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Sample records for jlab experimental program

  1. The Hall D Physics Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.

    2012-09-01

    GlueX is one of the flagship experiments of the 12 GeV era at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The energy of the electron accelerator at JLab is presently undergoing an upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV and a 4th experimental hall (Hall D) is being added. The GlueX experimental apparatus consists of a tagged coherent bremsstrahlung photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The photoproduced mesons, which are created inside of a 2.2 T solenoid, will then pass through a pair of drift chambers and eventually deposit their energy into either of two calorimeters, depending on their respective angles. GlueX will attempt to map out the light meson spectrum and search for meson-gluon hybrids to better understand the confinement of quarks and gluons in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). There is little data on the photoproduction of light mesons and the GlueX experiment will exceed the current photoproduction data by several orders of magnitude in the first year alone. Photoproduction is specifically well suited to search for meson-gluon hybrids because in the flux tube model the production cross-sections are higher for meson-gluon hybrids from photons, with the spins of the virtual quark-antiquark pair aligned, than from other sources such as pions, with the spins of the quark-antiquark pair anti-aligned. There are also other Hall D experiments proposed to look for physics beyond the Standard Model by studying Eta rare or forbidden decay channels such as eta to two neutral pions. The 12 GeV upgrade of the JLab accelerator and the complete physics program of Hall D will be presented.

  2. The spin program with CLAS at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minehart, R. C.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the status of an extensive program to study the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from longitudinally polarized NH3 and ND3 targets using the CLAS detector at JLab. The data span a range in Q 2 from 0.05-4.5 (GeV/c)2 and a range in W, the γ* N invariant mass, up to about 3 GeV. With the excellent particle identification available with the CLA, both inclusive and exclusive scattering can be studied. The experimental techniques are reviewed and some preliminary results are presented. This paper focuses on extraction of the spin structure functiong g 1 for the proton and the deuteron.

  3. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Yu-Chiu Chao; Pavel Chevtsov; Anthony Day; William Hicks; Michele Joyce; Jean-Claude Denard

    2004-05-01

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size (sigma {approx} 100 {micro}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of delta E / E < 3 x 10{sup -}5. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are noninvasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1.6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {micro}A down to few {micro}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  4. Hypernuclear spectroscopy program at JLab Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Nakamura, Satoshi; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, O.; Baturin, Pavlo; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bosted, Peter; Carlini, Roger; Chen, X.; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, AJI; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gan, Liping; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Halkyard, Rebekah; Honda, D.; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hu, S.; Hungerford, Ed; Ispiryan, Mikayel; Johnston, Kathleen; Jones, Mark; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kaneta, M.; Kato, F.; Kato, Seigo; Kawama, Daisuke; Keppel, Cynthia; Li, Ya; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Maruyama, Nayuta; Matsumura, Akihiko; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Navasardyan, Tigran; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Pamela, Priscilla; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera Castillo, Roberto; Roche, Julie; Rodriguez, Victor; Sato, Yoshinori; Seva, Tomislav; Tang, Liguang; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Sumihama, Mizuki; Song, Y.; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Hirokazu; Tvaskis, Vladas; Vulcan, William; Wang, B.; Wells, Steven; Yan, Chen; Yuan, Lulin; Zamkochian, S.

    2008-05-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2008.01.029
    Hypernuclear production by the (e,e?K+) reaction has unique advantages in hypernuclear spectroscopy of the S=?1 regime. The second-generation spectroscopy experiment on 12C, 7Li and 28Si targets has been recently carried out at JLab Hall C with a new experimental configuration (Tilt method) and also using a new high-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS). The experiment is described and preliminary results are presented together with the empasis of significance of the (e,e?K+) reaction for ? hypernuclear spectroscopy and its future prospects.

  5. The Nucleon Resonance Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf W. Gothe

    2006-02-01

    The status of the program to study baryon resonances at Jefferson Lab will be exemplified by the latest results on resonance parameters and transition form factors in single and double-pion production as well as kaon-hyperon decays.

  6. The JLab TMD Program at 6 GeV and 11 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    The precise mapping of the nucleon’s transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in the valence quark region has emerged as one of the flagship physics programs of the recently upgraded Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLab). The TMDs describe the three-dimensional, spin-correlated densities of quarks and gluons in the nucleon in momentum space, and are accessible experimentally through detailed studies of the Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) process, N ( e ; e 0 h ) X . The already unrivaled intensity, polarization and duty factor performance of CEBAF will combine with the dramatic expansion of its kinematic reach embodied by the recent near-doubling of the maximum beam energy to enable the first fully differential precision measurements of SIDIS structure functions in the valence region. In this paper, I will review the existing and forthcoming SIDIS results from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations and present an overview of the planned JLab SIDIS program at 11 GeV beam energy

  7. The JLAB 3D program at 12 GeV (TMDs + GPDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab CEBAF accelerator is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the beam energy up to 12 GeV. The three experimental Halls operating in the 6-GeV era are upgrading their detectors to adapt their performances to the new available kinematics, and a new Hall (D) is being built. The investigation of the three-dimensional nucleon structure both in the coordinate and in the momentum space represents an essential part of the 12-GeV physics program, and several proposals aiming at the extraction of related observables have been already approved in Hall A, B and C. In this proceedings, the focus of the JLab 3D program will be described, and a selection of proposals will be discussed.

  8. Theory Support for the Excited Baryon Analysis Program at the JLAB 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Mokeev, Viktor; Aznauryan, Inna; Braun, Vladimir; Capstick, Simon; Cloet, Ian; Edwards, Robert; Gianinni, M.; Lin, Huey-Wen; Roberts, C.D.; Stoler, Paul; Zhao, Qiang; Zou, Bing-Song

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the contributions of the Electromagnetic $\\gamma_vNN^*$ Transition Form Factors workshop participants that provide theoretical support of the excited baryon program at the 12 GeV energy upgrade at JLab. The main objectives of the workshop were (a) review the status of the $\\gamma_vNN^*$ transition form factors extracted from the meson electroproduction data, (b) call for the theoretical interpretations of the extracted $N$-$N^*$ transition form factors, that enable access to the mechanisms responsible for the N* formation and to their emergence from QCD.

  9. Nucleon form factors program with SBS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-12-01

    The physics of the nucleon form factors is the basic part of the Jefferson Laboratory program. We review the achievements of the 6-GeV era and the program with the 12- GeV beam with the SBS spectrometer in Hall A, with a focus on the nucleon ground state properties.

  10. Recent Results from the Jlab RSS Spin Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mahbubul Khandaker

    2009-12-01

    The spin physics program in Jefferson Lab’s Hall C concentrates on high precision and high resolution studies of the nucleon spin structure that can be extracted from inclusive polarized scattering experiments. The Resonances Spin Structure - RSS experiment has measured nucleon spin structure functions in the resonances region at an intermediate four-momentum transfer Q2 ~ 1.3 GeV2. The polarized target in Hall C could be polarized longitudinally and transversely, allowing extraction of both spin-dependent structure functions g1 and g2. Results on proton and deuteron spin asymmetries A1 and A2, and spin structure functions g1 and g2, are presented here.

  11. Highlights of JLab Neutron (3He) Spin Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen

    2009-07-01

    Nucleon spin structure has been an active, exciting and intriguing subject of interest for the last three decades. Recent precision spin-structure data from Jefferson Lab have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure at low Q2. In particular, it has improved our understanding of spin sum rules and higher-twist effects. First, results of neutron spin sum rules and polarizabilities in the low to intermediate Q2 region are presented. Comparison with theoretical calculations, in particular with Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) calculations, are discussed. Surprising disagreements of ChPT calculations with experimental results on the generalized spin polarizability, deltaLTn, were found. Results of precision measurements of the g2 structure function to study higher-twist effects are presented. The data indicate a significant higher-twist (twist-3 or higher) effect. The second moment of the spin structure functions and the twist-3 matrix element d2 results were extracted. The high Q2 result was compared with a Lattice QCD calculation. Finally, other neutron spin structure results, such as the resonance data for quark-hadron duality study and a precision measurement of the neutron spin asymmetry in the valence quark (high-x) region are briefly discussed.

  12. Timelike Compton Scattering off the nucleon: observables and experimental perspectives for JLab at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Marie

    2016-03-01

    Hard exclusive processes such as photoproduction or electroproduction of photon or meson off the nucleon provide access to the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), in the regime where the scattering amplitude is factorized into a hard and a soft part. GPDs contain the correlation between the longitudinal momentum fraction and the transverse spatial densities of quarks and gluons in the nucleon. Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS) correspond to the reaction gammaN --> gamma*N --> e+e?N, where the photon is scattered off a quark. It is measured through its interference with the associated Bethe-Heitler process, which has the same final state. TCS allows to access the GPDs and test their universality by comparison to the results obtained with the DVCS process (eN --> e gamma N). Also, results obtained with TCS provide additional independent constrains to the GPDs parameterization. We will present the physical motivations for TCS, with our theoretical predictions for TCS observables and their dependencies. We calculated for JLab 12 GeV energies all the single and double beam and/or target polarization observables off the proton and off the neutron. We will also present the experimental perspectives for the next years at JLab. Two proposals were already accepted at JLab: in Hall B, with the CLAS12 spectrometer, in order to measure the unpolarized cross section and in Hall A, with the SoLID spectrometer, in order to measure the unpolarized cross section and the beam spin asymmetry at high intensity. A Letter Of Intent was also submitted in order to measure the transverse target spin asymmetries in Hall C. We will discuss the merits of this different experiments and present some of the expected results.

  13. JLab's Hall A after the 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    John Lerose

    2004-11-14

    An overview is presented of the planned physics program for JLab's Hall A following the 12 GeV upgrade with emphasis on the equipment needed to achieve the desired experimental goals. Results of simulations of sample experiments with anticipated uncertainties are presented.

  14. Review of Recent Jlab Results

    SciTech Connect

    Elton Smith

    2005-08-21

    High quality polarized electron beams at Jefferson Lab make possible precision measurements of hadronic properties in the regime of strongly interacting QCD. We will describe a few programs at Jefferson Lab that are making measurements that link the basic static properties of hadrons to their quark sub-structure. For example, parity-violating electron proton elastic scattering probes the spatial distribution of strange quarks in the nucleon. The nucleon-Delta transition form factors give us information about the deformation of nucleons and Deltas. Finally, new high statistics measurements of photons scattering off proton and deuteron targets are used to set upper limits on the production of exotic baryons with strangeness S=+1. These examples will be used to illustrate the capabilities and focus of the experimental program at JLab.

  15. Engineering the Big Chill: The Story of JLab's Central Helium Liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    This article tells the story of the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), one of the US National Laboratories. JLab's successful superconducting radio frequency accelerator was only possible because a group of JLab engineers successfully tackled a complex of difficulties to build a cryogenic system that included the CHL, a task that required advancing the frontier of cryogenic technology. Ultimately, these cryogenic advances were applied far beyond JLab to the benefit of cutting-edge programs at other US national laboratories (Oak Ridge, Brookhaven, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at MSU) as well as NASA. This innovation story dramatizes the sort of engineer-driven technological problem solving that allows the successful launch and operation of experimental projects. Along the way, the CHL story also provides an important addition to our understanding of the role played by engineers and industry in creating knowledge at physics laboratories.

  16. Future Research Program at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2007-09-06

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  17. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Meson Production at Jlab/CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hyon-Suk Jo

    2012-04-01

    This report reviews the recent experimental results from the CLAS collaboration (Hall B of Jefferson Lab, or JLab) on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) and discusses their interpretation in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The impact of the experimental data on the applicability of the GPD mechanism to these exclusive reactions is discussed. Initial results obtained from JLab 6 GeV data indicate that DVCS might already be interpretable in this framework while GPD models fail to describe the exclusive meson production (DVMP) data with the GPD parameterizations presently used. An exception is the {phi} meson production for which the GPD mechanism appears to apply. The recent global analyses aiming to extract GPDs from fitting DVCS CLAS and world data are discussed. The GPD experimental program at CLAS12, planned with the upcoming 12 GeV upgrade of JLab, is briefly presented.

  18. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Doi, Daisuke; Fujii, Yu; Toshiyuki, Gogami; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kawama, Daisuke; Maeda, Kazushige; Maruta, Tomofumi; Matsumura, Akihiko; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Shichijo, Ayako; Tamura, Hirokazu; Taniya, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Taku; Yokota, Kosuke; Kato, S; Sato, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Motoba, T; Hiyama, E; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Ates, Ozgur; Chen, Chunhua; Christy, Michael; Keppel, Cynthia; Kohl, Karl; Li, Ya; Liyanage, Anusha Habarakada; Tang, Liguang; Walton, T; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhu, Lingyan; Baturin, Pavlo; Boeglin, Werner; Dhamija, Seema; Markowitz, Pete; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Hungerford, Ed; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Gaskell, David; Horn, Tanja; Jones, Mark; Smith, Gregory; Vulcan, William; Wood, Stephen; Johnston, C; Simicevic, Neven; Wells, Stephen; Samantha, Chhanda; Hu, Bitao; Shen, Ji; Wang, W; Zhang, Xiaozhuo; Zhang, Yi; Feng, Jing; Fu, Y; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, S; Jiang, Yi; Lu, H; Yan, Xinhu; Ye, Yunxiu; Gan, Liping; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Danagoulian, Samuel; Gasparian, Ashot; Elaasar, Mostafa; Wesselmann, Frank; Asaturyan, Arshak; Margaryan, Amur; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Androic, Darko; Furic, Miroslav; Petkovic, Tomislav; Seva, Tomislav; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Rodriguez, Victor; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cusanno, Francesco; Garibaldi, Franco; Urciuoli, Guido; De Leo, Raffaele; Maronne, S; Achenbach, Carsten; Pochodzalla, J

    2010-03-01

    Since the 1st generation experiment, E89-009, which was successfully carried out as a pilot experiment of (e,e'K+) hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab Hall C in 2000, precision hypernuclear spectroscopy by the (e,e'K+) reactions made considerable progress. It has evolved to the 2nd generation experiment, E01-011, in which a newly constructed high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) was installed and the “Tilt method” was adopted in order to suppress large electromagnetic background and to run with high luminosity. Preliminary high-resolution spectra of 7ΛHe and 28ΛAl together with that of 12ΛB that achieved resolution better than 500 keV(FWHM) were obtained. The third generation experiment, E05-115, has completed data taking with an experimental setup combining a new splitter magnet, high resolution electron spectrometer (HES) and the HKS used in the 2nd generation experiment. The data were accumulated with targets of 7Li, 9Be, 10B, 12C and 52Cr as well as with those of CH2 and H2O for calibration. The analysis is under way with particular emphasis of determining precision absolute hypernuclear masses. In this article, hypernuclear spectroscopy program in the wide mass range at JLab Hall C that has undergone three generation is described.

  19. The JLAB Research Program with the 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2001-05-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade are illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed.

  20. HIGH AVERAGE POWER UV FREE ELECTRON LASER EXPERIMENTS AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Williams, Gwyn

    2012-07-01

    Having produced 14 kW of average power at {approx}2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

  1. From quarks to nucleons: Highlights from the Research Program in Hall A at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2001-02-01

    After a brief introduction to the CEBAF accelerator, several recent results of the research programs in Hall A are discussed. All of those address the transition region between the meson-baryon and quark-gluon description of nuclear matter. Finally, the plans for upgrading CEBAF to 12 GeV are presented and the instrumentation under design for Hall A to carry out that research program is discussed.

  2. Generalized Parton Distributions and Deep Exclusive Reactions: Present Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Michel Garcon

    2004-07-01

    We review briefly the physical concept of generalized parton distributions and the experimental challenges associated with the corresponding measurements of deep exclusive reactions. The first data obtained at Jefferson Lab for exclusive photon (DVCS) and vector meson (DVMP) electroproduction above the resonance-excitation region are described. Two upcoming dedicated DVCS experiments are presented in some detail.

  3. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12 GeV program at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) for the Proton Polarimeter Back Tracker (BT) of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS BT GEM trackers consist of two sets of five large GEM chambers of size 60×200 cm2. The GEM chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules, each with an active area of 60×50 cm2. We have built and tested several prototypes and the construction of GEM modules for SBS BT is ongoing. We describe in this paper the design and construction of the GEM module prototype as well as the preliminary results on performance from tests carried out in our detector lab and during test beam at Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab).

  4. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well as the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).

  5. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    DOE PAGES

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; ...

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well asmore » the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).« less

  6. The JLAB UV Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Steven C.; Benson, Steven V.; Moore, Steven Wesley

    2013-05-01

    Recently the JLAB FEL has demonstrated 150 W at 400 nm and 200 W at 700 nm using a 33mm period undulator designed and built by STI Optronics. This paper describes the undulator design and performance. Two key requirements were low phase error, zero steering and offset end fields and small rms trajectory errors. We will describe a new genetic algorithm that allowed phase error minimization to 1.8 degrees while exceeding specifications. The mechanical design, control system and EPICS interface will also be summarized.

  7. Overview of high-Q2 nucleon form factor program with Super BigBite Spectrometer in JLab's Hall A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, Andrew; Jefferson Lab Hall A; Super BigBite Spectrometer Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The elastic electromagnetic form factors (EMFFs) of the nucleon describe the impact-parameter-space distributions of electric charge and magnetization in the nucleon in the infinite momentum frame. The form factors are among the simplest and most fundamental measurable dynamical quantities describing the nucleon's structure. Precision measurements of the nucleon form factors provide stringent benchmarks testing the most sophisticated theoretical models of the nucleon, as well as ab initio calculations in lattice QCD and continuum non-perturbative QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations. Measurements at momentum transfers Q in the few-GeV range probe the theoretically challenging region of transition between the non-perturbative and perturbative regimes of QCD. The recent upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to a maximum electron beam energy of 11 GeV will facilitate the measurement of the nucleon helicity-conserving (F1) and helicity-flip (F2) form factors of both proton and neutron to Q2 > 10 GeV2, In this talk, I will present an overview of the Super BigBite Spectrometer, currently under construction in CEBAF's experimental Hall A, and its physics program of high-Q2 nucleon EMFF measurements. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC0014230.

  8. Pentaquark Searches at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2007-01-01

    Since LEPS collaboration reported the first evidence for a S=+1 baryon resonance in early 2003 with a mass of 1.54 GeV, dubbed Θ+, more than ten experiments have confirmed this exotic state, among these two carried out at Jefferson Laboratory. At the same time, there are a number of experiments, mostly at high energies, that report null results. To try to clarify this situation, during the past year, The CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a second generation high-statistics experimental program to search for exotics baryons. Here the preliminary results from these experiments are reported.

  9. Future experimental programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    I was asked to discuss future experimental programs even though I am a theorist. As a result, I present my own personal views on where the field is, and where it is going, based on what I myself have been working on. In particular, I discuss why we need expeditions into high energies to find clues to where the relevant energy scale is for dark matter, baryon asymmetry and neutrino mass. I also argue that the next energy frontier machine should be justified on the basis of what we know, namely the mass of the Higgs boson, so that we will learn what energy we should aim at once we nail the Higgs sector. Finally, I make remarks on dark energy.

  10. Hadron Structure Studies in Hall A at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2007-10-08

    Three examples are presented from the broad program of nucleon structure research in Hall A at Jefferson Lab (JLab): a measurement of the neutron charge form factor to double the squared momentum-transfer of present data, highly accurate cross-section measurements of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and a program of parity-violating asymmetry studies with the 12 GeV upgrade that will provide sensitive probes of the Standard Model and its extensions.

  11. Hard Scattering Studies at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avagyan; Peter Bosted; Volker Burkert; Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2005-09-01

    We present current activities and future prospects for studies of hard scattering processes using the CLAS detector and the CEBAF polarized electron beam. Kinematic dependences of single and double spin asymmetries have been measured in a wide kinematic range at CLAS with a polarized NH{sub 3} and unpolarized liquid hydrogen targets. It has been shown that the data are consistent with factorization and observed target and beam asymmetries are in good agreement with measurements performed at higher energies, suggesting that the high energy-description of the semi-inclusive DIS process can be extended to the moderate energies of JLab measurements.

  12. Experimental challenges of the N* program

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf Gothe

    2012-04-01

    The first challenge faced in investigating the strong interaction from partially explored, where meson-cloud degrees of freedom dominate, to still unexplored distance scales, where the dressed-quark contributions are the dominating degrees of freedom, is to find an experiment that allows to measure observables that are probing this evolving nonperturbative QCD regime over the full range. Baryon spectroscopy can establish more sensitively, and in an almost model-independent way, nucleon excitation and non-resonant reaction amplitudes by complete measurements of pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction off nucleons. Elastic and transition form factors can then trace this evolution by measurements of elastic electron scattering and exclusive single-meson and double-pion electroproduction cross sections off the nucleon that will be extended to higher momentum transfers with the energy-upgraded CEBAF beam at JLab to study the dressed quark degrees of freedom, where their strong interaction is responsible for the ground and excited nucleon state formations. After establishing unprecedented high-precision data, the immanent next challenge is a high-quality analysis to extract these relevant electrocoupling parameters for various resonances that then can be compared to state of the art models and QCD-based calculations. Recent results demonstrate the status of the analysis and pinpoint further challenges, including those to establish QCD-based results directly from the experimental data.

  13. Electron Beam Moller Polarimeter at Jlab Hall a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamazdin, A.V.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Levchuk, L.G.; Pomatsalyuk, L.; Rubashkin, A.L.; Sorokin, P.V.; Dale, D.S.; Doyle, B.; Gorringe, T.; Korsch, W.; Zeps, V.; Chen, J.O.; Chudakov, E.; Nanda, S.; Saha, A.; Gasparian, A.

    As part of the spin-physics program at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), a Mo ller polarimeter was developed to measure the polarization of electron beam of energies 0.8 to 5.0 GeV. A unique signature for Mo ller scattering is obtained using a series of three quadrupole magnets which provide an angular selection, and a dipole magnet for energy analysis. The design, commissioning and the first results of the polarization measurements of this polarimeter will be presented as well as future plans to use its small scattering angle capabilities to investigate physics in very low Q2 regime.

  14. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes.

  15. [Experimental antitriatomic program in Santiago].

    PubMed

    Neghme, A; Schenone, H; Villarroel, F; Rojas, A

    1991-01-01

    The rural migration to urban centers occurred since the 40s in many Latin American countries, including Santiago the capital city of Chile, originated a growing belt of premises built with light poor material (the rests of previous rural habitations, mud, pieces of timber, plastic and cardboard for walls, and cane stalks and artificial clinkstones for roofs) giving raise to many types of slums. This situation facilitated the passive transport of the different instars, including eggs, of triatomine bugs. Due to the fact that in the 1959-1960 warm seasons, the Santiago province health institutions had received an increasing reported number of triatomine bugs (Triatoma infestans) in dwellings from different periurban, even urban and rural sections of the province, the central local health authorities with the advise of the University of Chile, Department of Parasitology decided to carry out an experimental program against these vectors of Chagas' disease. The program consisted basically in an spray and thorough application of liquid forms (emulsion, suspension, solution) of 1% lindane (average > or = 500 mg per 1 m2), depending on the material of the constructions, to all the surfaces of walls, ceilings, attics and peridomiciliary structures of all the infested dwellings in a sector and those located less than 100 m around. In order to reach triatomine bugs not affected, for different reasons, in the first spraying, a second application, identical to the first was performed to the total number of premises between 30 and 120 days later. Periodical evaluations were made, and positive dwellings found and neighboring ones were sprayed again. During insecticide applications adequate protection measures for spraying workers, inhabitants, domestic animals, household goods and food were adopted. All the steps of the program were accompanied by health education activities directed to individuals, families, school teachers and community institutions, tending to motivate the

  16. Single Meson Photoproduction at JLab Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Vincent; Joint Physics Analysis Center Team

    2016-09-01

    In this talk, I present the results from the Joint Physics Analysis Center about the photoproduction of a single meson (pseudoscalar or vector meson). We have developed the theoretical formalism to analysis forthcoming data at the, recently upgraded, JLab facility. We also present prediction for observables in the energy range of Eg = 5-11 GeV. Material (codes, notes, sim- ulations, etc) can be found online at the JPAC interactive website: http://www.indiana.edu/ jpac/index.html

  17. Multipacting analysis for JLAB ampere class cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Genfa Wu; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; Robert Rimmer; Evan Donoghue

    2005-07-10

    JLAB's ampere class 5-cell cavities require a moderate accelerating gradient (16.7 {approx} 20MV/m). Electron multipacting activity in the machine operating range can degrade the expected performance. A survey was conducted in the area of multipacting analysis for beta=1 electron cavity shapes, including options for the new high current cavity shape. The results obtained provided useful guidance to the final cavity shape adopted and to its expected performance.

  18. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2007-10-26

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  19. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2007-10-01

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  20. Polarized Ion Beams in Figure-8 Rings of JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2014-07-01

    The Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is designed to provide high polarization of both colliding beams. One of the unique features of JLab's MEIC is figure-8 shape of its rings. It allows preservation and control of polarization of all ion species including small-anomalous-magnetic-moment deuterons during their acceleration and storage. The figure-8 design conceptually expands the capability of obtaining polarized high-energy beams in comparison to conventional designs because of its property of having no preferred periodic spin direction. This allows one to control effectively the beam polarization by means of magnetic insertions with small field integrals. We present a complete scheme for preserving the ion polarization during all stages of acceleration and its control in the collider's experimental straights.

  1. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdure, N.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Martin, F.; Norton, R.; Radovic, S.

    2014-01-01

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields with liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.

  2. Development of a Positron Source for JLab at the IAC

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Tony

    2013-10-12

    We report on the research performed towards the development of a positron sour for Jefferson Lab's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, VA. The first year of work was used to benchmark the predictions of our current simulation with positron production efficiency measurements at the IAC. The second year used the benchmarked simulation to design a beam line configuration which optimized positron production efficiency while minimizing radioactive waste as well as design and construct a positron converter target. The final year quantified the performance of the positron source. This joint research and development project brought together the experiences of both electron accelerator facilities. Our intention is to use the project as a spring board towards developing a program of accelerator based research and education which will train students to meet the needs of both facilities as well as provide a pool of trained scientists.

  3. Concepts for the JLab Ampere-Class CW Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rimmer; E.F. Daly; W.R. Hicks; J. Henry; J. Preble; M. Stirbet; H. Wang; K.M. Wilson; G. Wu

    2005-05-01

    We describe the concepts and developments underway at JLab as part of the program to develop a new CW cryomodule capable of transporting ampere-level beam currents in a compact FEL. Requirements include real-estate gradient of at least 10 MV/m and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping, power couplers, tuners etc. are being designed and optimized for this application. Cavity considerations include a large iris for beam halo, low-RF losses, HOM frequencies and Q's, low peak surface fields, field flatness and microphonics. Module considerations include high packing factor, low static heat leak, image current heating of beam-line components, cost and maintainability. This module is being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.

  4. Nonperturbative relativistic approach to pion form factors: Predictions for future JLab experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krutov, A. F.; Troitsky, V. E.; Tsirova, N. A.

    2009-11-15

    Some predictions concerning possible results of the future experiments at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) on the pion form factor F{sub {pi}}(Q{sup 2}) are made. The calculations exploit the method proposed previously by the authors and based on the instant-form Poincare invariant approach to pions, considered as quark-antiquark systems. This model has predicted with surprising accuracy the values of F{sub {pi}}(Q{sup 2}), which were measured later in JLab experiments. The results are almost independent from the form of wave function. The pion mean square radius and the decay constant f{sub {pi}} also agree with experimental values. The model gives powerlike asymptotic behavior of F{sub {pi}}(Q{sup 2}) at high momentum transfer in agreement with QCD predictions.

  5. Refurbishment and testing of the 1970's era LASS solenoid coils for Jlab's Hall D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Joshua; Biallas, George Herman; Brindza, Paul; Carstens, Thomas; Creel, Jonathan; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, Floyd; Qiang, Yi; Spiegel, Scot; Stevens, Mark; Wissmann, Mark; Wolin, Elliott

    2012-06-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) refurbished the Large Aperture Solenoid Spectrometer (LASS) [1], 1.85 m bore solenoid, consisting of four superconducting coils to act as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at JLab for the Glue Excitations Experiment (GlueX) [2]. The coils, built in 1971 at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and used a second time for the Muon decays into Electron and GAmma ray (MEGA) Experiment [3] at Los Alamos, had electrical shorts and leaks to the insulating vacuum along with deteriorated superinsulation and instrumentation. Root cause diagnosis of the problems and the repair methods are described along with the measures used to qualify the vessels and piping within the Laboratory's Pressure Safety Program (mandated by 10CFR851). The extraordinary refrigerator operational methods used to utilize the obsolete cryogenic apparatus gathered for the off-line, single coil tests are described.

  6. FELIX construction status and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.; Knott, M.J.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    FELIX (Fusion Electromagnetic Induction Experiment) is an experimental test facility being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the study of electromagnetic effects in the first wall/blanket/shield (FWBS) systems of fusion reactors. The facility design, construction status, experimental program, instrumentation, and associated computer-code comparisons are described.

  7. Mars Radiator Characterization Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Hollingsworth, D. Keith

    2004-01-01

    Radiators are an enabling technology for the human exploration and development of the moon and Mars. As standard components of the heat rejection subsystem of space vehicles, radiators are used to reject waste heat to space and/or a planetary environment. They are typically large components of the thermal control system for a space vehicle or human habitation facility, and in some cases safety factors are used to oversize them when the operating environment cannot be fully characterized. Over-sizing can impose significant weight and size penalties that might be prohibitive for future missions. Radiator performance depends on the size of the radiator surface, its emittance and absorptance, the radiator temperature, the effective sky temperature surrounding the radiator, solar radiation and atmospheric irradiation levels, convection to or from the atmosphere (on Mars), and other conditions that could affect the nature of the radiator surface, such as dust accumulation. Most particularly, dust is expected to be a major contributor to the local environmental conditions on either the lunar or Martian surface. This conclusion regarding Mars is supported by measurements of dust accumulation on the Mars Sojourner Rover solar array during the Pathfinder mission. This Final Report describes a study of the effect of Martian dust accumulation on radiator performance. It is comprised of quantitative measurements of effective emittance for a range of dust accumulation levels on surfaces of known emittance under clean conditions. The test radiator coatings were Z-93P, NS-43G, and Silver Teflon (10 mil) film. The Martian dust simulant was Carbondale Red Clay. Results were obtained under vacuum conditions sufficient to reduce convection effects virtually to zero. The experiments required the development of a calorimetric apparatus that allows simultaneous measurements of the effective emittance for all the coatings at each set of experimental conditions. A method of adding dust to

  8. An Efficient RF Source for Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng

    2013-12-01

    We propose the development of a highly reliable high efficiency RF source for JLAB with a lower lifetime cost operating at 80% efficiency with system operating costs of about 0.7M$/year for the 6 GeV machine. The design of the RF source will be based upon two injection locked magnetrons in a novel combining architecture for amplitude modulation and a cross field amplifier (CFA) as an output tube for the 12 GeV upgrade. A cost analysis including efficiency and reliability will be performed to determine the optimum system architecture. Several different system architectures will be designed and evaluated for a dual injection locked magnetron source using novel combining techniques and possibly a CFA as the output tube. A paper design for the 1497 MHz magnetron system will be completed. The optimum system architecture with all relevant specifications will be completed so that a prototype can be built.

  9. MEIC Detector and Interaction Region at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhiwen

    2015-09-01

    The Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is envisioned as the next-generation US facility for exploring the strong interaction. The Medium-energy EIC (MEIC) is the first stage of the EIC at Jefferson Lab (JLab). It's aimed at mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark and gluon sea in the nucleon, understanding the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge, and probing the gluon fields in nuclei. A full-acceptance detector is designed to measure the complete final state. Its interaction region allows spectators tagged with high resolution to catch all nuclear and partonic target fragments. The combination of a high luminosity, polarized lepton and ion beams, and detectors fully integrated with the accelerator will allow MEIC to be a unique opportunity to make breakthroughs in the study of nucleon structure and QCD dynamics.

  10. PROJECT CONCERN, HARTFORD'S EXPERIMENTAL BUSING PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHAW, PEG

    THIS REPRINTED SERIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ABOUT PROJECT CONCERN, HARTFORD'S EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM WHICH BUSES INNER CITY CHILDREN TO SUBURBAN SCHOOLS, IS COMPOSED PRIMARILY OF ANECDOTAL REPORTS FROM MOTHERS, CHILDREN, AND TEACHERS. THE INDIVIDUAL ARTICLES DEAL WITH THE CHILDREN'S REACTIONS TO THE BUSING AND TO THEIR NEW SCHOOLS, THEIR ADJUSTMENT,…

  11. Progress of Bep Treatments on Nb at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, R.A. Rimmer,X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2010-05-01

    Recent experimental results have indicated that Buffered Electropolishing (BEP) is a promising candidate for the next generation of surface treatment technique for Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in particle accelerators. In order to lay the foundation for using BEP as the next generation surface treatment technique for Nb SRF cavities, some fundamental aspects of BEP treatments for Nb have to be investigated. In this report, recent progress on BEP study at JLab is shown. Improvements on the existing vertical BEP are made to allow water cooling from outside of a Nb single cell cavity in addition to cooling provided by acid circulation so that the temperature of the cavity can be stable during processing. Some investigation on the electrolyte mixture was performed to check the aging effect of the electrolyte. It is shown that good polishing results can still be obtained on Nb at a current density of 171 mA/cm when the BEP electrolyte was at the stationary condition and was more than 1.5 years old.

  12. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm3 of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  13. Investigation of differential surface removal due to electropolishing at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Folkie, James; Reece, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Surface chemistry carried out for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities such as Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) and Electropolishing (EP) aims to uniformly remove the internal surface of a cavity along the entire structure and within each cell from equator to iris in order to obtain an equally etched surface. A uniform removal, however, is not readily achievable due to the complex fluid flow and varying temperatures of the acid mixture, which can lead to differential etching. This needs to be considered when envisaging a certain surface damage removal throughout the interior. The process-specific differential etching influences the target frequency set at the manufacturing stage as well as the field flatness and length of the as-built cavity. We report on analyses of JLab's present EP system using experimental data for six nine-cell cavities that have been processed recently in the frame of the LCLS-II high-Q development plan. In conjunction with numerical simulations, the differential etching and the impact on field flatness is assessed.

  14. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Wright, Mathew C.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  15. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-29

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  16. The CTEQ-JLab global analysis of large-x PDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi

    2011-10-01

    I discuss several corrections to leading twist calculations of nucleon structure functions which are needed to include experimental data at large parton fractional momentum x and at low scales Q2 in global fits of parton distribution functions. In particular I discuss the results of the CTEQ-JLab global fit, and some work in progress. Topics covered include the interplay of target mass and higher-twist corrections, the importance of nuclear corrections for deuterium target data, and applications to the study of quark-hadron duality. Implications for collider physics are highlighted.

  17. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moeller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete next-to-leading order set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity-violating e{sup -}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}e{sup -}({gamma}) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultraprecise Moeller experiment to be performed at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and the relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. We also provide very compact expressions analytically free from nonphysical parameters and show them to be valid for fast, yet accurate estimations.

  18. Workshop on Physics with Neutral Kaon Beam at JLab (KL2016) Mini-Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Strakovsky, Igor I.; Amaryan, Moskov; Chudakov, Eugene A.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Pennington, Michael R.; Ritman, James L.

    2016-05-01

    The KL2016 Workshop is following the Letter of Intent LoI12-15-001 "Physics Opportunities with Secondary KL beam at JLab" submitted to PAC43 with the main focus on the physics of excited hyperons produced by the Kaon beam on unpolarized and polarized targets with GlueX setup in Hall D. Such studies will broaden a physics program of hadron spectroscopy extending it to the strange sector. The Workshop was organized to get a feedback from the community to strengthen physics motivation of the LoI and prepare a full proposal.

  19. BNL 56 MHz HOM damper prototype fabrication at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, N.; McIntyre, G.; Daly, E. F.; Clemens, W.; Wu, Q.; Seberg, S.; Bellavia, S.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider’s (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  20. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Naeem A.; Daly, Edward F.; Clemens, William A.; McIntyre, Gary T.; Wu, Qiong; Seberg, Scott; Bellavia, Steve

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  1. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, C. C.; Rogers, D. W.; Bahr, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    The primary objectives of this three-phase program are to develop technology for the design of advanced combustors with significantly lower pollutant emission levels than those of current combustors, and to demonstrate these pollutant emission reductions in CF6-50C engine tests. The purpose of the Phase 2 Program was to further develop the two most promising concepts identified in the Phase 1 Program, the double annular combustor and the radial/axial staged combustor, and to design a combustor and breadboard fuel splitter control for CF6-50 engine demonstration testing in the Phase 3 Program. Noise measurement and alternate fuels addendums to the basic program were conducted to obtain additional experimental data. Twenty-one full annular and fifty-two sector combustor configurations were evaluated. Both combustor types demonstrated the capability for significantly reducing pollutant emission levels. The most promising results were obtained with the double annular combustor. Rig test results corrected to CF-50C engine conditions produced EPA emission parameters for CO, HC, and NOX of 3.4, 0.4, and 4.5 respectively. These levels represent CO, HC, and NOX reductions of 69, 90, and 42 percent respectively from current combustor emission levels. The combustor also met smoke emission level requirements and development engine performance and installation requirements.

  2. The JLab high power ERL light source

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made

  3. The JLab high power ERL light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, G. R.; Behre, C.; Benson, S. V.; Bevins, M.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Coleman, J.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, H. F.; Evans, R.; Grippo, A.; Gruber, D.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Kelley, M. J.; Merminga, L.; Mammosser, J.; Moore, W.; Nishimori, N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Preble, J.; Rimmer, R.; Shinn, M.; Siggins, T.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Williams, G. P.; Zhang, S.

    2006-02-01

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz ˜ half cycle pulse whose average brightness is >5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted [Carr, et al., Nature 420 (2002) 153]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [Neil, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 662]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 μm in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 ms long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the

  4. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  5. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Vitti, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The alternate fuels investigation objective was to experimentally determine the impacts, if any, on exhaust emissions, performance, and durability characteristics of the hybrid and vorbix low pollution combustor concepts when operated on test fuels which simulate composition and property changes which might result from future broadened aviation turbine fuel specifications or use of synthetically derived crude feedstocks. Results of the program indicate a significant increase in CO and small NOX increase in emissions at idle for both combustor concepts, and an increase in THC for the vorbix concept. Minimal impact was observed on gaseous emissions at high power. The vorbix concept exhibited significant increase in exhaust smoke with increasing fuel aromatic content. Altitude stability was not affected for the vorbix combustor, but was substantially reduced for the hybrid concept. Severe carbon deposition was observed in both combustors following limited endurance testing with No. 2 home heat fuel. Liner temperature levels were insensitive to variations in aromatic content over the range of conditions investigated.

  6. Program for Experimentation With Expert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    CERBERUS is forward-chaining, knowledge-based system program useful for experimentation with expert systems. Inference-engine mechanism performs deductions according to user-supplied rule set. Information stored in intermediate area, and user interrogated only when no applicable data found in storage. Each assertion posed by CERBERUS answered with certainty ranging from 0 to 100 percent. Rule processor stops investigating applicable rules when goal reaches certainty of 95 percent or higher. Capable of operating for wide variety of domains. Sample rule files included for animal identification, pixel classification in image processing, and rudimentary car repair for novice mechanic. User supplies set of end goals or actions. System complexity decided by user's rule file. CERBERUS written in FORTRAN 77.

