-dimensional hydrocode to follow the molecular-atomic transitions of hydrogen. We examine powerful outflows into dense gas. The cocoon which forms around a jet is a very low density cavity of atomic gas. These atoms originate from strong shocks which dissociate the molecules. The rest of the molecules are either within the jet or swept up into very thin layers. Pulsed jets produce wider cavities and molecular layers which can grow onto resolvable jet knots. Three-dimensional simulations produce shocked molecular knots, distorted and multiple bow shocks and arclike structures. Spectroscopic and excitation properties of the hydrogen molecules are calculated. In the infrared, strong emission is seen from shocks within the jet (when pulsed) as well as from discrete regions along the cavity walls. Excitation, as measured by line ratios, is not generally constant. Broad double-peaked, shifted emission lines are predicted. The jet model for protostellar outflows is confronted with the constraints imposed by CO spectroscopic observations. From the three dimensional simulations we calculate line profiles and construct position-velocity diagrams for the (low-J) CO transitions. We find (1) the profiles imply power law variation of integrated brightness with velocity over a wide range of velocities, (2) the velocity field resembles a `Hubble Law' and (3) a hollow-shell structure at low velocities becomes an elongated lobe at high velocities. Deviations from the simple power law dependence of integrated brightness versus velocity occur at high velocities in our simulations. The curve first dips to a shallow minimum and then rises rapidly and peaks sharply. Reanalysis of the NGC 2264G and Cepheus E data confirm these predictions. We identify these two features with a jet-ambient shear layer and the jet itself. A deeper analysis reveals that

  7. Multiple Mode Actuation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2001-01-01

    The effects of multiple mode periodic excitation on the evolution of a circular turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit. Streamwise and cross-stream excitations were introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet on opposing sides of the jet. The introduction of high amplitude, periodic excitation in the streamwise direction enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Cross-stream excitation applied over a fraction of the jet circumference can deflect the jet away from the excitation slot. The two modes of excitation were combined using identical frequencies and varying the relative phase between the two actuators in search of an optimal response. It is shown that, for low and moderate periodic momentum input levels, the jet deflection angles depend strongly on the relative phase between the two actuators. Optimum performance is achieved when the phase difference is pi +/- pi/6. The lower effectiveness of the equal phase excitation is attributed to the generation of an azimuthally symmetric mode that does not produce the required non-axisymmetric vectoring. For high excitation levels, identical phase becomes more effective, while phase sensitivity decreases. An important finding was that with proper phase tuning, two unsteady actuators can be combined to obtain a non-linear response greater than the superposition of the individual effects.

  8. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  9. VLBA AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF JETS IN FRI RADIO GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS ON JET EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; O'Dea, C. P.; Tilak, A.; Baum, S. A.; Haynes, E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Fallon, C.; Christiansen, K.

    2012-07-20

    We present here the results from new Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz of 19 galaxies of a complete sample of 21 Uppasala General Catalog (UGC) Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies. New Chandra data of two sources, viz., UGC 00408 and UGC 08433, are combined with the Chandra archival data of 13 sources. The 5 GHz observations of 10 'core-jet' sources are polarization-sensitive, while the 1.6 GHz observations constitute second-epoch total intensity observations of nine 'core-only' sources. Polarized emission is detected in the jets of seven sources at 5 GHz, but the cores are essentially unpolarized, except in M87. Polarization is detected at the jet edges in several sources, and the inferred magnetic field is primarily aligned with the jet direction. This could be indicative of magnetic field 'shearing' due to jet-medium interaction, or the presence of helical magnetic fields. The jet peak intensity I{sub {nu}} falls with distance d from the core, following the relation, I{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}d{sup a} , where a is typically {approx} - 1.5. Assuming that adiabatic expansion losses are primarily responsible for the jet intensity 'dimming,' two limiting cases are considered: (1) the jet has a constant speed on parsec scales and is expanding gradually such that the jet radius r{proportional_to}d 0{sup .4}; this expansion is, however, unobservable in the laterally unresolved jets at 5 GHz, and (2) the jet is cylindrical and is accelerating on parsec scales. Accelerating parsec-scale jets are consistent with the phenomenon of 'magnetic driving' in Poynting-flux-dominated jets. While slow jet expansion as predicted by case (1) is indeed observed in a few sources from the literature that are resolved laterally, on scales of tens or hundreds of parsecs, case (2) cannot be ruled out in the present data, provided the jets become conical on scales larger than those probed by VLBA. Chandra observations of 15 UGC FRIs detect X-ray jets in

  10. Stability of Shallow Jovian Atmospheric Zonal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Dowling, T. E.; Showman, A. P.

    2007-10-01

    Jupiter's cloud-level zonal jets are remarkably steady in time despite their sharp curvature (i.e., second latitudinal derivative of the zonal wind profile). The stable jets must be supported by a proper sub-cloud wind and thermal structure; however, the large-scale deep structure of the zonal jets and temperature remain a major unknown in the gas-giant planet atmospheres. Past studies suggest two end-point scenarios of deep wind structures that allow stable cloud-level jets. The first shows that the jets are stable if they penetrate through the molecular hydrogen layer (Ingersoll and Pollard, 1982), although they do not address how the deep flow may be coupled to the cloud-level wind. Many other studies, though they may not directly address the shear instabilities, support this "deep jet” scenario (e.g. Heimpel and Aurnou, 2007); however, they do not rule out the possibility that the jets are shallow. Gierasch (2004) introduced a notable alternative to this "deep” picture. Through linear stability analysis, he showed that an isolated eastward jet that reaches a point of zero motion at 100-bar level, with Jupiter-like speeds and widths at the top, can be stable under certain conditions. However, his analysis contained several untested assumptions, and whether such flows are actually stable in a more realistic setting remains an open question. The possibility of stable shallow zonal jets on Jupiter remains largely unexplored, and this possibility deserves a thorough consideration. We present full-3D nonlinear simulations that test the stability of shallow zonal jets. We use Richardson number as a measure of vertical flow scale, and aim to show whether shallow jets are consistent with the observed jets and place theoretical constraints on the sub-cloud wind structure. Our study uses the EPIC model (Dowling et al., 1998, 2006). The research has been supported by NASA Planetary Atmosphere grants to APS and TED.

  11. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  12. Turbulence measurements of lateral jet injection into confined tubular crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, G. B.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to characterize the time-mean and turbulent flowfield of a deflected turbulent jet in a confining cylindrical crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of 2, 4, and 6 were investigated, with no swirl in the crossflow. A six-position single hotwire technique was used to measure the velocities and all turbulent normal and shear stresses. Measurements confirmed that the deflected jet is symmetrical about the vertical plane passing through the crossflow axis, and the jet penetration was found to be reduced from that of comparable velocity-ratio infinite crossflow cases.

  13. Relationship between Entrainment and Static Pressure Field on 2-D Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Ono, K.; Saima, A.

    1996-11-01

    It is well know that entrainment carried out in wakes and jets. This experimental study aimes at investigation the relationship between the entrainment and the pressure field in 2-D jet. The 2-D jet was generated by 2-D rectangular wind tunnel. The velocity and prressure fields were observed in order to investigate the free shear layer of jet. These value were measured by the x type hot-wire anemometer, LDV and the newly developed static pressure probe. Jet diffusion process is visualized by smoke wire method. The result of the experiment was that the static pressure fluctuated intensively, and was negative mean value because of the velocity intermittence in the free shear layer of the 2-D jet. It seems reasonable to suppose that entrainment occurs owing to the negative static pressure by the eddy motion and large scale convection in the free shear layer.

  14. Dichotomy of X-Ray Jets in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robe, D. M.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    It has been found that there are two different types of X-ray jets observed in the Sun's polar coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. A proposed model of this dichotomy is that a standard jet is produced by a burst of reconnection of the ambient magnetic field with the opposite-polarity leg of the base arcade. In contrast, it appears that a blowout jet is produced when the interior of the arcade has so much pent-up free magnetic energy in the form of shear and twist in the interior field that the external reconnection unleashes the interior field to erupt open. In this project, X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes taken by Hinode were searched for X-ray jets. Co-temporal movies taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 304 Å emission from He II, showing solar plasma at temperatures around 80,000 K, were examined for whether the identified blowout jets carry much more He II plasma than the identified standard jets. It was found that though some jets identified as standard from the X-ray movies could be seen in the He II 304 Å movies, the blowout jets carried much more 80,000 K plasma than did most standard jets. This finding supports the proposed model for the morphology and development of the two types of jets.

  15. Free turbulent shear flows. Volume 2: Summary of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on free turbulent shear flows are presented. Objectives of the conference are as follows: (1) collect and process data for a variety of free mixing problems, (2) assess present theoretical capability for predicting mean velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions in free turbulent flows, (3) identify and recommend experimental studies to advance knowledge of free shear flows, and (4) increase understanding of basic turbulent mixing process for application to free shear flows. Examples of specific cases of jet flow are included.

  16. Optimising uncertainty in physical sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Lyn, Jennifer A; Ramsey, Michael H; Damant, Andrew P; Wood, Roger

    2005-11-01

    Uncertainty associated with the result of a measurement can be dominated by the physical sample preparation stage of the measurement process. In view of this, the Optimised Uncertainty (OU) methodology has been further developed to allow the optimisation of the uncertainty from this source, in addition to that from the primary sampling and the subsequent chemical analysis. This new methodology for the optimisation of physical sample preparation uncertainty (u(prep), estimated as s(prep)) is applied for the first time, to a case study of myclobutanil in retail strawberries. An increase in expenditure (+7865%) on the preparatory process was advised in order to reduce the s(prep) by the 69% recommended. This reduction is desirable given the predicted overall saving, under optimised conditions, of 33,000 pounds Sterling per batch. This new methodology has been shown to provide guidance on the appropriate distribution of resources between the three principle stages of a measurement process, including physical sample preparation.

  17. Optimising costs in WLCG operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandes Pradillo, María; Dimou, Maria; Flix, Josep; Forti, Alessandra; Sciabà, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse the 50 Petabytes of data annually generated by the LHC. The WLCG operations are coordinated by a distributed team of managers and experts and performed by people at all participating sites and from all the experiments. Several improvements in the WLCG infrastructure have been implemented during the first long LHC shutdown to prepare for the increasing needs of the experiments during Run2 and beyond. However, constraints in funding will affect not only the computing resources but also the available effort for operations. This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation on the allocation of the effort in the different areas of WLCG operations, identifies the most important sources of inefficiency and proposes viable strategies for optimising the operational cost, taking into account the current trends in the evolution of the computing infrastructure and the computing models of the experiments.

  18. Optimising testing for phospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Helbert, M; Bodger, S; Cavenagh, J; D'Cruz, D; Thomas, J; MacCallum, P

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To compare anticardiolipin (ACL) and anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 (ß2gp1) enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and to incorporate these results into a meta-analysis of published data. Method—Three representative commercial ACL ELISAs and an in house ß2gp1 assay were optimised and then assessed on 124 sera from normal donors, patients with infection, or patients with APS. A Medline search was screened for papers meeting defined criteria to conduct a meta-analysis. The performance of the assays used in this study was included. Results—A non-quantitative ACL assay performed at least as well as the anti-ß2gp1 assay in the diagnosis of APS. Meta-analysis confirmed that neither assay is perfect, although the anti-ß2gp1 assay had a higher specificity and lower sensitivity than the ACL assay. Conclusions—The pooled data suggest that the ACL assay is used to investigate thrombosis without overt underlying pathology and that the improved specificity of the anti-ß2gp1 assay is exploited where infection, connective tissue disease, or atheroma are present. Key Words: antiphospholipid syndrome • anticardiolipin antibodies • anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 • sensitivity PMID:11533076

  19. Refraction and scattering of sound by a shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The angle and amplitude changes for acoustic waves refracted by a circular open jet shear layer were determined. The generalized refraction theory was assessed experimentally for on axis and off axis acoustic source locations as source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz and free stream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. Angle and amplitude changes across the shear layer show good agreement with theory. Experiments confirm that the refraction theory is independent of shear layer thickness, acoustic source frequency, and source type. A generalized theory is, thus, available for correcting far field noise data acquired in open jet test facilities. The effect of discrete tone scattering by the open jet turbulent shear layer was also studied. Scattering effects were investigated over the same Mach number range as frequency varied from 5 kHz to 15 kHz. Attenuation of discrete tone amplitude and tone broadening were measured as a function of acoustic source position and radiation angle. Scattering was found to be stronger at angles close to the open jet axis than at 90 deg, and becomes stronger as the acoustic source position shifts downstream. A scattering analysis provided an estimate of the onset of discrete tone scattering.

  20. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  1. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  2. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  3. Experimental investigation of a confined developing axisymmetric wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew; Vlachos, Pavlos; Garimella, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    The present work reports an experimental study of an axisymmetric, confined wall jet using planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the dielectric liquid HFE-7100. The wall jet is formed downstream from a confined and submerged impinging round jet, 3.75 mm in diameter. Both the developing region and self-similar region of the wall jet are investigated. The experiments are conducted for Reynolds numbers (Re = Ud/ υ) ranging from 1500 to 38000 and at a nozzle-to-plate spacing of four jet diameters. Image-preprocessing techniques are used to eliminate background noise and an ensemble correlation scheme is applied to improve the resolution of the measurement of the mean velocity field near the wall. A maximum measurement resolution of 36 μm is achieved. Profiles of the mean velocity, turbulent intensities, decay rate, spread rate and wall shear stress are used to characterize the influence of confinement on the wall jet development and inner layer scaling.

  4. Vorticity Dynamics in Single and Multiple Swirling Reacting Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Travis; Aguilar, Michael; Emerson, Benjamin; Noble, David; Lieuwen, Tim

    2015-11-01

    This presentation describes an analysis of the unsteady flow structures in two multinozzle swirling jet configurations. This work is motivated by the problem of combustion instabilities in premixed flames, a major concern in the development of modern low NOx combustors. The objective is to compare the unsteady flow structures in these two configurations for two separate geometries and determine how certain parameters, primarily distance between jets, influence the flow dynamics. The analysis aims to differentiate between the flow dynamics of single nozzle and triple nozzle configurations. This study looks at how the vorticity in the shear layers of one reacting swirling jet can affect the dynamics of a nearby similar jet. The distance between the swirling jets is found to have an effect on the flow field in determining where swirling jets merge and on the dynamics upstream of the merging location. Graduate Student, School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

  5. A NUMERICAL MODEL OF STANDARD TO BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Archontis, V.; Hood, A. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report on three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations of the formation of jets produced during the emergence and eruption of solar magnetic fields. The interaction between an emerging and an ambient magnetic field in the solar atmosphere leads to (external) reconnection and the formation of ''standard'' jets with an inverse Y-shaped configuration. Eventually, low-atmosphere (internal) reconnection of sheared fieldlines in the emerging flux region produces an erupting magnetic flux rope and a reconnection jet underneath it. The erupting plasma blows out the ambient field and, moreover, it unwinds as it is ejected into the outer solar atmosphere. The fast emission of the cool material that erupts together with the hot outflows due to external/internal reconnection form a wider ''blowout'' jet. We show the transition from ''standard'' to ''blowout'' jets and report on their 3D structure. The physical plasma properties of the jets are consistent with observational studies.

  6. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  7. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  8. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  9. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  10. F Ring Mini-Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attree, N.; Murray, C.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G.

    2012-12-01

    Mini-jets are small, (~50 km) linear features observed in Cassini images to be emanating from Saturn's F ring; they are believed to be produced by collisions with a local population of moonlets. An analysis of one such feature, observed over the course of a ~7.5 h sequence as its length changed from ~75 km to ~250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse back into the core, supports the collisional theory of their origin [1]. Orbit determination suggests that this mini-jet consisted of ring material displaced by a ~1 m/s collision with a nearby object, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. The colliding object itself is likely to be too small to resolve in these images but represents just one member of a population of F ring moonlets. Such a population has been investigated by UVIS occultations [2], and other methods, but generally remains unresolved in Cassini images. Collisional features such as this mini-jet therefore provide an additional tracer for the region's moonlet population. In this talk we will present the results of recent work in measuring and describing a subset of ~350 catalogued mini-jets, applying knowledge gained from the original mini-jet feature. Their distribution in space and time, proximity to Prometheus and evolution are all examined in an effort to place constraints on the properties of the underlying population of colliding objects. References [1] N. O. Attree, C. D. Murray, N. J. Cooper, and G. A. Williams. Detection of low velocity collisions in Saturn's F ring. Ap. J. Lett. (In press). [1] B. K. Meinke, L. W. Esposito, N. Albers, and M. Sremevi. Classification of F ring features observed in cassini UVIS occultations. Icarus, 218(1):545 - 554, 2012.

  11. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  12. Visualizing interior and exterior jet aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moondra, Manmohan S.

    In today's competitive aerospace industry, the quest for quiet has drawn significant attention to both the interior and exterior design of an airplane. Understanding the noise generation mechanisms of a jet aircraft is a crucial first step toward developing the most cost-effective noise and vibrations abatement methods. In this investigation, the Helmholtz Equation Least Squares (HELS) based nearfield acoustic holography will be used to understand noise transmission caused by jet engine and turbulence into the fuselage of a jet aircraft cruising at 30,000 ft. Modern propulsive jet engines produce exterior noise sources with a high amplitude noise field and complicated characteristics, which makes them very difficult to characterize. In particular, there are turbulent eddies that are moving through the jet at high speeds along the jet boundary. These turbulent eddies in the shear layer produce a directional and frequency dependent noise. The original HELS approach assumes a spherical source at the origin and computes the acoustic field based on spherical emission from this source. This assumption of one source at the origin is not sufficient to characterize a complex source like a jet. As such, a modified HELS approach is introduced that will help improve the source characterization as it is not dependent on a single source at the origin but a number of virtual sources throughout the space. Custom microphones are created to take acoustic pressure measurements around the jet engine. These measured acoustic pressures are then taken as input to the modified HELS algorithm to visualize the noise pattern of a subsonic jet engine.

  13. Splitting of Forced Elliptic Jets and Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, J.; Carlton, J.; Schwieterman, M.; Davis, E.; Bradley, E.; Linne, M.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluid dynamics in the interaction of large scale, three-dimensional vortex structures and transitional diffusion flames in a microgravity environment. The vortex structures are used to provide a known perturbation of the type used in passive and active shear layer control techniques. 'Passive techniques' refers to manipulation of the system geometry to influence the three dimensional dynamics of vortex structures, and 'active' refers to any technique which adds energy (acoustic or kinetic) to the flow to influence the shear layer vortex dynamics. In this work the passive forcing is provided by an elliptic jet cross-section, and the active forcing is incorporated by perturbing the jet velocity using a loudspeaker in the plenum section.

  14. Measurements of turbulent inclined plane dual jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. S.; Lin, Y. F.; Sheu, M. J.

    1993-11-01

    Measurements of mean velocities, flow direction, velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stress were made with a split film probe of hot wire anemometer to investigate the interactions created by two air jets issuing from two identical plane inclined nozzles. The reverse flow was detected by using the split film probe and observed by flow visualization. Experimental results with an inclined angle of 9° are presented in the paper. Some experimental results with an inclined angle of 27° are presented to investigate the effect of inclination on the flow field. Mean velocities approach self-preservation in both the converging region and the combining region. Velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stress approach self-preservation in the combining region only. The spreads of jet and the square of the decay of maximum mean velocity increase linearly as the distance from the nozzle exit increases.

  15. Analysis of a dusty wall jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hock-Bin; Roberts, Leonard

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is given for the entrainment of dust into a turbulent radial wall jet. Equations are solved based on incompressible flow of a radial wall jet into which dust is entrained from the wall and transported by turbulent diffusion and convection throughout the flow. It is shown that the resulting concentration of dust particles in the flow depends on the difference between the applied shear stress at the surface and the maximum level of shear stress that the surface can withstand (varies as rho(sub d)a(sub g)D) i.e., the pressure due to the weight of a single layer of dust. The analysis is expected to have application to the downflow that results from helicopter and VTOL aircraft.

  16. Numerical Study on Cryogenic Coflowing Jets under Transcritical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Hiroumi; Teramoto, Susumu; Okamoto, Koji; Yamanishi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-01

    A numerical and experimental study is presented on cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions for a better understanding of the propellant mixing in supercritical-pressure rocket engines. The major concerns are dominant flow structures in the mixing of cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions. Experimentally, in advance of detailed numerical simulations, cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coaxial jets were visualized by the backlighting photography technique. It was observed that a dense nitrogen core has a shear-layer instability near the injector exit and eventually breaks up into large lumps which dissolve and fade away downstream. In numerical simulations, LES technique was employed for more detailed discussion on the flow structures. LES of a cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coflowing plane jet was conducted with the same density and velocity ratios of inner/outer jets as the experiments. As observed in the experiments, the shear-layer instability in the inner mixing layers is predominant near the injector exit. After roll-up and paring, the shear-layer instability waves become large-scale vortices. They cause coherent vortex structures which become dominant in the downstream and break the dense core into lumps. Strouhal numbers of the shear-layer instability and the dense lump shedding in the numerical simulations were comparable to those measured in the experiments, respectively.

  17. Shear Stress Sensing with Elastic Microfence Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisotto, Alexxandra; Palmieri, Frank L.; Saini, Aditya; Lin, Yi; Thurman, Christopher S; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Taeyang; Connell, John W.; Zhu, Yong; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Jiang, Xiaoning; Wohl, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, elastic microfences were generated for the purpose of measuring shear forces acting on a wind tunnel model. The microfences were fabricated in a two part process involving laser ablation patterning to generate a template in a polymer film followed by soft lithography with a two-part silicone. Incorporation of a fluorescent dye was demonstrated as a method to enhance contrast between the sensing elements and the substrate. Sensing elements consisted of multiple microfences prepared at different orientations to enable determination of both shear force and directionality. Microfence arrays were integrated into an optical microscope with sub-micrometer resolution. Initial experiments were conducted on a flat plate wind tunnel model. Both image stabilization algorithms and digital image correlation were utilized to determine the amount of fence deflection as a result of airflow. Initial free jet experiments indicated that the microfences could be readily displaced and this displacement was recorded through the microscope.

  18. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  19. [Process optimisation: from theory to practical implementation].

    PubMed

    Töpfer, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Today process optimisation is an indispensable approach to mastering the current challenges of modern health care management. The objective is to design business processes free of defects and free of waste as well as their monitoring and controlling with meaningful test statistics. Based on the identification of essential key performance indicators, key success factors and value cash generators two basic approaches to process optimisation, which are well-established and widely used in the industry, are now being implemented in the health care sector as well: Lean Management and Six Sigma.

  20. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  1. The Giant Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  2. Numerical simulations of accretion disks and astrophysical jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Bodo, G.; Mignone, A.; Massaglia, S.; Ferrari, A.

    We present the results of high resolution numerical simulations concerning accretion disks and relativistic jets. For accretion disks, in the context of the problem of angular momentum transport, we performed simulations of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box approximation and, on the basis of our results, we discuss its validity. In the case of relativistic jets, we analyse how their interaction with the ambient medium can lead to their deceleration, as it appears to be the case for jets in FRI extragalactic radiosources.

  3. Spectra and Diffusion in a Round Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1951-01-01

    In a round turbulent jet at room temperature, measurement of the shear correlation coefficient as a function of frequency (through band-pass filters) has given a rather direct verification of Kolmogoroff's local-isotropy hypothesis. One-dimensional power spectra of velocity and temperature fluctuations, measured in unheated and heated jets, respectively, have been contrasted. Under the same conditions, the two corresponding transverse correlation functions have been measured and compared. Finally, measurements have been made of the mean thermal wakes behind local (line) heat sources in the unheated turbulent jet, and the order of magnitude of the temperature fluctuations has been determined.

  4. Spectrums and Diffusion in a Round Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1950-01-01

    In a round turbulent jet at room temperature, measurement of the shear correlation coefficient as a function of frequency (through bandpass filters) has given a rather direct verification of Kolmogoroff's local-isotropy hypothesis. One-dimensional power spectrums of velocity and temperature fluctuations, measured in unheated and heated jets, respectively, have been contrasted. Under the same conditions, the two corresponding transverse correlation functions have been measured and compared. Finally, measurements have been made of the mean thermal wakes behind local (line) heat sources in the unheated turbulent jet, and the order of magnitude of the temperature fluctuations has been determined. (author)

  5. Angular shear plate

    SciTech Connect

    Ruda, Mitchell C.; Greynolds, Alan W.; Stuhlinger, Tilman W.

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  6. Fighting wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A “coherent and sustained program” of improved radar detection of weather, pilot training, and better communication between pilots and air controllers can greatly reduce the risk of wind shear to airplanes landing or taking off, according to a National Research Council (NRC) committee.Wind shear, characterized by winds rapidly changing direction and speed, has caused several serious accidents in recent years; among the most notable is the July 8, 1982, crash of a Pan American World Airlines jetliner at the New Orleans International Airport, which killed 153 persons. Following the accident, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to contract with the NRC to study wind shear.

  7. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  8. On Optimal Development and Becoming an Optimiser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to provide a justification for the claim that optimal development and becoming an optimiser are educational ideals that parents should pursue in raising their children. Optimal development is conceptualised as enabling children to grow into flourishing persons, that is persons who have developed (and are still developing) their…

  9. An efficient and flexible web services-based multidisciplinary design optimisation framework for complex engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liansheng; Liu, Jihong

    2012-08-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) involves multiple disciplines, multiple coupled relationships and multiple processes, which is implemented by different specialists dispersed geographically on heterogeneous platforms with different analysis and optimisation tools. The product design data integration and data sharing among the participants hampers the development and applications of MDO in enterprises seriously. Therefore, a multi-hierarchical integrated product design data model (MH-iPDM) supporting the MDO in the web environment and a web services-based multidisciplinary design optimisation (Web-MDO) framework are proposed in this article. Based on the enabling technologies including web services, ontology, workflow, agent, XML and evidence theory, the proposed framework enables the designers geographically dispersed to work collaboratively in the MDO environment. The ontology-based workflow enables the logical reasoning of MDO to be processed dynamically. The evidence theory-based uncertainty reasoning and analysis supports the quantification, aggregation and analysis of the conflicting epistemic uncertainty from multiple sources, which improves the quality of product. Finally, a proof-of-concept prototype system is developed using J2EE and an example of supersonic business jet is demonstrated to verify the autonomous execution of MDO strategies and the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. Modern developments in shear flow control with swirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farokhi, Saeed; Taghavi, R.

    1990-01-01

    Passive and active control of swirling turbulent jets is experimentally investigated. Initial swirl distribution is shown to dominate the free jet evolution in the passive mode. Vortex breakdown, a manifestation of high intensity swirl, was achieved at below critical swirl number (S = 0.48) by reducing the vortex core diameter. The response of a swirling turbulent jet to single frequency, plane wave acoustic excitation was shown to depend strongly on the swirl number, excitation Strouhal number, amplitude of the excitation wave, and core turbulence in a low speed cold jet. A 10 percent reduction of the mean centerline velocity at x/D = 9.0 (and a corresponding increase in the shear layer momentum thickness) was achieved by large amplitude internal plane wave acoustic excitation. Helical instability waves of negative azimuthal wave numbers exhibit larger amplification rates than the plane waves in swirling free jets, according to hydrodynamic stability theory. Consequently, an active swirling shear layer control is proposed to include the generation of helical instability waves of arbitrary helicity and the promotion of modal interaction, through multifrequency forcing.

  11. Experimental investigation of mixing and ignition of transverse jets in supersonic crossflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2001-07-01

    Near-field mixing and ignition characteristics of sonic transverse jets injected into supersonic crossflows were studied experimentally. The use of an impulse facility made it feasible to achieve high temperature and high velocity conditions relevant to a realistic supersonic combustor environment. The application of supersonic flow visualization at ultra-fast-framing rates enabled a detailed study of the temporal evolution of jets. In the first part of the dissertation, hydrogen and ethylene fuel jets were studied because of their relevance to supersonic combustors. Ethylene transverse injection demonstrated higher penetration depth and larger jet shear layer growth as compared to the hydrogen case for the same momentum flux ratio. Previously the momentum flux ratio was suggested to be the main controlling parameter of the jet penetration; the results here demonstrated the existence of a ``tilting- stretching-tearing'' mechanism that alters the growth rate and the mixing properties of the jet shear layer. In the second part, we investigated the stability of the jet shear layer at various speed ratios and density ratios via schlieren. The high shear stresses induced by the large velocity difference across the jet shear layer had a large effect on the structure of the layer. For the unstable case, we noticed: (1)loss of Kelvin- Helmholtz structures; (2)increased growth rates with decreasing values of jet-to-free-stream velocity ratio; (3)large intrusions of crossflow in between the eddies, and (4)additional shock waves and distortion of the bow shock around the large eddies. Stable layers showed well-defined Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers. The results plotted in a density-velocity ratio diagram demonstrated two separate regions of stable and unstable jet shear layers with a separation line at a critical velocity ratio. The last part of the thesis studied the ignition capability of hydrogen and ethylene jets. Planar Laser- Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of OH demonstrated

  12. Experimental assessment of theory for refraction of sound by a shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    The refraction angle and amplitude changes associated with sound transmission through a circular, open-jet shear layer were studied in a 0.91 m diameter open jet acoustic research tunnel. Free stream Mach number was varied from 0.1 to 0.4. Good agreement between refraction angle correction theory and experiment was obtained over the test Mach number, frequency and angle measurement range for all on-axis acoustic source locations. For off-axis source positions, good agreement was obtained at a source-to-shear layer separation distance greater than the jet radius. Measureable differences between theory and experiment occurred at a source-to-shear layer separation distance less than one jet radius. A shear layer turbulence scattering experiment was conducted at 90 deg to the open jet axis for the same free stream Mach numbers and axial source locations used in the refraction study. Significant discrete tone spectrum broadening and tone amplitude changes were observed at open jet Mach numbers above 0.2 and at acoustic source frequencies greater than 5 kHz. More severe turbulence scattering was observed for downstream source locations.

  13. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    To investigate the possibility of active control of jet noise, knowledge of the noise generation mechanisms in natural jets is essential. Once these mechanisms are determined, active control can be used to manipulate the noise production processes. We investigated the evolution of the flow fields and the acoustic fields of rectangular and circular jets. A predominant flapping mode was found in the supersonic rectangular jets. We hope to increase the spreading of supersonic jets by active control of the flapping mode found in rectangular supersonic jets.

  14. Lateral jet injection into typical combustor flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental problem of lateral jet injection into typical flow fields in the absence of combustion was studied. All flow fields being investigated have no expansion of the crossflow (the test section to swirler diameter ratio D/d = 1), after its passage through an optional swirler (with swirl vane angle phi = 0 (swirler removed), 45, and 70 degree). The lateral jet(s) is(are) located one test-section diameter downstream of the test-section inlet (x/D = 1). The lateral jets have round-sectioned nozzles, each of which has an area of 1/100th of the cross sectional area of the crossflow (A sub j/A sub c = 1/100). Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of R = v sub j/u sub o = 2, 4, and 6 were investigated. Helium-bubble low visualization, five-hole pitot probe time-mean velocity measurements, and single-wire time-mean velocity and normal and shear stress turbulence data were obtained in the research program.

  15. Flow field topology of submerged jets with fractal generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafiero, Gioacchino; Discetti, Stefano; Astarita, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    Fractal grids (FGs) have been recently an object of numerous investigations due to the interesting capability of generating turbulence at multiple scales, thus paving the way to tune mixing and scalar transport. The flow field topology of a turbulent air jet equipped with a square FG is investigated by means of planar and volumetric particle image velocimetry. The comparison with the well-known features of a round jet without turbulence generators is also presented. The Reynolds number based on the nozzle exit section diameter for all the experiments is set to about 15 000. It is demonstrated that the presence of the grid enhances the entrainment rate and, as a consequence, the scalar transfer of the jet. Moreover, due to the effect of the jet external shear layer on the wake shed by the grid bars, the turbulence production region past the grid is significantly shortened with respect to the documented behavior of fractal grids in free-shear conditions. The organization of the large coherent structures in the FG case is also analyzed and discussed. Differently from the well-known generation of toroidal vortices due to the growth of azimuthal disturbances within the jet shear layer, the fractal grid introduces cross-wise disturbs which produce streamwise vortices; these structures, although characterized by a lower energy content, have a deeper streamwise penetration than the ring vortices, thus enhancing the entrainment process.

  16. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  17. Optimising a vortex fluidic device for controlling chemical reactivity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Lyzu; Chen, Xianjue; Stubbs, Keith A.; Raston, Colin L.

    2013-07-01

    A vortex fluidic device (VFD) involving a rapidly rotating tube open at one end forms dynamic thin films at high rotational speed for finite sub-millilitre volumes of liquid, with shear within the films depending on the speed and orientation of the tube. Continuous flow operation of the VFD where jet feeds of solutions are directed to the closed end of the tube provide additional tuneable shear from the viscous drag as the liquid whirls along the tube. The versatility of this simple, low cost microfluidic device, which can operate under confined mode or continuous flow is demonstrated in accelerating organic reactions, for model Diels-Alder dimerization of cyclopentadienes, and sequential aldol and Michael addition reactions, in accessing unusual 2,4,6-triarylpyridines. Residence times are controllable for continuous flow processing with the viscous drag dominating the shear for flow rates >0.1 mL/min in a 10 mm diameter tube rotating at >2000 rpm.

  18. Natural instability of free shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husain, Z. D.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Under controlled small-amplitude excitation, an initially laminar free shear layer experiences maximum growth rate at a Strouhal number St(theta) of 0.017 (consistent with theory) and maximum growth at St(theta) = 0.011, while the natural instability frequency St(theta-n) (of an unexcited shear layer) is found to have an intermediate value. Investigations in both axisymmetric and plane shear layers in a number of independent facilities reveal that the St(theta-n) value falls in the range 0.0125-0.0155, depending on the exit boundary-layer fluctuation level and the spanwise radius of curvature. The St(theta-n) value decreases with increasing jet diameter or exit boundary-layer fluctuation level, but is not a direct function of the exit momentum thickness Reynolds number. For a given facility, the instability details are found to be independent of whether the entrainment at the lip is parallel to the stream or orthogonal (due to the addition of an end plate). The steamwise evolutions of the amplitudes at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics and subharmonics are unique functions of the downstream distance nondimensionalized by the exit momentum thickness, but their details remain functions of the flow geometry (i.e., axisymmetric or plane).

