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Sample records for job injuries similarities

  1. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar working...

  2. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar working...

  3. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar working...

  4. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar working...

  5. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar working...

  6. Extending Synthetic Validation Methodology to Assess Occupational Similarities Within Job Sets and to Select Classification Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    objective of the project was accomplished in two ways: (1) by using a paper-and-pencil job analysis questionnaire and developing a PC-based technology ...evaluation of methodologies for achieving two distinct sub- objectives: Developing technology to cluster similar jobs or quantify the similarity...Radio Operator (SYNVAL) 310 Moble Subscr Equip Transmasn $yet Op (SYIIVAL) 41C Fire Control Instrument RepaLrer (JSURT) 453 Small Arma Repairer (JSRRT

  7. Expert ratings of job demand and job control as predictors of injury and musculoskeletal disorder risk in a manufacturing cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Linda F; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Slade, Martin D; Galusha, Deron; Cullen, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between workplace injury and musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risk and expert ratings of job-level psychosocial demand and job control, adjusting for job-level physical demand. Methods Among a cohort of 9260 aluminium manufacturing workers in jobs for which expert ratings of job-level physical and psychological demand and control were obtained during the 2 years following rating obtainment, multivariate mixed effects models were used to estimate relative risk (RR) of minor injury and minor MSD, serious injury and MSD, minor MSD only and serious MSD only by tertile of demand and control, adjusting for physical demand as well as other recognised risk factors. Results Compared with workers in jobs rated as having low psychological demand, workers in jobs with high psychological demand had 49% greater risk of serious injury and serious MSD requiring medical treatment, work restrictions or lost work time (RR=1.49; 95% CI 1.10 to 2.01). Workers in jobs rated as having low control displayed increased risk for minor injury and minor MSD (RR=1.45; 95% CI 1.12 to 1.87) compared with those in jobs rated as having high control. Conclusions Using expert ratings of job-level exposures, this study provides evidence that psychological job demand and job control contribute independently to injury and MSD risk in a blue-collar manufacturing cohort, and emphasises the importance of monitoring psychosocial workplace exposures in addition to physical workplace exposures to promote worker health and safety. PMID:26163544

  8. Expert ratings of job demand and job control as predictors of injury and musculoskeletal disorder risk in a manufacturing cohort.

    PubMed

    Cantley, Linda F; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Slade, Martin D; Galusha, Deron; Cullen, Mark R

    2016-04-01

    To examine associations between workplace injury and musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risk and expert ratings of job-level psychosocial demand and job control, adjusting for job-level physical demand. Among a cohort of 9260 aluminium manufacturing workers in jobs for which expert ratings of job-level physical and psychological demand and control were obtained during the 2 years following rating obtainment, multivariate mixed effects models were used to estimate relative risk (RR) of minor injury and minor MSD, serious injury and MSD, minor MSD only and serious MSD only by tertile of demand and control, adjusting for physical demand as well as other recognised risk factors. Compared with workers in jobs rated as having low psychological demand, workers in jobs with high psychological demand had 49% greater risk of serious injury and serious MSD requiring medical treatment, work restrictions or lost work time (RR=1.49; 95% CI 1.10 to 2.01). Workers in jobs rated as having low control displayed increased risk for minor injury and minor MSD (RR=1.45; 95% CI 1.12 to 1.87) compared with those in jobs rated as having high control. Using expert ratings of job-level exposures, this study provides evidence that psychological job demand and job control contribute independently to injury and MSD risk in a blue-collar manufacturing cohort, and emphasises the importance of monitoring psychosocial workplace exposures in addition to physical workplace exposures to promote worker health and safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. The neuropsychological similarities of mild and more severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Reitan, R M; Wolfson, D

    2000-07-01

    Reports in the literature have suggested that the neuropsychological effects of mild head injury are selective, represented by impairment of attention, information processing, and memory, and that evaluations with comprehensive and standard test batteries are likely to miss such deficits. The present study compared groups of individuals with mild head injuries, more severe head injuries, and non-brain-damaged controls using 19 tests from the Halstead-Reitan Battery. The results indicated that the group with mild head injuries performed significantly poorer than the controls, and that the group with more severe head injuries scored significantly more poorly than either of the other groups. Comparisons of the pattern of test scores for the two head-injured groups were remarkably similar across the 19 tests, yielding a rank difference correlation of 0.87. The findings yielded no evidence of selective or delimited impairment in the group with mild head injuries, but instead, showed them to have test results that were very similar, though showing less neuropsychological impairment, to the group of subjects with more severe head injuries. These findings suggest that a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery is necessary to detect the broad range of deficits that may result from mild head injury.

  10. Physically demanding jobs and occupational injury and disability in the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Ilyssa E; Bell, Nicole S

    2010-10-01

    Effective job assignments should take into account physical capabilities to perform required tasks. Failure to do so is likely to result in increased injuries and musculoskeletal disability. To evaluate the association between job demands and health outcomes among U.S. Army soldiers. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis is used to describe associations between job demands, hospitalizations, and disability among 261,096 enlisted Army soldiers in heavily, moderately, and lightly physically demanding occupations (2000-2005) who were followed for up to 5 years. Controlling for gender, race, and age, soldiers in heavily demanding jobs were at increased risk for any-cause injury, on-duty injuries, any-cause hospitalizations, and any-cause disability, but not for musculoskeletal disability. Army job assignments should more accurately match physical capabilities to job demands and/or jobs should be redesigned to reduce injuries. Though musculoskeletal disorders are often the result of acute injury, the demographic and occupational risk patterns differ from acute injury.

  11. Work in multiple jobs and the risk of injury in the US working population.

    PubMed

    Marucci-Wellman, Helen R; Willetts, Joanna L; Lin, Tin-Chi; Brennan, Melanye J; Verma, Santosh K

    2014-01-01

    We compared the risk of injury for multiple job holders (MJHs) with that for single job holders (SJHs). We used information from the National Health Interview Survey for the years 1997 through 2011 to estimate the rate of multiple job holding in the United States and compared characteristics and rates of self-reported injury (work and nonwork) for SJHs versus MJHs. Approximately 8.4% of those employed reported working more than 1 job in the week before the interview. The rate of work and nonwork injury episodes per 100 employed workers was higher for MJHs than for SJHs (4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.5, 4.8; vs 3.3; 95% CI = 3.1, 3.5 work injuries and 9.9; 95% CI = 8.9, 10.9; vs 7.4; 95% CI = 7.1, 7.6 nonwork injuries per 100 workers, respectively). When calculated per 100 full-time equivalents (P < .05), the rate ratio remained higher for MJHs. Our findings suggest that working in multiple jobs is associated with an increased risk of an injury, both at work and not at work, and should be considered in injury surveillance.

  12. Health status, job stress and work-related injury among Los Angeles taxi drivers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin-Chieh; Delp, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Taxi drivers work long hours for low wages and report hypertension, weight gain, and musculoskeletal pain associated with the sedentary nature of their job, stressful working conditions, and poor dietary habits. They also experience a high work-related fatality rate. The objective of this study is to examine the association of taxi drivers' health status and level of job stress with work-related injury and determine if a potential interaction exists. A survey of 309 Los Angeles taxi drivers provides basic data on health status, job stress, and work-related injuries. We further analyzed the data using a Modified Poisson regression approach with a robust error variance to estimate the relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) of work-related injuries. Focus group results supplemented and helped interpret the quantitative data. The joint effect of good health and low job stress was associated with a large reduction in the incidence of injuries, consistent with the hypothesis that health status and stress levels modify each other on the risk of work-related injury. These results suggest that the combination of stress reduction and health management programs together with changes in the stressful conditions of the job may provide targeted avenues to prevent injuries.

  13. Military Occupations Most Affected by Head/Sensory Injuries and the Potential Job Impact of Those Injuries.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Ben D; Kass, Steven J; Dhillon, Kieran K; Milam, Lana S; Cho, Timothy H; Rupert, Angus H

    2016-08-01

    Identifying Department of Defense (DoD) occupations affected by injuries to the head and sensory systems. We explored the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database to identify occupations with the highest incidence of injured personnel, then ranked how frequently they occurred in a top 10 list for each of four injury categories (head/brain, visual, auditory, vestibular) encompassing 25 injury codes. Across all four categories, the most affected occupations were identified, among which we chose three Army combat-related military occupational specialties (MOSs) for detailed study. We identified skills needed to perform these MOSs and explored whether MOS-critical deficits could be expected following the injuries. Some DoD occupations are more likely to suffer from these injuries, including Infantry, Combat Operations Control, Artillery/Gunnery, Motor Vehicle Operator, Combat Engineering, and Armor/Amphibious. Within these DoD occupations, we explored three Army combatant MOSs: Infantry (11B), Cavalry Scout (19D), and Artillery (13B), confirming that these jobs are likely to be disrupted by injuries within the four categories. Head and sensory injuries disproportionately affect certain military occupations. Relatively few injuries disrupt combat-related abilities that are job critical (e.g., firearms operation) and job specific (e.g., Artillery gunnery problems); these should be the focus of efforts to improve rehabilitation and RTD outcomes. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Relationships of physical job tasks and living conditions with occupational injuries in coal miners.

    PubMed

    Bhattacherjee, Ashis; Bertrand, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Benamghar, Lahoucine; Otero Sierra, Carmen; Michaely, Jean-Pierre; Ghosh, Apurna Kumar; d'Houtaud, Alphonse; Mur, Jean-Marie; Chau, Nearkasen

    2007-04-01

    This study assessed the relationships of job tasks and living conditions with occupational injuries among coal miners. The sample included randomly selected 516 underground workers. They completed a standardized self-administred questionnaire. The data were analyzed via logistic regression method. The rate of injuries in the past two years was 29.8%. The job tasks with significant crude relative risks were: power hammer, vibrating hand tools, pneumatic tools, bent trunk, awkward work posture, heat, standing about and walking, job tasks for trunk and upper/lower limbs, pain caused by work, and muscular tiredness. Logistic model shows a strong relationship between the number of job tasks (JT) and injuries (adjusted ORs vs. JT 0-1: 2.21, 95%CI 1.27-3.86 for JT 2-6 and 3.82, 2.14-6.82 for JT>or=7), and significant ORs>or=1.71 for face work, not-good-health-status, and psychotropic drug use. Musculoskeletal disorders and certain personality traits were also significant in univariate analysis. Therefore job tasks and living conditions strongly increase the injuries, and occupational physicians could help workers to find remedial measures.

  15. How do employment types and job stressors relate to occupational injury? A cross-sectional investigation of employees in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, K; Nakata, A; Ikeda, T; Otsuka, Y; Kawahito, J

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated whether 1) the risk of occupational injury differs among permanent employees and specific types of temporary workers, 2) the risk of occupational injury differs across different employment types depending on the degree of job stressors. A cross-sectional study design based on self-report survey data. A total of 36,688 full-time workers (28,868 men and 7820 women; average age = 35.4) were surveyed by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Employment types consisted of permanent employment and two forms of temporary employment: direct-hire and temporary work agent (TWA). Job characteristics including job demands, job control, and social support at work were measured. Occupational injury was measured by asking whether the participant had an injury on the job in the past 12 months that required a medical treatment. To investigate the relationships between employment types, job stressors, and occupational injury, hierarchical moderated logistic regression tests were conducted. High job demands (OR = 1.44) and low job control (OR = 1.21) were significantly associated with an increased risk of occupational injury, while controlling for demographic, life style, health, and occupational factors. In addition, direct-hires (OR = 1.85) and temporary agent workers (OR = 3.26) had a higher risk of occupational injury compared with permanent employees. However, the relationship between employment types and the risk of occupational injury depended on the levels of job demands and job control. Specifically, the magnitude of the relationship between job demands and the risk of occupational injury was substantially greater for temporary work agents than for permanent employees when they reported low levels of job control. Such an interaction effect between job demands and job control on the risk of occupational injury was not observed between permanent employees and direct-hire temporary workers. The current study indicated that temporary workers might be

  16. Marginal structural modeling of associations of occupational injuries with voluntary and involuntary job loss among nursing home workers

    PubMed Central

    Bacic, Janine; Velasquez, Esther; Hammer, Leslie B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Qualitative studies have highlighted the possibility of job loss following occupational injuries for some workers, but prospective investigations are scant. We used a sample of nursing home workers from the Work, Family, and Health Network to prospectively investigate association between occupational injuries and job loss. Methods We merged data on 1331 workers assessed four times over an 18-month period with administrative data that include job loss from employers and publicly-available data on their workplaces. Workers self-reported occupational injuries in surveys. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated risk ratios for the impact of occupational injuries on overall job loss, whereas multinomial models were used to estimate odds ratio of voluntary and involuntary job loss. Use of marginal structural models allowed for adjustments of multilevel list of confounders that may be time-varying and/or on the causal pathway. Results By 12 months, 30.3% of workers experienced occupational injury, whereas 24.2% experienced job loss by 18 months. Comparing workers who reported occupational injuries to those reporting no injuries, risk ratio of overall job loss within subsequent 6 months was 1.31 (95% CI=0.93–1.86). Comparing the same groups, injured workers had higher odds of experiencing involuntary job loss (OR:2.19; 95% CI:1.27–3.77). Also, compared to uninjured workers, those injured more than once had higher odds of voluntary job loss (OR:1.95; 95% CI:1.03–3.67), while those injured once had higher odds of involuntary job loss (OR:2.19; 95% CI:1.18–4.05). Conclusions Despite regulatory protections, occupational injuries were associated with increased risk of voluntary and involuntary job loss for nursing home workers. PMID:26786757

  17. Marginal structural modelling of associations of occupational injuries with voluntary and involuntary job loss among nursing home workers.

    PubMed

    Okechukwu, Cassandra Adiba; Bacic, Janine; Velasquez, Esther; Hammer, Leslie B

    2016-03-01

    Qualitative studies have highlighted the possibility of job loss following occupational injuries for some workers, but prospective investigations are scant. We used a sample of nursing home workers from the Work, Family and Health Network to prospectively investigate association between occupational injuries and job loss. We merged data on 1331 workers assessed 4 times over an 18-month period with administrative data that include job loss from employers and publicly available data on their workplaces. Workers self-reported occupational injuries in surveys. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated risk ratios for the impact of occupational injuries on overall job loss, whereas multinomial models were used to estimate OR of voluntary and involuntary job loss. Use of marginal structural models allowed for adjustments of multilevel lists of confounders that may be time varying and/or on the causal pathway. By 12 months, 30.3% of workers experienced occupational injury, whereas 24.2% experienced job loss by 18 months. Comparing workers who reported occupational injuries to those reporting no injuries, risk ratio of overall job loss within the subsequent 6 months was 1.31 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.86). Comparing the same groups, injured workers had higher odds of experiencing involuntary job loss (OR 2.19; 95% CI 1.27 to 3.77). Also, compared with uninjured workers, those injured more than once had higher odds of voluntary job loss (OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.03 to 3.67), while those injured once had higher odds of involuntary job loss (OR 2.19; 95% CI 1.18 to 4.05). Despite regulatory protections, occupational injuries were associated with increased risk of voluntary and involuntary job loss for nursing home workers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Sex differences and similarities in job attribute preferences: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Konrad, A M; Ritchie, J E; Lieb, P; Corrigall, E

    2000-07-01

    Many researchers have studied sex differences in job attribute preferences. The authors meta-analyzed 242 samples collected from 321,672 men and boys and 316,842 women and girls in the United States between 1970 and 1998. Findings indicated significant (p < .05) sex differences on 33 of 40 job attribute preferences examined. The effect sizes were small. Of the 33 significant differences, 26 had average effect sizes of magnitude .20 or less. The directions of the differences were generally consistent with gender roles and stereotypes. Many job attributes became relatively more important to women and girls in the 1980s and 1990s compared with the 1970s, indicating that women's aspirations to obtain job attributes rose as gender barriers to opportunity declined.