  7. Experimental clean combustor program: Noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Riloff, N., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Under a Noise Addendum to the NASA Experimental Clean Combustor Program (ECCP) internal pressure fluctuations were measured during tests of JT9D combustor designs conducted in a burner test rig. Measurements were correlated with burner operating parameters using an expression relating farfield noise to these parameters. For a given combustor, variation of internal noise with operating parameters was reasonably well predicted by this expression but the levels were higher than farfield predictions and differed significantly among several combustors. For two burners, discharge stream temperature fluctuations were obtained with fast-response thermocouples to allow calculation of indirect combustion noise which would be generated by passage of the temperature inhomogeneities through the high pressure turbine stages of a JT9D turbofan engine. Using a previously developed analysis, the computed indirect combustion noise was significantly lower than total low frequency core noise observed on this and several other engines.

  8. Heat Cycle Research Experimental Program, FY-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bliem, C.J.; Demuth, O.J.; Mines, G.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Heat Cycle Research Program, which is being conducted for the Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Testing at the Heat cycle Research Facility located at the DOE Geothermal Test Facility, East Mesa, California is presently being conducted to meet this objective. Current testing involves a supercritical vaporization and counterflow in-tube condensing system. The paper presents a brief description of the test facility and a discussion of the test program. Results of the experiments for the supercritical heaters and the countercurrent, vertical, in-tube condenser are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids. The heater and condenser behavior predicted by the Heat Transfer Research Institute computer codes used for correlation of the data was in excellent agreement with experimental results. Preliminary results of tests in which the turbine expansion ''passed through the two-phase region'' did not indicate efficiency degradation assignable to these metastable expansion processes. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  9. A MRPC prototype for SOLID-TOF in Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y; Wang, J; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Chen, H; Chen, J; Li, Y; Camsonne, A; Chen, J -P; Gao, H; Meziane, M

    2013-03-01

    A prototype of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) for the future SoLID time of flight system at JLab has been developed. The counter, trapezoidal in shape, is assembled with the newly developed low-resistive Chinese glass. It has 10 × 0.25 mm gas gaps and 11 readout strips of different lengths. The strip width is 2.5 cm with a strip-to-strip interval of 3 mm. Preliminary tests performed with cosmic-rays showed an efficiency higher than 95% and a time resolution around 50 ps. Results under diffuse/uniform irradiation performed at JLab with scattered high energy electrons showed a time resolution of 70–80 ps and over-95% efficiency up to an incoming flux of 15 kHz/cm{sup 2}. These performances meet the requirements of the new time of flight system SoLID-TOF.

  10. Electroproduction of K+ Λ at JLab Hall-C

    SciTech Connect

    Gogami, T.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chen, C.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Dalton, M.; Danagoulian, S.; De Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Kawama, D.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman, .; Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.

    2013-02-07

    A Λ hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment, JLab E05-115 was performed at JLab Hall-C in 2009 by the (e, e' K+) reaction. Data of Λ hypernuclei with mass numbers from A = 7 to A = 52 were successfully taken, and the analyses are in progress. A polyethylene (CH2) target was used as a proton target to calibrate energy scales, and to study elementary process of the p(e, e' K+)Λ, Σ0reaction. We report a preliminary differential cross section of K+ Λ electro-production at low Q2 [~0.01 (GeV/c)2] and at small kaon angles (cosΘ$CM\\atop{K}$ ~0.97) in the present article.

  11. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  12. Hydrogen hybrid vehicle engine development: Experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blarigan, P.

    1995-09-01

    A hydrogen fueled engine is being developed specifically for the auxiliary power unit (APU) in a series type hybrid vehicle. Hydrogen is different from other internal combustion (IC) engine fuels, and hybrid vehicle IC engine requirements are different from those of other IC vehicle engines. Together these differences will allow a new engine design based on first principles that will maximize thermal efficiency while minimizing principal emissions. The experimental program is proceeding in four steps: (1) Demonstration of the emissions and the indicated thermal efficiency capability of a standard CLR research engine modified for higher compression ratios and hydrogen fueled operation. (2) Design and test a new combustion chamber geometry for an existing single cylinder research engine, in an attempt to improve on the baseline indicated thermal efficiency of the CLR engine. (3) Design and build, in conjunction with an industrial collaborator, a new full scale research engine designed to maximize brake thermal efficiency. Include a full complement of combustion diagnostics. (4) Incorporate all of the knowledge thus obtained in the design and fabrication, by an industrial collaborator, of the hydrogen fueled engine for the hybrid vehicle power train illustrator. Results of the CLR baseline engine testing are presented, as well as preliminary data from the new combustion chamber engine. The CLR data confirm the low NOx produced by lean operation. The preliminary indicated thermal efficiency data from the new combustion chamber design engine show an improvement relative to the CLR engine. Comparison with previous high compression engine results shows reasonable agreement.

  13. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  14. Overview and Status of the 12 GeV Cryogenic System Upgrade At Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Arenius, Jonathan Creel, Venkatarao Ganni, Kelly Dixon, Peter Knudsen

    2010-04-01

    As part of the planned Jefferson Laboratory's electron accelerator (CEBAF) power upgrade, ten additional superconducting RF cryomodules will be added to its accelerator linacs. Although physically the same size as each of the original 40 linac cryomodules, each new cryomodule will have approximately 4 times the acceleration power. To support the additional cryomodule heat loads generated, the existing 2K, 4600W Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) plant capacity will be doubled to a total of 9200W at 2K plus 24,000W at 35K for shield loads. The specified base line process cycle has been modeled after the laboratory s "Ganni Helium Cycle" process technology. In addition, a fourth physics experimental "Hall D" will be constructed which will have an additional stand alone 200W at 4K helium cryogenic plant. In October of 2008, Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) received approval for project "Critical Decision 3" construction phase status from the US Department of Energy.

  15. Refurbishment and Testing of the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Coils for JLab's Hall D

    SciTech Connect

    Anumagalla, Ravi; Biallas, George; Brindza, Paul; Carstens, Thomas; Creel, Jonathan; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, Floyd; Qiang, Yi; Spiegel, Scot; Stevens, Mark; Wissmann, Mark; Wolin, Elliott

    2012-07-01

    JLab refurbished the LASS1, 1.85 m bore Solenoid, consisting of four superconducting coils to act as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The coils, built in 1971 at Stanford Linier Accelerator Center and used a second time at the MEGA Experiment at Los Alamos, had electrical shorts and leaks to the insulating vacuum along with deteriorated superinsulation & instrumentation. Root cause diagnosis of the problems and the repair methods are described along with the measures used to qualify the vessels and piping within the Laboratory's Pressure Safety Program (mandated by 10CFR851). The extraordinary refrigerator operational methods used to utilize the obsolete cryogenic apparatus gathered for the off-line, single coil tests are described.

  16. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; ...

    2010-11-19

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete NLO set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating e– e– → e– e– (γ) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultra-precise Moller experiment coming soon at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. In addition, we also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  17. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2010-11-19

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete NLO set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating e e → e e (γ) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultra-precise Moller experiment coming soon at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. In addition, we also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  18. An Experimental Visual Literacy Program in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewig, John Warren

    A study explored how children respond to visuals and how a program of visual literacy enhances oral and written response to pictures. The first and fifth grades of two schools, one urban and one suburban, with different socioecomic groups of students, were chosen to participate in a 1-year program consisting of one visual literacy lesson per week.…

  19. EVALUATION OF EXPERIMENTAL PRESCHOOL PROGRAM FOR EDUCATIONALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN (1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEWART, LUCILLE M.

    THE AIM OF AN EXPERIMENTAL PRESCHOOL PROGRAM FOR EDUCATIONALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN WAS TO PREPARE THEM FOR REGULAR KINDERGARTEN CLASSES. ACTIVITIES AND EXPERIENCES WERE PROVIDED WHICH HELPED THE CHILDREN EXPRESS THEMSELVES VERBALLY AND BECOME AWARE OF THEIR ENVIRONMENT. THE BUDGET FOR A 6-WEEK PROGRAM, INCLUDING STAFF, PROGRAM SUPPLIES, AND…

  20. Evaluation of LED-based Instrumentation for JLab Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Stephanie; Parvatam, Ruhi

    2014-09-01

    Light-Emitting Diodes have a multitude of uses due to their increasing efficiency, reliability, durability, and practical size. The wavelength-intensity properties of LEDs are important in the characterization of aerogel optical properties and thus the uniformity and performance of the Hall C threshold aerogel Cherenkov detectors at Jefferson Laboratory. LEDs are also practical for the PWO-based calorimeters at JLab for monitoring and recovering these crystals during and after exposure to radiation. This project is aimed at the construction and evaluation of LED-based instrumentation to characterize the optical properties of aerogel used in the JLab aerogel detectors and its application to future detectors. LEDs emit light at a nominal wavelength, but their spectrum covers a broad range. It is thus important to understand the LED spectrum. A spectrometer was constructed including a collimator, diffraction grating, and high-speed photodiode to measure the voltage, which was then converted into luminous intensity. This presentation will convey the results from measurements with LED-based instrumentation and discuss the application of LEDs covering wavelengths from the ultraviolet to near-infrared regions in future PWO-based detectors. Light-Emitting Diodes have a multitude of uses due to their increasing efficiency, reliability, durability, and practical size. The wavelength-intensity properties of LEDs are important in the characterization of aerogel optical properties and thus the uniformity and performance of the Hall C threshold aerogel Cherenkov detectors at Jefferson Laboratory. LEDs are also practical for the PWO-based calorimeters at JLab for monitoring and recovering these crystals during and after exposure to radiation. This project is aimed at the construction and evaluation of LED-based instrumentation to characterize the optical properties of aerogel used in the JLab aerogel detectors and its application to future detectors. LEDs emit light at a nominal

  1. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  2. Performance and Modeling of the JLAB IR FEL Upgrade Injector

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Beard; S. Benson; G. Biallas; D. Bullard; D. Douglas; H. F. Dylla; R.Evans; A. Grippo; J. Gubeli; K. Jordan; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; B. Yunn; S.Zhang

    2004-09-01

    The JLab IR Upgrade Injector has delivered up to 9.1 mA of CW electron beam current at 9 MeV. The injector is driven by a 350 kV DC Photocathode Gun. Injector behavior and beam-based measurements are in good agreement with PARMELA simulations. The injected beam envelopes were established by measuring beam spot sizes and comparing them with those predicted by a transpart matrix based model. The emittances were measured by fitting an initial trial beam matrix to the measured data. The injected bunch length was established by measuring the energy spread downstream of the Linac while operating at either side of crest.

  3. Neutron Spin Structure Measurements in JLab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-08-01

    Recently, the high polarized luminosity available at Jefferson Lab (JLab) has allowed the study of the nucleon spin structure at an unprecedented precision, enabling us to access the hard-to-reach valence quark (high-x) region and also to accurately map the intermediate to low Q{sup 2} region. The high-x region is of special interest, because this is where the valence quark contributions are expected to dominate. With sea quarks and explicit gluon contributions expected not to be important, it is a clean region to test our understanding of nucleon structure.

  4. Commissioning Cornell OSTs for SRF cavity testing at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the current quench limitations in SRF cavities is a topic essential for any SRF accelerator that requires high fields. This understanding crucially depends on correct and precise quench identification. Second sound quench detection in superfluid liquid helium with oscillating superleak transducers is a technique recently applied at Cornell University as a fast and versatile method for quench identification in SRF cavities. Having adopted Cornell design, we report in this contribution on our experience with OST for quench identification in different cavities at JLab.

  5. Tandem mirror thermal barrier experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Coensgen, F.H.; Drake, R.P.; Simonen, T.C.

    1980-01-02

    This report describes an experimental plan for the development of the Tandem Mirror Thermal Barrier. Included is: (1) a description of thermal barrier related physics experiments; (2) thermal barrier related experiments in the existing TMX and Phaedrus experiments; (3) a thermal barrier TMX upgrade; and (4) initiation of investigations of axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Experimental studies of the first two items are presently underway. Results are expected from the TMX upgrade by the close of 1981 and from axisymmetric tandem mirror experiments at the end of 1983. Plans for Phaedrus upgrades are developing for the same period.

  6. Operation Hope: An Experimental Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, A. Paul

    1973-01-01

    In efforts to place more effective social workers in the barrios and ghettoes, this program recruited potential college students from those areas, and provided them with support in academic skill development on-site classes; field placement; and supportive services. The most serious kinds of problem faced by these young people lie in the area of…

  7. NASA's aeronautics program: Systems technology and experimental program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The appropriateness of the division of effort between the directed to the solution of near-term problems and that directed to long-term technical advances in the program is addressed. Comparisons between in-house work and out-of-house work are presented. Programs include those in: general aviation; propulsive lift; rotorcraft; avionics and flight controls; small transport aircraft; and human/vehicle systems.

  8. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Baker, K. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Beckwith, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Frenje, J.; Huntington, C. M.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Smith, R. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Widmann, K.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  9. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Fournier, K. B.; Baker, K.; Barrios, M.; Bernstein, L.; Brown, G.; Celliers, P.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Johnson, M. G.; Huntington, C.; Jenei, A.; Kraus, R.; Ma, T.; Martinez, D.; McNabb, D.; Millot, M.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P.; Perez, F.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B.; Ross, J. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Smith, R.; Zylstra, A.; Collins, G.; Landen, O.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  10. Preliminary Design of JLAB Clas12 Large Superconducting Torus Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B; Taylor, C; Zbasnik, J; Dell'Orco, D; Ross, J; Chen, J; Xu, L; Chen, H; Wagner, B; McMullin, J; Pong, R; Juang, T; Wang, M; Carter, C; Quettier, L; Burkert, V; Elouadrhiri, L; Kashy, D; Leung, E; Schneider, W

    2011-06-01

    Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB) will need a 6-coil Torus producing a required integral of B-dl for an upgrade 12 GeV beam. In Sept. 2009, Wang NMR was awarded a contract to design, fabricate, assemble, deliver, and test at JLAB this ex citing magnet. The preliminary design review was completed by Dec. 2009 and intermediate design review will be completed by July 2010. Proto type coil construction, production of soldered conductor with SSC cable and final design review will be completed in 2010. We shall describe preliminary design and intermediate design for coil/cryostat, Torus central cylinder (hub), 48 cold mass suspensions, two intercoil support rings, cryocontrol tower, and adapter to Torus coil, magnet quench protection, and charge/ discharge con trol, and the two parallel path cooling design using supercritical helium. Because of coil in-plane and out-of-plane EM forces over these huge thin coils in addition to vacuum load, gravity load, and cool down thermal stress, we shall present the finite element analyses (FEA) on coil structure, 48 cold mass supports, intercoil cold rings, coil/ cryostat vacuum vessel, cryotower cryostat, and Torus hub. Finally, we shall shows that all pressure/ vacuum vessels and its weldment has satisfied ASME code.

  11. Fixed Target Beauty Physics Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The current and near term future fixed target physics efforts in observing particles with open beauty are reviewed. This includes a compilation of the non-observation upper limits and the observation of both upsilon and b-states. A short discussion of the theoretical predictions for the hadro-produced beauty pairs is included. The major part of this review is devoted to the techniques and tricks employed, a survey of the current and proposed experiments. A personal summary of the experimental prospects concludes this report. 28 refs., 26 figs.

  12. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  13. ISOFIT - A PROGRAM FOR FITTING SORPTION ISOTHERMS TO EXPERIMENTAL DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotherm expressions are important for describing the partitioning of contaminants in environmental systems. ISOFIT (ISOtherm FItting Tool) is a software program that fits isotherm parameters to experimental data via the minimization of a weighted sum of squared error (WSSE) obje...

  14. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Ali, S. J.; Benstead, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Coppari, F.; Eggert, J.; Erskine, D.; Panella, A. F.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Hua, R.; Huntington, C. M.; Jarrott, L. C.; Jiang, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; LePape, S.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Rinderknecht, H.; Ross, J. S.; Rubery, M.; Sio, H.; Smith, R. F.; Swadling, G. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy- Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  15. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, D. W.; Gleason, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Full annular versions of advanced combustor designs, sized to fit within the CF6-50 engine, were defined, manufactured, and tested at high pressure conditions. Configurations were screened, and significant reductions in CO, HC, and NOx emissions levels were achieved with two of these advanced combustor design concepts. Emissions and performance data at a typical AST cruise condition were also obtained along with combustor noise data as a part of an addendum to the basic program. The two promising combustor design approaches evolved in these efforts were the Double Annular Combustor and the Radial/Axial Combustor. With versions of these two basic combustor designs, CO and HC emissions levels at or near the target levels were obtained. Although the low target NOx emissions level was not obtained with these two advanced combustor designs, significant reductions were relative to the NOx levels of current technology combustors. Smoke emission levels below the target value were obtained.

  16. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A.; Greene, W.

    1977-01-01

    A two-stage vortex burning and mixing combustor and associated fuel system components were successfully tested at steady state and transient operating conditions. The combustor exceeded the program goals for all three emissions species, with oxides of nitrogen 10 percent below the goal, carbon monoxide 26 percent below the goal, and total unburned hydrocarbons 75 percent below the goal. Relative to the JT9D-7 combustor, the oxides of nitrogen were reduced by 58 percent, carbon monoxide emissions were reduced by 69 percent, and total unburned hydrocarbons were reduced by 9 percent. The combustor efficiency and exit temperature profiles were comparable to those of production combustor. Acceleration and starting characteristics were deficient relative to the production engine.

  17. Learning Effects of an Experimental EFL Program in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Charles Xiaoxue; Calandra, Brendan; Hibbard, Susan T.; McDowell Lefaiver, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects an experimental English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program in Second Life (SL) had on Chinese student EFL learning. The study took an evaluative approach using quasi-experimental design with participants from one Chinese university and one American university in the southeastern United States. Results indicated…

  18. Upgrade of the proximity focusing RICH at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Cisbani, Evaristo; Colilli, Stefano; Cusanno, Francesco; Fratoni, Rolando; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Giuliani, Fausto; Gricia, Massimo; Lucentini, Maurizio; Santavenere, Fabio; Urciuoli, Guido; Iodice, Mauro; Argentieri, A.; de Cataldo, Giacinto; De Leo, Raffaele; Lagamba, Luigi; Marrone, Stefano; Nappi, E.; Camsonne, Alexandre; Kross, Brian; Michaels, Robert; Reitz, Bodo; Segal, John; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zorn, Carl; Monno, E.; Breuer, Herbert

    2009-09-01

    The Hall A RICH at Jefferson Lab is undergoing an upgrade to adapt to the higher momentum kinematics of the neutron spin structure Transversity experiments planned to run in 2008. The JLab RICH is a proximity focusing detector using liquid C6F14 as Cherenkov radiator, a thin layer of CsI as photon converter, evaporated on segmented pad panels of a proportional chamber. The original RICH had a superior hadron identification up to 2 GeV/c with pion/kaon rejection at the level of 1:1000 at ~ similar90% intrinsic efficiency. The upgrade will extend this performance above 2.4 GeV/c by means of a larger photon detector (a multiwire-multipad proportional chamber) and a longer proximity gap which will improve the photon detection geometrical efficiency and the angular resolution, respectively.

  19. Charmonium dissociation in matter: perspectives from CERN to Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev

    2010-07-01

    The J/Psi-meson dissociation in nuclear matter remains one of the most surprising problems in physics. In 2000 the NA50 Collaboration at CERN reported anomalous results on J/Psi absorption that was considered as evidence of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. On the other hand, there may be other mechanisms which produce an increase in J/Psi absorption in a hot dense medium due to the modification of the charm mesons. Our detailed calculations were one of the first indications that the CERN data can indeed be well explained by a mechanism different from QGP formation. For further clarification we proposed to study the modification of charm in nuclei through antiproton annihilation, which is now part of the PANDA project at FAIR GSI. The experiment on charmonium dissociation in nuclei is under discussion at JLab as part of its 12 GeV upgrade.

  20. Charmonium dissociation in matter: perspectives from CERN to JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, A.

    2010-07-27

    The J/{Psi}-meson dissociation in nuclear matter remains one of the most surprising problems in physics. In 2000 the NA50 Collaboration at CERN reported anomalous results on J/{Psi} absorption that was considered as evidence of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. On the other hand, there may be other mechanisms which produce an increase in J/{Psi} absorption in a hot dense medium due to the modification of the charm mesons. Our detailed calculations were one of the first indications that the CERN data can indeed be well explained by a mechanism different from QGP formation. For further clarification we proposed to study the modification of charm in nuclei through antiproton annihilation, which is now part of the PANDA project at FAIR GSI. The experiment on charmonium dissociation in nuclei is under discussion at JLab as part of its 12 GeV upgrade.

  1. Improved Performance of JLab 7-Cell Cavities by Electropolishing

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Rongli Geng, Anthony Crawford

    2009-05-01

    The great majority of experience in niobium SRF cavity processing at Jefferson Lab is with BCP etching. This has been used on CEBAF cavities and others totalling over 600 in number. With improved process quality control, field emission is now largely controlled and other factors limit performance. All of the prototype cavities developed for the 12 GeV upgrade, although meeting minimum requirements, have demonstrated a Q-drop in the 17?23 MV/m range that is not remedied by 120 C bake. Most of these cavities received >250 micron removal by BCP etch. Two of these cavities have been electropolished using the protocol under development within ILC R&D activities. The first such cavity was transformed from Q = 3×109 at 17 MV/m to quench from 1×1010 at 35 MV/m. The details of this and subsequent electropolished JLab 7-cell cavities will be reported.

  2. High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

    2007-08-01

    Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

  3. High Gradient Results of ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavity in Collaboration With KEK and Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, F.; Konomi, T.; Saito, K.; Eremeev, G. V.; Geng, R. L.

    2011-07-01

    KEK and Jlab have continued S0-study collaboration on ICHIRO 9-cell cavities since 2008. In 2010, we have started S0 study on ICHIRO#7, full 9-cell cavity with end groups. Surface treatments and vertical tests have been repeated at Jlab. Maximum gradient of 40MV/m was achieved so far. We will describe the details of that and further plan of S0-study on ICHIRO 9-cell.

  4. Recovery Act - Measurement of Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering and Studies of the Nucleon Spin Structure at JLab 6 and 11 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiaochao

    2016-03-10

    The program proposed contains two ingredients which aim to address aspects of two of the three research frontiers of nuclear science as identified in the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan. The first topic, a test of the current Standard Model, is an ongoing project focusing on measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in ~e-2H deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS). The PVDIS measurement is complementary to other completed or ongoing low- to medium-energy tests of the Standard Model. As the first, exploratory, step, an experiment using a 6 GeV electron beam will be carried out from October to December 2009 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). Meanwhile, a program using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam is being planned. The PVDIS program as a whole will provide the first precision data on the axial quark neutral-weak coupling constants. This will either put the current Standard Model to a test that has never been done before, or reveal information on where to look for New Physics beyond the current Standard Model. The PVDIS program will also provide results on hadronic physics effects such as charge symmetry violation. The second part of the proposed program uses spin observables to address the research frontier concerning QCD and structure of the nucleon. An experiment using the JLab 6 GeV beam in 2001 showed that, contrary to predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD), while the valence up quark’s spin is parallel to the nucleon’s spin, the valence down quark’s spin is not. In order to test the limit of QCD in describing the nucleon spin structure to a region beyond the 6 GeV kinematics, this measurement will be extended to a more energetic, “deeper” valence quark region using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam with a polarized 3He target. Although the two topics of the proposed program appear to focus on different physics, for the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam, both will utilize a new, yet-to-be-built large acceptance

  5. The Rural Experimental Schools Program: Some Implications for Federal Reformers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herriott, Robert E.

    The National Institute of Education's (NIE) Experimental Schools (ES) program is described in terms of development and evaluation in this report on the ES rural component. Specifically, this report details the following: (1) Objectives and Procedures (competition requirements involving school districts of 2,500 or less in population, a local plan,…

  6. Pion and kaon structure functions at 12 GeV JLab and EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Pions and kaons are, along with protons and neutrons, the main building blocks of nuclear matter. They are connected to the Goldstone modes of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, the mechanism thought to generate all hadron mass in the visible universe. The distribution of the fundamental constituents, the quarks and gluons, is expected to be different in pions, kaons, and nucleons. However, experimental data are sparse. As a result, there has been persistent doubt about the behavior of the pion's valence quark structure function at large Bjorken-x and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of gluons. A 12 GeV JLab experiment using tagged DIS may contribute to the resolution of the former. The Electron-Ion Collider with an acceptance optimized for forward physics could provide access to structure functions over a larger kinematic region. This would allow for measurements testing if the origin of mass is encoded in the differences of gluons in pions, kaons, and nucleons, and measurements testing assumptions used in the extraction of structure functions and the pion and kaon form factors. Electroweak measurements at an EIC would also potentially allow to disentangle the role of quark flavors at high x. In this talk we will discuss the prospects of such measurements. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418.

  7. Aperture Test for Internal Target Operation in the JLAB High-current ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-01

    A high current beam transmission test has been successfully completed at the JLAB FEL Facility, culminating in very low-loss transmission of a high current CW beam through a small aperture. The purpose of this test was to determine if an ERL is capable of meeting the stringent requirements imposed by the use of a 1018/cm3 internal gas target proposed for the DarkLight experiment*. Minimal beamline modifications were made to create a machine configuration that is substantially different from those used in routine UV or IR FEL operation. A sustained (8 hour) high power beam run was performed, with clean transmission through a 2 mm transverse aperture of 127 mm length simulating the target configuration. A beam size of 50 um (rms) was measured near the center of the aperture. Experimental data from a week-long test run consistently exhibited beam loss of only a few ppm on the aperture while running 4.5 mA current at 100 MeV -- or nearly 0.5 MW beam power. This surpassed the users? expectation and demonstrated a unique capability of an ERL for this type of experiments. This report presents a summary of the experiment, a brief overview of our activities, and outlines future plans.

  8. Bunch Length Measurements at the JLab FEL Using Coherent Transition and Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Evtushenko; James Coleman; Kevin Jordan; J. Michael Klopf; George Neil; Gwyn Williams

    2006-05-01

    The JLab FEL is routinely operated with sub-picosecond bunches. The short bunch length is important for high gain of the FEL. Coherent transition radiation has been used for the bunch length measurements for many years [1]. This diagnostic can be used only in the pulsed beam mode. It is our goal to run the FEL with CW beam and a 74.85 MHz micropulse repetition rate, which, with the 135 pC nominal bunch charge corresponds to the beam average current of 10 mA. Hence it is very desirable to have the possibility of making bunch length measurements when running CW beam with any micropulse frequency. We use a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interferometer, which is essentially a Michelson interferometer, to measure the spectrum of the coherent synchrotron radiation generated in the last dipole of the magnetic bunch compressor upstream of the FEL wiggler. This noninvasive diagnostic provides bunch length measurements for CW beam operation at any micropulse frequency. We also compare the measurements made with the help of the FTIR interferometer with data obtained using the Martin-Puplett interferometer [1]. Results of the two diagnostics agree within 15 %. Here we present a description of the experimental setup, data evaluation procedure and results of the beam measurements.

  9. FLEXIBLE APPLICATION OF THE JLAB PANSOPHY INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR PROJECT REPORTS, PROCESS MONITORING, AND R&D SAMPLE TRACKING

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie Bookwalter; Bonnie Madre; Charles Reece

    2008-02-12

    The use and features of the JLab SRF Institute IT system Pansophy1,2 continue to expand. In support of the cryomodule rework project for CEBAF a full set of web-based travelers has been implemented and an integrated set of live summary reports has been created. A graphical user interface within the reports enables navigation to either higher-level summaries or drill-down to the original source data. In addition to collection of episodic data, Pansophy is now used to capture, coordinate, and display continuously logged process parameter that relate to technical water systems and clean room environmental conditions. In a new expansion, Pansophy is being used to collect and track process and analytical data sets associated with SRF material samples that are part of the surface creation, processing, and characterization R&D program.

  10. Confirming the potential for nucleon structure studies with neutral final states and the Neutral Particle Spectrometer at JLab Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uniyal, Rishabh; Horn, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    The two-arm combination of neutral-particle detection and a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer offers unique scientific capabilities to push the energy scale for studies of the transverse spatial and momentum structure of the nucleon through reactions with neutral particles requiring precision and high luminosity. As example, it enables precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section and the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section, which is crucial to validate a cornerstone of 3D transverse momentum imaging. This science program is enabled by a Neutral-Particle Spectrometer (NPS) and the magnetic spectrometer pair in Hall C at the 12 GeV JLab. In this talk we will discuss the experiment the NPS will be used for and its components, for instance, the crystal array and what properties are desirable from the crystals to meet the specifications of the experiments. supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418.

  11. First Cryogenic Tests with Jlab's New Upgrade cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; Gianluigi Ciovati; Juergen Halbritter; Ganapati Rao Myneni; Jacek Sekutowicz; Genfa Wu

    2004-08-01

    Two types of 7-cell cavities have been developed for the upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV. The High Gradient type (HG) has been optimized with respect to the ratio of E{sub peak}/E{sub acc}. The Low Loss (LL) type has optimized shunt impedance and improved geometric factor. Each cavity type features four DESY-type coaxial Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers and a waveguide input coupler. Design goals for these cavities have been set to E{sub acc} = 20 MV/m with an intrinsic Q{sub o} of 8 {center_dot} 10{sup 9} at 2.05 K. A niobium prototype of each cavity has been fabricated at JLab and both cavities have been evaluated at cryogenic temperatures after appropriate surface treatment. In addition, pressure sensitivity as well as Lorentz force detuning were evaluated. The damping of approximately 20 HOMs has been measured to verify the room temperature data. Several single cell cavities were tested in addition to multi cell cavities. We present in this contribution a summary of tests performed on the prototypes of the proposed cavities.

  12. Electron Beam Diagnostics Of The JLAB UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel; Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Marchlik, Matthew; Sexton, Daniel; Tennant, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    In this contribution we describe various systems and aspects of the electron beam diagnostics of the JLab UV FEL. The FEL is installed on a new bypass beam line at the existing 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL. Here, we describe a set of the following systems. A combination of OTR and phosphor viewers is used for measurements of the transverse beam profile, transverse emittance, and Twiss parameters. This system is also used for alignment of the optical cavity of the UV oscillator and to ensure the overlap between the electron beam and optical mode in the FEL wiggler. A system of beam position monitors equipped with log-amp based BPM electronics. Bunch length on the order of 120 fs RMS is measured with the help of a modified Martin-Puplett interferometer. The longitudinal transfer function measurement system is used to set up bunch compression in an optimal way, such that the LINAC RF curvature is compensated using only higher order magnetic elements of the beam transport. This set of diagnostic systems made a significant contribution in achieving first lasing of the FEL after only about 60 hours of beam operation.

  13. Chemistry aspects of the HEVA and VERCORS experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Leveque, J.P.; Andre, B.; Ducros, G.; Le Marois, G.; Lhiaubet, G.

    1995-01-01

    The HEVA and VERCORS experimental programs have been carried out to characterize some of the fission products (release rate coefficient, aerosol sizing, chemical species) emitted by nuclear fuel irradiated to approx 30 GWd/TU and heated up to 2,300 K (HEVA) and higher temperatures (VERCORS). Various test parameters were based on those expected in the course of a severe reactor accident. Eight tests were performed during the now completed HEVA program and four tests have been performed in the VERCORS studies. The chemical species recovered in the experimental loop are described, with particular emphasis place don the volatile fission products (cesium, iodine, tellurium), oxides (mainly molybdenum), and the components of the neutron-absorbing control rods (silver, indium, and cadmium).

  14. INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

    2007-09-01

    Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related

  15. JLAB Web Based Tracking System for Integrated Incident, Accident, Inspection, and Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    S. Prior; R. Lawrence

    2003-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, or JLab, is a Department of Energy particle accelerator used to conduct fundamental physics research. In such a facility there are numerous statutory, regulatory, contractual, and best practice requirements for managing and analyzing environmental health and safety (EH&S) related data. A tracking system has been developed at JLab that meets the needs of all levels of the organization, from the front line worker to the most senior management. This paper describes the system implementation and performance to date.

  16. The DarkLight Experiment at the JLab FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Peter

    2013-10-01

    DarkLight will study the production of gauge bosons associated with Dark Forces theories in the scattering of 100 MeV electrons on proton a target. DarkLight is a spectrometer to measure all the final state particles in e- + p -->e- + p +e- +e+ . QED allows this process and the invariant mass distribution of the e+e- pair is a continuum from nearly zero to nearly the electron beam energy. Dark Forces theories, which allow the dark matter mass scale to be over 1 TeV, predict a gauge boson A' in the mass range of 10-1,000 MeV and decays to an electron-positron pair with an invariant mass of mA'. We aim to search for this process using the 100 MeV, 10 mA electron beam at the JLab Free Electron Laser impinging on a hydrogen target with a 1019 cm-2 density. The resulting luminosity of 6 ×1035/cm2-s gives the experiment enough sensitivity to probe A' couplings of 10-9 α . DarkLight is unique in its design to detect all four particles in the final state. The leptons will be measured in a large high-rate TPC and a silicon sensor will measure the protons. A 0.5 T solenoidal magnetic field provides the momentum resolution and focuses the copious Møller scattering background down the beam line, away from the detectors. A first beam test has shown the FEL beam is compatible with the target design and that the hall backgrounds are manageable. The experiment has been approved by Jefferson Lab for first running in 2017.

  17. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

  18. Experimental status of the AGS Relativistic Heavy Ion Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. Craig

    1994-10-01

    The universal motivation for colliding large nuclei at relativistic energies is the expectation that a small volume of the primordial quark soup, generally referred to as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), can be created and studied. The QGP is formed via a phase transition caused by either the extreme baryon densities and/or the extreme temperatures achieved in the overlap zone of the two colliding nuclei. Experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) using a beam of Si nuclei at 14.6 GeV per nucleon on various nuclear targets have been completed. These same experiments are now actively searching for signatures of QGP formation using a beam of Au nuclei at 11.7 GeV per nucleon. This paper briefly summarizes some of the key results from the Si beam program and the current status of the experimental Au beam program at the AGS.

  19. The experimental program at the WNR neutron source at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    There are two white neutron sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory which are used in broad scientific program over the energy range from thermal to about seven hundred MeV. Largely because of the increased intensity over such an unprecedented energy range, use of these two facilities for nuclear science research has grown from 36 experimenters in 1987 to 118 in 1990. This paper focuses on research underway or recently completed at the high-energy neutron source of the WNR facility. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  20. The “SF” System of Sextupoles for the JLAB 10 KW Free Electron Laser Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    George Biallas, Mark Augustine, Kenneth Baggett, David Douglas, Robin Wines

    2009-05-01

    The characteristics of the system of “SF” Sextupoles for the infrared Free Electron Laser Upgrade1 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) are described. These eleven sextupoles possess a large field integral (2.15 T/m) with +/- 0.2%

  1. The HKS experiment on Lambda--hypernuclear spectroscopy via electroproduction at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Liguang; Yuan, Lulin; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, O.; Baturin, Pavlo; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bosted, Peter; Carlini, Roger; Chen, X.; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, AJI; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gan, Liping; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Halkyard, Rebekah; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, D.; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hu, S.; Hungerford, Ed; Ispiryan, Mikayel; Johnston, Kathleen; Jones, Mark; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kaneta, M.; Kato, F.; Kato, Seigo; Kawama, Daisuke; Keppel, Cynthia; Li, Y.; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Maruyama, Nayuta; Matsumura, Akihiko; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Nakamura, Satoshi; Navasardyan, Tigran; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Pamela, Priscilla; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera Castillo, Roberto; Roche, Julie; Rodriguez, Victor; Sato, Yoshinori; Seva, Tomislav; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Sumihama, Mizuki; Song, Yujun; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Hirokazu; Tvaskis, Vladas; Vulcan, William; Wang, B.; Wells, Stephen; Wood, Stephen; Yan, Chen; Zamkochian, S.

    2008-06-01

    The HKS (Jlab E01-011) experiment on spectroscopy of Lambda-hypernuclei using (e,e'K+) reaction was successfully carried out in 2005. This paper gives a brief description of the experiment and its technique and shows some of the preliminary spectra that are still under analysis.

  2. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  3. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    DOE PAGES

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; ...

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greatermore » than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  4. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of fan A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1971-01-01

    The aerodynamic component test results are presented of fan A, one of two high-bypass-ratio, 1160 feet per second single-stage fans, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. This fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.50 with an adiabatic efficiency of 86.5% at a total fan flow of 950 lb/sec. It was tested with and without inlet flow distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.52 and an adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% at a total fan flow of 962 lb/sec were actually achieved. An operating margin of 12.4% was demonstrated at design speed.

  5. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents the aerodynamic component test results of Fan C, a high-bypass-ratio, low-aerodynamic-loading, 1550 feet per second (472.4 m/sec), single-stage fan, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. The fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.60 with an adiabatic efficiency of 84.2 percent at a total fan flow of 915 lb/sec (415.0 kg/sec). It was tested with and without inlet distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.61 and an adiabatic efficiency of 83.9 percent at a total fan flow of 921 lb/sec (417.8 kg/sec) were actually achieved. An operating margin in excess of 14.6 percent was demonstrated at design speed.

  6. Main experimental results of the Phebus Severe Fuel Damage Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnier, C. )

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this program is to improve our knowledge about the early phase of a pressurized water reactor in-vessel core melt degradation in a temperature range up to 2800 K. The experimental program performed from December 1986 to June 1989 consists of six in-pile experiments with 21 fresh fuel rod bundles of 0.8 m active length. It is divided into two series of tests: (1) The first one (B9, B9R, B9+) is mainly devoted to the oxidation phenomenon and its consequences for fuel degradation. This series is characterized by high oxidation rates. (2) The second series [C3, C3+, Ag-In-CD (AIC)] is characterized by low oxidation rates of the cladding in order to study the interaction between the remaining Zircaloy and the other materials: interactions with Inconel and UO[sub 2] for C3 and C3+ tests and interactions with the Ag-In-Cd alloy and stainless steel of the control rod for the AIC test.

  7. Early-Life Nutritional Programming of Type 2 Diabetes: Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Vaiserman, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    Consistent evidence from both experimental and human studies suggest that inadequate nutrition in early life can contribute to risk of developing metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes (T2D) in adult life. In human populations, most findings supporting a causative relationship between early-life malnutrition and subsequent risk of T2D were obtained from quasi-experimental studies (‘natural experiments’). Prenatal and/or early postnatal exposures to famine were demonstrated to be associated with higher risk of T2D in many cohorts around the world. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression as a possible major contributor to the link between the early-life famine exposure and T2D in adulthood. Findings from these studies suggest that prenatal exposure to the famine may result in induction of persistent epigenetic changes that have adaptive significance in postnatal development but can predispose to metabolic disorders including T2D at the late stages of life. In this review, quasi-experimental data on the developmental programming of T2D are summarized and recent research findings on changes in DNA methylation that mediate these effects are discussed. PMID:28273874

  8. Studies of the transverse structure of the nucleon at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Mirazita, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Since the earliest measurements in the '70, hadronic physics deals with a number of surprising phenomena that cannot be explained in the framework of perturbative QCD. Examples are the small fraction of the proton spin carried by the valence quark spins, the persistence at high energies of single spin asymmetries and azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized processes. It is now believed that the answer to these questions may come from the transverse motion of partons inside the nucleon, which is encoded in the Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) Parton Distribution Functions. Among the large variety of processes that can be described in terms of TMDs, a major role is played by Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) reactions, in which, together with the scattered electron, one or more hadrons are detected in the final state. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries are the experimental observables sensitive to TMDs. The identification of the final hadrons allows the tagging of the quark involved in the reaction at the parton level, and then the flavor separation of the relevant TMDs. SIDIS reactions are studied at Jefferson Laboratories since many years and are one of the main items in the physics program after the upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator. The large amount of new data that will be available in few years calls for the implementation of new tools, such as multidimensional analyses and refined techniques of TMDs extraction from the experimental asymmetries. In this talk, the more recent results obtained at 6 GeV will be shown and the future measurements will be discussed.