  19. Magnetic Field Generation in Core-sheath Jets via the Kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Duţan, I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Meli, A.; Sol, H.; Zhang, B.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated magnetic field generation in velocity shears via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI) using a relativistic plasma jet core and stationary plasma sheath. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations consider plasma jet cores with Lorentz factors of 1.5, 5, and 15 for both electron-proton and electron-positron plasmas. For electron-proton plasmas, we find generation of strong large-scale DC currents and magnetic fields that extend over the entire shear surface and reach thicknesses of a few tens of electron skin depths. For electron-positron plasmas, we find generation of alternating currents and magnetic fields. Jet and sheath plasmas are accelerated across the shear surface in the strong magnetic fields generated by the kKHI. The mixing of jet and sheath plasmas generates a transverse structure similar to that produced by the Weibel instability.

  20. Magnetic field generation in core-sheath jets via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Duţan, I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Meli, A.; Sol, H.; Zhang, B.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2014-09-20

    We have investigated magnetic field generation in velocity shears via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI) using a relativistic plasma jet core and stationary plasma sheath. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations consider plasma jet cores with Lorentz factors of 1.5, 5, and 15 for both electron-proton and electron-positron plasmas. For electron-proton plasmas, we find generation of strong large-scale DC currents and magnetic fields that extend over the entire shear surface and reach thicknesses of a few tens of electron skin depths. For electron-positron plasmas, we find generation of alternating currents and magnetic fields. Jet and sheath plasmas are accelerated across the shear surface in the strong magnetic fields generated by the kKHI. The mixing of jet and sheath plasmas generates a transverse structure similar to that produced by the Weibel instability.

  1. The near field behavior of turbulent gas jets in a long confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Ronald M. C.; Ahmed, Saad A.; Yu, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    The near-field behavior of a turbulent gas jet (8.73 mm in diameter) in a long confinement was studied using a test rig with a confinement area ratio of about 205 and a length-to-jet diameter ratio of about 1700. Experiments were carried out with CO2, air, and He/air jets at different jet velocities, using a laser Doppler velocimeter for velocity and turbulence measurements and hot-wire anemometers for a detailed examination of the turbulent shear field of an air jet. The air column inside the tunnel was seen to be first compressed by the jet and then to be slowly pushed out of the tunnel, causing the jet to spread rapidly and to decay quickly. As a result, an equilibrium turbulence field is established in the first two diameters of the jet which bears a similarity to that found in self-preserving turbulent free jets and jets in short confinement. However, in contrast to the cases of the two latter jet types, the near field of jets in a long confinement is independent of jet fluid densities and velocities.

  2. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  3. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  4. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Naheed

    2015-01-01

    The anaesthetic management of patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease is a challenging task. It is associated with increased morbidity in the form of post-operative pulmonary complications. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function helps in reducing these complications. Patients are advised to stop smoking for a period of 4–6 weeks. This reduces airway reactivity, improves mucociliary function and decreases carboxy-haemoglobin. The widely used incentive spirometry may be useful only when combined with other respiratory muscle exercises. Volume-based inspiratory devices have the best results. Pharmacotherapy of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be optimised before considering the patient for elective surgery. Beta 2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids, are the main drugs used for this and several drugs play an adjunctive role in medical therapy. A graded approach has been suggested to manage these patients for elective surgery with an aim to achieve optimal pulmonary function. PMID:26556913

  5. Temperature-Corrected Model of Turbulence in Hot Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Pao, S. Paul; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2007-01-01

    An improved correction has been developed to increase the accuracy with which certain formulations of computational fluid dynamics predict mixing in shear layers of hot jet flows. The CFD formulations in question are those derived from the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations closed by means of a two-equation model of turbulence, known as the k-epsilon model, wherein effects of turbulence are summarized by means of an eddy viscosity. The need for a correction arises because it is well known among specialists in CFD that two-equation turbulence models, which were developed and calibrated for room-temperature, low Mach-number, plane-mixing-layer flows, underpredict mixing in shear layers of hot jet flows. The present correction represents an attempt to account for increased mixing that takes place in jet flows characterized by high gradients of total temperature. This correction also incorporates a commonly accepted, previously developed correction for the effect of compressibility on mixing.

  6. ATLAS software configuration and build tool optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybkin, Grigory; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ATLAS software code base is over 6 million lines organised in about 2000 packages. It makes use of some 100 external software packages, is developed by more than 400 developers and used by more than 2500 physicists from over 200 universities and laboratories in 6 continents. To meet the challenge of configuration and building of this software, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) is used. CMT expects each package to describe its build targets, build and environment setup parameters, dependencies on other packages in a text file called requirements, and each project (group of packages) to describe its policies and dependencies on other projects in a text project file. Based on the effective set of configuration parameters read from the requirements files of dependent packages and project files, CMT commands build the packages, generate the environment for their use, or query the packages. The main focus was on build time performance that was optimised within several approaches: reduction of the number of reads of requirements files that are now read once per package by a CMT build command that generates cached requirements files for subsequent CMT build commands; introduction of more fine-grained build parallelism at package task level, i.e., dependent applications and libraries are compiled in parallel; code optimisation of CMT commands used for build; introduction of package level build parallelism, i. e., parallelise the build of independent packages. By default, CMT launches NUMBER-OF-PROCESSORS build commands in parallel. The other focus was on CMT commands optimisation in general that made them approximately 2 times faster. CMT can generate a cached requirements file for the environment setup command, which is especially useful for deployment on distributed file systems like AFS or CERN VMFS. The use of parallelism, caching and code optimisation significantly-by several times-reduced software build time, environment setup time, increased the efficiency of

  7. Treatment planning optimisation in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    McGowan, S E; Burnet, N G; Lomax, A J

    2013-01-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is to achieve uniform target coverage while sparing normal tissue. In proton therapy, the same sources of geometric uncertainty are present as in conventional radiotherapy. However, an important and fundamental difference in proton therapy is that protons have a finite range, highly dependent on the electron density of the material they are traversing, resulting in a steep dose gradient at the distal edge of the Bragg peak. Therefore, an accurate knowledge of the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties affecting the proton range is essential for producing plans which are robust to these uncertainties. This review describes the current knowledge of the geometric uncertainties and discusses their impact on proton dose plans. The need for patient-specific validation is essential and in cases of complex intensity-modulated proton therapy plans the use of a planning target volume (PTV) may fail to ensure coverage of the target. In cases where a PTV cannot be used, other methods of quantifying plan quality have been investigated. A promising option is to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimisation algorithm. A further development is the inclusion of robustness into a multicriteria optimisation framework, allowing a multi-objective Pareto optimisation function to balance robustness and conformity. The question remains as to whether adaptive therapy can become an integral part of a proton therapy, to allow re-optimisation during the course of a patient's treatment. The challenge of ensuring that plans are robust to range uncertainties in proton therapy remains, although these methods can provide practical solutions.

  8. Treatment planning optimisation in proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, S E; Burnet, N G; Lomax, A J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The goal of radiotherapy is to achieve uniform target coverage while sparing normal tissue. In proton therapy, the same sources of geometric uncertainty are present as in conventional radiotherapy. However, an important and fundamental difference in proton therapy is that protons have a finite range, highly dependent on the electron density of the material they are traversing, resulting in a steep dose gradient at the distal edge of the Bragg peak. Therefore, an accurate knowledge of the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties affecting the proton range is essential for producing plans which are robust to these uncertainties. This review describes the current knowledge of the geometric uncertainties and discusses their impact on proton dose plans. The need for patient-specific validation is essential and in cases of complex intensity-modulated proton therapy plans the use of a planning target volume (PTV) may fail to ensure coverage of the target. In cases where a PTV cannot be used, other methods of quantifying plan quality have been investigated. A promising option is to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimisation algorithm. A further development is the inclusion of robustness into a multicriteria optimisation framework, allowing a multi-objective Pareto optimisation function to balance robustness and conformity. The question remains as to whether adaptive therapy can become an integral part of a proton therapy, to allow re-optimisation during the course of a patient's treatment. The challenge of ensuring that plans are robust to range uncertainties in proton therapy remains, although these methods can provide practical solutions. PMID:23255545

  9. A computational study of spatially evolving turbulent plane jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Scott Alan

    1998-09-01

    Turbulent plane jets are prototypical free shear flows of practical interest in propulsion, combustion and environmental flows. While considerable experimental research has been performed on planar jets, very few computational studies exist. To the author's knowledge, this is the first computational study of planar turbulent jets utilizing direct numerical simulation. Non-uniform, fourth-order compact derivatives in space and a low storage fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme in time are used to numerically solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Characteristic 'nonreflecting' boundary conditions are coupled with characteristic inflow boundary conditions to allow forcing at the inflow. Up to 2.3 million grid points are used. Two-dimensional simulations are initially performed in order to evaluate their relevance to turbulent jets. It is found that they behave in a fashion fundamentally different than is observed experimentally for planar jets. This difference is due to a two-dimensional vortex dipole instability which unrealistically dominates these simulations. A detailed study of the spatial development of a three- dimensional turbulent jet has been performed. Profiles of the mean velocity field and Reynolds stresses achieve self-similarity rapidly and compare very well with experimental data. The self-similar jet growth rate, K1u = 0.094, and centerline velocity decay rate, C1u = 0.208, are in good agreement with the typical experimental values, K1u = 0.100 and C1u = 0.189, of Gutmark and Wygnanski. The downstream growth of the centerline fluctuation intensities match the experimental evolution, although there are small differences due to the sensitivity of jets to the upstream conditions. The development of the initial shear layer instability as well as the downstream transition to the jet column mode at the end of the potential core is captured well. The evolution of the mixing process in turbulent planar jets is studied through analysis of the

  10. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 1013 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  11. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sale, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  12. Free volume under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-01

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems — particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  13. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  14. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  15. A theoretical study of the application of jet flap circulation control for reduction of rotor vibratory forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piziali, R. A.; Trenka, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a study to investigate the theoretical potential of a jet-flap control system for reducing the vertical and horizontal non-cancelling helicopter rotor blade root shears are presented. A computer simulation describing the jet-flap control rotor system was developed to examine the reduction of each harmonic of the transmitted shears as a function of various rotor and jet parameters, rotor operating conditions and rotor configurations. The computer simulation of the air-loads included the influences of nonuniform inflow and blade elastic motions. (no hub motions were allowed.) The rotor trim and total rotor power (including jet compressor power) were also determined. It was found that all harmonics of the transmitted horizontal and vertical shears could be suppressed simultaneously using a single jet control.

  16. Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-08-01

    Recent jet results in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the CDF experiment at the Tevatron are presented. The jet inclusive cross section is compared to next-to-leading order QCD prediction in different rapidity regions. The b-jet inclusive cross section is measured exploiting the long lifetime and large mass of B-hadrons. Jet shapes, W+jets and W/Z+photon cross sections are also measured and compared to expectations from QCD production.

  17. Protostellar Jets: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, B. F.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical simulations of astrophysical jets have been made in order to study their collimation and internal structure. Recently Ouyed & Pudritz (1997) did numerical simulations of axi-simetric magnetocentrifugal jets from a keplerian acretion disk employing the eulerian finite difference code Zeus-2D. During their simulation, it was raised a steady state jet confirming a lot of results of the MHD winds steady state theory. Following this scenario we did tridimensional numerial simulations of this model allowing the jet, after a perturbation, evolve into a not steady state producing the helical features observed in some protostellar jets.

  18. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  19. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  20. Railway vehicle performance optimisation using virtual homologation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, H.; Madeira, J. F. A.; Ambrósio, J.; Pombo, J.

    2016-09-01

    Unlike regular automotive vehicles, which are designed to travel in different types of roads, railway vehicles travel mostly in the same route during their life cycle. To accept the operation of a railway vehicle in a particular network, a homologation process is required according to local standard regulations. In Europe, the standards EN 14363 and UIC 518, which are used for railway vehicle acceptance, require on-track tests and/or numerical simulations. An important advantage of using virtual homologation is the reduction of the high costs associated with on-track tests by studying the railway vehicle performance in different operation conditions. This work proposes a methodology for the improvement of railway vehicle design with the objective of its operation in selected railway tracks by using optimisation. The analyses required for the vehicle improvement are performed under control of the optimisation method global and local optimisation using direct search. To quantify the performance of the vehicle, a new objective function is proposed, which includes: a Dynamic Performance Index, defined as a weighted sum of the indices obtained from the virtual homologation process; the non-compensated acceleration, which is related to the operational velocity; and a penalty associated with cases where the vehicle presents an unacceptable dynamic behaviour according to the standards. Thus, the optimisation process intends not only to improve the quality of the vehicle in terms of running safety and ride quality, but also to increase the vehicle availability via the reduction of the time for a journey while ensuring its operational acceptance under the standards. The design variables include the suspension characteristics and the operational velocity of the vehicle, which are allowed to vary in an acceptable range of variation. The results of the optimisation lead to a global minimum of the objective function in which the suspensions characteristics of the vehicle are

  1. Diagnosing particle acceleration in relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.; Liang, Edison P.; Summerlin, Errol J.; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian A.; Roustazadeh, Parisa

    2015-03-01

    The high-energy emission from blazars and other relativistic jet sources indicates that electrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic (GeV - TeV) energies in these systems. This paper summarizes recent results from numerical studies of two fundamentally different particle acceleration mechanisms potentially at work in relativistic jets: Magnetic-field generation and relativistic particle acceleration in relativistic shear layers, which are likely to be present in relativistic jets, is studied via Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic shocks is investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting magnetic-field configurations and thermal + non-thermal particle distributions are then used to predict multi-wavelength radiative (synchrotron + Compton) signatures of both acceleration scenarios. In particular, we address how anisotropic shear-layer acceleration may be able to circumvent the well-known Lorentz-factor crisis, and how the self-consistent evaluation of thermal + non-thermal particle populations in diffusive shock acceleration simulations provides tests of the bulk Comptonization model for the Big Blue Bump observed in the SEDs of several blazars.

  2. Reductions in Multi-Component Jet Noise by Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, Thomas D.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustics Wind Tunnel to determine the extent of jet exhaust noise reduction that can be obtained using water injection in a hot jet environment. The effects of water parameters such as mass flow rate, injection location, and spray patterns on suppression of dominant noise sources in both subsonic and supersonic jets were determined, and extrapolations to full-scale engine noise reduction were made. Water jets and sprays were injected in to the shear layers of cold and hot circular jets operating at both subsonic and supersonic exhaust conditions. Use of convergent-divergent and convergent nozzles (2.7in. D) allowed for simulations of all major jet noise sources. The experimental results show that water injection clearly disrupts shock noise sources within the jet plume, with large reductions in radiated shock noise. There are smaller reductions in jet mixing noise, resulting in only a small decrease in effective perceived noise level when projections are made to full scale. The fact that the measured noise reduction in the direction upstream of the nozzle was consistently larger than in the noisier downstream direction contributed to keeping effective perceived noise reductions small. Variations in the operation of the water injection system clearly show that injection at the nozzle exit rather than further downstream is required for the largest noise reduction. Noise reduction increased with water pressure as well as with its mass flow, although the type of injector had little effect.

  3. Effect of Turbulence Modeling on an Excited Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Hixon, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The flow dynamics in a high-speed jet are dominated by unsteady turbulent flow structures in the plume. Jet excitation seeks to control these flow structures through the natural instabilities present in the initial shear layer of the jet. Understanding and optimizing the excitation input, for jet noise reduction or plume mixing enhancement, requires many trials that may be done experimentally or computationally at a significant cost savings. Numerical simulations, which model various parts of the unsteady dynamics to reduce the computational expense of the simulation, must adequately capture the unsteady flow dynamics in the excited jet for the results are to be used. Four CFD methods are considered for use in an excited jet problem, including two turbulence models with an Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver, one Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver, and one URANS/LES hybrid method. Each method is used to simulate a simplified excited jet and the results are evaluated based on the flow data, computation time, and numerical stability. The knowledge gained about the effect of turbulence modeling and CFD methods from these basic simulations will guide and assist future three-dimensional (3-D) simulations that will be used to understand and optimize a realistic excited jet for a particular application.

  4. The Breakout Model for Coronal Jets with Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal jets are impulsive, collimated plasma outflows originating low in the solar corona. Many of these events exhibit broad, curtain-like morphologies with helical structure and motions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015) [doi:10.1038/nature14556] reported that such jets are associated with the eruption of small filaments and, therefore, are miniature versions of corona mass ejections (CMEs). This account differs from the traditional picture of jets, in that internal flare reconnection, rather than interchange reconnection with the external ambient magnetic field, creates the bright loops observed at the jet base. We present 3D simulations, performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS), which demonstrate how the magnetic breakout mechanism generates mini-CME-type jets in a compact bipolar region energized by simple footpoint motions. Our numerical model captures the formation of the strongly sheared pre-jet filament structure, the post-jet flare-like loops and ribbons, and the curtain-like untwisting dynamics observed higher in the corona. We will discuss the significance of our new results for understanding solar EUV and X-ray jets and CMEs in general. NASA supported this research by awards to the NASA Postdoctoral Program (P.F.W.) and the LWS TR&T and H-SR programs (C.R.D. & S.K.A.).

  5. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  6. Second order modeling of boundary-free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Lumley, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of realizable second order models for boundary-free turbulent flows is presented. The constraints on second order models based on the realizability principle are re-examined. The rapid terms in the pressure correlations for both the Reynolds stress and the passive scalar flux equations are constructed to exactly satisfy the joint realizability. All other model terms (return-to-isotropy, third moments, and terms in the dissipation equations) already satisfy realizability. To correct the spreading rate of the axisymmetric jet, an extra term is added to the dissipation equation which accounts for the effect of mean vortex stretching on dissipation. The test flows used in this study are the mixing shear layer, plane jet, axisymmetric jet, and plane wake. The numerical solutions show that the unified model equations predict all these flows reasonably. It is expected that these models would be suitable for more complex and critical flows.

  7. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  8. Development of conjugate shear bands during bulk simple shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, L. B.; Cobbold, P. R.

    In rocks possessing a strong planar fabric, shear bands of constant shear sense and oriented at an oblique angle to the foliation are considered by many authors to be characteristic of a non-coaxial bulk deformation history, whereas conjugate shear bands are considered to indicate coaxial shortening. However, in two areas where bulk deformation history appears to be non-coaxial (Cap Corse, Corsica and Ile de Groix, Brittany), conjugate shear bands are observed. In order to investigate this problem, experiments were performed by bulk simple shearing using Plasticine as a rock analogue. When slip between layers of the model is permitted, shear bands of normal-fault geometry form with both the same and opposite shear sense as the bulk simple shearing at approximately the same angle with the layering (40°) irrespective of layer orientation in the undeformed state (for initial orientations of 50, 30 and 15°). Shear bands are initially formed within individual layers and may propagate across layer interfaces when further movement along these is inhibited. The existence of conjugate shear bands in Corsica and Ile de Groix is therefore not incompatible with a model of bulk simple shearing for these two regions. In field studies, one should perhaps exercise care in using shear bands to determine the kind of motion or the sense of bulk shearing.

  9. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  10. Photospheric Emission from Stratified Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E p-L p relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  11. Virtual topological optimisation of scaffolds for rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Henrique de Amorim; Bártolo, Paulo Jorge da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Advanced additive techniques are now being developed to fabricate scaffolds with controlled architecture for tissue engineering. These techniques combine computer-aided design (CAD) with computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) tools to produce three-dimensional structures layer by layer in a multitude of materials. Actual prediction of the effective mechanical properties of scaffolds produced by additive technologies, is very important for tissue engineering applications. A novel computer based technique for scaffold design is topological optimisation. Topological optimisation is a form of "shape" optimisation, usually referred to as "layout" optimisation. The goal of topological optimisation is to find the best use of material for a body that is subjected to either a single load or a multiple load distribution. This paper proposes a topological optimisation scheme in order to obtain the ideal topological architectures of scaffolds, maximising its mechanical behaviour.

  12. Isogeometric shape optimisation of shell structures using multiresolution subdivision surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Bandara, Kosala; Cirak, Fehmi

    2016-08-01

    We introduce the isogeometric shape optimisation of thin shell structures using subdivision surfaces. Both triangular Loop and quadrilateral Catmull-Clark subdivision schemes are considered for geometry modelling and finite element analysis. A gradient-based shape optimisation technique is implemented to minimise compliance, i.e. to maximise stiffness. Different control meshes describing the same surface are used for geometry representation, optimisation and finite element analysis. The finite element analysis is performed with subdivision basis functions corresponding to a sufficiently fine control mesh. During iterative shape optimisation the geometry is updated starting from the coarsest control mesh and proceeding to increasingly finer control meshes. The proposed approach is applied to three optimisation examples, namely a catenary, a roof over a rectangular domain, and free-form architectural shell roof. The influence of the geometry description and the used subdivision scheme on the obtained optimised curved geometries are investigated in detail.

  13. Physical concept of shear fracture mesomechanism and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzidowski, Edward S.

    2011-09-01

    The key objective of the present paper is an attempt to create an interface between the existing inconsistent views on the microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the mechanism of plastic deformation and shear fracture. This will be enabled by a focus on the course and effects of the evolution of dislocation structure, and will consist in considering an indirect, i.e. a mesoscopic scale of the discussed phenomena. Thanks to this, a synergy between the mechanisms of deformation and fracture of materials will be proven, which will provide an opportunity for a smooth transfer from the microscopic, through mesoscopic, to macroscopic scale of the analysed phenomena. This in turn will offer an opportunity to define and use the new criteria for controlling the mechanism of shear fracture. These criteria will be applicable to the complete range of temperatures and strain rates which are typical of metal working processes. Some examples of how these criteria may be applied in order to optimise the parameters of metal working will also be provided. These examples have made it possible to prove that the physical approach to shear fracture mesomechanism offers much broader cognitive and utilitarian opportunities than the existing purely mathematical methods. This is due to the fact that the physical approach allows for a deeper understanding of shear fracture meso- and macromechanism, and generates new criteria controlling this mechanism.

  14. Holographic lateral shear interferometer.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Mallick, S

    1976-11-01

    A new type of lateral shear holographic interferometer is described. It can be used to test lenses as well as spherical and aspherical surfaces. A null pattern with straight fringes can be obtained for an aspherical surface, provided one has a prototype that can be used for making the hologram.

  15. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  16. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning-a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates-is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates. PMID:27636496

  17. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Powling, Alexander; Siodmok, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p T . We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  18. The Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise from Dualstream and Rectangular Jets Using RANS CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A.; Morris, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Supersonic jets operating off-design produce broadband shock-associated noise. Broadband shock-associated noise is characterized by multiple broadband peaks in the far-field and is often the dominant source of noise towards the sideline and upstream direction relative to the jet axis. It is due to large scale coherent turbulence structures in the jet shear layers interacting with the shock cell structure. A broadband shock-associated noise model recently developed by the authors predicts this noise component from solutions to the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a two-equation turbulence model. The broadband shock-associated noise model is applied to dualstream and rectangular nozzles operating supersonically, heated, and off-design. The dualstream jet broadband shock-associated noise predictions are conducted for cases when the core jet is supersonic and the fan jet is subsonic, the core jet is subsonic and the fan jet is supersonic, and when both jet streams operate supersonically. Rectangular jet predictions are shown for a convergent-divergent nozzle operating both over- and under-expanded for cold and heated conditions. The original model implementation has been heavily modified to make accurate predictions for the dualstream jets. It is also argued that for over-expanded jets the oblique shock wave attached to the nozzle lip contributes little to broadband shock-associated noise. All predictions are compared with experiments.

  19. The effects of profiles on supersonic jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Bhat, T. R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of velocity profiles on supersonic jet noise are studied by using stability calculations made for a shock-free coannular jet, with both the inner and outer flows supersonic. The Mach wave emission process is modeled as the noise generated by the large scale turbulent structures or the instability waves in the mixing region. Both the vortex-sheet and the realistic finite thickness shear layer models are considered. The stability calculations were performed for both inverted and normal velocity profiles. Comparisons are made with the results for an equivalent single jet, based on equal thrust, mass flow rate and exit area to that of the coannular jet. The advantages and disadvantages of these velocity profiles as far as noise radiation is concerned are discussed. It is shown that the Rayleigh's model prediction of the merits and demerits of different velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Genetic algorithms for modelling and optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, John

    2005-12-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are a heuristic search and optimisation technique inspired by natural evolution. They have been successfully applied to a wide range of real-world problems of significant complexity. This paper is intended as an introduction to GAs aimed at immunologists and mathematicians interested in immunology. We describe how to construct a GA and the main strands of GA theory before speculatively identifying possible applications of GAs to the study of immunology. An illustrative example of using a GA for a medical optimal control problem is provided. The paper also includes a brief account of the related area of artificial immune systems.

  1. Coiling and Folding of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2007-11-01

    The study of fluid jets impacting on a flat surface has industrial applications in many areas, including processing of foods and consumer goods, bottle filling, and polymer melt processing. Previous studies have focused primarily on purely viscous, Newtonian fluids, which exhibit a number of different dynamical regimes including dripping, steady jetting, folding, and steady coiling. Here we add another dimension to the problem by focusing on mobile (low viscosity) viscoelastic fluids, with the study of two wormlike-micellar fluids, a cetylpyridinum-salicylic acid salt (CPyCl/NaSal) solution, and an industrially relevant shampoo base. We investigate the effects of viscosity and elasticity on the dynamics of axi-symmetric jets. The viscoelasticity of the fluids is systematically controlled by varying the concentration of salt counterions. Experimental methods include shear and extensional rheology measurements to characterize the fluids, and high-speed digital video imaging. In addition to the regimes observed in purely viscous systems, we also find a novel regime in which the elastic jet buckles and folds on itself, and alternates between coiling and folding behavior. We suggest phase diagrams and scaling laws for the coiling and folding frequencies through a systematic exploration of the experimental parameter space (height of fall, imposed flow rate, elasticity of the solution).

  2. Towards the optimisation and adaptation of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Schmalfuß, S; Zellnitz, S; Sommerfeld, M; Urbanetz, N

    2014-08-15

    Pulmonary drug delivery by dry powder inhalers is becoming more and more popular. Such an inhalation device must insure that during the inhalation process the drug powder is detached from the carrier due to fluid flow stresses. The goal of the project is the development of a drug powder detachment model to be used in numerical computations (CFD, computational fluid dynamics) of fluid flow and carrier particle motion through the inhaler and the resulting efficiency of drug delivery. This programme will be the basis for the optimisation of inhaler geometry and dry powder inhaler formulation. For this purpose a multi-scale approach is adopted. First the flow field through the inhaler is numerically calculated with OpenFOAM(®) and the flow stresses experienced by the carrier particles are recorded. This information is used for micro-scale simulations using the Lattice-Boltzmann method where only one carrier particle covered with drug powder is placed in cubic flow domain and exposed to the relevant flow situations, e.g. plug and shear flow with different Reynolds numbers. Therefrom the fluid forces on the drug particles are obtained. In order to allow the determination of the drug particle detachment possibility by lift-off, sliding or rolling, also measurements by AFM (atomic force microscope) were conducted for different carrier particle surface structures. The contact properties, such as van der Waals force, friction coefficient and adhesion surface energy were used to determine, from a force or moment balance (fluid forces versus contact forces), the detachment probability by the three mechanisms as a function of carrier particle Reynolds number. These results will be used for deriving the drug powder detachment model. PMID:24792975

  3. Towards the optimisation and adaptation of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Schmalfuß, S; Zellnitz, S; Sommerfeld, M; Urbanetz, N

    2014-08-15

    Pulmonary drug delivery by dry powder inhalers is becoming more and more popular. Such an inhalation device must insure that during the inhalation process the drug powder is detached from the carrier due to fluid flow stresses. The goal of the project is the development of a drug powder detachment model to be used in numerical computations (CFD, computational fluid dynamics) of fluid flow and carrier particle motion through the inhaler and the resulting efficiency of drug delivery. This programme will be the basis for the optimisation of inhaler geometry and dry powder inhaler formulation. For this purpose a multi-scale approach is adopted. First the flow field through the inhaler is numerically calculated with OpenFOAM(®) and the flow stresses experienced by the carrier particles are recorded. This information is used for micro-scale simulations using the Lattice-Boltzmann method where only one carrier particle covered with drug powder is placed in cubic flow domain and exposed to the relevant flow situations, e.g. plug and shear flow with different Reynolds numbers. Therefrom the fluid forces on the drug particles are obtained. In order to allow the determination of the drug particle detachment possibility by lift-off, sliding or rolling, also measurements by AFM (atomic force microscope) were conducted for different carrier particle surface structures. The contact properties, such as van der Waals force, friction coefficient and adhesion surface energy were used to determine, from a force or moment balance (fluid forces versus contact forces), the detachment probability by the three mechanisms as a function of carrier particle Reynolds number. These results will be used for deriving the drug powder detachment model.

  4. Interfacial shear stress measurement using high spatial resolution multiphase PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-06-01

    In multiphase flows, form drag and viscous shear stress transfer momentum between phases. For numerous environmental and man-made flows, it is of primary importance to predict this transfer at a liquid-gas interface. In its general expression, interfacial shear stress involves local velocity gradients as well as surface velocity, curvature, and surface tension gradients. It is therefore a challenging quantity to measure experimentally or compute numerically. In fact, no experimental work to date has been able to directly resolve all the terms contributing to the shear stress in the case of curved and moving surfaces. In an attempt to fully resolve the interface shear stress when surface tension gradients are negligible, high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are acquired simultaneously on both sides of a water-air interface. The flow consists of a well-conditioned uniform and homogeneous water jet discharging in quiescent air, which exhibits two-dimensional surface waves as a result of a shear layer instability below the surface. PIV provides velocity fields in both phases, while planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to track the interface and obtain its curvature. To compute the interfacial shear stress from the data, several processing schemes are proposed and compared, using liquid and/or gas phase data. Vorticity at the surface, which relates to the shear stress through the dynamic boundary condition at the surface, is also computed and provides additional strategies for estimating the shear. The various schemes are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties, validating the methodology for experimentally resolving this demanding quantity.

  5. Optimal recovery from microburst wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulgund, Sandeep S.

    1993-01-01

    Severe low-altitude wind variability represents an infrequent but significant hazard to aircraft taking off or landing. During the period from 1964 to 1985, microburst wind shear was a contributing factor in at least 26 civil aviation accidents involving nearly 500 fatalities and over 200 injuries. A microburst is a strong localized downdraft that strikes the ground, creating winds that diverge radially from the impact point. The physics of microbursts have only been recently understood in detail, and it has been found that effective recovery from inadvertent encounters may require piloting techniques that are counter-intuitive to flight crews. The goal of this work was to optimize the flight path of a twin-jet transport aircraft encountering a microburst during approach to landing. The objective was to execute an escape maneuver that maintained safe ground clearance and an adequate stall margin during the climb-out portion of the trajectory.

  6. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  7. Shear-thinning Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  8. Gelation under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C.; Muzny, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  9. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  11. Bloodstain pattern analysis as optimisation problem.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Autilia; Di Nunzio, Ciro; Garofano, Luciano; Saliva, Maurizio; Ricci, Pietrantonio; Acampora, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis (BPA) is an approach to support forensic investigators in reconstructing the dynamics of bloody crimes. This forensic technique has been successfully applied in solving heinous and complex murder cases around the world and, recently, computer-based BPA approaches have been designed to better support investigators both in terms of speed and quality of analysis. However, despite its widespread use, current automatic techniques for BPA try to define some algorithmic steps to replicate a sequence of subjective investigators' tasks without relying on any mathematical formalism to compute an objective reconstruction of the crime. The lack of an objective mathematical foundation is a critical issue in a scenario where the quality of evidences can strongly affect a court trial and the life of people involved in that trial. This paper introduces the very first formal representation of BPA by means of an optimisation problem, on which to base the next generation of crime reconstruction techniques. As an example of the benefits provided by the proposed formal representation of BPA, a case study based on a genetic algorithm shows how the BPA optimisation problem can support investigators in performing a fast, precise, automatic and objective analysis.

  12. Visual parameter optimisation for biomedical image processing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomedical image processing methods require users to optimise input parameters to ensure high-quality output. This presents two challenges. First, it is difficult to optimise multiple input parameters for multiple input images. Second, it is difficult to achieve an understanding of underlying algorithms, in particular, relationships between input and output. Results We present a visualisation method that transforms users' ability to understand algorithm behaviour by integrating input and output, and by supporting exploration of their relationships. We discuss its application to a colour deconvolution technique for stained histology images and show how it enabled a domain expert to identify suitable parameter values for the deconvolution of two types of images, and metrics to quantify deconvolution performance. It also enabled a breakthrough in understanding by invalidating an underlying assumption about the algorithm. Conclusions The visualisation method presented here provides analysis capability for multiple inputs and outputs in biomedical image processing that is not supported by previous analysis software. The analysis supported by our method is not feasible with conventional trial-and-error approaches. PMID:26329538

  13. Bloodstain pattern analysis as optimisation problem.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Autilia; Di Nunzio, Ciro; Garofano, Luciano; Saliva, Maurizio; Ricci, Pietrantonio; Acampora, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis (BPA) is an approach to support forensic investigators in reconstructing the dynamics of bloody crimes. This forensic technique has been successfully applied in solving heinous and complex murder cases around the world and, recently, computer-based BPA approaches have been designed to better support investigators both in terms of speed and quality of analysis. However, despite its widespread use, current automatic techniques for BPA try to define some algorithmic steps to replicate a sequence of subjective investigators' tasks without relying on any mathematical formalism to compute an objective reconstruction of the crime. The lack of an objective mathematical foundation is a critical issue in a scenario where the quality of evidences can strongly affect a court trial and the life of people involved in that trial. This paper introduces the very first formal representation of BPA by means of an optimisation problem, on which to base the next generation of crime reconstruction techniques. As an example of the benefits provided by the proposed formal representation of BPA, a case study based on a genetic algorithm shows how the BPA optimisation problem can support investigators in performing a fast, precise, automatic and objective analysis. PMID:27462014

  14. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Quasi-Homologous Solar Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (31)) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet, and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  15. Effect of Free Jet on Refraction and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Bridges, James E.; Dippold, Vance F., III

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates the role of a free jet on the sound radiated from a jet. In particular, the role of an infinite wind tunnel, which simulates the forward flight condition, is compared to that of a finite wind tunnel. The second configuration is usually used in experiments, where the microphones are located in a static ambient medium far outside the free jet. To study the effect of the free jet on noise, both propagation and source strength need to be addressed. In this work, the exact Green's function in a locally parallel flow is derived for a simulated flight case. Numerical examples are presented that show a reduction in the magnitude of the Green's function in the aft arc and an increase in the forward arc for the simulated flight condition. The effect of finite wind tunnel on refraction is sensitive to the source location and is most pronounced in the aft arc. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solution (RANS) yields the required mean flow and turbulence scales that are used in the jet mixing noise spectrum calculations. In addition to the sound/flow interaction, the separate effect of source strength and elongation of the noise-generating region of the jet in a forward flight is studied. Comparisons are made with experiments for the static and finite tunnel cases. Finally, the standard free-jet shear corrections that convert the finite wind tunnel measurements to an ideal wind tunnel arrangement are evaluated.