  19. Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters: a nationwide cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeong-Kwang; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Kim, KyooSang; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Roh, Jaehoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the nature of association between job stress and occupational injuries among firefighters in Korea. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting We conducted a nationwide survey using self-reported questionnaires in South Korea. Participants A survey was conducted among 30 630 firefighters; 25 616 (83.6%) responded. Our study included firefighters who were 20–59 years old. Individuals with <12 months of current job experience and those with missing data were excluded; ultimately, 14 991 firefighters were analysed. Results Among fire suppression personnel, high job demands (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.77), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.37), a poor organisational system (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55), and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.64) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; high job demands (OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.47) were also associated with the frequency of injuries. Among emergency medical services personnel, high job demands (OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.66), a poor organisational system (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.85), lack of reward (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.69) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.54) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; low job control (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.36), lack of reward (OR=1.17, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.35) and a negative workplace climate (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.34) were also associated with a greater number of injuries. Among officers, high job demands (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.85) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.10) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injuries; however, there was no significant correlation between job stress and the number of injuries. Conclusions High job stress among firefighters was

  20. Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters: a nationwide cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong-Kwang; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Kim, KyooSang; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Roh, Jaehoon

    2016-11-25

    We aimed to assess the nature of association between job stress and occupational injuries among firefighters in Korea. Cross-sectional study. We conducted a nationwide survey using self-reported questionnaires in South Korea. A survey was conducted among 30 630 firefighters; 25 616 (83.6%) responded. Our study included firefighters who were 20-59 years old. Individuals with <12 months of current job experience and those with missing data were excluded; ultimately, 14 991 firefighters were analysed. Among fire suppression personnel, high job demands (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.77), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.37), a poor organisational system (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55), and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.64) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; high job demands (OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.47) were also associated with the frequency of injuries. Among emergency medical services personnel, high job demands (OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.66), a poor organisational system (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.85), lack of reward (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.69) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.54) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; low job control (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.36), lack of reward (OR=1.17, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.35) and a negative workplace climate (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.34) were also associated with a greater number of injuries. Among officers, high job demands (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.85) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.10) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injuries; however, there was no significant correlation between job stress and the number of injuries. High job stress among firefighters was associated with both the occurrence of occupational injury

  1. The influence of workplace injuries on work-family conflict: job and financial insecurity as mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Ericka R; Halbesleben, Jonathon R B; Paustian-Underdahl, Samantha C

    2013-10-01

    Research examining the outcomes of workplace injuries has focused on high costs to the organization. In this study, we utilize conservation of resources theory to develop and test a model that explains how and under what circumstances workplace injuries impact employees' perceptions of how their work interferes with their family. Results from 194 registered nurses (along with 85 of their spouses), using path analytic tests of moderated mediation, provide support for the prediction that the mediated effect of workplace injury severity on work-family conflict (through job and financial insecurity) is weaker when employees perceive high levels of supervisor support. We discuss the implications of these findings for the study of job and financial insecurity and work-family conflict. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are also presented.

  2. Developing physical exposure-based back injury risk models applicable to manual handling jobs in distribution centers.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Steven A; Marras, William S; Ferguson, Sue A; Splittstoesser, Riley E; Yang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Using our ultrasound-based "Moment Monitor," exposures to biomechanical low back disorder risk factors were quantified in 195 volunteers who worked in 50 different distribution center jobs. Low back injury rates, determined from a retrospective examination of each company's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 300 records over the 3-year period immediately prior to data collection, were used to classify each job's back injury risk level. The analyses focused on the factors differentiating the high-risk jobs (those having had 12 or more back injuries/200,000 hr of exposure) from the low-risk jobs (those defined as having no back injuries in the preceding 3 years). Univariate analyses indicated that measures of load moment exposure and force application could distinguish between high (n = 15) and low (n = 15) back injury risk distribution center jobs. A three-factor multiple logistic regression model capable of predicting high-risk jobs with very good sensitivity (87%) and specificity (73%) indicated that risk could be assessed using the mean across the sampled lifts of the peak forward and or lateral bending dynamic load moments that occurred during each lift, the mean of the peak push/pull forces across the sampled lifts, and the mean duration of the non-load exposure periods. A surrogate model, one that does not require the Moment Monitor equipment to assess a job's back injury risk, was identified although with some compromise in model sensitivity relative to the original model.

  3. Identifying occupational attributes of jobs performed after spinal cord injury: implications for vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sinden, Kathryn E; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2013-09-01

    Although individuals after spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrate a breadth of ability and employment potential, return-to-work (RTW) outcomes are low. In Canada, only 38% of individuals RTW after SCI. Refining the process of job suitability and enhancing job search strategies have been suggested to improve RTW outcomes. Our primary study objective was to identify occupational attributes of jobs performed after SCI that might be used to inform vocational rehabilitation strategies and improve RTW outcomes after SCI. A secondary analysis of participants from the Study of Health and Activity in People with Spinal Cord Injury employed in an occupation for which they received pay, was conducted. Frequency distributions for various occupational attributes including physical demands and educational requirements were examined across 181 reported occupations. χ-tests identified whether the primary mode of mobility was related to occupational physical demands. Analysis of the physical demand attribute identified that 58% of occupations required sitting and 33% required sitting/standing or walking. Forty-four percent of occupations required upper or multiple limb coordination. Eighty-three percent of occupations required a limited strength capacity. Sixty percent of occupations required college education and 58% required an undergraduate university education. χ-analysis revealed nonsignificant associations between primary mode of mobility and physical demands. In conclusion, a breadth of occupational attributes in jobs performed by individuals after SCI was identified. These results are suggested to inform future vocational rehabilitation strategies.

  4. Job stability in skilled work and communication ability after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S

    2016-01-01

    Communication deficits may play a critical role in maintaining employment after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but links between specific communication deficits and employment outcomes have not been determined. This study identified communication measures that distinguished stably employed versus unstably employed adults with TBI. Participants were 31 adults with moderate-severe TBI who were employed full-time for at least 12 consecutive months before injury in skilled jobs and had attempted return to skilled jobs after injury. Sixteen had achieved stable employment (SE) post-injury, defined as full-time employment for ≥12 consecutive months; and 15 had unstable employment (UE). Participants completed a battery of communication tests identified in a prior qualitative study of communication skills required for skilled work. Measures of spoken language comprehension, verbal reasoning, social inference, reading and politeness in spoken discourse significantly discriminated between SE and UE groups. Two nested models were completed and compared. The first model excluded discourse data because of missing data for two UE and one SE participant. This model revealed that measures of verbal reasoning speed (β = -0.18, p = 0.05) and social inference (β = 0.19, p = 0.05) were predictive independent of the overall model. The second model included discourse politeness data and was a better overall predictor of group membership (Likelihood ratio test, Model 1: 3.824, Model 2: 2.865). Communication measures were positively associated with SE in skilled jobs after TBI. Clinicians should include assessment of communication for adults attempting return to work after TBI, paying specific attention to social inference and speed of verbal reasoning skills. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in communication impairments associated with the cognitive skills underlying interpersonal skills. Communication impairment after TBI has been anecdotally associated with

  5. Impact of psychosocial job stress on non-fatal occupational injuries in small and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Akinori; Ikeda, Tomoko; Takahashi, Masaya; Haratani, Takashi; Hojou, Minoru; Fujioka, Yosei; Swanson, Naomi G; Araki, Shunichi

    2006-08-01

    Workers involved in manufacturing are known to comprise a high-risk population for occupational injury, and this risk is greater in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial job stress and occupational injuries among workers in SMEs. One thousand forty-nine men and 721 women from 244 SMEs participated in this study. Perceived job stress was evaluated with the Japanese version of the generic job stress questionnaire, which covered 14 job stress variables. Occupational injury was assessed by self-report during the last 1-year period. Workers with high quantitative workload (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55 for men, 1.62 for women), high cognitive demands (OR = 1.70 for men, 1.53 for women), and low job satisfaction (OR = 1.33 for men, 1.93 for women) had a significantly increased risk of occupational injury in the multivariate model. High variance in workload (OR = 1.70) and high job future ambiguity (OR = 1.35) in men, and low job control (OR = 2.04) and high intragroup conflict (OR = 1.66) in women were significantly associated with occupational injury. In manufacturing/production workers, high quantitative workload (OR = 1.91), high variance in workload (OR = 2.02), and high depressive symptoms (OR = 1.55) were significantly associated with injury in men, while low social support from colleagues (OR = 2.36) or family (OR = 2.51) was related to injury in women. These data point to an independent relationship between psychosocial job stress and self-reported occupational injury in SMEs. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  6. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  7. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  8. Job stability in skilled work and communication ability after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Communication deficits may play a critical role in maintaining employment after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but links between specific communication deficits and employment outcomes have not been determined. This study identified communication measures that distinguished stably employed versus unstably employed adults with TBI. Methods Participants were 31 adults with moderate-severe TBI who were employed full-time for at least 12 consecutive months before injury in skilled jobs and had attempted return to skilled jobs after injury. Sixteen had achieved stable employment (SE) post-injury, defined as full-time employment for ≥12 consecutive months; and 15 had unstable (UE) employment. Participants completed a battery of communication tests identified in a prior qualitative study of communication skills required for skilled work. Results Measures of spoken language comprehension, verbal reasoning, social inference, reading, and politeness in spoken discourse significantly discriminated between SE and UE groups. Two nested models were completed and compared. The first model excluded discourse data because of missing data for two UE and one SE participant. This model revealed that measures of verbal reasoning speed (β = −0.18, p = 0.05) and social inference (β = 0.19, p = 0.05) were predictive independent of the overall model. The second model included discourse data and was a better overall predictor of group membership (Likelihood ratio test, Model 1: 3.824, Model 2: 2.865). Conclusion Communication measures were positively associated with stable employment in skilled jobs after TBI. Clinicians should include assessment of communication for adults attempting return to work after TBI, paying specific attention to social inference and speed of verbal reasoning skills. PMID:25958999

  9. Risk of job-related injury among construction laborers with a diagnosis of substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Pollack, E S; Franklin, G M; Fulton-Kehoe, D; Chowdhury, R

    1998-06-01

    This study attempts to determine whether a diagnosis of substance abuse among construction laborers is associated with an increased risk of work-related injuries. Records for construction laborers in Washington State who were covered by health insurance through the local union were matched against workers' compensation records in the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries. Using the health insurance records, we identified those who had a diagnosis of substance abuse during the two-year period 1990-1991. Using the workers' compensation records, we were then able to compare injury rates for those with substance abuse diagnoses with the rates for those without such diagnoses. The total cohort consisted of 7,895 laborers. Among the 422 who had a substance abuse diagnosis, the rate of time-loss injuries per 100 full-time equivalent workers was 15.1, compared with 10.9 among the remainder of the cohort. Most of the difference appeared in the 25-34-year age group, in which the rate of injury per 100 full-time equivalent workers was 23.6 for substance abusers, compared with a rate of 12.2 for non-substance abusers, for a statistically significant relative risk of 1.93. The study suggests that younger workers might be an appropriate target for interventions aimed at reducing the level of substance abuse as a way of preventing injuries on the job. Studies by others have indicated some degree of success in this direction through the use of employee assistance programs in which the worker is referred to specific programs or providers for treatment. The state legislature in Washington has recently passed legislation providing incentives for the use of employee assistance programs. More effort is needed, however, to evaluate the effectiveness of such programs.

  10. Similarities Between Large Animal-Related and Motor Vehicle Crash-Related Injuries.

    PubMed

    Tremelling, Abigail M; Marley, Robert A; Marley, Mackenzie B; Woofter, Christina M; Docherty, Courtney; Salvator, Ann E; Muakkassa, Farid F

    2017-09-01

    Many Americans sustain large animal-related injuries (LARIs) from blunt trauma. We compare the injuries and management of LARI in our region of the United States with those of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs). A 15-year retrospective study of trauma patients with LARI matched to MVC controls by Injury Severity Score (ISS), age, and sex was conducted. Values were statistically compared, and differences were considered statistically significant at P < .05. There were 156 LARI cases, of which 87% were related to horses, 8% to bulls, and the remainder to deer, mules, bison, cows, and rams. In the LARI group, the age was 42±18 years (mean±SD), ISS was 7±4, and 61% were females. The MVC group had a significantly longer length of hospital stay (5±5 vs 4±3 days) and blood alcohol concentration (35±84 vs 3±20 g/L). There were no significant differences in injury patterns between LARI and MVC; however, additional radiological studies (RS) were performed on MVC (9±6 vs 7±5). LARI patients were more often transferred from rural locations (39% vs 25%) and traveled further to our trauma center (40±32 vs 24±29 km) than did MVC patients. LARI has a similar pattern of injury to MVC, but fewer RS. LARI typically occurred further away, requiring transfer from rural areas to our institution. We recommend a similar approach for the evaluation of LARI and MVC. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Migrant workers in Italy: an analysis of injury risk taking into account occupational characteristics and job tenure.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Massimiliano; Bena, Antonella; Costa, Giuseppe

    2017-04-22

    Migrants resident in Italy exceeded 5 million in 2015, representing 8.2% of the resident population. The study of the mechanisms that explain the differential health of migrant workers (as a whole and for specific nationalities) has been identified as a priority for research. The international literature has shown that migrant workers have a higher risk of total and fatal injury than natives, but some results are conflicting. The aim of this paper is to study the injury risk differentials between migrants, born in countries with strong migratory pressure (SMPC), and workers born in high income countries (HIC), taking into account individual and firm characteristics and job tenure. In addition to a comprehensive analysis of occupational safety among migrants, the study focuses on Moroccans, the largest community in Italy in the years of the analysis. Using the Work History Italian Panel-Salute integrated database, only contracts of employment in the private sector, starting in the period between 2000 and 2005 and held by men, were selected. The analysis focused on economic sectors with an important foreign component: engineering, construction, wholesale and retail trade, transportation and storage. Injury rates were calculated using a definition of serious occupational injuries based on the type of injury. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated using a Poisson distribution for panel data taking into account time-dependent variables. Injury rates among SMPC workers were higher than for HIC workers in engineering (15.61 ‰ py vs. 8.92 ‰ py), but there were no significant differences in construction (11.21 vs. 10.09), transportation and storage (7.82 vs. 7.23) and the wholesale and retail sectors (4.06 vs. 4.67). Injury rates for Moroccans were higher than for both HIC and total migrant workers in all economic sectors considered. The multivariate analysis revealed an interaction effect of job tenure among both SMPC and Moroccan workers in the construction

  12. Contributions of occupational hazards and human factors in occupational injuries and their associations with job, age and type of injuries in railway workers.