  9. Training Paraprofessionals in Programming: An Experimental Course Incorporating Developmental Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, James M.; Tinsley, Diane J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a training program designed to train undergraduate paraprofessionals to plan, facilitate, and evaluate developmental workshops for college students. The program incorporated developmental theory and concepts. (JAC)

  10. 34 CFR 387.1 - What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? 387.1 Section 387.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... INNOVATIVE TRAINING General § 387.1 What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? This program...

  11. RF System Requirements for a Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert A; Hannon, Fay E; Guo, Jiquan; Huang, Shichun; Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, S

    2015-09-01

    JLab is studying options for a medium energy electron-ion collider that could fit on the JLab site and use CEBAF as a full-energy electron injector. A new ion source, linac and booster would be required, together with collider storage rings for the ions and electrons. In order to achieve the maximum luminosity these will be high-current storage rings with many bunches. We present the high-level RF system requirements for the storage rings, ion booster ring and high-energy ion beam cooling system, and describe the technology options under consideration to meet them. We also present options for staging that might reduce the initial capital cost while providing a smooth upgrade path to a higher final energy. The technologies under consideration may also be useful for other proposed storage ring colliders or ultimate light sources.

  12. Commissioning and Testing the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Magnet in JLab's Hall D

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Joshua T.; Biallas, George H.; Brown, G.; Butler, David E.; Carstens, Thomas J.; Chudakov, Eugene A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, F.; Qiang, Yi; Smith, Elton S.; Stevens, Mark A.; Spiegel, Scot L.; Whitlatch, Timothy E.; Wolin, Elliott J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.

    2015-06-01

    JLab refurbished and reconfigured the LASS1, 1.85m bore Solenoid and installed it as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The magnet contains four superconducting coils within an iron yoke. The magnet was built in the early1970's at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and used a second time at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The coils were extensively refurbished and individually tested by JLab. A new Cryogenic Distribution Box provides cryogens and their control valving, current distribution bus, and instrumentation pass-through. A repurposed CTI 2800 refrigerator system and new transfer line complete the system. We describe the re-configuration, the process and problems of re-commissioning the magnet and the results of testing the completed magnet.

  13. Double-spin asymmetries in electron-nucleon scattering in Halls B and C at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Crabb

    2003-07-15

    Three experiments at JLab have measured the double polarization asymmetries in the nucleon resonance region, using polarized electron beams incident on polarized proton and deuteron targets. The analysis for the first experiment, eg1a in Hall B, is nearly finished and preliminary values of the spin structure function g1(x, Q2) and the first moment (x) have been extracted. The other two experiments, one in Hall B and one in Hall C, are still analyzing data. Some results are presented.

  14. The low Q$^2$ chicane and Compton polarimeter at the JLab EIC

    SciTech Connect

    Camsonne, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    The JLAB EIC (JLEIC) design includes a chicane after the interaction point to detect electron associated with production of quasi-real photon at the interaction. This chicane layout can also be used for Compton polarimetry to measure the electron beam polarization. This proceeding will present the layout of the low Q^2 chicane and the implementation and current R&D; of a Compton polarimeter which would be located in the middle of this chicane.

  15. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 6. Single annulus tests, transient test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1 to 2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. This report presents the experimental results for the transient portion of the single annulus test program. The test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a ribless heater and a ribbed heater under steady state as well as transient conditions. The ribbed heater testing is currently underway and will be reported separately. The steady state portion of this test program with ribless heater was completed and reported in report No. CU-HTRF-T3A. The present report presents transient test results obtained from a ribless, uniform annulus test section. A total of thirty five transients were conducted with six cases in which flow excursion occurred. No unstable conditions resulted for tests in which the steady state Q{sub ratio} OFI limit was not exceeded.

  16. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 5: Single annulus tests, steady-state test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents results for the steady state portion of the finless single annulus test program. The objective of the experimental study was to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a finless or ribless heater and a ribbed heater. The latter program is currently underway and will be reported separately. For finless heater, testing was conducted in both a steady state and transient mode. The present report presents steady state results for a series of experiments with uniform and asymmetric heating. The demand curves obtained under uniform heating yielded OFI flow-rates which were slightly below those obtained for a circular tube geometry with the same L/D ratio; however, the single annulus had a hydraulic diameter which was approximately fifty percent larger than the circular tube. The asymmetric heating cases were selected to provide the same average power input as the uniform cases. The results for these tests indicated that the flow-rate at OFI increased with the degree of asymmetry.

  17. Asymptotic behavior of the deuteron form factors in the two-nucleon model and electron scattering experiments at GeV energies at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Krutov, A. F.; Tsirova, N. A.; Troitsky, V. E.

    2008-10-15

    Using the instant form dynamics of Poincare invariant quantum mechanics and the modified relativistic impulse approximation proposed previously, we calculate asymptotic behavior of electromagnetic form factors for the deuteron considered as a two-nucleon system. We show that today, experimentation on elastic ed scattering has reached the asymptotic regime. We also estimate the possible range of momentum transfer in which the quark degrees of freedom will possibly be seen in future JLab experiments. The explicit relation between the behavior of the deuteron wave function at r=0 and the form factors asymptotic behavior is obtained, and the conditions of wave functions that give the asymptotic behavior predicted by QCD and quark counting rules are formulated.

  18. Noise addendum experimental clean combustor program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Ross, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of advanced CTOL aircraft engines with reduced exhaust emissions is discussed. Combustor noise information provided during the basic emissions program and used to advantage in securing reduced levels of combustion noise is included. Results are presented of internal pressure transducer measurements made during the scheduled emissions test program on ten configurations involving variations of three basic combustor designs.

  19. A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of Schoolwide Violence Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Tia Navelene; Leite, Walter; Smith, Stephen W.

    2017-01-01

    Violence prevention programs are commonplace in today's schools, though reviews of the literature reveal mixed empirical findings on their effectiveness. Often, these programs include a variety of components such as social skills training, student mentoring, and activities designed to build a sense of school community that have not been tested for…

  20. Proposal for an Experimental Program in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Coll. of Education.

    The University of Florida College of Education proposes to experiment with a new program for the education of elementary school teachers. The design emphasizes maximum opportunities for self-direction, individualization through wide variations in instructional program and rate of progress, and close correlation of didactic instruction and…

  1. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program. 98.3 Section 98.3 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STUDENT RIGHTS IN RESEARCH, EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS, AND TESTING § 98.3 Access to instructional material used in...

  2. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits A to F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits A through F. Among the information included in the exhibits is the experimental model schedule, the schematic representation, the content display, and the course outlines for all courses in the program.…

  3. Kentucky's Experimental Elementary Counselor Program: Results and Recommendations for Marketing Exemplary Practices To Meet KERA Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Thomas F.; Latto, Lowell D.

    This report examines Kentucky's experimental elementary guidance programs, which were funded in 1988 and evaluated in the second year of the 2-year experimental program. In the second year, data were gathered from counselors, teachers, students, and parents; the data are presented in this document. The first section, "Effective Elementary…

  4. Heat Cycle Reserch Experimental Program report, FY-84

    SciTech Connect

    Whitbeck, J.F.

    1984-09-01

    The Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) is an experimental binary-cycle facility used to investigate different concepts and/or components for generating electrical power from a geothermal resource. This report briefly desc

  5. Voluntary Mobile Source Programs: Crediting Innovation and Experimentation Brochure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA document provides guidance on Voluntary Mobile Source Emission Reduction Programs (VMEPs) that could be implemented and credited with emission reductions for State Implementation Plans (SIPs) related purposes.

  6. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  7. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R

    2012-04-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants' ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed.

  8. Understanding Complexity and Self-Organization in a Defense Program Management Organization (Experimental Design)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-18

    SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Understanding Complexity and Self-Organization in a Defense Program Management Organization (Experimental Design...ID Program Manager and has had multiple operational and acquisition related tours. He is a 1995 graduate of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School with...Organization in a Defense Program Management Organization (Experimental Design) 18 March 2016 Raymond Jones, Lecturer Graduate School of Business

  9. The Development and Experimental Analysis of a Self-Instructional Program in Graphical Kinematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, John G.

    A project to help vocational-technical teachers in the development and experimental analysis of self-instructional programs is presented. The emphasis in developing the program was on maximizing effectiveness and efficiency of program-learner interaction as measured by criterion items. These items emphasized cognitive content dealing with the…

  10. An Experimental Test of a First Grade Reading-Typewriting Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernazza, Ann Marie; And Others

    Two classes of randomly assigned first graders were given an experimental form of a reading-typewriting program with one typewriter for each child. The program consisted of 25 workbook lessons, each relating to a single phoneme. The computer was used as a program design tool to determine an optimal teaching order of phonemic elements. The children…

  11. EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING AND DESIGN DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOHR, RICHARD L.; WOLFE, GEORGE P.

    AN EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING AND DESIGN DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DEVELOP A PROPOSED CURRICULUM OUTLINE AND ADMISSION STANDARDS FOR OTHER INSTITUTIONS IN THE PLANNING OF PROGRAMS TO TRAIN COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS. OF THE FIRST CLASS OF 26 STUDENTS, 17 COMPLETED THE PROGRAM AND 12 (INCLUDING ONE WHO DID NOT GRADUATE) WERE…

  12. Modifications to JLab 12 GeV Refrigerator and Wide Range Mix Mode Performance Testing Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Hasan, N.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of data obtained during the spring 2013 commissioning of the new 4.5 K refrigeration system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade indicated a wide capacity range with good efficiency and minimal operator interaction. Testing also showed that the refrigerator required higher liquid nitrogen (LN) consumption for its pre-cooler than anticipated by the design. This does not affect the capacity of the refrigerator, but it does result in an increased LN utility cost. During the summer of 2015 the modifications were implemented by the cold box manufacturer, according to a design similar to the JLab 12 GeV cold box specification. Subsequently, JLab recommissioned the cold box and performed extensive performance testing, ranging from 20% to 100% of the design maximum capacity, and in various modes of operation, ranging from pure refrigeration, pure liquefaction, half-and-half mix mode and at selected design modes using the Floating Pressure – Ganni Cycle. The testing demonstrated that the refrigerator system has a good and fairly constant performance over a wide capacity range and different modes of operation. It also demonstrated the modifications resulted in a LN consumption that met the design for the pure refrigeration mode (which is the most demanding) and was lower than the design for the nominal and maximum capacity modes. In addition, a pulsed-load test, similar to what is expected for cryogenic systems supporting fusion experiments, was conducted to observe the response using the Floating Pressure – Ganni Cycle, which was stable and robust. This paper will discuss the results and analysis of this testing pertaining to the LN consumption, the system efficiency over a wide range of capacity and different modes and the behaviour of the system to a pulsed load.

  13. Studies of the transverse structure of the nucleon at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirazita, Marco

    2014-03-01

    An overview of the studies on the Trasverse Momentum Dependent parton distribution functions performed at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory in the three experimental Halls with the 6 GeV electron beam will be presented. Plans for the future measurements after the upgrade of the laboratory currently underway will be also discussed.

  14. Studies of the 3D Structure of the Nucleon at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut

    2016-07-01

    Studies of the 3D structure of the nucleon encoded in Transverse Momentum Dependent distribution and fragmentation functions of partons and Generalized Parton Distributions are among the key objectives of the JLab 12 GeV upgrade and the Electron Ion Collider. Main challenges in extracting 3D partonic distributions from precision measurements of hard scattering processes include clear understanding of leading twist QCD fundamentals, higher twist effects, and also correlations of hadron production in target and current fragmentation regions. In this contribution we discuss some ongoing studies and future measurements of spin-orbit correlations at Jefferson Lab.

  15. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  16. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-29

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of the ELS Teacher Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Donald P.; And Others

    This report presents the results of pragmatically selected tryouts of the English Language Services "Teacher Education Program" in the Regional English Language Centre in Singapore, the Central Institute of English in Hyderabad, and the Instituto Pedagogico in Caracas. American Institutes for Research, in submitting the present evaluation to the…

  18. Are Facilitated Mentoring Programs Beneficial? A Randomized Experimental Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Toby Marshall; Song, Zhaoli

    2008-01-01

    Results from a pretest-posttest randomized field experiment study with a control group comparing the impact of high- and low-level-facilitated mentoring programs on new employees' performance and perceptions about their jobs and organization were reported in this paper. Results indicated increases in job satisfaction, organizational commitment,…

  19. Geography of Africa; An Experimental Programmed Teaching Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witthuhn, Barton; And Others

    This programmed text of basic geography was created by Project Africa, a social studies curriculum research and development project established at Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). This material is intended to serve as an independent study aid for students who wish to understand basic geographic principles of location, seasons…

  20. Handbook for First Year Experimental Language Development Program, Book Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppe, J., Comp.

    This hand book is to be used in conjunction with Book Two of an English as a second language program for young aboriginal children. It outlines in detail suggested activities for each week of class, emphasizing oral and reading skills. There are numerous games, poems, and short stories. Also included are appendixes on teaching equipment,…

  1. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  2. Experimental Program for the Determination of Hull Structural Damping Coefficients.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    experimental conditions must be recorded and presented as part of the data. Completeness requires that all factors related to the data must be measured...carrier, and a Ŕ,000 ton container ship). - 17. Ley Weds I. Distribution Steemen, Damping Document is available to the Hull vibrations public through the...Vibration ............................... 18 2.1.1.2 Forced Vibration Steady State ............... 19 2.1.1.3 Transient or Non- Harmonic Vibration

  3. AFGL Rocket - and Shuttle-Borne Particle Beam Experimental Program,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    7 2.3 Damage to Enem ~y Space Based Systems............7 2.4 Beam Detection and Diagnostics .. ... ...... .... 7 3.0 REVIEW OF PREVIOUS AND PLANNED...EXPERIMENTAL OBJECTIVES (cont’d) FUNCTIONAL OBJECTIVE DESCRIPTION REMARKS 10. Equatorial Joint experiment with Higher power desirable Chemistry LLLTV...Ionosphere", Geophiys. Res. Lett. 3, 409 (1976) 12 Cambou F. et al., Annales de Geophysique "Special Issue on the Results of the Active French-Soviet ARAKS

  4. Experimental Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Generator Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    unlimited The facilities of Argonne National Laboratory are owned by the United States Govern- ment. Under the terms of a contract (W-31-109-Eng-38) among...of Wisconsin-Madison NOTICE This report was p ed as an account of work sponsored by the United State irnment. Neither the United States nor the United ...Laboratory In accordance with policies and programs formulated, ap- i: proved and reviewed by the Aanneletten. MEMBERS OF ARGONNE UNIVERSITIES ASSOCIATION

  5. The effectiveness of family planning programs evaluated with true experimental designs.

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, K E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper describes the magnitude of effects for family planning programs evaluated with true experimental designs. METHODS: Studies that used true experimental designs to evaluate family planning programs were identified and their results subjected to meta-analysis. RESULTS: For the 14 studies with the information needed to calculate effect size, the Pearson r between program and effect variables ranged from -.08 to .09 and averaged .08. CONCLUSIONS: The programs evaluated in the studies considered have had, on average, smaller effects than many would assume and desire. PMID:9146451

  6. The rf experimental program in the fermilab mucool test area

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Sandstrom, R.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.S.; Johnson, R.

    2005-05-20

    The rf R&D program for high-gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown and dark current production under a variety of conditions.

  7. The rf experimental program in the Fermilab mucool test area

    SciTech Connect

    J. Norem; R. Sandstrom; A. Bross; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; Y. Torun; R. Rimmer; D. Li; M. Zisman; R. Johnson

    2005-05-16

    The rf R&D program for high gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown, and dark current production under a variety of conditions.

  8. Some Occupational and Organizational Implications for Designing an Experimental Program in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evan, William M.

    1973-01-01

    Attempts to design an experimental program for the training of a new generation of educational administrators, with the rationale being based on selected concepts and propositions of occupational sociology, organizational theory, and systems theory. (Author)

  9. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  10. JLab E07-011: Precision measurements of g1d using ND3 and LiD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosted, P.

    2009-07-01

    We plan to make definitive measurements of the deuteron spin structure function g1d/F1d in the deep-inelastic kinematics accessible with a 6 GeV beam at JLab. The principal goal is to provide the low Q2 anchor points for NLO pQCD plus higher twist fits to g1d/F1d, which is particularly sensitive to ΔG(x) (the polarized gluon density of the nucleon) and the sum of up and down quark polarizations. By spanning a factor of typically two in the Q2-range at nine values of x, the new data will strongly constrain the higher twist contribution to the fits, with a corresponding reduction in the polarized PDF uncertainties. The proposed measurements, when combined with existing and planned world data at higher Q2, will provide the theoretically cleanest determination of ΔG(x) in the moderate to high x region, and will provide a necessary complement to the low x program of RHIC-spin. The experiment will use both 6LiD and ND3 as a source of polarized deuterons, with approximately equal running times for both to constrain the nuclear effects in 6LiD, the target used by the higher Q2 experiments at SLAC and CERN. Both the target and low current (nA scale) 6 GeV electron beam will be longitudinally polarized. Electrons scattered at angles from about 18° to 45° will be detected. Additional measurements at lower Q2 will be made using a 4.8 GeV beam energy.

  11. Exclusive processes at JLab at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions provide a unique opportunity to probe the complex internal structure of the nucleon. They allow to access information about the correlations between parton transverse spatial and longitudinal momentum distributions from experimental observables. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) have been carried out at Jefferson Lab using continuous electron beam with energies up to 6 GeV. Unpolarized cross sections, beam, target and double spin asymmetries have been measured for DVCS as well as for π0 exclusive electroproduction. The data from Hall B provide a wide kinematic coverage with Q2=1-4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1-0.5, and -t up to 2 GeV2. Hall A data have limited kinematic range partially overlapping with Hall B kinematics but provide a high accuracy measurements. Scaling tests of the DVCS cross sections provide solid evidence of twist-2 dominance, which makes chiral-even GPDs accessible even at modest Q2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) model. Successful description of the recent CLAS π0 exclusive production data within the framework of the GPD-based model provides a unique opportunity to access the chiral-odd GPDs.

  12. An Overview of Longitudinal Spin Structure Measurements from JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.

    2013-08-01

    Jefferson Lab is currently one of the facilities leading the investigation of the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past 15 years, several high precision measurements have been completed, extending our knowledge of the polarized structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} down to Q{sup 2} = 0.02 GeV{sup 2}. In particular, the low-Q{sup 2} range ({<=} 0.1 GeV{sup 2}) from these data allows us to make a benchmark-check of Chiral Perturbation theory ({chi}PT). Previous results for the moments of the spin structure functions in this region have shown mixed agreement. For {Gamma}{sub 1}, the first moment of g{sub 1}, we find good consistency between data and theory. However, we have seen a surprisingly large discrepancy with {chi}PT calculations for the {delta}{sub LT} spin polarizability on the neutron, which is significantly less sensitive to the {Delta}-resonance contribution. These proceedings will discuss the recent experimental effort at low Q{sup 2} from Jefferson Lab, including a discussion of preliminary results on the neutron. The new results on the neutron still show a sizeable discrepancy between data and theory. However, new calculations show improved agreement with data for some observables. In addition, new proton data for g{sub 2} is also expected to help resolve the disagreement for {delta}{sub LT}.

  13. An Overview of an Experimental Demonstration Aerotow Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Bowers, Albion H.; Lokos, William A.; Peters, Todd L.; Gera, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An overview of an experimental demonstration of aerotowing a delta-wing airplane with low-aspect ratio and relatively high wing loading is presented. Aerotowing of future space launch configurations is a new concept, and the objective of the work described herein is to demonstrate the aerotow operation using an airplane configuration similar to conceptual space launch vehicles. Background information on the use of aerotow for a space launch vehicle is presented, and the aerotow system used in this demonstration is described. The ground tests, analytical studies, and flight planning used to predict system behavior and to enhance flight safety are detailed. The instrumentation suite and flight test maneuvers flown are discussed, preliminary performance is assessed, and flight test results are compared with the preflight predictions.

  14. PROCESS: Program for Research on Operator Control in an Experimental Simulated Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelsma, Otto; Bijlstra, Jim P.

    An experimental tool is described for the investigation of the human control behavior for slow responding dynamic systems. The Program for Research on Operator Control in an Experimental Simulated Setting (PROCESS) is a simulation of a dynamic water-alcohol distillation system that can be used in research on operator training. In particular,…

  15. 34 CFR 387.1 - What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? 387.1 Section 387.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EXPERIMENTAL...

  16. 34 CFR 387.1 - What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? 387.1 Section 387.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EXPERIMENTAL...

  17. 34 CFR 387.1 - What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? 387.1 Section 387.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EXPERIMENTAL...

  18. 34 CFR 387.1 - What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? 387.1 Section 387.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EXPERIMENTAL...

  19. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits G to L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits G through L. Among the information included in the exhibits is the evaluation reports of the commission on accreditation, the detailed curriculum, and the accredited program's scope, sequence, and course…

  20. Federal Initiatives and Rural School Improvement: Findings from the Experimental Schools Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herriott, Robert E.

    Abt Associates' concluding report on its research of the federally funded Experimental Schools (ES) program identifies educational needs in rural schools, introduces the substance of the ES program, and presents the major findings of the research in terms of the dynamics of rural school districts and the design and implementation of federal…

  1. Overview of the Pegasus-II experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Adams, P.J.; Atchison, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    Pegasus-II is a pulsed power facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory which is used to conduct a variety of experiments in the high energy density regime, with applications to the physics of nuclear weapons as well as basic science. The chief mission of the facility is the systematic investigation of hydrodynamic physics issues through the use of a magnetically-driven, cylindrical imploding liner. At 4.3-MJ of stored energy, Pegasus-II is one of the largest capacitor-bank facilities in the world. Peak currents as high as 12 MA have been produced with a quarter-cycle time of 6--8 {micro}s. The active portion of the standardized aluminum liner is a 3.2-g right hollow cylinder designed such that the inner surface of the liner remains at solid aluminum density during the course of the experiment. The run-in time for a typical experiment is {approximately}10 {micro}s. For some experiments, a diagnostic package is placed inside the liner to analyze physical processes associated with multi-microsecond convergent implosions of macroscopic solid shells. These campaigns include the study of instability growth rates, hydrodynamic bounce and mix, and mechanical heating associated with high strain and strain rate. Other experimental studies, in particular those examining the shock /production of ejecta and shock-driven hydrodynamic vortex formation and compression, have involved the use of an internal target package. By varying the Pegasus-II operating conditions, the impact of the liner on an internal target of a few cm diameter results in shock pressures of 100kBar--1MBar with liner velocities of 3 mm/{micro}s--10 mm/{micro}s. Some experiments have been conducted in the regime where strength of materials affects the hydrodynamical behavior of the system, while for other target designs, efforts have been made to minimize the role of material strength. Hydrodynamic experiments on Pegasus-II uniquely combine convergent geometry with axial diagnostic access of macroscopic

  2. A experimental research program on chirality at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Markert, Christina

    2016-09-01

    Heavy-ion collisions provide a unique opportunity to investigate the fundamental laws of physics of the strong force. The extreme conditions created by the collisions within a finite volume are akin to the properties of the deconfined partonic state which existed very shortly after the Big Bang and just prior to visible matter formation in the Universe. In this state massless quarks and gluons (partons) are ``quasi free" particles, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). By following the expansion and cooling of this state, we will map out the process of nucleonic matter formation, which occurs during the phase transition. The fundamental properties of this early partonic phase of matter are not well understood, but they are essential for confirming QCD (Quantum Chromo-Dynamics) and the Standard Model. The specific topic, chiral symmetry restoration, has been called ``the remaining puzzle of QCD.'' This puzzle can only be studied in the dense partonic medium generated in heavy-ion collisions. The research objectives of this proposal are the development and application of new analysis strategies to study chirality and the properties of the medium above the QGP phase transition using hadronic resonances detected with the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN research laboratory in Switzerland. This grant funded a new effort at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) to investigate the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) at the highest possible energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN via the ALICE experiment. The findings added to our knowledge of the dynamical evolution and the properties of the hot, dense matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, and provided a deeper understanding of multi-hadron interactions in these extreme nuclear matter systems. Our group contributed as well to the hardware and software for the ALICE USA-funded Calorimeter Detector (EMCal). The LHC research program and its connection to

  3. NASA/Pratt and Whitney experimental clean combustor program: Engine test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Greene, W.

    1977-01-01

    A two-stage vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) combustor and associated fuel system components were successfully tested in an experimental JT9D engine at steady-state and transient operating conditions, using ASTM Jet-A fuel. Full-scale JT9D experimental engine tests were conducted in a phase three aircraft experimental clean combustor program. The low-pollution combustor, fuel system, and fuel control concepts were derived from phase one and phase two programs in which several combustor concepts were evaluated, refined, and optimized in a component test rig. Significant pollution reductions were achieved with the combustor which meets the performance, operating, and installation requirements of the engine.

  4. Developmental origins of health and disease: experimental and human evidence of fetal programming for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Gusmão Correia, M L; Volpato, A M; Águila, M B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, C A

    2012-07-01

    The concept of developmental origins of health and disease has been defined as the process through which the environment encountered before birth, or in infancy, shapes the long-term control of tissue physiology and homeostasis. The evidence for programming derives from a large number of experimental and epidemiological observations. Several nutritional interventions during diverse phases of pregnancy and lactation in rodents are associated with fetal and neonatal programming for metabolic syndrome. In this paper, recent experimental models and human epidemiological studies providing evidence for the fetal programming associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and related diseases are revisited.

  5. Animal Science Technology. An Experimental Developmental Program. Volume I, Report of the Developmental Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Herman G.; And Others

    In 1961, administrative personnel at Delhi College in New York observed that formal training programs for animal science technicians were virtually nonexistant. Response to this apparent need resulted in the initiation of perhaps the first 2-year Animal Science Technology Program in the nation. This two-volume report is the result of an extensive…

  6. PROGRESS ON THE INTERACTION REGION DESIGN AND DETECTOR INTEGRATION AT JLAB'S MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy; Brindza, Paul; Camsonne, Alexandre; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Ent, Rolf; Gaskell, David; Lin, Fanglei; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Ungaro, Maurizio; Zhang, Yuhong; Hyde, Charles; Park, Kijun; Sullivan, Michael; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2014-07-01

    One of the unique features of JLab's Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is a full-acceptance detector with a dedicated, small-angle, high-resolution detection system, capable of covering a wide range of momenta (and charge-to-mass ratios) with respect to the original ion beam to enable access to new physics. We present an interaction region design developed with close integration of the detection and beam dynamical aspects. The dynamical aspect of the design rests on a symmetry-based concept for compensation of non-linear effects. The optics and geometry have been optimized to accommodate the detection requirements and to ensure the interaction region's modularity for ease of integration into the collider ring lattices. As a result, the design offers an excellent detector performance combined with the necessary provisions for non-linear dynamical optimization.

  7. Commissioning and operational results of the 12 GeV helium compression system at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    The new compressor system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in the spring of 2013 and incorporates many design changes, discussed in previous publications, to improve the operational range, efficiency, reliability and maintainability as compared to previous compressor skids used for this application. The 12 GeV helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels supporting three pressure levels in the new cold box. During compressor commissioning the compressors were operated independent of the cold box over a wide range of process conditions to verify proper performance including adequate cooling and oil removal. Isothermal and volumetric efficiencies over these process conditions for several built-involume ratios were obtained. This paper will discuss the operational envelope results and the modifications/improvements incorporated into the skids.

  8. Commissioning and operational results of the 12 GeV helium compression system at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The new compressor system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in the spring of 2013 and incorporates many design changes, discussed in previous publications, to improve the operational range, efficiency, reliability and maintainability as compared to previous compressor skids used for this application. The 12 GeV helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels supporting three pressure levels in the new cold box. During compressor commissioning the compressors were operated independent of the cold box over a wide range of process conditions to verify proper performance including adequate cooling and oil removal. Isothermal and volumetric efficiencies over these process conditions for several built-involume ratios were obtained. This paper will discuss the operational envelope results and the modifications/improvements incorporated into the skids.

  9. Electroweak Measurements of Neutron Densities in CREX and PREX at JLab, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Charles J.; Kumar, Krishna S.; Michaels, Robert W.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of the parity-violating electron scattering asymmetry is an established technique at Jefferson Lab and provides a new opportunity to measure the weak charge distribution and hence pin down the neutron radius in nuclei in a relatively clean and model-independent way. This is because the Z boson of the weak interaction couples primarily to neutrons. We will describe the PREX and CREX experiments on ${}^{208}$Pb and ${}^{48}$Ca respectively; these are both doubly-magic nuclei whose first excited state can be discriminated by the high resolution spectrometers at JLab. The heavier lead nucleus, with a neutron excess, provides an interpretation of the neutron skin thickness in terms of properties of bulk neutron matter. For the lighter ${}^{48}$Ca nucleus, which is also rich in neutrons, microscopic nuclear theory calculations are feasible and are sensitive to poorly constrained 3-neutron forces.

  10. Electrons on the HDice target: Results and analysis of test runs at JLab in 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Michael; Bass, Christopher; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Deur, Alexandre; Hanretty, Charles; Ho, Dao; Kageya, Tsuneo; Laine, Vivien; Peng, Peng; Sandorfi, Andrew; Wei, Xiangdong; Whisnant, Charles

    2014-06-01

    During the Jefferson Labaratory E06-101 (g14) experiment \\cite{g14} utilizing photons on solid HD and performed in Hall B, two opportunities arose for targets to be subjected to multi-GeV electron beams in week-long campaigns of dose accumulation and NMR polarization measurements. This was in preparation for conditionally approved electron experiments after the 12 GeV JLab upgrade\\cite{trans}. Besides the important thermal effects, evidence consistent with screening of the NMR and with decay of the target polarization was observed during bombardment and for a time afterwards. The solid hydrogens have been the subject of previous radiation damage studies, both for possible polarized DT fusion\\cite{Forrest97} and for production of dynamically polarized nuclear targets\\cite{Radtke04}. We synthesize all this information into an overall picture that can guide on-going development of the HDice target system for future use.

  11. JLAMP: AN AMPLIFIER-BASED FEL IN THE JLAB SRF ERL DRIVER

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jordan; Stephen V. Benson; David Douglas; Pavel Evtushenko; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; George R. Neil

    2007-06-13

    Notional designs for energy-recovering linac (“ERL”) -driven high average power free electron lasers (“FEL”s) often invoke amplifier-based architectures. To date, however, amplifier FELs have been limited in average power output to values several orders of magnitude lower than those demonstrated in optical-resonator based systems; this is due at least in part to the limited electron beam powers available from their driver accelerators. In order to directly contrast the performance available from amplifiers to that provided by high-power cavity-based resonators, we have developed a scheme to test an amplifier FEL in the JLab SRF ERL driver. We describe an accelerator system design that can seamlessly and non-invasively integrate a 10 m wiggler into the existing system and which provides, at least in principle, performance that would support high-efficiency lasing in an amplifier configuration. Details of the design and an accelerator performance analysis will be presented

  12. Future Spin Physics at JLab 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Kees de

    2007-06-13

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  13. Future Spin Physics at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2006-10-02

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  14. [Experimental and theoretical plasma physics program]. [Final progress report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, H.

    1983-12-31

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory programs, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In the following, the authors summarize the technical progress in five major areas: (1) RF interaction with plasmas including wave propagation and RF heating, (2) spheromak formation, equilibrium, and stability; (3) stability of nonaxisymmetric systems (EBT, mirrors, etc.); (4) stability theory of toroidal plasmas (tokamak, RFP, etc); and (5) nonlinear theory.

  15. [Experimental and theoretical plasma physics program]. Technical progress [in FY 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, H.

    1981-12-31

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory programs and in many cases these theoretical development helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In the following, the authors summarize the technical progress in five major areas: (1) rf interaction with plasmas including wave propagation, rf heating, rf induced runaways and current drive; (2) spheromak -- formation, equilibrium, and stability; (3) stability of nonaxisymmetric systems (EBT, mirror, etc.); (4) stability theory of toroidal plasmas -- tokamak, RFP, etc.; and (5) nonlinear theory.

  16. The Generalized Parton Distribution program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, C. Munoz

    2008-10-13

    Recent results on the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) will be presented. The emphasis will be in the Hall A program aiming at measuring Q{sup 2}--dependences of different terms of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) cross section. This is a fundamental step before one can extract GPD information from JLab DVCS data. Neutral pion production will also be discussed and results from the CLAS collaboration will be shown. Finally, the upcoming program in Hall A, using both a 6 GeV beam ({approx_equal}2010) and a 11 GeV beam ({approx_equal}2015) will be described.

  17. EXPHER (EXperimental PHysics ERror analysis): a Declaration Language and a Program Generator for the Treatment of Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Philippe; Taupin, Daniel

    1995-05-01

    EXPHER refers to both a package — program generating compiler and library — which facilitates the treatment of a set of experimental data associated to a physical model, and a specification language describing the behaviour of the experimental devices, EXPHER yields a compilable program whose execution determines the most likely values of the parameters involved in the physical model, but also their error bars and their comprehensive error matrix. EXPHER est à la fois un logiciel — compilateur et générateur de programme, avec une bibliothèque associée — facilitant le traitement d'une série de données expérimentales associée à un modèle de physique et un langage de spécification du comportement de l'appareillage expérimental. À partir de cette description de l'appareillage, EXPHER produit un programme compilable dont l'exécution détermine les valeurs les plus probables de paramètres du modèle physique, leur barre d'erreur et la matrice d'erreurs finale.

  18. Welfare reform and child care: evidence from 10 experimental welfare-to-work programs.

    PubMed

    Robins, Philip K

    2007-10-01

    This article examines the employment and child care responses of families participating in 10 experimental welfare reform programs conducted in the United States between 1989 and 2002. For the programs analyzed, child care use increases by about the same amount as the increase in employment. Most of the increased child care comprises informal care by a relative, particularly care by a sibling or a grandparent. Although there are significant differences in the child care responses across the various programs tested, there are no significant differences in the impacts for persons leaving welfare versus persons staying on welfare.

  19. Q0 Improvement of Large-Grain Multi-Cell Cavities by Using JLab's Standard ILC EP Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, R. L.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Liu, K. X.; Lu, X. Y.; Zhao, K.

    2011-07-01

    As reported previously at the Berlin workshop, applying the JLab standard ILC electropolishing (EP) recipe on previously buffered chemical polishing (BCP) etched fine-grain multi-cell cavities results in improvement both in gradient and Q{sub 0}. We recently had the opportunity to experiment with two 1300 MHz 9-cell large-gain niobium cavities manufactured by JLab and Peking University. Both cavities were initially BCP etched and further processed by using JLab's standard ILC EP recipe. Due to fabrication defects, these two cavities only reached a gradient in the range of 20-30 MV/m. Interestingly both cavities demonstrated significant Q{sub 0} improvement in the gradient range of 15-20 MV/m. At 2K, a Q{sub 0} value of 2E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. At a reduced temperature of 1.8K, a Q{sub 0} value of 3E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. These results suggest that a possible path for obtaining higher Q{sub 0} in the medium gradient range is to use the large-grain material for cavity fabrication and EP and low temperature bake for cavity processing.

  20. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designed to explore or develop new or unproven teaching methods or techniques. (c) For the purpose of the... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to instructional material used in a research or... RIGHTS IN RESEARCH, EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS, AND TESTING § 98.3 Access to instructional material used in...

  1. Prison Education and Rehabilitation: Illusion or Reality? A Case Study of an Experimental Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.; And Others

    A review of the literature, covering a variety of theories as to the causes of criminal behavior in young people and barriers to their rehabilitation, lays the groundwork for a report of an experimental program using the humanities to assist in the rehabilitation of young criminal offenders, at the State Correctional Institution at Camp Hill, Pa.…

  2. NSF's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Subsidizing Academic Research or State Budgets?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    This cross-state empirical study focuses on the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) and examines its impact on the academic research and development (R&D) expenditures financed by state governments. Based on a panel of 50 states during 1979-2006, the empirical results indicate that…

  3. Phase-Elective English: An Experimental Program for Grades Eleven and Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Board of Education, Louisville, KY.

    This report of an experimental program, developed at the Jeffersontown High School in Louisville, Kentucky, describes 26 nongraded elective English courses which are divided into five ability-level phases. Phase 1 and 2 courses (for less advanced students) deal with such areas as developmental reading, vocational English, oral communication,…

  4. The Mirror Nuclei 3H and 3He Program at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Javier

    2017-03-01

    Using electron beam energies of up to 11 GeV, Jefferson Lab plans to carry out in the near future a group of four experiments involving the mirror nuclei 3H and 3He. The experiments aim to, (A) extract the deep inelastic neutron to proton structure function ratio F_2^n/F_2^p (and u / d quark distributions) for 0.2 ≤ x ≤ 0.9, (B) study the isospin structure of two-nucleon and search for three-nucleon Short Range Correlations (SRC) for x < 3, (C) measure the proton momentum distribution of both nuclei at x = 1.2 to further our understanding of SRCs in the few-body and (D) extract the charge radii of both nuclei at Q^2 ≤ 0.1 GeV^2.

  5. The Mirror Nuclei 3H and 3He Program at JLab

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez, Javier

    2017-02-28

    Jefferson Lab plans to carry out in the near future a group of four experiments involving the mirror nuclei 3H and 3He, using electron beam energies of up to 11 GeV. Our experiments aim to, (A) extract the deep inelastic neutron to proton structure function ratio Fmore » $$n\\atop{2}$$F$$p\\atop{2}$$ (and u / d quark distributions) for 0.2 ≤ x ≤ 0.9 , (B) study the isospin structure of two-nucleon and search for three-nucleon Short Range Correlations (SRC) for x < 3 , (C) measure the proton momentum distribution of both nuclei at $x = 1.2$ to further our understanding of SRCs in the few-body and (D) extract the charge radii of both nuclei at Q2 ≤ 0.1 GeV2.« less

  6. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, Evelyn; Craddick, William G; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Wendt, Robert L; Woodbury, Professor Keith A.

    2007-09-01

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program

  7. Overview of the C-2U Advanced Beam-Driven FRC Experimental Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Barnes, D.; Dettrick, S.; Garate, E.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Ivanov, A. A.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The world's largest compact toroid (CT) device, C-2, has recently been upgraded to C-2U at Tri Alpha Energy to seek for a sustainment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by neutral-beam (NB) injection. The C-2 experimental program was successfully completed with dramatic improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas, as well as demonstrated plasma pressure increase and plasma heating by NB injection. To enhance the NB injection effect and further improve the FRC performance, the C-2U experimental program has started with following key system upgrades: (i) increased total NB input power to 10 + MW (15 keV hydrogen) with tilted injection angle; (ii) enhanced edge-biasing capability for stability control; (iii) upgraded particle inventory control systems. The initial C-2U experiment has already demonstrated much further improvements, revealing advanced beam-driven FRC plasmas. In the best operating regime we have successfully achieved plasma sustainment up to 5 + ms; while, in the longer-pulsed regime the plasma lifetime can be extended up to the end of NB pulse-duration (8 + ms). The overall C-2U experimental program and the initial experimental results will be presented at the meeting.