  16. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments with Confined Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Downstream mixing of coaxial jets discharging in an expanded duct was studied to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the propulsion community for combustor flow modeling. Flow visualization studies showed four major shear regions occurring; a wake region immediately downstream of the inlet jet inlet duct; a shear region further downstream between the inner and annular jets; a recirculation zone; and a reattachment zone. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two velocity component data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two color laser velocimeter (LV) system. Axial, radial and azimuthal velocities and turbulent momentum transport rate measurements in the r-z and r-theta planes were used to determine the mean value, second central moment (or rms fluctuation from mean), skewness and kurtosis for each data set probability density function (p.d.f.). A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data were obtained system. Velocity and mass transport in all three directions as well as concentration distributions were used to obtain the mean, second central moments, skewness and kurtosis for each p.d.f. These LV/LIF measurements also exposed the existence of a large region of countergradient turbulent axial mass transport in the region where the annular jet fluid was accelerating the inner jet fluid.

  17. ON A CORONAL BLOWOUT JET: THE FIRST OBSERVATION OF A SIMULTANEOUSLY PRODUCED BUBBLE-LIKE CME AND A JET-LIKE CME IN A SOLAR EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-02-01

    The coronal blowout jet is a peculiar category among various jet phenomena, in which the sheared base arch, often carrying a small filament, experiences a miniature version of blowout eruption that produces large-scale coronal mass ejection (CME). In this paper, we report such a coronal blowout jet with high-resolution multi-wavelength and multi-angle observations taken from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, and Big Bear Solar Observatory. For the first time, we find that simultaneous bubble-like and jet-like CMEs were dynamically related to the blowout jet that showed cool and hot components next to each other. Our observational results indicate that (1) the cool component resulted from the eruption of the filament contained within the jet's base arch, and it further caused the bubble-like CME; (2) the jet-like CME was associated with the hot component, which was the outward moving heated plasma generated by the reconnection of the base arch and its ambient open field lines. On the other hand, bifurcation of the jet's cool component was also observed, which resulted from the uncoupling of the erupting filament's two legs that were highly twisted at the very beginning. Based on these results, we propose a model to interpret the coronal blowout jet, in which the external reconnection not only produces the jet-like CME, but also leads to the rising of the filament. Subsequently, internal reconnection starts underneath the rising filament and thereby causes the bubble-like CME.

  18. Blowout Jets: Evidence from Hinode/XRT for X-Ray Jets Made by Blowout Eruption of the Emerging Bipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2009-01-01

    Yamauchi et al (2004, ApJ, 605, 511) found that there are two structurally and dynamically distinct types of H macrospicules in polar coronal holes: single-column jet macrospicules and erupting-loop macrospicules. The structure and motion of the single-column jet macrospicules fit the standard Shibata reconnection picture for solar X-ray jets (Shibata et al 1992, PASJ, 44, L173). The form and motion of the erupting-loop macrospicules is reminiscent of the ejective eruption of the sheared-core-field flux rope in the filament-eruption birth of a bubble-type coronal mass ejection (CME). That roughly half of all polar H macrospicules were observed to be erupting-loop macrospicules suggests that there should be a corresponding large class of X-ray jets in which the emerging bipole at the base of the jet undergoes a blowout eruption as in a bubble-type CME, instead of staying closed as in the standard picture for X-ray jets. Along with a cartoon of the standard picture, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures to be expected of a blowout jet in high-resolution coronal X-ray movies such as from Hinode/XRT. From Hinode/XRT movies in polar coronal holes, we show: (1) examples of X-ray jets that fit the standard picture very well, and (2) other examples that do not fit the standard picture but do show signatures appropriate for blowout jets. These signatures are (1) a flare arcade inside the emerging bipole in addition to the flare arcade produced between the emerging bipole and the ambient high-reaching unipolar field by reconnection of these two fields as in the standard picture, and (2) in addition to the jet prong expected from the standard reconnection, a second jet prong or strand, one that could not be produced by the standard reconnection but could be produced by reconnection between the ambient unipolar field and one leg of an erupting core-field flux rope that has blown out the emerging bipole. We therefore infer that these "two pronged" jets are made by

  19. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  20. Response of multi-panel assembly to noise from a jet in forward motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Mcgreevy, J. L.; Fenno, C. C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A model of the interaction of the noise from a spreading subsonic jet with a 4 panel assembly is studied numerically in two dimensions. The effect of forward motion of the jet is accounted for by considering a uniform flow field superimposed on a mean jet exit profile. The jet is initially excited by a pulse-like source inserted into the flow field. The pulse triggers instabilities associated with the inviscid instability of the jet shear layer. These instabilities generate sound which in turn serves to excite the panels. We compare the sound from the jet, the responses of the panels and the resulting acoustic radiation for the static jet and the jet in forward motion. The far field acoustic radiation, the panel response and sound radiated from the panels are all computed and compared to computations of a static jet. The results demonstrate that for a jet in forward motion there is a reduction in sound in downstream directions and an increase in sound in upstream directions in agreement with experiments. Furthermore, the panel response and radiation for a jet in forward motion exhibits a downstream attenuation as compared with the static case.

  1. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Ciancone, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configutations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  2. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  3. Boundary element based multiresolution shape optimisation in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Kosala; Cirak, Fehmi; Of, Günther; Steinbach, Olaf; Zapletal, Jan

    2015-09-01

    We consider the shape optimisation of high-voltage devices subject to electrostatic field equations by combining fast boundary elements with multiresolution subdivision surfaces. The geometry of the domain is described with subdivision surfaces and different resolutions of the same geometry are used for optimisation and analysis. The primal and adjoint problems are discretised with the boundary element method using a sufficiently fine control mesh. For shape optimisation the geometry is updated starting from the coarsest control mesh with increasingly finer control meshes. The multiresolution approach effectively prevents the appearance of non-physical geometry oscillations in the optimised shapes. Moreover, there is no need for mesh regeneration or smoothing during the optimisation due to the absence of a volume mesh. We present several numerical experiments and one industrial application to demonstrate the robustness and versatility of the developed approach.

  4. Resonant instability of supersonic shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Lele, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation of possible resonant instability of a supersonic shear layer is carried out. The resonance of two acoustic duct modes of the flow induced by periodic Mach waves generated by a wavy wall is sought. Results of the simulations are reported. Simulations are unable to document a resonant instability and the mixing characteristics remain unchanged. Possible weakness of the present simulations are discussed. A second set of simulations involving a mixing layer separating a supersonic and a subsonic stream were performed. A wavy wall placed adjacent to the supersonic stream to produce a set of periodic Mach waves terminating at the shear layer is modelled. The entire flow field is similar to that of an imperfectly expanded supersonic jet discharging into a subsonic coflowing stream for which enhanced mixing due to the onset of screech (feedback instability) is known to occur. The purpose of these simulations is to see if enhanced mixing and feedback instability would, indeed, take place. Some evidence of feedback oscillations is found in the simulated flow.

  5. Recurrent Solar Jets Induced by a Satellite Spot and Moving Magnetic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Su, Jiangtao; Yin, Zhiqiang; Priya, T. G.; Zhang, Hongqi; Liu, Jihong; Xu, Haiqing; Yu, Sijie

    2015-12-01

    Recurrent and homologous jets were observed to the west edge of active region NOAA 11513 at the boundary of a coronal hole. We find two kinds of cancellations between opposite polarity magnetic fluxes, inducing the generation of recurrent jets. First, a satellite spot continuously collides with a pre-existing opposite polarity magnetic field and causes recurrent solar jets. Second, moving magnetic features, which emerge near the sunspot penumbra, pass through the ambient plasma and eventually collide with the opposite polarity magnetic field. Among these recurrent jets, a blowout jet that occurred around 21:10 UT is investigated. The rotation of the pre-existing magnetic field and the shear motion of the satellite spot accumulate magnetic energy, which creates the possibility for the jet to experience blowout right from the standard.

  6. RECURRENT SOLAR JETS INDUCED BY A SATELLITE SPOT AND MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Su, Jiangtao; Yin, Zhiqiang; Priya, T. G.; Zhang, Hongqi; Xu, Haiqing; Yu, Sijie; Liu, Jihong

    2015-12-10

    Recurrent and homologous jets were observed to the west edge of active region NOAA 11513 at the boundary of a coronal hole. We find two kinds of cancellations between opposite polarity magnetic fluxes, inducing the generation of recurrent jets. First, a satellite spot continuously collides with a pre-existing opposite polarity magnetic field and causes recurrent solar jets. Second, moving magnetic features, which emerge near the sunspot penumbra, pass through the ambient plasma and eventually collide with the opposite polarity magnetic field. Among these recurrent jets, a blowout jet that occurred around 21:10 UT is investigated. The rotation of the pre-existing magnetic field and the shear motion of the satellite spot accumulate magnetic energy, which creates the possibility for the jet to experience blowout right from the standard.

  7. Evidence of melt in {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} recovered copper jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    A shaped charge (81 mm, 42{degrees}, OFHC copper cone) was fired into a {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 gm, of which 184 gm was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g. dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work we present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet we find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  8. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  9. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  10. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  11. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  12. Research on JET in view of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamela, Jerome; Ongena, Jef; Watkins, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Research on JET is focused on further development of the two ITER reference plasma scenarios. The ELMy H-Mode, has been extended to lower rho* at high and q_95=3, with simultaneously H_98=0.9, and f_GW=0.9 at I_p=3.5 MA. The dependence of confinement on beta and rho* has been found to be more favorable than given by the IPB98(y,2) scaling. Highlights in the development of Advanced Regimes with Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) and strong reversed shear (q_0=2-3, q_min=1.5-2.5) are : (i) operation at a core density close to the Greenwald limit and (ii) full current drive in 3T/1.8MA ITB plasmas extended to 20 seconds with a JET record injected energy of E≈ 330MJ; (iii) 7 keV Te≈ Ti ITB plasmas at low toroidal rotation, and (iv) wide radius ITB's (r/a=0.6). Furthermore, emphasis in JET is placed on (i) mitigating the impact of ELMs, (ii) understanding the phenomena leading to tritium retention and (iii) preparing burning plasma physics. Recent developments on JET in view of ITER are : (i) real-time control in both ELMy H-Mode and ITB plasmas and (ii) an upgrade of JET with: (a) increased NBI power (b) a new ELM-resilient ITER-like ICRH antenna (7MW) to be tested in 2006 (c) 16 new and upgraded diagnostics.

  13. Coherent structures - Reality and myth. [in turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Large-scale coherent structures (CS) in turbulent shear flows are characterized, reviewing recent theoretical and experimental investigations. The use of computers as a research tool and the flow-visualization experimental technique are introduced, CS are defined, the history of their discovery is traced, and their main characteristics are listed. Topics discussed and illustrated include the initial condition of the free shear layer, triple and double decomposition, topological features of CS, detection and eduction of CS, phase alignment via cross correlation, induced versus natural structures, the bursting phenomenon, turbulent spot, streaks, bursting frequency, the axisymmetric mixing layer, vortex pairing in an axisymmetric jet, CS and jet noise, broadband noise amplification via pure-tone excitation, CS interaction in a plane-jet near field, the Taylor hypothesis applied to CS, negative production, and the validity of the Reynolds-number similarity hypothesis. It is found that the coherent Reynolds stress, vorticity, and production are not much greater than the time-averaged values for fully developed flows with significant incoherent turbulence, suggesting that the importance of CS may have been exaggerated in some recent studies.

  14. Automatic optimisation of gamma dose rate sensor networks: The DETECT Optimisation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, K. B.; Müller, T. O.; Astrup, P.; Dyve, J. E.

    2014-05-01

    Fast delivery of comprehensive information on the radiological situation is essential for decision-making in nuclear emergencies. Most national radiological agencies in Europe employ gamma dose rate sensor networks to monitor radioactive pollution of the atmosphere. Sensor locations were often chosen using regular grids or according to administrative constraints. Nowadays, however, the choice can be based on more realistic risk assessment, as it is possible to simulate potential radioactive plumes. To support sensor planning, we developed the DETECT Optimisation Tool (DOT) within the scope of the EU FP 7 project DETECT. It evaluates the gamma dose rates that a proposed set of sensors might measure in an emergency and uses this information to optimise the sensor locations. The gamma dose rates are taken from a comprehensive library of simulations of atmospheric radioactive plumes from 64 source locations. These simulations cover the whole European Union, so the DOT allows evaluation and optimisation of sensor networks for all EU countries, as well as evaluation of fencing sensors around possible sources. Users can choose from seven cost functions to evaluate the capability of a given monitoring network for early detection of radioactive plumes or for the creation of dose maps. The DOT is implemented as a stand-alone easy-to-use JAVA-based application with a graphical user interface and an R backend. Users can run evaluations and optimisations, and display, store and download the results. The DOT runs on a server and can be accessed via common web browsers; it can also be installed locally.

  15. Optimising primary care for people with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review considers key areas in primary care regarding the diagnosis of dementia. Issues surrounding assessment, policy and incentives are considered. In addition, the relevance of non-medication approaches for dementia in primary care, which aim to enhance or maintain quality of life by maximising psychological and social function in the context of existing disabilities, is deliberated. Finally, key issues about primary care medication management are considered, and relevant therapeutic strategies with recommendation for a collaborative approach that improve outcomes by linking primary and secondary healthcare services – including general practice and pharmacy – with social care needs are weighed up. A key aspect of such a collaborative approach is to support informal carers in optimising medication. PMID:24427181

  16. Optimising Impact in Astronomy for Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eli

    2015-08-01

    Positive outcomes in the fields of science education and international development are notoriously difficult to achieve. Among the challenges facing projects that use astronomy to improve education and socio-economic development is how to optimise project design in order to achieve the greatest possible benefits. Over the past century, medical scientists along with statisticians and economists have progressed an increasingly sophisticated and scientific approach to designing, testing and improving social intervention and public health education strategies. This talk offers a brief review of the history and current state of `intervention science'. A similar framework is then proposed for astronomy outreach and education projects, with applied examples given of how existing evidence can be used to inform project design, predict and estimate cost-effectiveness, minimise the risk of unintended negative consequences and increase the likelihood of target outcomes being achieved.

  17. X-Point Reconnection from Shear Driving in Kinetic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Germaschewski, K.; Bessho, N.; Karpen, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    The explosive energy release in solar eruptive phenomena such as CMEs/eruptive flares and coronal jets is believed to be due to magnetic reconnection. Magnetic free energy builds up slowly in the corona due to footpoint stressing by the photospheric motions. Along with the free energy, current sheets build up at coronal nulls, which eventually triggers fast reconnection and explosive energy release. This basic scenario has been modeled extensively by MHD simulations and applied to both CMEs/eruptive flares and jets, but the reconnection itself is well-known to be due to kinetic processes. Consequently, it is imperative that shear-driven X-point reconnection be modeled in a fully kinetic system so as to test and guide the MHD results. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic-field shear at the system boundary is a trivial matter, but this is definitely not the case for a kinetic system, because the electric currents need to be fully consistent with all the mass motions. We present the first results of reconnection in a 2D X-Point geometry due to a velocity shear driver perpendicular to the plane of reconnection. We compare the results to high-resolution MHD simulations and discuss the implications for coronal activity.

  18. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  19. Wind shear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techniques for forecasting and detecting a type of wind shear called microbursts are being tested this month in an operational program at Denver's Stapleton International Airport as part of an effort to reduce hazards to airplanes and passengers.Wind shear, which can be spawned by convective storms, can occur as a microburst. These downbursts of cool air are usually recognizable as a visible rain shaft beneath a thundercloud. Sometimes, however, the rain shaft evaporates before reaching the ground, leaving the downdraft invisible. Although thunderstorms are traditionally avoided by airplane pilots, these invisible downdrafts also harbor hazards in what usually appear to be safe skies. When the downdraft reaches the earth's surface, the downdraft spreads out horizontally, much like a stream of water gushing from a garden hose on a concrete surface, explained John McCarthy, director of the operational program. Airplanes can encounter trouble when the downdraft from the microburst causes sudden shifts in wind direction, which may reduce lift on the wing, an especially dangerous situation during takeoff.

  20. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  1. Using Optimisation Techniques to Granulise Rough Set Partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossingham, Bodie; Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents an approach to optimise rough set partition sizes using various optimisation techniques. Three optimisation techniques are implemented to perform the granularisation process, namely, genetic algorithm (GA), hill climbing (HC) and simulated annealing (SA). These optimisation methods maximise the classification accuracy of the rough sets. The proposed rough set partition method is tested on a set of demographic properties of individuals obtained from the South African antenatal survey. The three techniques are compared in terms of their computational time, accuracy and number of rules produced when applied to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) data set. The optimised methods results are compared to a well known non-optimised discretisation method, equal-width-bin partitioning (EWB). The accuracies achieved after optimising the partitions using GA, HC and SA are 66.89%, 65.84% and 65.48% respectively, compared to the accuracy of EWB of 59.86%. In addition to rough sets providing the plausabilities of the estimated HIV status, they also provide the linguistic rules describing how the demographic parameters drive the risk of HIV.

  2. Using Optimisation Techniques to Granulise Rough Set Partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Crossingham, Bodie; Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2007-11-02

    This paper presents an approach to optimise rough set partition sizes using various optimisation techniques. Three optimisation techniques are implemented to perform the granularisation process, namely, genetic algorithm (GA), hill climbing (HC) and simulated annealing (SA). These optimisation methods maximise the classification accuracy of the rough sets. The proposed rough set partition method is tested on a set of demographic properties of individuals obtained from the South African antenatal survey. The three techniques are compared in terms of their computational time, accuracy and number of rules produced when applied to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) data set. The optimised methods results are compared to a well known non-optimised discretisation method, equal-width-bin partitioning (EWB). The accuracies achieved after optimising the partitions using GA, HC and SA are 66.89%, 65.84% and 65.48% respectively, compared to the accuracy of EWB of 59.86%. In addition to rough sets providing the plausabilities of the estimated HIV status, they also provide the linguistic rules describing how the demographic parameters drive the risk of HIV.

  3. Liquid jets injected into non-uniform crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambe, Samir

    An experimental study has been conducted with liquid jets injected transversely into a crossflow to study the effect of non-uniformities in the crossflow velocity distribution to the jet behavior. Two different non-uniform crossflows were created during this work, a shear-laden crossflow and a swirling crossflow. The shear-laden crossflow was generated by merging two independent, co-directional, parallel airstreams creating a shear mixing layer at the interface between them. The crossflow exhibited a quasi-linear velocity gradient across the height of the test chamber. By varying the velocities of the two airstreams, the sense and the slope of the crossflow velocity gradient could be changed. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) studies were conducted to characterize the crossflow. The parameter, UR, is defined as the ratio of the velocities of the two streams and governs the velocity gradient. A positive velocity gradient was observed for UR > 1 and a negative velocity gradient for UR < 1. PIV and Phase Doppler Particle Anemometry (PDPA) studies were conducted to study the penetration and atomization of 0.5 mm diameter water jets injected into this crossflow. The crossflow velocity gradient was observed to have a significant effect on jet penetration as well as the post breakup spray. For high UR (> 1), jet penetration increased and the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) distribution became more uniform. For low UR (< 1), low penetration, higher droplet velocities and better atomization were observed. The second crossflow tested was a swirling flow generated using in-house designed axial swirlers. Three swirlers were used, with vane exit angles of 30°, 45° and 60°. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was used to study the crossflow velocities. The axial (Ux) and the tangential (Utheta) components of the crossflow velocity were observed to decrease with increasing radial distance away from the centerbody. The flow angle of the crossflow was smaller than the vane exit angle

  4. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  5. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger; Mcintyre, Timothy

    2016-04-19

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  6. On the Scaling Law for Broadband Shock Noise Intensity in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanudula, Max

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for the scaling of broadband shock noise intensity in supersonic jets was formulated on the basis of linear shock-shear wave interaction. An hypothesis has been postulated that the peak angle of incidence (closer to the critical angle) for the shear wave primarily governs the generation of sound in the interaction process rather than the noise generation contribution from off-peak incident angles. The proposed theory satisfactorily explains the well-known scaling law for the broadband shock -associated noise in supersonic jets.

  7. A Theoretical Basis for the Scaling Law of Broadband Shock Noise Intensity in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical basis for the scaling of broadband shock noise intensity In supersonic jets was formulated considering linear shock-shear wave interaction. Modeling of broadband shock noise with the aid of shock-turbulence interaction with special reference to linear theories is briefly reviewed. An hypothesis has been postulated that the peak angle of incidence (closer to the critical angle) for the shear wave primarily governs the generation of sound in the interaction process with the noise generation contribution from off-peak incident angles being relatively unimportant. The proposed hypothesis satisfactorily explains the well-known scaling law for the broadband shock-associated noise in supersonic jets.

  8. Spatial growth of the current-driven instability in relativistic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the influence of velocity shear and a radial density profile on the spatial development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability along helically magnetized relativistic jets via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we use a nonperiodic computational box, the jet flow is initially established across the computational grid, and a precessional perturbation at the inlet triggers growth of the kink instability. If the velocity shear radius is located inside the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, a static nonpropagating CD kink is excited as the perturbation propagates down the jet. Temporal growth disrupts the initial flow across the computational grid not too far from the inlet. On the other hand, if the velocity shear radius is outside the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, the kink is advected with the flow and grows spatially down the jet. In this case, flow is maintained to much larger distances from the inlet. The effect of different radial density profiles is more subtle. When the density increases with radius, the kink appears to saturate by the end of the simulation without apparent disruption of the helical twist. This behavior suggests that relativistic jets consisting of a tenuous spine surrounded by a denser medium with a velocity shear radius outside the radius of the maximum toroidal magnetic field have a relatively stable configuration.

  9. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  10. Tunable shear thickening in suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neil Y C; Ness, Christopher; Cates, Michael E; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-09-27

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomenon in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allows for tuning of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to 2 decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a route toward creating materials whose mechanical properties can be controlled. PMID:27621472

  11. AngioJet thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Singh, Varinder; Wilentz, James R; Makkar, Raj R

    2004-10-01

    The AngioJet rheolytic thrombectomy system is designed to remove thrombus with the Venturi-Bernoulli effect, with multiple high-velocity, high-pressure saline jets which are introduced through orifices in the distal tip of the catheter to create a localized low-pressure zone, resulting in a vacuum effect with the entrainment and dissociation of bulky thrombus. Rheolytic thrombectomy with the AngioJet catheter can reduce the thrombus burden in the setting of AMI and degenerated SVGs. The long-term follow-up appears to be favorable in patients treated with rheolytic thrombectomy in the setting of acute myocardial infarction over conventional primary angioplasty. PMID:15505358

  12. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  13. The effects of initial jet exit conditions on plume resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Seiner, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The acoustic emission and boundary layer of a cold jet issuing from an underexpanded sonic nozzle have been measured for lip thicknesses of the nozzle exit varying from 0.015-0.625 nozzle diameters. Near-field acoustic data demonstrate that the amplitude and frequency of certain modes of screech and the dominant mode of instability which exists in the shear layer are dependent on nozzle lip thickness. Changes in momentum thickness due to variations in the nozzle exit were also quantified.

  14. Validation of the Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig for Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Brown, Clifford A.

    2005-01-01

    The development and acoustic validation of the Small Hot Jet Aeroacoustic Rig (SHJAR) is documented. Originally conceived to support fundamental research in jet noise, the rig has been designed and developed using the best practices of the industry. While validating the rig for acoustic work, a method of characterizing all extraneous rig noise was developed. With this in hand, the researcher can know when the jet data being measured is being contaminated and design the experiment around this limitation. Also considered is the question of uncertainty, where it is shown that there is a fundamental uncertainty of 0.5dB or so to the best experiments, confirmed by repeatability studies. One area not generally accounted for in the uncertainty analysis is the variation which can result from differences in initial condition of the nozzle shear layer. This initial condition was modified and the differences in both flow and sound were documented. The bottom line is that extreme caution must be applied when working on small jet rigs, but that highly accurate results can be made independent of scale.

  15. A Thermodynamic, kinematic and microphysical analysis of a jet and gigantic jet-producing Florida thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, S. M.; Splitt, M. E.; Brownlee, James; Spiva, Nicholas; Liu, Ningyu

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a meteorological analysis of a storm that produced two jets, four gigantic jets (GJ), and a starter, which were observed by two radars as well as the Kennedy Space Center 4-Dimensional Lightning Surveillance System on 3 August 2013 in Central Florida. The work is the first application of dual polarization data to a jet-producing storm and is the fifth case related to a tropical disturbance. The storm environment is consistent with the moist tropical paradigm that characterizes about three quarters of the surface and aircraft observed jet and GJ events. The most unstable (MU) convective available potential energy is not unusual for Florida summer convection and is below the climatological mean for these events. An unusual speed shear layer is located near the storm equilibrium level (EL) and the storm exhibits a tilted structure with CGs displaced upshear. The turbulence, as measured by the eddy dissipation rate, is extreme near the storm top during the event window, consistent with the GJ mixing hypothesis. The individual events are collocated with, and track along, the center axis of the divergent outflow at the EL and occur within the region of the coldest GOES IR temperatures—placing the events within the overshoot. The dual polarization data indicate a deep graupel column, extending above the mixed phase layer, to a 13 km altitude.

  16. Turbulent Mixing of an Angled Jet in Various Mainstream Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Kevin; Coletti, Filippo; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2013-11-01

    The angled jet in crossflow has been studied in detail with specific emphasis on the turbulent mixing of the jet fluid with the mainstream flow. The interaction of the upstream boundary layer with the jet shear layer results in complex vortex patterns that cause large mean distortion of the jet and rapid turbulent mixing. Most previous studies have been conducted in flat plate flows with little attention paid to the characteristics of the boundary layer. The present study examines the effect of mainstream geometric changes on the jet trajectory, counter-rotating vortex pair strength, and turbulent mixing. Seven cases were examined including flat plate boundary layers with three different thicknesses, adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases, and flows with concave and convex streamwise curvature. Full field, 3D mean velocity and scalar concentration fields were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in a water flow. The distortion of the streamtube initiated at the hole exit was examined for each of the seven cases. The degree of mixing was quantified by measuring the amount of mainstream fluid entrained into the jet as well as the turbulent diffusivity as a function of streamwise position.

  17. Inkjet printing - the physics of manipulating liquid jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. D.; Hoath, S. D.; Hutchings, I. M.

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 30 years inkjet printing technology has been developed for many applications including: product date codes, mailing shots, desktop printing, large-area graphics and, most recently, the direct writing of materials to form electronic, biological, polymeric and metallic devices. The new non-graphical applications require higher print rates, better resolution and higher reliability while printing more complex, non-Newtonian and heavily solids-loaded liquids. This makes the understanding of the physics involved in the precise manipulation of liquid jets and drops ever more important. The proper understanding and control of jet formation and subsequent motion of the jetted materials requires physical studies into material properties at very high shear rates, acoustic modes in print heads, instabilities of jets, drop formation, drop motion, stretching of fluid ligaments, the role of polymers in jet break up, electrical charging of drops and the aerodynamic and electrostatic interaction of jets and drops in flight. Techniques for observation, measurement and analysis are evolving to assist these studies. This paper presents some examples of the application of physics to understanding and implementing inkjet printing, including recent work at the Cambridge Inkjet Research Centre.

  18. An experimental investigation of the aeroacoustic properties of high-speed, helium/air mixture axisymmetric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, Michael Justin

    The acoustic and aerodynamic properties of high-speed axisymmetric jets are investigated experimentally in a recently refurbished high-speed jet noise facility. Mach numbers from 0.5 to 1.5 are tested with an emphasis on Mach 0.9 and 1.5 jets. Reynolds numbers for the current study range from approximately 200,000 to 600,000. The properties of heated jets which are important in aeroacoustic studies, namely low density and high velocity, are simulated in the current study by adding helium to the jet flow. In addition, an optical deflectometry system is used to provide unique two-point space-time correlation measurements within the jet shear layer. A combination of acoustic, mean flow, and optical deflectometry measurements are made for both pure air and helium/air mixture jets at various helium concentrations. Far-field acoustic measurements indicate very reasonable agreement between previously measured heated jet directivity patterns and those at simulated temperature ratios using helium/air mixture jets. The addition of helium also shows strong similarities to the addition of heat in the mean velocity profile measurements. A shortening of the potential core and a slight decrease in jet spreading rate are observed with helium addition---the same trends observed for heated jets. Optical deflectometry measurements near the end of the potential core along the jet lip line exhibit distinct cross-correlation curves for the pure air jet cases. However, helium/air mixture jets display much lower levels of correlation and little evidence of large-scale structure in the measured spectra. It is believed the strong visual density gradients throughout the shear layer effectively mask the large-scale structure, thus reflecting a limitation of the optical deflectometer. Finally, a decrease in normalized convection velocity with simulated heating (helium addition) is observed.

  19. Measurement of jet activity in top quark events using the eμ final state with two b-tagged jets in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2016-09-13

    Measurements of the jet activity in tt¯ events produced in proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV are presented, using 20.3 fb–1 of data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The events were selected in the dilepton eμ decay channel with two identified b-jets. The numbers of additional jets for various jet transverse momentum (pT) thresholds, and the normalised differential cross-sections as a function of pT for the five highest-pT additional jets, were measured in the jet pseudo-rapidity range |η| < 4.5. The gap fraction, the fraction of events which do not contain an additional jet in amore » central rapidity region, was measured for several rapidity intervals as a function of the minimum pT of a single jet or the scalar sum of pT of all additional jets. These fractions were also measured in different intervals of the invariant mass of the eμbb¯ system. All measurements were corrected for detector effects, and found to be mostly well-described by predictions from next-to-leading-order and leading-order tt¯ event generators with appropriate parameter choices. Lastly, the results can be used to further optimise the parameters used in such generators.« less

  20. Measurement of jet activity in top quark events using the eμ final state with two b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. 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G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of the jet activity in toverline{t} events produced in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV are presented, using 20.3 fb-1 of data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The events were selected in the dilepton eμ decay channel with two identified b-jets. The numbers of additional jets for various jet transverse momentum ( p T) thresholds, and the normalised differential cross-sections as a function of p T for the five highest- p T additional jets, were measured in the jet pseudo-rapidity range | η| < 4 .5. The gap fraction, the fraction of events which do not contain an additional jet in a central rapidity region, was measured for several rapidity intervals as a function of the minimum p T of a single jet or the scalar sum of p T of all additional jets. These fractions were also measured in different intervals of the invariant mass of the eμ boverline{b} system. All measurements were corrected for detector effects, and found to be mostly well-described by predictions from next-to-leading-order and leading-order toverline{t} event generators with appropriate parameter choices. The results can be used to further optimise the parameters used in such generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emission from stratified jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Matsumoto, Jin; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Tolstov, Alexey; Mao, Jirong; Dainotti, Maria; Mizuta, Akira

    2014-07-10

    We explore the spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emissions from stratified jets in which multiple components, separated by sharp velocity shear regions, are distributed in lateral directions. Propagation of thermal photons injected at a high optical depth region are calculated until they escape from the photosphere. It is found that the presence of the lateral structure within the jet leads to the nonthermal feature of the spectra and significant polarization signal in the resulting emission. The deviation from thermal spectra, as well as the polarization degree, tends to be enhanced as the velocity gradient in the shear region increases. In particular, we show that emissions from multicomponent jet can reproduce the typical observed spectra of gamma-ray bursts irrespective of the position of the observer when a velocity shear region is closely spaced in various lateral (θ) positions. The degree of polarization associated with the emission is significant (>few percent) at a wide range of observer angles and can be higher than 30%.

  2. Coanda effect jet around a cylinder with an interacting adjacent surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Randolph Allen

    The effects of placing a plane solid surface in close proximity to a Coanda effect jet turning over a cylindrical surface are investigated to help judge the possible application of this type of jet to manufacturing line processes. The Coanda jet is proposed as a coating control mechanism for fluidic coatings on sheets or a particulate removal device. A Coanda jet placed close to a surface will develop a strong tangential flow that will shear by viscous effects and pressure gradients. A turbulent k-epsilon finite element model, developed in FIDAP, is presented that studies the effects of cylinder-sheet separation distance and jet-to-gap angular placement of the jet. It is assumed that the operation is isothermal and that the sheet speed is negligible compared to the air jet speed. Unconstrained models and cases with a distant surface were run and compared to published experimental results for an unconstrained Coanda jet to validate the modeling method and optimize the empirical constants in the k-epsilon equations. Best agreement is found if the C(sub 2) parameter in the equations is increased from 1.92 to 3.0. Maximum shear stress and pressure gradient values increased exponentially for a decreasing gap size and physical geometric constraints will be the limiting factor to efficiency. For similar initial jets this study shows that the Coanda jet develops stripping forces about 1/2 as great as the regular air-knife, but has advantages such as directed flow. The Coanda jet is seen as a viable option to air-knives for certain operations.