    PubMed

    Chau, Nearkasen; Gauchard, Gerome C; Dehaene, Dominique; Benamghar, Lahoucine; Touron, Christian; Perrin, Philippe P; Mur, Jean-Marie

    2007-05-01

    To assess the contributions of environmental hazards, technical dysfunctions, lack of work organization, know-how and job knowledge, and other human factors in occupational injuries and their relationships with job, age and type of accidents in railway workers. The sample included 1,604 male workers, having had at least one occupational injury with sick leave during a 2-year period in voluntary French railway services. A standardized questionnaire was filled in by the person-in-charge of prevention, with the injured worker. Data analysis was performed via the chi(2) independence test and adjusted odds ratios (OR) with Mantel-Haenszel test. The environmental hazards were implicated in 24.7%, technical dysfunctions in 16.0%, lack of work organization in 13.7%, lack of know-how in 17.6%, lack of job knowledge in 5.2%, and the other human factors in 31.9% of occupational injuries. The injuries caused by lack of know-how or job knowledge were more represented in workers aged less than 30 (ORs adjusted for job 1.45, 95% CI 1.02-2.06 and 2.06, 1.22-3.49, respectively), those by environmental hazards in energy and electrical traction maintenance operators and train drivers (ORs adjusted for age 2.04, 1.16-3.58 and 1.80, 1.01-3.20, respectively), and those by lack of work organization in mechanical maintenance operators and in energy and electrical traction maintenance operators (ORs adjusted for age 2.24, 1.13-4.45 and 1.83, 1.30-2.57, respectively). The causes considered were strongly related with the type of injuries. This study found that environmental hazards, technical dysfunctions, lack of work organization, lack of knowledge and other human factors had important contributions in injuries, and they were related to job, age and type of injuries. These findings are useful for prevention. Training is necessary for young workers. The occupational physician could help the workers to be more aware of the risks.

  13. Clinical, Cognitive, and Genetic Predictors of Change in Job Status Following Traumatic Brain Injury in a Military Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. Duke; Suzuki, Hideo; Drake, Angela I.; Jak, Amy J.; Houston, Wes S.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk associated with military duty, and residual effects from TBI may adversely affect a service member's ability to complete duties. It is, therefore, important to identify factors associated with a change in job status following TBI in an active military population. On the basis of previous research, we predicted that apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype may be 1 factor. Design Cohort study of military personnel who sustained a mild to moderate TBI. Setting Military medical clinics. Patients or Other Participants Fifty-two military participants were recruited through the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, affiliated with Naval Medical Center San Diego and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Concussion Clinic located at the First Marine Division at Camp Pendleton. Intervention(s) A multivariate statistical classification approach called optimal data analysis allowed for consideration of APOE genotype alongside cognitive, emotional, psychosocial, and physical functioning. Main Outcome Measure(s) APOE genotype, neuropsychological, psychosocial, and clinical outcomes. Results We identified a model of factors that was associated with a change in job status among military personnel who experienced a mild or moderate TBI. Conclusions Factors associated with a change in job status are different when APOE genotype is considered. We conclude that APOE genotype may be an important genetic factor in recovery from mild to moderate head injury. PMID:19158597

  14. Qualitative case studies of professional-level workers with traumatic brain injuries: A contextual approach to job accommodation and retention.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Richard T; Rumrill, Phillip D; Rumrill, Stuart P; Minton, Deborah L; Hendricks, Deborah J; Sampson, Elaine; Stauffer, Callista; Scherer, Marcia J; Nardone, Amanda; Leopold, Anne; Jacobs, Karen; Elias, Eileen

    2017-09-14

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multi-systemic disability that causes a wide range of difficulties with personal and social functioning. Four individuals with TBI participated in an evaluation of barriers to their continued employment following graduation from college. A trained interviewer completed the Work Experience Survey (WES) in teleconsultation sessions with each participant. Researchers applied a qualitative case study research design. Participants reported a wide range of difficulties in performing essential functions of their jobs (3 to 24) that have the potential to significantly affect their productivity. Career mastery problems reflected outcomes associated with TBI such as 'believing that others think I do a good job' and 'having the resources (e.g., knowledge, tools, supplies, and equipment) needed to do the job.' Indicative of their wish to continue their current employment, participants reported high levels of job satisfaction. The WES is a cost-effective needs assessment tool to aid health and rehabilitation professionals in providing on-the-job supports to workers with TBI.

  15. Do Female and Male Employees in Iran Experience Similar Work-Family Interference, Job, and Life Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Leila

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at examining gender differences in the experience of work-family interference and perceived job-life satisfaction in a group of Iranian employees. The participants in the study consist of 387 Iranian male and female employees from a variety of organizations. The results of t tests and multiple regression analysis using EQS 6.1…

  16. Do Female and Male Employees in Iran Experience Similar Work-Family Interference, Job, and Life Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Leila

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at examining gender differences in the experience of work-family interference and perceived job-life satisfaction in a group of Iranian employees. The participants in the study consist of 387 Iranian male and female employees from a variety of organizations. The results of t tests and multiple regression analysis using EQS 6.1…

  17. Similarities and Differences in Role Conflict, Role Commitment, and Job Satisfaction for Female and Male High School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckman, Ellen Wexler

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of gender, role conflict, role commitment, and job satisfaction on the high school principal. Data were collected from high school principals in three midwestern states. The results indicated that there are differences between female and male high school principals in their personal and…

  18. Skin wound healing, ischemia-reperfusion injury and nerve regeneration: Similarities in the sequential events and molecular basis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qattan, MM; Al-Kattan, WM

    2004-01-01

    Skin wound healing, ischemia-reperfusion injury and nerve regeneration are three important topics for the hand surgeon. The events and molecular basis for each of these three topics are very complex, and previous review articles have discussed each topic separately. The present review demonstrates and comments on the similarities in the sequential events and molecular basis among skin wound healing, ischemia-reperfusion injury and nerve regeneration. PMID:24115884

  19. Are injuries from terror and war similar? A comparison study of civilians and soldiers.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Kobi; Jaffe, Dena H

    2010-08-01

    To compare injuries and hospital utilization and outcomes from terror and war for civilians and soldiers. Injuries from terror and war are not necessarily comparable, especially among civilians and soldiers. For example, civilians have less direct exposure to conflict and are unprepared for injury, whereas soldiers are psychologically and physically prepared for combat on battlefields that are often far from trauma centers. Evidence-based studies distinguishing and characterizing differences in injuries according to conflict type and population group are lacking. A retrospective study was performed using hospitalization data from the Israel National Trauma Registry (10/2000-12/2006). Terror and war accounted for trauma hospitalizations among 1784 civilians and 802 soldiers. Most civilians (93%) were injured in terror and transferred to trauma centers by land, whereas soldiers were transferred by land and air. Critical injuries and injuries to multiple body regions were more likely in terror than war. Soldiers tended to present with less severe injuries from war than from terror. Rates of first admission to orthopedic surgery were greater for all casualties with the exception of civilians injured in terror who were equally likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. In-hospital mortality was higher among terror (7%) than war (2%) casualties, and particularly among civilians. This study provides evidence that substantial differences exist in injury characteristics and hospital resources required to treat civilians and soldiers injured in terror and war. Hospital preparedness and management should focus on treating combat injuries that result from specific causes-terror or war.

  20. Jobs, Jobs, Jobs!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Teaching is not the safe career bet that it once was. The thinking used to be: New students will always be entering the public schools, and older teachers will always be retiring, so new teachers will always be needed. But teaching jobs aren't secure enough to stand up to the "Great Recession," as this drawn-out downturn has been called. Across…

  1. Jobs, Jobs, Jobs!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Teaching is not the safe career bet that it once was. The thinking used to be: New students will always be entering the public schools, and older teachers will always be retiring, so new teachers will always be needed. But teaching jobs aren't secure enough to stand up to the "Great Recession," as this drawn-out downturn has been called. Across…

  2. Sport and nonsport etiologies of mild traumatic brain injury: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Amanda R; Li, Xiaoqi; Levin, Harvey S

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has recently gained appreciation as a significant public health problem, which has highlighted just how little is known about its proximal and long-term effects. A major challenge in the study of mTBI is the heterogeneity of the condition. Research on mTBI has historically separated sport and nonsport etiologies, and the extent to which research from one of these samples translates to the other is unclear. This review examines the literature on mTBI, with a focus on comparing sport and nonsport etiologies with regard to the latest research on biomechanics, pathophysiology, neurocognitive effects, and neuroimaging. Issues of particular relevance to sports injuries, such as exercise, repetitive injuries, subconcussive blows, and chronic injury effects, are also reviewed.

  3. Burn and cut injuries related to job stress among kitchen workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Haruyama, Yasuo; Matsuzuki, Hiroe; Tomita, Shigeru; Muto, Takashi; Haratani, Takashi; Muto, Shigeki; Ito, Akiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the correlation between kitchen work-related burns and cuts and job stress, a self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted involving 991 kitchen workers among 126 kitchen facilities. The demographics, condition of burns and cuts, job stress with the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), health condition, and work-related and environmental factors were surveyed. Multiple logistic regression models and trend tests were used according to quartiles (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4) of each sub-scale BJSQ. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, burns/cuts were associated with a higher score category (Q4) of job demands (OR: 2.56, 95% CI: 1.10-6.02/OR: 2.72, 95% CI: 1.30-5.69), psychological stress (OR: 4.49, 95% CI: 2.05-9.81/OR: 3.52, 95% CI: 1.84-6.72), and physical stress (OR: 2.41, 95% CI: 1.20-4.98/OR 2.16, 95% CI: 1.16-4.01). The ORs of the burn/cut injures increased from Q1 to Q4 with job demands (p for trend = 0.045/0.003), psychological stress (p for trend<0.001/0.001), and physical stress (p for trend = 0.006/0.005), respectively. These findings suggest that kitchen work-related burns and cuts are more likely to be correlated with job stress, and the higher the job stress score, the higher the frequency of burns and cuts among kitchen workers.

  4. Similarities and differences of acute nonconvulsive seizures and other epileptic activities following penetrating and ischemic brain injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Mountney, Andrea; Chen, Zhiyong; Wei, Guo; Cao, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Khatri, Vivek; Cunningham, Tracy; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-04-01

    The similarities and differences between acute nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) and other epileptic events, for example, periodic epileptiform discharges (PED) and intermittent rhythmic delta activities (IRDA), were characterized in rat models of penetrating and ischemic brain injuries. The NCS were spontaneously induced by either unilateral frontal penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), and were detected by continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring begun immediately after the injury and continued for 72 h or 24 h, respectively. Analysis of NCS profiles (incidence, frequency, duration, and time distribution) revealed a high NCS incidence in both injury models. The EEG waveform expressions of NCS and PED exhibited intrinsic variations that resembled human electrographic manifestations of post-traumatic and post-ischemic ictal and inter-ictal events, but these waveform variations were not distinguishable between the two types of brain injury. However, the NCS after pMCAO occurred more acutely and intensely (latency=0.6 h, frequency=25 episodes/rat) compared with the PBBI-induced NCS (latency=24 h, frequency=10 episodes/rat), such that the most salient features differentiating post-traumatic and post-ischemic NCS were the intensity and time distribution of the NCS profiles. After pMCAO, nearly 50% of the seizures occurred within the first 2 h of injury, whereas after PBBI, NCS occurred sporadically (0-5%/h) throughout the 72 h recording period. The PED were episodically associated with NCS. By contrast, the IRDA appeared to be independent of other epileptic events. This study provided comprehensive comparisons of post-traumatic and post-ischemic epileptic profiles. The identification of the similarities and differences across a broad spectrum of epileptic events may lead to differential strategies for post-traumatic and post-stroke seizure interventions.

  5. Acute alcohol-induced pancreatic injury is similar with intravenous and intragastric routes of alcohol administration.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lutz; Dieckmann, Ralf; Hackert, Thilo; Gebhard, Martha-Maria; Werner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Five percent of alcoholics develop an acute pancreatitis (AP). The mechanism leading to pancreatic injury is not yet understood. Microcirculatory disorders seem to play a pivotal role. The objective of this study was to compare alcoholic pancreatic injury in response to intravenous and intragastric routes of alcohol administration. Alcohol was applied in rats intravenously (IV) or gastric via a surgical implanted feeding tube (IG). Serum alcohol concentration was maintained between 1.5‰ and 2.5‰. Four subgroups (n = 6/group) were examined in the IV/IG arm and compared with healthy controls. Pancreatic microcirculation, enzyme levels, and morphological damage were assessed after 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. Microcirculatory analysis showed significantly disturbed pancreatic perfusion and increased adherent leukocytes in IV and IG animals. In IV and IG groups, serum amylase was increased without morphological signs of AP compared with healthy controls. Alcohol application does not induce AP in rodents, but impairs pancreatic microcirculation irrespectively of the application route. Intravenous application is commonly used and shows no disadvantages compared with the physiological intragastric application form. Therefore, the intravenous route offers a valid model, which mimics the physiological process for further studies of the influence of acute alcohol intoxication on the pancreas.

  6. Characteristics of persons and jobs with needlestick injuries in a national data set.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Paul; Wiatrowski, William J; Gillen, Marion; Steenland, N Kyle

    2008-08-01

    Physicians, nurses, and others are at risk of needlesticks, yet little national information is available regarding incidence across demographic and occupational categories. Analysis was conducted on national data on occupational injuries for 1992-2003 from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Because BLS data were limited to cases with 1 or more days of work loss, and reasons related to reporting of incidents, the data only reflected a subset of all needlesticks. Nevertheless, the data were internally consistent across categories so that relative magnitudes were reliable. Statistical tests for differences in proportions were conducted that compared needlesticks with all other occupational injuries and employment. Cases with 1 or more days of work loss numbered 903 per year, on average, from 1992 through 2003. Women comprised 73.3% (95% CI: 72.5%-74.2%) of persons injured. For those reporting race, white, non-Hispanic comprised 69.3% of the total (95% CI: 68.1%-70.4%); black, non-Hispanic, 14.8% (95% CI: 13.9%-15.6%); and Hispanic, 13.8% (95% CI: 12.9%-14.6%). The age bracket 35 to 44 years had the highest percentage of injuries at 34.0% (95% CI: 33.1%-34.9%). Ages over 54 years reported smaller percentages of needlestick injuries than either all other injuries or employment. Occupations with greatest frequencies included registered nurses, nursing aides and orderlies, janitors and cleaners, licensed practical nurses, and maids and housemen. Occupations with greatest risks included biologic technicians, janitors and cleaners, and maids and housemen. Almost 20% (95% CI: 18.88%-20.49%) of needlesticks occurred outside the services industry. Seven percent (95% CI: 6.56%-7.53%) of needlesticks resulted in 31 or more days of work loss in contrast to 20.46% (95% CI: 20.44%-20.48%) of all other injuries. In this nationally representative sample, the most frequent demographic and occupational categories were women; white, non-Hispanic; ages 35 to 44 years; and registered

  7. Drug-induced liver injury associated with Agaricus blazei Murill which is very similar to autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hisamochi, Akiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Arinaga, Teruko; Ide, Tatsuya; Miyajima, Ichiro; Ogata, Kei; Kuwahara, Reiichiro; Koga, Yuriko; Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Sata, Michio

    2013-04-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) is one of the most popular complementary alternative medicines (CAM). We experienced a case of a 60-year-old woman with severe hepatitis associated with extract of ABM and extract of Ganoderma lucidum, and a case of a 75-year-old man with drug-induced liver injury (DILI) associated with extract of ABM and fucoidan. Their clinical courses from the start of CAM until the onset of DILI were observed unexpectedly, because they were under observation for stable malignant neoplasms: stage III malignant thymoma and stage IV lung cancer, respectively. However, they did not talk about taking CAM with their physicians. There were two common points between these two cases. First, they were diagnosed as compatible with DILI by using an international diagnostic scale, the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method. The second point was that histological findings of the liver were very similar to autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). In addition, serum immunoglobulin G and zinc sulfate turbidity tests gradually increased from the start of CAM to the onset of DILI. Their clinical course and liver histology suggested that the immunostimulating action of ABM caused liver injury which was very similar to that seen in AIH.