  8. SASSIE: A program to study intrinsically disordered biological molecules and macromolecular ensembles using experimental scattering restraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Joseph E.; Raghunandan, Sindhu; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-02-01

    A program to construct ensembles of biomolecular structures that are consistent with experimental scattering data are described. Specifically, we generate an ensemble of biomolecular structures by varying sets of backbone dihedral angles that are then filtered using experimentally determined restraints to rapidly determine structures that have scattering profiles that are consistent with scattering data. We discuss an application of these tools to predict a set of structures for the HIV-1 Gag protein, an intrinsically disordered protein, that are consistent with small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. We have assembled these algorithms into a program called SASSIE for structure generation, visualization, and analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins and other macromolecular ensembles using neutron and X-ray scattering restraints. Program summaryProgram title: SASSIE Catalogue identifier: AEKL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 991 624 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 826 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, C/C++, Fortran Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: 32- and 64-bit Linux (Ubuntu 10.04, Centos 5.6) and Mac OS X (10.6.6) RAM: 1 GB Classification: 3 External routines: Python 2.6.5, numpy 1.4.0, swig 1.3.40, scipy 0.8.0, Gnuplot-py-1.8, Tcl 8.5, Tk 8.5, Mac installation requires aquaterm 1.0 (or X window system) and Xcode 3 development tools. Nature of problem: Open source software to generate structures of disordered biological molecules that subsequently allow for the comparison of computational and experimental results is limiting the use of scattering resources. Solution method: Starting with an all atom model of a protein, for example, users can input

  9. Effect of formal specifications on program complexity and reliability: An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Amrit L.; Sahoo, Swarupa N.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study undertaken to assess the improvement in program quality by using formal specifications. Specifications in the Z notation were developed for a simple but realistic antimissile system. These specifications were then used to develop 2 versions in C by 2 programmers. Another set of 3 versions in Ada were independently developed from informal specifications in English. A comparison of the reliability and complexity of the resulting programs suggests the advantages of using formal specifications in terms of number of errors detected and fault avoidance.

  10. HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

  11. Commissioning of helium refrigeration system at JLab for 12 GeV upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.; Arenius, D.

    2014-01-01

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system added to the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) for the 12 GeV upgrade will double its previous capacity. It includes a 4.5 K cold box system and compressor system with associated oil removal and gas management systems. At its maximum capacity condition, this new system supports an additional 238 g/s 30 K 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW 35-55 K shield load. Five more design conditions, ranging from liquefaction to refrigeration and a stand-by/reduced load state, were specified for the sizing and selection of its components. The cold box system is comprised of a 300-60 K vertical cold box that incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and a 60-4.5 K horizontal cold box housing seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review the salient 4.5 K system design features and discuss the recent commissioning results.

  12. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  13. Commissioning of helium refrigeration system at JLab for 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system added to the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) for the 12 GeV upgrade will double its previous capacity. It includes a 4.5 K cold box system and compressor system with associated oil removal and gas management systems. At its maximum capacity condition, this new system supports an additional 238 g/s 30 K 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW 35–55 K shield load. Five more design conditions, ranging from liquefaction to refrigeration and a stand-by/reduced load state, were specified for the sizing and selection of its components. The cold box system is comprised of a 300–60 K vertical cold box that incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and a 60–4.5 K horizontal cold box housing seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review the salient 4.5 K system design features and discuss the recent commissioning results.

  14. Controls-structures interaction guest investigator program: Overview and phase 1 experimental results and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase 1 experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding the following topics: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  15. A digital computer propulsion control facility: Description of capabilities and summary of experimental program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Arpasi, D. J.; Lehtinen, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flight weight digital computers are being used today to carry out many of the propulsion system control functions previously delegated exclusively to hydromechanical controllers. An operational digital computer facility for propulsion control mode studies has been used successfully in several experimental programs. This paper describes the system and some of the results concerned with engine control, inlet control, and inlet engine integrated control. Analytical designs for the digital propulsion control modes include both classical and modern/optimal techniques.

  16. Experimental program for real gas flow code validation at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames Rsearch Center is described. Ground-based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arc jet facilities and heated-air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also included are large-scale computer systems for kinetic theory simulations and benchmark code solutions. Flight tests consist of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, the Space Shuttle, Project Fire 2, and planetary probes such as Galileo, Pioneer Venus, and PAET.

  17. A theoretical/experimental program to develop active optical pollution sensors, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poultney, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on experimental investigations of Lidar and the application of Lidar to environmental and atmospheric science. Specifically the following programs are considered: calibration and application of the LaRC 48-inch Lidar; efficient and certain detection of SO2 and other gases in the calibration tank using the Raman Stack Monitor Lidar; the potential of Lidar remote sensing from the space shuttle; and the planning and mounting of efforts to realize the promise of backscatter differential absorption Lidar.

  18. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  19. Commissioning and initial experimental program of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alef, S.; Bauer, P.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Böse, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Geffers, D.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Görtz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Knaust, J.; Kohl, K.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.; Zimmermann, T.

    2016-11-01

    BGO-OD is a new meson photoproduction experiment at the ELSA facility of Bonn University. It aims at the investigation of non strange and strange baryon excitations, and is especially designed to be able to detect weekly bound meson-baryon type structures. The setup for the BGO-OD experiment is presented, the characteristics of the photon beam and the detector performances are shown and the initial experimental program is discussed.

  20. Progress report of a research program in experimental high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lanou, R.E. Jr.; Cutts, D.

    1990-07-01

    An experimental program in strong and electro-weak interaction physics of elementary particles is being carried out using electronic detection techniques. Experiments have been performed at Brown, Brookhaven, and Fermilab. The work described in this report by the Electronic Detector Group addresses the following: neutrino interactions and intrinsic properties, preparations for experiments ( D--ZERO'') at the FNAL 2 TeV {bar p}p Collider, new detection techniques for neutrino properties.

  1. The User-Assisted Automated Experimental (TEST) Design Program (AED): Version II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK System Development Corporation AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS 4134 Linden Avenue Suite 305 62202F, 7184-00-09...pro- cedures and which maximize information return while minimizing the number of observations (tests) required. The overall experimental design...E. Taylor, SDC Colorado Springs, CO, for his work on the Central Composite Design, Mr. Edwin G. Meyer who developed many of the algorithms and

  2. A computer program for enzyme kinetics that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, R; Gavaldà, M T; Canela, E I

    1986-01-01

    A method of model discrimination and parameter estimation in enzyme kinetics is proposed. The experimental design and analysis of the model are carried out simultaneously and the stopping rule for experimentation is deduced by the experimenter when the probabilities a posteriori indicate that one model is clearly superior to the rest. A FORTRAN77 program specifically developed for joint designs is given. The method is very powerful, as indicated by its usefulness in the discrimination between models. For example, it has been successfully applied to three cases of enzyme kinetics (a single-substrate Michaelian reaction with product inhibition, a single-substrate complex reaction and a two-substrate reaction). By using this method the most probable model and the estimates of the parameters can be obtained in one experimental session. The FORTRAN77 program is deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50134 (19 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. PMID:3800965

  3. Experimental and Demonstration Program, Copper Country Intermediate School District. End of Budget Period Reports 1972 and 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    End of budget period reports are presented for an experimental and demonstration program aimed at increasing the learning process and achievement of K-4 children and to effect internal and external change in teachers' attitudes and behavior. The program, instituted in a rural, low income area, consists of an Orff music program and a theater…

  4. [The measurement of time and its instruments: the program of experimental psychology of Gabriele Buccola].

    PubMed

    Degni, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Gabriele Buccola is remembered as the first Italian psychologist to have developed a rigorous program of laboratory research. The careful examination of the instruments and experimental planning of his psychochronometric investigations reveals the indissoluble bond between theory and experimentation that defines a scientific conception of psychology on the basis of a differential methodology. For Buccola it is important to demonstrate that there exist "laws" that govern the mental processes, and that there exists a time that regulates human reactions and behaviour, considering however the individual differences and various factors that can bear influence to increase or decrease it. The use of 'intelligent' instruments proves to be fundamental within a model of experimentation directed towards pointing out individual differences and not just identifying the general laws of mental functioning. Buccola in this way imparts a psychological characterization to the study of mental illness--placing him as an initiator of experimental psychopathology, which will have a significant development in Europe thanks precisely to the work of Kraepelin--along with a differential and clinical-experimental bent to the emerging Italian scientific psychology. Lastly, the attention directed to the study of complex mental processes leads Buccola to lay the foundation in Italy for the study of the subjective experience of time.

  5. Incorporation of a PbSe Array Based Spectrograph into EPICS using LabView at the JLab FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hardy; S.V. Benson; Michelle D. Shinn; S. Zhang

    2005-08-21

    A real-time spectrograph with a 1Hz update rate was designed and installed at the JLab FEL facility using a Cal Sensors PbSe array and a Roper Scientific SpectraPro 300 monochrometer. This paper describes the implementation of EPICS channel access on a remote PC running LabView with modification of vendor supplied LabView VI's to allow display of FEL light spectra in real-time on a remote workstation. This allows PC based diagnostics to be used in EPICS.

  6. Determination of the linear polarization for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction experiments in Hall-B at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabintsev, Arthur

    2010-02-01

    The JLab CLAS g9a experiments are double polarization measurements that have accumulated photoproduction data using a linearly polarized, tagged photons incident on a longitudinally polarized, frozen spin butanol target (FROST). Linearly polarized photons were produced via coherent bremsstrahlung from an electron beam incident on an oriented diamond crystal.footnotetextU. Timm, Fortschritte der Physik, 17, 765 (1969). The analysis of the resulting coherent peaks was used to determine photon polarization which agree with phenomenological calculations.footnotetextA. Natter, et al., Nuc. Inst Meth B 211, 465 (2003). )

  7. Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research programexperimental and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2009-04-01

    This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

  8. Status of Hall B superconducting magnets for the CLAS12 detector at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Quettier, L; Kashy, D; Elouadrhiri, L; Salpietro, E; Schneider, W; Small, R; Leung, E; Juang, T; McMullin, J; Taylor, C; Xu, L; Wagner, B; Wang, B; Wang, M; Zbasnik, J

    2011-12-01

    Hadron physics has been an essential part of the physics program with the CLAS detector in experimental hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). With the 12 GeV upgrade of the CEBAF machine, hadron physics in Hall B will be extended to a new domain of higher mass resonances and the range of higher transferred momentum using up to 11 GeV electron beams and the upgraded CLAS12 detector. In this paper, status of the hall B superconducting magnets for the CLAS12 detector is presented.

  9. Evaluation of project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 2 Program) by the program participants: findings based on the Experimental Implementation Phase.

    PubMed

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F; Chan, Candace W Y

    2008-05-23

    A total of 49 schools participated in the Secondary 2 Program of the Experimental Implementation Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes). After completion of the program, 7,406 students completed a Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form A) designed by the research team to reveal their comments about the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the schools, the research team aggregated the data to form a "reconstructed" overall profile on the perceptions of the program participants. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors. About 80% of the respondents were satisfied with the program and regarded it as helpful to their overall development. The present findings provide support to the effectiveness of Secondary 2 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S. from the perspective of the program participants.

  10. Do conditional cash transfers influence migration? A study using experimental data from the Mexican PROGRESA program.

    PubMed

    Stecklov, Guy; Winters, Paul; Stampini, Marco; Davis, Benjamin

    2005-11-01

    Prior research on Mexican migration has shown that social networks and economic incentives play an important role in determining migration outcomes. We use experimental data from PROGRESA, Mexico's primary poverty-reduction program, to evaluate the effects of conditional cash transfers on migration both domestically and to the United States. Our study complements a growing body of literature aimed at overcoming longstanding hurdles to the establishment of causal validity in empirical studies of migration. Analysis based on the data collected before and after the program's onset shows that conditional transfers reduce U.S. migration but not domestic migration. The data also enable us to explore the role of existing family and community migration networks. The results show that migration networks strongly influence migration, but that the effect of conditional transfers on migration is apparently not mediated by existing migration network structures. Our results suggest that conditional transfers may be helpful in managing rural out-migration, particularly to the United States.

  11. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  12. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for the Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I

    2002-11-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. NIF is now entering the first phases of its laser commissioning program. Low-energy preamplifier rod laser shots have been successfully propagated through the entire laser chain. Higher energy shots are planned through the end of 2002. NIF's target experimental systems are also being installed in preparation for laser performance and experimental capability commissioning starting in 2003.

  13. Pilot study of the Korean Parent Training Program using a partial group randomized experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunjung; Cain, Kevin; Boutain, Doris; Chun, Jin-Joo; Kim, Sangho; Im, Hyesang

    2017-01-01

    Problems Korean American (KA) children experience mental health problems due to difficulties in parenting dysfunction complicated by living in two cultures. Methods Korean Parent Training Program (KPTP) was pilot tested with 48 KA mothers of children (ages 3–8) using partial group randomized controlled experimental study design. Self-report survey and observation data were gathered. Findings Analyses using generalized estimating equation indicated the intervention group mothers increased effective parenting and their children decreased behavior problems and reported less acculturation conflict with mothers. Conclusions The KPTP is a promising way to promote effective parenting and increase positive child mental health in KA families. PMID:24645901

  14. High-energy-physics studies. Progress report, Part I. Experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The experimental high energy physics program at Ohio State University for 1982 is described. The following topics are discussed: a search for neutrino oscillations at LAMPF; measuring charm and beauty decays via hadronic production in a hybrid emulsion spectrometer; prompt neutrino production experiment; search for long-lived particles from neutrino interactions in a tagged emulsion spectrometer; electron-positron interactions at CESR-CLEO; a search for exotic forms of stable matter; and development of computer systems for data processing and for development of detectors. (GHT)

  15. The User-Assisted Automated Experimental (TEST), Design Program (AED): Version I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASKAREA 4 WORK UNiT NUMBERS System Development Corporation ARE0&WOR1UITOUMER 4134 Linden Avenue Suite 305 62202F...number of experiments than would be required in the usual experimental procedures and which maximize information return while minimizing the number of... ACDF AF BCEF 81D ACOE BC AE ACDF 13DEF SO ACDE AF 13CEF BE AC ADEF BCDF IF ACEF AD BCDE CD AIDE ABCF EF CE AS ABCDEF OF CF ABEF ABCD DE DE ABCD ABEF CF

  16. Extraction of the pretzelosity distribution from experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Lefky, Christopher; Prokudin, Alexei

    2015-02-13

    We attempt an extraction of the pretzelosity distribution ($h^{\\perp}_{1T}$) from preliminary COMPASS, HERMES, and JLAB experimental data on $\\sin(3\\phi_h - \\phi_S)$ asymmetry on proton and deuteron targets. The resulting distributions, albeit big errors, show tendency for up quark pretzelosity to be positive and down quark pretzelosity to be negative. A model relation of pretzelosity distribution and Orbital Angular Momentum of quarks is used to estimate contributions of up and down quarks.

  17. JLab E07-011: Precision measurements of g{sub 1}{sup d} using ND{sub 3} and LiD

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.

    2009-07-27

    We plan to make definitive measurements of the deuteron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup d}/F{sub 1}{sup d} in the deep-inelastic kinematics accessible with a 6 GeV beam at JLab. The principal goal is to provide the low Q{sup 2} anchor points for NLO pQCD plus higher twist fits to g{sub 1}{sup d}/F{sub 1}{sup d}, which is particularly sensitive to DELTAG(x)(the polarized gluon density of the nucleon) and the sum of up and down quark polarizations. By spanning a factor of typically two in the Q{sup 2}-range at nine values of x, the new data will strongly constrain the higher twist contribution to the fits, with a corresponding reduction in the polarized PDF uncertainties. The proposed measurements, when combined with existing and planned world data at higher Q{sup 2}, will provide the theoretically cleanest determination of DELTAG(x) in the moderate to high x region, and will provide a necessary complement to the low x program of RHIC-spin.The experiment will use both {sup 6}LiD and ND{sub 3} as a source of polarized deuterons, with approximately equal running times for both to constrain the nuclear effects in {sup 6}LiD, the target used by the higher Q{sup 2} experiments at SLAC and CERN. Both the target and low current (nA scale) 6 GeV electron beam will be longitudinally polarized. Electrons scattered at angles from about 18 deg. to 45 deg. will be detected. Additional measurements at lower Q{sup 2} will be made using a 4.8 GeV beam energy.

  18. Overview of C-2U FRC Experimental Program and Plans for C-2W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Cappello, M.; Ivanov, A. A.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's experimental program has been focused on a demonstration of reliable field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment, driven by fast ions via high-power neutral-beam (NB) injection. The world's largest compact-toroid experimental devices, C-2 and C-2U, have successfully produced a well-stabilized, sustainable FRC plasma state with NB injection (input power, PNB 10 + MW; 15 keV hydrogen) and end-on coaxial plasma guns. Remarkable improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas have led to further improved fast-ion build up; thereby, an advanced beam-driven FRC state has been produced and sustained for up to 5 + ms (longer than all characteristic system time scales), only limited by hardware and electric supply constraints such as NB and plasma-gun power supplies. To further improve the FRC performance the C-2U device is being replaced by C-2W featuring higher injected NB power, longer pulse duration as well as enhanced edge-biasing systems and substantially upgraded divertors. Main C-2U experimental results and key features of C-2W will be presented. Tri Alpha Energy, Inc.

  19. Development plan for the External Hazards Experimental Group. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Justin Leigh; Smith, Curtis Lee; Burns, Douglas Edward; Kammerer, Annie

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the development plan for a new multi-partner External Hazards Experimental Group (EHEG) coordinated by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) technical pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Currently, there is limited data available for development and validation of the tools and methods being developed in the RISMC Toolkit. The EHEG is being developed to obtain high-quality, small- and large-scale experimental data validation of RISMC tools and methods in a timely and cost-effective way. The group of universities and national laboratories that will eventually form the EHEG (which is ultimately expected to include both the initial participants and other universities and national laboratories that have been identified) have the expertise and experimental capabilities needed to both obtain and compile existing data archives and perform additional seismic and flooding experiments. The data developed by EHEG will be stored in databases for use within RISMC. These databases will be used to validate the advanced external hazard tools and methods.

  20. Noise characteristics of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Searle, N.; Blakney, D. F.; Pennock, A. P.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental data base was developed from the model upper surface blowing (USB) propulsive lift system hardware. While the emphasis was on far field noise data, a considerable amount of relevant flow field data were also obtained. The data were derived from experiments in four different facilities resulting in: (1) small scale static flow field data; (2) small scale static noise data; (3) small scale simulated forward speed noise and load data; and (4) limited larger-scale static noise flow field and load data. All of the small scale tests used the same USB flap parts. Operational and geometrical variables covered in the test program included jet velocity, nozzle shape, nozzle area, nozzle impingement angle, nozzle vertical and horizontal location, flap length, flap deflection angle, and flap radius of curvature.

  1. Experimental Program to Elucidate and Control Stimulated Brillouin and Raman Backscattering in Long-Scale Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D.

    1998-10-19

    Laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce X-rays to drive the implosion of a fusion capsule. Stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering (SRS and SBS) could result in unacceptably high laser reflectivities. Unfortunately, it is impossible at present to fully simulate these processes realistically. The authors experimental program aims to understand these instabilities by pursuing a dual strategy. (1) They use a gas-filled hohlraum design, which best approaches ignition-hohlraum conditions, on the Nova laser to identify important non linear trends. (2) They are shifting towards more fundamental experiments with a nearly diffraction-limited interaction laser beam illuminating extremely well characterized plasmas on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos to probe the relevant fundamental processes.

  2. A framework program for the teaching of alternative methods (replacement, reduction, refinement) to animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Daneshian, Mardas; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Blaauboer, Bas; Caloni, Francesca; Cosson, Pierre; Curren, Rodger; Goldberg, Alan; Gruber, Franz; Ohl, Frauke; Pfaller, Walter; van der Valk, Jan; Vinardell, Pilar; Zurlo, Joanne; Hartung, Thomas; Leist, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Development of improved communication and education strategies is important to make alternatives to the use of animals, and the broad range of applications of the 3Rs concept better known and understood by different audiences. For this purpose, the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing in Europe (CAAT-Europe) together with the Transatlantic Think Tank for Toxicology (t(4)) hosted a three-day workshop on "Teaching Alternative Methods to Animal Experimentation". A compilation of the recommendations by a group of international specialists in the field is summarized in this report. Initially, the workshop participants identified the different audience groups to be addressed and also the communication media that may be used. The main outcome of the workshop was a framework for a comprehensive educational program. The modular structure of the teaching program presented here allows adaptation to different audiences with their specific needs; different time schedules can be easily accommodated on this basis. The topics cover the 3Rs principle, basic research, toxicological applications, method development and validation, regulatory aspects, case studies and ethical aspects of 3Rs approaches. This expert consortium agreed to generating teaching materials covering all modules and providing them in an open access online repository.

  3. Survey of computer programs for prediction of crash response and of its experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    The author seeks to critically assess the potentialities of the mathematical and hybrid simulators which predict post-impact response of transportation vehicles. A strict rigorous numerical analysis of a complex phenomenon like crash may leave a lot to be desired with regard to the fidelity of mathematical simulation. Hybrid simulations on the other hand which exploit experimentally observed features of deformations appear to hold a lot of promise. MARC, ANSYS, NONSAP, DYCAST, ACTION, WHAM II and KRASH are among some of the simulators examined for their capabilities with regard to prediction of post impact response of vehicles. A review of these simulators reveals that much more by way of an analysis capability may be desirable than what is currently available. NASA's crashworthiness testing program in conjunction with similar programs of various other agencies, besides generating a large data base, will be equally useful in the validation of new mathematical concepts of nonlinear analysis and in the successful extension of other techniques in crashworthiness.

  4. [Developmental programming of metabolic diseases--a review of studies on experimental animal models].

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Iwona; Zgódka, Paulina; Milewska, Marta; Błaszczyk, Maciej; Grzelkowska-Kowalczyk, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Growth and development in utero is a complex and dynamic process that requires interaction between the mother organism and the fetus. The delivery of macro--and micronutrients, oxygen and endocrine signals has crucial importance for providing a high level of proliferation, growth and differentiation of cells, and a disruption in food intake not only has an influence on the growth of the fetus, but also has negative consequences for the offspring’s health in the future. Diseases that traditionally are linked to inappropriate life style of adults, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arterial hypertension, can be "programmed" in the early stage of life and the disturbed growth of the fetus leads to the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. The structural changes of some organs, such as the brain, pancreas and kidney, modifications of the signaling and metabolic pathways in skeletal muscles and in fatty tissue, epigenetic mechanisms and mitochondrial dysfunction are the basis of the metabolic disruptions. The programming of the metabolic disturbances is connected with the disruption in the intrauterine environment experienced in the early and late gestation period. It causes the changes in deposition of triglycerides, activation of the hormonal "stress axis" and disturbances in the offspring’s glucose tolerance. The present review summarizes experimental results that led to the identification of the above-mentioned links and it underlines the role of animal models in the studies of this important concept.

  5. Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

  6. Progress report of a research program in experimental and theoretical high energy physics, 1 June 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Cutts, D.; Fried, H.M.

    1993-06-01

    The main emphasis in the theoretical program has been in the area of string theory; also investigated were confinement and other aspects of QCD, electroweak symmetry breaking, and electroweak baryogenesis. The research program in computational physics concentrated on the development of the source Galerkin method of numerical quantum field theory. One portion of the experimental program dealt with interactions of leptons and hadrons from accelerator and strophysics sources. A description of the Large Volume Detector at Gran Sasso and its use as a stellar collapse monitor is given, along with an account of research and development on resistive plate counters. The rest of the experimental program concerns hadron collider and neutrino physics, with major emphasis on the D0 experiment at the TeVatron. The commissioning of the D0 detector and its operation are described, along with D0 analysis. Also reported is a novel cryogenic technique utilizing superfluid helium for neutrino calorimetry. 122 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs.

  7. Measurements of Polarization Transfers in Real Compton Scattering by a proton target at JLAB. A new source of information on the 3D shape of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-03-01

    In this thesis work, results of the analysis of the polarization transfers measured in real Compton scattering (RCS) by the Collaboration E07-002 at the Je fferson Lab Hall-C are presented. The data were collected at large scattering angle (theta_cm = 70deg) and with a polarized incident photon beam at an average energy of 3.8 GeV. Such a kind of experiments allows one to understand more deeply the reaction mechanism, that involves a real photon, by extracting both Compton form factors and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) (also relevant for possibly shedding light on the total angular momentum of the nucleon). The obtained results for the longitudinal and transverse polarization transfers K_LL and K_LT, are of crucial importance, since they confirm unambiguously the disagreement between experimental data and pQCD prediction, as it was found in E99-114 experiment, and favor the Handbag mechanism. The E99-114 and E07-002 results can contribute to attract new interest on the great yield of the Compton scattering by a nucleon target, as demonstrated by the recent approval of an experimental proposal submitted to the Jefferson Lab PAC 42 for a Wide-angle Compton Scattering experiment, at 8 and 10 GeV Photon Energies. The new experiments approved to run with the updated 12 GeV electron beam at JLab, are characterized by much higher luminosities, and a new GEM tracker is under development to tackle the challenging backgrounds. Within this context, we present a new multistep tracking algorithm, based on (i) a Neural Network (NN) designed for a fast and efficient association of the hits measured by the GEM detector which allows the track identification, and (ii) the application of both a Kalman filter and Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother to further improve the track reconstruction. The full procedure, i.e. NN and filtering, appears very promising, with high performances in terms of both association effciency and reconstruction accuracy, and these preliminary results will

  8. Nonlinear model identification of an experimental ball-and-tube system using a genetic programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Leandro dos Santos; Pessôa, Marcelo Wicthoff

    2009-07-01

    Most processes in industry are characterized by nonlinear and time-varying behavior. The identification of mathematical models typically nonlinear systems is vital in many fields of engineering. The developed mathematical models can be used to study the behavior of the underlying system as well as for supervision, fault detection, prediction, estimation of unmeasurable variables, optimization and model-based control purposes. A variety of system identification techniques are applied to the modeling of process dynamics. Recently, the identification of nonlinear systems by genetic programming (GP) approaches has been successfully applied in many applications. GP is a paradigm of evolutionary computation field based on a structure description method that applies the principles of natural evolution to optimization problems and its nature is a generalized hierarchy computer program description. GP adopts a tree structure code to describe an identification problem. Unlike the traditional approximation methods where the structure of an approximate model is fixed, the structure of the GP tree itself is modified and optimized and, thus, there is a possibility that GP trees could be more appropriate or accurate approximate models. This paper focuses the GP method for structure selection in a system identification applications. The proposed GP method combines different techniques for tuning of crossover and mutation probabilities with an orthogonal least-squares (OLS) algorithm to estimate the contribution of the branches of the tree to the accuracy of the discrete polynomial Nonlinear AutoRegressive with eXogenous inputs (NARX) model. The nonlinear system identification procedure, based on a NARX representation and GP, is applied to empirical case study of an experimental ball-and-tube system. The results demonstrate that the GP with OLS is a promising technique for NARX modeling.

  9. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study. Weatherization Assistance Program: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  10. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize, and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cow-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale, risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  11. Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2012-03-01

    Overview of Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD, with focus on the spin structure. Nucleon (spin) Structure provides valuable information on QCD dynamics. A decade of experiments from JLab yields these exciting results: (1) valence spin structure, duality; (2) spin sum rules and polarizabilities; (3) precision measurements of g{sub 2} - high-twist; and (4) first neutron transverse spin results - Collins/Sivers/A{sub LT}. There is a bright future as the 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly enhance our capability: (1) Precision determination of the valence quark spin structure flavor separation; and (2) Precision extraction of transversity/tensor charge/TMDs.

  12. A complete dosimetry experimental program in support to the core characterization and to the power calibration of the CABRI reactor. A complete dosimetry experimental program in support of the core characterization and of the power calibration of the CABRI reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rodiac, F.; Hudelot, JP.; Lecerf, J.; Garnier, Y.; Ritter, G.

    2015-07-01

    CABRI is an experimental pulse reactor operated by CEA at the Cadarache research center. Since 1978 the experimental programs have aimed at studying the fuel behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. Since 2003, it has been refurbished in order to be able to provide RIA and LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) experiments in prototypical PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 deg. C). This project is part of a broader scope including an overall facility refurbishment and a safety review. The global modification is conducted by the CEA project team. It is funded by IRSN, which is conducting the CIP experimental program, in the framework of the OECD/NEA project CIP. It is financed in the framework of an international collaboration. During the reactor restart, commissioning tests are realized for all equipment, systems and circuits of the reactor. In particular neutronics and power commissioning tests will be performed respectively in 2015 and 2016. This paper focuses on the design of a complete and original dosimetry program that was built in support to the CABRI core characterization and to the power calibration. Each one of the above experimental goals will be fully described, as well as the target uncertainties and the forecasted experimental techniques and data treatment. (authors)

  13. A Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD): Support for the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Code Validation Program (COVAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, S.A.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Hunt, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    The Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD) described in this paper was developed to aid researchers with code validation for impacts that occur at velocities faster than the testable regime. Codes of concern include both hydrocodes and fast-running analytical or semi-empirical models used to predict the impact phenomenology and damage that results to projectiles and targets. There are several well documented experimental programs that can serve as benchmarks for code validation; these are identified and described. Recommendations for further experimentation (a canonical problem) to provide validation data are also discussed.

  14. A Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD): Support for the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Code Validation Program (COVAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Scott A.; Anderson, Charles E., Jr.; Hertel, Eugene S., Jr.; Hunt, Ronald D.

    The Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD) described in this paper was developed to aid researchers with code validation for impacts that occur at velocities faster than the testable regime. Codes of concern include both hydrocodes and fast-running analytical or semi-empirical models used to predict the impact phenomenology and damage that results to projectiles and targets. There are several well documented experimental programs that can serve as benchmarks for code validation; these are identified and described. Recommendations for further experimentation (a canonical problem) to provide validation data are also discussed.

  15. Progress report of a research program in experimental and theoretical high energy physics, 1 January 1992--31 May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Cutts, D.; Fried, H.M.; Guralnik, G.; Jevicki, A.; King, K.; Lanou, R.E.; Partridge, R.; Tan, C.I.; Widgoff, M.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses research at Brown University in experimental and theoretical high energy physics. Some of the research programs conducted are: interactions of leptons and hadrons form accelerator and astrophysical sources; hadron interactions with hydrogen and heavier nuclei; large volume detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory; GEM collaboration at SSC; and hadron colliders and neutrino physics. (LSP)

  16. For the Love of Statistics: Appreciating and Learning to Apply Experimental Analysis and Statistics through Computer Programming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascaró, Maite; Sacristán, Ana Isabel; Rufino, Marta M.

    2016-01-01

    For the past 4 years, we have been involved in a project that aims to enhance the teaching and learning of experimental analysis and statistics, of environmental and biological sciences students, through computational programming activities (using R code). In this project, through an iterative design, we have developed sequences of R-code-based…

  17. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BURRELL,KH

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, the authors have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) the authors have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {le} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. They have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiation power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  18. Vibratory response of a precision double-multi-layer monochromator positioning system using a generic modeling program with experimental verification.

    SciTech Connect

    Barraza, J.

    1998-07-29

    A generic vibratory response-modeling program has been developed as a tool for designing high-precision optical positioning systems. The systems are modeled as rigid-body structures connected by linear non-rigid elements such as complex actuators and bearings. The full dynamic properties of each non-rigid element are determined experimentally or theoretically, then integrated into the program as inertial and stiffness matrices. Thus, it is possible to have a suite of standardize structural elements for modeling many different positioning systems that use standardized components. This paper will present the application of this program to a double-multi-layer monochromator positioning system that utilizes standardized components. Calculated results are compared to experimental modal analysis results.

  19. Anger & Aggression Management in Young Adolescents: An Experimental Validation of the SCARE Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, D. Scott; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    A study examined the validity of the SCARE program; an anger management program developed with high school students. Adolescents (n=207) exposed to the SCARE program had significantly lower levels of anger and aggression, slightly higher anger control, and lower scores on aggressive and violent attitudes a year after exposure. (Contains…

  20. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 12. Single annulus transient test program data tables: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    The single annulus test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the fuel assemblies used in the Savannah River Site production reactors. Data files were transmitted from Columbia University to Savannah River Site in a DOS compatible format. This report provides a hardcopy version of the electronic media data files.

  1. Experimental verification of a real-time program for the determination of temperature and sag of overhead lines

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R.A.; Black, W.Z.; Byrd, W.R.; Champion, T.C. III

    1983-07-01

    An outdoor test facility was used to experimentally verify real-time overhead conductor ampacity and sag programs. The facility consists of a 213m span of 26/7 336 kcmil ACSR conductor completely instrumented with 13 thermocouples as well as a sag and tension device. A weather station mounted near mid-span monitors all pertinent weather conditions. The measured conductor temperatures fluctuated significantly along the length of the test span. Spanwise variations in the measured instantaneous temperatures were frequently in excess of 10/sup 0/C for a wide variety of conductor currents and weather conditions. The conductor temperatures predicted by the real-time ampacity program were within 10/sup 0/C of the average measured conductor temperatures for all tests. Measured conductor sags were within 5 percent of values predicted by a real-time sag program. The results of the experimental project show that accurate predictions of real-time conductor temperatures and sags can be achieved by knowing the conductor current, wind speed, wind direction and the ambient air temperature. Therefore, computer programs are capable of predicting conductor temperatures and sags with a minimum amount of weather data provided by a simple and inexpensive weather station. Instrumentation placed on the conductor is not necessary for execution of the ampacity and sag programs.

  2. Promoting resilience in youth from divorced families: lessons learned from experimental trials of the New Beginnings Program.

    PubMed

    Wolchik, Sharlene A; Schenck, Clorinda E; Sandler, Irwin N

    2009-12-01

    This article focuses on the contributions that the program of research on the New Beginnings Program (NBP) has made to understanding pathways to resilience in youth who experience parental divorce. First, the research demonstrating that divorce increases risk for mental health, physical health, and social adaptation problems is reviewed. Next, theory and research linking social environmental-level and youth-level modifiable risk factors and resilience resources to youth's postdivorce adjustment are presented. The conceptual framework underlying the NBP and the risk factors and resilience resources targeted in this program are described next. The short-term and long-term results of two experimental, randomized efficacy trials of the NBP and moderators and mediators of its effects are then presented. Analyses that examine whether youth self-systems beliefs account for the links between program-induced changes in family-level resilience resources and positive long-term program on adaptation outcomes are presented and how experimental trials can be used to further theories of resilience for youth facing adversities is discussed. The final section describes directions for future research on the NBP.

  3. Promoting Resilience in Youth from Divorced Families: Lessons Learned from Experimental Trials of the New Beginnings Program

    PubMed Central

    Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Schenck, Clorinda E.; Sandler, Irwin N.

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the contributions that the program of research on the New Beginnings Program (NBP) has made to understanding pathways to resilience in youth who experience parental divorce. First, the research demonstrating that divorce increases risk for mental health, physical health and social adaptation problems is reviewed. Next, theory and research linking social environmental-level and youth-level modifiable risk factors and resilience resources to youth’s post-divorce adjustment are presented. The conceptual framework underlying the NBP and the risk factors and resilience resources targeted in this program are described next. The short-term and long-term results of two experimental, randomized efficacy trials of the NBP and moderators and mediators of its effects are then presented. Analyses that examine whether youth self-systems beliefs account for the links between program-induced changes in family-level resilience resources and positive long-term program on adaptation outcomes are presented and how experimental trials can be used to further theories of resilience for youth facing adversities is discussed. The final section describes directions for future research on the NBP. PMID:19807862

  4. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BURRELL,HK

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  5. The MIRTE Experimental Program: An Opportunity to Test Structural Materials in Various Configurations in Thermal Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Leclaire, Nicolas; Le Dauphin, Francois-Xavier; Duhamel, Isabelle; Briggs, Blair; Piot, Jerome; Rennesson, Malvina; Laville, Arnaud

    2014-11-04

    The MIRTE (Materials in Interacting and Reflecting configurations, all Thicknesses) program was established to answer the needs of criticality safety practitioners in terms of experimental validation of structural materials and to possibly contribute to nuclear data improvement, which ultimately supports reactor safety analysis as well. MIRTE took the shape of a collaboration between the AREVA and ANDRA French industrialists and a noncommercial international funding partner such as the U.S. Department of Energy. The aim of this paper is to present the configurations of the MIRTE 1 and MIRTE 2 programs and to highlight the results of the titanium experiments recently published in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.

  6. Commissioning results of Nb3Sn cavity vapor diffusion deposition system at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Clemens, William A.; Macha, Kurt M.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R.

    2015-09-01

    Nb3Sn as a BCS superconductor with a superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium offers potential benefit for SRF cavities via a lower-than-niobium surface resistance at the same temperature and frequency. A Nb3Sn vapor diffusion deposition system designed for coating of 1.5 and 1.3 GHz single-cell cavities was built and commissioned at JLab. As the part of the commissioning, RF performance at 2.0 K of a single-cell 1.5 GHz CEBAF-shaped cavity was measured before and after coating in the system. Before Nb3Sn coating the cavity had a Q0 of about 1010 and was limited by the high field Q-slope at Eacc ≅ 27 MV/m. Coated cavity exhibited the superconducting transition at about 17.9 K. The low-field quality factor was about 5∙109 at 4.3 K and 7∙109 at 2.0 K decreasing with field to about 1∙109 at Eacc ≅ 8 MV/m at both temperatures. The highest field was limited by the available RF power.

  7. Civil Defense Adult Education, A Case Study of an Experimental Pilot Program in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Millicent Kicklighter

    A study of the development and effectiveness of the Florida Pilot Program in Civil Defense Adult Education was conducted from the viewpoint of a participant observer and from data gathered from official records. An instrument developed to gauge the extent to which the objectives of the program were achieved was sent to the 66 counties where the…

  8. Effects of Experimentally Induced Familiarization of Content and Different Response Modes on Achievement from Programmed Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Theodore; Kagen, Edward

    This study investigated attribute by treatment interactions between prior familiarity and response mode to programmed materials for college level subjects by manipulating subjects' familiarity. The programs were a revised version of Diagnosis of Myocardial Infraction in standard format and in a reading version. Materials to familiarize subjects…

  9. An Experimental Study Evaluating Professional Development Activities within a State Funded Pre-Kindergarten Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Susan H.; Swank, Paul R.; Anthony, Jason L.; Assel, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and evaluation for scaling up a comprehensive early childhood teacher professional development program into 11 communities across 2 years with funding through state legislative actions. The comprehensive program had four major components based on results from a previous multi-condition random assignment…

  10. Integration of Major Computer Program Packages into Experimental Courses: Organic Synthesis Design and the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandel, Bonnie Burns; Solomon, Robert W.

    1981-01-01

    Presents discussion on: (1) computer assisted synthesis in industry and academia; (2) computer applications to teaching organic synthesis; (3) a computer program (ORGSYN) incorporating reactions to synthesize aliphatic compounds; and (4) the design of a computer program as a heuristic device in an introductory organic course. (SK)

  11. The Development of Pre-Reading Skills in an Experimental Kindergarten Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanchfield, Jo M.