  3. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  4. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  5. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  6. Effect of tabs on the evolution of an axisymmetric jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Samimy, M.; Reeder, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of vortex generators, in the form of small tabs at the nozzle exit, on the evolution of an axisymmetric jet was investigated experimentally over a jet Mach number range of 0.34 to 1.81. The effects of one, two, and four tabs were studied in comparison with the corresponding case without a tab. Each tab introduced an indentation in the shear layer, apparently through the action of streamwise vortices which appeared to be of the trailing vortex type originating from the tips of the tab rather that of the necklace vortex type originating from the base of the tab. The resultant effect of two tabs, placed at diametrically opposite locations, was to essentially bifurcate the jet. The influence of the tabs was essentially the same at subsonic and supersonic conditions indicating that compressibility has little to do with the effect.

  7. Fluid-dynamic and aeroacoustic investigations of shrouded jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerasamy, V.

    1980-08-01

    The fluid dynamic and aeroacoustic characteristics of a high subsonic jet discharging from a shrouded nozzle were investigated theoretically and experimentally to explore the possibility of jet noise reduction and thrust augmentation for STOL/VTOL aircraft. The preliminary design calculations of an adiabatic shrouded nozzle were performed by solving iteratively the one dimensional fluid dynamic equations governing the compressible flow. A two dimensional flow model, consisting of second order partial differential equations of a parabolic type, was used to find the effect of shroud length on the ejector performance. This model consists of the conservation laws with thin shear layer assumptions incorporating the Prandtl's mixing length hypothesis for turbulence closure. A numerical integration method was used to solve the governing fluid dynamic equations of motion. The aeroacoustic characteristics of the shrouded jet were analyzed based on the Lighthill's V(8) law.

  8. Optimisation of lateral car dynamics taking into account parameter uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jochen; Bestle, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    Simulation studies on an active all-wheel-steering car show that disturbance of vehicle parameters have high influence on lateral car dynamics. This motivates the need of robust design against such parameter uncertainties. A specific parametrisation is established combining deterministic, velocity-dependent steering control parameters with partly uncertain, velocity-independent vehicle parameters for simultaneous use in a numerical optimisation process. Model-based objectives are formulated and summarised in a multi-objective optimisation problem where especially the lateral steady-state behaviour is improved by an adaption strategy based on measurable uncertainties. The normally distributed uncertainties are generated by optimal Latin hypercube sampling and a response surface based strategy helps to cut down time consuming model evaluations which offers the possibility to use a genetic optimisation algorithm. Optimisation results are discussed in different criterion spaces and the achieved improvements confirm the validity of the proposed procedure.

  9. The acoustic signature of bubbles fragmenting in sheared flow.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the sound of bubbles fragmenting in fluid shear are presented and analyzed. The frequency, amplitude, and decay rate of the acoustic emissions from 1.8-mm-radius bubbles fragmenting between opposed fluid jets have been determined. A broad band of frequencies (1.8 to 30 kHz) is observed with peak pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.03 to 2 Pa. While the peak pressure amplitudes show no significant scaling with frequency, the frequency dependence of the decay rates is consistent with the sum of thermal and acoustic radiation losses.

  10. Refraction of sound by a shear layer - Experimental assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the refraction angle and amplitude changes associated with sound transmission through a circular, open jet shear layer. Both on-axis and off-axis acoustic source locations were used. Source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz while freestream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. The experimental results were compared with an existing refraction theory which was extended to account for off-axis source positions. A simple experiment was also conducted to assess the importance of turbulence scattering between 1 kHz and 25 kHz.

  11. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  12. Multilevel optimisation of aerospace and lightweight structures incorporating postbuckling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Shuang

    The optimisation of aerospace structures is a very complex problem, due to the hundreds of design variables a multidisciplinary optimisation may contain, so that multilevel optimisation is required. This thesis presents the recent developments to the multilevel optimisation software VICONOPT MLO, which is a multilevel optimisation interface between the well established analysis and design software packages VICONOPT and MSC/NASTRAN. The software developed is called VICONOPT MLOP (Multilevel Optimisation with Postbuckling), and allows for postbuckling behaviour, using analysis based on the Wittrick-Williams algorithm. The objective of this research is to enable a more detailed insight into the multilevel optimisation and postbuckling behaviour of a complex structure. In VICONOPT MLOP optimisation problems, individual panels of the structural model are allowed to buckle before the design load is reached. These panels continue to carry load with differing levels of reduced stiffness. VICONOPT MLOP creates new MSC/NASTRAN data files based on this reduced stiffness data and iterates through analysis cycles to converge on an appropriate load re-distribution. Once load convergence has been obtained with an appropriate criterion, the converged load distribution is used as a starting point in the optimisation of the constituent panels, i.e. a new design cycle is started, in which the updated ply thicknesses for each panel are calculated by VICONOPT and returned to MSC/NASTRAN through VICONOPT MLOP. Further finite element analysis of the whole structure is then carried out to determine the new stress distributions in each panel. The whole process is repeated until a mass convergence criterion is met. A detailed overview of the functionality of VICONOPT MLOP is presented in the thesis. A case study is conducted into the multilevel optimisation of a composite aircraft wing, to demonstrate the capabilities of VICONOPT MLOP and identify areas for future studies. The results of

  13. Turbulent Sediment Suspension and Induced Ripple Dynamics Absent Mean Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. A.; Cowen, E.

    2014-12-01

    The uprush and backwash phases in the swash zone, the region of the beach that is alternately covered and uncovered by wave run-up, are fundamentally different events. Backwash is dominated by a growing boundary layer where the turbulence is set by the bed shear stress. In this phase traditional boundary layer turbulence models and Shields-type critical stress pickup functions work well. However, the uprush phase, while often viewed in the context of traditional boundary layer turbulence models, has little in common with the backwash phase. During uprush, the entire water column is turbulent, as it rapidly advects well-stirred highly turbulent flow generated offshore from breaking waves or collapsing bores. Turbulence levels in the uprush are several times higher than turbulent boundary layer theory would predict and hence the use of a boundary layer model to predict turbulence levels during uprush grossly under predicts the turbulence and subsequent sediment suspension in the swash zone. To study the importance of this advected turbulence to sediment suspension we conduct experiments in a water tank designed to generate horizontally homogeneous isotropic turbulence absent mean shear using randomly actuated synthetic jet arrays suspended above both a solid glass plate and a narrowly graded sediment bed. Using jet arrays with different jet spacings allows the generation of high Reynolds number turbulence with variable integral length scales, which we hypothesize control the characteristic length scales in the induced ripple field. Particle image velocimetry and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the near-bed flow and this unique turbulent boundary layer. Metrics include the mean flow and turbulence intensities and stresses, temporal and spatial spectra, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and integral length scales of the turbulence. We leverage our unique dataset to compare the flows over impermeable fixed and permeable mobile

  14. Multiobjective optimisation of bogie suspension to boost speed on curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milad Mousavi-Bideleh, Seyed; Berbyuk, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    To improve safety and maximum admissible speed on different operational scenarios, multiobjective optimisation of bogie suspension components of a one-car railway vehicle model is considered. The vehicle model has 50 degrees of freedom and is developed in multibody dynamics software SIMPACK. Track shift force, running stability, and risk of derailment are selected as safety objective functions. The improved maximum admissible speeds of the vehicle on curves are determined based on the track plane accelerations up to 1.5 m/s2. To attenuate the number of design parameters for optimisation and improve the computational efficiency, a global sensitivity analysis is accomplished using the multiplicative dimensional reduction method (M-DRM). A multistep optimisation routine based on genetic algorithm (GA) and MATLAB/SIMPACK co-simulation is executed at three levels. The bogie conventional secondary and primary suspension components are chosen as the design parameters in the first two steps, respectively. In the last step semi-active suspension is in focus. The input electrical current to magnetorheological yaw dampers is optimised to guarantee an appropriate safety level. Semi-active controllers are also applied and the respective effects on bogie dynamics are explored. The safety Pareto optimised results are compared with those associated with in-service values. The global sensitivity analysis and multistep approach significantly reduced the number of design parameters and improved the computational efficiency of the optimisation. Furthermore, using the optimised values of design parameters give the possibility to run the vehicle up to 13% faster on curves while a satisfactory safety level is guaranteed. The results obtained can be used in Pareto optimisation and active bogie suspension design problems.

  15. Shear flow by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1985-08-01

    A detailed comparison is made between a number of methods for generating shear flow in Molecular Dynamics computer simulation. Algorithms which closely mimic most experimental methods for producing shear flow are those by Trozzi and Ciccotti, and Ashurst and Hoover. They employ hard wall boundaries and fluid walls respectively (with sheared cell periodicity being only in two dimensions). The sheared fluid properties are therefore inextricably linked with interfacial effects. These problems are largely eliminated by the Lees and Edwards scheme which creates a pseudo-infinite sheared material. There are a number of derivatives of this model including one favoured by the author for investigating non-linear viscoelastic phenomena. A number of results from this scheme pertaining to the Lennard-Jones liquid are presented.

  16. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes. PMID:23089595

  17. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  18. Acoustic excitation: A promising new means of controlling shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques have long been sought for the controlled modification of turbulent shear layers, such as in jets, wakes, boundary layers, and separated flows. Relatively recently published results of laboratory experiments have established that coherent structures exist within turbulent flows. These results indicate that even apparently chaotic flow fields can contain deterministic, nonrandom elements. Even more recently published results show that deliberate acoustic excitation of these coherent structures has a significant effect on the mixing characteristics of shear layers. Therefore, we have initiated a research effort to develop both an understanding of the interaction mechanisms and the ability to use it to favorably modify various shear layers. Acoustic excitation circumvents the need for pumping significant flow rates, as required by suction or blowing. Control of flows by intentional excitation of natural flow instabilities involves new and largely unexplored phenomena and offers considerable potential for improving component performance. Nonintrusive techniques for flow field control may permit much more efficient, flexible propulsion systems and aircraft designs, including means of stall avoidance and recovery. The techniques developed may also find application in many other areas where mixing is important, such as reactors, continuous lasers, rocket engines, and fluidic devices. It is the objective of this paper to examine some potential applications of the acoustic excitation technique to various shear layer flows of practical aerospace systems.

  19. Vortex pairing and organized structures in axisymmetric jets under controlled excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of experiments which have been carried out in a circular air jet facility consisting of two settling chambers in sequence. Sinusoidal perturbations in the exit profile are introduced at controlled frequencies and amplitudes with the aid of a loudspeaker attached to the wall of the first chamber. It was found that vortex pairing in circular jets can occur in two distinct modes, including the shear layer mode and the jet mode. Amplitude variations, the conditions for strong vortex pairing, and the spectral evolution downstream are illustrated with the aid of graphs.

  20. Optimisation study of a vehicle bumper subsystem with fuzzy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, L.; Moens, D.; Donders, S.; Vandepitte, D.

    2012-10-01

    This paper deals with the design and optimisation for crashworthiness of a vehicle bumper subsystem, which is a key scenario for vehicle component design. The automotive manufacturers and suppliers have to find optimal design solutions for such subsystems that comply with the conflicting requirements of the regulatory bodies regarding functional performance (safety and repairability) and regarding the environmental impact (mass). For the bumper design challenge, an integrated methodology for multi-attribute design engineering of mechanical structures is set up. The integrated process captures the various tasks that are usually performed manually, this way facilitating the automated design iterations for optimisation. Subsequently, an optimisation process is applied that takes the effect of parametric uncertainties into account, such that the system level of failure possibility is acceptable. This optimisation process is referred to as possibility-based design optimisation and integrates the fuzzy FE analysis applied for the uncertainty treatment in crash simulations. This process is the counterpart of the reliability-based design optimisation used in a probabilistic context with statistically defined parameters (variabilities).

  1. Acoustics of dual-stream high-speed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiasi, Marco Tullio

    2000-10-01

    This work presents the results of noise measurements in high-speed, round jets whose Mach number and velocity simulate the conditions of jet engines at take-off. The Mach number of the jet potential core ranged from 1.27 to 1.77 and the velocity ranged from 550 m/s to 1010 m/s. Most of the jets were silenced with a coflow that prevented the formation of Mach waves, a dominant contribution to supersonic jet noise. This method, called Mach Wave Elimination, relies on the shielding effect of the coflow which makes the motion of the eddies subsonic with respect to the surrounding streams, thus impeding the creation of Mach waves. Schlieren photography and pitot probe surveys were used to detect the principal features and the growth rate of the jets. Microphone measurements were performed inside an anechoic chamber at many positions around the jet exit. The results were corrected for the microphone response and for the effect of human sensitivity to sound. Equal-thrust comparison of different experimental results shows that elimination of Mach waves is very effective in reducing noise in the direction of strongest emission. Except for localized shock-associated components, noise emission was found to be insensitive to nozzle exit pressure and to depend principally on the values of fully-expanded Mach number and velocity in the jet potential core. Jets with a shorter Mach wave emitting region exhibited better noise suppression. Best results were obtained with an eccentric coflow that allows the shear layer of the upper part of the jet to grow naturally while silencing the jet in the downward direction. Coflows are capable of reducing the near-field screech peaks by up to 10 dB in imperfectly-expanded jets. Scaling the experimental results to a fall-size engine shows that eccentric coflows reduce the noise perceived in the direction of peak emission by up to 11 dB. Preliminary analysis of the application of this silencing technique to engine design indicates that Mach

  2. Creating High Energy Density Jets in Laboratory Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Robert

    2005-04-01

    A new experimental platform for the investigation of high Mach-number, high energy-density jets has been developed at the University of Rochester's Omega laser facility. Assuming the scalability of the Euler equations, the resulting mm-sized jets should scale to astrophysical objects such as Herbig-Haro objects and jet-driven supernovae that may involve jets with similar internal Mach numbers. This scalability still holds in the presence of radiation as long as the relative importance of radiative cooling is similar. In these experiments, either direct or indirect laser drive is used to launch a strong shock into a 125 micron thick titanium foil target that caps a 700 micron thick titanium washer. After the shock breaks out into the 300 micron diameter cylindrical hole in the washer, a dense, well-collimated jet with an energy density of more than 0.1 MJ per cc is formed. The jet is then imaged as it propagates for 100s of ns down a cylinder of low-density polymer foam. The experiments are diagnosed by point-projection with a micro-dot vanadium backligher. The field of view is several mm and the resolution is 15 microns. The X-ray radiographs show the hydrodynamically unstable jet and the bow shock driving into the surrounding foam. Such complex experimental data provide a challenge to hydrocodes and so are being used to test the hydrodynamic simulations of these types of flows. Initial comparisons between the data and LANL and AWE simulations will be shown. However, the high Reynolds numbers of both the laboratory and astrophysical jets suggest that, given sufficient time and shear, turbulence should develop; this cannot be reliably modeled by present, resolution-limited simulations. Future work concerning the applicability of the Omega experiments to astrophysical objects and the quantitative study of turbulent mixing via subgrid-scale models will be discussed.

  3. Shape optimisation of an underwater Bernoulli gripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Tim; Sellier, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we are interested in maximising the suction produced by an underwater Bernoulli gripper. Bernoulli grippers work by exploiting low pressure regions caused by the acceleration of a working fluid through a narrow channel, between the gripper and a surface, to provide a suction force. This mechanism allows for non-contact adhesion to various surfaces and may be used to hold a robot to the hull of a ship while it inspects welds for example. A Bernoulli type pressure analysis was used to model the system with a Darcy friction factor approximation to include the effects of frictional losses. The analysis involved a constrained optimisation in order to avoid cavitation within the mechanism which would result in decreased performance and damage to surfaces. A sensitivity based method and gradient descent approach was used to find the optimum shape of a discretised surface. The model's accuracy has been quantified against finite volume computational fluid dynamics simulation (ANSYS CFX) using the k- ω SST turbulence model. Preliminary results indicate significant improvement in suction force when compared to a simple geometry by retaining a pressure just above that at which cavitation would occur over as much surface area as possible. Doctoral candidate in the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of Canterbury, New Zealand.

  4. Screening optimisation for indirect potable reuse.

    PubMed

    Hatt, J W; Judd, S J; Germain, E

    2011-01-01

    An automatic backflush pre-filter used for pre-treatment for secondary wastewater re-use was evaluated and optimised at two different mesh sizes over an 18 month period. The filter was initially run with a 500 microm rating mesh size, as recommended by the supplier of the downstream membrane filtration process, and then at 100 microm to investigate any change in water quality produced and associated improved membrane performance. With the 500 microm mesh in place, the filter fouling rate was low and a backflush was initiated every 3.5 h. For the 100 microm mesh the fouling rate was extremely rapid. Fouling was found to be caused by reverse side blockage of the pre-filter due to biofilm growth, and not by improved solids capture; there was no improvement in water quality with the smaller mesh size, since particle unloading from the biofilm took place. The pre-filter fouling rate was found to be related to turbidity. At a turbidity of 5 NTU the filter backflushed around 200 times per day, while at 10 NTU this increased to over 300 times. Further analysis enabled the backflush water volume to be decreased by reducing the backflush duration and increasing the backflush cycle time (i.e. the time between backflushes).

  5. Optimising the outcome after anastomotic posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a plan that would optimise the outcome after an anastomotic repair of a pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI). Methods Data on the delayed repair of PFUI from reports in English were critically reviewed. The search criteria included reports by high-volume surgeons and those from tertiary centres of reconstructive urethral surgery. Results The delayed repair of a PFUI should not be attempted within 4–6 months of the initial trauma. A tension-free, scar-free and mucosa-to-mucosa urethral anastomosis is critically important for a successful outcome. Urethral defects shorter than a third of the bulbar urethral length can usually be repaired by a simple perineal operation, while longer defects usually need an elaborated perineal or perineo-abdominal transpubic procedure. The finest suture that provides adequate strength should always be used for a urethral anastomosis, generally 3/0 polyglactin 910 for adult patients and 4/0 for children. In transpubic urethroplasty, an omental wrapping of the intra-abdominal segment of the bulbar urethra and the site of anastomosis is mandatory. Conclusions Anastomotic repair of a PFUI entails various surgical components, and the importance of each of these should not be underestimated. Careful attention to these surgical components is mandatory for a successful outcome after repair. PMID:26019975

  6. Mathematical modeling of a gas jet impinging on a two phase bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Álvárez, J.; Ramírez-Argáez, Marco A.; González-Rivera, C.

    2012-09-01

    In this work a three phase 3D mathematical model was developed using the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) algorithm, which is able to accurately describe the cavity geometry and size as well as the liquid flow patterns created when a gas jet impinges on a two phase liquid free surface. These phenomena are commonly found in steelmaking operations such as in the Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) and the Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) where oxygen jets impinge on a steel bath and they control heat, momentum and mass transfer. The cavity formed in the liquids by the impinging jet depends on a force balance at the free surface where the inertial force of the jet governs these phenomena. The inertial force of the jet and its angle play important roles, being the lowest angle the best choice to shear the bath and promote stronger circulation and better mixing in the liquids.

  7. Thermal ink jet: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanka, Ivan

    1992-05-01

    The first public demonstration of thermal ink jet printing was done by Canon in 1981 and the first thermal ink jet product, ThinkJet, was introduced by the Hewlett-Packard Company in 1984. Since then, this powerful printing technology has assumed a strong presence in the market. In this discussion, we will first briefly review the printer market, the increasing role thermal ink jet is playing in this arena, as well as the reasons for its success. The technology discussion will follow, and will focus on several highlights in thermal ink jet physics, materials, and printing. We will conclude with our comments on future thermal ink jet developments.

  8. Parameters optimisation of a vehicle suspension system using a particle swarm optimisation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno Drehmer, Luis Roberto; Paucar Casas, Walter Jesus; Martins Gomes, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the lumped suspension parameters that minimise a multi-objective function in a vehicle model under different standard PSD road profiles. This optimisation tries to meet the rms vertical acceleration weighted limits for human sensitivity curves from ISO 2631 [ISO-2631: guide for evaluation of human exposure to whole-body vibration. Europe; 1997] at the driver's seat, the road holding capability and the suspension working space. The vehicle is modelled in the frequency domain using eight degrees of freedom under a random road profile. The particle swarm optimisation and sequential quadratic programming algorithms are used to obtain the suspension optimal parameters in different road profile and vehicle velocity conditions. A sensitivity analysis is performed using the obtained results and, in Class G road profile, the seat damping has the major influence on the minimisation of the multi-objective function. The influence of vehicle parameters in vibration attenuation is analysed and it is concluded that the front suspension stiffness should be less stiff than the rear ones when the driver's seat relative position is located forward the centre of gravity of the car body. Graphs and tables for the behaviour of suspension parameters related to road classes, used algorithms and velocities are presented to illustrate the results. In Class A road profile it was possible to find optimal parameters within the boundaries of the design variables that resulted in acceptable values for the comfort, road holding and suspension working space.

  9. Optimisation of the formulation of a bubble bath by a chemometric approach market segmentation and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Emilio; Robotti, Elisa; Gennaro, Maria Carla; Bertetto, Mariella

    2003-03-01

    The optimisation of the formulation of a commercial bubble bath was performed by chemometric analysis of Panel Tests results. A first Panel Test was performed to choose the best essence, among four proposed to the consumers; the best essence chosen was used in the revised commercial bubble bath. Afterwards, the effect of changing the amount of four components (the amount of primary surfactant, the essence, the hydratant and the colouring agent) of the bubble bath was studied by a fractional factorial design. The segmentation of the bubble bath market was performed by a second Panel Test, in which the consumers were requested to evaluate the samples coming from the experimental design. The results were then treated by Principal Component Analysis. The market had two segments: people preferring a product with a rich formulation and people preferring a poor product. The final target, i.e. the optimisation of the formulation for each segment, was obtained by the calculation of regression models relating the subjective evaluations given by the Panel and the compositions of the samples. The regression models allowed to identify the best formulations for the two segments ofthe market.

  10. LES of a Jet Excited by the Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of a high-speed jet are governed by the instability waves that form in the free-shear boundary layer of the jet. Jet excitation manipulates the growth and saturation of particular instability waves to control the unsteady flow structures that characterize the energy cascade in the jet.The results may include jet noise mitigation or a reduction in the infrared signature of the jet. The Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPA) have demonstrated the ability to excite a high-speed jets in laboratory experiments. Extending and optimizing this excitation technology, however, is a complex process that will require many tests and trials. Computational simulations can play an important role in understanding and optimizing this actuator technology for real-world applications. Previous research has focused on developing a suitable actuator model and coupling it with the appropriate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods using two-dimensional spatial flow approximations. This work is now extended to three-dimensions (3-D) in space. The actuator model is adapted to a series of discrete actuators and a 3-D LES simulation of an excited jet is run. The results are used to study the fluid dynamics near the actuator and in the jet plume.

  11. Multidirectional direct simple shear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, D.J.; Germaine, J.T.; Ladd, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The paper describes a new simple shear testing device, the multidirectional direct simple shear (MDSS) apparatus, for testing soil specimens under conditions that simulate, at the element level, the state of stress acting within the foundation soil of an offshore Arctic gravity structure. The MDSS uses a circular specimen that is consolidated under both a vertical effective stress ({sigma}{sub vc}{prime}) and a horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 1}). The specimen is subsequently sheared undrained by applying a second independent horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 2}) at an angle {theta} relative to the horizontal consolidation shear stress {tau}{sub 1}. Evaluation of the MDSS first compares conventional K{sub D}-consolidated undrained direct simple shear (CK{sub 0}UDSS) test data ({tau}{sub 1} = 0) on normally consolidated Boston blue clay (BBC) with results obtained in the Geonor DSS device. The MDSS gives lower secant Young`s modulus values and on average 8% lower strengths, but produces remarkably less scatter in the test results than the Geonor DSS. Kinematic proof tests with an elastic material (rubber) confirm that the setup procedure, application of forces, and strain measurement systems in the MDSS work properly and produce repeatable results. Results from a MDSS test program on BBC wherein specimens were first normally consolidated with {sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and {tau}{sub 1} = 0.2{sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and then sheared undrained at {theta} varing in 30{degree} increments from zero (shear in same direction) to 150{degree} show dramatic differences in the response of the soil as a function of {theta}. The peak undrained strength varies almost twofold from 0 = 0 to 120{degree}, while the deformation behavior varies from very brittle at low {theta} angles to becoming ductile at higher angles. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  13. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  14. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  15. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  16. Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.; Gilbride, J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model to estimate the shielding of noise emitted from a point noise source has been developed assuming the shielding jet to be a cylinder of constant radius with uniform flow across the cross section. Comparison to experiment indicated that the model overestimates diffraction of sound around the jet in the far downstream region. The shielding jet model is modified to include widening downstream of the nozzle exit. This not only represents a more realistic model of the jet, but is also expected to improve the shielding estimate downstream. The modified jet model incorporates a Mach number dependent widening rate, a corresponding decrease in flow velocity downstream and an equivalent slug flow evaluation to retain the locally parallel flow approximation of the model development. The shielding analysis with modified jet model is compared to measured data for a subsonic isothermal air jet and a simulated hot subsonic jet. Improvement of the shielding estimate is discussed.

  17. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  18. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  19. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes.

  20. Hypersonic jet control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.; Smith, A. J.

    The present study aims to identify some of the parameters which determine the upstream extent and the lateral spreading of the separation front around an under-expanded transverse jet on a slender blunted cone. The tests were conducted in the Cranfield hypersonic facility at M∞ = 8.2, Re∞ /cm = 4.5 to 9.0 × 104 and at M∞ = 12.3, Re∞ /cm = 3.3 × 104. Air was used as the working gas for both the freestream and the jet. Schlieren pictures were used for the visualisation of the three-dimensional structures around the jet. Pressure, normal force and pitching moment measurements were conducted to quantitatively study the interaction region and its effects on the vehicle. An analytical algorithm has been developed to predict the shape of the separation front around the body.

  1. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  2. A linear shock cell model for non-circular jets using conformal mapping with a pseudo-spectral hybrid scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Thonse R. S.; Baty, Roy S.; Morris, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    The shock structure in non-circular supersonic jets is predicted using a linear model. This model includes the effects of the finite thickness of the mixing layer and the turbulence in the jet shear layer. A numerical solution is obtained using a conformal mapping grid generation scheme with a hybrid pseudo-spectral discretization method. The uniform pressure perturbation at the jet exit is approximated by a Fourier-Mathieu series. The pressure at downstream locations is obtained from an eigenfunction expansion that is matched to the pressure perturbation at the jet exit. Results are presented for a circular jet and for an elliptic jet of aspect ratio 2.0. Comparisons are made with experimental data.

  3. Time-resolved proper orthogonal decomposition of liquid jet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2009-11-01

    New insight into the mechanism of liquid jet in crossflow atomization is provided by an analysis technique based on proper orthogonal decomposition and spectral analysis. Data are provided in the form of high-speed videos of the jet near field from experiments over a broad range of injection conditions. For each condition, proper orthogonal modes (POMs) are generated and ordered by intensity variation relative to the time average. The feasibility of jet dynamics reduction by truncation of the POM series to the first few modes is then examined as a function of crossflow velocity for laminar and turbulent liquid injection. At conditions where the jet breaks up into large chunks of liquid, the superposition of specific orthogonal modes is observed to track long waves traveling along the liquid column. The temporal coefficients of these modes can be described as a bandpass spectrum that shifts toward higher frequencies as the crossflow velocity is increased. The dynamic correlation of these modes is quantified by their cross-power spectrum density. Based on the frequency and wavelength extracted from the videos, the observed traveling waves are linked to the linearly fastest growing wave of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The gas boundary layer thickness at the gas-liquid shear layer emerges at the end of this study as the dominant length scale of jet dynamics at moderate Weber numbers.

  4. The development of an axisymmetric curved turbulent wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory-Smith, D. G.; Hawkins, M. J.

    1991-12-01

    An experimental study has been carried out of the low speed Coanda wall jet with both streamwise and axisymmetric curvature. A single component laser Doppler technique was used, and by taking several orientations at a given point, values of the three mean velocities and five of the six Reynolds stresses were obtained. The lateral divergence and convex streamwise curvature both enhanced the turbulence in the outer part of the jet compared with a plane two-dimensional wall jet. The inner layer exhibited a large separation of the positions of maximum velocity and zero shear stress. It was found that the streamwise mean velocity profile became established very rapidly downstream of the slot exit. The profile appeared fairly similar at later downstream positions, but the mean radial velocity and turbulence parameters showed the expected nonself preservation of the flow. Removal of the streamwise curvature resulted in a general return of the jet conditions toward those expected of a plane wall jet. The range and accuracy of the data may be used for developing turbulence models and computational techniques for this type of flow.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Multiple Turbulent Round Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balajee, G. K.; Panchapakesan, Nagangudy

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent round jet flow was simulated as a large eddy simulation with OpenFoam software package for a jet Reynolds number of 11000. The intensity of the fluctuating motion in the incoming nozzle flow was adjusted so that the initial shear layer development compares well with available experimental data. The far field development of averages of higher order moments up to fourth order were compared with experiments. The agreement is good indicating that the large eddy motions were being computed satisfactorily by the simulation. Turbulent kinetic energy budget as well as the quality of the LES simulations were also evaluated. These conditions were then used to perform a multiple turbulent round jets simulation with the same initial momentum flux. The far field of the flow was compared with the single jet simulation and experiments to test approach to self similarity. The evolution of the higher order moments in the development region where the multiple jets interact were studied. We will also present FTLE fields computed from the simulation to educe structures and compare it with those educed by other scalar measures. Support of AR&DB CIFAAR, and VIRGO cluster at IIT Madras is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Round impinging jets with relatively large stand-off distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shademan, Mehrdad; Balachandar, Ram; Roussinova, Vesselina; Barron, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Large eddy simulation and particle image velocimetry measurements have been performed to evaluate the characteristics of a turbulent impinging jet with large nozzle height-to-diameter ratio (H/D = 20). The Reynolds number considered is approximately 28 000 based on the jet exit velocity and nozzle diameter. Mean normalized centerline velocity in both the free jet and impingement regions and pressure distribution over the plate obtained from simulations and experiments show good agreement. The ring-like vortices generated due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the exit of the nozzle merge, break down and transform into large scale structures while traveling towards the impingement plate. A Strouhal number of 0.63 was found for the vortices generated at the exit of the nozzle. However, this parameter is reduced along the centerline towards the impingement zone. A characteristic frequency was also determined for the large scale structures impinging on the plate. The expansion, growth, tilt, and three-dimensionality of the impinging structures cause dislocation of the impinging flow from the centerline, which is significantly larger when compared with flows having small H/D ratios. Contrary to the behavior of impinging jets with small stand-off distance, due to the loss of coherence, the large scale structures do not result in significant secondary vortices in the wall jet region and consequently less fluctuations were observed for wall shear stress.

  7. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  8. Shear thinning of nanoparticle suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-08-01

    Results of large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented for nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The nanoparticles are modeled as a uniform distribution of Lennard-Jones particles, while the solvent is represented by standard Lennard-Jones particles. Here we present results for the shear rheology of spherical nanoparticles of size 5 to 20 times that of the solvent for a range of nanoparticle volume fractions and interactions. Results from NEMD simulations suggest that for strongly interacting nanoparticle that form a colloidal gel, the shear rheology of the suspension depends only weakly on the size of the nanoparticle, even for nanoparticles as small as 5 times that of the solvent. However for hard sphere-like colloids the size of the nanoparticles strongly affects the shear rheology. The shear rheology for dumbbell nanoparticles made of two fused spheres is also compared to spherical nanoparticles and found to be similar except at very high volume fractions.

  9. A piezoelectric shear stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress, suppressing effects of normal stress components, by applying opposite poling vectors to the piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces where it demonstrated high sensitivity to shear stress (91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3 (PMN-33%PT, d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also exhibited negligible sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is up to 800 Hz.

  10. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  11. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  12. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  13. CT dose optimisation and reduction in osteoarticular disease.

    PubMed

    Gervaise, A; Teixeira, P; Villani, N; Lecocq, S; Louis, M; Blum, A

    2013-04-01

    With an improvement in the temporal and spatial resolution, computed tomography (CT) is indicated in the evaluation of a great many osteoarticular diseases. New exploration techniques such as the dynamic CT and CT bone perfusion also provide new indications. However, CT is still an irradiating imaging technique and dose optimisation and reduction remains primordial. In this paper, the authors first present the typical doses delivered during CT in osteoarticular disease. They then discuss the different ways to optimise and reduce these doses by distinguishing the behavioural factors from the technical factors. Among the latter, the optimisation of the milliamps and kilovoltage is indispensable and should be adapted to the type of exploration and the morphotype of each individual. These technical factors also benefit from recent technological evolutions with the distribution of iterative reconstructions. In this way, the dose may be divided by two and provide an image of equal quality. With these dose optimisation and reduction techniques, it is now possible, while maintaining an excellent quality of the image, to obtain low-dose or even very low-dose acquisitions with a dose sometimes similar that of a standard X-ray assessment. Nevertheless, although these technical factors provide a major reduction in the dose delivered, behavioural factors, such as compliance with the indications, remain fundamental. Finally, the authors describe how to optimise and reduce the dose with specific applications in musculoskeletal imaging such as the dynamic CT, CT bone perfusion and dual energy CT.

  14. Biogeography-based optimisation of Cognitive Radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranjot; Rattan, Munish; Singh Patterh, Manjeet

    2014-01-01

    Biogeography-based optimisation (BBO) is a novel population-based global optimisation algorithm that is stimulated by the science of biogeography. The mathematical models of biogeography describe how a species arises, migrates from one habitat (Island) to another or gets extinct. BBO searches for the global optimum mainly through two steps: migration and mutation. These steps are controlled by immigration and emigration rates of the species in the habitat which are also used to share information between the habitats. In this paper, BBO has been applied to Cognitive Radio (CR) system for optimising its various transmission parameters to meet the quality of service (QoS) that is defined by the user in terms of minimum transmit power, minimum bit error rate (BER), maximum throughput, minimum interference and maximum spectral efficiency. To confirm the capability of biogeography-based optimisation algorithm, the results obtained by BBO are compared with that obtained by using genetic algorithm (GA) for the various QoS parameters, and it has been observed that BBO outperforms GA in system optimisation.