  8. Analysis of miners job attendence behavior and its relationship to miners accidents and injuries. Final report. Open file report, 21 September 1982-21 December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, P.S.

    1985-10-01

    The report examines coal-miner absenteeism and its relationship to accidents and injuries at underground mines. A total of 19 mines participated in various phases of this 3-year project. Miners at the participating mines ranged in number from 185 to 776. The data consisted of the mines' daily attendance records and detailed interviews with approximately 50 miners from each mine. The interviews contained questions about the miners' satisfaction with various on-the-job and off-the-job factors, their perceptions of the mines' absenteeism policies, the reasons or causes for their own absences, and the miners' demographic characteristics. Accident and injury data from six mines were used in parametric and multiple regression analysis of the absenteeism-accident relationship. The data represented activity during approximately 80,000 miner-days worked. Strategies for reducing absenteeism are discussed.

  9. Tiring job and work related injury road crashes in the GAZEL cohort.

    PubMed

    Chiron, Mireille; Bernard, Marlène; Lafont, Sylviane; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2008-05-01

    The objective was to describe at-work and commuting crashes occurring in a cohort of French employees and to investigate occupational risk factors. The subjects were employees of the French national electricity and gas companies, Electricité de France and Gaz de France (EDF-GDF), who volunteered to join a research cohort (the GAZEL cohort which included 20,625 participants in 1989). Only crashes with injuries were considered. Crashes for the periods 1989--2001 were recorded together with the type of journey (commuting, work, private), the type of road-user, self-estimated responsibility, and injuries sustained by the subject. Annual incidences for gender/age groups and socio-occupational groups were computed for each of the two types of work related crashes. Occupational risk factor analyses were conducted using a Cox proportional hazards regression model with time-dependent covariates adjusting for the main confounders. A total of 146,285 person years at work were observed. Two indicators of self-reported work fatigue were associated with the occurrence of at-work crashes: "nervously tiring work" for males (RR=1.6, 95% CI [1.1; 2.3]), sustained standing for females (RR=3.0, 95% CI [1.0; 8.4]), adjusting for health status, location of residence, type of family, transport mode and mileage. As regards crashes while commuting, a self-reported uncomfortable position at work was a risk factor among women (RR=1.9, 95% CI [1.1; 3.3]). On the other hand, these occupational factors were not linked to road crashes in private trips. Work related road crashes seem then to be a matter for a specific prevention. Preventing employees from becoming exhausted should be considered as the first way to initiate such a prevention.

  10. Active muscle regeneration following eccentric contraction-induced injury is similar between healthy young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, R. Gavin; Clough, Launa G.; Dirain, Marvin; Sandesara, Bhanuprasad; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Repair of skeletal muscle after injury is a key aspect of maintaining proper musculoskeletal function. Studies have suggested that regenerative processes, including myogenesis and angiogenesis, are impaired during advanced age, but evidence from humans is limited. This study aimed to compare active muscle regeneration between healthy young and older adults. We evaluated changes in clinical, biochemical, and immunohistochemical indices of muscle regeneration at precisely 2 (T2) and 7 (T3) days following acute muscle injury. Men and women, aged 18-30 and ≥70 years, matched for gender and body mass index, performed 150 unilateral, eccentric contractions of the plantar flexors at 110% of one repetition maximum. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance, adjusted for gender, habitual physical activity, and baseline level of the outcome. A total of 30 young (n = 15; 22.5 ± 3.7 yr) and older (n = 15; 75.8 ± 5.0 yr) adults completed the study. Following muscle injury, force production declined 16% and 14% in young and older adults, respectively, by T2 and in each group, returned to 93% of baseline strength by T3. Despite modest differences in the pattern of response, postinjury changes in intramuscular concentrations of myogenic growth factors and number of myonuclear (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole+ and paired box 7+) cells were largely similar between groups. Likewise, postinjury changes in serum and intramuscular indices of inflammation (e.g., TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and angiogenesis (e.g., VEGF and kinase insert domain receptor) did not differ significantly between groups. These findings suggest that declines in physical activity and increased co-morbidity may contribute to age-related impairments in active muscle regeneration rather than aging per se. PMID:23493365

  11. Similar change in platelets and leucocytes 24 h after injury is associated with septic shock a week later.

    PubMed

    Jol, Saskia; Hietbrink, Falco; Leenen, Luke P H; Koenderman, Leo; van Wessem, Karlijn J P

    2017-03-01

    Septic shock is a severe complication in polytrauma patients. Early identification of patients at risk can guide future prevention strategies. Platelets (PLTs) and leucocytes presumably play an important role in the post-injury inflammatory response. The role of early changes in PLT and leucocyte counts was investigated in search for the aetiology of the development of septic complications. Polytrauma patients (aged 16-80 years) admitted to the intensive care unit with an expected stay of at least 3 days were included. PLT and leucocyte counts were measured on a daily basis for 14 days. A total of 41 patients were included, of whom nine (22%) developed septic shock. There was no difference in (New) Injury Severity Score or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores between patients who developed septic shock and patients who did not. Three patients died, one of them in septic shock. Patients who developed septic shock during hospital stay had lower PLTs and a slower recovery to normal PLT counts than patients without septic shock. Patients who developed either a decrease in both PLTs and leucocytes or an increase in PLTs and leucocytes in the first 24 h after trauma were more likely to develop septic shock. This correlation was not found in patients who did not develop septic shock. A similar change in PLT and leucocyte counts in the first 24 h after trauma is associated with the development of septic shock after a week. This indicates an early interaction between PLTs and leucocytes, which needs further investigation to gain more insight in the aetiology of post-injury septic complications. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Active muscle regeneration following eccentric contraction-induced injury is similar between healthy young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Buford, Thomas W; MacNeil, R Gavin; Clough, Launa G; Dirain, Marvin; Sandesara, Bhanuprasad; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2014-06-01

    Repair of skeletal muscle after injury is a key aspect of maintaining proper musculoskeletal function. Studies have suggested that regenerative processes, including myogenesis and angiogenesis, are impaired during advanced age, but evidence from humans is limited. This study aimed to compare active muscle regeneration between healthy young and older adults. We evaluated changes in clinical, biochemical, and immunohistochemical indices of muscle regeneration at precisely 2 (T2) and 7 (T3) days following acute muscle injury. Men and women, aged 18-30 and ≥70 years, matched for gender and body mass index, performed 150 unilateral, eccentric contractions of the plantar flexors at 110% of one repetition maximum. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance, adjusted for gender, habitual physical activity, and baseline level of the outcome. A total of 30 young (n = 15; 22.5 ± 3.7 yr) and older (n = 15; 75.8 ± 5.0 yr) adults completed the study. Following muscle injury, force production declined 16% and 14% in young and older adults, respectively, by T2 and in each group, returned to 93% of baseline strength by T3. Despite modest differences in the pattern of response, postinjury changes in intramuscular concentrations of myogenic growth factors and number of myonuclear (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole+ and paired box 7+) cells were largely similar between groups. Likewise, postinjury changes in serum and intramuscular indices of inflammation (e.g., TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and angiogenesis (e.g., VEGF and kinase insert domain receptor) did not differ significantly between groups. These findings suggest that declines in physical activity and increased co-morbidity may contribute to age-related impairments in active muscle regeneration rather than aging per se.

  13. Using hierarchical cluster models to systematically identify groups of jobs with similar occupational questionnaire response patterns to assist rule-based expert exposure assessment in population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Melissa C; Shortreed, Susan M; Wheeler, David C; Burstyn, Igor; Vermeulen, Roel; Pronk, Anjoeka; Colt, Joanne S; Baris, Dalsu; Karagas, Margaret R; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Armenti, Karla R; Silverman, Debra T; Yu, Kai

    2015-05-01

    Rule-based expert exposure assessment based on questionnaire response patterns in population-based studies improves the transparency of the decisions. The number of unique response patterns, however, can be nearly equal to the number of jobs. An expert may reduce the number of patterns that need assessment using expert opinion, but each expert may identify different patterns of responses that identify an exposure scenario. Here, hierarchical clustering methods are proposed as a systematic data reduction step to reproducibly identify similar questionnaire response patterns prior to obtaining expert estimates. As a proof-of-concept, we used hierarchical clustering methods to identify groups of jobs (clusters) with similar responses to diesel exhaust-related questions and then evaluated whether the jobs within a cluster had similar (previously assessed) estimates of occupational diesel exhaust exposure. Using the New England Bladder Cancer Study as a case study, we applied hierarchical cluster models to the diesel-related variables extracted from the occupational history and job- and industry-specific questionnaires (modules). Cluster models were separately developed for two subsets: (i) 5395 jobs with ≥1 variable extracted from the occupational history indicating a potential diesel exposure scenario, but without a module with diesel-related questions; and (ii) 5929 jobs with both occupational history and module responses to diesel-relevant questions. For each subset, we varied the numbers of clusters extracted from the cluster tree developed for each model from 100 to 1000 groups of jobs. Using previously made estimates of the probability (ordinal), intensity (µg m(-3) respirable elemental carbon), and frequency (hours per week) of occupational exposure to diesel exhaust, we examined the similarity of the exposure estimates for jobs within the same cluster in two ways. First, the clusters' homogeneity (defined as >75% with the same estimate) was examined compared

  14. Using Hierarchical Cluster Models to Systematically Identify Groups of Jobs With Similar Occupational Questionnaire Response Patterns to Assist Rule-Based Expert Exposure Assessment in Population-Based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Melissa C.; Shortreed, Susan M.; Wheeler, David C.; Burstyn, Igor; Vermeulen, Roel; Pronk, Anjoeka; Colt, Joanne S.; Baris, Dalsu; Karagas, Margaret R.; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Armenti, Karla R.; Silverman, Debra T.; Yu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Rule-based expert exposure assessment based on questionnaire response patterns in population-based studies improves the transparency of the decisions. The number of unique response patterns, however, can be nearly equal to the number of jobs. An expert may reduce the number of patterns that need assessment using expert opinion, but each expert may identify different patterns of responses that identify an exposure scenario. Here, hierarchical clustering methods are proposed as a systematic data reduction step to reproducibly identify similar questionnaire response patterns prior to obtaining expert estimates. As a proof-of-concept, we used hierarchical clustering methods to identify groups of jobs (clusters) with similar responses to diesel exhaust-related questions and then evaluated whether the jobs within a cluster had similar (previously assessed) estimates of occupational diesel exhaust exposure. Methods: Using the New England Bladder Cancer Study as a case study, we applied hierarchical cluster models to the diesel-related variables extracted from the occupational history and job- and industry-specific questionnaires (modules). Cluster models were separately developed for two subsets: (i) 5395 jobs with ≥1 variable extracted from the occupational history indicating a potential diesel exposure scenario, but without a module with diesel-related questions; and (ii) 5929 jobs with both occupational history and module responses to diesel-relevant questions. For each subset, we varied the numbers of clusters extracted from the cluster tree developed for each model from 100 to 1000 groups of jobs. Using previously made estimates of the probability (ordinal), intensity (µg m−3 respirable elemental carbon), and frequency (hours per week) of occupational exposure to diesel exhaust, we examined the similarity of the exposure estimates for jobs within the same cluster in two ways. First, the clusters’ homogeneity (defined as >75% with the same estimate

  15. [Medical visits before return to work, after a long lasting absence, above 60 days, for injuries or common diseases in a public transport company. Analysis and discussions of utility and consequences in term of evaluation of fitness to specific job].

    PubMed

    Verga, A; Bordini, L; Ricci, M G; Di Lucca, P; Todaro, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opportunity to do medical visits before return to work, after a long continuous absence, above 60 days, for injuries (occupational and non-occupational) or common diseases. We have examined medical records of 403 workers, in 2010 and 2011, occupied in a public transport company, in order to control the following variables: job, age, clinical conditions related to the absences, classification of the absence as injuries or common disease and conclusions about medical fitness to specific job. Our findings have shown an equal percentage of causes of absences in term of injuries or common diseases. The main cause of absence and of non fit to specific job, after medical evaluation, is depending on orthopaedic post-traumatic diseases. This evidence support the importance to do medical visits after long-lasting absence from work, particularly in case of jobs (bus, tram, subway drivers) at risk for other people.

  16. Smad phosphoisoform signals in acute and chronic liver injury: similarities and differences between epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually arises from hepatic fibrosis caused by chronic inflammation. In chronic liver damage, hepatic stellate cells undergo progressive activation to myofibroblasts (MFB), which are important extracellular-matrix-producing mesenchymal cells. Concomitantly, perturbation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling by pro-inflammatory cytokines in the epithelial cells of the liver (hepatocytes) promotes both fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis (fibro-carcinogenesis). Insights into fibro-carcinogenic effects on chronically damaged hepatocytes have come from recent detailed analyses of the TGF-β signaling process. Smad proteins, which convey signals from TGF-β receptors to the nucleus, have intermediate linker regions between conserved Mad homology (MH) 1 and MH2 domains. TGF-β type I receptor and pro-inflammatory cytokine-activated kinases differentially phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 to create phosphoisoforms phosphorylated at the COOH-terminal, linker, or both (L/C) regions. After acute liver injury, TGF-β-mediated pSmad3C signaling terminates hepatocytic proliferation induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated mitogenic pSmad3L pathway; TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines synergistically enhance collagen synthesis by activated hepatic stellate cells via pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C pathways. During chronic liver disease progression, pre-neoplastic hepatocytes persistently affected by TGF-β together with pro-inflammatory cytokines come to exhibit the same carcinogenic (mitogenic) pSmad3L and fibrogenic pSmad2L/C signaling as do MFB, thereby accelerating liver fibrosis while increasing risk of HCC. This review of Smad phosphoisoform-mediated signals examines similarities and differences between epithelial and mesenchymal cells in acute and chronic liver injuries and considers Smad linker phosphorylation as a potential target for the chemoprevention of fibro-carcinogenesis.

  17. Cognitive recovery after severe traumatic brain injury in children/adolescents and adults: similar positive outcome but different underlying pathways?

    PubMed

    Tavano, Alessandro; Galbiati, Susanna; Recla, Monica; Bardoni, Alessandra; Dominici, Chiara; Pastore, Valentina; Strazzer, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Does younger age at the time of severe traumatic brain injury (STBI) protect from cognitive symptoms? To answer this question, the authors compared the neuropsychological profile of late school-age children/adolescents and young adult patients at mid- and long-term recovery periods (6 and 12 months post-STBI). Twenty-eight children/adolescents and 26 clinically matched adults were tested on measures of general intelligence, attention, executive functions, visuoperceptual, visuospatial and visuoconstructive abilities. Coma duration and the post-acute Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were used as predictor variables in a series of regression analyses. Children/adolescents and adults similarly improved on most measures, except for visuospatial and visuoconstructive skills, which worsened in time for children/adolescents. Coma duration significantly predicted performance IQ and visuoperceptual scores in children/adolescents. The GOS score significantly predicted performance and verbal IQ, sustained attention, visuoconstructive and long-term memory skills. Coma duration predicted executive function skills in both age groups. (1) No evidence was found for a neuroprotective effect of younger age at STBI; and (2) Coma duration and GOS score predicted neuropsychological recovery in children/adolescents and adults, respectively. This suggests the existence of underlying age-specific recovery processes after STBI.