    Kindergarten children from 17 Los Angeles, California, schools were the subjects in a research project designed to measure the effects of a structured prereading program. The program emphasized six types of reading skills: (1) listening for comprehension, (2) listening for auditory discrimination, (3) visual discrimination, (4) oral language…

  12. Minority Students in Journalism. Recruiting, Retaining, Graduating: Lessons from Six Experimental Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenstein, Ralph L.

    This report describes the implementation and results of six university programs, funded by the Knight Foundation, to recruit and retain students from underrepresented minority groups in the field of journalism. It reviews the objectives, background, implementation, and results of continuing programs at Florida A&M University, the University of…

  13. Using a Quasi-Experimental Research Design to Assess Knowledge in Continuing Medical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markert, Ronald J.; O'Neill, Sally C.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of continuing medical education (CME) programs include knowledge acquisition, skill development, clinical reasoning and decision making, and health care outcomes. We conducted a yearlong medical education research study in which knowledge acquisition in our CME programs was assessed. Method: A randomized…

  14. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Summary of Experimental Impacts after Three Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patrick; Gutmann, Babette; Puma, Michael; Kisida, Brian; Rizzo, Lou; Eissa, Nada

    2009-01-01

    The District of Columbia School Choice Incentive Act of 2003, passed by the Congress in January 2004, established the first federally funded, private school voucher program in the United States. The purpose of the new scholarship program is to provide low-income parents, particularly those whose children attend schools identified for improvement…

  15. The Controls-Structures Interaction Guest Investigator Program - An overview and phase I experimental results. [for flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase I experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  16. The Mirror Nuclei $$^{3}\\hbox {H}$$ 3 H and $$^{3}\\hbox {He}$$ 3 He Program at JLab

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez, Javier

    2017-02-28

    Using electron beam energies of up to 11 GeV, Jefferson Lab plans to carry out in the near future a group of four experiments involving the mirror nucleimore » $$^{3}\\hbox {H}$$ and$$^{3}\\hbox {He}$$ . The experiments aim to, (A) extract the deep inelastic neutron to proton structure function ratio $$F_2^n/F_2^p$$ (and u / d quark distributions) for $$0.2 \\le x \\le 0.9$$ , (B) study the isospin structure of two-nucleon and search for three-nucleon Short Range Correlations (SRC) for $x < 3$ , (C) measure the proton momentum distribution of both nuclei at $x = 1.2$ to further our understanding of SRCs in the few-body and (D) extract the charge radii of both nuclei at $$Q^2 \\le 0.1\\,\\hbox {GeV}^2$$ .« less

  17. Experimental assessment of a computer program used in Space Shuttle orbiter entry heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. L.; Hudgins, J.

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tile taken from the Space Shuttle orbiter was subjected to a nominal heating rate of 60 kW/sq m in the laboratory. The surface temperature response to this heating was measured and used as input to a computer program which computed the applied heating rate. The program is part of a software system that is used to infer convective heating rates to the orbiter thermal protection system during entry. The measured and computed heating rates are compared. Results confirm the applicability of this program to the determination of flight heat transfer rates from flight measured surface temperature data.

  18. The Effects of an Orientation Program on Quality of Life of Patients with Thalassemia: a Quasi-Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Zahra; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Nourbakhsh, Sayed Mohamad Kazem; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-09-01

    Introduction: Medical advances have improved life expectancy and survival of patients with thalassemia. However, as getting older, patients with thalassemia experience different complications which impair their quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a nurse-implemented orientation program on quality of life in patients with thalassemia. Methods: A convenience sample of 55 patients with thalassemia were recruited in this quasi-experimental study. Patients were randomly allocated to control or experimental groups. A demographic questionnaire, Thalassemia quality of life questionnaire, and 36-item short form health survey were used for data collection before and one month after the intervention. In the intervention group, 1.5-month orientation program including of the three steps of inauguration, implementation, and closure was implemented, while the control group received routine care. The Chi-square, independent t-test and paired-samples t-test were used for data analysis by using SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The intervention and control group did not differ significantly from each other regarding demographic characteristics. Moreover, no significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding the quality of life scores after the implementation of orientation program. Conclusion: Implementing a short-term orientation program was not effective in enhancing the quality of life in patients with thalassemia; hence, developing long-term multimodal strategies may result in better improvement.

  19. The Effects of an Orientation Program on Quality of Life of Patients with Thalassemia: a Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Zahra; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Nourbakhsh, Sayed Mohamad Kazem; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medical advances have improved life expectancy and survival of patients with thalassemia. However, as getting older, patients with thalassemia experience different complications which impair their quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a nurse-implemented orientation program on quality of life in patients with thalassemia. Methods: A convenience sample of 55 patients with thalassemia were recruited in this quasi-experimental study. Patients were randomly allocated to control or experimental groups. A demographic questionnaire, Thalassemia quality of life questionnaire, and 36-item short form health survey were used for data collection before and one month after the intervention. In the intervention group, 1.5-month orientation program including of the three steps of inauguration, implementation, and closure was implemented, while the control group received routine care. The Chi-square, independent t-test and paired-samples t-test were used for data analysis by using SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The intervention and control group did not differ significantly from each other regarding demographic characteristics. Moreover, no significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding the quality of life scores after the implementation of orientation program. Conclusion: Implementing a short-term orientation program was not effective in enhancing the quality of life in patients with thalassemia; hence, developing long-term multimodal strategies may result in better improvement. PMID:27752488

  20. Field Study Evaluation of an Experimental Physical Fitness Program for USAF Firefighters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    program. G. CONCLUSIONS The results of submaximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer to predict aerobic capacity on all firefighters assigned to four...exercise test began with the subject pedaling the cycle ergometer (Monark 868) to the rhythm of a metronome (50 rpm). The first three minutes were...statistically signific&nt at p<.05 - Partic’pant-nonparticipant responses to the cycle ergometer training program are presented in Figures 1 & 2. These

  1. OSMOSE an experimental program for improving neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R. T.; Aliberti, G.; Zhong, Z.; Graczyk, D.; Loussi, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Commissariat a l Energie Atomique

    2007-10-18

    This report describes the technical results of tasks and activities conducted in FY07 to support the DOE-CEA collaboration on the OSMOSE program. The activities are divided into five high-level tasks: reactor modeling and pre-experiment analysis, sample fabrication and analysis, reactor experiments, data treatment and analysis, and assessment for relevance to high priority advanced reactor programs (such as GNEP and Gen-IV).

  2. Testing of the Guidance Program. Project ABLE; Development and Evaluation of an Experimental Curriculum for the New Quincy (Mass.) Vocational-Technical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullery, J. William; O'Brien, Robert K.

    The Project ABLE Guidance Program was designed to prepare junior high school students for making an appropriate and stable choice of a high school program. To determine the success of the program, an experimental and a control group were administered the Project ABLE Career Development Inventory prior to and after implementation of the guidance…

  3. Social cohesion through football: a quasi-experimental mixed methods design to evaluate a complex health promotion program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Social isolation and disengagement fragments local communities. Evidence indicates that refugee families are highly vulnerable to social isolation in their countries of resettlement. Research to identify approaches to best address this is needed. Football United is a program that aims to foster social inclusion and cohesion in areas with high refugee settlement in New South Wales, Australia, through skills and leadership development, mentoring, and the creation of links with local community and corporate leaders and organisations. The Social Cohesion through Football study's broad goal is to examine the implementation of a complex health promotion program, and to analyse the processes involved in program implementation. The study will consider program impact on individual health and wellbeing, social inclusion and cohesion, as well as analyse how the program by necessity interacts and adapts to context during implementation, a concept we refer to as plasticity. The proposed study will be the first prospective cohort impact study to our knowledge to assess the impact of a comprehensive integrated program using football as a vehicle for fostering social inclusion and cohesion in communities with high refugee settlement. Methods/design A quasi-experimental cohort study design with treatment partitioning involving four study sites. The study employs a 'dose response' model, comparing those with no involvement in the Football United program with those with lower or higher levels of participation. A range of qualitative and quantitative measures will be used in the study. Study participants' emotional well being, resilience, ethnic identity and other group orientation, feelings of social inclusion and belonging will be measured using a survey instrument complemented by relevant data drawn from in-depth interviews, self reporting measures and participant observation. The views of key informants from the program and the wider community will also be solicited. Discussion

  4. Intermediate experimental vehicle, ESA program aerodynamics-aerothermodynamics key technologies for spacecraft design and successful flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutheil, Sylvain; Pibarot, Julien; Tran, Dac; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Tribot, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of placing Europe among the world's space players in the strategic area of atmospheric re-entry, several studies on experimental vehicle concepts and improvements of critical re-entry technologies have paved the way for the flight of an experimental space craft. The successful flight of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV), under ESA's Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP), is definitively a significant step forward from the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator flight (1998), establishing Europe as a key player in this field. The IXV project objectives were the design, development, manufacture and ground and flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled reentry system, which is highly flexible and maneuverable. The paper presents, the role of aerodynamics aerothermodynamics as part of the key technologies for designing an atmospheric re-entry spacecraft and securing a successful flight.

  5. Commissioning and operational results of helium refrigeration system at JLab for the 12GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system at the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL-2) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in late spring of 2013, following the commissioning of the new compressor system, and has been supporting 12 GeV LINAC commissioning since that time. Six design modes were tested during commissioning, consisting of a maximum capacity, nominal capacity, maximum liquefaction, maximum refrigeration, maximum fill and a stand-by/reduced load condition. The maximum capacity was designed to support a 238 g/s, 30 K and 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s, 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW, 35-55 K shield load. The other modes were selected to ensure proper component sizing and selection to allow the cold box to operate over a wide range of conditions and capacities. The cold box system is comprised of two physically independent cold boxes with interconnecting transfer-lines. The outside (upper) 300-60 K vertical cold box has no turbines and incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and 80-K beds. The inside (lower) 60-4.5 K horizontal cold box houses seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander and a 20-K bed. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will summarize the analysis of the test data obtained over the wide range of operating conditions and capacities which were tested.

  6. SELECTIVE DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION IN PRACTICE, SURVEY OF OPERATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL SDI PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOWNIE, CURRIE S.; HOSHOVSKY, ALEXANDER G.

    AN OVERVIEW OF THE OPERATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEMS ESTABLISHED FOR THE SELECTIVE DISSEMINATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION (SDI) IS PRESENTED. AN ATTEMPT HAS ALSO BEEN MADE TO IDENTIFY THE TRENDS WHICH MAY SHAPE THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SELECTIVE DISSEMINATION PROCEDURES. THE REPORT IS BASED IN PART ON THE EXISTING SDI…

  7. An Experimental Juvenile Probation Program: Effects on Parent and Peer Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brank, Eve; Lane, Jodi; Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to provide a wider range of services to youth and their families than is traditionally available in routine probation, the South Oxnard Challenge Project (SOCP) employed a team approach to service delivery of an intensive probation program. The researchers interviewed juveniles who were randomly assigned to either the SOCP…

  8. An Analysis of the Sensitivity of Quasi-Experimental Net Impact Estimates of CETA Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Katherine P.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Net impact estimates of Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs vary widely and can be explained by the different evaluation methodologies used. Estimates are sensitive to the inclusion of recently unemployed persons in the comparison sample and assumptions about the time of decision to enroll in CETA. (GDC)

  9. Integration of Major Computer Program Packages into Experimental Courses: A Freshman Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschitz, Irving

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of the Gaussian 70 computer programs to carry out quantum chemical calculations, including single calculations, geometry, optimization, and potential surface scans. Includes a summary of student activities and benefits for students in an honors freshman chemistry course. (SK)

  10. An Experimental Comparison of an Intrinsically Programed Text and a Narrative Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senter, R. J.; And Others

    The study compared three methods of instruction in binary and octal arithmetic, i.e., (1) Norman Crowder's branched programed text, "The Arithmetic of Computers," (2) another version of this text modified so that subjects could not see the instructional material while answering "branching" questions, and (3) a narrative text…

  11. Experimental Use of A Programming Language (APL) at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creveling, Cyrus J., Ed.

    This document explains A Programming Language (APL) and describes the experiment that the Information Processing Division has undertaken to introduce APL to the Goddard Scientific Community. A brief historical sketch of steps taken to date is included and appendices giving illustrative examples of how APL actually has been used at the Goddard…

  12. VAXELN Experimentation: Programming a Real-Time Periodic Task Dispatcher Using VAXELN Ada 1.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    and is approved for publication. FOR THE COMMANDER Karl Shingler SEI Joint Program Office This work is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense...34); 28 CMU/SEI-87.TR-532 boom I@. Pat (OXT"rant.mimlteo). slaw- Lise ; WmttedStriaoLvat (0em.dl; BOOCNOZO.Vat (Caguemi S.stio); enale) M%.: i Fremttedl

  13. The Effectiveness of Employee Assistance Program Supervisor Training: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Robert J.; Colan, Neil B.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 291 supervisors were assigned to 3 groups (in-house training, external training, no training) for training in management of troubled employees. Both forms of training were effective in improving supervisors' knowledge of employee assistance programs. Supervisory training was best viewed as a process, not a single event. (SK)

  14. An experimental evaluation of error seeding as a program validation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.; Ammann, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    A previously reported experiment in error seeding as a program validation technique is summarized. The experiment was designed to test the validity of three assumptions on which the alleged effectiveness of error seeding is based. Errors were seeded into 17 functionally identical but independently programmed Pascal programs in such a way as to produce 408 programs, each with one seeded error. Using mean time to failure as a metric, results indicated that it is possible to generate seeded errors that are arbitrarily but not equally difficult to locate. Examination of indigenous errors demonstrated that these are also arbitrarily difficult to locate. These two results support the assumption that seeded and indigenous errors are approximately equally difficult to locate. However, the assumption that, for each type of error, all errors are equally difficult to locate was not borne out. Finally, since a seeded error occasionally corrected an indigenous error, the assumption that errors do not interfere with each other was proven wrong. Error seeding can be made useful by taking these results into account in modifying the underlying model.

  15. Pattern of Plagiarism in Novice Students' Generated Programs: An Experimental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmadzadeh, Marzieh; Mahmoudabadi, Elham; Khodadadi, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence shows that in computer programming courses plagiarism is a widespread problem. With the growing number of students in such courses, manual plagiarism detection is impractical. This requires instructors to use one of the many available plagiarism detection tools. Prior to choosing one of such tools, a metric that assures the…

  16. Experimental Study of Single Spin Asymmetries and TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    This presentation covers: Recent SSA Results from JLab Hall A with a Transversely Polarized 3He (n); New Preliminary SSA Results from JLab Hall A with a Transversely polarized 3He (n); TMD study at JLab 12 GeV in Hall A; and Long-term Future plans for TMDs study with Electron-Ion Colliders (EIC).

  17. Optimal trajectories for flexible-link manipulator slewing using recursive quadratic programming: Experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Eisler, G.R.; Feddema, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Procedures for trajectory planning and control of flexible link robots are becoming increasingly important to satisfy performance requirements of hazardous waste removal efforts. It has been shown that utilizing link flexibility in designing open loop joint commands can result in improved performance as opposed to damping vibration throughout a trajectory. The efficient use of link compliance is exploited in this work. Specifically, experimental verification of minimum time, straight line tracking using a two-link planar flexible robot is presented. A numerical optimization process, using an experimentally verified modal model, is used for obtaining minimum time joint torque and angle histories. The optimal joint states are used as commands to the proportional-derivative servo actuated joints. These commands are precompensated for the nonnegligible joint servo actuator dynamics. Using the precompensated joint commands, the optimal joint angles are tracked with such fidelity that the tip tracking error is less than 2.5 cm.

  18. Photon attenuation coefficients of Heavy-Metal Oxide glasses by MCNP code, XCOM program and experimental data: A comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khayatt, A. M.; Ali, A. M.; Singh, Vishwanath P.

    2014-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients, μ/ρ, total interaction cross-section, σt, and mean free path (MFP) of some Heavy Metal Oxides (HMO) glasses, with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials, have been investigated using the MCNP-4C code. Appreciable variations are noted for all parameters by changing the photon energy and the chemical composition of HMO glasses. The numerical simulations parameters are compared with experimental data wherever possible. Comparisons are also made with predictions from the XCOM program in the energy region from 1 keV to 100 MeV. Good agreement noticed indicates that the chosen Monte Carlo method may be employed to make additional calculations on the photon attenuation characteristics of different glass systems, a capability particularly useful in cases where no analogous experimental data exist.

  19. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruel, A.; Di Salvo, J.; Roche, A.; Girard, J.-M.; Philibert, H.; Bonora, J.; Ledoux, J.-F.; Morel, C.; Lecluze, A.; Foucras, A.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Colombier, A.-C.

    2016-02-01

    Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm), and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the "hafnium" configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations). Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  20. Spike-train acquisition, analysis and real-time experimental control using a graphical programming language (LabView).

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, M A; Mapletoft, E A; Miles, T S

    1995-11-01

    A solution is described for the acquisition on a personal computer of standard pulses derived from neuronal discharge, measurement of neuronal discharge times, real-time control of stimulus delivery based on specified inter-pulse interval conditions in the neuronal spike train, and on-line display and analysis of the experimental data. The hardware consisted of an Apple Macintosh IIci computer and a plug-in card (National Instruments NB-MIO16) that supports A/D, D/A, digital I/O and timer functions. The software was written in the object-oriented graphical programming language LabView. Essential elements of the source code of the LabView program are presented and explained. The use of the system is demonstrated in an experiment in which the reflex responses to muscle stretch are assessed for a single motor unit in the human masseter muscle.

  1. Calibration of propulsion simulation nozzles for space shuttle booster and orbiter models for the abort/separation staging experimental program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, L. R., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the power-on aerodynamic flight characteristics of the booster and orbiter vehicles during the abort separation maneuver is reported. An essential contribution to such a test program is the gas dynamic simulation of the size and shape of the plumes emitting from the full-scale orbiter and booster main propulsion systems. The two major effects of the plume which must be simulated are: the interaction of the plume with the external flow field, and the direct impingement of the plumes on surfaces which are enveloped by the plume. To accomplish the objective of correct plume simulation, the similarity parameters developed by Herron and the requirement to match momentum flux per unit area between the model and the full-scale systems, were applied to the orbiter and booster propulsion systems.

  2. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program]. [Purdue Univ. , West Lafayette, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac[endash]Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  3. A linear programming approach to characterizing norm bounded uncertainty from experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheid, R. E.; Bayard, D. S.; Yam, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The linear programming spectral overbounding and factorization (LPSOF) algorithm, an algorithm for finding a minimum phase transfer function of specified order whose magnitude tightly overbounds a specified nonparametric function of frequency, is introduced. This method has direct application to transforming nonparametric uncertainty bounds (available from system identification experiments) into parametric representations required for modern robust control design software (i.e., a minimum-phase transfer function multiplied by a norm-bounded perturbation).

  4. Valores, Creencias Y Objectivos: Base del programa de la Escuela Experimental P.K. Yonge. (Values, Beliefs and Objectives: The Basis of Experimental Schools P.K. Yonge's Program.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Coll. of Education.

    The values, beliefs, and objectives that form the core of the program at the Experimental School P.K. Yonge in the University of Florida are presented in this paper which is written in Spanish. This experimental school serves approximately 900 students from grades one through twelve. The function of the school is to conduct research to solve…

  5. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations: Experimental program, high-speed pressure tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Basic pressure data are presented which was obtained from an experimental study of upper-surface blown configurations at cruise. The high-speed (subsonic) experimental work, studying the aerodynamic effects of wing-nacelle geometric variations, was conducted around semi-span model configurations composed of diversified, interchangeable components. Power simulation was provided by high-pressure air ducted through closed forebody nacelles. Nozzle geometry was varied across size, exit aspect ratio, exit position and boattail angle. Both 3-D force and 2-D pressure measurements were obtained at cruise Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.8 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to about 3.0. The experimental investigation was supported by an analytical synthesis of the system using a vortex lattice representation with first-order power effects. Results are also presented from a compatibility study in which a short-haul transport is designed on the basis of the aerodynamic findings in the experimental study as well as acoustical data obtained in a concurrent program. High-lift test data are used to substantiate the projected performance of the selected transport design.

  6. Ergonomic office design and aging: a quasi-experimental field study of employee reactions to an ergonomics intervention program.

    PubMed

    May, Douglas R; Reed, Kendra; Schwoerer, Catherine E; Potter, Paul

    2004-04-01

    A naturally occurring quasi-experimental longitudinal field study of 87 municipal employees using pretest and posttest measures investigated the effects of an office workstation ergonomics intervention program on employees' perceptions of their workstation characteristics, levels of persistent pain, eyestrain, and workstation satisfaction. The study examined whether reactions differed between younger and older employees. Results revealed that workstation improvements were associated with enhanced perceptions of the workstation's ergonomic qualities, less upper back pain, and greater workstation satisfaction. Among those experiencing an improvement, the perceptions of workstation ergonomic qualities increased more for younger than older employees, supporting the "impressionable years" framework in the psychological literature on aging. Implications for human resources managers are discussed.

  7. An Experimental Trial of Adaptive Programming in Drug Court: Outcomes at 6, 12 and 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Harron, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Test whether an adaptive program improves outcomes in drug court by adjusting the schedule of court hearings and clinical case-management sessions pursuant to a priori performance criteria. Methods Consenting participants in a misdemeanor drug court were randomly assigned to the adaptive program (n = 62) or to a baseline-matching condition (n = 63) in which they attended court hearings based on the results of a criminal risk assessment. Outcome measures were re-arrest rates at 18 months post-entry to the drug court and urine drug test results and structured interview results at 6 and 12 months post-entry. Results Although previously published analyses revealed significantly fewer positive drug tests for participants in the adaptive condition during the first 18 weeks of drug court, current analyses indicate the effects converged during the ensuing year. Between-group differences in new arrest rates, urine drug test results and self-reported psychosocial problems were small and non-statistically significant at 6, 12 and 18 months post-entry. A non-significant trend (p = .10) suggests there may have been a small residual impact (Cramer's ν = .15) on new misdemeanor arrests after 18 months. Conclusions Adaptive programming shows promise for enhancing short-term outcomes in drug courts; however, additional efforts are needed to extend the effects beyond the first 4 to 6 months of enrollment. PMID:25346652

  8. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  9. Exotic Mesons at JLab Before 2013? The Search for New Forms of Matter at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Bookwalter

    2007-10-01

    A proposal to search for exotic mesons in photoproduction has been accepted for running at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer in Hall B. This program will bolster previously-thin statistics in many photoproduction channels, primarily those with charged particles in the final state, as well as seeking to confirm earlier findings in neutral channels, if possible. The promise of the neutral 3pi channel is discussed. In addition, the experiment seeks to study the spectrum of both exotic and ordinary strangeonia. Limitations of the CLAS detector for meson spectroscopy are discussed, as well as possible solutions to minimize such limitations.

  10. Exotic Mesons at JLab Before 2013? The Search for New Forms of Matter at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, Craig

    2007-10-26

    A proposal to search for exotic mesons in photoproduction has been accepted for running at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer in Hall B. This program will bolster previously-thin statistics in many photoproduction channels, primarily those with charged particles in the final state, as well as seeking to confirm earlier findings in neutral channels, if possible. The promise of the neutral 3{pi} channel is discussed. In addition, the experiment seeks to study the spectrum of both exotic and ordinary strangeonia. Limitations of the CLAS detector for meson spectroscopy are discussed, as well as possible solutions to minimize such limitations.

  11. Studies of semi-inclusive and hard exclusive processes at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avagyan

    2008-06-19

    The main goal of experiments proposed for the {\\tt CLAS12} detector in conjunction with the 12-GeV CEBAF accelerator is the study of the nucleon through hard exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive processes. This will provide new insights into nucleon dynamics at the elementary quark and gluon level. In this contribution we provide an overview of ongoing studies of the structure of nucleon in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom and future physics program planned with CLAS and {\\tt CLAS12}.

  12. Extraction of the pretzelosity distribution from experimental data

    DOE PAGES

    Lefky, Christopher; Prokudin, Alexei

    2015-02-13

    We attempt an extraction of the pretzelosity distribution (more » $$h^{\\perp}_{1T}$$) from preliminary COMPASS, HERMES, and JLAB experimental data on $$\\sin(3\\phi_h - \\phi_S)$$ asymmetry on proton and deuteron targets. The resulting distributions, albeit big errors, show tendency for up quark pretzelosity to be positive and down quark pretzelosity to be negative. A model relation of pretzelosity distribution and Orbital Angular Momentum of quarks is used to estimate contributions of up and down quarks.« less

  13. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  14. R&D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-02-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  15. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, T.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary results of two projects in the development phase of reliable wind turbines designed to supply cost-competitive electrical energy were discussed. An experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are first reviewed. The results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs are also discussed. These studies predict wind energy costs of 1.5 to 7 cents per kW-h for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 per year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  16. Engineering experimental program on the effects of near-space radiation on lithium doped solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of the real-time degradation characteristics of lithium-diffused silicon solar cells are reported. A strontium-90 radioisotope was used for simulation of a typical earth-orbital electron environment. The experiment was performed in an ion pump vacuum chamber with samples maintained at -50, +20, +50, and +80 C. Samples were illuminated during the 6-month exposure run with solar cell 1-5 characteristics measured periodically in situ. This 6-month exposure corresponded to a 1 MeV equivalent fluence of approximately 10 to the 14th power electrons/sq cm. Several types of lithium cells were irradiatied and compared directly with conventional N/P cells. The best lithium cells compared favorably with N/P cells, particularly at the higher test temperatures. With a slight improvement of initial performance characteristics, lithium cells appear feasible for 5 to 10 year missions at synchronous altitude. Based on the reported results and those of other irradiation experiments, lithium cells would appear to be superior to N/P cells in proton-dominated earth-orbital environments. Another important conclusion of the effort was that illuminated/loaded cells degrade more rapidly than do dark/unloaded cells. The irradiation experiment provided data of high quality with a high degree of confidence because of the experimental and statistical analysis techniques utilized.

  17. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 1. [aircraft exhaust/gas analysis - gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Vitti, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A program of screening three low emission combustors for conventional takeoff and landing, by testing and analyzing thirty-two configurations is presented. Configurations were tested that met the emission goals at idle operating conditions for carbon monoxide and for unburned hydrocarbons (emission index values of 20 and 4, respectively). Configurations were also tested that met a smoke number goal of 15 at sea-level take-off conditions. None of the configurations met the goal for oxides of nitrogen emissions at sea-level take-off conditions. The best configurations demonstrated oxide of nitrogen emission levels that were approximately 61 percent lower than those produced by the JT9D-7 engine, but these levels were still approximately 24 percent above the goal of an emission index level of 10. Additional combustor performance characteristics, including lean blowout, exit temperature pattern factor and radial profile, pressure loss, altitude stability, and altitude relight characteristics were documented. The results indicate the need for significant improvement in the altitude stability and relight characteristics. In addition to the basic program for current aircraft engine combustors, seventeen combustor configurations were evaluated for advanced supersonic technology applications. The configurations were tested at cruise conditions, and a conceptual design was evolved.

  18. Impact of WHO Hand Hygiene Improvement Program Implementation: A Quasi-Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Farhoudi, Farinaz; Hoshangi Davani, Minoo; Ghalebi, Nadiyeh; Sajadi, Golnar; Taghizadeh, Raziyeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. As affirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO), hand hygiene is the most powerful preventive measure against healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) and, thus, it has become one of the five key elements of patient safety program. The aim is to assess the effect of implementation of the WHO's Multimodal Hand Hygiene Improvement Strategy among healthcare workers of a tertiary teaching hospital in a developing country. Methods. Hand hygiene compliance was assessed among healthcare workers, according to five defined moments for hand hygiene of the WHO, before and after implementation of the WHO's Multimodal Hand Hygiene Improvement Strategy in fourteen wards of a tertiary teaching hospital in Shiraz, Iran. We used direct observation method and documented the results in WHO hand hygiene observation forms. Results. There was a significant change in compliance before and after implementation of WHO's Multimodal HH Improvement Strategy (29.8% and 70.98%, resp.). Conclusions. Implementing WHO hand hygiene program can significantly improve hand hygiene compliance among nurses. PMID:27999811

  19. The experimental clean combustor program: Description and status to November 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The generation of technology was studied for the development of advanced commercial CTOL aircraft engines with lower exhaust emissions than current aircraft. The program is in three phases. Phase 1, already completed, consisted of screening tests of low pollution combustor concepts. Phase 2, currently in progress, consists of test rig refinement of the most promising combustor concepts. Phase 2 test results are reported. Phase 3, also currently in progress, consists of incorporating and evaluating the best combustors as part of a complete engine. Engine test plans and pollution sampling techniques are described in this report. Program pollution goals, specified at engine idle and take-off conditions, are idle emission index value of 20 and 4 for carbon monoxide (CO) and total unburned hydrocarbons (THC), respectively, and at take-off are an oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission index level of 10 and a smoke number of 15. Pollution data were obtained at all engine operating conditions. Results are presented in terms of emission index and also in terms of the Environmental Protection Agency's 1979 Standards Parameter.

  20. Study and design of cryogenic propellant acquisition systems. Volume 2: Supporting experimental program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Areas of cryogenic fuel systems were identified where critical experimental information was needed either to define a design criteria or to establish the feasibility of a design concept or a critical aspect of a particular design. Such data requirements fell into three broad categories: (1) basic surface tension screen characteristics; (2) screen acquisition device fabrication problems; and (3) screen surface tension device operational failure modes. To explore these problems and to establish design criteria where possible, extensive laboratory or bench test scale experiments were conducted. In general, these proved to be quite successful and, in many instances, the test results were directly used in the system design analyses and development. In some cases, particularly those relating to operational-type problems, areas requiring future research were identified, especially screen heat transfer and vibrational effects.

  1. Experimental instrumentation system for the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive optics are used in telescopes for both viewing objects with minimum distortion and for transmitting laser beams with minimum beam divergence and dance. In order to test concepts on a smaller scale, NASA MSFC is in the process of setting up an adaptive optics test facility with precision (fraction of wavelengths) measurement equipment. The initial system under test is the adaptive optical telescope called PAMELA (Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture). Goals of this test are: assessment of test hardware specifications for PAMELA application and the determination of the sensitivities of instruments for measuring PAMELA (and other adaptive optical telescopes) imperfections; evaluation of the PAMELA system integration effort and test progress and recommended actions to enhance these activities; and development of concepts and prototypes of experimental apparatuses for PAMELA.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Craig; Neary, Vincent Sinclair; Gunawan, Budi; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-10-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM2) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  3. High- and Low-Level Dissonance-Based Eating Disorder Prevention Programs with Young Women with Body Image Concerns: An Experimental Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Whitney; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As cognitive dissonance is theorized to contribute to the effects of dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs, we evaluated a high-dissonance version of this program against a low-dissonance version and a wait-list control condition to provide an experimental test of the mechanism of intervention effects. Method: Female…

  4. An Experimental Evaluation of Programed Instruction as One of Two Review Techniques for Two-Year College Students Concerned with Solving Acid-Base Chemical Equilibrium Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharon, Jared Bear

    The major purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a programed instructional unit for a first year college chemistry course. The topic of the unit was the categorization and solution of acid-base equilibria problems. The experimental programed instruction text was used by 41 students and the fifth edition of Schaum's Theory and Problems of…

  5. An integrated experimental program to understanding leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarens, A. F.; Wang, S.; Liang, B.; Peters, C. A.; Fitts, J. P.; Deng, H.; Ellis, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Leakage from the deep saline aquifers targeted in geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is difficult to study because of heterogeneities in the structure and chemical composition of the subsurface along with the characteristically large length scales and resulting phase changes that are involved. The chemical and physical processes that govern the buoyancy driven flow of CO2 are important to understand because leakage could undermine the nominal goal of GCS to keep CO2 out of the atmosphere. Here we report on a partnership between Princeton and the University of Virginia (UVa) to study these processes experimentally across multiple length scales in both porous media and fractured caprocks. Experiments span length scales from microns to meters, and the processes studied range from geochemical reactions to the physics of flow. In this presentation, we summarize the suite of experiments that are underway and present recent findings. We seek to demonstrate that this coordinated, multi-disciplinary, multi-scale research collaboration will lead to improved understanding of the fundamental processes that may control the permanence of stored CO2. At UVa, the aim has been to characterize the interfacial properties that will impact buoyancy driven flows in porous media. Contact angle experiments at the CO2-brine-mineral interface have been carried out on silica, carbonate and clay minerals. These results will be used to inform how mineral heterogeneity influences multiphase buoyant flow through sandstones in which pore surfaces are frequently coated by diagenetic clays. Although all minerals are water wetting, the pH point of zero charge was found to be a good predictor of maximum wetting for a solid surface. When the CO2 was not in equilibrium with the brine, hysteric effects were observed as CO2 dissolved into the bulk fluid. Some of this is associated with contact line pinning on certain surfaces that may be driven by salt precipitation near the phase interface. Contact

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Craig; Neary, Vincent Sinclair; Gunawan, Budi; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN - SAFL) . Reference Model 2 (RM2) is a 1:15 geometric scale dual - rotor cross flow vertical axis device with counter - rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.43m and rotor height, hT = 0.323 m. RM2 is a river turbine designed for a site modeled after a reach in the lower Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Barone et al. 2014) . Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM2 . Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2. 35m3s-1 , resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1. 2 ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec = 6 .1x104. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and their ability to accurately simulate turbulent inflow environments, device performance metrics, and to reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order

  7. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE’s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts – 15436

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Heather; Flach, Greg; Smith, Frank; Langton, Christine; Brown, Kevin; Mallick, Pramod

    2015-01-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Tank Waste Management-sponsored Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. DOE needs in this area include the following to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex: long-term performance predictions, flow sheet development and flow sheet enhancements, and conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. The DOE-EM Cementitious Barriers Partnership is producing software and experimental programs resulting in new methods and data needed for end-users involved with environmental cleanup and waste disposal. Both the modeling tools and the experimental data have already benefited the DOE sites in the areas of performance assessments by increasing confidence backed up with modeling support, leaching methods, and transport properties developed for actual DOE materials. In 2014, the CBP Partnership released the CBP Software Toolbox –“Version 2.0” which provides concrete degradation models for 1) sulfate attack, 2) carbonation, and 3) chloride initiated rebar corrosion, and includes constituent leaching. These models are applicable and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for service life and long-term performance evaluations and predictions of nuclear and radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex, including future SRS Saltstone and HLW tank performance assessments and special analyses, Hanford site HLW tank closure projects and other projects in which cementitious barriers are required, the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project which requires source terms from cementitious containment structures as input to their flow simulations, regulatory reviews of DOE performance

  8. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle, ESA Program Aerothermodynamics- Transition And Steps And Gaps Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verand, Jean-Luc; Pelissier, Christian; Sourgen, Frederic; Fontaine, Joelle; Garcon, Francois; Spel, Martin; van Hauwaert, Pierre; Charbonnier, Dominique; Vos, Jan; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Pibarot, Julien; Tribot, Jean-Pierre; Mareschi, Vincenzo; Ferrarella, Daniella; Rufolo, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) project objectives are the design, development, manufacture and ground and flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system, which is highly flexible and manoeuvrable. The IXV vehicle is a flying test bed for securing the next step of operational space vehicle development by supporting technology demonstration and system concept through the following objectives: a) Aerothermodynamics b) Advanced In Flight Experiments c) Thermal Protection System d) Guidance Navigation and Control e) System design The assessment of the general aerothermodynamic environment of IXV vehicle is mainly performed considering a smooth simplified geometry. However, the thermal protection system of IXV includes a mono-block ceramic matrix composite nose and an assembly of shingles between which steps and gaps are generated. From an aerothermodynamic point of view, such a distributed roughness layout cannot be ignored in terms of modification of the interaction between the flow and the body. To assess this effect, dedicated Mach number 5.5 wind tunnel tests (ONERA, S3MA facility) and numerical simulations (RTECH and CFS Engineering) have been performed during the phase C2 of the project. The paper presents the general logic of the work, with emphasis on the wind tunnel model design, tests involving infrared thermal measurements as well as the CFD rebuilding of the flow in the wind tunnel and the extrapolation from ground-to-flight.

  9. Using an experimental manipulation to determine the effectiveness of a stock enhancement program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    We used an experimental manipulation to determine the impact of stocking 178 mm channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus in six impoundments. The study design consisted of equal numbers (two) of control, ceased-stock, and stocked treatments that were sampled one year before and two years after stocking. Relative abundance, growth, size structure, and average weight significantly changed over time based on samples collected with hoop nets. Catch rates decreased at both ceased-stock lakes and increased for one stocked lake, while growth rates changed for at least one ceased-stock and stocked lake. The average weight of channel catfish in the ceased-stock treatment increased by 6% and 25%, whereas weight decreased by 28% and 78% in both stocked lakes. The variability in observed responses between lakes in both ceased-stock and stocked treatments indicates that a one-size-fits-all stocking agenda is impractical, suggesting lake specific and density-dependent mechanisms affect channel catfish population dynamics.

  10. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M. Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21) compared to a control group (n = 24). Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes. PMID:27462290

  11. [Experimental studies with mice on the program of the biosatellite BION-M1 mission].

    PubMed

    Andreev-Andrievsky, A A; Shenkman, B S; Popova, A S; Dolguikh, O N; Anokhin, K V; Soldatov, P E; Ilyin, E A; Sychev, V N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the BION-M1 project was laying the evidence and technological basis for addressing the medical issues of future remote space exploration missions by humans. The program of researches with the use of mice was focused on elicitation of cellular and molecular mechanisms of the muscular, cardiovascular and immune reactions to extended exposure in microgravity. The comprehensive studies combined lifetime measurements with investigations of mice tissues and cells by dint of the cutting-edge morphological, biochemical and molecular biology techniques. Males of mice C57/BL6 aged 4 to 5 months were chosen as the object of studies. They were distributed into the flight, ground control and two vivarium (laboratory control) groups and investigated immediately on return and after 7 days of readaptation. Some of the physiological functions were recorded throughout the flight. To ensure wellbeing of the animals in the experiments and to enhance data quality, prior to launch the mice were specially trained so as to accommodate to the group living, eating space food, and in-flight stress factors. Those of the mice that were designated for lifetime investigations were tested and received training pre-launch.

  12. Large Engine Technology Program. Task 21: Rich Burn Liner for Near Term Experimental Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hautman, D. J.; Padget, F. C.; Kwoka, D.; Siskind, K. S.; Lohmann, R. P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the task reported herein, which was conducted as part of the NASA sponsored Large Engine Technology program, was to define and evaluate a near-term rich-zone liner construction based on currently available materials and fabrication processes for a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor. This liner must be capable of operation at the temperatures and pressures of simulated HSCT flight conditions but only needs sufficient durability for limited duration testing in combustor rigs and demonstrator engines in the near future. This must be achieved at realistic cooling airflow rates since the approach must not compromise the emissions, performance, and operability of the test combustors, relative to the product engine goals. The effort was initiated with an analytical screening of three different liner construction concepts. These included a full cylinder metallic liner and one with multiple segments of monolithic ceramic, both of which incorporated convective cooling on the external surface using combustor airflow that bypassed the rich zone. The third approach was a metallic platelet construction with internal convective cooling. These three metal liner/jacket combinations were tested in a modified version of an existing Rich-Quench-Lean combustor rig to obtain data for heat transfer model refinement and durability verification.