  15. Jet Surface Interaction Scrubbing Noise from High Aspect-Ratio Rectangular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bozak, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity of the airframe. Distributed propulsion system with exhaust configurations that resemble a high aspect ratio rectangular jet are among geometries of interest. Nearby solid surfaces could provide noise shielding for the purpose of reduced community noise. Interaction of high-speed jet exhaust with structure could also generate new sources of sound as a result of flow scrubbing past the structure, and or scattered noise from sharp edges. The present study provides a theoretical framework to predict the scrubbing noise component from a high aspect ratio rectangular exhaust in proximity of a solid surface. The analysis uses the Greens function (GF) to the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation in a transversely sheared mean flow. Sources of sound are defined as the auto-covariance function of second-rank velocity fluctuations in the jet plume, and are modeled using a RANS-based acoustic analogy approach. Acoustic predictions are presented in an 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular exhaust at three subsonic Mach numbers. The effect of nearby surface on the scrubbing noise component is shown on both reflected and shielded sides of the plate.

  16. Vortex dynamics in a turbulent shear flow over a cavity at near-zero Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Shiyao; Ceccio, Steven; Driscoll, James

    2007-11-01

    A kilohertz frame-rate Cinematographic Particle Imaging Velocimetry system was used to acquire time series of whole-field velocity data for an incompressible, turbulent shear flow over a rectangular, shallow cavity with ReL = 2.87 x 10^5, where L is the cavity length. The cavity shear layer was divided into three regions that exhibited different vortex dynamics: formation, convection/evolution, and impingement. The second region is similar to a free shear layer, with vortex roll-up that is well predicted by linear, inviscid instability theory. The impinging shear layer produces a jet-like flow along the downstream wall, resulting in a large-scale recirculation zone in the cavity. This flow impinges on the shear layer in the formation region, increasing the shear layer growth rate. No self-sustained pressure or flow-field oscillations were observed for a variety of flow speeds. The dynamics of the shear layer in the impingement region was found to be correlated with the dynamic pressure on the downstream wall.

  17. The noise emitted by turbulent jets in close proximity to solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. W.; Parsons, C.

    1986-07-01

    The present calculations of basic directivity patterns for randomly oriented longitudinal and lateral quadrupole types near a rigid plane indicate substantial differences between the two types. By applying Lighthill's (1954) acoustic analogy and extending the Ribner (1969) modeling method for acoustic sources, the basic directivity pattern of the sound generated by a unit volume of jet-type shear layer turbulence near an infinite grid plane is calculated and found to be very different from the corresponding elliptical one obtained by unit volume of free-field shear layer turbulence. The theory is presently applied to an actual turbulent shear flow, in the form of a plane, two-dimensional wall jet, basic aeroacoustic predictions are thereby obtained.

  18. Magnetotail Reconnection Jets at Lunar Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Eastwood, J. P.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T.; Mistry, R.; McFadden, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection redistributes energy by releasing magnetic energy into particle energies—high speed bulk flows, heating, and particle acceleration. With near-Earth in situ observations, we have access to different parameter regimes: The magnetotail has typically a very large magnetic shear and symmetric boundary conditions. Reconnection at the magnetopause, in contrast, usually takes place under asymmetric boundary conditions and a variety of shear angles. Finally, reconnecting current sheets in the solar wind are typically large scale and not affected by nearby obstacles, and observations are typically made extremely far downstream from the X-line. As such, magnetotail reconnection, especially at lunar distances where the effect of the Earth's dipole is small, should be closest to simple models. Ion heating has recently been studied systematically in solar wind and magnetopause reconnection, but not in the magnetotail. The energetics of magnetotail reconnection jets are particularly interesting as the available magnetic energy per particle (Bin2/μ0nin = miVA,in2) is typically orders of magnitude higher and the inflow plasma beta much lower than in the solar wind and at the magnetopause. We survey ARTEMIS data from 2011-2014 for fast reconnection flows and analyse their statistical properties. In particular, we address (i) the ion temperature increase (ii) ion temperature anisotropy and firehose instability, and (iii) the underlying ion dynamics. We examine the spatial structure of the ion temperature across the exhaust, and compare with particle-in-cell simulations. We find that the temperature parallel to the magnetic field dominates near the edges of the jet, while the very center of the exhaust has Tperp > Tpara, indicating Speiser-like ion motion.

  19. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  20. Stationary relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with vz≈ c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialised code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres and elucidated the nature of radial oscillations of steady-state jets.

  1. Jets and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Soper, Davison E.

    2013-06-01

    An essential element of the development of the strong interaction component of the Standard Model of particle physics, QCD, has been the evolving understanding of the "jets" of particles that appear in the final states of high energy particle collisions. In this chapter we provide a historical outline of those developments...

  2. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  3. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  4. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  5. Microfluidic converging/diverging channels optimised for homogeneous extensional deformation

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, K.; Oliveira, M. S. N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we optimise microfluidic converging/diverging geometries in order to produce constant strain-rates along the centreline of the flow, for performing studies under homogeneous extension. The design is examined for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows where the effects of aspect ratio and dimensionless contraction length are investigated. Initially, pressure driven flows of Newtonian fluids under creeping flow conditions are considered, which is a reasonable approximation in microfluidics, and the limits of the applicability of the design in terms of Reynolds numbers are investigated. The optimised geometry is then used for studying the flow of viscoelastic fluids and the practical limitations in terms of Weissenberg number are reported. Furthermore, the optimisation strategy is also applied for electro-osmotic driven flows, where the development of a plug-like velocity profile allows for a wider region of homogeneous extensional deformation in the flow field. PMID:27478523

  6. Quasi-combinatorial energy landscapes for nanoalloy structure optimisation.

    PubMed

    Schebarchov, D; Wales, D J

    2015-11-14

    We formulate nanoalloy structure prediction as a mixed-variable optimisation problem, where the homotops can be associated with an effective, quasi-combinatorial energy landscape in permutation space. We survey this effective landscape for a representative set of binary systems modelled by the Gupta potential. In segregating systems with small lattice mismatch, we find that homotops have a relatively straightforward landscape with few local optima - a scenario well-suited for local (combinatorial) optimisation techniques that scale quadratically with system size. Combining these techniques with multiple local-neighbourhood structures yields a search for multiminima, and we demonstrate that generalised basin-hopping with a metropolis acceptance criterion in the space of multiminima can then be effective for global optimisation of binary and ternary nanoalloys.

  7. CLIC Crab Cavity Design Optimisation for Maximum Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, A.C.; Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dolgashev, V.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2012-04-25

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  8. Microfluidic converging/diverging channels optimised for homogeneous extensional deformation.

    PubMed

    Zografos, K; Pimenta, F; Alves, M A; Oliveira, M S N

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we optimise microfluidic converging/diverging geometries in order to produce constant strain-rates along the centreline of the flow, for performing studies under homogeneous extension. The design is examined for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows where the effects of aspect ratio and dimensionless contraction length are investigated. Initially, pressure driven flows of Newtonian fluids under creeping flow conditions are considered, which is a reasonable approximation in microfluidics, and the limits of the applicability of the design in terms of Reynolds numbers are investigated. The optimised geometry is then used for studying the flow of viscoelastic fluids and the practical limitations in terms of Weissenberg number are reported. Furthermore, the optimisation strategy is also applied for electro-osmotic driven flows, where the development of a plug-like velocity profile allows for a wider region of homogeneous extensional deformation in the flow field.

  9. Microfluidic converging/diverging channels optimised for homogeneous extensional deformation.

    PubMed

    Zografos, K; Pimenta, F; Alves, M A; Oliveira, M S N

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we optimise microfluidic converging/diverging geometries in order to produce constant strain-rates along the centreline of the flow, for performing studies under homogeneous extension. The design is examined for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows where the effects of aspect ratio and dimensionless contraction length are investigated. Initially, pressure driven flows of Newtonian fluids under creeping flow conditions are considered, which is a reasonable approximation in microfluidics, and the limits of the applicability of the design in terms of Reynolds numbers are investigated. The optimised geometry is then used for studying the flow of viscoelastic fluids and the practical limitations in terms of Weissenberg number are reported. Furthermore, the optimisation strategy is also applied for electro-osmotic driven flows, where the development of a plug-like velocity profile allows for a wider region of homogeneous extensional deformation in the flow field. PMID:27478523

  10. Towards enhancing and delaying disturbances in free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Jackson, T. L.; Lasseigne, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    The family of shear flows comprising the jet, wake, and the mixing layer are subjected to perturbations in an inviscid incompressible fluid. By modeling the basic mean flows as parallel with piecewise linear variations for the velocities, complete and general solutions to the linearized equations of motion can be obtained in closed form as functions of all space variables and time when posed as an initial value problem. The results show that there is a continuous as well as the discrete spectrum that is more familiar in stability theory and therefore there can be both algebraic and exponential growth of disturbances in time. These bases make it feasible to consider control of such flows. To this end, the possibility of enhancing the disturbances in the mixing layer and delaying the onset in the jet and wake is investigated. It is found that growth of perturbations can be delayed to a considerable degree for the jet and the wake but, by comparison, cannot be enhanced in the mixing layer. By using moving coordinates, a method for demonstrating the predominant early and long time behavior of disturbances in these flows is given for continuous velocity profiles. It is shown that the early time transients are always algebraic whereas the asymptotic limit is that of an exponential normal mode. Numerical treatment of the new governing equations confirm the conclusions reached by use of the piecewise linear basic models. Although not pursued here, feedback mechanisms designed for control of the flow could be devised using the results of this work.

  11. Turbulence Statistics of a Buoyant Jet in a Stratified Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleney, Amy Brooke

    Using non-intrusive optical diagnostics, turbulence statistics for a round, incompressible, buoyant, and vertical jet discharging freely into a stably linear stratified environment is studied and compared to a reference case of a neutrally buoyant jet in a uniform environment. This is part of a validation campaign for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Buoyancy forces are known to significantly affect the jet evolution in a stratified environment. Despite their ubiquity in numerous natural and man-made flows, available data in these jets are limited, which constrain our understanding of the underlying physical processes. In particular, there is a dearth of velocity field data, which makes it challenging to validate numerical codes, currently used for modeling these important flows. Herein, jet near- and far-field behaviors are obtained with a combination of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and multi-scale time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) for Reynolds number up to 20,000. Deploying non-intrusive optical diagnostics in a variable density environment is challenging in liquids. The refractive index is strongly affected by the density, which introduces optical aberrations and occlusions that prevent the resolution of the flow. One solution consists of using index matched fluids with different densities. Here a pair of water solutions - isopropanol and NaCl - are identified that satisfy these requirements. In fact, they provide a density difference up to 5%, which is the largest reported for such fluid pairs. Additionally, by design, the kinematic viscosities of the solutions are identical. This greatly simplifies the analysis and subsequent simulations of the data. The spectral and temperature dependence of the solutions are fully characterized. In the near-field, shear layer roll-up is analyzed and characterized as a function of initial velocity profile. In the far-field, turbulence statistics are reported for two different scales, one

  12. Applying Hanford Tank Mixing Data to Define Pulse Jet Mixer Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Holton, Langdon K.

    2015-12-07

    Pulse jet mixed (PJM) process vessels are being developed for storing, blending, and chemical processing of nuclear waste slurries at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to be built at Hanford, Washington. These waste slurries exhibit variable process feed characteristics including Newtonian to non-Newtonian rheologies over a range of solids loadings. Waste feed to the WTP from the Hanford Tank Farms will be accomplished via the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) system which includes million-gallon underground storage double-shell tanks (DSTs) with dual-opposed jet mixer pumps. Experience using WFD type jet mixer pumps to mobilize actual Hanford waste in DSTs may be used to establish design threshold criteria of interest to pulse jet mixed process vessel operation. This paper describes a method to evaluate the pulse jet mixed vessel capability to process waste based on information obtained during mobilizing and suspending waste by the WFD system jet mixer pumps in a DST. Calculations of jet velocity and wall shear stress in a specific pulse jet mixed process vessel were performed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The CFD-modelled process vessel consists of a 4.9-m- (16-ft-) diameter tank with a 2:1 semi-elliptical head, a single, 10-cm (4-in.) downward facing 60-degree conical nozzle, and a 0.61-m (24-in.) inside diameter PJM. The PJM is located at 70% of the vessel radius with the nozzle stand-off-distance 14 cm (6 in.) above the vessel head. The CFD modeled fluid velocity and wall shear stress can be used to estimate vessel waste-processing performance by comparison to available actual WFD system process data. Test data from the operation of jet mixer pumps in the 23-m (75-ft) diameter DSTs have demonstrated mobilization, solid particles in a sediment matrix were moved from their initial location, and suspension, mobilized solid particles were moved to a higher elevation in the vessel than their initial location, of waste solids

  13. Laminar and turbulent nozzle-jet flows and their acoustic near-field

    SciTech Connect

    Bühler, Stefan; Obrist, Dominik; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2014-08-15

    We investigate numerically the effects of nozzle-exit flow conditions on the jet-flow development and the near-field sound at a diameter-based Reynolds number of Re{sub D} = 18 100 and Mach number Ma = 0.9. Our computational setup features the inclusion of a cylindrical nozzle which allows to establish a physical nozzle-exit flow and therefore well-defined initial jet-flow conditions. Within the nozzle, the flow is modeled by a potential flow core and a laminar, transitional, or developing turbulent boundary layer. The goal is to document and to compare the effects of the different jet inflows on the jet flow development and the sound radiation. For laminar and transitional boundary layers, transition to turbulence in the jet shear layer is governed by the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the turbulent nozzle boundary layer, the jet flow development is characterized by a rapid changeover to a turbulent free shear layer within about one nozzle diameter. Sound pressure levels are strongly enhanced for laminar and transitional exit conditions compared to the turbulent case. However, a frequency and frequency-wavenumber analysis of the near-field pressure indicates that the dominant sound radiation characteristics remain largely unaffected. By applying a recently developed scaling procedure, we obtain a close match of the scaled near-field sound spectra for all nozzle-exit turbulence levels and also a reasonable agreement with experimental far-field data.

  14. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  15. Discovery and optimisation studies of antimalarial phenotypic hits.

    PubMed

    Mital, Alka; Murugesan, Dinakaran; Kaiser, Marcel; Yeates, Clive; Gilbert, Ian H

    2015-10-20

    There is an urgent need for the development of new antimalarial compounds. As a result of a phenotypic screen, several compounds with potent activity against the parasite Plasmodium falciparum were identified. Characterization of these compounds is discussed, along with approaches to optimise the physicochemical properties. The in vitro antimalarial activity of these compounds against P. falciparum K1 had EC50 values in the range of 0.09-29 μM, and generally good selectivity (typically >100-fold) compared to a mammalian cell line (L6). One example showed no significant activity against a rodent model of malaria, and more work is needed to optimise these compounds. PMID:26408453

  16. Robust eigenstructure clustering by non-smooth optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Minh Ngoc; Noll, Dominikus; Apkarian, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    We extend classical eigenstructure assignment to more realistic problems, where additional performance and robustness specifications arise. Our aim is to combine time-domain constraints, as reflected by pole location and eigenvector structure, with frequency-domain objectives such as the H2, H∞ or Hankel norms. Using pole clustering, we allow poles to move in polydisks of prescribed size around their nominal values, driven by optimisation. Eigenelements, that is poles and eigenvectors, are allowed to move simultaneously and serve as decision variables in a specialised non-smooth optimisation technique. Two aerospace applications illustrate the power of the new method.

  17. The Role of Shear Stress in Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation and Failure: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Leonard D.; Bashar, Khalid; Griffin, Philip; Kavanagh, Eamon G.; Walsh, Stewart R.; Walsh, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-maturation and post-maturation venous stenosis are the primary causes of failure within arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs). Although the exact mechanisms triggering failure remain unclear, abnormal hemodynamic profiles are thought to mediate vascular remodelling and can adversely impact on fistula patency. Aim The review aims to clarify the role of shear stress on outward remodelling during maturation and evaluate the evidence supporting theories related to the localisation and development of intimal hyperplasia within AVFs. Methods A systematic review of studies comparing remodelling data with hemodynamic data obtained from computational fluid dynamics of AVFs during and after maturation was conducted. Results Outward remodelling occurred to reduce or normalise the level of shear stress over time in fistulae with a large radius of curvature (curved) whereas shear stress was found to augment over time in fistulae with a small radius of curvature (straight) coinciding with minimal to no increases in lumen area. Although this review highlighted that there is a growing body of evidence suggesting low and oscillating shear stress may stimulate the initiation and development of intimal medial thickening within AVFs. Further lines of evidence are needed to support the disturbed flow theory and outward remodelling findings before surgical configurations and treatment strategies are optimised to conform to them. This review highlighted that variation between the time of analysis, classification of IH, resolution of simulations, data processing techniques and omission of various shear stress metrics prevented forming pooling of data amongst studies. Conclusion Standardised measurements and data processing techniques are needed to comprehensively evaluate the relationship between shear stress and intimal medial thickening. Advances in image acquisition and flow quantifications coupled with the increasing prevalence of longitudinal studies commencing from fistula

  18. Flapping instability of a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Jean-Philippe; Cartellier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We study the flapping instability observed when a liquid jet is incompletely atomized by a fast parallel gas stream: the remaining liquid jet is destabilized over a scale large compared with its radius, and breaks into liquid fragments. We characterize the symmetry of this instability and its frequency. The intact liquid length is measured as a function of gas and liquid velocity, and turns out to be longer than the one predicted by Raynal (1997) for a planar mixing layer. The frequency of the instability is measured with a spectral method, and is in agreement with the frequency observed for the planar shear instability, though slightly smaller. The planar, and not helical, symmetry of the instability makes it akin to a flapping instability, observed when a planar liquid sheet is atomized by two planar gas streams. We next measure drop sizes when the flapping instability is present, with a method based on image processing. Measured size distributions are in agreement with distributions observed in a mixing layer geometry for low gas velocities (long tail distribution). The mean drop diameter depends weakly on liquid velocity, and decreases as d10˜Ug0.9. On the contrary, Sauter diameter depends strongly on liquid velocity.

  19. Interacting jets from binary protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, G. C.; Lery, T.; O'Sullivan, S.; Spicer, D.; Bacciotti, F.; Rosen, A.

    2008-02-01

    Aims: We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. Methods: We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. Results: We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. Conclusions: While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly parallel, as in most observed cases, we show that the magnetic field can help the collimation and refocusing of both of the two jets.

  20. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  1. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  2. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    PubMed

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  3. Comparison of the single/multi transverse jets under the influence of shock wave in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Rahimi Takami, M.; Heidari, H. R.; Fallah, Keivan; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the effects of the shock wave on sonic transverse hydrogen through single and multi-jets for supersonic combustion were investigated numerically. This study presents the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between fuel jets (single or multi array) and incident shock waves into a Mach 4.0 crossflow. Parametric studies were conducted on the performance of the shock wave by using the RANS equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. In a parametric study, both the streamwise spacing and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied. For all downstream mixing, the associated flow behavior was found to be a direct result of both the type of injection (single/Multi jet) and interactions between shock waves and injectors. According to the results, shock wave reduces the maximum concentration of the hydrogen jet more than 20% in both single and multi jet. Furthermore, a significant increase (approximately 40%) occurs in the mixing of the hydrogen jet at downstream when shock generator is presented in the multi jet with PR=0.27. Moreover, hydrogen-air mixing rate extends in streamwise direction as the jet space increases. Thus, an enhanced mixing zone occurs in the in far downstream of the jet and the shock wave.

  4. Breakup structure of two-phase jets with various momentum flux from a porous injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kim, Dohun; Koo, Jaye

    2014-02-01

    Spray structure and atomization characteristics were investigated through a comparison of a porous and a shear coaxial injector. The porous injector shows better atomization performance than the shear coaxial injector. To increase atomization performance and mixing efficiency of two-phase jets, a coaxial porous injector which can be applicable to liquid rocket combustors was designed and tested. The characteristics of atomization and spray from a porous and a shear coaxial injector were characterized by the momentum flux ratio. The breakup mechanism of the porous injector is governed by Taylor-Culick flow and axial shear forces. Momentum of injected gas flow through a porous material which is composed of sintered metal is radically transferred to the center of the liquid column, and then liquid column is effectively broken up. Although the shapes of spray from porous and shear coaxial jets were similar for various momentum ratio, spray structures such as spray angle and droplet sizes were different. As increasing the momentum flux ratio, SMD from the porous injector showed smaller value than the shear coaxial injector

  5. Non-linear Total Energy Optimisation of a Fleet of Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolle, Lars; Biegler-König, Friedrich; Deeskow, Peter

    In order to optimise the energy production in a fleet of power plants, it is necessary to solve a mixed integer optimisation problem. Traditionally, the continuous parts of the problem are linearized and a Simplex scheme is applied. Alternatively, heuristic "bionic" optimisation methods can be used without having to linearize the problem. Weare going to demonstrate this approach by modelling power plant blocks with fast Neural Networks and optimising the operation of multi-block power plants over one day with Simulated Annealing.

  6. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  7. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  8. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  9. A new technique for the measurement of surface shear stress vectors using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Muratore, J. J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Research has recently shown that liquid crystal coating (LCC) color-change response to shear depends on both shear stress magnitude and direction. Additional research was thus conducted to extend the LCC method from a flow-visualization tool to a surface shear stress vector measurement technique. A shear-sensitive LCC was applied to a planar test surface and illuminated by white light from the normal direction. A fiber optic probe was used to capture light scattered by the LCC from a point on the centerline of a turbulent, tangential-jet flow. Both the relative shear stress magnitude and the relative in-plane view angle between the sensor and the centerline shear vector were systematically varied. A spectrophotometer was used to obtain scattered-light spectra which were used to quantify the LCC color (dominant wavelength) as a function of shear stress magnitude and direction. At any fixed shear stress magnitude, the minimum dominant wavelength was measured when the shear vector was aligned with and directed away from the observer; changes in the relative in-plane view angle to either side of this vector/observer aligned position resulted in symmetric Gaussian increases in measured dominant wavelength. Based on these results, a vector measurement methodology, involving multiple oblique-view observations of the test surface, was formulated. Under present test conditions, the measurement resolution of this technique was found to be +/- 1 deg for vector orientations and +/- 5% for vector magnitudes. An approach t o extend the present methodology to full-surface applications is proposed.

  10. Wear/comfort Pareto optimisation of bogie suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milad Mousavi Bideleh, Seyed; Berbyuk, Viktor; Persson, Rickard

    2016-08-01

    Pareto optimisation of bogie suspension components is considered for a 50 degrees of freedom railway vehicle model to reduce wheel/rail contact wear and improve passenger ride comfort. Several operational scenarios including tracks with different curve radii ranging from very small radii up to straight tracks are considered for the analysis. In each case, the maximum admissible speed is applied to the vehicle. Design parameters are categorised into two levels and the wear/comfort Pareto optimisation is accordingly accomplished in a multistep manner to improve the computational efficiency. The genetic algorithm (GA) is employed to perform the multi-objective optimisation. Two suspension system configurations are considered, a symmetric and an asymmetric in which the primary or secondary suspension elements on the right- and left-hand sides of the vehicle are not the same. It is shown that the vehicle performance on curves can be significantly improved using the asymmetric suspension configuration. The Pareto-optimised values of the design parameters achieved here guarantee wear reduction and comfort improvement for railway vehicles and can also be utilised in developing the reference vehicle models for design of bogie active suspension systems.

  11. Hierarchical optimisation on scissor seat suspension characteristic and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlei; Zhang, Xinjie; Guo, Konghui; Lv, Jiming; Yang, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Scissor seat suspension has been applied widely to attenuate the cab vibrations of commercial vehicles, while its design generally needs a trade-off between the seat acceleration and suspension travel, which creates a typical optimisation issue. A complexity for this issue is that the optimal dynamics parameters are not easy to approach solutions fast and unequivocally. Hence, the hierarchical optimisation on scissor seat suspension characteristic and structure is proposed, providing a top-down methodology with the globally optimal and fast convergent solutions to compromise these design contradictions. In details, a characteristic-oriented non-parametric dynamics model of the scissor seat suspension is formulated firstly via databases, describing its vertical dynamics accurately. Then, the ideal vertical stiffness-damping characteristic is cascaded via the characteristic-oriented model, and the structure parameters are optimised in accordance with a structure-oriented multi-body dynamics model of the scissor seat suspension. Eventually, the seat effective amplitude transmissibility factor, suspension travel and the CPU time for solving are evaluated. The results show the seat suspension performance and convergent speed of the globally optimal solutions are improved well. Hence, the proposed hierarchical optimisation methodology regarding characteristic and structure of the scissor seat suspension is promising for its virtual development.

  12. Optimising Microbial Growth with a Bench-Top Bioreactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. M. R.; Borin, S. L.; Chooi, K. P.; Huang, S. S.; Newgas, A. J. S.; Sodagar, D.; Ziegler, C. A.; Chan, G. H. T.; Walsh, K. A. P.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of impeller size, agitation and aeration on the rate of yeast growth were investigated using bench-top bioreactors. This exercise, carried out over a six-month period, served as an effective demonstration of the importance of different operating parameters on cell growth and provided a means of determining the optimisation conditions…

  13. Evaluation of a High Throughput Starch Analysis Optimised for Wood

    PubMed Central

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes. PMID:24523863

  14. Phenomenology of photon-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of collider physics is to unambiguously associate detector-based objects with the corresponding elementary physics objects. A particular example is the association of calorimeter-based objects such as “jets,” identified with a standard (IR-safe) jet algorithm, with the underlying physics objects, which may be QCD-jets (arising from a scattered parton), electrons, photons or, as discussed here, photon-jets (a group of collinear photons). This separation is especially interesting in the context of Higgs search, where the signal includes events with two photons (in the Standard Model) as well as events with two photon-jets (in a variety of Beyond the Standard Model scenarios), while QCD provides ever-present background. Here we describe the implementation of techniques from the rapidly evolving area of jet substructure studies, not only to enhance the more familiar photon-QCD separation, but also to separately distinguish photon-jets, i.e., to separate usual jets into three categories: single photons, photon-jets and QCD-jets. The efficacy of these techniques for separation is illustrated through studies of simulated data.

  15. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  16. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  17. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  18. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  19. Shear rates measurements in natural shear zones using quartz piezometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Hervé Leloup, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Whether deformation within the deep continental crust is fundamentally concentrated in narrow shear zones or distributed in wide zones stays a major controversy of the earth sciences. This is in part because direct measurements of ductile strain or strain rate are difficult, especially when deformation is intense as it is the case in ductile shear zones. Paleo-shear stress can be evaluated by using paleo-piezometers that link shear stress to the size of recrystallized minerals. Such piezometers are calibrated by microphysical models or experimental studies. Indirect measurements of strain rate in natural rocks can be achieved using shear stress, an estimation of the temperature of deformation, and assuming a flow law. However, such estimates have rarely been validated by independent constraints. By comparing shear rates calculated from paleopiezometry, and measured in situ in the same outcrop we determined the more appropriate paleopiezometer and power flow law in order to generalize the method to other outcrops. Within the Ailao - Red River shear zone (ASSR, SE Asia) paleo strain rates during the Miocene left-lateral shear are estimated between 1*10-13 s-1 and 2*10-13 s-1 from tectonic considerations. At site C1, by combining dating of syntectonic dykes and measurements of their deformation, the strain rate is calculated between 3 and 4*10-14 s-1 between 29 to 22 Ma, (Sassier et al., JGR, 2009). Quartz ribbons of sample YY33 from the same outcrop show continuous dynamic recrystallisation (DRX) mechanisms, characterized by subgrain rotation nucleation, and growth by grain boundary migration (Shimitzu et al. JSG, 2008). This dislocation creep regime is compatible with the microphysical models of Twiss (Pure Ammp. Geoph., 1977) and Shimitzu (JSG, 2008) and the experimental piezometer of Stipp and Tullis (GRL, 2003). The measured quartz grain size range between 10 and 960 μm, while the mean recrystallized grain size is 112.2 ± 1.5μm. The associated paleostress is

  20. Generation of cumulative jets during underwater explosion of copper wires in the ``X-pinch'' configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, D.; Toker, G.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2013-11-01

    The results of experiments with underwater electrical explosion of 0.1 mm diameter copper wires in X-pinch configuration are presented. A pulsed generator producing a ˜30 kA-amplitude current with a ˜65 ns rise time was used for the explosion of the wires. Shadowgraph and shearing interferometry techniques were applied for optical diagnostics. Evidence of fast-moving copper jets, originating from the location of the intersection of the exploding wires, is reported. Simultaneous measurement of the expansion of the wires, shock waves, and copper jets showed that the dynamics of the jets strongly resemble the classic problem of a collision of two planes, producing two consecutive cumulative jets.

  1. Behavior of Electrospinning Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Han; Reneker, Darrell

    2002-03-01

    During the electrospinning of jets of polymer solutions such as polyethylene oxide in water, interference colors similar to those seen in the walls of soap bubbles are seen if the proper illumination is provided. The colors can be seen both in the straight part of the jet and in the loops formed by the electrically driven bending instability. The colors were correlated with measurements of the diameter of segments of a particular color. The path of a slowly moving jet of polyisobutylene in a mixture of acetone and paraffin oil was recorded. A well-developed expanding spiral that moved downward was observed. The downward velocity of a typical segment was .13 m/s, and the radial velocity of the same segment was .23m/s. The development of the second bending instability occurred 180 ms after the first, and a third bending instability occurred 280 ms after the first. The growth of the bending instability clearly demonstrated its self-similar, fractal nature. A network of electrospun polyisobutylene fibers was collected in an isopropyl alcohol precipitation bath.

  2. Optimisation of logistics processes of energy grass collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányai, Tamás.

    2010-05-01

    The collection of energy grass is a logistics-intensive process [1]. The optimal design and control of transportation and collection subprocesses is a critical point of the supply chain. To avoid irresponsible decisions by right of experience and intuition, the optimisation and analysis of collection processes based on mathematical models and methods is the scientific suggestible way. Within the frame of this work, the author focuses on the optimisation possibilities of the collection processes, especially from the point of view transportation and related warehousing operations. However the developed optimisation methods in the literature [2] take into account the harvesting processes, county-specific yields, transportation distances, erosion constraints, machinery specifications, and other key variables, but the possibility of more collection points and the multi-level collection were not taken into consideration. The possible areas of using energy grass is very wide (energetically use, biogas and bio alcohol production, paper and textile industry, industrial fibre material, foddering purposes, biological soil protection [3], etc.), so not only a single level but also a multi-level collection system with more collection and production facilities has to be taken into consideration. The input parameters of the optimisation problem are the followings: total amount of energy grass to be harvested in each region; specific facility costs of collection, warehousing and production units; specific costs of transportation resources; pre-scheduling of harvesting process; specific transportation and warehousing costs; pre-scheduling of processing of energy grass at each facility (exclusive warehousing). The model take into consideration the following assumptions: (1) cooperative relation among processing and production facilties, (2) capacity constraints are not ignored, (3) the cost function of transportation is non-linear, (4) the drivers conditions are ignored. The

  3. Measurement and correlation of jet fuel viscosities at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schruben, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and procedures were developed to measure jet fuel viscosity for eight current and future jet fuels at temperatures from ambient to near -60 C by shear viscometry. Viscosity data showed good reproducibility even at temperatures a few degrees below the measured freezing point. The viscosity-temperature relationship could be correlated by two linear segments when plotted as a standard log-log type representation (ASTM D 341). At high temperatures, the viscosity-temperature slope is low. At low temperatures, where wax precipitation is significant, the slope is higher. The breakpoint between temperature regions is the filter flow temperature, a fuel characteristic approximated by the freezing point. A generalization of the representation for the eight experimental fuels provided a predictive correlation for low-temperature viscosity, considered sufficiently accurate for many design or performance calculations.

  4. Modellingthe Turbulent Mixing Noise Associated with Coanda Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Caroline

    2004-11-01

    Turbulent Mixing Noise (TMN) is a primary high-frequency noise source in aeronautical and aerospace applications that utilize the Coanda effect, due to the enhanced turbulence levels and entrainment that devices employing this effect generally offer when compared with conventional jet flows. A theory, previously developed to predict the TMN emitted by unit volume of jet-type shear-layer turbulence close to a rigid plane, is extended to predict the aeroacoustic characteristics of a three-dimensional turbulent flow over a particular Coanda surface. The ability to accurately predict this significant source of high frequency acoustic radiation will allow investigation of modifications to basic Coanda devices, so that the benefits of such devices can be fully exploited, without this unfortunate side effect.

  5. Aeroacoustics of Turbulent Jets: Flow Structure, Noise Sources, and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff; Callender, Bryan William; Martens, Steve

    The paper reviews research performed to advance the understanding of state-of-the-art technologies capable of reducing coaxial jet noise simulating the exhaust flow of turbofan engines. The review focuses on an emerging jet noise passive control technology known as chevron nozzles. The fundamental physical mechanisms responsible for the acoustic benefits provided by these nozzles are discussed. Additionally, the relationship between these physical mechanisms and some of the primary chevron geometric parameters are highlighted. Far-field acoustic measurements over a wide range of nozzle operating conditions illustrated the ability of the chevron nozzles to provide acoustic benefits. Detailed mappings of the acoustic near-field provided more insight into the chevron noise suppression mechanisms by successfully identifying two primary chevron effects consistent with the results of the far-field measurements: chevrons penetration and shear velocity across them. Mean and turbulence data identified the physical flow mechanisms responsible for the effects documented in the far- and near-field studies.

  6. CARS Temperature Measurements in a Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, S. A.; Danehy, P. M.; Magnotti, G.; Cutler, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements were made in a combustion-heated supersonic axi-symmetric free jet from a nozzle with a diameter of 6.35 cm using dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS). The resulting mean and standard deviation temperature maps are presented. The temperature results show that the gas temperature on the centerline remains constant for approximately 5 nozzle diameters. As the heated gas mixes with the ambient air further downstream the mean temperature decreases. The standard deviation map shows evidence of the increase of turbulence in the shear layer as the jet proceeds downstream and mixes with the ambient air. The challenges of collecting data in a harsh environment are discussed along with influences to the data. The yield of the data collected is presented and possible improvements to the yield is presented are discussed.