  18. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K W

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  19. Spillway-Induced Salmon Head Injury Triggers the Generation of Brain αII-Spectrin Breakdown Product Biomarkers Similar to Mammalian Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario. PMID:19214235

  20. Physical Therapy Activities in Stroke, Knee Arthroplasty, and Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation: Their Variation, Similarities, and Association With Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Putman, Koen; Smout, Randall J.; Horn, Susan D.; Tian, Wenqiang

    2011-01-01

    Background The mix of physical therapy services is thought to be different with different impairment groups. However, it is not clear how much variation there is across impairment groups. Furthermore, the extent to which the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional outcomes across different types of patients is unknown. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine similarities and differences in the mix of physical therapy activities used in rehabilitation among patients from different impairment groups and (2) to examine whether the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional improvement across impairment groups. Design This was a prospective observational cohort study. Methods The study was conducted in inpatient rehabilitation facilities. The participants were 433 patients with stroke, 429 patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and 207 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures used in this study included: (1) the Comprehensive Severity Index to measure the severity of each patient's medical condition, (2) the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) to measure function, and (3) point-of-care instruments to measure time spent in specific physical therapy activities. Results All 3 groups had similar admission motor FIM scores but varying cognitive FIM scores. Patients with TKA spent more time on exercise than the other 2 groups (average=31.7 versus 6.2 minutes per day). Patients with TKA received the most physical therapy (average=65.3 minutes per day), whereas the TBI group received the least physical therapy (average=38.3 minutes per day). Multivariate analysis showed that only 2 physical therapy activities (gait training and community mobility) were both positively associated with discharge motor FIM outcomes across all 3 groups. Three physical therapy activities (assessment time, bed mobility, and transfers) were negatively associated with discharge motor FIM outcome. Limitations The study

  1. DPP-4 Inhibitor and Estrogen Share Similar Efficacy Against Cardiac Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury in Obese-Insulin Resistant and Estrogen-Deprived Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Tanajak, Pongpan; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen deprivation aggravates cardiac injury after myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. Although either estrogen or the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, reduces myocardial damage following cardiac I/R, their effects on the heart in obese-insulin resistant and estrogen deprived conditions remain unknown. Ovariectomized (O) rats (n = 36) were divided to receive either normal diet (NDO) or high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks, followed by treatment with a vehicle, estrogen or vildagliptin for 4 weeks. The setting of in vivo cardiac I/R injury, 30-min ischemia and 120-min reperfusion, was performed. At 12 weeks after ovariectomy, both NDO and HFO rats exhibited an obese-insulin resistant condition. Both NDO and HFO rats treated with estrogen and vildagliptin showed reduced fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA index. Both treatments improved cardiac function indicated by restoration of heart rate variability and increased %left ventricular ejection fraction (%LVEF). The treatments similarly protected cardiac mitochondrial function against I/R injury, leading to a reduction in the infarct size, oxidative stress and apoptosis in the ischemic myocardium. These findings demonstrate that vildagliptin effectively improves metabolic status, and shares similar efficacy to estrogen in reducing myocardial infarction and protecting cardiac mitochondrial function against I/R injury in estrogen-deprived obese-insulin resistant rats. PMID:28281660

  2. WISC-IV Profiles in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: Similarities to and Differences from the WISC-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Daniel N.; Thaler, Nicholas S.; Donohue, Brad; Mayfield, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV; D. Wechsler, 2003a) is often utilized to assess children with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although little information is available regarding its psychometric properties in these children. The current study examined WISC-IV performance in a sample of 61 children with TBI. As…

  3. WISC-IV Profiles in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: Similarities to and Differences from the WISC-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Daniel N.; Thaler, Nicholas S.; Donohue, Brad; Mayfield, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV; D. Wechsler, 2003a) is often utilized to assess children with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although little information is available regarding its psychometric properties in these children. The current study examined WISC-IV performance in a sample of 61 children with TBI. As…

  4. Similar mechanisms of traumatic rectal injuries in patients who had anal sex with animals to those who were butt-fisted by human sexual partner.

    PubMed

    Sendler, Damian Jacob

    2017-10-01

    Sexual pleasure comes in various forms of physical play, for many it involves stimulation of the vagina, while the anus for others; some enjoy both. A recent report by Cappelletti et al.(1) shows a meta-analysis of cases describing anal trauma due to sexual fisting in human partners. This clinical article reports four cases of males diagnosed with zoophilia, and who received anal sex from animals, resulting in injuries. Surgical and psychiatric evaluations are summarized. Unusual etiology of sexual activity with animals caused peri-anal trauma in men who engaged in anal sex with dogs and farm animals. Injuries to patients who receive anal sex from animals are mechanistically similar to fisting-induced rectal damage. Among zoophiles, the mode of harm occurs through blood-engorged, interlocked penis that causes tissue lacerations upon retraction from an anus. In people experimenting with fisting, repetitive stretching within anal canal and of external sphincter causes the internal injuries. The mode of physical stimulation explains the extent of injuries in fisters vs. zoophiles: in fisting, the pressure applied by hand is controllable proximally around and within anal sphincter, while penetration by the animal penis is unpredictable and occurs within the proximal anal canal. Forensically, the findings presented in this article describe a significant mechanism of injury in fisters versus passive zoophiles. These descriptions may aid in clinically differentiating pleasurable and pathological rectal stimulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. A job safety program for construction workers designed to reduce the potential for occupational injury using tool box training sessions and computer-assisted biofeedback stress management techniques.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth A; Ruppe, Joan

    2002-01-01

    This project was conducted with a multicultural construction company in Hawaii, USA. The job duties performed included drywall and carpentry work. The following objectives were selected for this project: (a) fire prevention training and inspection of first aid equipment; (b) blood-borne pathogen training and risk evaluation; (c) ergonomic and risk evaluation intervention program; (d) electrical safety training and inspection program; (e) slips, trips, and falls safety training; (f) stress assessment and Personal Profile System; (g) safety and health program survey; (h) improving employee relations and morale by emphasizing spirituality; and (i) computer-assisted biofeedback stress management training. Results of the project indicated that observed safety hazards, reported injuries, and levels of perceived stress. were reduced for the majority of the population.

  6. WISC-IV profiles in children with traumatic brain injury: similarities to and differences from the WISC-III.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel N; Thaler, Nicholas S; Donohue, Brad; Mayfield, Joan

    2010-03-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV; D. Wechsler, 2003a) is often utilized to assess children with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although little information is available regarding its psychometric properties in these children. The current study examined WISC-IV performance in a sample of 61 children with TBI. As compared to the standardization sample, results indicated that the TBI group exhibited relative deficits on all subtest and index scores, with the greatest deficits on the Processing Speed Index (PSI) and Coding subtest scores. However, the Perceptual Reasoning Index score was not uniquely sensitive to brain injury, and the Cognitive Processing Index score was less sensitive to TBI than the PSI score. Also, the PSI did not uniquely predict learning and memory abilities, as had been reported in previous studies of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III; D. Wechsler, 1991). The present findings indicate substantive differences between the WISC-III and WISC-IV profiles of children with TBI.

  7. Objective Neuropsychological Deficits in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: What Remains Beyond Symptom Similarity?

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, Hélène; Marchand, André; Guay, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study intends to characterize the neuropsychological profile in persons with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using objective measures of cognitive performance. A neuropsychological battery of tests for attention, memory and executive functions was administered to four groups: PTSD (n = 25), mTBI (n = 19), subjects with two formal diagnoses: Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI/PTSD) (n = 6) and controls (n = 25). Confounding variables, such as medical, developmental or neurological antecedents, were controlled and measures of co-morbid conditions, such as depression and anxiety, were considered. The PTSD and mTBI/PTSD groups reported more anxiety and depressive symptoms. They also presented more cognitive deficits than the mTBI group. Since the two PTSD groups differ in severity of PTSD symptoms but not in severity of depression and anxiety symptoms, the PTSD condition could not be considered as the unique factor affecting the results. The findings underline the importance of controlling for confounding medical and psychological co-morbidities in the evaluation and treatment of PTSD populations, especially when a concomitant mTBI is also suspected. PMID:25469837

  8. Difference in protective effects of three structurally similar flavonoid glycosides from Hypericum ascyron against H₂O₂-induced injury in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Mei; Luo, Xue-Gang; Li, Kun; Wang, Nan; Hua, Er-Bin; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-10-01

    According to previous studies, hyperoside possesses myocardial protective effects. To investigate whether isoquercitrin and isohyperoside have similar functions, the protective effects of isoquercitrin and isohyperoside against H2O2‑induced injury in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts were evaluated using a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The mechanism of action was investigated by assessing the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of hyperoside and isoquercitrin‑pretreated H9c2 cardiomyocytes following H2O2‑induced injury, and examining their effects on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The isolation of two flavonoid glycosides from H. ascyron was performed, following extraction, using semi‑preparative high performance liquid chromatography. Using the spectral characteristics, the structures of these compounds were identified as isoquercitrin and isohyperoside. This was the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that isohyperoside has been identified from H. ascyron. The results revealed that isoquercitrin and isohyperoside possessed similar protective effects to hyperoside against H2O2‑induced injury in H9c2 cells. The half maximal inhibitory concentration values of hyperoside, isoquercitrin and isohyperoside were 0.0008, 0.0017 and 0.0002 µM, respectively. Based on these results, isohyperoside possessed more marked protective effects against H2O2‑induced injury in the H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. The significant reduction in LDH leakage, decrease in MDA level and increase in SOD activity also provided evidence of the cardioprotective effects of isoquercitrin and isohyperoside. The present study reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the myocardial protective effects of isoquercitrin and isohyperoside. The mechanism of action may involve protection of the cell membrane from oxidative damage.

  9. Acute Kidney Injury Risk Assessment: Differences and Similarities Between Resource-Limited and Resource-Rich Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Kianoush; Macedo, Etienne; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.; Hooi, Lai Seong; Khullar, Dinesh; Bagga, Arvind; Chakravarthi, Rajasekara; Mehta, Ravindra

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among acutely ill patients is reportedly very high and has vexing consequences on patient outcomes and health care systems. The risks and impact of AKI differ between developed and developing countries. Among developing countries, AKI occurs in young individuals with no or limited comorbidities, and is usually due to environmental causes, including infectious diseases. Although several risk factors have been identified for AKI in different settings, there is limited information on how risk assessment can be used at population and patient levels to improve care in patients with AKI, particularly in developing countries where significant health disparities may exist. The Acute Disease Quality Initiative consensus conference work group addressed the issue of identifying risk factors for AKI and provided recommendations for developing individualized risk stratification strategies to improve care. We proposed a 5-dimension, evidence-based categorization of AKI risk that allows clinicians and investigators to study, define, and implement individualized risk assessment tools for the region or country where they practice. These dimensions include environmental, socioeconomic and cultural factors, processes of care, exposures, and the inherent risks of AKI. We provide examples of these risks and describe approaches for risk assessments in the developing world. We anticipate that these recommendations will be useful for health care providers to plan and execute interventions to limit the impact of AKI on society and each individual patient. Using a modified Delphi process, this group reached consensus regarding several aspects of AKI risk stratification. PMID:28845471

  10. Chronic lung injury risk estimates for urban areas having ozone patterns similar to those in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, M.; Narducci, P.; Whitfield, R.; Richmond, H.M.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the approach and result of an assessment of health risks associated with long-term exposure to ozone. The health endpoint of interest is the probability of formation of mild lesions in the centriacinar region of the lung among children living in New York City. The risk model incorporates an exposure model and a health model. The exposure model is preliminary results of the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model (P-NEM) for ozone, and the health model is the judgments of active researchers about the likelihood of formation of ozone-induced lesions in the human lung. Children and New York City were chosen as the population and city of interest because it is believed that children are more sensitive to ozone than any other group of people, and New York City is more representative of other urban areas than Los Angeles, the other city of which P-NEM exposure results are available. Risk results are presented for ten exposure distributions generated by P-NEM, two air quality scenarios (``as-is`` and ``attainment``), and two exposure periods (1 and 10 ozone seasons). The results vary across experts, are not very sensitive to variations in P-NEM exposure distributions, are lower for attainment conditions than as-is conditions, and are lower for 1 season of exposure than 10 seasons. Although these results are specific to children living in areas having exposure patterns similar to those found in the Northeast, they are fairly representative of results for outdoor workers in the Northeast and Southern California and for children in Southern California. The reason for this is that many experts believe that children and outdoor workers respond in a similar fashion to the given exposure patterns, or that exposure patterns in the Northeast and Southern California are similar. Some experts held both of these beliefs. These results should help policymakers evaluate alternative national ambient air quality standards for ozone. 4 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Chronic lung injury risk estimates for urban areas having ozone patterns similar to those in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, M.; Narducci, P.; Whitfield, R. ); Richmond, H.M. . Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards)

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the approach and result of an assessment of health risks associated with long-term exposure to ozone. The health endpoint of interest is the probability of formation of mild lesions in the centriacinar region of the lung among children living in New York City. The risk model incorporates an exposure model and a health model. The exposure model is preliminary results of the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model (P-NEM) for ozone, and the health model is the judgments of active researchers about the likelihood of formation of ozone-induced lesions in the human lung. Children and New York City were chosen as the population and city of interest because it is believed that children are more sensitive to ozone than any other group of people, and New York City is more representative of other urban areas than Los Angeles, the other city of which P-NEM exposure results are available. Risk results are presented for ten exposure distributions generated by P-NEM, two air quality scenarios ( as-is'' and attainment''), and two exposure periods (1 and 10 ozone seasons). The results vary across experts, are not very sensitive to variations in P-NEM exposure distributions, are lower for attainment conditions than as-is conditions, and are lower for 1 season of exposure than 10 seasons. Although these results are specific to children living in areas having exposure patterns similar to those found in the Northeast, they are fairly representative of results for outdoor workers in the Northeast and Southern California and for children in Southern California. The reason for this is that many experts believe that children and outdoor workers respond in a similar fashion to the given exposure patterns, or that exposure patterns in the Northeast and Southern California are similar. Some experts held both of these beliefs. These results should help policymakers evaluate alternative national ambient air quality standards for ozone. 4 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. World Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amirault, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    Although jobs in international corporations operating in the United States are not substantially different from those of their domestic counterparts, international job opportunities will be greatest for those who have prepared themselves through education, experience, and travel. (Author/JOW)

  13. Job Satisfaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    well include an "overall, global or unidimensional component" (p 184) but that additional specific factors were also evident, ie. "job satisfaction is...between a person’s life style and organisational structure. They hypothesised that job satisfaction may be adversely affected if there is any significant...between job satisfaction and an independent life style, and; thirdly, that "job satisfac- tion is maximispd when the individual places a high value

  14. Job Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsell, Ruth; Thompson, Gretchen

    1979-01-01

    Counselors at the UCLA Placement Center organized the Job Club to develop successful job search techniques with group support, direction, and encouragement. Specific goals were: (a) to provide a forum for sharing; (b) to assist in identifying job-related skills; (c) to provide basic information; (d) to establish guidelines; and (e) assist decision…

  15. Occupational injury risk by sex in a manufacturing cohort

    PubMed Central

    Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Cantley, Linda F; Galusha, Deron; Slade, Martin D; Taiwo, Oyebode A; Cullen, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study expands previous research comparing injury risk for women and men in a cohort of 24 000 US aluminium manufacturing workers in 15 facilities from 2001 to 2010. Methods We compared injury rates (all injury, first aid, medical treatment, restricted work and lost work time) by sex and by job and sex. Using a mixed effect modelling approach, we calculated ORs and 95% CIs adjusting for age, job tenure, ethnicity and year as fixed effects and person, job and plant as random effects. Additionally, we modelled the data stratified by plant type to examine potential differences in injury risk between smelter (generally recognised as more hazardous) and fabrication production environments. Results Risk of injury was higher for women in four out of the five injury outcomes: all injuries combined (OR: 1.58, CI 1.48 to 1.67), injuries requiring first aid (OR: 1.61, CI 1.54 to 1.70), injuries requiring medical treatment (OR: 1.18, CI 1.03 to 1.36) and injuries requiring restricted work (OR: 1.65, CI 1.46 to 1.87). No difference in the risk of lost time injury by sex was found in this cohort. Analyses stratified by plant type showed similarly elevated injury risk for women, although the risk estimates were higher in smelters than fabrication plants. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the largest single-firm study examining injury risk by sex with sufficient data to appropriately adjust for job. We show a consistently higher injury risk for women compared with men in the smelting and fabrication environments. PMID:24924313

  16. Job descriptions and job matching.

    PubMed

    Pirie, Susan

    2004-10-01

    As the date for national roll-out and the implementation for Agenda for Change draws near, many of you will be involved in the job matching process. This is designed to measure your job against a national job profile, thus establishing which pay band you will be placed in and so determining your salary.