  13. Experimentally induced testicular dysgenesis syndrome originates in the masculinization programming window

    PubMed Central

    van den Driesche, Sander; Kilcoyne, Karen R.; Wagner, Ida; Rebourcet, Diane; Mitchell, Rod; McKinnell, Chris; Macpherson, Sheila; Donat, Roland; Shukla, Chitranjan J.; Jorgensen, Anne; Skakkebaek, Niels E.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) hypothesis, which proposes that common reproductive disorders of newborn and adult human males may have a common fetal origin, is largely untested. We tested this hypothesis using a rat model involving gestational exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP), which suppresses testosterone production by the fetal testis. We evaluated if induction of TDS via testosterone suppression is restricted to the “masculinization programming window” (MPW), as indicated by reduction in anogenital distance (AGD). We show that DBP suppresses fetal testosterone equally during and after the MPW, but only DBP exposure in the MPW causes reduced AGD, focal testicular dysgenesis, and TDS disorders (cryptorchidism, hypospadias, reduced adult testis size, and compensated adult Leydig cell failure). Focal testicular dysgenesis, reduced size of adult male reproductive organs, and TDS disorders and their severity were all strongly associated with reduced AGD. We related our findings to human TDS cases by demonstrating similar focal dysgenetic changes in testes of men with preinvasive germ cell neoplasia (GCNIS) and in testes of DBP-MPW animals. If our results are translatable to humans, they suggest that identification of potential causes of human TDS disorders should focus on exposures during a human MPW equivalent, especially if negatively associated with offspring AGD. PMID:28352662

  14. Experimental active and passive dosimetry systems for the NASA Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, M. F.; Janni, J. F.; Ainsworth, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Active and passive dosimetry instrumentation to measure absorbed dose, charged particle spectra, and linear energy transfer spectra inside the command module and orbital workshop on the Skylab program were developed and tested. The active dosimetry system consists of one integral unit employing both a tissue equivalent ionization chamber and silicon solid state detectors. The instrument measures dose rates from 0.2 millirad/hour to 25 rads/hour, linear energy transfer spectra from 2.8 to 42.4 Kev/micron, and the proton and alpha particle energy spectra from 0.5 to 75 Mev. The active dosimeter is equipped with a portable radiation sensor for use in astronaut on-body and spacecraft shielding surveys during passage of the Skylab through significant space radiations. Data are transmitted in real time or are recorded by onboard spacecraft tape recorder for rapid evaluation of the radiation levels. The passive dosimetry systems consist of twelve (12) hard-mounted assemblies, each containing a variety of passive radiation sensors which are recoverable at the end of the mission for analysis.

  15. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21) compared to a control group (n = 24). Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes.

  16. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B; Zhang, Y

    2012-08-01

    beginning, the design studies at Jefferson Lab have focused on achieving high collider performance, particularly ultrahigh luminosities up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} per detector with large acceptance, while maintaining high polarization for both the electron and light-ion beams. These are the two key performance requirements of a future electron-ion collider facility as articulated by the NSAC Long Range Plan. In MEIC, a new ion complex is designed specifically to deliver ion beams that match the high bunch repetition and highly polarized electron beam from CEBAF. During the last two years, both development of the science case and optimization of the machine design point toward a medium-energy electron-ion collider as the topmost goal for Jefferson Lab. The MEIC, with relatively compact collider rings, can deliver a luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy up to 65 GeV. It offers an electron energy up to 11 GeV, a proton energy up to 100 GeV, and corresponding energies per nucleon for heavy ions with the same magnetic rigidity. This design choice balances the scope of the science program, collider capabilities, accelerator technology innovation, and total project cost. An energy upgrade could be implemented in the future by adding two large collider rings housed in another large tunnel to push the center-of-mass energy up to or exceeding 140 GeV. After careful consideration of an alternative electron energy recovery linac on ion storage ring approach, a ring-ring collider scenario at high bunch repetition frequency was found to offer fully competitive performance while eliminating the uncertainties of challenging R&D on ampere-class polarized electron sources and many-pass energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). The essential new elements of an MEIC facility at Jefferson Lab are an electron storage ring and an entirely new, modern ion acceleration and storage complex. For the high-current electron collider ring, the upgraded 12 GeV CEBAF SRF

  17. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle, ESA Program IXV ATDB Tool and Aerothermodynamic Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschi, Vincenzo; Ferrarella, Daniela; Zaccagnino, Elio; Tribot, Jean-Pierre; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Haya-Ramos, Rodrigo; Rufolo, Giuseppe; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2011-05-01

    In the complex domain of the space technologies and among the different applications available in Europe, a great interest has been placed since several years in the development of re-entry technologies. Among the different achievements obtained in that field it is to be recalled the experience of the Atmospheric Re-entry Vehicle flight in 1998 and a certain number of important investments per-formed at Agency and national levels like Hermes, MSTP, Festip, X-38, FLPP, TRP, GSTP, HSTS, AREV, Pre-X. IXV (Intermediate eXperimental V ehicle) builds on these past experiences and studies and it is conceived to be the next technological step forward with respect to ARD With respect to previous European ballistic or quasi- ballistic demonstrators, IXV will have an increased in- flight manoeuvrability and the planned mission will allow verifying the performances of the required technologies against a wider re-entry corridor. This will imply from the pure technological aspect to increase the level of engagement on critical technologies and disciplines like aerodynamics/aerothermodynamics, guidance, navigation, control, thermal protection materials and in flight measurements. In order to support the TPS design and the other sub- systems, an AeroThermodynamicDataBase Tool has been developed by Dassault Aviation and integrated by Thales Alenia Space with the Functional Engineering Simulator (used for GNC performances evaluation) in order to characterize the aerothermodynamic behaviour of the vehicle. This paper will describe: - The methodology used to develop the ATDB tool, based on the processing of CFD computations and WTT campaigns results. - The utilization of the ATDB tool, by means of its integration into the System process. - The methodology used for the aerothermal characterization of IXV.

  18. Experimental test plan: USDOE/JAERI collaborative program for the coated particle fuel performance test

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Fukuda, K.

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the coated-particle fuel performance test agreed to under Annex 2 of the arrangement between the US Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on cooperation in research and development regarding high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The test will evaluate the behavior of reference fuel compacts containing coated-particle fuels fabricated according to the specifications for the US Modular HTGR and the Japanese High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) concepts. Two experimental capsules, HRB-21 and HRB-22, are being tested. Capsule HRB-21 contains only US reference fuel, and HRB-22 contains only JAERI reference fuel. Both capsules will be irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Capsule HRB-21 will be operated at a mean volumetric fuel temperature of 975{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) and a fast fluence of {le}4.5 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Capsule HRB-22 will be operated at a mean centerline fuel temperature of 1250 to 1300{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 5.5% FIMA and a fast fluence of 1.7 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Performance of the fuels during irradiation will be closely monitored using on-line fission gas surveillance. Following irradiation, both capsules will undergo detailed examinations and core heatup simulation testing. Results from in-reactor monitoring and postirradiation testing will be analyzed to comparatively assess US and Japanese coated-particle fuel performance. 3 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. (Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Luckhardt, R.; Terry, N.; Drake, D.; Gaines, J.

    1990-04-27

    This KMS Fusion Semi-Annual Technical Report covers the period October 1989 through March 1990. It contains a review of work performed by KMS Fusion, Inc. (KMSF), in support of the national program to achieve inertially confined fusion (ICF). A major section of the report is devoted to target technology, a field which is expected to play an increasingly important role in the overall KMSF fusion effort. Among the highlights of our efforts in this area covered in this report are: improvements and new developments in target fabrication techniques, including a discussion of techniques for introducing gaussian bumps and bands on target surfaces. Development of a single automated system for the interferometric characterization of transparent shells. Residual gas analysis of the blowing gases contained in glass shells made from xerogels. These usually include CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, and are objectionable because they dilute the fuel. Efforts to observe the ice layers formed in the {beta}-layering process in cryogenic targets, and to simulate the formation of these layers. In addition to our work on target technology, we conducted experiments with the Chroma laser and supported the ICF effort at other labs with theoretical and computational support as well as diagnostic development. Included in the work covered in this report are: experiments on Chroma to study interpenetration of and ionization balance in laser generated plasmas. Diagnostic development, including an optical probe for the Aurora laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a high energy x-ray continuum spectrograph for Aurora. Investigation of the radiation cooling instability as a possible mechanism for the generation of relatively cold, dense jets observed in ICF experiments.

  20. To Support Research Activities Under the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    2003-01-01

    The Alabama NASA EPSCoR Program is a collaborative venture of The Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama EPSCoR, and faculty and staff at 10 Alabama colleges and universities as well as the Alabama School of Math and Science in Mobile. There are two Research Clusters which include infrastructure-building and outreach elements embedded in their research activities. Each of the two Research Clusters is in an area of clear and demonstrable relevance to NASA's mission, to components of other Alabama EPSCoR projects, and to the State of Alabama's economic development. This Final Report summarizes and reports upon those additional activities occurring after the first report was submitted in March 2000 (included here as Appendix C). Since the nature of the activities and the manner in which they relate to one another differ by cluster, these clusters function independently and are summarized in parallel in this report. They do share a common administration by the Alabama Space Grant Consortium (ASGC) and by this means, good ideas from each group were communicated to the other, as appropriate. During the past year these research teams, involving 15 scientists, 16 graduate students, 16 undergraduates, and 7 high school students involving 10 Alabama universities had 14 peer reviewed scientific journal articles published, 21 others reviewed for publication or published in proceedings, gave 7 formal presentations and numerous informal presentations to well over 3000 people, received 3 patents and were awarded 14 research proposals for more than $213K dollars in additional research related to these investigations. Each cluster's activities are described and an Appendix summarizes these achievements.

  1. Inflammatory response in visceral fat tissue and liver is prenatally programmed: experimental research.

    PubMed

    Bezpalko, L; Gavrilyuk, O; Zayachkivska, O

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of developmental programming we analyzed the effects of maternal stress and food intake on physiological activity of adipose tissue and hepatocellular organization in the offsprings. The experiments were conducted in nonlinear female rats (n=20) and their male offsprings (n=28). During their pregnancy female rats were exposed to social and emotional stress using Pratt's model, and nutritional insults: high sugar diet (HSD) with chronic access to 30% solution of saccharose in drinking water ad libitum, high fat diet (HFD) containing 45% calories from fat or their combination - high sugar and high fat diet (HSFD). The effects of maternal stress and nutrition on severity of visceral fat and liver changes were then examined in offsprings, along with changes in serum levels of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1b, IL-8 (in rats known as GRO/CINC-1), leptin and adiponectin, respectively. Maternal exposure to stress in combination with HSFD resulted in the most prominent changes in the offsprings: histological changes in the visceral fat tissue and liver with cell reorganization and signs of inflammation, 217% increase in IL-1β level, 99% increase in GRO/CINC-1 level, 79% increase in leptin level and 41% decrease in adiponectin level. The leptin/adiponectin index was elevated in all study groups and reached 158% in HSD group, 138% in HFD group and was two times higher in HSFD group vs control. The rat model used in this study provides novel insight into development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Expressed pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may indicate early changes in liver and adipose tissue functioning and leptin/adiponectin index could be a novel non-invasive marker of metabolic-related liver alteration. Healthy nutrition and stress management during prenatal period may serve as a valid strategy to prevent liver and adipose tissue inflammation/alteration and metabolic disorders in adulthood.

  2. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  3. Parametric studies on heterogeneous cores for fast breeder reactors: The Pre-Racine and Racine experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Humbert, G.; Kappler, F.; Martini, M.; Norvez, G.; Rimpault, G.; Ruelle, B.; Scholtyssek, W.; Stanculescu, A.

    1984-07-01

    The Pre-Racine and Racine experimental programs, which have been performed on the Masurca critical assembly at Cadarache since 1976, were designed for the study of the neutron physics characteristics of heterogeneous fast reactor cores. Geometrically simple configurations were chosen in which parameters, being typical for heterogeneous cores, were varied in a systematic manner while the basic fissile composition was kept the same. Measurements were made especially of the critical mass, the distributions of reaction rates and the spectral indices, the reactivity of sodium voiding, and control rod worths. Analyses were made independently by Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and DEBENE using their own calculational techniques and cross sections. No bias for core heterogeneity was found on critical mass predictions. The CEA calculations for void reactivities are consistent in heterogeneous and homogeneous configurations. For the calculation of local parameters, e.g., reaction rates and spectral indices, more sophisticated methods must be applied in heterogeneous cores, as transport effects also become more important in fissile zones with increasing fertile volume fraction. It was found at CEA that the ratio of the calculated reactivity of a central control rod to the experimental value does not change with the core size or with the presence of internal breeder zones.

  4. A program for calculating expansion-tube flow quantities for real-gas mixtures and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1972-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN 4 language is presented which determines expansion-tube flow quantities for real test gases CO2 N2, O2, Ar, He, and H2, or mixtures of these gases, in thermochemical equilibrium. The effects of dissociation and first and second ionization are included. Flow quantities behind the incident shock into the quiescent test gas are determined from the pressure and temperature of the quiescent test gas in conjunction with: (1) incident-shock velocity, (2) static pressure immediately behind the incident shock, or (3) pressure and temperature of the driver gas (imperfect hydrogen or helium). The effect of the possible existence of a shock reflection at the secondary diaphragm of the expansion tube is included. Expansion-tube test-section flow conditions are obtained by performing an isentropic unsteady expansion from the conditions behind the incident shock or reflected shock to either the test-region velocity or the static pressure. Both a thermochemical-equilibrium expansion and a frozen expansion are included. Flow conditions immediately behind the bow shock of a model positioned at the test section are also determined. Results from the program are compared with preliminary experimental data obtained in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube.

  5. Discovery and development of anticancer agents from marine sponges: perspectives based on a chemistry-experimental therapeutics collaborative program.

    PubMed

    Valeriote, Frederick A; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Johnson, Tyler A; Amagata, Taro; Crews, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative program was initiated in 1990 between the natural product chemistry laboratory of Dr. Phillip Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz and the experimental therapeutics laboratory of Dr. Fred Valeriote at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The program focused on the discovery and development of anticancer drugs from sponge extracts. A novel in vitro disk diffusion, solid tumor selective assay was used to examine 2,036 extracts from 683 individual sponges. The bioassay-directed fractionation discovery component led to the identification of active pure compounds from many of these sponges. In most cases, pure compound was prepared in sufficient quantities to both chemically identify the active compound(s) as well as pursue one or more of the biological development components. The latter included IC50, clonogenic survival-concentration exposure, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic assessment studies. Solid tumor selective compounds included fascaplysin and 10-bromofascaplysin (Fascaplysinopsis), neoamphimedine, 5-methoxyneoamphimedine and alpkinidine (Xestospongia), makaluvamine C and makaluvamine H (Zyzzya), psymberin (Psammocinia and Ircinia), and ethylplakortide Z and ethyldidehydroplakortide Z (Plakortis). These compounds or analogs thereof continue to have therapeutic potential.

  6. Detecting and removing inconsistencies between experimental data and signaling network topologies using integer linear programming on interaction graphs.

    PubMed

    Melas, Ioannis N; Samaga, Regina; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Klamt, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Cross-referencing experimental data with our current knowledge of signaling network topologies is one central goal of mathematical modeling of cellular signal transduction networks. We present a new methodology for data-driven interrogation and training of signaling networks. While most published methods for signaling network inference operate on Bayesian, Boolean, or ODE models, our approach uses integer linear programming (ILP) on interaction graphs to encode constraints on the qualitative behavior of the nodes. These constraints are posed by the network topology and their formulation as ILP allows us to predict the possible qualitative changes (up, down, no effect) of the activation levels of the nodes for a given stimulus. We provide four basic operations to detect and remove inconsistencies between measurements and predicted behavior: (i) find a topology-consistent explanation for responses of signaling nodes measured in a stimulus-response experiment (if none exists, find the closest explanation); (ii) determine a minimal set of nodes that need to be corrected to make an inconsistent scenario consistent; (iii) determine the optimal subgraph of the given network topology which can best reflect measurements from a set of experimental scenarios; (iv) find possibly missing edges that would improve the consistency of the graph with respect to a set of experimental scenarios the most. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by interrogating a manually curated interaction graph model of EGFR/ErbB signaling against a library of high-throughput phosphoproteomic data measured in primary hepatocytes. Our methods detect interactions that are likely to be inactive in hepatocytes and provide suggestions for new interactions that, if included, would significantly improve the goodness of fit. Our framework is highly flexible and the underlying model requires only easily accessible biological knowledge. All related algorithms were implemented in a freely

  7. Detecting and Removing Inconsistencies between Experimental Data and Signaling Network Topologies Using Integer Linear Programming on Interaction Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Klamt, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Cross-referencing experimental data with our current knowledge of signaling network topologies is one central goal of mathematical modeling of cellular signal transduction networks. We present a new methodology for data-driven interrogation and training of signaling networks. While most published methods for signaling network inference operate on Bayesian, Boolean, or ODE models, our approach uses integer linear programming (ILP) on interaction graphs to encode constraints on the qualitative behavior of the nodes. These constraints are posed by the network topology and their formulation as ILP allows us to predict the possible qualitative changes (up, down, no effect) of the activation levels of the nodes for a given stimulus. We provide four basic operations to detect and remove inconsistencies between measurements and predicted behavior: (i) find a topology-consistent explanation for responses of signaling nodes measured in a stimulus-response experiment (if none exists, find the closest explanation); (ii) determine a minimal set of nodes that need to be corrected to make an inconsistent scenario consistent; (iii) determine the optimal subgraph of the given network topology which can best reflect measurements from a set of experimental scenarios; (iv) find possibly missing edges that would improve the consistency of the graph with respect to a set of experimental scenarios the most. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by interrogating a manually curated interaction graph model of EGFR/ErbB signaling against a library of high-throughput phosphoproteomic data measured in primary hepatocytes. Our methods detect interactions that are likely to be inactive in hepatocytes and provide suggestions for new interactions that, if included, would significantly improve the goodness of fit. Our framework is highly flexible and the underlying model requires only easily accessible biological knowledge. All related algorithms were implemented in a freely

  8. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Russell .

    2009-09-10

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional

  9. JLAB Hurricane recovery

    SciTech Connect

    A. Hutton; D. Arenius; J. Benesch; S. Chattopadhyay; E. F. Daly; O. Garza; R. Kazimi; R. Lauzi; L. Merminga; W. Merz; R. Nelson; W. Oren; M. Poelker; P. Powers; J. Preble; V. Ganni; C. R. Reece; R. Rimmer; M. Spata; S. Suhring

    2004-07-01

    Hurricane Isabel, originally a Category 5 storm, arrived at Jefferson Lab on September 18, 2003 with winds of only 75 mph, creating little direct damage to the infrastructure. However, electric power was lost for four days allowing the superconducting cryomodules to warm up and causing a total loss of the liquid helium. The subsequent recovery of the cryomodules and the impact of the considerable amount of opportunistic preventive maintenance provides important lessons for all accelerator complexes, not only those with superconducting elements. The details of how the recovery process was structured and the resulting improvement in accelerator availability will be discussed in detail.

  10. Using a Non-Equivalent Groups Quasi Experimental Design to Reduce Internal Validity Threats to Claims Made by Math and Science K-12 Teacher Recruitment Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Laura

    2009-10-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act national policy established in 2009 calls for ``meaningful data'' that demonstrate educational improvements, including the recruitment of high-quality teachers. The scant data available and the low credibility of many K-12 math/science teacher recruitment program evaluations remain the major barriers for the identification of effective recruitment strategies. Our study presents a methodology to better evaluate the impact of recruitment programs on increasing participants' interest in teaching careers. The research capitalizes on the use of several control groups and presents a non-equivalent groups quasi-experimental evaluation design that produces program effect claims with higher internal validity than claims generated by current program evaluations. With this method that compares responses to a teaching career interest question from undergraduates all along a continuum from just attending an information session to participating (or not) in the recruitment program, we were able to compare the effect of the program in increasing participants' interest in teaching careers versus the evolution of the same interest but in the absence of the program. We were also able to make suggestions for program improvement and further research. While our findings may not apply to other K-12 math/science teacher recruitment programs, we believe that our evaluation methodology does and will contribute to conduct stronger program evaluations. In so doing, our evaluation procedure may inform recruitment program designers and policy makers.

  11. Cyber Panel Experimentation Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    this attack the adversary does a portscan of the server and then performs 10 attempts to guess the login/password on the ftp server. 2. Guess Telnet...password: In this attack the adversary does a portscan of the server and then performs 10 attempts to guess the login/password on the telnet server...single, pure, alert that detected scan and probe activity from attack steps 0 and 1. The 3 sub-reports contained: 21 portscan -related alerts from

  12. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, D.N.; Schwalm, C.; Michalak, A.M; Schaefer, K.; King, A.W.; Wei, Y.; Jacobson, A.; Liu, S.; Cook, R.; Post, W.M.; Berthier, G.; Hayes, D.; Huang, M.; Ito, A.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Mao, J.; Peng, C.H.; Peng, S.; Poulter, B.; Riccuito, D.; Shi, X.; Tian, H.; Wang, W.; Zeng, N.; Zhao, F.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  13. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project - Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntzinger, D. N.; Schwalm, C.; Michalak, A. M.; Schaefer, K.; King, A. W.; Wei, Y.; Jacobson, A.; Liu, S.; Cook, R. B.; Post, W. M.; Berthier, G.; Hayes, D.; Huang, M.; Ito, A.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Mao, J.; Peng, C. H.; Peng, S.; Poulter, B.; Riccuito, D.; Shi, X.; Tian, H.; Wang, W.; Zeng, N.; Zhao, F.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-07-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  14. The North American Carbon Program Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project - Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntzinger, D. N.; Schwalm, C.; Michalak, A. M.; Schaefer, K.; King, A. W.; Wei, Y.; Jacobson, A.; Liu, S.; Cook, R. B.; Post, W. M.; Berthier, G.; Hayes, D.; Huang, M.; Ito, A.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Mao, J.; Peng, C. H.; Peng, S.; Poulter, B.; Riccuito, D.; Shi, X.; Tian, H.; Wang, W.; Zeng, N.; Zhao, F.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g., nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g., photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e., model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  15. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    PubMed

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  16. Overview of the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Experimental Program and Future Plan on C-2 Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Binderbauer, Michl; Tuszewski, Michel; Guo, Houyang; Garate, Eusebio; Barnes, Dan; Putvinski, Sergei; Tajima, Toshiki; Sevier, Leigh

    2014-10-01

    C-2 is the world's largest compact-toroid (CT) device at Tri Alpha Energy that produces field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by colliding/merging oppositely-directed CTs and seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral-beam (NB) injection into FRCs. Recently, significant progress has been made in C-2 on both technology and physics fronts, achieving ~ 5 ms stable plasmas with a dramatic improvement in confinement. FRCs are stabilized with an edge biasing using end-on plasma-guns and/or electrodes, and are partially sustained with NB injection (20 keV Hydrogen, ~ 4 MW). Recent work to reduce scrape-off layer and radiative losses has succeeded in reducing the average power balance deficit to ~ 1.5 MW. Increasing plasma pressure and electron temperature are now observed during brief periods of the discharge, which indicate a sign of NB injection effect such as accumulating fast-ions as well as heating core/edge plasmas. Highlights of these advances, broader C-2 experimental program, and future plan on upgrading the C-2 device with new NBs (15 keV, up to 10 MW injection power, selectable beam injection angle) will be presented.

  17. Influence of the Expression of Inflammatory Markers on Kidney after Fetal Programming in an Experimental Model of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Júnior, Carlos Donizete; Guimarães, Camila Souza de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Aldo Rogelis Aquiles; da Glória, Maria Aparecida; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Rocha, Laura Penna; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the expression of inflammatory markers in experimental renal failure after fetal programming. Methods. The offspring aged two and five months were divided into four groups: CC (control dams, control offspring); DC (diabetic dams, control offspring); CFA (control dams, folic acid offspring, 250 mg/Kg); and DFA (diabetic dams, folic acid offspring). Gene expression of inflammatory markers MCP-1, IL-1, NOS3, TGF-β, TNF-α, and VEGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results. MCP-1 was increased in the CFA and DFA groups at two and five months of age, as well as in DC5 when compared to CC5. There was a higher expression of IL-1 in the CFA2, DFA2, and DC2 groups. There was a decrease in NOS3 and an increase in TNF-α in DFA5 in relation to CFA5. The gene expression of TGF-β increased in cases that had received folic acid at two and five months, and VEGF decreased in the CFA5 and DFA5 groups. DC5 showed increased VEGF expression in comparison with CC5. Conclusions. Gestational diabetes mellitus and folic acid both change the expression of inflammatory markers, thus demonstrating that the exposure to harmful agents in adulthood has a more severe impact in cases which underwent fetal reprogramming. PMID:28018922

  18. Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Predictors of Success in Adult Education Programs: Evidence from Experimental Data with Low-Income Welfare Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne; Kalil, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Using data on approximately 2,000 low-income welfare recipients in a three-site random-assignment intervention conducted in the early 1990s (the NEWWS), we examine the role of cognitive and non-cognitive factors in moderating experimental impacts of an adult education training program for women who lacked a high school degree or GED at the time of…

  19. A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS ON PUPIL ACHIEVEMENT OBSERVED DURING FIRST THREE YEARS OF THE PROJECT, SECONDARY MATHEMATICS EVALUATION PROJECT. INTERIM REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERICKSEN, GERALD L.; RYAN, JAMES J.

    A REPORT IS GIVEN OF THE FIRST 3 YEARS OF A FIELD STUDY CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SEVERAL PROTOTYPE, SECONDARY MATHEMATICS PROGRAMS THAT WERE PRODUCED BY DIFFERENT CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT GROUPS. MATHEMATICS TEACHERS WHO HAD NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE WITH "MODERN" OR EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES TO MATHEMATICS TAUGHT A SELECTED…

  20. What Works for Early Language and Literacy Development: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Intervention Strategies. Fact Sheet. Publication #2011-18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Alison; Ling, Thomson

    2011-01-01

    Given the importance of the early childhood period as a time when the foundation is laid for later language and literacy, it is important to determine what activities and experiences lead to positive language and literacy outcomes in early childhood. This Fact Sheet reviews fifteen experimentally-evaluated programs and intervention strategies that…

  1. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  2. The Meson Spectroscopy Program at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The experimental techniques that will be applied by the next generation meson spectroscopy experiments at JLab are described. For the first time, these experiments will be able to exploit the features of a photon beam of unprecedented intensity and momentum resolution, that will allow to perform precision studies of meson states with masses below 3 GeV/c2. Photon induced reactions will enhance the production of spin-1 mesons, that are of particular interest according to the most recent Lattice QCD calculations of the lightest exotic hybrid meson.

  3. A quasi-experimental study of a reminiscence program focused on autobiographical memory in institutionalized older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Teresa Silveira; Afonso, Rosa Marina Lopes Brás Martins; Ribeiro, Óscar Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Working with past memories through reminiscence interventions has been practiced for several decades with successful outcomes on mental health in older adults. Few studies however have focused on autobiographical memory recall in older individuals with cognitive impairment. This study aims to analyze the impact of an individual reminiscence program in a group of older persons with cognitive decline living in nursing homes on the dimensions of cognition, autobiographical memory, mood, behavior and anxiety. A two-group pre-test and post-test design with single blinded assessment was conducted. Forty-one participants were randomized to an experimental group (n=20) and a control group (n=21). The first group attended five weekly individual reminiscence sessions. Changes in the outcome measures were examined for cognition (Montreal Cognitive Assessment; Autobiographical Memory Test), behavior (Alzheimer Disease Assessment Subscale Non-Cog) and emotional status (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia; Geriatric Depression Scale, and Geriatric Anxiety Inventory). Participants attending reminiscence sessions exhibited better outcomes compared to the control group in cognition, anxiety and depression (p<0.001), and presented a higher number of retrieved autobiographical events, specificity of evoked memories and positive valence of events (p<0.001), and also presented lower latency time for recalling events, and lower negative recalled events (p<0.01). This study supports the potential value of reminiscence therapy in improving the recall of autobiographical memory. Reminiscence therapy can be helpful to maintain or improve cognitive function, decrease anxiety and manage depressive symptoms and altered behavior, but further investigation is needed to clarify long-term effects.

  4. An Experimental Study of the Effects of an Alternative Work Experience Program in the Middle School. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Mark

    Objectives of the study were (1) to develop and implement an alternative work experience program for a middle school; (2) to test the effect of the program on attitudes toward school, career maturity, and vocational interests of the students; and (3) to provide information and procedures for a model work experience program. Western Kentucky…

  5. Strengthening Scientific Verbal Behavior: An Experimental Comparison of Progressively Prompted and Unprompted Programmed Instruction and Prose Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Darrel R.; Bostow, Darrel E.; Heimisson, Gudmundur T.

    2007-01-01

    Web-based software was used to deliver and record the effects of programmed instruction that progressively added formal prompts until attempts were successful, programmed instruction with one attempt, and prose tutorials. Error-contingent progressive prompting took significantly longer than programmed instruction and prose. Both forms of…

  6. Strengthening scientific verbal behavior: an experimental comparison of progressively prompted and unprompted programmed instruction and prose tutorials.

    PubMed

    Davis, Darrel R; Bostow, Darrel E; Heimisson, Gudmundur T

    2007-01-01

    Web-based software was used to deliver and record the effects of programmed instruction that progressively added formal prompts until attempts were successful, programmed instruction with one attempt, and prose tutorials. Error-contingent progressive prompting took significantly longer than programmed instruction and prose. Both forms of programmed instruction substantially increased the appropriate use of behavioral vocabulary during subsequent interpretive essays. These behavioral gains extended to a different setting, suggesting that more was being learned than simply how to answer programmed tutorial frames correctly.

  7. High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

    1981-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup

  8. An experimental evaluation of theory-based mother and mother-child programs for children of divorce.

    PubMed

    Wolchik, S A; West, S G; Sandler, I N; Tein, J Y; Coatsworth, D; Lengua, L; Weiss, L; Anderson, E R; Greene, S M; Griffin, W A

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 theory-based preventive interventions for divorced families: a program for mothers and a dual component mother-child program. The mother program targeted mother-child relationship quality, discipline, interparental conflict, and the father-child relationship. The child program targeted active coping, avoidant coping, appraisals of divorce stressors, and mother-child relationship quality. Families with a 9- to 12-year-old child (N = 240) were randomly assigned to the mother, dual-component, or self-study program. Postintervention comparisons showed significant positive program effects of the mother program versus self-study condition on relationship quality, discipline, attitude toward father-child contact, and adjustment problems. For several outcomes, more positive effects occurred in families with poorer initial functioning. Program effects on externalizing problems were maintained at 6-month follow-up. A few additive effects of the dual-component program occurred for the putative mediators; none occurred for adjustment problems.

  9. Promoting Child Development through Group-Based Parent Support within a Cash Transfer Program: Experimental Effects on Children's Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Lia C. H.; Kagawa, Rose M. C.; Knauer, Heather A.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Guerra, Armando Garcia; Neufeld, Lynnette M.

    2017-01-01

    We examined effects on child development of a group-based parenting support program ("Educación Inicial" - EI) when combined with Mexico's conditional cash transfer (CCT) program ("Prospera," originally 'Oportunidades" and "Progresa"). This cluster-randomized trial included 204 communities (n = 1,113 children in…

  10. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, October 22, 1976-February 24, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    The Dental Auxiliary Department of the University of Puerto Rico designed a career option dental auxiliary training program which is a step ladder program with three exit points over a period of two academic years. The first option is a six-month track to train a traditional chairside dental auxiliary. The second option is a nine-month track to…

  11. Experimental Impacts of a Teacher Professional Development Program in Chile on Preschool Classroom Quality and Child Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E.; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M. Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J.; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found…

  12. Experimental impacts of a teacher professional development program in Chile on preschool classroom quality and child outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-03-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found moderate to large positive impacts on observed emotional and instructional support as well as classroom organization in prekindergarten classrooms after 1 year of the program. After 2 years of the program, moderate positive impacts were observed on emotional support and classroom organization. No significant program impacts on child outcomes were detected at posttest (1 marginal effect, an increase in a composite of self-regulation and low problem behaviors, was observed). Professional development for preschool teachers in Chile can improve classroom quality. More intensive curricular approaches are needed for these improvements to translate into effects on children.

  13. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  14. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  15. Promoting child development through group-based parent support within a cash transfer program: Experimental effects on children's outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fernald, Lia C H; Kagawa, Rose M C; Knauer, Heather A; Schnaas, Lourdes; Guerra, Armando Garcia; Neufeld, Lynnette M

    2017-02-01

    We examined effects on child development of a group-based parenting support program (Educación Inicial - EI) when combined with Mexico's conditional cash transfer (CCT) program (Prospera, originally Oportunidades and Progresa). This cluster-randomized trial included 204 communities (n = 1,113 children in final sample), stratified by community indigenous status, and assigned to receive either: (T0) CCT only; (T1) CCT plus availability of EI in the community; or (T2) T1 plus promotion of the EI program by the CCT program. Interviews were conducted with the mother or primary caregiver of each child at baseline (2008, children 0-18 months old), and at follow-up (2012, children 3-5 years old); the intervention began after baseline and continued for all eligible households. Cognitive development was assessed with the Extended Ages and Stages Questionnaire (baseline) and the McCarthy Scales of Children's Development (follow-up); assessors were blinded to treatment. All analyses were intention to treat. There were significant effects on child development when EI received support and promotion from the CCT program (T₂ vs. T₀: General Cognitive Index, β = 3.90; 95% CI [0.51, 7.30], Verbal Score, β = 4.28; 95% CI [0.51, 8.05], and Memory Score, β = 4.14; 95% CI [0.62, 7.66]), effects equivalent to 0.26-0.29 SD. There were no significant benefits when the programs operated independently (T₁ vs. T₀). In stratified analyses, EI showed significant effects in indigenous communities only. We found consistent results in regressions controlling for covariates, with some reductions in magnitude of differences. Our findings suggest that group-based, parenting support programs can improve child outcomes within the context of a CCT, but only when the 2 programs are integrated and mutually supportive. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Reducing HIV Risk among Transgender Women in Thailand: A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of the Sisters Program

    PubMed Central

    Pawa, Duangta; Firestone, Rebecca; Ratchasi, Sindh; Dowling, Olivia; Jittakoat, Yaowalak; Duke, Alex; Mundy, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Transgender women are particularly at risk of HIV infection, but little evidence exists on effective HIV prevention strategies with this population. We evaluated whether Sisters, a peer-led program for transgender women, could reduce HIV risks in Pattaya, Thailand. The study used time-location sampling to recruit 308 transgender women in Pattaya into a behavioral survey in 2011. Coarsened exact matching was used to create statistically equivalent groups of program participants and non-participants, based on factors influencing likelihood of program participation. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated effects of any program participation and participation by delivery channel on: condom use at last sex; consistent condom and condom/water-based lubricant use in the past 3 months with commercial, casual, and regular partners; and receipt of HIV testing in the past 6 months. Program coverage reached 75% of the population. In a matched sub-sample (n = 238), participation in outreach was associated with consistent condom/water-based lubricant use with commercial partners (AOR 3.22, 95% CI 1.64–6.31). Attendance at the Sisters drop-in center was associated with receiving an HIV test (AOR 2.58, 95% CI 1.47–4.52). Dedicated transgender-friendly programs are effective at reducing HIV risks and require expansion to better serve this key population and improve HIV prevention strategies. PMID:24204750

  17. Exclusive Electroproduction of meson rho on the nucleon Virtualite Intermediate With the CLAS Detector at Jlab; Electroproduction Exclusive de meson rho sur le nucleon Virtualite Intermediaire Avec le Detecteur CLAS at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjidakis, Cynthia

    2002-12-17

    This report presents the exclusive rho0 meson electroproduction on the nucleon at intermediate square momentum transfers Q2 (1.5 < Q2 < 3 GeV2) and above the resonance region. The experiment has been taken place at the Jefferson laboratory with the CLAS detector, with a 4.2 GeV beam energy on a hydrogen target in the February-March 1999 period. They present the results and in particular the L/T separated cross sections. This experimentally unexplored domain experimentally is at the intersection between traditional ''soft'' hadronic physics models (VDM and Regge inspired models) and ''hard'' pQCD inspired approaches (recently introduced Generalized Parton Distribution). They discuss both approaches and their domain of validity.

  18. An optical coherent transient true-time delay device: Concept development and experimental demonstrations including delay programming with frequency-chirped pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Kristian Doyle

    1998-09-01

    A coherent transient true-time delay regenerator is presented in terms of conceptual development, simulations and experimental demonstrations in Tm3+:YAG. Theory predicts the arrival time of the emitted signals for a three-pulse sequence of square pulses. A shifting of the emitted signal's arrival time as a function of the individual pulse's area and duration is experimentally demonstrated. A novel delay-programming scheme is presented using linear frequency-chirped pulses. This technique enables changing the programmed delay only by frequency-shifting one (or both) of these pulses without changing its timing, bandwidth or duration. A delay range of 500 ns with sub-100 ps resolution is demonstrated for a signal bandwidth of 40 MHz. A continuous data stream of 100 bits, of a duration longer than the dephasing time T2 of Tm3+:YAG, is also delayed by a grating stored with linear frequency-chirped pulses. Frequency division multiplexing of delays is experimentally demonstrated for two delays whose gratings are in adjacent frequency channels, and stored with linear frequency-chirped pulses. The application of a coherent transient true-time delay device in array antennas is considered, and future research directions for this implementation are given.

  19. MDTA VOCATIONAL EXPERIMENTAL-DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR TRAINING AND PLACEMENT OF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS. 11TH PROGRESS REPORT, COMMUNITY SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEE, JOHN M.; AND OTHERS

    THE VOCATIONAL EXPERIMENTAL-DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT DRAPER CORRECTIONAL CENTER, AN EXPERIMENT TO REDUCE RECIDIVISM THROUGH VOCATIONAL TRAINING, IN ITS FIRST 21 MONTHS TRAINED 173 YOUTHS IN SEVEN TRADES AND PLACED 150 GRADUATES IN JOBS. DETAILS OF SELECTION, COUNSELING, TRAINING, PLACEMENT, AND FOLLOW-UP OF INMATES THE USE OF INDIVIDUALIZED…

  20. "Learn Young, Learn Fair", a Stress Management Program for Fifth and Sixth Graders: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods: Fifty-two schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was collected in the fall of 2002, the spring of 2003,…

  1. Does Moving to Better Neighborhoods Lead to Better Schooling Opportunities? Parental School Choice in an Experimental Housing Voucher Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Stefanie; Rosenblatt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous research has demonstrated that children growing up in poor communities have limited access to high-performing schools, while more affluent neighborhoods tend to have higher-ranking schools and more opportunities for after-school programs and activities. Therefore, many researchers and policy makers expected not only that the…

  2. An Experimental Comparison of Two Types of Self-Instructional Programs for a SAGE System Paired-Associate Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; Lindley, Richard H.

    A study was conducted to determine the optimal presentation methods for teaching the phonetic alphabet which is characteristic of much of the symbolic material which forms part of the SAGE L-system operator task. This discrete-item, paired-associate material was prepared in six different formats: (1) long continuous-discourse program, overt…

  3. Advanced theoretical and experimental studies in automatic control and information systems. [including mathematical programming and game theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Polak, E.; Zadeh, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of research projects is briefly summarized which includes investigations in the following areas: (1) mathematical programming problems for large system and infinite-dimensional spaces, (2) bounded-input bounded-output stability, (3) non-parametric approximations, and (4) differential games. A list of reports and papers which were published over the ten year period of research is included.