  7. Supersonic impinging jet noise reduction using a hybrid control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Alex; Kumar, Rajan

    2015-07-01

    Control of the highly resonant flowfield associated with supersonic impinging jet has been experimentally investigated. Measurements were made in the supersonic impinging jet facility at the Florida State University for a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded jet. Measurements included unsteady pressures on a surface plate near the nozzle exit, acoustics in the nearfield and beneath the impingement plane, and velocity field using particle image velocimetry. Both passive control using porous surface and active control with high momentum microjet injection are effective in reducing nearfield noise and flow unsteadiness over a range of geometrical parameters; however, the type of noise reduction achieved by the two techniques is different. The passive control reduces broadband noise whereas microjet injection attenuates high amplitude impinging tones. The hybrid control, a combination of two control methods, reduces both broadband and high amplitude impinging tones and surprisingly its effectiveness is more that the additive effect of the two control techniques. The flow field measurements show that with hybrid control the impinging jet is stabilized and the turbulence quantities such as streamwise turbulence intensity, transverse turbulence intensity and turbulent shear stress are significantly reduced.

  8. Jet flow control at the blade scale to manipulate lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braud, Caroline; Guilmineau, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    The turbulent atmospheric boundary layer in which wind turbines are implemented is strongly inhomogeneous and unsteady. This induces unsteady mechanical loads at different characteristic time scales from seconds to minutes which limits significantly their life time. Different control strategies have been proposed in the framework of the French ANR SmartEole project to alleviate the impact of these upstream fluctuations at the farm, wind turbine and blade scales (i.e. characteristic time scales from seconds to minutes). The present work, which is part of this ANR project, focuses on the flow control strategies at the blade scale, to manipulate lift and thus alleviate fatigue loads. The design of a NACA654-421 airfoil profile has been modified to be able to implement jet control. Slotted jet and discrete jet configurations were implemented numerically and experimentally respectively. Results show the ability of both configurations to increase the lift by up to 30% using a significant redistribution of the mean shear. Efficiency seems to be more important using slotted jets, which however needs to be confirmed from 3D simulations.

  9. Microburst Simulation via Vortex-Ring and Turbulent Jet Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tung

    Microbursts, suggested as primary causes of many aircraft fatal crashes, are the subject of this research. A microburst, or low-level intense wind shear, is generated by a thunderstorm or a small rain cloud, and presents hazardous conditions for aircraft during take-off and landing maneuvers. Recently released data show that a microburst resembles a transient vortex ring. Three microburst models have been constructed in this study. First, the turbulent jet model encompasses a free jet at high altitude and a wall jet near the ground surface. Second, the vortex ring model is a combination of a primary and an image vortex ring, with an inviscid -viscous interaction at the central axial and surface regions. An unsteady version of this model is also provided by solving the trajectory equation with the Direct Formal Integration (DFI) method or with the Runge-Kutta method. Third and finally, the complete unsteady microburst model equations (conservation of mass, momentum, and energy), or what has been referred to as the Navier-Stokes model formulation, are solved by the successive over relaxation method. Results show that the microburst can be simulated accurately by impulsive turbulent jet at high altitude and a transient vortex ring in mid-air and near the ground surface. In addition to improved understanding of the physical nature of microbursts, the models presented here can also be used for flight simulation and the pilot training purposes.

  10. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  11. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2000-01-01

    A thin free shear layer containing an inflection point in the mean velocity profile is inherently unstable. Disturbances in the flow field can excite the unstable behavior of a shear layer, if the appropriate combination of frequencies and shear layer thicknesses exists, causing instability waves to grow. For other combinations of frequencies and thicknesses, these instability waves remain neutral in amplitude or decay in the downstream direction. A growing instability wave radiates noise when its phase velocity becomes supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This occurs primarily when the mean jet flow velocity is supersonic. Thus, the small disturbances in the flow, which themselves may generate noise, have generated an additional noise source. It is the purpose of this problem to test the ability of CAA to compute this additional source of noise. The problem is idealized such that the exciting disturbance is a fixed known acoustic source pulsating at a single frequency. The source is placed inside of a 2D jet with parallel flow; hence, the shear layer thickness is constant. With the source amplitude small enough, the problem is governed by the following set of linear equations given in dimensional form.

  12. W + jet production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, Andrea; /INFN, Rome

    2006-10-01

    A measurement of W {yields} e{nu} + n-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II (CDF II) is presented. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}, and includes events with up to 4 or more jets. In each jet multiplicity sample the differential and cumulative cross sections with respect to the transverse energy of the i{sup th} jet are measured. For W+ {ge} 2 jets the differential cross section with respect to the 2-leading jets invariant mass m{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} and angural separation {Delta} R{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} is also reported. The data are compared to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Injury and mortality of juvenile salmon entrained in a submerged jet entering still water

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-05-21

    Juvenile salmon can be injured and killed when they pass through hydroelectric turbines and other downstream passage alternatives. The hydraulic conditions in these complex environments that pose a risk to the health of fish include turbulent shear flows, collisions with hydraulic structures, cavitation, and rapid change of pressure. Improvements in the understating of the biological responses of juvenile salmon in turbulent shear flows can reduce salmon injury and mortality. In a series of studies, juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawythscha) were exposed to turbulent shear flows in two mechanisms: 1) the slow-fish-to-fast-water mechanism, where test fish were introduced into a turbulent jet from slow-moving water through an introduction tube placed just outside the edge of the jet; 2) the fast-fish-to-slow-water mechanism, where test fish were carried by the fast-moving water of a submerged turbulent jet into the slow-moving water of a flume. All fish exposures to the water jet were recorded by two high-speed, high-resolution cameras. Motion-tracking analysis was then performed on the digital videos to quantify associated kinematic and dynamic parameters. The main results for the slow-fish-to-fast-water mechanism were described in Deng et al (2005). This chapter will discuss the test results of the fast-fish-to-slow-water mechanism and compare the results of the two mechanisms.

  14. Broadband Shock Noise in Internally-Mixed Dual-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband shock noise (BBSN) has been studied in some detail in single-flow jets and recently in dual-stream jets with separate flow exhaust systems. Shock noise is of great concern in these latter cases because of the noise created for the aircraft cabin by the underexpanded nozzle flow at cruise. Another case where shock noise is of concern is in the case of future supersonic aircraft that are expected to have bypass ratios small enough to justify internally mixed exhaust systems, and whose mission will push cycles to the point of imperfectly expanded flows. Dual-stream jets with internally mixed plume have some simplifying aspects relative to the separate flow jets, having a single shock structure given by the common nozzle pressure. This is used to separate the contribution of the turbulent shear layer to the broadband shock noise. Shock structure is held constant while the geometry and strength of the inner and merged shear layers are varying by changing splitter area ratio and core stream temperature. Flow and noise measurements are presented which document the efforts at separating the contribution of the inner shear layer to the broadband shock noise.

  15. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  16. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  17. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  18. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  19. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  20. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  1. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  2. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  3. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  4. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  5. Self-limiting feedback between baroclinic waves and a NAO-like sheared zonal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    The eddy-mean flow interaction associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is examined by using the baroclinic wave life cycle experiments. When a sheared zonal flow perturbation akin to the NAO-related dipole wind anomaly is added to the basic state, momentum fluxes due to baroclinic waves tend to reinforce the initial zonal flow dipole in the upper troposphere both for the anticyclonic and cyclonic shears. The eddy feedback is stronger for the anticyclonic shear because the node of the dipole flow is asymmetric about the basic jet, suggesting that the positive NAO is more favored by the eddy feedback. For the zonal wind anomaly with extremely large amplitude, the baroclinic wave breaking cannot efficiently intensify the zonal flow dipole, indicating a self-limitation in the positive eddy feedback to the NAO-like zonal flow anomaly.

  6. On determining wall shear stress in spatially developing two-dimensional wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Johansson, T. Gunnar; White, Christopher M.; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    A full momentum integral-based method for determining wall shear stress is presented. The method is mathematically exact and has the advantage of having no explicit streamwise gradient terms. It is applicable for flows that change rapidly in the streamwise direction and, in particular, to flows with ill-defined outer boundary conditions or when the measurement grid does not extend over the whole boundary layer thickness. The method is applied to two different experimental plane turbulent wall jet data sets for which independent estimates of wall shear stress were known, and the different results compare favorably. Complications owing to experimental limitations and measurement error in determining wall shear stress from the proposed method are presented, and mitigating strategies are described.

  7. Incorporation of wind shear terms into the governing equations of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Bowles, R. U.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional analyses of aircraft motion in the atmosphere have neglected wind speed variability on the scales associated with many atmospheric phenomena such as thunderstorms, low-level jets, etc. These phemonena produce wind shears that have been determined as the probable cause in many recent commercial airline accidents. This paper derives the six degrees equations of motion or an aircraft incorporating the variable wind terms. The equations are presented in several coordinate systems (i.e., body coordinates, inertial coordinates, etc.). The wind shear terms, including the temporal and spatial gradients of the wind, appear differently in the various coordinate system. These terms are discussed. Also, the influence of wind shear on inputs to computing the aerodynamic coefficients such as the effects of wind velocity vector rotation on relative angular rates of rotation and on the time rate of change of angles of attack and side slip are addressed.

  8. Stochastic analysis of spectral broadening by a free turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the time-varying shear layer between a harmonic acoustic source and an observer on the frequency content of the observed sound is considered. Experimental data show that the spectral content of the acoustic signal is considerably broadened upon passing through such a shear layer. Theoretical analysis is presented which shows that such spectral broadening is entirely consistent with amplitude modulation of the acoustic signal by the time-varying shear layer. Thus, no actual frequency shift need be hypothesized to explain the spectral phenomenon. Experimental tests were conducted at 2, 4, and 6 kHz and at free jet flow velocities of 10, 20, and 30 m/s. Analysis of acoustic pressure time histories obtained from these tests confirms the above conclusion, at least for the low Mach numbers considered.

  9. The Role of Instability Waves in Predicting Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Handler, Louis M.

    2003-01-01

    Debate over whether linear instability waves play a role in the prediction of jet noise has been going on for many years. Parallel mean flow models, such as the one proposed by Lilley, usually neglect these waves because they cause the solution to become infinite. The present paper solves the true non-parallel acoustic equations for a two-dimensional shear layer by using a vector Greens function and assuming small mean flow spread rate. The results show that linear instability waves must be accounted for in order to construct a proper causal solution to the problem.

  10. Radiation-Driven Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-10-01

    Radiative winds and jets from luminous accretion disks/tori are reviewed. Among various models of astrophysical jets, plasma outflows emanating from accretion disks/tori and accelerated by the radiation pressure is the most promising one. Here explained are the roles of radiation pressure force and radiation drag force. Rise and fall of a torus model are also discussed, following its revenge. Finally, the millennium jet model, where the multistage acceleration takes place, is proposed.

  11. Recent Developments in the Use of Liquid Crystal Coatings for Full-Surface Shear Stress Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D. C.; Wilder, M. C.; Zilliac, G.; Hu, K. C.; Whitney, D. J.; Deardorff, D. G.; Moffat, R. J.; Farina, D. J.; Danek, C.; Martinez, R.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Under normal white-light illumination and oblique observation, liquid crystal coating (LCC) color-change response to shear depends on both shear stress magnitude as well as the direction of the applied shear relative to the observer's line of sight. These color-change responses were quantified by subjecting a LCC to a wall-jet shear flow and measuring scattered-light spectra using a fiber optic probe and spectrophotometer. At any fixed shear stress magnitude, the maximum color change was measured when the shear vector was aligned with and directed away from the observer; changes in the relative in-plane view angle to either side of this vector/observer aligned position resulted in symmetric Gaussian reductions in measured color change. For this vector/observer aligned orientation, color change was found to scale linearly with increasing shear stress magnitude over an eight-fold range. Based on these results, a surface shear stress vector measurement methodology, involving multiple oblique-view observations of the test surface, was formulated. In the present paper, the experimental approach and data analysis procedure required to extend this vector measurement methodology to full-surface applications will be outlined and progress towards demonstrating this areal capability will be reviewed.

  12. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  13. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  14. Electromagnetic Models of Extragalactic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, M.; Blandford, R.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-22

    Relativistic jets may be confined by large-scale, anisotropic electromagnetic stresses that balance isotropic particle pressure and disordered magnetic field. A class of axisymmetric equilibrium jet models will be described and their radiative properties outlined under simple assumptions. The partition of the jet power between electromagnetic and mechanical forms and the comoving energy density between particles and magnetic field will be discussed. Current carrying jets may be recognized by their polarization patterns. Progress and prospects for measuring this using VLBI and GLAST observations will be summarized.

  15. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  16. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  17. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  18. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for investigating the shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain is described. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity, but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results of this investigation are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  19. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    The shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain was investigated. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies to date, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  20. Deformation, wave phenomena, and breakup outcomes of round nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform gaseous crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chee-Loon

    Scope and method of study. An experimental and computational research is performed to study the deformation and breakup of round nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform gaseous crossflow. Pulsed photography and shadow graphy in conjunction with high-speed imaging were used to study the wave phenomena and the droplets properties/transport dynamics of a nonturbulent liquid jet injected into a uniform crossflow within the bag breakup regime. The computational study extended the previous two-dimensional study by adding the third dimension, allowing the wave properties to be modeled. The computational simulation employed the Volume of Fluid (VOF) formulation of FLUENT, and was run on a 3-processors parallel Linux cluster and P4 desktops. The validated, time-accurate, CFD simulation analyzes the surface properties of the liquid jets within the column, bag, and shear breakup regimes by considering the effects of surface tension, liquid viscosity, and crossflow Weber number at large liquid/gas density ratios (>500) and small Ohnesorge numbers (<0.1). Findings and conclusions. Present experimental results show that the column waves along the liquid jet are attributed to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the nodes layout per bag affected the breakup mechanisms of the bags. Three distinctive sizes of droplets were produced in the bag breakup regime. The size of bag-droplets normalized by the nozzle exit diameter was constant. The different trajectories for bag- and node-droplets suggested that separation of bag- and node-droplets is possible. The computational results included jet deformations, jet cross-sectional area, jet velocity, wake velocity defect, wake width, and wavelengths of column and surface waves. Present computational results yielded a similarity solution for the inner wake region. In bag breakup, the lower pressure along the sides of the jet pulled the liquid away from both the upwind and downwind surfaces of the liquid cross-section. In shear breakup, the

  1. Review of the Shearing Process for Sheet Steels and Its Effect on Sheared-Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; Van Tyne, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Failure in sheared-edge stretching often limits the use of advanced high-strength steel sheets in automotive applications. The present study analyzes data in the literature from laboratory experiments on both the shearing process and the characteristics of sheared edges. Shearing produces a surface with regions of rollover, burnish, fracture, and burr. The effect of clearance and tensile strength on the shear face characteristics is quantified. Higher strength, lower ductility steels exhibit an increase in percent fracture region. The shearing process also creates a zone of deformation adjacent to the shear face called the shear-affected zone (SAZ). From an analysis of data in the literature, it is concluded that deformation in the SAZ is the dominant factor in controlling failure during sheared-edge stretching. The characteristics of the shear face are generally important for failures during sheared-edge stretching only as there is a correlation between the characteristics of the shear face and the characteristics of the SAZ. The effect of the shear burr on shear-edge stretching is also related to a correlation with the characteristics of the SAZ. In reviewing the literature, many shearing variables that could affect sheared-edge stretching limits are not identified or if identified, not quantified. It is likely that some of these variables could affect subsequent sheared-edge stretching limits.

  2. Laboratory Experiments, Numerical Simulations, and Astronomical Observations of Deflected Supersonic Jets: Application to HH 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J. M.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R. F.; Rosen, P. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Blue, B. E.; Williams, R. J. R.; Carver, R.; Frank, A.

    2009-11-01

    Collimated supersonic flows in laboratory experiments behave in a similar manner to astrophysical jets provided that radiation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are unimportant in the laboratory jets and that the experimental and astrophysical jets share similar dimensionless parameters such as the Mach number and the ratio of the density between the jet and the ambient medium. When these conditions apply, laboratory jets provide a means to study their astrophysical counterparts for a variety of initial conditions, arbitrary viewing angles, and different times, attributes especially helpful for interpreting astronomical images where the viewing angle and initial conditions are fixed and the time domain is limited. Experiments are also a powerful way to test numerical fluid codes in a parameter range in which the codes must perform well. In this paper, we combine images from a series of laboratory experiments of deflected supersonic jets with numerical simulations and new spectral observations of an astrophysical example, the young stellar jet HH 110. The experiments provide key insights into how deflected jets evolve in three dimensions, particularly within working surfaces where multiple subsonic shells and filaments form, and along the interface where shocked jet material penetrates into and destroys the obstacle along its path. The experiments also underscore the importance of the viewing angle in determining what an observer will see. The simulations match the experiments so well that we can use the simulated velocity maps to compare the dynamics in the experiment with those implied by the astronomical spectra. The experiments support a model where the observed shock structures in HH 110 form as a result of a pulsed driving source rather than from weak shocks that may arise in the supersonic shear layer between the Mach disk and bow shock of the jet's working surface.

  3. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS, AND ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS OF DEFLECTED SUPERSONIC JETS: APPLICATION TO HH 110

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Carver, R.; Foster, J. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Williams, R. J. R.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R. F.; Hansen, J. F.; Blue, B. E.; Frank, A.

    2009-11-01

    Collimated supersonic flows in laboratory experiments behave in a similar manner to astrophysical jets provided that radiation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are unimportant in the laboratory jets and that the experimental and astrophysical jets share similar dimensionless parameters such as the Mach number and the ratio of the density between the jet and the ambient medium. When these conditions apply, laboratory jets provide a means to study their astrophysical counterparts for a variety of initial conditions, arbitrary viewing angles, and different times, attributes especially helpful for interpreting astronomical images where the viewing angle and initial conditions are fixed and the time domain is limited. Experiments are also a powerful way to test numerical fluid codes in a parameter range in which the codes must perform well. In this paper, we combine images from a series of laboratory experiments of deflected supersonic jets with numerical simulations and new spectral observations of an astrophysical example, the young stellar jet HH 110. The experiments provide key insights into how deflected jets evolve in three dimensions, particularly within working surfaces where multiple subsonic shells and filaments form, and along the interface where shocked jet material penetrates into and destroys the obstacle along its path. The experiments also underscore the importance of the viewing angle in determining what an observer will see. The simulations match the experiments so well that we can use the simulated velocity maps to compare the dynamics in the experiment with those implied by the astronomical spectra. The experiments support a model where the observed shock structures in HH 110 form as a result of a pulsed driving source rather than from weak shocks that may arise in the supersonic shear layer between the Mach disk and bow shock of the jet's working surface.

  4. Vortex control in large-eddy simulations of compressible round jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidi, Mohamed; Lesieur, Marcel; Métais, Olivier

    We investigate through large-eddy simulations the effects of different types of upstream forcing in subsonic (Mach 0.7) and supersonic (Mach 1.4) round jets. We have reproduced and tested the different methods of forcing developed in incompressible round jets by Urbin and Métais In Direct and Large-Eddy Simulations II, 1997, P. R. Chollet, J. P. Voke, and L. Kleiser, Kluwer: Dordrecht, pp. 539 542, Danaila and Boersma, Physics of Fluids A, 12, 1255 1257, da Silva and Métais Physics of Fluids, 14, 3798 3819, (see also Lee and Reynolds Bifurcating and blooming jets at high Reynolds number 5th Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, New York). Our strategy is to search the optimal excitation that maximizes the jet spreading at Reynolds number Re = 36 000. Four different forcings based on information obtained both instantaneously and statistically. In the subsonic case, and as in the incompressible one, we aimed to favour the flow spreading along one particular plane (bifurcating plane), while maintaining a standard or reduced spreading rate along the bisecting plane, perpendicular to the bifurcating one. The flow response to the excitations is analysed both instantaneously and statistically. In the subsonic case, and as in the incompressible one, the maximum jet spreading is obtained with inlet varicose flapping perturbations at preferred and first subharmonic frequencies, respectively. The potential core length is reduced by 27% with respect to the natural jet. These results are in good agreement with several laboratory experiments and numerical simulations carried out in incompressible round jets. Indeed, the subsonic jet has a convective Mach number of 0.35, and is weakly affected by compressibility. In the supersonic jet case, on the other hand, the highest spreading rate is found with a flapping excitation at the second subharmonic. The potential core length is now reduced by 28% with respect to the unforced jet.

  5. Field of Flow About a Jet and Effect of Jets on Stability of Jet-Propelled Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1946-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on jet-induced flow deviation. Analysis is given of flow inclination induced outside cold and hot jets and jet deflection caused by angle of attack. Applications to computation of effects of jet on longitudinal stability and trim are explained. Effect of jet temperature on flow inclination was found small when thrust coefficient is used as criterion for similitude. The average jet-induced downwash over tail plane was obtained geometrically.

  6. Transiently Jammed State in Shear Thickening Suspensions under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Allen, Benjamin; Brown, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We examine the response of a suspension of cornstarch and water under normal impact at controlled velocities. This is a model system to understand why a person can run on the surface of a discontinuous shear thickening fluid. Using simultaneous high-speed imaging of the top and bottom surfaces along with normal force measurements allows us to investigate whether the force response is a result of system spanning structures. We observe a shear thickening transition where above a critical velocity the normal force increases by orders of magnitude. In the high force regime the force response is displacement dependent like a solid rather than velocity dependent like a liquid. The stresses are on the order of 106 Pa which is enough to hold up a person's weight. In this regime imaging shows the existence of a solid like structure that extends to the bottom interface.

  7. Heat Transfer and Flow Structure Evaluation of a Synthetic Jet Emanating from a Planar Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-07-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  8. Shear modulus estimation with vibrating needle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Insana, Michael

    2010-06-01

    An ultrasonic shear wave imaging technique is being developed for estimating the complex shear modulus of biphasic hydropolymers including soft biological tissues. A needle placed in the medium is vibrated along its axis to generate harmonic shear waves. Doppler pulses synchronously track particle motion to estimate shear wave propagation speed. Velocity estimation is improved by implementing a k-lag phase estimator. Fitting shear-wave speed estimates to the predicted dispersion relation curves obtained from two rheological models, we estimate the elastic and viscous components of the complex shear modulus. The dispersion equation estimated using the standard linear solid-body (Zener) model is compared with that from the Kelvin-Voigt model to estimate moduli in gelatin gels in the 50 to 450 Hz shear wave frequency bandwidth. Both models give comparable estimates that agree with independent shear rheometer measurements obtained at lower strain rates. PMID:20529711

  9. Shear dynamics in higher dimensional FLRW cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahwa, Isha; Nandan, Hemwati; Goswami, Umananda Dev

    2015-12-01

    We study the shear dynamics of higher dimensional Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering a non-perfect fluid which exerts different pressure in the normal and extra dimensions. We generalise the definition of shear tensor for higher dimensional spacetime and prove it to be consistent with the evolution equation for shear tensor obtained from the Ricci identities. The shear tensor however vanishes for the case of usual FLRW metric in four dimensions. The evolution of shear tensor for higher dimensional FLRW cosmology is investigated numerically. The role of extra dimensions and other parameters involved in shear dynamics is discussed in detail. We find that with increase in anisotropy parameter, time of decay of shear increases while with increase in number of extra dimensions, shear tends to decay early.

  10. Static shear modulus of electrorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lihong; Tam, Wing Yim; Huang, Xianxiang; Sheng, Ping

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements of the static shear modulus of electrorheological (ER) fluids consisting of water-wetted silica microspheres in silicone oil. A shear-annealing method, using creep-recovery (CR) cycles under an external electric field, is used to enhance ER properties of the fluid. The shear-annealing method enables the silica spheres in the ER fluid to form better aligned and denser column microstructures. A stable state with elastic shear deformation is obtained after a sufficient number of CR cycles, with an optimal combination of stress duration and shear strength. Static shear modulus is obtained by measuring the elastic deformations at different shear stresses for an electric field frequency from 10 to 1000 Hz. A water-bridge model is proposed to explain the enhanced shear modulus.

  11. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to

  12. Transition to turbulence and noise radiation in heated coaxial jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloor, Michael; Bühler, Stefan; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2016-04-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition and noise radiation of a parametrized set of subsonic coaxial jet flows with a hot primary (core) stream are investigated numerically by Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and direct noise computation. This study extends our previous research on local linear stability of heated coaxial jet flows by analyzing the nonlinear evolution of initially laminar flows disturbed by a superposition of small-amplitude unstable eigenmodes. First, a baseline configuration is studied to shed light on the flow dynamics of coaxial jet flows. Subsequently, LESs are performed for a range of Mach and Reynolds numbers to systematically analyze the influences of the temperature and the velocity ratios between the primary and the secondary (bypass) stream. The results provide a basis for a detailed analysis of fundamental flow-acoustic phenomena in the considered heated coaxial jet flows. Increasing the primary-jet temperature leads to an increase of fluctuation levels and to an amplification of far-field noise, especially at low frequencies. Strong mixing between the cold bypass stream and the hot primary stream as well as the intermittent character of the flow field at the end of the potential core lead to a pronounced noise radiation at an aft angle of approximately 35∘. The velocity ratio strongly affects the shear-layer development and therefore also the noise generation mechanisms. Increasing the secondary-stream velocity amplifies the dominance of outer shear-layer perturbations while the disturbance growth rates in the inner shear layer decrease. Already for rmic > 40R1, where rmic is the distance from the end of the potential core and R1 is the core-jet radius, a perfect 1/rmic decay of the sound pressure amplitudes is observed. The potential-core length increases for higher secondary-stream velocities which leads to a shift of the center of the dominant acoustic radiation in the downstream direction.

  13. PIV/PLIF experiments of jet mixing in a model of a rotary kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, I. A. Sofia; Johansson, Simon P. A.; Lundström, T. Staffan; Marjavaara, B. Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The jet mixing in a downscaled, isothermal model of a rotary kiln is investigated experimentally through simultaneous particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements. The kiln is modeled as a cylinder with three inlets in one end, two semicircular-shaped inlets for what is called the secondary fluid divided by a wall in between, called the back plate, where the burner nozzle is located. The scaling of the burner nozzle between real kiln and model and the corresponding jet flow through it is determined by the Craya-Curtet parameter. Three momentum flux ratios of the secondary fluid are investigated, and the interaction with the burner jet is scrutinized. It is found that the burner jet characteristics, its mixing with the secondary fluid and the resulting flow field surrounding the jet are dependent on the momentum flux ratio. A particular result is that stable shear layers give a more even mixing as compared to a case with shear layers subjected to a more prominent vortex shedding.

  14. Measurement of intact-core length of atomizing liquid jets by image deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Roger; Burch, Robert; Kuo, Kenneth; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their high liquid load fractions and hence their optical opacity. Focus was on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact-liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial-type rocket engine injectors in which liquid oxygen is injected through the center post while high velocity gaseous hydrogen is injected through a concentric annulus, providing a shear force to the liquid jet surface. Real-time x ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, is used to make the measurements. The intact-liquid-core length data were obtained and interpreted using two conceptually different methods to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure, gas-to-liquid momentum ratio, and cavitation.

  15. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  16. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  17. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  18. Lifted turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jay A.

    Experiments were conducted on lifted, turbulent jet diffusion flames. An automated technique using a linear photodiode array was implemented to measure the temporal history of the liftoff height h. The measurements enabled accurate determination of the mean liftoff height [...] under a wide range of flow conditions, including several fuels, nozzle diameters, and exit velocities [...]. The results showed an approximately linear relationship between [...] and [...], with a slight dependence on Reynolds number. A strain-rate model for liftoff, based on far-field scaling of turbulent jets, provides an explanation for the linear dependence of [...] on [...]. Measurements were also made in which the nozzle fluid contained varying amounts of air, where it was found that the slope of the [...] vs. [...] line increases faster than predicted by far-field scaling of turbulent jets. The discrepancy is attributed to near-field effects.The amplitudes of the fluctuations in h were found to be of the order of the local large scale of the jet. There is a slight increase in normalized fluctuation level [...] with [...], and there is some variation of [...] with fuel type. The time scales of the fluctuations of h were found to be considerably longer than the local large-scale time of the turbulence [...]. By using fuels of different chemical times to vary [...], the measured correlation time [...] normalized by [...] was found to collapse with Richardson number [...]. Experiments in which the nozzles were oriented horizontally showed no change in [...], however. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate alternative explanations for the variation of [...] with [...]. These experiments included measuring the flame length L simultaneously with h, and measuring the visible radiation I simultaneously with h. L(t) was found to be nearly uncorrelated with h(t), dismissing the possibility that a feedback mechanism from L to h controls the fluctuations of h. Although I(t) is highly

  19. Experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Ricardo Benjamin

    An experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control is conducted. The synthetic jet actuator is placed on the pressure side towards the trailing edge on a NACA 65(2)-415 airfoil representative of the cross section of an Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) in an industrial gas compressor. By redirecting or vectoring the shear layer at the trailing edge, the synthetic jet actuator increases lift and decreases drag on the airfoil without a mechanical device or flap. A compressor map that defines upper and lower bounds on operating velocities and airfoil dimensions, is compared with operating conditions of the low-speed wind tunnel at San Diego State University, to match gas compressor conditions in the wind tunnel. Realistic test conditions can range from Mach=0.12 to Mach= 0.27 and an airfoil chord from c=0.1 m to c=0.3 m. Based on the operating conditions, a final airfoil model is fabricated with a chord of c=0.1m. Several synthetic jet actuator designs are considered. A initial synthetic jet is designed to house a piezoelectric element with a material frequency of 1200 hz in a cavity with a volume of 4.47 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 1.5 mm. With these dimensions, the Helmholtz frequency of the design is 1800Hz. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments show that the design has a jet with a peak centerline jet velocity of 26 m/s at 750 Hz. A modified slant face synthetic jet is designed so that the cavity fits flush within the NACA airfoil surface. The slanted synthetic jet has a cavity volume of 4.67 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 3.45 mm resulting in a Helmholtz frequency of 1170 hz for this design. PIV experiments show that the jet is redirected along the slant face according to the Coanda effect. A final synthetic jet actuator is directly integrated into the trailing edge of an airfoil with a cavity volume of 4.6 cm3, a slot width of 0.2 mm, and a slot depth of 1.6 mm. The Helmholtz frequency is 1450 Hz and

  20. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind-shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of how turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  1. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an

  2. Design of wind shear filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joerck, H.

    1984-01-01

    A number of aircraft accidents are caused by the effects of wind shear. In connection with efforts to eliminate or reduce hazards leading to such accidents, the possibility was considered to improve aircraft control systems. However, the effective implementation of the considered approaches will only be possible if suitable filters can be designed for a separation of gusts, which involve higher frequencies from low-frequency wind shear components. Filters of appropriate design should be suited for an employment in connection with all flight conditions. Feasible approaches for obtaining such filters are discussed. A survey is provided regarding the order of magnitude of the improvements which can be achieved, taking into account the performance characteristics of the A300 controller.

  3. Controlled shear/tension fixture

    DOEpatents

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Liu, Chain-tsuan; George, Easo P.

    2012-07-24

    A test fixture for simultaneously testing two material test samples is provided. The fixture provides substantially equal shear and tensile stresses in each test specimens. By gradually applying a load force to the fixture only one of the two specimens fractures. Upon fracture of the one specimen, the fixture and the load train lose contact and the second specimen is preserved in a state of upset just prior to fracture. Particular advantages of the fixture are (1) to control the tensile to shear load on the specimen for understanding the effect of these stresses on the deformation behavior of advanced materials, (2) to control the location of fracture for accessing localized material properties including the variation of the mechanical properties and residual stresses across the thickness of advanced materials, (3) to yield a fractured specimen for strength measurement and an unfractured specimen for examining the microstructure just prior to fracture.

  4. Discovery and optimisation studies of antimalarial phenotypic hits

    PubMed Central

    Mital, Alka; Murugesan, Dinakaran; Kaiser, Marcel; Yeates, Clive; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of new antimalarial compounds. As a result of a phenotypic screen, several compounds with potent activity against the parasite Plasmodium falciparum were identified. Characterization of these compounds is discussed, along with approaches to optimise the physicochemical properties. The in vitro antimalarial activity of these compounds against P. falciparum K1 had EC50 values in the range of 0.09–29 μM, and generally good selectivity (typically >100-fold) compared to a mammalian cell line (L6). One example showed no significant activity against a rodent model of malaria, and more work is needed to optimise these compounds. PMID:26408453

  5. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-08-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure.

  6. Biomass supply chain optimisation for Organosolv-based biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Giarola, Sara; Patel, Mayank; Shah, Nilay

    2014-05-01

    This work aims at providing a Mixed Integer Linear Programming modelling framework to help define planning strategies for the development of sustainable biorefineries. The up-scaling of an Organosolv biorefinery was addressed via optimisation of the whole system economics. Three real world case studies were addressed to show the high-level flexibility and wide applicability of the tool to model different biomass typologies (i.e. forest fellings, cereal residues and energy crops) and supply strategies. Model outcomes have revealed how supply chain optimisation techniques could help shed light on the development of sustainable biorefineries. Feedstock quality, quantity, temporal and geographical availability are crucial to determine biorefinery location and the cost-efficient way to supply the feedstock to the plant. Storage costs are relevant for biorefineries based on cereal stubble, while wood supply chains present dominant pretreatment operations costs.

  7. Computed tomography dose optimisation in cystic fibrosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Helena; Twomey, Maria; Moloney, Fiachra; O’Neill, Siobhan B; Murphy, Kevin; O’Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive disease of the Caucasian population worldwide, with respiratory disease remaining the most relevant source of morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) is frequently used for monitoring disease complications and progression. Over the last fifteen years there has been a six-fold increase in the use of CT, which has lead to a growing concern in relation to cumulative radiation exposure. The challenge to the medical profession is to identify dose reduction strategies that meet acceptable image quality, but fulfil the requirements of a diagnostic quality CT. Dose-optimisation, particularly in CT, is essential as it reduces the chances of patients receiving cumulative radiation doses in excess of 100 mSv, a dose deemed significant by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. This review article explores the current trends in imaging in CF with particular emphasis on new developments in dose optimisation. PMID:27158420

  8. Life cycle optimisation for highway best management practices.

    PubMed

    Lee, J G; Heaney, J P; Rapp, D N; Pack, C A

    2006-01-01

    Highway runoff can cause a number of water quantity and quality problems. Stormwater management systems for highways have been developed based on a fast drainage for large storm situations. Non-point source pollution from highway runoff is a growing water quality concern. Stormwater quality control needs to be integrated into highway drainage design and operation to reduce the stormwater impacts on the receiving water. A continuous simulation/optimisation model for analysing integrated highway best management practices (BMPs) is presented. This model can evaluate the life cycle performance of infiltration and/or storage oriented highway BMPs. It can be directly integrated with spreadsheet optimisation tools to find the least cost options for implementing BMPs throughout a specified life cycle.