  17. Renin-angiotensin system transgenic mouse model recapitulates pathophysiology similar to human preeclampsia with renal injury that may be mediated through VEGF.

    PubMed

    Denney, J Morgan; Bird, Cynthia; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Sampene, Emmanuel; Bird, Ian M; Shah, Dinesh M

    2017-03-01

    Using a transgenic cross, we evaluated features of preeclampsia, renal injury and the sFlt1/VEGF changes. Transgenic hAGT and hREN, or wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6 mice were cross-bred: female hAGT × male hREN for preeclampsia (PRE) model and female WT × male WT for pregnant controls (WTP). Samples were collected for plasma VEGF, sFlt1, and urine albumin. Blood pressures (BP) were monitored by telemetry. Vascular reactivity was investigated by wire myography. Kidneys and placenta were immunostained for sFlt1 and VEGF. Eleven PRE and 9 WTP mice were compared. PRE more frequently demonstrated albuminuria, glomerular endotheliosis (80% vs. 11%; P = 0.02), and placental necrosis (60% vs. 0%; P < 0.01). PRE group demonstrated declining BPs with advancing gestation. Plasma sFlt1 increased across pregnancy in PRE; VEGF did not vary. IHC demonstrated the presence of sFlt1 in glomeruli, lymphatics, and collecting tubules of PRE kidneys, suggesting excretion. VEGF immunostaining was increased specifically in the glomeruli of PRE kidneys. Placenta in PRE showed marked immunostaining for sFlt1. We conclude that this transgenic model of preeclampsia recapitulates human preeclamptic state with high fidelity, and that, vascular adaptation to pregnancy is suggested by declining BPs and reduced vascular response to PE and increased response to acetylcholine. Placental damage with resultant increased release of sFlt1, proteinuria, deficient spiral artery remodeling, and glomerular endotheliosis were observed in this model of PRE. Increased VEGF binding to glomerular endothelial cells in this model of PRE is similar to human PRE and leads us to hypothesize that renal injury in preeclampsia may be mediated through local VEGF. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. 34 CFR 106.55 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 106.55 Section 106.55... Prohibited § 106.55 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  19. 38 CFR 23.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job classification and... Prohibited § 23.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  20. 13 CFR 113.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Job classification and structure... Prohibited § 113.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  1. 13 CFR 113.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Job classification and structure... Prohibited § 113.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  2. 38 CFR 23.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job classification and... Prohibited § 23.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  3. 34 CFR 106.55 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 106.55 Section 106.55... Prohibited § 106.55 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  4. 13 CFR 113.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Job classification and structure... Prohibited § 113.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  5. 34 CFR 106.55 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 106.55 Section 106.55... Prohibited § 106.55 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  6. 34 CFR 106.55 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 106.55 Section 106.55... Prohibited § 106.55 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  7. 13 CFR 113.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Job classification and structure... Prohibited § 113.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  8. 38 CFR 23.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job classification and... Prohibited § 23.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  9. 34 CFR 106.55 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 106.55 Section 106.55... Prohibited § 106.55 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  10. 38 CFR 23.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job classification and... Prohibited § 23.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  11. 38 CFR 23.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job classification and... Prohibited § 23.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  12. 13 CFR 113.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Job classification and structure... Prohibited § 113.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as being for..., seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or job...

  13. Job enrichment in job design.

    PubMed

    Bobeng, B J

    1977-03-01

    For optimal operation in labor-intensive industries, such as foodservice, not only scientific management principles but also behavioral aspects (the people) must be considered in designing job content. Three psychologic states--work that is meaningful, responsibility for outcomes, and knowledge of outcomes--are critical in motivating people. These, in turn encompass the core dimensions of skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy, and feedback. Job enrichment and job enlargement--related but not identical means of expanding job content--when combined, offer the likelihood of redesigned jobs in the core dimensions. Effective implementation of a job enrichment program hinges on diagnosing problems in the work system, actual changes in the work, and systematic evaluation of the changes. The importance of the contribution of the behavioral sciences to management cannot be neglected.

  14. Job Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Rick

    1970-01-01

    Job enrichment means giving people more decision-making power, more responsibility, more grasp of the totality of the job, and a sense of their own importance in the company. This article presents evidence of the successful working of this approach (Donnelly Mirrors), and the lack of success with an opposing approach (General Motors). (NL)

  15. JOB ANALYSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JONES, HAROLD E.

    THE JOB ANALYSES WERE COMPOSED FROM ACTIVITY RECORDS KEPT BY EACH PROFESSIONAL EXTENSION WORKER IN KANSAS. JOB ANALYSES ARE GIVEN FOR THE ADMINISTRATION (DIRECTOR, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, SATE LEADERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS), EXTENSION SPECIALISTS, DISTRICT AGENTS, AND COUNTY EXTENSION AGENTS. DISCUSSION OF…

  16. Malleolar fractures and their ligamentous injury equivalents have similar outcomes in supination-external rotation type IV fractures of the ankle treated by anatomical internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Berkes, M B; Little, M T M; Lazaro, L E; Sculco, P K; Cymerman, R M; Daigl, M; Helfet, D L; Lorich, D G

    2012-11-01

    It has previously been suggested that among unstable ankle fractures, the presence of a malleolar fracture is associated with a worse outcome than a corresponding ligamentous injury. However, previous studies have included heterogeneous groups of injury. The purpose of this study was to determine whether any specific pattern of bony and/or ligamentous injury among a series of supination-external rotation type IV (SER IV) ankle fractures treated with anatomical fixation was associated with a worse outcome. We analysed a prospective cohort of 108 SER IV ankle fractures with a follow-up of one year. Pre-operative radiographs and MRIs were undertaken to characterise precisely the pattern of injury. Operative treatment included fixation of all malleolar fractures. Post-operative CT was used to assess reduction. The primary and secondary outcome measures were the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the range of movement of the ankle. There were no clinically relevant differences between the four possible SER IV fracture pattern groups with regard to the FAOS or range of movement. In this population of strictly defined SER IV ankle injuries, the presence of a malleolar fracture was not associated with a significantly worse clinical outcome than its ligamentous injury counterpart. Other factors inherent to the injury and treatment may play a more important role in predicting outcome.

  17. [Occupational injuries and sickness absence: association with job demand, decision latitude, and life style in 2174 workers in the Veneto Region].

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, G; Mattioli, S; Baldasseroni, A; Bontadi, D; Capodicasa, E; Marzia, Vita; Mazzi, Maddalena; Patané, P; Torri, Paola; Marangi, G; Fadda, Emanuela; Priolo, G; Scoizzato, L; Maier, Elisabetta; Campo, G; Marchiori, L

    2008-01-01

    Stress was the most frequent (26,9%) health problem reported in a survey on the perception of working and health conditions in 5000 workers in the Veneto Region. The aim of the study was to investigate in the Veneto Region the association between occupational stress and events occurred in the previous 12 months: occupational accidents, or sickness absence for 10 or more consecutive days. Perceived occupational stress is correlated, according to Karasek's model, to high job demand (JD) and low decision latitude (DL). Using Karasek's questionnaire (to which questions on smoking and alcohol consumption were added), we examined 2174 subjects working in 30 companies with between 10 and 500 employees, who belonged to the occupational categories of industry and services that are more prevalent in the Veneto Region. The questionnaire was administered by the occupational physician during health surveillance. The subjects were classified on the basis of current exposure to psychosocial factors or, for subjects reporting an event, their exposure at that time. We identified the tertiles of JD and DL; data were submitted to the analysis of multiple logistic regression, estimating odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The population attributable risk (PAR) was calculated using the formula (pc (OR-1)/OR), where pc is the fraction of exposed cases. An elevated risk of occupational accidents was found in subjects with regular consumption of alcohol (OR = 2.0; IC = 1.2-3.5), in smokers smoking 10-20 (2.3; 1.3-3.8) or >20 cigarettes/day (3.8; 1.8-7.9), in the highest tertile of JD (2.29; 1.35-3.89) and in the lowest tertile of DL (1.6; 1.0-2.6). PAR was 37.6% for occupational factors (high JD and low DL), 44.5%for non-occupational factors (cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption), and 82.1% overall. The risk of sickness absence increased in subjects smoking 10-20 cigarettes (1.63 = 1.1-2.40), in the highest tertile of JD (1.5; 1.0-2.2) and in the lowest tertile of DL (1

  18. A registry-based case-control study of risk factors for the development of multiple non-fatal injuries on the job.

    PubMed

    Li, C Y; Du, C L; Chen, C J; Sung, F C

    1999-07-01

    Using compensation records of Taiwan, we conducted a case-control study nested within a cohort of 77,846 active workers who experienced at least one incidence of non-fatal work-related injury between 1994 and 1996 in order to explore factors associated with risk of sustaining multiple non-fatal injuries in the workplace. Cases (n = 2,616) were workers with more than three incidences of non-fatal injury during the study period and controls (n = 3,974) were randomly sampled from workers who experienced only one incidence of non-fatal injury during the same period. Compared with construction workers, workers employed in mining and quarrying (OR = 2.7), manufacturing (OR = 1.2), commerce (OR = 1.6), transport, storage and communication (OR = 1.3) and social, personal and community service (OR = 1.4) were all at significantly elevated risk of multiple non-fatal injuries. Both age and wage showed a significant dose-response effect on the risk of developing multiple non-fatal injuries. The preliminary analysis suggests that workers in certain industries are at significantly elevated risks of multiple work-related non-fatal injuries, in particular those in the mining and quarry industries. Additionally, further preventive measures should be aimed at protecting older workers from such injuries and further studies would help provide more specific interpretations on the positive association between higher wage earning and risk of multiple non-fatal injuries.

  19. Job Task Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC.

    This publication consists of job task analyses for jobs in textile manufacturing. Information provided for each job in the greige and finishing plants includes job title, job purpose, and job duties with related educational objectives, curriculum, assessment, and outcome. These job titles are included: yarn manufacturing head overhauler, yarn…

  20. Your Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torre, Liz; And Others

    Information and accompanying exercises are provided in this learning module to reinforce basic reading, writing, and math skills and, at the same time, introduce personal assessment and job-seeking techniques. The module's first section provides suggestions for assessing personal interests and identifying the assets one has to offer an employer.…

  1. Your Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torre, Liz; And Others

    Information and accompanying exercises are provided in this learning module to reinforce basic reading, writing, and math skills and, at the same time, introduce personal assessment and job-seeking techniques. The module's first section provides suggestions for assessing personal interests and identifying the assets one has to offer an employer.…

  2. Job Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angerer, John M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an overview of job burnout, discusses the pioneering research and current theories of the burnout construct, along with the history of the main burnout assessment--the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Concludes that an understanding of the interaction between employee and his or her environment is critical for grasping the origin of burnout.…

  3. Space Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Herman J.; And Others

    This booklet, intended for children in grades K-3 as "vocational guidance in a space age," should be read to the child in early school years at an appropriate time. The booklet is divided into five chapters and a summary. Topics discussed concern space workers, space travelers, jobs in space, spaceships, and preparing for a career in space…

  4. Job Ready.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults of Washington, Seattle.

    Intended for use by employers for assessing how "job-ready" their particular business environment may be, the booklet provides information illustrating what physical changes could be made to allow persons with mobility limitations to enter and conduct business independently in a particular building. Illustrations along with brief explanations are…

  5. Job Olympics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerweck, Debra R.; Chauza, Phyllis J.

    This document consists of materials on Hiawatha (Kansas) High School's 1993 Job Olympics, a competition for high school students with disabilities. The materials are those included in a packet for student participants. A cover/information sheet details eligibility, entry deadline, date and place of competition, opening ceremonies, events, and a…

  6. 41 CFR 60-2.12 - Job group analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employed. (b) In the job group analysis, jobs at the establishment with similar content, wage rates, and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Job group analysis. 60-2... 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose and Contents of Affirmative Action Programs § 60-2.12 Job...

  7. 45 CFR 2555.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Job classification and structure. 2555.520 Section... Activities Prohibited § 2555.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  8. 32 CFR 196.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 196.520... Activities Prohibited § 196.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  9. 32 CFR 196.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 196.520... Activities Prohibited § 196.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  10. 32 CFR 196.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 196.520... Activities Prohibited § 196.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  11. 36 CFR 1211.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job classification and... Activities Prohibited § 1211.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  12. 45 CFR 2555.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Job classification and structure. 2555.520 Section... Activities Prohibited § 2555.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  13. 36 CFR 1211.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Job classification and... Activities Prohibited § 1211.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  14. 45 CFR 2555.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Job classification and structure. 2555.520 Section... Activities Prohibited § 2555.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  15. 32 CFR 196.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 196.520... Activities Prohibited § 196.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  16. 24 CFR 3.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Job classification and structure. 3... Activities Prohibited § 3.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  17. 45 CFR 2555.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Job classification and structure. 2555.520 Section... Activities Prohibited § 2555.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  18. 24 CFR 3.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Job classification and structure. 3... Activities Prohibited § 3.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  19. 36 CFR 1211.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job classification and... Activities Prohibited § 1211.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  20. 45 CFR 2555.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Job classification and structure. 2555.520 Section... Activities Prohibited § 2555.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  1. 24 CFR 3.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Job classification and structure. 3... Activities Prohibited § 3.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  2. 24 CFR 3.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Job classification and structure. 3... Activities Prohibited § 3.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  3. 32 CFR 196.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job classification and structure. 196.520... Activities Prohibited § 196.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  4. 36 CFR 1211.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job classification and... Activities Prohibited § 1211.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  5. 24 CFR 3.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Job classification and structure. 3... Activities Prohibited § 3.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job as... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  6. 36 CFR 1211.520 - Job classification and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job classification and... Activities Prohibited § 1211.520 Job classification and structure. A recipient shall not: (a) Classify a job... progression, seniority systems, career ladders, or tenure systems for similar jobs, position descriptions, or...

  7. Job Clusters as Perceived by High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivekananthan, Pathe S.; Weber, Larry J.

    Career awareness is described as the manner by which students cluster jobs. The clustering of jobs was based on the students perceptions of similarities among job titles. Interest inventories were used as the bases to select 36 job titles. Seventy-eight high school students sorted the stimuli into several categories. The multidimensional scaling…

  8. Job Readiness Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesolowski, Dennis G.

    Designed for professionals in rehabilitation settings, this curriculum guide presents fifteen lessons that focus on preparing to seek a job, job seeking, and job maintenance. Among the lesson titles included in the guide are (1) How to Find the Right Job and Categories of Jobs, (2) Self-Expressed Interests and Attitudes for Specific Jobs, (3)…

  9. Molecular similarity and property similarity.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Frédérique; Horvath, Dragos

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the main efforts undertaken up to date in order to understand, rationalize and apply the similarity principle (similar compounds=>similar properties) as a computational tool in modern drug discovery. The best suited mathematical expression of this classical working hypothesis of medicinal chemistry needs to be carefully chosen (out of the virtually infinite possible implementations in terms of molecular descriptors and molecular similarity metrics), in order to achieve an optimal validation of the hypothesis that molecules that are neighbors in the Structural Space will also display similar properties. This overview will show why no single "absolute" measure of molecular similarity can be conceived, and why molecular similarity scores should be considered tunable tools that need to be adapted to each problem to solve.