  4. Father Involvement Program Effects on Fathers, Father Figures, and Their Head Start Children: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jay; Iglesias, Aquiles

    1999-01-01

    This study examined effects of participation in a Head Start-based father involvement intervention program. Findings suggested a positive association between high level participation in the intervention and increased father involvement at post- treatment. Children in the high participation group showed higher mathematics readiness change scores.…

  5. A Weight-Loss Program Using Self-Control Techniques in a Correctional Facility: An Experimental Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Edward E.; DeNinno, John

    1977-01-01

    Self-control techniques were taught to an obese 27-year-old black male to help modify overeating behavior. Self-reinforcement was utilized in addition to systematic isolation of chained eating behavior from associated stimulus situations. A physical exercise program was employed in conjunction with the self-control techniques. (Author)

  6. Lessons Learned from the Use of Randomized and Quasi-Experimental Field Designs for the Evaluation of Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Andy; Johnson, R. Burke

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2002, the field of education has seen a heavy emphasis on the use of "scientifically based research" for designing and testing the effectiveness of new and existing educational programs. According to NCLB, when addressing basic cause and effect questions scientifically based…

  7. Experimental program to stimulate competitive energy research in North Dakota: Summary and significance of DOE Trainee research

    SciTech Connect

    Boudjouk, Philip

    1999-07-01

    The general goals of the North Dakota DOE/EPSCoR Program are to enhance the capabilities of North Dakota's researchers to conduct nationally competitive energy-related research and to develop science and engineering human resources to meet current and future needs in energy-related areas. Doctoral students were trained and energy research was conducted.

  8. What Works for Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Publication #2014-64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Heather; Manlove, Jennifer; Moore, Kristen Anderson; Mass, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The United States continues to have one of the highest teen birth rates in the developed world, and adolescent rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are also high. These factors highlight the need to identify effective evidence-based programs to improve adolescent reproductive health. This brief synthesizes findings from 118 experimental…

  9. Using CHAINS, a QuickBASIC 4.5 Program, to Teach Single-Subject Experimentation with Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dermer, Marshall Lev

    2004-01-01

    Students enrolled in a single-subject design course studied the repeated acquisition of response sequences by using CHAINS, a QuickBASIC 4.5 program, which runs in DOS or Windows. For about 2 months, students examined the learning of such sequences as a function of various treatments. Each week students graphed their data, discussed their…

  10. OTSEGO COUNTY EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM FOR TESTING METHODS OF FORMING FARM MANAGEMENT STUDY GROUPS, A PROGRESS REPORT. EXTENSION STUDY, NUMBER 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONGEST, JAMES W.; GENGENBACK, WILLIAM H.

    THE MOST FREQUENT METHOD OF GROUP FORMATION FOR INTENSIVE FARM MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS IN NEW YORK STATE HAS BEEN TO COMBINE ALL INTERESTED FARMERS IN LARGE GROUPS AT THE COUNTY EXTENSION HEADQUARTERS. THIS EXPERIMENT WAS SET UP TO STUDY THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO METHODS OF FORMING SMALL GROUPS--BY SOCIOMETRIC CHOICE OR SIMILAR CHARACTERISTICS. ALL…

  11. Project BOLT--Final Report for the Experimental and Demonstration Phase of the Basic Occupational Language Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rican Forum, Inc., New York, NY.

    The Puerto Rican Forum's Basic Occupational Language Training (BOLT) program teaches English language skills to Spanish-speaking people, and Spanish language skills to English-speaking people. Special BOLT curricula emphasize high-skilled instructors, audio-visual and audio-lingual techniques, job-oriented vocabularies, and on-site instruction.…

  12. Assessment of needs for satellite tracking of birds and suggestions for expediting a program. [experimental design using Nimbus 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, F. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Equipment development and testing, animal-instrument interphase or attachment methods, and the evaluation of various feasibility-tracking experiments with raptors are described as well as suggestions for expediting a future program. Results of animal-instrument interphases work indicate that large free-flying birds can be successfully instrumented with radio packages comparable in weight to satellite-transmitter packages. The 401 MHz frequency proved satisfactory for a combination of satellite and ground tracking of migrating birds. Tests run for nearly a year with the Nimbus 6 satellite and a miniaturized, one-watt prototype RAMS transmitter produced encouraging results in regard to location accuracy, frequency of contact with satellite and use of whip antennas. A future program is recommended with priority given to development of six operational transmitters for feasibility experiments.

  13. Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS. An Integrated, Prioritized Work Plan for Diagnostic Development and Maintenance and Supporting Capability

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    This Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS is an integrated prioritized work plan for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), program that is independent of individual National Security Enterprise Laboratories’ (Labs) requests or specific Subprograms being supported. This prioritized work plan is influenced by national priorities presented in the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF) and other strategy documents (Primary and Secondary Assessment Technologies Plans and the Plutonium Experiments Plan). This document satisfies completion criteria for FY 2010 MRT milestone #3496: Document an integrated, prioritized work plan for diagnostic development, maintenance, and supporting capability. This document is an update of the 3-year NNSS plan written a year ago, September 21, 2009, to define and understand Lab requests for diagnostic implementation. This plan is consistent with Lab interpretations of the PCF, Primary Assessment Technologies, and Plutonium Experiment plans.

  14. The meson spectroscopy program with CLAS12 at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hadronic spectrum is one of the most powerful tools to investigate the mechanism at the basis of quark confinement within hadrons. A precise determination of the spectrum allows not only to assess the properties of the hadrons in their fundamental and excited states, but also to investigate the existence of states resulting from alternative configurations of quarks and gluons, such as the glue-balls, hybrid hadrons and many-quarks configurations. The study of the mesonic part of the spectrum can play a central role in this investigation thanks to the strong signature that the hybrid mesons are expected to have: the presence of explicit gluonic degrees of freedom in such states may result in JPC configurations not allowed for the standard q ¯ q states. From the experimental side the expected high-multiplicity decays of the hybrid mesons require an apparatus with high performances in terms of rate-capability, resolution and acceptance. The CLAS12 experiment (formally MesonEx) is one of new-generation experiments at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLAB) for which an unprecedented statistics of events, with fully reconstructed kinematics for large particle multiplicity decays, will be available. A wide scientific program that will start in 2016 has been deployed for meson spectrum investigation with the CLAS12 apparatus in Hall B at energies up to 11 GeV. One of the main parts of the program is based on the use of the Forward Tagger apparatus, which will allow CLAS12 experiment to extend the study of meson electro-production to the quasi-real photo-production kinematical region (very low Q2), where the production of hybrid mesons is expected to be favoured. The data analysis which is required to extract the signal from hybrid states should go beyond the standard partial wave analysis techniques and a new analysis framework is being set up through the international network Haspect. The Haspect Network gathers people involved into theoretical and

  15. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program: Test facilities, model design instrumentation, and lowspeed, high-lift tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The model hardware, test facilities and instrumentation utilized in an experimental study of upper surface blown configurations at cruise is described. The high speed (subsonic) experimental work, studying the aerodynamic effects of wing nacelle geometric variations, was conducted around semispan model configurations composed of diversified, interchangeable components. Power simulation was provided by high pressure air ducted through closed forebody nacelles. Nozzle geometry was varied across size, exit aspect ratio, exit position and boattail angle. Three dimensional force and two dimensional pressure measurements were obtained at cruise Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.8 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to about 3.0. The experimental investigation was supported by an analytical synthesis of the system using a vortex lattice representation with first order power effects. Results are also presented from a compatibility study in which a short haul transport is designed on the basis of the aerodynamic findings in the experimental study as well as acoustical data obtained in a concurrent program. High lift test data are used to substantiate the projected performance of the selected transport design.

  16. Prediction of thinning of the sheet metal in the program AutoForm and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorko, M.; Urbánek, M.; Rund, M.

    2017-02-01

    The manufacture of press-formed parts often involves deep-drawing operations. Deep drawing, however, can be deemed an industrial branch in its own right. Today, many experimental as well as numerical methods are available for designing and optimizing deep drawing operations. The best option, however, is to combine both approaches. The present paper describes one such investigation. Here, measurements and numerical simulation were used for mapping the impact of anisotropy on thickness variation in a spherical-shaped drawn part of DC01 steel. Variation in sheet thickness was measured on spherical-shaped drawn parts of various geometries by means of two cameras, and evaluated with digital image correlation using the ARAMIS software from the company GOM. The forming experiment was carried out on an INOVA 200 kN servohydraulic testing machine in which the force vs. piston displacement curve was recorded. The same experiment was then numerically simulated and analyzed using the AUTOFORM software. Various parameters were monitored, such as thinning, strain magnitude, formability, and others. For the purpose of this simulation, a series of mechanical tests was conducted to obtain descriptions of the experimental material of 1.5 mm thickness. A material model was constructed from the tests data involving the work-hardening curve, the impact of anisotropy, and the forming limit diagram. Specifically, these tests included tensile tests, the Nakajima test, and the stacked test, which were carried out to determine materials data for the model. The actual sheet thickness was measured on a sectioned spherical-shaped drawn part using a NIKON optical microscope. The variations in thickness along defined lines on the sectioned drawn part were compared with the numerical simulations data using digital image correlation. The above-described experimental programme is suitable for calibrating a material model for any computational software and can correctly solve deep-drawing problems.

  17. AMPS data management requirements study, appendix 1. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Flow charts and display formats for the simulation of five experiments are given. The experiments are: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observations of ambient plasma; (3) ionospheric measurements with subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustical gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A detailed explanation of the simulation procedure, definition of variables, and an explanation of how the experimenter makes display choices is also presented. A functional description is included on each flow chart and the assumptions and definitions of terms and scope of the flow charts and displays are presented.

  18. Rotor burst protection program: Experimentation to provide guidelines for the design of turbine rotor burst fragment containment rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangano, G. J.; Salvino, J. T.; Delucia, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Empirical guidelines for the design of minimum weight turbine rotor disk fragment containment rings made from a monolithic metal were generated by experimentally establishing the relationship between a variable that provides a measure of containment ring capability and several other variables that both characterized the configurational aspects of the rotor fragments and containment ring, and had been found from exploratory testing to have had significant influence on the containment process. Test methodology and data analysis techniques are described. Results are presented in graphs and tables.

  19. JASPER [Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research], USDOE/PNC shielding research program: Analysis of the JASPER fission gas plenum experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1990-05-01

    The results of the analysis of the Fission Gas Plenum Experiment are presented. This experiment is the second in a series of several experiments comprising a joint US DOE-Japan PNC Shielding Research Program (JASPER). The four Fission Gas Plenum Experiment configurations, designed for the measurement of neutron streaming through the fission gas plenum region, were analyzed using Monte Carlo and two-dimensional discrete ordinated methods. Calculated results compared well with measured results in many cases, although results were consistently underpredicted for the shorter plenum configurations. Like the measured data, the calculated results indicated no significant streaming when results from the heterogeneous mockups were compared to those from the homogeneous mockups. An explanation is given as to why little streaming was observed. The Hornyak button dose rates were overpredicted because of a normalization problem with the response function but yielded horizontal traverse curves whose shapes agreed well with the measured shapes to the same extent as did those for the other integral detectors. 16 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Influence of maternal overnutrition and gestational diabetes on the programming of metabolic health outcomes in the offspring: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Troy J; Moyce, Brittany L; Kereliuk, Stephanie M; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have risen across the world during the past few decades and has also reached an alarming level among children. In addition, women are currently more likely than ever to enter pregnancy obese. As a result, the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus is also on the rise. While diet and lifestyle contribute to these trends, population health data show that maternal obesity and diabetes during pregnancy during critical stages of development are major factors that contribute to the development of chronic disease in adolescent and adult offspring. Fetal programming of metabolic function, through physiological and (or) epigenetic mechanisms, may also have an intergenerational effect, and as a result may perpetuate metabolic disorders in the next generation. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that characterizes how maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in the offspring. In particular, we focus on animal studies that investigate the molecular mechanisms that are programmed by the gestational environment and lead to disease phenotypes in the offspring. We also review interventional studies that prevent disease with a developmental origin in the offspring.

  1. Analytical prediction with multidimensional computer programs and experimental verification of the performance, at a variety of operating conditions, of two traveling wave tubes with depressed collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Kosmahl, H. G.; Ramins, P.; Stankiewicz, N.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are compared for two high performance, octave bandwidth TWT's that use depressed collectors (MDC's) to improve the efficiency. The computations were carried out with advanced, multidimensional computer programs that are described here in detail. These programs model the electron beam as a series of either disks or rings of charge and follow their multidimensional trajectories from the RF input of the ideal TWT, through the slow wave structure, through the magnetic refocusing system, to their points of impact in the depressed collector. Traveling wave tube performance, collector efficiency, and collector current distribution were computed and the results compared with measurements for a number of TWT-MDC systems. Power conservation and correct accounting of TWT and collector losses were observed. For the TWT's operating at saturation, very good agreement was obtained between the computed and measured collector efficiencies. For a TWT operating 3 and 6 dB below saturation, excellent agreement between computed and measured collector efficiencies was obtained in some cases but only fair agreement in others. However, deviations can largely be explained by small differences in the computed and actual spent beam energy distributions. The analytical tools used here appear to be sufficiently refined to design efficient collectors for this class of TWT. However, for maximum efficiency, some experimental optimization (e.g., collector voltages and aperture sizes) will most likely be required.

  2. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  3. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGES

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  4. Efficacy of a Culturally Tailored Therapeutic Intervention Program for Community Dwelling Depressed Korean American Women: A Non-Randomized Quasi-Experimental Design Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kunsook; Park, So-Young; Hahm, Sohee; Lee, Young Na; Seo, Jin Young; Nokes, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Asian American women are more prone to suffer with depression compared to their non-Asian American counterparts and have lower rates of seeking mental healthcare services due to lack of available culturally appropriate therapies. Two prior studies of a culturally tailored therapeutic intervention called LogoAutobiography were helpful in treating depressed Korean American women. The LogoAutobiography program was revised to enhance its efficacy not only for depressive symptoms and purpose in life but also to increase coping strategies. Objectives To test the efficacy of the Enhanced LogoAutobiography program on depressive symptoms, purpose in life, and coping strategies of depressed community-dwelling Korean American women. Design Two-group, non-randomized quasi-experimental design. Settings Local Korean community areas located in New York City and eastern New Jersey of the United States. Participants A total of 54 depressed women with Korean heritage completed either experimental group (n1= 25) or control group (n2= 29). Sample inclusion criteria were adult women with Korean heritage, depressive symptoms as measured by a CES-D score 16 or higher, fluent Korean language, and able to participate independently. Sample exclusion criteria were those who presented active suicidal ideation and history of episodes of mania or psychosis screened by the psychosocial survey questionnaire. Methods The experimental group received Enhanced Logo-Autobiography program which was guided by a facilitator who used a manualized intervention for 90 minute sessions over 8 weeks; the control group attended routine weekly community activities. Data were collected during the first session (pretest), the end of 8 weeks (posttest), and the 3 months follow-up session. Time and group changes in depressive symptoms, purpose in life, and coping strategies were computed using Repeated Measures General Linear Model (RMGLM). Results Findings suggested that the experimental group showed

  5. QCSEE - The key to future short-haul air transport. [Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul Experimental Engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciepluch, C. C.; Willis, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the design and test procedure for the QCSEE (quiet, clean, short-haul experimental engine). The engines designed for the YC-14 and YC-15 STOL aircraft, both use a very low fan pressure ratio to keep jet-flap noise about 3 dB below total system noise. Other noise reducing features discussed are the low tip speed fans and a carefully selected number of fan blades and vanes with adequate spacing between them. Attention is also given to the development of a low emissions combustor, and reduction of fan frame weight, through the use of graphite/epoxy material. The YC-15 engine also employs variable pitch fans to provide thrust reversal, thus saving weight. Finally, it is noted that the tests have proven that the engines could be configurated to meet the needs of a powered lift system without excessively compromising performance or weight.

  6. Subchannel Thermal-Hydraulic Experimental Program (STEP). Volume 1. Mixing in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, A.R.; Zielke, L.A.

    1980-08-01

    This volume describes an experiment that was performed to determine the mixing characteristics of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. The objective of this project was to improve the subchannel computer code models of the reactor core. The experimental technique was isokinetic subchannel withdrawal of the entire flow from two sample subchannels. Once withdrawn, the sample fluid was condensed and its enthalpy was measured by regenerative heat exchange calorimetry. The test bundle was a 4 x 6 electrically heated array with a 50% power upset. The COBRA IIIC code was used to model the experiment and to determine the value of the thermal mixing coefficient, ..beta.., that was necessary to predict the measured results. Both single- and two-phase data were obtained over a range of PWR operating conditions. The results indicate that both single- and two-phase mixing is small. The COBRA model predicts the enthalpy data using a turbulent mixing coefficient, ..beta.. approx. = 0.002.

  7. A High Soy Diet Reduces Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Bcl-xL Expression In Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lovekamp-Swan, Tara; Glendenning, Michele; Schreihofer, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    Soy phytoestrogens have been proposed as an alternative to estrogen replacement therapy and have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects in the brain. We have shown that a high soy diet significantly reduces infarct size following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Here, we tested the hypothesis that a high soy diet would attenuate programmed cell death after stroke. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and fed either an isoflavone-reduced diet (IFP) or a high soy diet (SP) for 2 weeks before undergoing 90 minutes of transient MCAO (tMCAO) followed by 22.5 hr reperfusion. Infarct size, as assessed by TTC staining, was significantly reduced by a high soy diet (p< 0.05). Apoptosis in the ischemic cortex, measured by TUNEL staining, was significantly reduced by the high soy diet. The number of active caspase-3 positive cells and caspase-mediated α-spectrin cleavage was also significantly decreased in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Furthermore, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was significantly reduced in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Soy significantly increased bcl-xL mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic cortex compared to IFP rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased neuronal expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL in the ischemic cortex of both IFP and SP rats following tMCAO. These results suggest that a high soy diet decreases both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent programmed cell death following tMCAO. Further, a high soy diet enhances expression of the cell survival factor bcl-xL following tMCAO, contributing to the neuroprotective effects of soy in the ischemic cortex. PMID:17706879

  8. Experiments with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer at Jlab Hall C and the New Spectroscopy of ^12_Lambda B Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Liguang; Chen, Chunhua; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Kawama, Daisuke; Han, Yuncheng; Yuan, Lulin; Matsumura, Akihiko; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Acha Quimper, Armando; Achenbach, Carsten; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Ates, Ozgur; Badui, Rafael; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Werner; Bono, Jason; Bosted, Peter; Brash, Edward; Carter, Philip; Carlini, Roger; Chiba, Atsushi; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Dalton, Mark; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; De Leo, Raffaele; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Doi, Daisuke; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, D; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kato, Seigo; Kawai, Masaharu; Keppel, Cynthia; Khanal, Hari; Kohl, M; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Li, Ya; Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Maxwell, Victor; Millener, David; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Motoba, Toshio; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Narayan, Amrendra; Neville, Casey; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Nunez, Angel; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Pochodzalla, J; Qiu, Xiyu; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera, R; Roche, Julie; Samanta, Chhanda; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segbefia, Edwin; Schott, Diane; Shichijo, Ayako; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Taniya, Naotaka; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Veilleux, Micah; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yamamoto, Taku; Yan, Chen; Ye, Z; Yokota, Kosuke; Zhamkochyan, Simon; Zhu, Lingyan

    2014-09-01

    Since the pioneering experiment, E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "Tilt Method", to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet were added to produce precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. These two experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, resulted in two new data sets, producing sub-MeV energy resolution in the spectra of ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{28}_{\\Lambda} \\text{Al}$ and ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{10}_{\\Lambda}\\text{Be}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{52}_{\\Lambda}\\text{V}$. All three experiments obtained a ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$, spectrum, which is the most characteristic $p$-shell hypernucleus and is commonly used for calibration. Independent analyses of these different experiments demonstrate excellent consistency and provide the clearest level structure to date of this hypernucleus as produced by the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction. This paper presents details of these experiments, and the extraction and analysis of the observed ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ spectrum.

  9. Developing an ecosystem perspective from experimental monitoring programs: I. Demographic responses of a rare geothermal grass to soil temperature.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, B M; Enberg, A

    2001-08-01

    The geysers panic grass [Dichanthelium lanuginosum Spellenberg var. thermale (Bol.) Spellenberg or DILA] is exclusively associated with surface geothermal manifestations in Sonoma County, California, USA (38 degrees 46'N, 122 degrees 38'W). Steam extraction by power plants could alter the subsurface distribution of heat and water to the site, potentially impacting subpopulations of this rare plant. The purpose of this study was to use demographic monitoring to determine: (1) temporal and spatial patterns of soil temperature in relation to the distribution of established DILA individuals at Little Geysers, (2) in situ response of experimental populations of DILA to spatial variations in soil temperature, and (3) habitat requirements of DILA as an indicator of its tolerance to variations in surficial geothermal features. Thermocouple transects and a datalogger provided data for characterizing the spatial and temporal patterns of soil temperature in four microhabitats (fumarole, DILA stand, Andropogon stand, and cleared). Experimental populations were established by precisely sowing and monitoring DILA seeds in these microhabitats. The results indicated that spatial and temporal variations in soil temperature had significant effects on the processes of germination, growth, survivorship, and reproduction, thus producing a readily observed metapopulation patch dynamic in relation to geothermal activity. Seasonal depressions of soil temperature near the fumaroles by cold air and prolonged rainfall events also promoted the emergence and survival of DILA seedlings in a microhabitat that was previously too hot to occupy. Over longer periods of time, DILA metapopulation dynamism reflected climatic and geothermal variation. Drought years inhibited germination for lack of water, but more importantly for the lack of requisite soil temperature depressions in the fumarole microhabitat. Wet years promoted subpopulation expansion into transition areas that were once too hot and dry

  10. Experimental test program for evaluation of solid lubricant coating as applied to compliant foil gas bearings to 315 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental apparatus and test procedure was developed to compare the performance of two solid lubricant coatings for air lubricated compliant foil gas bearings in the temperature range of 25 to 315 C. Polyimide bonded additive (SBGC) were tested extensively for durability and frictional characteristics. A partial arc bearing constructed of Inconel X-750 was coated on the bore with one of these coatings. The foil was subjected to repeated start/stop cycles. Performance comparisons reveal that although both coatings survive thousands of start/stop cycles, only the PBGF coated bearing achieves the specified 9000 start/stops. There is enough wear on the SBGC coated bearing to warrant termination of the test prior to 9000 start/stop cycles due to coating failure. The frictional characteristics of the PBGF are better at the elevated temperatures than at lower temperatures; a marked increase in sliding friction occurs as the temperature decreases. The SBGC maintains relatively constant frictional characteristics independent of operating temperature.

  11. Experimental and analytical program to determine strains in 737 LAP splice joints subjected to normal fuselage pressurization loads

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Jeong, D.Y.

    1996-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (FAATC) has initiated several research projects to assess the structural integrity of the aging commercial aircraft fleet. One area of research involves the understanding of a phenomenon known as ``Widespread Fatigue Damage`` or WFD, which refers to a type of multiple element cracking that degrades the damage tolerance capability of an aircraft structure. Research on WFD has been performed both experimentally and analytically including finite element modeling of fuselage lap splice joints by the Volpe Center. Fuselage pressurization tests have also been conducted at the FAA`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to obtain strain gage data from select locations on the FAA/AANC 737 Transport Aircraft Test Bed. One-hundred strain channels were used to monitor five different lap splice bays including the fuselage skin and substructure elements. These test results have been used to evaluate the accuracy of the analytical models and to support general aircraft analysis efforts. This paper documents the strain fields measured during the AANC tests and successfully correlates the results with analytical predictions.

  12. A "politically robust" experimental design for public policy evaluation, with application to the Mexican universal health insurance program.

    PubMed

    King, Gary; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Ravishankar, Nirmala; Moore, Ryan T; Lakin, Jason; Vargas, Manett; Tellez-Rojo, Martha Maria; Hernandez Avila, Juan Eugenio; Hernandez Avila, Mauricio; Hernandez Llamas, Hector

    2007-01-01

    We develop an approach to conducting large-scale randomized public policy experiments intended to be more robust to the political interventions that have ruined some or all parts of many similar previous efforts. Our proposed design is insulated from selection bias in some circumstances even if we lose observations; our inferences can still be unbiased even if politics disrupts any two of the three steps in our analytical procedures; and other empirical checks are available to validate the overall design. We illustrate with a design and empirical validation of an evaluation of the Mexican Seguro Popular de Salud (Universal Health Insurance)program we are conducting. Seguro Popular, which is intended to grow to provide medical care, drugs, preventative services, and financial health protection to the 50 million Mexicans without health insurance, is one of the largest health reforms of any country in the last two decades. The evaluation is also large scale, constituting one of the largest policy experiments to date and what may be the largest randomized health policy experiment ever.

  13. Does the theory-driven program affect the risky behavior of drug injecting users in a healthy city? A quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Karimy, Mahmood; Abedi, Ahmad Reza; Abredari, Hamid; Taher, Mohammad; Zarei, Fatemeh; Rezaie Shahsavarloo, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: The horror of HIV/AIDS as a non-curable, grueling disease is a destructive issue for every country. Drug use, shared needles and unsafe sex are closely linked to the transmission of HIV/AIDS. Modification or changing unhealthy behavior through educational programs can lead to HIV prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of theory-based education intervention on HIV prevention transmission in drug addicts. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 69 male drug injecting users were entered in to the theory- based educational intervention. Data were collected using a questionnaire, before and 3 months after four sessions (group discussions, lecture, film displaying and role play) of educational intervention. Results: The findings signified that the mean scores of constructs (self-efficacy, susceptibility, severity and benefit) significantly increased after the educational intervention, and the perceived barriers decreased (p< 0.001). Also, the history of HIV testing was reported to be 9% before the intervention, while the rate increased to 88% after the intervention. Conclusion: The present research offers a primary founding for planning and implementing a theory based educational program to prevent HIV/AIDS transmission in drug injecting addicts. This research revealed that health educational intervention improved preventive behaviors and the knowledge of HIV/AIDS participants. PMID:27390684

  14. Effects of a Behavioral and Exercise Program on Depression and Quality of Life in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Azizan, Azilyana; Justine, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Sedentary behavior and low participation in exercise among older adults can lead to depression and low quality of life (QOL). The current study investigated the effects of behavioral and exercise programs on depression severity and QOL among Malaysian community-dwelling older adults. A controlled, quasi-experimental, pre-posttest design was used. A total of 63 participants were divided into three groups: (a) exercise and behavior group (EBG), (b) exercise only group (EG), and (c) control group (CG). Results showed a significant difference in depression among groups (F(2,58) = 33.49, p < 0.01, η(2) = 0.54; mean, EBG < EG < CG) and in physical (F(2,58) = 5.33, p < 0.01, η(2)= 0.16; mean, EBG > EG > CG) and mental (F(2,58) = 4.08, p < 0.01, η(2) = 0.12; mean, EBG > CG > EG) scores of QOL. A combination of behavioral and exercise programs has superior effects on depression and QOL of older adults. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(2), 45-54.].

  15. Forecast of criticality experiments and experimental programs needed to support nuclear operations in the United States of America: 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, D.

    1994-03-01

    This Forecast is generated by the Chair of the Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup (ENIWG), with input from Department of Energy and the nuclear community. One of the current concerns addressed by ENIWG was the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board`s Recommendation 93-2. This Recommendation delineated the need for a critical experimental capability, which includes (1) a program of general-purpose experiments, (2) improving the information base, and (3) ongoing departmental programs. The nuclear community also recognizes the importance of criticality theory, which, as a stepping stone to computational analysis and safety code development, needs to be benchmarked against well-characterized critical experiments. A summary project of the Department`s needs with respect to criticality information includes (1) hands-on training, (2) criticality and nuclear data, (3) detector systems, (4) uranium- and plutonium-based reactors, and (5) accident analysis. The Workgroup has evaluated, prioritized, and categorized each proposed experiment and program. Transportation/Applications is a new category intended to cover the areas of storage, training, emergency response, and standards. This category has the highest number of priority-1 experiments (nine). Facilities capable of performing experiments include the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) along with Area V at Sandia National Laboratory. The LACEF continues to house the most significant collection of critical assemblies in the Western Hemisphere. The staff of this facility and Area V are trained and certified, and documentation is current. ENIWG will continue to work with the nuclear community to identify and prioritize experiments because there is an overwhelming need for critical experiments to be performed for basic research and code validation.

  16. Measurement of the photon electroproduction cross section at JLAB with the goal of performing a Rosenbluth separation of the DVCS contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Arguello, Alejandro Marti

    2014-07-11

    The study of the inner structure of hadrons allows us to understand the nature of the interactions between partons, quarks and gluons, described by Quantum Chromodynamics. The elastic scattering reactions, which have been studied in order to measure the nucleon form factors, are included in this frame. The inelastic scattering reactions are also included in this frame, they allow us to obtain information about the nucleon structure thanks to the development of the parton distribution functions (PDFs). While through elastic scattering we can obtain information about the charge distribution of the nucleon, and hence, about the spatial distribution of the partons, through inelastic scattering we obtain information about the momentum distributions of partons, by employing the PDFs. However, we can study the exclusive inelastic scattering reactions, such as the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), wich allow us to access to the spatial and momentum distributions simultaneously. This is possible thanks to the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), which allow us to correlate both types of distributions. The process known as DVCS is the easiest way to access the GPDs. This process can be expressed as the scattering of an electron by a proton by means of a virtual photon with the result of the scattered initial particles plus a real photon. We find a process competing with DVCS known as Bethe-Heitler (BH), in which the real photon is radiated by the lepton rather than the quark. Due to the small cross section of DVCS, of the order of nb, in order to conduct these kind of experiments it is necessary to make use of facilities capable of providing high beam intensities. One of these facilities is the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility , where the experiment JLab E07-007, "Complete Separation of Virtual Photon and π⁰ Electroproduction Observables of Unpolarized Protons", took place during the months of October to December of 2010. The main goal of this

  17. The influence of the International Baccalaureate experimental science program format on classroom learning environment and student attitudes toward the subject of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiford, Lisa Renee

    This study examined the classroom learning environments and science attitudes of students in three IB Higher Level science classrooms. The study sample consisted of 82 twelfth grade IB science students and three IB Higher Level science teachers. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used to generate assertions toward the development of a grounded theory on accelerated curriculum effects on the classroom learning environment. The four research questions that guided this investigation are: (1) What are the shared characteristics of IB Higher Level experimental science instructors? (2) What instructional methods do instructors use to implement the IB Higher Level experimental science program and why do the instructors use these methods? (3) What are the students' perceptions about the classroom learning environment in IB Higher Level experimental science courses? (4) Does a relationship exist between student perceptions of the classroom learning environment and student attitudes toward the subject of science in IB Higher Level experimental science courses? The qualitative data sources were field notes from classroom observations, teacher interview transcripts, and relevant documents. These data sources were analyzed by constant comparison analysis. Assertions were generated about the educational and professional qualifications of the Higher Level science instructors and the teaching methods used to implement the IB science curriculum. Quantitative data sources consisted of student responses to the Preferred and Actual Forms of the Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire (ICEQ) and the Attitude Towards Science in School Assessment (ATSSA). Student responses to the Preferred and Actual Forms of the ICEQ were analyzed with paired t-tests and one way analyses of variance to determine the students' perceptions about the science classroom environment. Correlation tests were used to examine the relationship between learning environment dimensions and

  18. Timelike Compton Scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Paremuzyan, Rafayel G.

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated, that with exclusive final state, data from electron scattering experiments that are recorded with loose trigger requirements can be used to analyze photoproduction reactions. A preliminary results on Timelike Compton Scattering using the electroproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. In particular, using final state (pe{sup -}e{sup +}) photoproduction of vector mesons and timelike photon is studied. Angular asymmetries in Timelike Compton Scattering region is compared with model predictions in the framework of Generalized Parton Distribution.

  19. The JLab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C. D.

    2009-08-04

    A polarized, frozen spin target has been designed and constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol are polarized via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to approximately 90% using microwaves and an external, 5 T solenoid magnet. The target sample is then cooled to approximately 30 mK while an internal 0.56 T superconducting magnet is used to maintain the polarization. Relaxation times in excess of 3500 hours have been observed.

  20. Hydrogen engine development: Experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blarigan, P.

    1996-10-01

    In the continuing development of a hydrogen fueled IC engine optimized for application to a generator set or hybrid vehicle, experiments were performed at Sandia National Laboratories on two engine configurations. The intent is to maximize thermal efficiency while complying with strict emissions standards. The initial investigation was conducted utilizing a spark ignited 0.491 liter single cylinder Onan engine and has progressed to a spark ignited 0.850 liter modified for single cylinder operation Perkins engine. Both combustion chamber geometries were {open_quotes}pancake{close_quotes} shaped and achieved a compression ratio of 14:1. The engines were operated under premixed conditions. The results demonstrate that both engines can comply with the California Air Resources Board`s proposed Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle standards for NO{sub x} during operation at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. The Onan engine achieved an indicated thermal efficiency of 43% at 1800 RPM, as determined by integration of the pressure-volume relationships. Initial experiments with the larger displacement Perkins engine have realized a gain, relative to the Onan engine, in indicated thermal efficiency of 2% at 1800 RPM, and 15% at 1200 RPM.

  1. Progress report of a research program in experimental high energy physics, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980. [Brown Univ. , Providence, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.M.; Widgoff, M.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental program to study the interactions of hadrons and photons is being carried out with hybrid systems that include bubble chambers as visible targets as well as counter spectrometers. Experiments are being performed at the accelerators of the laboratories at Batavia, Stanford, and Geneva, Switzerland. The bubble chamber - hybrid system group is engaged in several experiments at Fermilab. Extensive analysis of the interactions of 147-GeV/c ..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/, and p in hydrogen is in progress. The results of an earlier experiment on ..pi../sup -/p interactions at the same momentum, in the same experimental set-up, are available for comparison; in this way the range of incident-channel quantum numbers studied is extended with a minimum of systematic error. This year there has been particular emphasis on associated production in interactions of the form ab ..-->.. cX, on rho/sup 0/ production, and on multiparticle correlations. Comparison of hadron production by hadrons with hadron production by leptons is being extended to all the incident particles, for a variety of kinematic variables. Two experiments with an improved hybrid system are now scheduled for data-taking at Fermilab in early 1981, to study ..pi../sup + -/K/sup +/ and p/sup + -/ interactions in hydrogen, and in aluminum, slver, and gold foils, at beam momenta of 200 and 400 GeV/c. A similar study at 250 GeV/c, using the large European Hybrid System at CERN, will begin during 1981. During the spring and summer of 1980, data-taking was begun on two experiments investigating photoproduction of charm and vector mesons, in a polarized monoenergetic backscattered laser beam of 20 GeV/c using the SLAC Hybrid Facility.

  2. The Effect of Ursolic Acid on Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis Is Related to Programed Cell Death and Presents Therapeutic Potential in Experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eduardo S.; Campos, Bruno L. S.; Jesus, Jéssica A.; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Ribeiro, Susan P.; Kallás, Esper G.; Rafael-Fernandes, Mariana; Santos-Gomes, Gabriela; Silva, Marcelo S.; Sessa, Deborah P.; Lago, João H. G.; Levy, Débora; Passero, Luiz F. D.

    2015-01-01

    Among neglected tropical diseases, leishmaniasis is one of the most important ones, affecting more than 12 million people worldwide. The available treatments are not well tolerated, and present diverse side effects, justifying the search for new therapeutic compounds. In the present study, the activity of ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) were assayed in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis (in vitro and in vivo). Promastigote forms of L. amazonensis were incubated with OA and UA for 24h, and effective concentration 50% (EC50) was estimated. Ultraestructural alterations in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes after UA treatment were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, and the possible mode of action was assayed through Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, caspase 3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and transmembrane mitochondrial potential. The UA potential was evaluated in intracellular amastigotes, and its therapeutic potential was evaluated in L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice. UA eliminated L. amazonensis promastigotes with an EC50 of 6.4 μg/mL, comparable with miltefosine, while OA presented only a marginal effect on promastigote forms at 100 μg/mL. The possible mechanism by which promastigotes were eliminated by UA was programmed cell death, independent of caspase 3/7, but it was highly dependent on mitochondria activity. UA was not toxic for peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice, and it was able to eliminate intracellular amastigotes, associated with nitric oxide (NO) production. OA did not eliminate amastigotes nor trigger NO. L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice submitted to UA treatment presented lesser lesion size and parasitism compared to control. This study showed, for the first time, that UA eliminate promastigote forms through a mechanism associated with programed cell death, and importantly, was effective in vivo. Therefore, UA can be considered an interesting candidate for future tests as a prototype drug for the treatment

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements

  4. Earth, soil and environmental science research facility at sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source. II. Scientific program and experimental instrumentation (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, S.; Eng., P. J.; Jaski, Y. R.; Lazaraz, N.; Pluth, J.; Murray, P.; Rarback, H.; Rivers, M.

    1996-09-01

    The GSECARS (APS sector 13) scientific program will provide fundamental new information on the deep structure and composition of the Earth and other planets, the formation of economic mineral deposits, the cycles and fate of toxic metals in the environment, and the mechanisms of nutrient uptake and disease in plants. In the four experimental stations (2 per beamline), scientists will have access to three main x-ray techniques: diffraction (microcrystal, powder, diamond anvil cell, and large volume press), fluorescence microprobe, and spectroscopy (conventional, microbeam, liquid and solid surfaces). The high pressure facilities will be capable of x-ray crystallography at P≳360 GPa and T˜6000 K with the diamond anvil cell and P˜25 GPa and T˜2500 °C with the large volume press. Diffractometers will allow study of 1 micrometer crystals and micro-powders. The microprobe (1 micrometer focused beam) will be capable of chemical analyses in the sub-ppm range using wavelength and energy dispersive detectors. Spectroscopy instrumentation will be available for XANES and EXAFS with microbeams as well as high sensitivity conventional XAS and studies of liquid and solid interfaces. Visiting scientists will be able to setup, calibrate, and test experiments in off-line laboratories with equipment such as micromanipulators, optical microscopes, clean bench, glove boxes, high powered optical and Raman spectrometers.

  5. FINAL REPORT OF FY 1999, 2000, AND 2001 ACTIVITIES: CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED SOUNDING SYSTEM IN SUPPORT OF THE DOE/ARM EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ed R. Westwater CIRES, University of Colorado /NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory 325 Broadway MS R/E/ET1 Boulder, Colorado 80305

    2002-04-30

    OAK B188 FINAL REPORT OF FY 1999, 2000, AND 2001 ACTIVITIES: CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED SOUNDING SYSTEM IN SUPPORT OF THE DOE/ARM EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM The basic goals of the research are to develop and test algorithms and deploy instruments that improve measurements of atmospheric quantities relevant to radiative transfer and climate research. Primary among these atmospheric variables are integrated amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid, as well as profiles of temperature, water vapor and cloud liquid. A primary thrust of this research is to combine data from instruments available to ARM to maximize their importance in radiative transfer and climate research. To gather data relevant to these studies, participation in field experiments, especially intensive operating periods, as well as the subsequent analysis and dissemination of collected data, is of primary importance. Examples of relevant experiments include several Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods at the Southern Great Plains Cloud And Radiation Testbed site, experiments in the Tropical Western Pacific such as PROBE and Nauru'99, and experiments at the North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean site. This final report describes our analyses of data taken during these field experiments.