  9. Bright-white beetle scales optimise multiple scattering of light.

    PubMed

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure. PMID:25123449

  10. Optimising the person-centred management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence at a worrying rate and has been exacerbated by the worldwide obesity epidemic. The number of people in the UK diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has soared by 60% in the past 10 years. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious condition, with significant associated risks, and is the leading cause of avoidable macro- and microvascular complications. Health professionals have a key role in enabling and optimising person-centred approaches, educating and augmenting the essential skills every person, whatever his or her individual circumstances, requires for the successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reviews approaches to care for the management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, which includes optimising person-centred targets, promoting individualised care, minimising the risk of complications and promoting education from diagnosis onwards.

  11. Optimised Charging Performance On Quantum X Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, David A.; Sakase, Takao; Miura, Ryuichi; Goldberg, Richard D.; Murrell, Adrian J.

    2006-11-01

    A key parameter in the optimisation of CMOS device yield is the minimisation of charging-induced damage and/or breakdown of the gate dielectric material during ion implantation. In typical ion beams used for transistor doping applications, beam potentials can charge up the wafer surface if not controlled, and hence this potential must be neutralised to avoid damage to devices. MOS capacitor TEG (Test Element Group) wafers are an industry standard metric for determining the charging performance of ion implanters. By optimising the performance of the High Density Plasma Flood System (HDPFS) of the Applied Materials Quantum X ion implanter, TEG device yields of >90% at antenna ratios of 1E5:1 for a gate dielectric thickness of 3.5 nm on 300 mm wafers have been demonstrated.

  12. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    PubMed Central

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure. PMID:25123449

  13. Model updating and structural optimisation of a tennis racket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammens, S.; Heylen, W.; Sas, P.

    1992-09-01

    In recent years several methods have been developed for updating finite element models with regard to their dynamic characteristics, by using vibration information. Many techniques use modal characteristics (resonance frequencies, damping factors, modal displacement etc.) for tuning physical parameters of the model (elasticity moduli, mass density, plate thicknesses, cross sectional characteristics etc.) in order to obtain a finite element model which shows the same dynamic features as the real structure. One of these techniques is the User Acceptance model updating technique. Since this technique not only uses physically interpretable model parameters, but also allows an easy selection and/or weighting of those parameters and the dynamic characteristics to be matched, it is also applicable to dynamic structural optimisation. If used as such, the desired vibration parameters serve as a goal for the structural optimisation procedure. The algorithm determines modifications of the structure, within the imposed boundary conditions, that will match the desired dynamic behaviour, an example illustrates this process.

  14. Intra-ply shear locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Thije, R. H. W.; Akkerman, R.

    2007-04-01

    Intra-ply shear locking results in unrealistic fibre stresses and spurious wrinkling in composite forming simulations. Three remedies are investigated: aligning the mesh, applying reduced integration and using multi-field elements. The bias extension simulation is used to test several triangular and quadrilateral elements on their capability to avoid locking. Their performance under large deformations is tested as well. The new multi-field element seems to be the best locking free element in random meshes.

  15. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  16. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  19. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  20. Gluon jets from heavy paraquarkonium

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, A.N.; Kodaira, J.; Muta, T.

    1982-02-01

    The GGG and qq-barG jets in the decay of very heavy paraquarkonia are analyzed in perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The thrust distributions are calculated and the result is compared with the thrust distributions in the orthoquarkonium decay and in e/sup +/e/sup -/..-->..qq-barG jets.

  1. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  2. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    PubMed Central

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  3. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear.

    PubMed

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  4. Magnetically driven jets and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Berk, H. L.; Contopoulos, J.

    1991-01-01

    Four equations for the origin and propagation of nonrelativistic jets and winds are derived from the basic conservation laws of ideal MHD. The axial current density is negative in the vicinity of the axis and positive at larger radii; there is no net current because this is energetically favored. The magnetic field is essential for the jet solutions in that the zz-component of the magnetic stress acts, in opposition to gravity, to drive matter through the slow magnetosonic critical point. For a representative self-consistent disk/jet solution relevant to a protostellar system, the reaction of the accreted mass expelled in the jets is 0.1, the ratio of the power carried by the jets to the disk luminosity is 0.66, and the ratio of the boundary layer to disk luminosities is less than about 0.13. The star's rotation rate decreases with time even for rotation rates much less than the breakup rate.

  5. Nucleosynthesis in Jets from Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    2008-05-21

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside magnetically driven jets ejected from collapsars, or rotating magnetized stars collapsing to a black hole, based on two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the collapsars during the core collapse. We follow the evolution of the abundances of about 4000 nuclides from the collapse phase to the ejection phase using a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates only in the energetic jets (>10{sup 51} erg), so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly, even when the collapsars have a relatively small magnetic field (10{sup 10} G) and a moderately rotating core before the collapse. The abundance patterns inside the jets are similar to that of the r-elements in the solar system. The higher energy jets have larger amounts of {sup 56}Ni. Less energetic jets, which have small amounts of {sup 56}Ni, could induce GRB without supernova, such as GRB060505 and GRB060614.

  6. Survival Estimates for Juvenile Fish Subjected to a Laboratory-Generated Shear Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Greg R.; Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2004-03-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout and steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss, spring and fall chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, and American shad Alosa sapidissima were exposed to shear environments in the laboratory to determine the rate of strain that would kill or injure them. Fish were exposed to a submerged jet of water with exit velocities adjustable from 0 to 21.3 m/sec. The exposure strain rates for our tests ranged from 0 to about 1100 sec-1. The greatest strain rate tested is beyond rates expected in most natural fish habitat or during passage through the turbine intake of a hydroelectric dam. The rate of strain experienced by test fish varied based on a change in distance or scale of 1.8 cm, the approximate width of the fish tested. Turbulence intensity in the area of the jet where fish were subjected to the shear environment was +3 to 6% of the estimated exposure strain rate. Injuries and mortalities increased with increasing strain rates. There were no significant injuries to any fish subjected to rates of strain !U500 sec-1. American shad were the most susceptible to injury after being subjected to a shear environment while steelhead and rainbow trout were the most resistant. Fish exposed head first to the jet had higher injury/mortality rates than fish introduced tail first. Our studies reinforce past conclusions that a one-time exposure to shear environments exceeding a change in velocity of 15 m/sec over 1.8 cm is harmful to juvenile fish. The associated exposure strain rate for these velocities is ~850 sec-1 at a measurement scale of Dy = 1.8 cm.

  7. Honeybee economics: optimisation of foraging in a variable world

    PubMed Central

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    In honeybees fast and efficient exploitation of nectar and pollen sources is achieved by persistent endothermy throughout the foraging cycle, which means extremely high energy costs. The need for food promotes maximisation of the intake rate, and the high costs call for energetic optimisation. Experiments on how honeybees resolve this conflict have to consider that foraging takes place in a variable environment concerning microclimate and food quality and availability. Here we report, in simultaneous measurements of energy costs, gains, and intake rate and efficiency, how honeybee foragers manage this challenge in their highly variable environment. If possible, during unlimited sucrose flow, they follow an ‘investment-guided’ (‘time is honey’) economic strategy promising increased returns. They maximise net intake rate by investing both own heat production and solar heat to increase body temperature to a level which guarantees a high suction velocity. They switch to an ‘economizing’ (‘save the honey’) optimisation of energetic efficiency if the intake rate is restricted by the food source when an increased body temperature would not guarantee a high intake rate. With this flexible and graded change between economic strategies honeybees can do both maximise colony intake rate and optimise foraging efficiency in reaction to environmental variation. PMID:27320240

  8. Customisable 3D printed microfluidics for integrated analysis and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, T; Harding, M J; Harris, R A; Friel, R J; Christie, S D R

    2016-08-16

    The formation of smart Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices featuring integrated sensing optics is currently hindered by convoluted and expensive manufacturing procedures. In this work, a series of 3D-printed LOC devices were designed and manufactured via stereolithography (SL) in a matter of hours. The spectroscopic performance of a variety of optical fibre combinations were tested, and the optimum path length for performing Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy determined. The information gained in these trials was then used in a reaction optimisation for the formation of carvone semicarbazone. The production of high resolution surface channels (100-500 μm) means that these devices were capable of handling a wide range of concentrations (9 μM-38 mM), and are ideally suited to both analyte detection and process optimisation. This ability to tailor the chip design and its integrated features as a direct result of the reaction being assessed, at such a low time and cost penalty greatly increases the user's ability to optimise both their device and reaction. As a result of the information gained in this investigation, we are able to report the first instance of a 3D-printed LOC device with fully integrated, in-line monitoring capabilities via the use of embedded optical fibres capable of performing UV-vis spectroscopy directly inside micro channels. PMID:27452498

  9. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Adam J.; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Hendon, Christopher H.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy–volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other “beyond” density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  10. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Adam J; Skelton, Jonathan M; Hendon, Christopher H; Butler, Keith T; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy-volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other "beyond" density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4 and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  11. Honeybee economics: optimisation of foraging in a variable world.

    PubMed

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut

    2016-06-20

    In honeybees fast and efficient exploitation of nectar and pollen sources is achieved by persistent endothermy throughout the foraging cycle, which means extremely high energy costs. The need for food promotes maximisation of the intake rate, and the high costs call for energetic optimisation. Experiments on how honeybees resolve this conflict have to consider that foraging takes place in a variable environment concerning microclimate and food quality and availability. Here we report, in simultaneous measurements of energy costs, gains, and intake rate and efficiency, how honeybee foragers manage this challenge in their highly variable environment. If possible, during unlimited sucrose flow, they follow an 'investment-guided' ('time is honey') economic strategy promising increased returns. They maximise net intake rate by investing both own heat production and solar heat to increase body temperature to a level which guarantees a high suction velocity. They switch to an 'economizing' ('save the honey') optimisation of energetic efficiency if the intake rate is restricted by the food source when an increased body temperature would not guarantee a high intake rate. With this flexible and graded change between economic strategies honeybees can do both maximise colony intake rate and optimise foraging efficiency in reaction to environmental variation.

  12. Honeybee economics: optimisation of foraging in a variable world.

    PubMed

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    In honeybees fast and efficient exploitation of nectar and pollen sources is achieved by persistent endothermy throughout the foraging cycle, which means extremely high energy costs. The need for food promotes maximisation of the intake rate, and the high costs call for energetic optimisation. Experiments on how honeybees resolve this conflict have to consider that foraging takes place in a variable environment concerning microclimate and food quality and availability. Here we report, in simultaneous measurements of energy costs, gains, and intake rate and efficiency, how honeybee foragers manage this challenge in their highly variable environment. If possible, during unlimited sucrose flow, they follow an 'investment-guided' ('time is honey') economic strategy promising increased returns. They maximise net intake rate by investing both own heat production and solar heat to increase body temperature to a level which guarantees a high suction velocity. They switch to an 'economizing' ('save the honey') optimisation of energetic efficiency if the intake rate is restricted by the food source when an increased body temperature would not guarantee a high intake rate. With this flexible and graded change between economic strategies honeybees can do both maximise colony intake rate and optimise foraging efficiency in reaction to environmental variation. PMID:27320240

  13. Statistical optimisation techniques in fatigue signal editing problem

    SciTech Connect

    Nopiah, Z. M.; Osman, M. H.; Baharin, N.; Abdullah, S.

    2015-02-03

    Success in fatigue signal editing is determined by the level of length reduction without compromising statistical constraints. A great reduction rate can be achieved by removing small amplitude cycles from the recorded signal. The long recorded signal sometimes renders the cycle-to-cycle editing process daunting. This has encouraged researchers to focus on the segment-based approach. This paper discusses joint application of the Running Damage Extraction (RDE) technique and single constrained Genetic Algorithm (GA) in fatigue signal editing optimisation.. In the first section, the RDE technique is used to restructure and summarise the fatigue strain. This technique combines the overlapping window and fatigue strain-life models. It is designed to identify and isolate the fatigue events that exist in the variable amplitude strain data into different segments whereby the retention of statistical parameters and the vibration energy are considered. In the second section, the fatigue data editing problem is formulated as a constrained single optimisation problem that can be solved using GA method. The GA produces the shortest edited fatigue signal by selecting appropriate segments from a pool of labelling segments. Challenges arise due to constraints on the segment selection by deviation level over three signal properties, namely cumulative fatigue damage, root mean square and kurtosis values. Experimental results over several case studies show that the idea of solving fatigue signal editing within a framework of optimisation is effective and automatic, and that the GA is robust for constrained segment selection.

  14. Optimisation of composite bone plates for ulnar transverse fractures.

    PubMed

    Chakladar, N D; Harper, L T; Parsons, A J

    2016-04-01

    Metallic bone plates are commonly used for arm bone fractures where conservative treatment (casts) cannot provide adequate support and compression at the fracture site. These plates, made of stainless steel or titanium alloys, tend to shield stress transfer at the fracture site and delay the bone healing rate. This study investigates the feasibility of adopting advanced composite materials to overcome stress shielding effects by optimising the geometry and mechanical properties of the plate to match more closely to the bone. An ulnar transverse fracture is characterised and finite element techniques are employed to investigate the feasibility of a composite-plated fractured bone construct over a stainless steel equivalent. Numerical models of intact and fractured bones are analysed and the mechanical behaviour is found to agree with experimental data. The mechanical properties are tailored to produce an optimised composite plate, offering a 25% reduction in length and a 70% reduction in mass. The optimised design may help to reduce stress shielding and increase bone healing rates. PMID:26875147

  15. Parameter Screening and Optimisation for ILP Using Designed Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Ashwin; Ramakrishnan, Ganesh

    Reports of experiments conducted with an Inductive Logic Programming system rarely describe how specific values of parameters of the system are arrived at when constructing models. Usually, no attempt is made to identify sensitive parameters, and those that are used are often given "factory-supplied" default values, or values obtained from some non-systematic exploratory analysis. The immediate consequence of this is, of course, that it is not clear if better models could have been obtained if some form of parameter selection and optimisation had been performed. Questions follow inevitably on the experiments themselves: specifically, are all algorithms being treated fairly, and is the exploratory phase sufficiently well-defined to allow the experiments to be replicated? In this paper, we investigate the use of parameter selection and optimisation techniques grouped under the study of experimental design. Screening and "response surface" methods determine, in turn, sensitive parameters and good values for these parameters. This combined use of parameter selection and response surface-driven optimisation has a long history of application in industrial engineering, and its role in ILP is investigated using two well-known benchmarks. The results suggest that computational overheads from this preliminary phase are not substantial, and that much can be gained, both on improving system performance and on enabling controlled experimentation, by adopting well-established procedures such as the ones proposed here.

  16. Apparatus for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Metz, III, Curtis F.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type comprising an array of fuel pins disposed within an outer metal shell or shroud. A spent fuel assembly is first compacted in a known manner and then incrementally sheared using fixed and movable shear blades having matched laterally projecting teeth which slidably intermesh to provide the desired shearing action. Incremental advancement of the fuel assembly after each shear cycle is limited to a distance corresponding to the lateral projection of the teeth to ensure fuel assembly breakup into small uniform segments which are amenable to remote chemical processing.

  17. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  18. Crossing of Shears Bands in P

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J. R.; Kruecken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Novak, J. R.; Dewald, A.; Klug, T.; Kemper, G.; von Brentano, P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    2001-09-24

    Subpicosecond lifetimes of states in shears band 1 in {sup 197}Pb were measured by means of the recoil distance method employing Gammasphere and the New Yale Plunger Device. The extracted reduced matrix elements, B(M1) , show a clear sensitivity to the crossing of different shears configurations reflecting the closing and reopening of the shears blades. The energies and B(M1) values in the band crossing region are successfully described in the framework of the semiclassical model of the shears bands. The relevance of core rotation contributions are shown. The results point to the existence of shears states with an angular momentum coupling angle larger than 90{sup o} .

  19. Ideal stability limits of reverse shear equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.W.; Hughes, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The dependence on various plasma parameters of the ideal stability limit of reverse shear current profiles in TFTR and other tokamaks has been thoroughly explored. Profiles with reverse shear allow core access to the second ballooning stability region. In addition, for sufficient shear reversal, modes with n = 2 and greater are also stabilized. The n = 1 stability threshold is only slightly affected by reverse shear and becomes the limiting instability. The mode is predominately an infernal mode with a significant external contribution. Particular emphasis will be on analysis of recent experimental results of enhanced reverse shear (ERS) profiles in TFTR and a study of those profile characteristics which optimize TFTR performance.

  20. Application of a Planar Doppler Velocimetry System to a High Reynolds Number Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    A Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) system has been constructed and used to investigate the instantaneous turbulent velocity structure of a round high-speed compressible air jet with a low-speed co-flow. The exit condition was Mach=0.85 at ambient pressure, yielding a Reynolds number of about 650,000 on diameter. The PDV system was installed at NASA Langley Research Center in the Small Anechoic Jet Facility (SAJF), a chamber in which both the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of jets can be studied. For this test, the goal was to gather data which can be used to relate the turbulence structure of the jet to the levels and character of the acoustic noise produced by the jet. The current PDV system can acquire single-velocity-component, single-shot, planar images (15ns exposures) at 30 Hz. For this paper, the primary data set consists of 240 frames of velocity data acquired with both the jet and the low-speed co-flow seeded with light-scattering articles. Thus, velocities could be measured everywhere in the jet shear layer, both in the jet fluid and in the entrained co-flow. Some data were also taken with only the jet flow seeded. These provided mixing concentration images along with the reduced velocity fields. Other images were taken with only the co-flow seeded. These produced unique quantitative images of high speed entrainment. Optical "laser speckle" noise is the largest source of random noise in pulsed PDV systems. Components for the PDV imaging system were specifically selected to minimize speckle noise. To reduce systematic velocity errors due to laser drift, a frequency monitoring reference leg with a temperature-tuned reference iodine cell, was employed. In the course of this study, a novel flow seeder was developed. It enabled continuously variable seeding of the flow with particles of Sheared Pyrogenic Amorphous Hydrophobic Silica (SPAHS). The seeder comprised a dry fluidized bed hopper and a supersonic nozzle "pickup." Shearing action in the pickup

  1. Collimation and Stability of Three Dimensional Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, P. E.; Clarke, D. A.; Howell, D. A.

    1993-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of cylindrical jets established in equilibrium with a surrounding uniform medium have been performed. Large scale structures such as helical twisting of the jet, elliptical distortion and bifurcation of the jet, and triangular distortion and trifurcation of the jet have been seen in the simulations. The grid resolution has been sufficient to allow the development of structures on smaller scales and has revealed higher order distortions of the jet surface and complex structure internal to the jet. However, smaller scale surface distortion and internal jet structure do not significantly modify the large scale dynamics. It is the large scale surface distortions and accompanying filamentation that dominate the jet dynamics. Decollimation occurs as the jet bifurcates or trifurcates. Jets with density less than the immediately surrounding medium rapidly decollimate and expand as the jet filaments into multiple streams leading to shock heating and mass entrainment. The resulting morphology resembles a turbulent plume and might be relevant to some FRI type radio sources. Jet densities higher than the immediately surrounding medium are required to produce FRII type radio source jet morphology and protostellar jet morphology. Thus, while jets may be denser or lighter than the external medium through which they propagate, it is the conditions in the cocoon or lobe around the jet that governs the dynamics far behind the jet front. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-8919180, EPSCoR grant EHR-9108761 and NSF-REU grant AST-9300413.

  2. Hydrodynamic instability and shear layer effects in turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlimpert, S.; Feldhusen, A.; Grimmen, J. H.; Roidl, B.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2016-01-01

    A turbulent premixed plane jet flame is analyzed by large-eddy simulations. The analysis shows that the flame front wrinkling is strongly influenced by the shear layer effect when the gas expansion effects are small leading to larger flame front amplitudes at the flame base than at high gas expansion ratios. However, the hydrodynamic instability effect induces a continuously increasing flame front amplitude which yields an enhanced flame pocket generation at the flame tip. Both phenomena influence the magnitude of the turbulent burning area and burning area rate response through the flame front deflections which are determined by the contribution coefficient. This coefficient represents the mutual interaction between the flame and the flow. At low gas expansion ratios, the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent flame are wider in terms of dominant modes at Strouhal numbers which are linked to the mean flame height oscillations. Thus, at low gas expansion ratios, the vortex-flame interaction is less damped by the flame in the sense that vortices can perturb the flame front stronger. The total heat release rate trend of St-2.2 previously found for a round jet flame is also determined for the current slot jet at realistic gas expansion ratios indicating a general tendency to transfer energy from large to small flame structures. At high gas expansion ratios, an increasing Markstein length leads to an energy transfer between neighboring dominant modes in the low frequency range 1 < St < 10 and the burning area rate response becomes more important for the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent slot flames which agrees with recent findings for a laminar premixed plane flame.

  3. Stochastic optimisation of water allocation on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Straatsma, Menno; Karssenberg, Derek; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2014-05-01

    Climate change, increasing population and further economic developments are expected to increase water scarcity for many regions of the world. Optimal water management strategies are required to minimise the water gap between water supply and domestic, industrial and agricultural water demand. A crucial aspect of water allocation is the spatial scale of optimisation. Blue water supply peaks at the upstream parts of large catchments, whereas demands are often largest at the industrialised downstream parts. Two extremes exist in water allocation: (i) 'First come, first serve,' which allows the upstream water demands to be fulfilled without considerations of downstream demands, and (ii) 'All for one, one for all' that satisfies water allocation over the whole catchment. In practice, water treaties govern intermediate solutions. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of these two end members on water allocation optimisation with respect to water scarcity. We conduct this study on a global scale with the year 2100 as temporal horizon. Water supply is calculated using the hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB, operating at a 5 arcminutes resolution and a daily time step. PCR-GLOBWB is forced with temperature and precipitation fields from the Hadgem2-ES global circulation model that participated in the latest coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). Water demands are calculated for representative concentration pathway 6.0 (RCP 6.0) and shared socio-economic pathway scenario 2 (SSP2). To enable the fast computation of the optimisation, we developed a hydrologically correct network of 1800 basin segments with an average size of 100 000 square kilometres. The maximum number of nodes in a network was 140 for the Amazon Basin. Water demands and supplies are aggregated to cubic kilometres per month per segment. A new open source implementation of the water allocation is developed for the stochastic optimisation of the water allocation. We apply a Genetic Algorithm

  4. Inclusive jet cross sections and jet shapes at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Wainer, N.

    1991-09-01

    The inclusive jet cross section and jet shapes at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV have been measured by CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. results are compared to recent next-to-leading order QCD calculations, which predict variation of the cross section with cone size, as well as variation of the jet shape with energy. A lower limit on the parameter {Lambda}{sub c}, which characterize a contact interaction associated with quark sub-structure is determined to be 1400 GeV at the 95% confidence level. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Rotary-Jet Thrust Augmentor with Jet-Flapped Blades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Stephane Jean

    The concepts and the mechanisms of thrust augmentation are analyzed. The theoretical performance of different types of thrust augmentors is discussed with an emphasis on the Rotary-Jet ejector. The application of thrust augmentors to STOVL aircrafts and the merits of the ejector in this application are discussed where the theoretical performance of the Rotary-Jet is shown to be particularly attractive. A review of previous steady-flow and Rotary-Jet ejector experimental data shows equivalent performance levels. Recent experimental work on the Rotary-Jet is analyzed and several factors adversely affecting performance are identified and discussed. To address these problems a new configuration is proposed where the rotor is fitted with blades, allowing better control of the primary/secondary interaction. The jet sheet exiting at the trailing edge of the foil forms a jet flap. A two-dimensional analysis of the aerodynamics around a jet-flapped airfoil is performed for the first time using a fluid finite element code. Whereas in previous models the presence of the pressure gradient across the jet sheet is an assumption, its presence is predicted by the present method. Results of a test run show good agreement with experimental results by others. This method is applied to the geometry of blade model #10. An original three-dimensional model of the self -driven, jet-flapped bladed rotor is presented which, given set geometrical parameters and operating conditions, solves at each section for the jet and blade angle and calculates the rotor thrust augmentation. The results of parametric runs identify favorable design trends which are applied to the design of prototype test models. An experimental test program has been performed. Flow visualization and local flow velocity and pressure measurements were used to identify favorable jet sheet characteristics. The presence of losses in the spinning rotor are evidenced. Seven blade models were tested in a parametric study. Rotor

  6. Predicting the stability of a compressible periodic parallel jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey H.

    1996-01-01

    It is known that mixing enhancement in compressible free shear layer flows with high convective Mach numbers is difficult. One design strategy to get around this is to use multiple nozzles. Extrapolating this design concept in a one dimensional manner, one arrives at an array of parallel rectangular nozzles where the smaller dimension is omega and the longer dimension, b, is taken to be infinite. In this paper, the feasibility of predicting the stability of this type of compressible periodic parallel jet flow is discussed. The problem is treated using Floquet-Bloch theory. Numerical solutions to this eigenvalue problem are presented. For the case presented, the interjet spacing, s, was selected so that s/omega =2.23. Typical plots of the eigenvalue and stability curves are presented. Results obtained for a range of convective Mach numbers from 3 to 5 show growth rates omega(sub i)=kc(sub i)/2 range from 0.25 to 0.29. These results indicate that coherent two-dimensional structures can occur without difficulty in multiple parallel periodic jet nozzles and that shear layer mixing should occur with this type of nozzle design.

  7. Multiple jet study data correlations. [data correlation for jet mixing flow of air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Eberhardt, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Correlations are presented which allow determination of penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets injected normal to a ducted subsonic heated primary air stream. Correlations were obtained over jet-to-primary stream momentum flux ratios of 6 to 60 for locations from 1 to 30 jet diameters downstream of the injection plane. The range of geometric and operating variables makes the correlations relevant to gas turbine combustors. Correlations were obtained for the mixing efficiency between jets and primary stream using an energy exchange parameter. Also jet centerplane velocity and temperature trajectories were correlated and centerplane dimensionless temperature distributions defined. An assumption of a Gaussian vertical temperature distribution at all stations is shown to result in a reasonable temperature field model. Data are presented which allow comparison of predicted and measured values over the range of conditions specified above.

  8. Shear-driven instabilities and shocks in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromang, Sébastien; Leconte, Jeremy; Heng, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Context. General circulation models of the atmosphere of hot Jupiters have shown the existence of a supersonic eastward equatorial jet. These results have been obtained using numerical schemes that filter out vertically propagating sound waves and assume vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, or were acquired with fully compressive codes that use large dissipative coefficients. Aims: We remove these two limitations and investigate the effects of compressibility on the atmospheric dynamics by solving the standard Euler equations. Methods: This was done by means of a series of simulations performed in the framework of the equatorial β-plane approximation using the finite-volume shock-capturing code RAMSES. Results: At low resolution, we recover the classical results described in the literature: we find a strong and steady supersonic equatorial jet of a few km s-1 that displays no signature of shocks. We next show that the jet zonal velocity depends significantly on the grid meridional resolution. When this resolution is fine enough to properly resolve the jet, the latter is subject to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The jet zonal mean velocity displays regular oscillations with a typical timescale of a few days and a significant amplitude of about 15% of the jet velocity. We also find compelling evidence for the development of a vertical shear instability at pressure levels of a few bars. It seems to be responsible for an increased downward kinetic energy flux that significantly affects the temperature of the deep atmosphere and appears to act as a form of drag on the equatorial jet. This instability also creates velocity fluctuations that propagate upward and steepen into weak shocks at pressure levels of a few mbars. Conclusions: We conclude that hot-Jupiter equatorial jets are potentially unstable to both a barotropic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and a vertical shear instability. Upon confirmation using more realistic models, these two instabilities could result in

  9. Direct numerical simulation of shear localization and decomposition reactions in shock-loaded HMX crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, Ryan A.; Barton, Nathan R.; Reaugh, John E.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2015-05-14

    A numerical model is developed to study the shock wave ignition of HMX crystal. The model accounts for the coupling between crystal thermal/mechanical responses and chemical reactions that are driven by the temperature field. This allows for the direct numerical simulation of decomposition reactions in the hot spots formed by shock/impact loading. The model is used to simulate intragranular pore collapse under shock wave loading. In a reference case: (i) shear-enabled micro-jetting is responsible for a modest extent of reaction in the pore collapse region, and (ii) shear banding is found to be an important mode of localization. The shear bands, which are filled with molten HMX, grow out of the pore collapse region and serve as potential ignition sites. The model predictions of shear banding and reactivity are found to be quite sensitive to the respective flow strengths of the solid and liquid phases. In this regard, it is shown that reasonable assumptions of liquid-HMX viscosity can lead to chemical reactions within the shear bands on a nanosecond time scale.

  10. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  11. On the origin of jets and vortices in turbulent planetary atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jougla, Thibault; Dritschel, David G.

    2016-04-01

    Stratified rotating fluids tend to form large scale coherent structures. These structures are present in many different geophysical fluids, for example jet streams in the Earth's atmosphere, the famous and conspicuous jets in the Jovian atmosphere, and oceanic jets like the latent jets and the well-known main currents including the Gulf stream and Kuroshio. Observations, numerical models, and laboratory experiments have sought to explain their origins and their evolutions. To investigate the coexistence, evolution and vertical structure of jets and vortices in turbulent planetary atmospheres, we make use of the widely studied two-layer quasi-geostrophic shallow water model on the β-plane. Numerical simulations at ultra-high resolution are carried out with the Combined Lagrangian Advection Method [1]. Following Panetta 1988 [2], to characterise the pole to equator heating variation on a planet, a vertical shear is imposed and maintained by thermal damping. To crudely represent convection from the bottom layer to the top layer, hetons are constantly added to the flow. Many numerical simulations covering a large range of parameters have been run. The thermal damping and vertical shear dependence has been widely studied and analysed. The baroclinicity of the flow is clearly evident in all cases studied. Moreover, the flow is strongly dependent on thermal damping. There is a competition between baroclinic instabilities trying to reduce the imposed vertical shear and thermal damping trying to maintain the vertical shear. Without any thermal damping, the imposed vertical shear quickly erodes. On the other hand if the thermal damping is very high, the flow is mainly dominated by incoherent, small-scale turbulence. For weaker thermal damping, the competition between baroclinic instability and thermal damping may lead to oscillations between stable and turbulent phases. However, thermal damping does not have a significant impact on the number of homogeneous regions and jets

  12. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  13. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  14. Commercial jet transport crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widmayer, E.; Brende, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a study to identify areas of research and approaches that may result in improved occupant survivability and crashworthiness of transport aircraft are given. The study defines areas of structural crashworthiness for transport aircraft which might form the basis for a research program. A 10-year research and development program to improve the structural impact resistance of general aviation and commercial jet transport aircraft is planned. As part of this program parallel studies were conducted to review the accident experience of commercial transport aircraft, assess the accident performance of structural components and the status of impact resistance technology, and recommend areas of research and development for that 10-year plan. The results of that study are also given.

  15. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  16. Upgrading jet turbine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a joint government/industry program that is developing a new breed of turbine components, including bearings, blades, and seals, to double the propulsion capacity of both military and commercial jet engines. Although the tensions of the Cold War have receded with the demise of the Soviet Union, the US continually seeks to improve the operational readiness of its weapon systems. The challenge facing the Pentagon today is maintaining US technological superiority in the face of post-Cold War budget cuts. A model program for doing so is the joint government/industry Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology program, or IHPTET (pronounced ip-tet). The goal of the IHPTET program is to develop technologies that will double the propulsion capability of military turbine engines by the turn of the century.

  17. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  18. Structure of backward facing step flow in low Reynolds number controlled by synthetic jet array with different injection velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Saneyuki

    2013-11-01

    This study presents detailed structure of separated flow downstream of a backward facing step affected by a non-uniform periodic disturbance along spanwise direction induced by synthetic jet array. The Reynolds number based on the step height ranged from 300 to 900. The frequency of the synthetic jet actuation was selected within the acceptance frequency range of separating shear layer. The periodic disturbance generates periodic transverse vortices whose size and shape change corresponding to the strength of the disturbance. The effect of different injection velocities in the synthetic jet array from those of adjacent jets on the transverse vortex structure and resulting reattachment process is discussed based on the wall shear stress measured by the Micro Flow Sensor (MFS) and flow visualization. Near wall behavior of the transverse vortex above the MFS was related to the sensor output. The results show that non-uniform injection velocity manipulated in the jet array induces difference in the distorted vortex structure and reattachment process in spanwise direction, which strongly depend on the Reynolds number and injection velocities of the synthetic jets.

  19. Jet control carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikake, K.; Idota, Y.; Ohsawa, K.; Sugiyama, K.

    1982-06-29

    A jet control type carburetor according to the present invention includes an intake pipe having an intake passage formed in an inner wall thereof, the intake passage allowing an intake air to flow therethrough; a venturi provided in the intake pipe, for controlling flow velocity and pressure of the intake air in the intake passage; a fuel nozzle opened into the intake passage and connected to a fuel supply source through a fuel passage for sucking the fuel within the intake passage from the fuel nozzle in order to introduce the mixture of air and fuel within the intake passage; a throttle valve provided downstream of the venturi, for controlling the flow rate of the mixture of intake air and fuel; a control air nozzle opened into the intake passage and connected to an air supply source through a control air passage for jetting the flow of the control air to the fuel spurted from the fuel nozzle to afford the kinetic energy of the control air to the fuel; and a throttle means provided upstream of the control air nozzle in the control air passage, for controlling the flow rate of the control air. The control air nozzle has a predetermined inner diameter (da) and is provided at a portion apart from the fuel nozzle with a predetermined spacing (w), and a dimensional relationship of the spacing W between the fuel nozzle and the control air nozzle to the inner diameter (da) of the control air nozzle is set as follows: w/da < or = 20.