  10. Determinants of Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intent in Home Health Workers: The Role of Job Demands and Resources.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yuri; Lee, Ahyoung A; Zadrozny, Michelle; Bae, Sung-Heui; Kim, Miyong T; Marti, Nathan C

    2017-01-01

    Based on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, this study explored the impact of job demands (physical injury and racial/ethnic discrimination) and resources (self-confidence in job performance and recognition by supervisor/organization/society) on home health workers' employee outcomes (job satisfaction and turnover intent). Using data from the National Home Health Aide Survey (N = 3,354), multivariate models of job satisfaction and turnover intent were explored. In both models, the negative impact of demands (physical injury and racial/ethnic discrimination) and the positive impact of resources (self-confidence in job performance and recognition by supervisor and organization) were observed. The overall findings suggest that physical injury and discrimination should be prioritized in prevention and intervention efforts to improve home health workers' safety and well-being. Attention also needs to be paid to ways to bolster work-related efficacy and to promote an organizational culture of appreciation and respect.

  11. Similar to Spironolactone, Oxymatrine Is Protective in Aldosterone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Injury via Inhibition of Calpain and Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yan; Bai, Cong-Hui; Shen, Xiang-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that oxymatrine (OMT) possesses variously pharmacological properties, especially on the cardiovascular system. We previously demonstrated that activated calpain/apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-mediated pathway was the key molecular mechanism in aldosterone (ALD) induces cardiomyocytes apoptosis. In the present study, we extended the experimentation by investigating the effect of OMT on cardiomyocytes exposed to ALD, as compared to spironolactone (Spiro), a classical ALD receptor antagonist. Cardiomyocytes were pre-incubated with OMT, Spiro or vehicle for 1 h, and then, cardiomyocytes were exposed to ALD 24 h. The cell injury was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage ratio. Apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, annexin V/PI staining, and relative caspase-3 activity assay. Furthermore, expression of pro-apoptotic proteins including truncated Bid (tBid), calpain and AIF were evaluated by western blot analysis. ALD stimulation increased cardiomyocytes apoptosis, caspase-3 activity and protein expression of calpain, tBid and AIF in the cytosol (p<0.05). Pre-incubated with cardiomyocytes injury and increased caspase-3 activity were significantly attenuated (p<0.05). Furthermore, OMT suppressed ALD-induced high expression of calpain and AIF. And these effects of OMT could be comparable to Spiro. These findings indicated that OMT might be a potential cardioprotective-agent against excessive ALD-induced cardiotoxicity, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of calpain/AIF signaling. PMID:24551180

  12. It's My Job: Job Descriptions for Over 30 Camp Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Edie

    This book was created to assist youth-camp directors define their camp jobs to improve employee performance assessment, training, and hiring. The book, aimed at clarifying issues in fair-hiring practices required by the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), includes the descriptions of 31 jobs. Each description includes the job's minimum…

  13. It's My Job: Job Descriptions for Over 30 Camp Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Edie

    This book was created to assist youth-camp directors define their camp jobs to improve employee performance assessment, training, and hiring. The book, aimed at clarifying issues in fair-hiring practices required by the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), includes the descriptions of 31 jobs. Each description includes the job's minimum…

  14. Do Immigrants Work In Riskier Jobs?

    PubMed Central

    ORRENIUS, PIA M.; ZAVODNY, MADELINE

    2009-01-01

    Recent media and government reports suggest that immigrants are more likely to hold jobs with poor working conditions than U.S.-born workers, perhaps because immigrants work in jobs that “natives don’t want.” Despite this widespread view, earlier studies have not found immigrants to be in riskier jobs than natives. This study combines individual-level data from the 2003–2005 American Community Survey with Bureau of Labor Statistics data on work-related injuries and fatalities to take a fresh look at whether foreign-born workers are employed in more dangerous jobs. The results indicate that immigrants are in fact more likely to work in risky jobs than U.S.-born workers, partly due to differences in average characteristics, such as immigrants’ lower English-language ability and educational attainment. PMID:19771943

  15. Do immigrants work in riskier jobs?

    PubMed

    Orrenius, Pia M; Zavodny, Madeline

    2009-08-01

    Recent media and government reports suggest that immigrants are more likely to hold jobs with poor working conditions than U.S.-born workers, perhaps because immigrants work in jobs that "natives don't want." Despite this widespread view, earlier studies have not found immigrants to be in riskier jobs than natives. This study combines individual-level data from the 2003-2005 American Community Survey with Bureau of Labor Statistics data on work-related injuries and fatalities to take afresh look at whether foreign-born workers are employed in more dangerous jobs. The results indicate that immigrants are in fact more likely to work in risky jobs than U.S.-born workers, partly due to differences in average characteristics, such as immigrants' lower English-language ability and educational attainment.

  16. Arm Crank and Wheelchair Ergometry Produce Similar Peak Oxygen Uptake but Different Work Economy Values in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Helgerud, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To study whether values for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and work economy (WE) at a standardized workload are different when tested by arm crank ergometry (ACE) and wheelchair ergometry (WCE). Methods. Twelve paraplegic men with spinal cord injury (SCI) in stable neurological condition participated in this cross-sectional repeated-measures study. We determined VO2peak and peak power output (POpeak) values during ACE and WCE in a work-matched protocol. Work economy was tested at a standardized workload of 30 Watts (W) for both ACE and WCE. Results. There were no significant differences in VO2peak (mL·kg−1·min−1) between ACE (27.3 ± 3.2) and WCE (27.4 ± 3.8) trials, and a Bland-Altman plot shows that findings are within 95% level of agreement. WE or oxygen consumption at 30 W (VO2-30W) was significantly lower during WCE compared to ACE (P < 0.039). Mean (95% CI) POpeak (W) were 130 (111–138) and 100 (83–110) during ACE and WCE, respectively. Conclusion. The findings in the present study support the use of both ACE and WCE for testing peak oxygen uptake. However, WE differed between the two test modalities, meaning that less total energy is used to perform external work of 30 W during wheelchair exercise when using this WCE (VP100 Handisport ergometer). Clinical Trials Protocol Record is NCT00987155/4.2007.2271. PMID:27144169

  17. Job burnout.

    PubMed

    Maslach, C; Schaufeli, W B; Leiter, M P

    2001-01-01

    Burnout is a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job, and is defined by the three dimensions of exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy. The past 25 years of research has established the complexity of the construct, and places the individual stress experience within a larger organizational context of people's relation to their work. Recently, the work on burnout has expanded internationally and has led to new conceptual models. The focus on engagement, the positive antithesis of burnout, promises to yield new perspectives on interventions to alleviate burnout. The social focus of burnout, the solid research basis concerning the syndrome, and its specific ties to the work domain make a distinct and valuable contribution to people's health and well-being.

  18. Characteristics of job rotation in the Midwest US manufacturing sector.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Michael; Davis, Kermit; Kotowski, Susan; Aedla, Pranathi; Dunning, Kari

    2005-12-15

    Job rotation has been advocated as a suitable intervention to control work-related musculoskeletal disorders. However, little is known regarding the prevalence of job rotation, methods used to identify jobs for rotation or the benefits or limitations of job rotation. A web-based questionnaire was developed to survey job rotation practices from Midwest US manufacturing companies. Results indicated that 42.7% of the companies contacted used job rotation, where the median time for which they had used job rotation was 5 years. Job rotation was used mainly to reduce exposure to risk factors for work-related injuries and to reduce work related injuries, whereas supervisor decisions and ergonomic analyses were used to select jobs for the rotation scheme. Major limitations to successful implementation of job rotation included rotation of individuals with medical restrictions, decreased product quality and lack of jobs to rotate to. These findings suggest that further study is needed to determine if exposure to risk factors is reduced through current efforts.

  19. Associations of Individual-Related and Job-Related Risk Factors with Nonfatal Occupational Injury in the Coal Workers of Shanxi Province: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Nan; Wang, Cong; Wang, Tong; Huang, Jian-Jun; Sun, Chen-Ming; Liang, Jie; Liu, Xiao-Meng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationships between the risk factors and the incidence of nonfatal occupational injury of coal mine workers of Shanxi Province. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from July 2013 to December 2013, and 4319 workers were recruited from more than 200,000 coal mine employees who are exposed to continuous potential risk of occupational injuries by using a two-stage stratified cluster sampling method. Trained interviewers having necessary medical knowledge conducted face-to-face interviews with the participants. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI). Results A total number of 3618 effective respondents were got from 4319 participants (83.77%) and the mean age of the participants was 41.5 years with the standard deviation of 8.65. Significant crude odds ratios were observed for all factors considered except for marital status, education, work duration, BMI, EPQ-RSC(P) scale and EPQ-RSC(L) scale. Results from multivariable logistic regression model showed significant adjusted odds ratios for risk factors including gender (female vs male 0.275, 0.094–0.800), age (≥55 vs ≤25yr 0.169, 0.032–0.900), work type (light physical labor vs heavy physical labor 0.504, 0.328–0.774), workplace (underground auxiliary vs underground front-line 0.595, 0.385–0.919), length of shiftwork experience (0~5yr vs no shift 2.075, 1.287–3.344 and ≥15yr vs no shift 2.076, 1.230–3.504) and EPQ-RSC(E) score (extraversion vs introversion 0.538, 0.334–0.867). Conclusions Several risk factors of nonfatal occupational injury were identified including male, age, heavy physical labor, underground front-line, length of shiftwork experience and introversion. The coal mining enterprises should pay attention to controlling the hazards associated with frontline physical work. Workers’ behaviors, life styles and personality traits should also be considered, so

  20. Job demands, job resources and safety outcomes: The roles of emotional exhaustion and safety compliance.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Jiang, Li; Yao, Xiang; Li, YongJuan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model in explaining the relationship of job demands and resources with safety outcomes (i.e., workplace injuries and near-misses). We collected self-reported data from 670 crude oil production workers from three sub-companies of a major oilfield company in China. The results of a structural equation analysis indicated that job demands (psychological and physical demands) and job resources (decision latitude, supervisor support and coworker support) could affect emotional exhaustion and safety compliance, and thus influence the occurrence of injuries and near-misses. The implications of the present findings regarding both the JD-R model and occupational safety research were discussed.

  1. Get a job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    At AGU's 1996 Fall Meeting, a record number of jobs were advertised through the AGU Job Center. Approximately 150 employers advertised 164 jobs at the meeting in San Francisco, while 302 applicants used the center's services and about 50 sat for on-site interviews. At the 1995 Fall Meeting, the Job Center attracted 87 employers and 230 applicants.

  2. Retention in the United States Job Corps: Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Kenneth R.; Forke, Christine M.; Kinsman, Sara B.; Fleegler, Eric; Grimes, Eric K.; Rosenbloom, Tamar; Schneider, John S.; Schwarz, Donald F.; Cnaan, Avital; Zhao, Huaqing; Cohen, Brian M.; Gibbs, Kathleen P.

    A project used a mixed quantitative-qualitative approach, drawing from the Job Corps database and site visits at five sites, to generate knowledge that can guide policymakers and program planners as they act to increase retention in the Job Corps or similar programs. Quantitative data on 343,097 students who enrolled in Job Corps between July 1993…

  3. 32 CFR 1656.11 - Job performance standards and sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job performance standards and sanctions. 1656.11... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.11 Job performance standards and sanctions. (a) Standards of Performance. An ASW is... employer of his other employees in similar jobs. If there are no other employees, the standards shall...

  4. 32 CFR 1656.11 - Job performance standards and sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job performance standards and sanctions. 1656.11... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.11 Job performance standards and sanctions. (a) Standards of Performance. An ASW is... employer of his other employees in similar jobs. If there are no other employees, the standards shall...

  5. 32 CFR 1656.11 - Job performance standards and sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job performance standards and sanctions. 1656.11... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.11 Job performance standards and sanctions. (a) Standards of Performance. An ASW is... employer of his other employees in similar jobs. If there are no other employees, the standards shall...

  6. 32 CFR 1656.11 - Job performance standards and sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job performance standards and sanctions. 1656.11... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.11 Job performance standards and sanctions. (a) Standards of Performance. An ASW is... employer of his other employees in similar jobs. If there are no other employees, the standards shall...

  7. 32 CFR 1656.11 - Job performance standards and sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job performance standards and sanctions. 1656.11... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.11 Job performance standards and sanctions. (a) Standards of Performance. An ASW is... employer of his other employees in similar jobs. If there are no other employees, the standards shall...

  8. Chronic Conditions, Workplace Safety, And Job Demands Contribute To Absenteeism And Job Performance.

    PubMed

    Jinnett, Kimberly; Schwatka, Natalie; Tenney, Liliana; Brockbank, Claire V S; Newman, Lee S

    2017-02-01

    An aging workforce, increased prevalence of chronic health conditions, and the potential for longer working lives have both societal and economic implications. We analyzed the combined impact of workplace safety, employee health, and job demands (work task difficulty) on worker absence and job performance. The study sample consisted of 16,926 employees who participated in a worksite wellness program offered by a workers' compensation insurer to their employers-314 large, midsize, and small businesses in Colorado across multiple industries. We found that both workplace safety and employees' chronic health conditions contributed to absenteeism and job performance, but their impact was influenced by the physical and cognitive difficulty of the job. If employers want to reduce health-related productivity losses, they should take an integrated approach to mitigate job-related injuries, promote employee health, and improve the fit between a worker's duties and abilities.

  9. Farm work practices and farm injuries in Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Stallones, L; Beseler, C

    2003-01-01

    Study objectives: To describe the farm work patterns and the relationship between hours spent working on specific farm tasks and task specific work related injuries among women and men. Design: A cross sectional survey of farm operators and their spouses in an eight county area of Colorado was conducted. Personal interviews were conducted between 1993 and 1997. Interviews took between 45 minutes to two hours to complete, depending on the complexity of individuals' personal histories. Farms were selected using stratified random sampling technique. Setting: Eight counties in Northeastern Colorado representing 47% of agricultural production in the state. Participants: A total of 301 women and 459 men who were farm residents and involved in farm work were recruited. Outcome measure: Self reported injuries resulting in medical attention or treatment other than first aid, or inability to do normal work activities, or loss of consciousness, or transfer to another job were assessed in relationship to the specific job task being performed at the time of the injury. Results: Women were at higher risk for injury than men when involved with other farm chores (rate ratio 8.18). For all other task related injuries, men and women were at similar risk when compared using hours of exposure to the farm tasks. Conclusion: Farm safety training and injury prevention programs need to include women working on farms. PMID:12966013

  10. Jobs in Construction. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The booklet describes jobs in the construction industry under the classifications of public and private building. Separate chapters discuss the process of building a city hospital, a model home, and a State highway. Chapters outline miscellaneous jobs in the industry such as elevator constructors, lathers, plasterers, roofers, and sheet metal…

  11. Measuring Job Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Thomas; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses issues in measuring job security and presents a comparison of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the Current Population Survey on job tenure and contingent employment. (SK)

  12. Measuring Job Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Thomas; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses issues in measuring job security and presents a comparison of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the Current Population Survey on job tenure and contingent employment. (SK)

  13. Job and Task Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Morris, Johnnye M.

    1972-01-01

    Job and task analyses for bus boy, short order cook, and child care aide; also contains a career ladder for a child care center and proposed course of study and job analysis form for child care aide. (SB)

  14. GMAG Jobs Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This event is open to the members of the magnetism community, especially postdocs and students, who are interested in jobs in industry, national labs, and academia, or have a job opportunity to offer. Refreshments will be served

  15. Job Search Activity Patterns of Successful and Unsuccessful Job Seekers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjos, Diane L.