  6. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Philip L.

    2007-10-26

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  7. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    P.L. Cole

    2007-10-01

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  8. Refinement, testing, and application of an Integrated Data Assimilation/Sounding System (IDASS) for the DOE/ARM Experimental Program. Final report for period September 20, 1990 - May 8, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, David B.

    2002-04-09

    This report describes work done by NCAR under the ''Refinement, Testing, and Application of an Integrated Data Assimilation/Sounding System (IDASS) for the DOE/ARM Experimental Program''. It includes a discussion of the goals, findings and a list of 27 journal articles, 92 non-refereed papers and 30 other presentations not associated with a formal publication.

  9. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  10. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  11. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  12. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  13. Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Abeid, Muzdalifat; Muganyizi, Projestine; Mpembeni, Rose; Darj, Elisabeth; Axemo, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background Sexual violence against women and children in Tanzania and globally is a human rights violation and a developmental challenge. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of training health professionals on rape management. The specific objectives were to evaluate the changes of knowledge and attitudes toward sexual violence among a selected population of health professionals at primary health care level. Design A quasi-experimental design using cross-sectional surveys was conducted to evaluate health care workers’ knowledge, attitude, and clinical practice toward sexual violence before and after the training program. The study involved the Kilombero (intervention) and Ulanga (comparison) districts in Morogoro region. A total of 151 health professionals at baseline (2012) and 169 in the final assessment (2014) participated in the survey. Data were collected using the same structured questionnaire. The amount of change in key indicators from baseline to final assessment in the two areas was compared using composite scores in the pre- and post-interventions, and the net intervention effect was calculated by the difference in difference method. Results Overall, there was improved knowledge in the intervention district from 55% at baseline to 86% and a decreased knowledge from 58.5 to 36.2% in the comparison area with a net effect of 53.7% and a p-value less than 0.0001. The proportion of participants who exhibited an accepting attitude toward violence declined from 15.3 to 11.2% in the intervention area but increased from 13.2 to 20.0% in the comparison area. Conclusions Training on the management of sexual violence is feasible and the results indicate improvement in healthcare workers’ knowledge and practice but not attitudes. Lessons learned from this study for successful replication of such an intervention in similar settings require commitment from those at strategic level within the health service to ensure that adequate resources are

  14. Effects of a Community-Based Healthy Lifestyle Intervention Program (Co-HELP) among Adults with Prediabetes in a Developing Country: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Ming Moy, Foong; Awalludin, Intan Attikah Nur; Mohd Ali, Zainudin

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes among Malaysian adults has increased by more than two folds over the past two decades. Strategies to collaborate with the existing community partners may become a promising channel for wide-scale dissemination of diabetes prevention in the country. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of community-based lifestyle interventions delivered to adults with prediabetes and their health-related quality of life as compared to the usual care group. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in two sub-urban communities in Seremban, Malaysia. A total of 268 participants with prediabetes aged between 18 to 65 years old were assigned to either the community-based lifestyle intervention (Co-HELP) (n = 122) or the usual care (n = 146) groups. The Co-HELP program was delivered in partnership with the existing community volunteers to incorporate diet, physical activity, and behaviour modification strategies. Participants in the Co-HELP group received twelve group-based sessions and two individual counselling to reinforce behavioural change. Participants in the usual care group received standard health education from primary health providers in the clinic setting. Primary outcomes were fasting blood glucose, 2-hour plasma glucose, and HbA1C. Secondary outcomes included weight, BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, physical activity, diet, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Results An intention-to-treat analysis of between-groups at 12-month (mean difference, 95% CI) revealed that the Co-HELP participants’ mean fasting plasma glucose reduced by -0.40 mmol/l (-0.51 to -0.28, p<0.001), 2-hour post glucose by -0.58 mmol/l (-0.91 to -0.24, p<0.001), HbA1C by -0.24% (-0.34 to -0.15, p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure by -2.63 mmHg (-3.79 to -1.48, p<0.01), and waist circumference by -2.44 cm (-4.75 to -0

  15. Systems Sustainability: Implementation of Enhanced Maintenance Programs at the Kurchatov Institute, the All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental physics and the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Technical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coppinger, M.; Pikula, M.; Randolph, J.D.; Windham, M.

    1999-09-20

    Implementation of quality maintenance programs is essential to enhancing sustainable continuous operations of United States funded Materials Protection, Control and Accountability (MPC and A) equipment/systems upgrades at various Russian nuclear facilities. An effective maintenance program is expected to provide assurances to both parties for achieving maximum continuous systems operations with minimum down time. To be effective, the program developed must focus on minimum down time for any part of a system. Minimum down time is realized through the implementation of a quality maintenance program that includes preventative maintenance, necessary diagnostic tools, properly trained technical staff, and an in-house inventory of required spare parts for repairing the impacted component of the system. A centralized maintenance management program is logistically essential for the success of this effort because of the large volume of MPC and A equipment/systems installed at those sites. This paper will discuss current programs and conditions at the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute, the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Technical Physics and the All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics and will address those steps necessary to implement an upgraded program at those sites.

  16. MSFC Skylab experimenter's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined in the main text and amplified, as appropriate, in appendixes. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  17. Development, Evaluation, and Use of Programmed Materials. A Report on the Activities of the Materials Development Unit, MDT Vocational Experimental-Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, John M.; And Others

    The project described in this report attempted to provide a special project for the selection, counseling, testing, assessment, training, placement, and follow-up of prison inmates whose many problems prevented their profiting from conventional programs in vocational training. The mathematical approach to programing was used in developing the…

  18. The Platinum Bullet: An Experimental Evaluation of CUNY's Accelerated Study in Associate Program (ASAP)--New Three-Year Impacts, Cost Analyses, and Implementation Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Michael; Scrivener, Susan; Fresques, Hannah; Ratledge, Alyssa; Rudd, Tim; Sommo, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The City University of New York's (CUNY's) Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) combines many of the ideas from a range of programs into a comprehensive model that requires students to attend school full-time, and provides supports and incentives for three years. ASAP's financial aid reforms, enhanced student services, and scheduling…

  19. What Works for African American Children and Adolescents: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2011-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandy, Tawana; Moore, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    The disproportionate vulnerability of African American youth to certain negative outcomes, including teen pregnancy, low academic achievement, HIV infection, and violent death, has emphasized the need for out-of-school time program providers and funders to seek programs that have been found to have positive impacts for this population.…

  20. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  1. HTR-Proteus Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 5,6,7,&8: Columnar Hexagonal Point-on-Point Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Sterbentz, James W.; Snoj, Luka; Lengar, Igor; Koberl, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  2. The experimental technique of the G^0 measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Julie

    2001-10-01

    The G^0 experiment(JLab experiment E00-006, D.H. Beck, spokesperson.) will measure the parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The experiment will be performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab using a dedicated apparatus. In order to achieve the required statistical accuracy of the measurements, a super-conducting toroidal spectrometer, with azimuthally symmetric angular acceptance, and an associated cryogenic target have been constructed. The Focal Plane Detectors are arranged in 8 arrays of 16 arc-shaped scintillator pairs providing a fast signal compatible with the high rates of this counting experiment. For the forward angle measurement, custom built electronics will provide a time-of-flight measurement discriminating elastic recoil protons from pions and inelastic protons. For the backward angle measurements, additional scintillators and Cerenkov counters will provide separation of the elastic electrons from inelastic electrons and pions. An overview of the experimental apparatus and method for the G^0 measurement will be presented.

  3. A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a Community-Based HIV Prevention Intervention for Mexican American Female Adolescents: The SHERO's Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Gary W.; Bangi, Audrey K.; Sanchez, Bernadette; Doll, Mimi; Pedraza, Ana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a quasi-experimental evaluation of a community-based, culturally and ecologically tailored HIV prevention intervention for Mexican American female adolescents grounded in the AIDS risk reduction model. A total of 378 Mexican American female adolescents (mean age = 15.2) participated in either the nine-session SHERO's (a…

  4. Experimentally Estimated Impacts of School Vouchers on College Enrollment and Degree Attainment. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 15-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.; Peterson, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first experimental estimates of the long-term impacts of a voucher to attend private school by linking data from a privately sponsored voucher initiative in New York City, which awarded the scholarships by lottery to low-income families, to administrative records on college enrollment and degree attainment. We find no significant…

  5. Social Information-Processing Skills and Aggression: A Quasi-Experimental Trial of the Making Choices and Making Choices Plus Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzian, Mary A.; Li, Jilan; Fraser, Mark W.; Day, Steven H.; Rose, Roderick A.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the findings from an efficacy trial of a school-based, universal prevention program designed to reduce aggressive behavior of by strengthening emotion regulation and social information-processing (SIP) skills. Three cohorts of third graders (N = 479) participated in this study. The first cohort participated in the Making…

  6. "PCI Reading Program": The Final Report of a Three Year Experimental Study in Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toby, Megan; Jaciw, Andrew; Ma, Boya; Lipton, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    PCI Education conducted a three-year longitudinal study to determine the comparative effectiveness of the "PCI Reading Program" ("PCI") for students with severe disabilities as implemented in Florida's Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. The primary question addressed by the study is whether students…

  7. Results of an Experimental Program to Provide Low Cost Computer Searches of the NASA Information File to University Graduate Students in the Southeast. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Frederick O.; Phillips, Dennis M.

    In an effort to increase dissemination of scientific and technological information, a program was undertaken whereby graduate students in science and engineering could request a computer-produced bibliography and/or abstracts of documents identified by the computer. The principal resource was the National Aeronautics and Space Administration…

  8. What Works for Female Children and Adolescents: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2012-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Kelly; Terzian, Mary A.; Moore, Kristin A.

    2012-01-01

    Girls face unique developmental challenges in childhood and adolescence. Compared to boys, girls tend to report more mental health problems, and they are susceptible to reproductive health risks, such as unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease. While a number of evidence-based programs have been found to be effective at reducing risk…

  9. A Quasi-Experimental Investigation of How the Gates Millennium Scholars Program Is Related to College Students' Time Use and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DesJardins, Stephen L.; McCall, Brian P.; Ott, Molly; Kim, Jiyun

    2010-01-01

    A national scholarship program provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is designed to improve access to and success in higher education for low-income high-achieving minority students by providing them with full tuition scholarships and non-monetary support. We use a regression discontinuity approach to investigate whether the receipt of…

  10. 21st Century Community Learning Centers 2013: A Quasi-Experimental Investigation of Program Impacts on Student Achievement in Mathematics and Reading/Language Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry; Hixson, Nate

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes an evaluation study investigating the effects of participation in the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) program on student achievement in mathematics and reading/language arts, for the cohort of students who participated during the 2012-2013 school year. The report is a supplement to the Office of Assessment,…

  11. 21st Century Community Learning Centers 2014: A Quasi-Experimental Investigation of Program Impacts on Student Achievement in Mathematics and Reading/Language Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry; Whisman, Andy

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes an evaluation study investigating the effects of participation in the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) program on student achievement in mathematics and reading/language arts, for the cohort of students who participated during the 2013-2014 school year. The report is a supplement to the Office of Assessment,…

  12. Africa South of the Sahara, Rationale and Introduction: An Experimental Program of Study for Secondary School Social Studies Students. Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Project Africa.

    The articulation of a rationale for Project Africa's instructional program, the collection of materials for improving inquiry-oriented instruction at the secondary level about Africa south of the Sahara, and the preparation of teaching and study guides have been completed. This geographic region, rather than the whole continent, was chosen to…

  13. GUIDANCE FOR RESEARCH HOUSE STUDIES OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM, VOLUME 2: MODEL-BACKED EXPERIMENTAL PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING RADON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides guidance and a readily available reference to groups involved with the Florida Radon Research Program's (FRRP's) research house studies. It includes: 1): Lists of Parameters for continuous and periodic high and low resolution measurements; (2) Protocols for c...

  14. Research Brief--Effects of An Experimental Program on the Quality of Children's Art and Concept Attainment Using a Synthesis of Japanese Music and Art Education Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platten, Marvin R.; Arimitsu, Tokuroh

    1982-01-01

    American 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old children participated in an art program synthesizing the Suzuki Music method and an art instruction method developed by Yoshio Tamano. Children receiving the self-paced art lessons at home gained more in concept formation and painting skill than did a control group. (PP)

  15. What Works for Older Youth during the Transition to Adulthood: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2010-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Alena M.; Mbwana, Kassim; Hair, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Major strides have been made in the field of youth development. However, youth transitioning into adulthood have not received similar attention. These older youth have frequently been overlooked by policymakers and practitioners who have been more focused on designing programs and services for adolescents and young children. Because older youth…

  16. Can reproductive health voucher programs improve quality of postnatal care? A quasi-experimental evaluation of Kenya's safe motherhood voucher scheme.

    PubMed

    Watt, Claire; Abuya, Timothy; Warren, Charlotte E; Obare, Francis; Kanya, Lucy; Bellows, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the group-level causal relationship between the expansion of Kenya's Safe Motherhood voucher program and changes in quality of postnatal care (PNC) provided at voucher-contracted facilities. We compare facilities accredited since program inception in 2006 (phase I) and facilities accredited since 2010-2011 (phase II) relative to comparable non-voucher facilities. PNC quality is assessed using observed clinical content processes, as well as client-reported outcome measures. Two-tailed unpaired t-tests are used to identify differences in mean process quality scores and client-reported outcome measures, comparing changes between intervention and comparison groups at the 2010 and 2012 data collection periods. Difference-in-differences analysis is used to estimate the reproductive health (RH) voucher program's causal effect on quality of care by exploiting group-level differences between voucher-accredited and non-accredited facilities in 2010 and 2012. Participation in the voucher scheme since 2006 significantly improves overall quality of postnatal care by 39% (p=0.02), where quality is defined as the observable processes or components of service provision that occur during a PNC consultation. Program participation since phase I is estimated to improve the quality of observed maternal postnatal care by 86% (p=0.02), with the largest quality improvements in counseling on family planning methods (IRR 5.0; p=0.01) and return to fertility (IRR 2.6; p=0.01). Despite improvements in maternal aspects of PNC, we find a high proportion of mothers who seek PNC are not being checked by any provider after delivery. Additional strategies will be necessary to standardize provision of packaged postnatal interventions to both mother and newborn. This study addresses an important gap in the existing RH literature by using a strong evaluation design to assess RH voucher program effectiveness on quality improvement.

  17. Development of the electron cooling simulation program for JLEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, He; Chen, Jie; Li, Rui; Zhang, Yuhong; Huang, He; Luo, Li-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In the JLab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) project the traditional electron cooling technique is used to reduce the ion beam emittance at the booster ring, and to compensate the intrabeam scattering effect and maintain the ion beam emittance during collision at the collider ring. A new electron cooling process simulation program has been developed to fulfill the requirements of the JLEIC electron cooler design. The new program allows the users to calculate the electron cooling rate and simulate the cooling process with either DC or bunched electron beam to cool either coasting or bunched ion beam. It has been benchmarked with BETACOOL in aspect of accuracy and efficiency. In typical electron cooling process of JLEIC, the two programs agree very well and we have seen a significant improvement of computational speed using the new one. Being adaptive to the modern multicore hardware makes it possible to further enhance the efficiency for computationally intensive problems. The new program is being actively used in the electron cooling study and cooler design for JLEIC. We will present our models and some simulation results in this paper.

  18. Experimental Lithium-Ion Battery Developed for Demonstration at the 2007 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William R.; Baldwin, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Electrochemistry Branch designed and built five lithium-ion battery packs for demonstration in spacesuit simulators as a part of the 2007 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) activity at Cinder Lake, Arizona. The experimental batteries incorporated advanced, NASA-developed electrolytes and included internal protection against over-current, overdischarge and over-temperature. The 500-g experimental batteries were designed to deliver a constant power of 22 W for 2.5 hr with a minimum voltage of 13 V. When discharged at the maximum expected power output of 38.5 W, the batteries operated for 103 min of discharge time, achieving a specific energy of 130 Wh/kg. This report summarizes design details and safety considerations. Results for field trials and laboratory testing are summarized.

  19. Efficacy of a group-based parenting program on stress and self-efficacy among Japanese mothers: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Sally; Bloomfield, Linda; Appleton, Jane; Kitaoka, Kazuyo

    2013-12-01

    Early child development and the impact of parenting on later life are of global concern. The rise in child abuse and maltreatment in Japan suggests that measures to increase self-efficacy and reduce stress would benefit Japanese parents. In this study, we explored if Japanese parents attending a 123Magic parenting program reported reduced stress and enhanced self-efficacy. Questionnaire data were collected from 49 mothers attending a parenting program conducted in public nursery schools in one prefecture in Japan. There were significant changes in parenting self-efficacy scores (P < 0.001) and parenting stress scores (P < 0.01). Focus groups with 16 parents also found that there were benefits to parents in terms of increased confidence and less stress. The findings provide support for the role of public health nurses in delivering group-based parenting support in Japan.

  20. Can Reproductive Health Voucher Programs Improve Quality of Postnatal Care? A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of Kenya’s Safe Motherhood Voucher Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Claire; Abuya, Timothy; Warren, Charlotte E.; Obare, Francis; Kanya, Lucy; Bellows, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the group-level causal relationship between the expansion of Kenya’s Safe Motherhood voucher program and changes in quality of postnatal care (PNC) provided at voucher-contracted facilities. We compare facilities accredited since program inception in 2006 (phase I) and facilities accredited since 2010-2011 (phase II) relative to comparable non-voucher facilities. PNC quality is assessed using observed clinical content processes, as well as client-reported outcome measures. Two-tailed unpaired t-tests are used to identify differences in mean process quality scores and client-reported outcome measures, comparing changes between intervention and comparison groups at the 2010 and 2012 data collection periods. Difference-in-differences analysis is used to estimate the reproductive health (RH) voucher program’s causal effect on quality of care by exploiting group-level differences between voucher-accredited and non-accredited facilities in 2010 and 2012. Participation in the voucher scheme since 2006 significantly improves overall quality of postnatal care by 39% (p=0.02), where quality is defined as the observable processes or components of service provision that occur during a PNC consultation. Program participation since phase I is estimated to improve the quality of observed maternal postnatal care by 86% (p=0.02), with the largest quality improvements in counseling on family planning methods (IRR 5.0; p=0.01) and return to fertility (IRR 2.6; p=0.01). Despite improvements in maternal aspects of PNC, we find a high proportion of mothers who seek PNC are not being checked by any provider after delivery. Additional strategies will be necessary to standardize provision of packaged postnatal interventions to both mother and newborn. This study addresses an important gap in the existing RH literature by using a strong evaluation design to assess RH voucher program effectiveness on quality improvement. PMID:25835713

  1. Measurements of the electric form factor of the neutron at JLab via recoil polarimetry in the reaction: d(e, e-prime n)p

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Finn

    2004-11-01

    Preliminary results are reported for measurements of the ratio of the electric form factor to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, GEn/GMn, obtained via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic 2H(e, e?n) 1H reaction at Q2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c)2. The measurements, conducted in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, together with other recent polarization measurements, are the result of a decade long effort to establish a firm experimental database for the important, but elusive, electric form factor of the neutron.

  2. Pentaquark search at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2007-09-01

    In 2004 a second-generation experimental program has been undertaken at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), to try to find a definite answer to whether the ?+ and other 5-quark baryons exist. Here the results of CLAS high-statistics experiments are reported.

  3. Program plan and summary, remote fluvial experimental (REFLEX) series: Research experiments using advanced remote sensing technologies with emphasis on hydrologic transport, and hydrologic-ecologic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wobber, F.J.

    1986-10-01

    This document describes research designed to evaluate advanced remote sensing technologies for environmental research. A series of Remote Fluvial Experiments (REFLEX) - stressing new applications of remote sensing systems and use of advanced digital analysis methods - are described. Program strategy, experiments, research areas, and future initiatives are summarized. The goals of REFLEX are: (1) to apply new and developing aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies - including both advanced sensor systems and digital/optical processing - for interdisciplinary scientific experiments in hydrology and to hydrologic/ecologic interactions; (2) to develop new concepts for processing and analyzing remote sensing data for general scientific application; and (3) to demonstrate innovative analytical technologies that advance the state of the art in applying information from remote sensing systems, for example, supercomputer processing and analysis.

  4. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  5. MC5r and A2Ar Deficiencies During Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis Identifies Distinct T cell Polarization Programs and a Biphasic Regulatory Response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Darren J; Preble, Janine; Lee, Stacey; Foster, C Stephen; Taylor, Andrew W

    2016-11-25

    Autoantigen-specific regulatory immunity emerges in the spleen of mice recovering from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), a murine model for human autoimmune uveoretinitis. This regulatory immunity provides induced tolerance to ocular autoantigen, and requires melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5r) expression on antigen presenting cells with adenosine 2 A receptor (A2Ar) expression on T cells. During EAU it is not well understood what roles MC5r and A2Ar have on promoting regulatory immunity. Cytokine profile analysis during EAU revealed MC5r and A2Ar each mediate distinct T cell responses, and are responsible for a functional regulatory immune response in the spleen. A2Ar stimulation at EAU onset did not augment this regulatory response, nor bypass the MC5r requirement to induce regulatory immunity. The importance of this pathway in human autoimmune uveitis was assayed. PBMC from uveitis patients were assayed for MC5r expression on monocytes and A2Ar on T cells, and comparison between uveitis patients and healthy controls had no significant difference. The importance for MC5r and A2Ar expression in EAU to promote the induction of protective regulatory immunity, and the expression of MC5r and A2Ar on human immune cells, suggests that it may be possible to utilize the melanocortin-adenosinergic pathways to induce protective immunity in uveitic patients.

  6. Experimental/engineering support for EPA's FBC program: final report. Volume II. Particulate, Nitrogen Oxide, and Trace Element Control. Final report, December 1975-December 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Ahmed, M.M.; Ulerich, N.H.; Alvin, M.A.; Keairns, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    The report gives results of an investigation of particulate, NOx, and trace element control for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems used with coal. A model, developed previously to project the loading and size distribution of particulate emissions from FBC systems, was used to permit an integrated analysis of particle control options for FBC. An experimental 150 scf/sec high-temperature/-pressure particulate control test facility, treating simulated flue gas, was constructed and shaken down to permit investigation of alternative particulate control devices. Available data on NOx emissions from FBC, and on NOx formation and decomposition, are reviewed to identify significant FBC operating parameters affecting NOx emissions, and to assess formation/decomposition mechanisms that may be controlling in FBC. The previous thermodynamic projections of trace element emissions from FBC were expanded to include aluminum, iron, titanium, cobalt, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, and nickel. These projections provide a first-level approximation of the distribution of volatile and condensed phases of compounds of these metals in FBC effluent streams.

  7. MC5r and A2Ar Deficiencies During Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis Identifies Distinct T cell Polarization Programs and a Biphasic Regulatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Darren J.; Preble, Janine; Lee, Stacey; Foster, C. Stephen; Taylor, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantigen-specific regulatory immunity emerges in the spleen of mice recovering from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), a murine model for human autoimmune uveoretinitis. This regulatory immunity provides induced tolerance to ocular autoantigen, and requires melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5r) expression on antigen presenting cells with adenosine 2 A receptor (A2Ar) expression on T cells. During EAU it is not well understood what roles MC5r and A2Ar have on promoting regulatory immunity. Cytokine profile analysis during EAU revealed MC5r and A2Ar each mediate distinct T cell responses, and are responsible for a functional regulatory immune response in the spleen. A2Ar stimulation at EAU onset did not augment this regulatory response, nor bypass the MC5r requirement to induce regulatory immunity. The importance of this pathway in human autoimmune uveitis was assayed. PBMC from uveitis patients were assayed for MC5r expression on monocytes and A2Ar on T cells, and comparison between uveitis patients and healthy controls had no significant difference. The importance for MC5r and A2Ar expression in EAU to promote the induction of protective regulatory immunity, and the expression of MC5r and A2Ar on human immune cells, suggests that it may be possible to utilize the melanocortin-adenosinergic pathways to induce protective immunity in uveitic patients. PMID:27886238

  8. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadlia, L.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  9. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  10. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  11. Effects of acidic deposition on the erosion of carbonate stone - experimental results from the U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Reimann, K.J.; Sciammarella, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the goals of NAPAP-sponsored research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone has been to quantify the incremental effects of wet and dry deposition of hydrogen ion, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides on stone erosion. Test briquettes and slabs of freshly quarried Indiana limestone and Vermont marble have been exposed to ambient environmental conditions in a long-term exposure program. Physical measurements of the recession of test stones exposed to ambient conditions at an angle of 30?? to horizontal at the five NAPAP materials exposure sites range from ~15 to ~30?? ??m yr-1 for marble, and from ~25 to ~45 ??m yr -1 for limestone, and are approximately double the recession estimates based on the observed calcium content of run-off solutions from test slabs. The difference between the physical and chemical recession measurements is attributed to the loss of mineral grains from the stone surfaces that are not measured in the run-off experiments. The erosion due to grain loss does not appear to be influenced by rainfall acidity, however, preliminary evidence suggests that grain loss may be influenced by dry deposition of sulfur dioxide between rainfall events. Chemical analyses of the run-off solutions and associated rainfall blanks suggest that ~30% of erosion by dissolution can be attributed to the wet deposition of hydrogen ion and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid between rain events. The remaining ~70% of erosion by dissolution is accounted for by the solubility of carbonate stone in rain that is in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide ('clean rain'). These results are for marble and limestone slabs exposed at an angle of 30?? from horizontal. The relative contribution of sulfur dioxide to chemical erosion is significantly enhanced for stone slabs having an inclination of 60?? or 85??. The dry deposition of alkaline particulate material has a mitigating effect at the two urban field exposure sites at Washington, DC

  12. Engineering the Big Chill: The story of JLab’s Central Helium Liquefier

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Catherine

    2014-03-29

    This article tells the story of the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), one of the US National Laboratories. JLab’s successful superconducting radio frequency accelerator was only possible because a group of JLab engineers successfully tackled a complex of difficulties to build a cryogenic system that included the CHL, a task that required advancing the frontier of cryogenic technology. Ultimately, these cryogenic advances were applied far beyond JLab to the benefit of cutting-edge programs at other US national laboratories (Oak Ridge, Brookhaven, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at MSU) as well as NASA. In addition, this innovation story dramatizes the sort of engineer-driven technological problem solving that allows the successful launch and operation of experimental projects. Along the way, the CHL story also provides an important addition to our understanding of the role played by engineers and industry in creating knowledge at physics laboratories.

  13. Effect of the Crisis Assistance Program on poverty transition for seriously ill people in South Korea: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-O; Joung, Won Oh

    2014-01-01

    The Crisis Assistance Program (CAP) is a newly developed social protection scheme in South Korea. It was implemented in 2006 in order to assist individuals experiencing a sudden or temporary financial emergency. CAP provides temporary assistance to cover the direct user fees associated with inpatient care up to three or six million KRW (US $2673-5346). In this study, we aimed to compare the poverty dynamics in recipients versus non-recipients and to determine whether there is an association between participation in CAP and poverty transition. For the purpose, we analyzed longitudinal data from 2009 to 2011 from 55,710 people who requested CAP during a serious illness at local governmental offices throughout South Korea. During the 1.6 years of follow-up, 8712 (15.6%) of those who requested CAP fell into absolute poverty. Results showed that there was a 16% reducing effect of CAP on poverty transition (hazard ratio [HR] 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79-0.90, p < 0.001) and there was a 33% delay in the time to falling into poverty (time ratio [TR] 1.33, 95% CI 1.20-1.47, p < 0.001) after adjusting for covariates. In this analysis model, the risk of poverty transition induced by experiencing a serious illness decreased rapidly with time (ancillary parameter [AP] 0.61, 95% CI 0.59-0.62). The results were essentially unchanged even after performing a rigorous propensity analysis, which limited the analyses to 12,944 propensity-matched subjects (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.91, p < 0.001; TR 1.38, 95% CI 1.18-1.61, p < 0.001; AP 0.54, 95% CI 0.52-0.57). Our findings provide additional evidence for recommending the use of a payment strategy that relieves out-of-pocket payments so as to reduce medical impoverishment. A temporary assistance scheme for people experiencing a serious illness may be an alternative healthcare financing strategy to confront the issue of health inequality among the medically and socioeconomically vulnerable.

  14. D-optimal experimental design coupled with parallel factor analysis 2 decomposition a useful tool in the determination of triazines in oranges by programmed temperature vaporization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry when using dispersive-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Herrero, A; Ortiz, M C; Sarabia, L A

    2013-05-03

    The determination of triazines in oranges using a GC-MS system coupled to a programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) inlet in the context of legislation is performed. Both pretreatment (using a Quick Easy Cheap Effective Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) procedure) and injection steps are optimized using D-optimal experimental designs for reducing the experimental effort. The relative dirty extracts obtained and the elution time shifts make it necessary to use a PARAFAC2 decomposition to solve these two usual problems in the chromatographic determinations. The "second-order advantage" of the PARAFAC2 decomposition allows unequivocal identification according to document SANCO/12495/2011 (taking into account the tolerances for relative retention time and the relative abundance for the diagnostic ions), avoiding false negatives even in the presence of unknown co-eluents. The detection limits (CCα) found, from 0.51 to 1.05μgkg(-1), are far below the maximum residue levels (MRLs) established by the European Union for simazine, atrazine, terbuthylazine, ametryn, simetryn, prometryn and terbutryn in oranges. No MRL violations were found in the commercial oranges analyzed.

  15. The JLab Ampere-Class cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Edward Daly; William Hicks; James Henry; Joseph Preble; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; Katherine Wilson; Genfa Wu

    2005-07-10

    We report on the design of a new cryomodule capable of accelerating high-current beams for future ERL based high power compact FELs. We discuss the factors influencing the design choices, including BBU threshold, frequency, HOM power, real-estate gradient, peak surface fields, and operating efficiency. We present a conceptual design that meets the requirements of compact MW-class FEL, however this module design could be useful for a wide range of applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc. The concepts developed for this design could also be useful for larger ERL-based light sources, XFELs and even linear colliders.

  16. Factorization studies in SIDIS at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Bosted; Rolf Ent; David Gaskell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Tigran Navasardyan; Varden Tadevosyan

    2006-08-28

    Data for positive and negative pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets are found to satisfy factorization tests in the kinematic region Q{sup 2} > 2 GeV{sup 2}, 0.2 < 0.45, W > 2 GeV, M{sub x} > 1.5 GeV, and 0.3 < 0.6.

  17. Recent Results from JLab on Nucleon Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-02-01

    Highlights of recent data from Jefferson Lab on the nucleon response to an electro-magnetic probe are presented. Recent technological advances in polarized beams and either polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data. An outlook is presented of planned experiments.

  18. Recent Results from JLab on Nucleon Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2003-05-01

    Highlights of recent data from Jefferson Lab on the nucleon response to an electro-magnetic probe are presented. Recent technological advances in polarized beams and either polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data. An outlook is presented of planned experiments.

  19. Experimental philosophy.

    PubMed

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  20. Biosphere 2 test module experimentation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alling, Abigail; Leigh, Linda S.; Maccallum, Taber; Alvarez-Romo, Norberto

    1990-01-01

    The Biosphere 2 Test Module is a facility which has the capability to do either short or long term closures: five month closures with plants were conducted. Also conducted were investigations of specific problems, such as trace gas purification by bioregenerative systems by in-putting a fixed concentration of a gas and observing its uptake over time. In other Test Module experiments, the concentration of one gas was changed to observe what effects this has on other gases present or on the system. The science of biospherics which encompasses the study of closed biological systems provides an opening into the future in space as well as in the Earth's biosphere.

  1. An experimental high energy physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, J. A.; Loeffler, F. J.; McIlwain, R. L.; Miller, D. H.; Palfrey, T. R.; Shibata, E. I.

    1989-05-01

    The CLEO detector accumulated, (approximately 480,000 B-mesons) the world's largest sample of B decays, before being shutdown in May 1988 for the installation of CLEO II. This data sample came from 335 pb(-1) accumulated at the upsilon (4S). The Cornell Electron Storage Ring set new luminosity records, reaching 3.5 pb(-1) in a single day. These data are being intensively analyzed and 21 papers were given at the Baltimore APS meeting. Among the highlights are: confirmation of B(sup 0)(bar B)(sup 0) mixing; discovery of the charm-strange baryon xi (sub c)(sup 0); limits on b yields u decay; and non-observation of B yields p(bar p)pi(pi), which was reported by the ARGUS collaboration. The construction of CLEO II is proceeding on schedule. The new 1.5 T superconducting magnet has passed all tests and all of the detector elements have been installed. This includes a 7800 CsI crystals electromagnetic shower calorimeter. The data from the Gamma Ray Astrophysics experiment show a significant signal for high energy gamma ray emission from Cygnus X-3 and also confirm the previously reported anomalous period from Her X-1. Meanwhile, the old 6 mirror telescope has been refitted with 26 high resolution mirrors and improved fast electronics. GRANDE, the next generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique, has been formally proposed to HEPAP. The detector will search for neutrino emission in the Southern Hemisphere and gamma radiation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. Experimental Results Obtained with Air Liquide Cold Compression System: CERN LHC and SNS Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcayre, F.; Courty, J.-C.; Hamber, F.; Hilbert, B.; Monneret, E.; Toia, J.-L.

    2006-04-01

    Large scale collider facilities will make intensive use of superconducting magnets, operating below 2.0 K. This dictates high-capacity refrigeration systems operating below 2.0 K. These systems, making use of cryogenic centrifugal compressors in a series arrangement with room temperature screw compressors will be coupled to a refrigerator, providing a certain power at 4.5 K. A first Air Liquide Cold Compression System (CCS) unit was built and delivered to CERN in 2001. Installed at the beginning of 2002, it was commissioned and tested successfully during year 2002. A series of four sets of identical CCS were then tested in 2004. Another set of four cryogenic centrifugal compressors (CCC) has been delivered to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in 2002. These compressors were tested and commissioned from December 2004 to July 2005. The experimental results obtained with these systems will be presented and discussed: the characteristics of the CCC will be detailed. The principles of control for the CCC in series will be detailed.

  3. tmLQCD: A program suite to simulate Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Karl; Urbach, Carsten

    2009-12-01

    We discuss a program suite for simulating Quantum Chromodynamics on a 4-dimensional space-time lattice. The basic Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is introduced and a number of algorithmic improvements are explained. We then discuss the implementations of these concepts as well as our parallelisation strategy in the actual simulation code. Finally, we provide a user guide to compile and run the program. Program summaryProgram title: tmLQCD Catalogue identifier: AEEH_v1_0 Program summary URL::http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence (GPL) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 122 768 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 931 042 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C and MPI Computer: any Operating system: any with a standard C compiler Has the code been vectorised or parallelised?: Yes. One or optionally any even number of processors may be used. Tested with up to 32 768 processors RAM: no typical values available Classification: 11.5 External routines: LAPACK [1] and LIME [2] library Nature of problem: Quantum Chromodynamics Solution method: Markov Chain Monte Carlo using the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm with mass preconditioning and multiple time scales [3]. Iterative solver for large systems of linear equations. Restrictions: Restricted to an even number of (not necessarily mass degenerate) quark flavours in the Wilson or Wilson twisted mass formulation of lattice QCD. Running time: Depending on the problem size, the architecture and the input parameters from a few minutes to weeks. References:http://www.netlib.org/lapack/. USQCD, http://usqcd.jlab.org/usqcd-docs/c-lime/. C. Urbach, K. Jansen, A. Shindler, U. Wenger, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174 (2006) 87, hep-lat/0506011.

  4. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  5. Experimental macroevolution†

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  6. An Experimental LISP Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lun, Wang

    1987-04-01

    This paper presents a multi-microprocessor LISP machine whose goal is to exploit the inherent parallelism in the LISP programs fully. The base architecture is a MIMD architecture based on a hybrid model for combinating data driven, demand driven and VoN Neumann process schemes. The basic evaluation strategy is data driven. Lazy evaluation mechanism is introduced to avoid unnecessary and unsafe computations. An experimental system with the four processor elements has been built in HIT, China. The system consists of a Z80 microcomputer and three TP8O1s interconnected through three buses. Each processor evaluates a part of programs asynchronously. The shared memory is divided into two parts: list cell area and enviroment area, each of which has the indepen-dent common bus to avoid the bus bottleneck.

  7. Python to learn programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanchikov, A.; Zhaparov, M.; Suliyev, R.

    2013-04-01

    Today we have a lot of programming languages that can realize our needs, but the most important question is how to teach programming to beginner students. In this paper we suggest using Python for this purpose, because it is a programming language that has neatly organized syntax and powerful tools to solve any task. Moreover it is very close to simple math thinking. Python is chosen as a primary programming language for freshmen in most of leading universities. Writing code in python is easy. In this paper we give some examples of program codes written in Java, C++ and Python language, and we make a comparison between them. Firstly, this paper proposes advantages of Python language in relation to C++ and JAVA. Then it shows the results of a comparison of short program codes written in three different languages, followed by a discussion on how students understand programming. Finally experimental results of students' success in programming courses are shown.

  8. Programs | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    OCG facilitates cancer genomics research through a series of highly-focused programs. These programs generate and disseminate genomic data for use by the cancer research community. OCG programs also promote advances in technology-based infrastructure and create valuable experimental reagents and tools. OCG programs encourage collaboration by interconnecting with other genomics and cancer projects in order to accelerate translation of findings into the clinic. Below are OCG’s current, completed, and initiated programs:

  9. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  10. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  11. Particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-08-21

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density {approximately} 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams.

  12. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Construction of spline functions in spreadsheets to smooth experimental data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous manuscript detailed how spreadsheet software can be programmed to smooth experimental data via cubic splines. This addendum corrects a few errors in the previous manuscript and provides additional necessary programming steps. ...

  14. Charge of the containerless experimentation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.

    1990-01-01

    The experimentation was undertaken to study the elimination or reduction of surface contamination for which there is adequate Earth-based technology along with the reduction of dynamic nucleation for which there a paucity of reliable data. One objective is to delineate scientific justification of the U.S. Containerless Experimentation Program in Microgravity for the next decade and beyond. Another objective is for the guidance of NASA to define the next generation of containerless experimentation instruments in microgravity.

  15. Experimenters' reference based upon Skylab experiment management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined and amplified, as appropriate. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  16. University Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. W.D. Reece

    1999-09-01

    The University Reactor Sharing Program provides funding for reactor experimentation to institutions that do not normally have access to a research reactor. Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material to producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding also gives small colleges and universities the opportunity to use the facility for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy.

  17. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  18. Probing Nucleon Structure with Meson Electro-production in Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Stephen

    2011-02-01

    Meson electro-production is used in Hall C at Jefferson Lab to probe nucleon, baryon and nuclear structure. The experimental program in Hall C includes studies of semi-inclusive pion production, p, d(e, e'π±)X, where low energy factorization has been observed, suggesting that these reactions can be used to probe nucleon structure, including transverse momentum distributions of quarks, at energies available at JLab after the upcoming 12 GeV upgrade.

  19. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  20. Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This article lists postsecondary programs specifically for people with deafness and other postsecondary programs with supportive services for students with deafness. Alphabetized by state, contact information is provided for each of the programs, along with date the program was founded, programs, degrees, and number of students and staff with…