  20. Performance of jets at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Matthias; CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The calibration and reconstruction of jets critically relies on the performance of the calorimeters. Extending out to large pseudorapidities, the measurements depend on the interplay between forward calorimeters, central calorimeters, and the tracking system. The high number of additional pile-up interactions poses further complications. In CMS, these difficulties are overcome using the 'particle-flow' approach, which aims at reconstructing individually each particle in the event prior to the jet clustering. Measurements of the jet energy scale and the procedure for jet energy calibration in CMS are reviewed, which are performed with dijet, photon + jet, and Z+jet data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1. The effect of pile-up interactions and the state of the art mitigation techniques used in CMS as well as the main sources of uncertainty of the jet energy calibration are also presented.

  1. Shear instability of plastically-deforming metals in high-velocity impact welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Ali; Kinsey, Brad; Chini, Greg

    2016-10-01

    High-speed oblique impact of two metal plates results in the development of an intense shear region at their interface leading to interfacial profile distortion and interatomic bonding. If the relative velocity is sufficient, a distinct wavy morphology with a well-defined amplitude and wavelength is observed. Emergence of this morphology below the melting point of the metal plates is usually taken as evidence of a successful weld. Amongvarious proposed mechanisms, instability owing to large tangential velocity variations near the interface has received significant attention. With one exception, the few quantitative stability analyses of this proposed mechanism have treated an anti-symmetric/shear-layer base profile (i.e., a Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration) and employed an inviscid or Newtonian viscous fluid constitutive relation. The former stipulation implies the energy source for the instability is the presumed relative shearing motion of the two plates, while the latter is appropriate only if melting occurs locally near the interface. In this study, these restrictions, which are at odds with the conditions realized in high-velocity impact welding, are relaxed. A quantitative temporal linear stability analysis is performed to investigate whether the interfacial wave morphology could be the signature of a shear-driven high strain-rate instability of a perfectly plastic material undergoing a jet-like deformation near the interface. The resulting partial differential eigenvalue problem is solved numerically using a spectral collocation method in which customized boundary conditions near the interface are implemented to properly treat the singularity arising from the vanishing of the base flow strain-rate at the symmetry plane of the jet. The solution of the eigenvalue problem yields the wavelength and growth rate of the dominant wave-like disturbances along the interface and confirms that a shear instability of a plastically-deforming material is compatible with the

  2. Evolution of twist-shear and dip-shear in flaring active region NOAA 10930

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosain, Sanjay; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2011-08-01

    We study the evolution of magnetic shear angle in a flare productive active region NOAA 10930. The magnetic shear angle is defined as the deviation in the orientation of the observed magnetic field vector with respect to the potential field vector. The shear angle is measured in horizontal as well as vertical plane. The former is computed by taking the difference between the azimuth angles of the observed and potential field and is called the twist-shear, while the latter is computed by taking the difference between the inclination angles of the observed and potential field and is called the dip-shear. The evolution of the two shear angles is then tracked over a small region located over the sheared penumbra of the delta sunspot in NOAA 10930. We find that, while the twist-shear shows an increasing trend after the flare the dip-shear shows a significant drop after the flare.

  3. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  4. Shear Fractures of Extreme Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-10-01

    Natural and laboratory observations show that shear ruptures (faults) can propagate with extreme dynamics (up to intersonic rupture velocities) through intact materials and along pre-existing faults with frictional and coherent (bonded) interfaces. The rupture propagation is accompanied by significant fault strength weakening in the rupture head. Although essential for understanding earthquakes, rock mechanics, tribology and fractures, the question of what physical processes determine how that weakening occurs is still unresolved. The general approach today to explain the fault weakening is based upon the strong velocity-weakening friction law according to which the fault strength drops rapidly with slip velocity. Different mechanisms of strength weakening caused by slip velocity have been proposed including thermal effect, high-frequency compressional waves, expansion of pore fluid, macroscopic melting and gel formation. This paper proposes that shear ruptures of extreme dynamics propagating in intact materials and in pre-existing frictional and coherent interfaces are governed by the same recently identified mechanism which is associated with an intensive microcracking process in the rupture tip observed for all types of extreme ruptures. The microcracking process creates, in certain conditions, a special fan-like microstructure shear resistance of which is extremely low (up to an order of magnitude less than the frictional strength). The fan-structure representing the rupture head provides strong interface weakening and causes high slip and rupture velocities. In contrast with the velocity-weakening dependency, this mechanism provides the opposite weakening-velocity effect. The fan-mechanism differs remarkably from all reported earlier mechanisms, and it can provide such important features observed in extreme ruptures as: extreme slip and rupture velocities, high slip velocity without heating, off-fault tensile cracking, transition from crack-like to pulse

  5. A Particle-Tracking-Velocimetry (PTV) Investigation of Liquid Injection in a DC Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, David; Tarlet, Dominique; Meillot, Erick

    2014-02-01

    The present article describes experimental results of liquid injection in a thermal plasma jet by particle-tracking velocimetry (PTV). This technique delivers an in-situ real-time analysis of the liquid breakup and measures the velocities and the trajectories of the particles. The observations were done within the 10 mm surrounding the injection location where the plasma brightness is considerable. First, a validation of the proposed investigation method was carried out in a slower plasma jet. Subsequently, PTV measurements within faster plasma jets, resulting in a set of trajectories, were compared with trajectories achieved through optical diagnostics based on a simple shadow-graph technique proposed by Damiani et al. [Injection d'un liquide au sein d'un jet plasma thermique: optimisation de la trajectoire des particules, Proceedings of Congrès Francophone de Techniques Laser, CFTL 2010, Vandoeuvre lès nancy, France, 2010 (in French)]. These trajectories indicated that a higher plasma flow rate was required to spray all droplet sizes in the axis of the flow, thereby enabling an optimal spraying (then coating) application for producing nanostructured thin layers. This study showed that the liquid injection parameters are of main importance to obtain optimal injection and plasma parameters to achieve the required coating properties.

  6. An investigation on co-axial water-jet assisted fiber laser cutting of metal sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Yuvraj K.; Mullick, Suvradip; Nath, Ashish K.

    2016-02-01

    Water assisted laser cutting has received significant attention in recent times with assurance of many advantages than conventional gas assisted laser cutting. A comparative study between co-axial water-jet and gas-jet assisted laser cutting of thin sheets of mild steel (MS) and titanium (Ti) by fiber laser is presented. Fiber laser (1.07 μm wavelength) was utilised because of its low absorption in water. The cut quality was evaluated in terms of average kerf, projected dross height, heat affected zone (HAZ) and cut surface roughness. It was observed that a broad range process parameter could produce consistent cut quality in MS. However, oxygen assisted cutting could produce better quality only with optimised parameters at high laser power and high cutting speed. In Ti cutting the water-jet assisted laser cutting performed better over the entire range of process parameters compared with gas assisted cutting. The specific energy, defined as the amount of laser energy required to remove unit volume of material was found more in case of water-jet assisted laser cutting process. It is mainly due to various losses associated with water assisted laser processing such as absorption of laser energy in water and scattering at the interaction zone.

  7. Temporal oscillations of the shear stress and scattered light in a shear-banding--shear-thickening micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Azzouzi, H; Decruppe, J P; Lerouge, S; Greffier, O

    2005-08-01

    The results of optical and rheological experiments performed on a viscoelastic solution (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide + sodium salicylate in water) are reported. The flow curve has a horizontal plateau extending between two critical shear rates characteristic of heterogeneous flows formed by two layers of fluid with different viscosities. These two bands which also have different optical anisotropy are clearly seen by direct observation in polarized light. At the end of the plateau, apparent shear thickening is observed in a narrow range of shear rates; in phase oscillations of the shear stress and of the first normal stress difference are recorded in a shearing device operating under controlled strain. The direct observation of the annular gap of a Couette cell in a direction perpendicular to a plane containing the vorticity shows that the turbidity of the whole sample also undergoes time dependent variations with the same period as the shear stress. However no banding is observed during the oscillations and the flow remains homogeneous.

  8. Temporal oscillations of the shear stress and scattered light in a shear-banding-shear-thickening micellar solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouzi, H.; Decruppe, J. P.; Lerouge, S.; Greffier, O.

    2005-08-01

    The results of optical and rheological experiments performed on a viscoelastic solution (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide + sodium salicylate in water) are reported. The flow curve has a horizontal plateau extending between two critical shear rates characteristic of heterogeneous flows formed by two layers of fluid with different viscosities. These two bands which also have different optical anisotropy are clearly seen by direct observation in polarized light. At the end of the plateau, apparent shear thickening is observed in a narrow range of shear rates; in phase oscillations of the shear stress and of the first normal stress difference are recorded in a shearing device operating under controlled strain. The direct observation of the annular gap of a Couette cell in a direction perpendicular to a plane containing the vorticity shows that the turbidity of the whole sample also undergoes time dependent variations with the same period as the shear stress. However no banding is observed during the oscillations and the flow remains homogeneous.

  9. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Structure and Instability of Low-Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap Sriramachandra

    2004-01-01

    Reynolds number was varied from 200 to 1500 and jet Richardson number was varied from 0.72 to 0.002. Power spectra plots generated from Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of angular deflection data acquired at a temporal resolution of 1000Hz reveal substantial damping of the oscillation amplitude in microgravity at low Richardson numbers (0.002). Quantitative concentration data in the form of spatial and temporal evolutions of the instability data in Earth gravity and microgravity reveal significant variations in the jet flow structure upon removal of buoyancy forces. Radial variation of the frequency spectra and time traces of helium concentration revealed the importance of gravitational effects in the jet shear layer region. Linear temporal and spatio-temporal stability analyses of a low-density round gas jet injected into a high-density ambient gas were performed by assuming hyper-tan mean velocity and density profiles. The flow was assumed to be non parallel. Viscous and diffusive effects were ignored. The mean flow parameters were represented as the sum of the mean value and a small normal-mode fluctuation. A second order differential equation governing the pressure disturbance amplitude was derived from the basic conservation equations. The effects of the inhomogeneous shear layer and the Froude number (signifying the effects of gravity) on the temporal and spatio-temporal results were delineated. A decrease in the density ratio (ratio of the density of the jet to the density of the ambient gas) resulted in an increase in the temporal amplification rate of the disturbances. The temporal growth rate of the disturbances increased as the Froude number was reduced. The spatio-temporal analysis performed to determine the absolute instability characteristics of the jet yield positive absolute temporal growth rates at all Fr and different axial locations. As buoyancy was removed (Fr . 8), the previously existing absolute instability disappeared at all locations

  10. Radio jet propagation and wide-angle tailed radio sources in merging galaxy cluster environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loken, Chris; Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM) within merging clusters of galaxies is likely to be in a violent or turbulent dynamical state which may have a significant effect on the evolution of cluster radio sources. We present results from a recent gas + N-body simulation of a cluster merger, suggesting that mergers can result in long-lived, supersonic bulk flows, as well as shocks, within a few hundred kiloparsecs of the core of the dominant cluster. These results have motivated our new two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of jet propagation in such environments. The first set of simulations models the ISM/ICM transition as a contact discontinuity with a strong velocity shear. A supersonic (M(sub j) = 6) jet crossing this discontinuity into an ICM with a transverse, supersonic wind bends continuously, becomes 'naked' on the upwind side, and forms a distended cocoon on the downwind side. In the case of a mildly supersonic jet (M(sub j) = 3), however, a shock is driven into the ISM and ISM material is pulled along with the jet into the ICM. Instabilities excited at the ISM/ICM interface result in the jet repeatedly pinching off and reestablishing itself in a series of 'disconnection events.' The second set of simulations deals with a jet encountering a shock in the merging cluster environment. A series of relatively high-resolution two-dimensional calculations is used to confirm earlier analysis predicting that the jet will not disrupt when the jet Mach number is greater than the shock Mach number. A jet which survives the encounter with the shock will decrease in radius and disrupt shortly thereafter as a result of the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We also find, in disagreement with predictions, that the jet flaring angle decreases with increasing jet density. Finally, a three-dimensional simulation of a jet crossing an oblique shock gives rise to a morphology which resembles a wide-angle tailed radio source with the jet flaring at the shock and

  11. The aeroacoustics of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1995-01-01

    This research project was a joint experimental/computational study of noise in supersonic jets. The experiments were performed in a low to moderate Reynolds number anechoic supersonic jet facility. Computations have focused on the modeling of the effect of an external shroud on the generation and radiation of jet noise. This report summarizes the results of the research program in the form of the Masters and Doctoral theses of those students who obtained their degrees with the assistance of this research grant. In addition, the presentations and publications made by the principal investigators and the research students is appended.

  12. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  13. Inception and evolution of coherent structures in under-expanded supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegeman, P. C.; Pérez, J. M.; Soria, J.; Theofilis, V.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the generation and nature of the large coherent structures observed experimentally in an under-expanded supersonic impinging jet. More specifically, the questions to answer are: What mechanisms govern the receptivity process at the nozzle lip?, how does the underlying flow field affect the evolution of the large-scale coherent structure generated from the initial instability? and what are the interactions between the large-scale (forced) coherent structures and the developing turbulence in the jet shear layer? In order to answer some of these questions both alternatives, that these structures come from global modal flow instabilities or from convective instabilities, the latter, are considered in this work. The stability analysis considered in the former case is performed in this work near the nozzle around the temporal average of the flow obtained by using an in-house LES (Large Eddy Simulation) code. The flow in this region is considered laminar, steady and without non-linear effects. The well known feedback loop in the impinging jet, according to which acoustic waves propagate upstream and excite the jet shear-layer (see Figure 2), advises against some of the hypothesis considered previously in the global stability analysis (ie. non-linear approximation). However the acoustic waves are orders of magnitude smaller than the hydrodynamic waves and should be smoothed out in the temporal average used in the calculation of the mean flow. The results show that both, axisymmetrical (m = 0) and azimuthal modes (m ≥ 1) are stable to global modal analysis and only convective instability could justify the instabilities observed in experiments in the shear layer. A study on the receptivity problem confirms that external disturbances may enter and excite the shear layer, being responsible of the instabilities observed in both experiments and direct numerical simulations.

  14. Emission of sound from axisymmetric turbulence convected by a mean flow with application to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Rosenbaum, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    A model, based on Lighthill's theory, for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. Unlike Ribner's model, it does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic. turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed.

  15. The effect of the constitutive response on the predicted temperatures in copper jets

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Lassila, D.H.

    1993-08-01

    This paper examines the effect of various elements in a set constitutive equations on predicted stress and temperature response of material undergoing pressure and strain histories representative of those in copper jets formed by shaped charges. It is found that the dependence of the flow stress on hydrostatic pressure, which enters here through the pressure dependence of the shear modulus, has a significant effect on predicted flow stress and hence temperature.

  16. Self-similar solution of the problem of a turbulent flow in a round submerged jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmidt, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    A mathematical model of the flow in a round submerged turbulent jet is considered. The model includes differential transport equations for the normal components of the Reynolds stress tensor and Rodi's algebraic approximations for shear stresses. A theoretical-group analysis of the examined model is performed, and a reduced self-similar system of ordinary differential equations is derived and solved numerically. It is shown that the calculated results agree with available experimental data.

  17. Conductor shears as iceberg encroaches

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    Operators in the Arctic regions must protect wellheads from encroaching icebergs and icepack sheets. Diverting ice masses and excavating large holes below scour depth is expensive. Now an alternate approach allows the conductor to shear, shuts in the well, and provides a method of re-entering the well. The new system has been successfully used by Mobil on two exploratory wells in the Hibernia field off eastern Canada. The wells used 18 3/4-in. wellheads rated at 10,000 psi with 36-in. conductor pipe. The performance of the system is discussed.

  18. Magnetorheological Shear Flow Near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, Daniel; Tighe, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Flow in magnetorheological (MR) fluids and systems near jamming both display hallmarks of complex fluid rheology, including yield stresses and shear thinning viscosities. They are also tunable, which means that both phenomena can be used as a switching mechanism in ``smart'' fluids, i.e. fluids where properties can be tuned rapidly and reversibly by changing external parameters. We use numerical simulations to investigate the rheological properties of MR fluids close to the jamming transition as a function of the applied field and volume fraction. We are especially interested in the crossover region where both phenomena are needed to describe the observed dynamics. Funded by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  19. Jet stream related observations by MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the jet stream and its observation by MST radar is presented. The climatology and synoptic and mesoscale structure of jet streams is briefly reviewed. MST radar observations of jet stream winds, and associated waves and turbulence are then considered. The possibility of using a network of ST radars to track jet stream winds in near real time is explored.

  20. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of sheer flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  1. Multi-objective optimisation for a sustainable groundwater resources and agricultural management in arid coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Jens; Heck, Vera; Schütze, Niels

    2014-05-01

    The scarcity of freshwater in coastal arid regions, coupled with an ongoing population growth, makes optimal water management crucial. Excessive use of groundwater for irrigation in agriculture puts those regions at risk of saltwater intrusion which limits the agricultural opportunities. To solve these problems, a simulation based integrated water management system has been developed to ensure a long-term profitable and sustainable water resources and agricultural management. Within the system, a groundwater module, assessing the water resources availability, and an agricultural module, controlling irrigation and cultivation, are connected in an optimisation module, optimising the water management. To reduce the computational complexity of the optimisation procedure, surrogate models are applied which describe the behaviour of the groundwater and agriculture process models regarding the most relevant variables for management. Furthermore, the optimisation problem is decomposed into a two-step optimisation. An analytical inner optimisation estimates irrigation practices and crop patterns, while an outer evolutionary optimisation algorithm determines the overall water abstraction scenarios, based on results of the inner optimisation. By these two features, consequent surrogate model application and decomposition of optimisation, the computational complexity of the optimisation problem is reduced considerably, allowing the consideration of specific regional and temporal aspects in the management tool. The methodology is demonstrated by an exemplary application of the south Batinah region in the Sultanate of Oman which is affected by saltwater intrusion into a coastal aquifer system due to excessive groundwater withdrawal for irrigated agriculture. Due to contradicting objectives like profit-oriented agriculture vs. aquifer sustainability, multi-objective optimisation is performed. Optimisation runs for different simulation periods and management strategies show that a

  2. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, Sebastian; Harris, D.E.; Marshall, H.L.; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  3. The importance of shear heating for shear localization during tectonic nappe displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Dániel; Duretz, Thibault; Podladchikov, Yuri; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2016-04-01

    Localization of deformation plays a major role during tectonic processes at all scale, from the formation of deformation bands within single grains up to crustal and lithospheric scale shear zones. The role of shear localization is particularly important for the formation and displacement of tectonic nappes during orogeny. It has been shown that a simple one-dimensional (1D) thermo-mechanical shear zone model, which considers a power-law flow law and temperature dependent viscosity, can to the first-order explain thrust-sheet and fold nappe formation. This 1D model could successfully reproduce the overall shear strain distribution across natural nappes and shear zones, but underestimated systematically the shear strain at the base of the nappe and shear zone. This underestimation indicates that certain processes have been ignored in the analysis. We present therefore a new 1D thermo-mechanical model which also considers shear heating and the related thermal softening of temperature-dependent viscosity to quantify the impact of shear heating on strain localization during nappe displacement. We perform a dimensional analysis of the equations which describe the 1D shear zone model to determine the dimensionless parameters which control the deformation. Three deformation modes controlled by dimensionless parameters will be distinguished: (1) shear deformation for which shear heating is negligible, (2) shear deformation for which shear heating is moderate and displacement velocities stay in the range of plate velocities, (3) shear deformation for which shear heating is significant and velocities and temperatures increase continuously (thermal runaway). The 1D shear zone model is applied to the Helvetic nappe system in general and the Morcles, Doldenhorn and Wildhorn nappes in particular. For the geological and microstructural data available for the Helvetic nappe system we determine whether shear heating was important during nappe formation or not. The 1D results are

  4. Jet Measurements for Development of Jet Noise Prediction Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The primary focus of my presentation is the development of the jet noise prediction code JeNo with most examples coming from the experimental work that drove the theoretical development and validation. JeNo is a statistical jet noise prediction code, based upon the Lilley acoustic analogy. Our approach uses time-average 2-D or 3-D mean and turbulent statistics of the flow as input. The output is source distributions and spectral directivity.

  5. Optimisation of logistics processes of energy grass collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányai, Tamás.

    2010-05-01

    The collection of energy grass is a logistics-intensive process [1]. The optimal design and control of transportation and collection subprocesses is a critical point of the supply chain. To avoid irresponsible decisions by right of experience and intuition, the optimisation and analysis of collection processes based on mathematical models and methods is the scientific suggestible way. Within the frame of this work, the author focuses on the optimisation possibilities of the collection processes, especially from the point of view transportation and related warehousing operations. However the developed optimisation methods in the literature [2] take into account the harvesting processes, county-specific yields, transportation distances, erosion constraints, machinery specifications, and other key variables, but the possibility of more collection points and the multi-level collection were not taken into consideration. The possible areas of using energy grass is very wide (energetically use, biogas and bio alcohol production, paper and textile industry, industrial fibre material, foddering purposes, biological soil protection [3], etc.), so not only a single level but also a multi-level collection system with more collection and production facilities has to be taken into consideration. The input parameters of the optimisation problem are the followings: total amount of energy grass to be harvested in each region; specific facility costs of collection, warehousing and production units; specific costs of transportation resources; pre-scheduling of harvesting process; specific transportation and warehousing costs; pre-scheduling of processing of energy grass at each facility (exclusive warehousing). The model take into consideration the following assumptions: (1) cooperative relation among processing and production facilties, (2) capacity constraints are not ignored, (3) the cost function of transportation is non-linear, (4) the drivers conditions are ignored. The

  6. A Theory for Emergence of Equatorial Deep Jets from Turbulence based on Statistical Mean State Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Farrell, B.

    2013-12-01

    Equatorial deep jets (EDJs) are persistent, zonally-coherent jets found within one degree of the equator in all ocean basins (Luyten and Swallow, 1976). The jets are characterized by a vertically oscillating ('stacked') structure between ~500-2000m depth, with jet amplitudes on the order of 10 cm/s superimposed upon a large-scale background shear flow. EDJs are a striking feature of the equatorial climate system and play an important role in equatorial ocean transport. However, the physical mechanism responsible for the presence of EDJs remains uncertain. Previous theoretical models for EDJs have suggested mechanisms involving the reflection and constructive interference of equatorially trapped waves (Wunsch 1977, McCreary 1984) and the instability of mixed Rossby-gravity waves with EDJs as the fastest-growing eigenfunction (Hua et al. 2008, Eden et al. 2008). In this work we explore the jet formation mechanism and the parameter dependence of EDJ structure in the idealized theoretical model of the stochastically-driven equatorial beta plane. The model is formulated in three ways: 1) Fully nonlinear equations of motion 2) Quasilinear (or mean-field) dynamics 3) Statistical state dynamics employing a second order closure method (stochastic structural stability theory). Results from the three models are compared, and the implications for both the jet formation and equilibration mechanisms, as well as the role of eddy-eddy nonlinearity in the EDJ system, are discussed.

  7. The Prediction of Jet Noise Ground Effects Using an Acoustic Analogy and a Tailored Green's Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of an acoustic analogy for the mixing noise component of jet noise in the presence of an infinite surface is presented. The reflection of jet noise by the ground changes the distribution of acoustic energy and is characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns. The equivalent sources are modeled based on the two-point cross- correlation of the turbulent velocity fluctuations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solution. Propagation effects, due to reflection by the surface and refaction by the jet shear layer, are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations (LEE). The vector Green's function of the LEE is written in relation to Lilley's equation; that is, approximated with matched asymptotic solutions and the Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation. The Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation for an infinite flat plane with impedance is the Weyl-van der Pol equation. Predictions are compared with an unheated Mach 0.95 jet produced by a nozzle with an exit diameter of 0.3302 meters. Microphones are placed at various heights and distances from the nozzle exit in the peak jet noise direction above an acoustically hard and an asphalt surface. The predictions are shown to accurately capture jet noise ground effects that are characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns in the mid- and far-field and capture overall trends in the near-field.

  8. Large-Eddy Simulations of Noise Generation in Supersonic Jets at Realistic Engine Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junhui; Corrigan, Andrew; Kailasanath, K.; Taylor, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) have been carried out to investigate the noise generation in highly heated supersonic jets at temperatures similar to those observed in high-performance jet engine exhausts. It is found that the exhaust temperature of high-performance jet engines can range from 1000K at an intermediate power to above 2000K at a maximum afterburning power. In low-temperature jets, the effects of the variation of the specific heat ratio as well as the radial temperature profile near the nozzle exit are small and are ignored, but it is not clear whether those effects can be also ignored in highly heated jets. The impact of the variation of the specific heat ratio is assessed by comparing LES results using a variable specific heat ratio with those using a constant specific heat ratio. The impact on both the flow field and the noise distributions are investigated. Because the total temperature near the nozzle wall can be substantially lower than the nozzle total temperature either due to the heating loss through the nozzle wall or due to the cooling applied near the wall, this lower wall temperature may impact the temperature in the shear layer, and thus impact the noise generation. The impact of the radial temperature profile on the jet noise generation is investigated by comparing results of lower nozzle wall temperatures with those of the adiabatic wall condition.

  9. Development of a low frequency shear horizontal piezoelectric transducer for the generation of plane SH waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Guillaume; Viens, Martin; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The shear horizontal guided wave fundamental mode (SH0) has the particularity of being the only non-dispersive plate guided wave mode. This characteristic makes this ultrasonic guided wave mode very attractive in non-destructive testing, facilitating signal processing for long range inspections. It is, however, difficult to generate only a single guided wave mode when using piezoelectric transduction. This work aims to develop a piezoelectric transducer capable of generating a virtually pure plane zeroth order shear horizontal wave. The chosen material was the PZT-5H for its dominant d15 piezoelectric constant, which makes it a perfect candidate for SH-wave generation. The transducer dimensions were optimised using an analytical model based on the Huygens' principle of superposition and the dipole pattern of a shear point source. A 3D multiphysics finite element model was then used to validate the analytical model results. Experimental validation was finally conducted with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) system. Excellent agreement between the analytical model, finite element model and experimental validation was seen.

  10. LES/RANS Simulation of a Supersonic Reacting Wall Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jack R.; Boles, John A.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents results from large-eddy / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) simulations of the well-known Burrows-Kurkov supersonic reacting wall-jet experiment. Generally good agreement with experimental mole fraction, stagnation temperature, and Pitot pressure profiles is obtained for non-reactive mixing of the hydrogen jet with a non-vitiated air stream. A lifted flame, stabilized between 10 and 22 cm downstream of the hydrogen jet, is formed for hydrogen injected into a vitiated air stream. Flame stabilization occurs closer to the hydrogen injection location when a three-dimensional combustor geometry (with boundary layer development resolved on all walls) is considered. Volumetric expansion of the reactive shear layer is accompanied by the formation of large eddies which interact strongly with the reaction zone. Time averaged predictions of the reaction zone structure show an under-prediction of the peak water concentration and stagnation temperature, relative to experimental data and to results from a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculation. If the experimental data can be considered as being accurate, this result indicates that the present LES/RANS method does not correctly capture the cascade of turbulence scales that should be resolvable on the present mesh. Instead, energy is concentrated in the very largest scales, which provide an over-mixing effect that excessively cools and strains the flame. Predictions improve with the use of a low-dissipation version of the baseline piecewise parabolic advection scheme, which captures the formation of smaller-scale structures superimposed on larger structures of the order of the shear-layer width.

  11. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    PubMed

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-01

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  12. Experimental investigation of a reacting transverse jet in a high pressure oscillating vitiated crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugger, Christopher A.

    near a pressure node of the 1st axial combustor mode, where the dominant flowfield fluctuations are a time-varying crossflow velocity. For the non-reacting jets, the nominal jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio is 19. For the reacting jets, the nominal jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio is 6. Two cross sectional planes parallel to the jet injection wall are investigated: 1 and 2.7 jet diameters from the jet injection wall. The combustor crossflow high frequency wall mounted pressure data is given for each test case. The velocity and OH-PLIF data is presented as instantaneous snapshots, time and phase averaged flowfields, modal decompositions using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Dynamic Mode Decomposition, and a jet cycle analysis relative to the crossflow acoustic cycle. Analysis of the five test cases shows that the jet cross sectional velocity and OH-PLIF dynamics display a multitude of dynamics. These are often organized into shear layer dynamics and wake dynamics, but are not mutually exclusive. For large unsteady crossflow velocity oscillations at the 1st axial combustor mode, both dynamics show strong organization at the unsteady crossflow frequency. Deciphering these dynamics is complicated by the fact that the ostensible jet response to the time-varying crossflow is a time-varying jet penetration. This drives the jet toward and away from the jet injection wall. These motions are perpendicular to the laser sheet and creates significant out-of-plane motions. The amplitude of crossflow unsteadiness appears to play a role in the sharpness of the wake dynamics. For the non-reacting cases, the wake dynamics are strong and dominant spectral features in the flowfield. For the reacting cases, the wake dynamics are spectrally distinct in the lower amplitude crossflow unsteadiness case, but a large unsteady amplitude crossflow appears to suppress the spectral bands in the frequency range corresponding to wake vortex dynamics.

  13. An experimental study on jets issuing from elliptic inclined nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on an experimental flow visualisation and digital particle image velocimetry investigation on forced jets exhausting from aspect ratio equal to three elliptic nozzles with exits inclined at 30° and 60°. Flow images show that shear layer instabilities and subsequent vortex roll-ups are formed parallel to the inclined nozzle exits at 30° incline and that rapid re-orientation of the vortex roll-ups occurs at 60° incline. Flow observations also show that strong axis-switching occurs in a non-inclined elliptic nozzle. However, 30° and 60° elliptic inclined nozzles produce significant distortions to and suppression of the axis-switching behaviour, respectively. As a result, flow stresses and turbulent kinetic energy distributions become increasingly asymmetric. Their coherency and magnitudes along the shorter nozzle lengths also vary significantly. This can be attributed to the dissimilar formations of vortex roll-ups and rib structures, as well as unequal mutual interactions between them as the incline-angle increases. Lastly, results also show that unlike circular inclined nozzles, elliptic inclined nozzles do not produce serpentine-shaped jet columns nor lead to significant lateral jet-spread at large incline-angles.

  14. Theory of two-point correlations of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A large body of careful experimental measurements of two-point correlations of far field jet noise was carried out. The model of jet-noise generation is an approximate version of an earlier work of Ribner, based on the foundations of Lighthill. The model incorporates isotropic turbulence superimposed on a specified mean shear flow, with assumed space-time velocity correlations, but with source convection neglected. The particular vehicle is the Proudman format, and the previous work (mean-square pressure) is extended to display the two-point space-time correlations of pressure. The shape of polar plots of correlation is found to derive from two main factors: (1) the noncompactness of the source region, which allows differences in travel times to the two microphones - the dominant effect; (2) the directivities of the constituent quadrupoles - a weak effect. The noncompactness effect causes the directional lobes in a polar plot to have pointed tips (cusps) and to be especially narrow in the plane of the jet axis. In these respects, and in the quantitative shapes of the normalized correlation curves, results of the theory show generally good agreement with Maestrello's experimental measurements.

  15. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  16. Surface Breakup of A Liquid Jet Injected Into A Gaseous Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzad Jazi, Mohsen

    The normal injection of a liquid jet into a gaseous crossflow has many engineering applications. In this thesis, detailed numerical simulations based on the level set method are employed to understand the physical mechanism underlying the jet ``surface breakup''. The numerical observations reveal the existence of hydrodynamic instabilities on the jet periphery. The temporal growth of such azimuthal instabilities leads to the formation of interface corrugations, which are eventually sheared off of the jet surface as sheet-like structures. The sheets finally undergo disintegration into ligaments and drops during the surface breakup process. Temporal linear stability analyses are employed to understand the nature of these instabilities. To facilitate the analysis, analytical solutions for the flow fields of the jet and the crossflow are derived. We identify the ``shear instability'' as the primary destabilization mechanism in the flow. This inherently inviscid mechanism opposes the previously suggested mechanism of surface breakup (known as ``boundary layer stripping''), which is based on a viscous interpretation. The influence of the jet-to-crossflow density ratio on the flow stability are also studied. The findings show that a higher density jet leads to higher wavenumber instabilities on the jet surface and thereby subsequent smaller drops and ligaments. The stability characteristics of the most amplified modes (i.e., the wavenumber and corresponding growth rate) obtained from stability analyses and numerical simulations are in good agreement. The stability results of the jet also show that the density may have a non-monotonic stabilizing/destabilizing effect on the flow stability. To investigate such effect, the concept of wave resonance are employed to physically interpret the inviscid instability mechanism in two-phase flows with sharp interfaces and linear velocity profiles. We demonstrate that neutrally stable waves are formed due to the density jump in the

  17. Nonlinear eddy viscosity modeling and experimental study of jet spreading rates.

    PubMed

    Heschl, C; Inthavong, K; Sanz, W; Tu, J

    2014-02-01

    Indoor airflow pattern is strongly influenced by turbulent shear and turbulent normal stresses that are responsible for entrainment effects and turbulence-driven secondary motion. Therefore, an accurate prediction of room airflows requires reliable modeling of these turbulent quantities. The most widely used turbulence models include RANS-based models that provide quick solutions but are known to fail in turbulent free shear and wall-affected flows. In order to cope with this deficiency, this study presents a nonlinear k-ε turbulence model and evaluates it along with linear k-ε models for an indoor isothermal linear diffuser jet flow measured in two model rooms using PIV. The results show that the flow contains a free jet near the inlet region and a wall-affected region downstream where the jet is pushed toward the ceiling by entrainment through the well-known Coanda effect. The CFD results show that an accurate prediction of the entrainment process is very important and that the nonlinear eddy viscosity model is able to predict the turbulence-driven secondary motions. Furthermore, turbulence models that are calibrated for high Reynolds free shear layer flows were not able to reproduce the measured velocity distributions, and it is suggested that the model constants of turbulence models should be adjusted before they are used for room airflow simulations. PMID:23668473

  18. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell W.; Pruett, Brian O. M.

    2016-02-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulent eddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing, both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulent eddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of -5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a -1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.

  19. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulenteddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing, both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulenteddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Furthermore,super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of –5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a –1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.

  20. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulenteddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing,more » both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulenteddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Furthermore,super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of –5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a –1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.« less