    1988-01-01

    Unemployed job seekers indicated resources they were using in their job search. Ninety days later, job seekers (N=178) who had found employment did not report using significantly more resources in their job search activities than did unsuccessful job seekers (N=636). Primary difference between successful and unsuccessful job seekers seemed to be…

  16. Factors affecting allied health faculty job satisfaction: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Romig, Barbara; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Denmark, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests job satisfaction can make a difference in keeping qualified workers on the job, but little research has been conducted focusing specifically on allied health faculty. In order to attract and retain top quality faculty, colleges and universities should understand the variables impacting faculty satisfaction and develop a plan to enhance satisfaction. An integrative literature review (CINHAL, ERIC, Journal of Allied Health, Chronicle of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and current books on job satisfaction) of faculty job satisfaction and dissatisfaction produced a variety of publications presenting the key determinants of job satisfaction by allied health faculty in the United States. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the various factors that influence job satisfaction, especially by allied health faculty, in institutions of higher education in the U.S. The procedure used for this analysis consisted of reviewing allied health and higher education faculty studies to identify factors influencing job satisfaction, research questions, sample size reported, instruments used for measurement of job satisfaction, and job satisfaction results. While the theoretical models of allied health and higher education faculty job satisfaction exist separately in the literature, their remarkable similarities permit the prospect of a contemporary framework of the essential components of job satisfaction. Potential opportunities for continuing research on the personal and professional variables impacting job satisfaction of allied health faculty and similar disciplines are presented.

  17. The Promise of JOBS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Newsletter for the Business & Literacy Communities, 1992

    1992-01-01

    About 2 years after enactment of the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) Program, the Southport Institute for Policy Analysis began a 2-year study of how extensively JOBS was being implemented at the state level, in what manner, and with what results. The study included four elements: literature review, interviews and consultations with…

  18. Get a Job!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, John V.

    1976-01-01

    To help an industrial arts educator find a job, the author proposes some questions job-seekers should ask themselves and makes suggestions regarding the resume, sources of information about job vacancies, the interview, and information that should be found out before an offer is accepted. (AJ)

  19. Creating Motivating Job Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilaro, Angie; Rossett, Allison

    1993-01-01

    Explains how to create job aids that employees will be motivated to use, based on a review of pertinent literature and interviews with professionals. Topics addressed include linking motivation with job aids; Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, Satisfaction) model of motivation; and design strategies for job aids based on Keller's…

  20. Replacing America's Job Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  1. Creating Motivating Job Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilaro, Angie; Rossett, Allison

    1993-01-01

    Explains how to create job aids that employees will be motivated to use, based on a review of pertinent literature and interviews with professionals. Topics addressed include linking motivation with job aids; Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, Satisfaction) model of motivation; and design strategies for job aids based on Keller's…

  2. Replacing America's Job Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  3. Job conditions, job satisfaction, somatic complaints and burnout among East African nurses.

    PubMed

    van der Doef, Margot; Mbazzi, Femke Bannink; Verhoeven, Chris

    2012-06-01

    To describe job conditions, job satisfaction, somatic complaints and burnout of female East African nurses working in public and private hospitals and to determine how these well-being outcomes are associated with job conditions. Insight into job conditions, health and well-being status and their interrelation is virtually lacking for East African nurses. Cross-sectional survey of 309 female nurses in private and public hospitals in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Nurses completed a survey assessing job conditions and job satisfaction (the Leiden Quality of Work Life Questionnaire-nurses version), somatic complaints (subscale of the Symptom CheckList) and burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory). The East African nurses show high levels of somatic complaints, and nearly one-third of the sample would be labelled as burned out. In comparison with a Western European nurses reference group, the nurses score unfavourably on job conditions that require financial investment (e.g. workload, staffing, equipment and materials). On aspects related to the social climate (e.g. decision latitude, cooperation), however, they score more favourably. In comparison with private hospital nurses, public hospital nurses score similarly on aspects related to the social climate, but worse on the other job conditions. Public hospital nurses have a lower job satisfaction than private hospital nurses, but show comparable levels of somatic complaints and burnout. Strongest correlates of low job satisfaction are low supervisor support and low financial reward. Burnout is mainly associated with high workload and inadequate information provision, whereas somatic complaints are associated with demanding physical working conditions. Improvement in job conditions may reduce the high levels of burnout and somatic complaints and enhance job satisfaction in East African nurses. Efforts and investments should be made to improve the job conditions in East African nurses as they are key persons in the delivery of

  4. Workplace threats to health and job turnover among women workers.

    PubMed

    Gucer, Patricia W; Oliver, Marc; McDiarmid, Melissa

    2003-07-01

    Is job turnover related to concern about workplace health risks? Using data from a national sample of working women, we examined the relationships among workplace risk communications, worker concerns about workplace threats from hazardous substances, indoor air quality, and job change. Eight percent reported changing a job as a result of concern over workplace threats to health. Previous workplace injury predicted concern about hazardous materials and indoor air quality as well as job change, but employer communication about workplace health risks was associated with less job change and less concern about indoor air quality. Women worry about workplace threats to their health enough to change their jobs, but employers may have the power to cut turnover costs and reduce disruption to workers' lives through the use of risk communication programs.

  5. Acute work injuries among electric utility meter readers.

    PubMed

    Sahl, J D; Kelsh, M A; Haines, K D; Sands, F K; Kraus, J

    1997-05-01

    This report provides estimates of incidence rates for acute work injuries for a well defined cohort of electric utility meter readers. Specifically, person-time rates by sex, age, and job experience are evaluated by part of body injured and type of injury. Meter readers experienced 731 acute lost time [11.1 per 100 person-work years; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.3-11.9] and 4,401 acute non-lost time (66.5 per 100 person-work years; 95% CI = 64.6-68.5) work injuries over the study period, 1980-1992. Women had nearly twice the lost time injury rate as men (17.5 vs 9.6 per 100 person-work years). There is an inverse relation between job experience and both lost time and non-lost time injuries. Although these data are limited to the electric utility industry, they may be relevant to occupations with similar tasks and environments, including residential gas and water supply industry meter readers and postal carriers.

  6. A grid job monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, Catalin; Nowack, Andreas; Padhi, Sanjay; Sarkar, Subir; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based Job Monitoring framework for individual Grid sites that allows users to follow in detail their jobs in quasi-real time. The framework consists of several independent components: (a) a set of sensors that run on the site CE and worker nodes and update a database, (b) a simple yet extensible web services framework and (c) an Ajax powered web interface having a look-and-feel and control similar to a desktop application. The monitoring framework supports LSF, Condor and PBS-like batch systems. This is one of the first monitoring systems where an X.509 authenticated web interface can be seamlessly accessed by both end-users and site administrators. While a site administrator has access to all the possible information, a user can only view the jobs for the Virtual Organizations (VO) he/she is a part of. The monitoring framework design supports several possible deployment scenarios. For a site running a supported batch system, the system may be deployed as a whole, or existing site sensors can be adapted and reused with the web services components. A site may even prefer to build the web server independently and choose to use only the Ajax powered web interface. Finally, the system is being used to monitor a glideinWMS instance. This broadens the scope significantly, allowing it to monitor jobs over multiple sites.

  7. A Grid job monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Catalin; Nowack, Andreas; Padhi, Sanjay; Sarkar, Subir

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a web-based Job Monitoring framework for individual Grid sites that allows users to follow in detail their jobs in quasi-real time. The framework consists of several independent components : (a) a set of sensors that run on the site CE and worker nodes and update a database, (b) a simple yet extensible web services framework and (c) an Ajax powered web interface having a look-and-feel and control similar to a desktop application. The monitoring framework supports LSF, Condor and PBS-like batch systems. This is one of the first monitoring systems where an X.509 authenticated web interface can be seamlessly accessed by both end-users and site administrators. While a site administrator has access to all the possible information, a user can only view the jobs for the Virtual Organizations (VO) he/she is a part of. The monitoring framework design supports several possible deployment scenarios. For a site running a supported batch system, the system may be deployed as a whole, or existing site sensors can be adapted and reused with the web services components. A site may even prefer to build the web server independently and choose to use only the Ajax powered web interface. Finally, the system is being used to monitor a glideinWMS instance. This broadens the scope significantly, allowing it to monitor jobs over multiple sites.

  8. Estimating job runtime for CMS analysis jobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfiligoi, I.

    2014-06-01

    The basic premise of pilot systems is to create an overlay scheduling system on top of leased resources. And by definition, leases have a limited lifetime, so any job that is scheduled on such resources must finish before the lease is over, or it will be killed and all the computation is wasted. In order to effectively schedule jobs to resources, the pilot system thus requires the expected runtime of the users' jobs. Past studies have shown that relying on user provided estimates is not a valid strategy, so the system should try to make an estimate by itself. This paper provides a study of the historical data obtained from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's Analysis Operations submission system. Clear patterns are observed, suggesting that making prediction of an expected job lifetime range is achievable with high confidence level in this environment.

  9. Rhein and rhubarb similarly protect the blood-brain barrier after experimental traumatic brain injury via gp91phox subunit of NADPH oxidase/ROS/ERK/MMP-9 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Fan, Xuegong; Tang, Tao; Fan, Rong; Zhang, Chunhu; Huang, Zebing; Peng, Weijun; Gan, Pingping; Xiong, Xingui; Huang, Wei; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress chiefly contributes to the disruption of the BBB following traumatic brain injury (TBI). The Chinese herbal medicine rhubarb is a promising antioxidant in treating TBI. Here we performed in vivo and in vitro experiments to determine whether rhubarb and its absorbed bioactive compound protected the BBB after TBI by increasing ZO-1 expression through inhibition of gp91phox subunit of NADPH oxidase/ROS/ERK/MMP-9 pathway. Rats were subjected to the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model, and primary rat cortical astrocytes were exposed to scratch-wound model. The liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method showed that rhein was the compound absorbed in the brains of CCI rats after rhubarb administration. The wet-dry weights and Evans blue measurements revealed that rhubarb and rhein ameliorated BBB damage and brain edema in CCI rats. Western blots showed that rhubarb and rhein downregulated GFAP in vitro. RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, Western blot and dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate analysis indicated that rhubarb prevented activation of gp91phox subunit of NADPH oxidase induced ROS production, subsequently inhibited ERK/MMP-9 pathway in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, rhein and rhubarb similarly protected the BBB by inhibiting this signaling cascade. The results provide a novel herbal medicine to protect BBB following TBI via an antioxidative molecular mechanism. PMID:27901023

  10. Job satisfaction trends during nurses' early career

    PubMed Central

    Murrells, Trevor; Robinson, Sarah; Griffiths, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction is an important component of nurses' lives that can impact on patient safety, productivity and performance, quality of care, retention and turnover, commitment to the organisation and the profession. Little is known about job satisfaction in early career and how it varies for different groups of nurses. This paper investigates how the components of job satisfaction vary during early career in newly qualified UK nurses. Methods Nurses were sampled using a combined census and multi-stage approach (n = 3962). Data were collected by questionnaire at 6 months, 18 months and 3 years after qualification between 1998 and 2001. Scores were calculated for seven job satisfaction components and a single item that measured satisfaction with pay. Scores were compared longitudinally and between nursing speciality (general, children's, mental health) using a mixed model approach. Results No single pattern across time emerged. Trends varied by branch and job satisfaction component. Rank order of job satisfaction components, from high to low scores, was very similar for adult and child branch nurses and different for mental health. Nurses were least satisfied with pay and most satisfied with relationships at 6 and 18 months and with resources (adult and child) and relationships (mental health) at 3 years. Trends were typically upwards for adult branch nurses, varied for children's nurses and downwards for mental health nurses. Conclusion The impact of time on job satisfaction in early career is highly dependent on specialism. Different contexts, settings and organisational settings lead to varying experiences. Future research should focus on understanding the relationships between job characteristics and the components of job satisfaction rather than job satisfaction as a unitary construct. Research that further investigates the benefits of a formal one year preceptorship or probationary period is needed. PMID:18534023

  11. Are healthcare middle management jobs extreme jobs?

    PubMed

    Buchanan, David A; Parry, Emma; Gascoigne, Charlotte; Moore, Cíara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the incidence of "extreme jobs" among middle managers in acute hospitals, and to identify individual and organizational implications. The paper is based on interviews and focus groups with managers at six hospitals, a "proof of concept" pilot with an operations management team, and a survey administered at five hospitals. Six of the original dimensions of extreme jobs, identified in commercial settings, apply to hospital management: long hours, unpredictable work patterns, tight deadlines with fast pace, broad responsibility, "24/7 availability", mentoring and coaching. Six healthcare-specific dimensions were identified: making life or death decisions, conflicting priorities, being required to do more with fewer resources, responding to regulatory bodies, the need to involve many people before introducing improvements, fighting a negative climate. Around 75 per cent of hospital middle managers have extreme jobs. This extreme healthcare management job model was derived inductively from a qualitative study involving a small number of respondents. While the evidence suggests that extreme jobs are common, further research is required to assess the antecedents, incidence, and implications of these working practices. A varied, intense, fast-paced role with responsibility and long hours can be rewarding, for some. However, multi-tasking across complex roles can lead to fatigue, burnout, and mistakes, patient care may be compromised, and family life may be adversely affected. As far as the authors can ascertain, there are no other studies exploring acute sector management roles through an extreme jobs lens.

  12. Job Hunter's Guide Featuring the Seek-a-Job Flock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Educational Development and Training Center.

    This job hunter's guide features the "Seek-a-Job Flock," a set of bird characters that humorously help to illustrate job hunting basics. The guide contains five sections: (1) how to find job openings; (2) how to make the interview appointment; (3) how to complete the job application form; (4) how to act during the interview; and (5) how to follow…

  13. Literacy Issues Within Victoria's Job Network, Job Search Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quelch, John

    A study established the extent of literacy deficits among participants in Victoria's Job Network, Job Search Training (JST) programs, and the impact that identified literacy deficits are having on job seekers' ability to participate in the Australian Job Search program and on their job seeking potential. Data were sought from 35 programs (with…

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of occupational injuries among municipal solid waste collectors in four zones of Amhara region, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Eskezia, Debassu; Aderaw, Zewdie; Ahmed, Kedir Y; Tadese, Fentaw

    2016-08-24

    Refuse collectors are at a high risk for fatal and non-fatal occupational accidents. This is more intensified in developing countries, like Ethiopia, due to physically demanding nature of the job. However, information on occupational injuries and related factors are almost non-existent in Ethiopia. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of occupational injuries and its associated factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among municipal solid waste collectors in four zones of Amhara region from February to May 2015. Computer generated simple random sampling technique was used to select the samples. Interviewer administrated questionnaires were used for the data collection process. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between outcome variables and explanatory variables. In this study, the annual prevalence of at least one occupational injury among solid waste workers was 34.3 % (95 % CI: 29.52, 39.10). Of these, 50.7 % of them were visited health facility to receive health care. The independent predictors of at least one occupational injury were shorter service years, low monthly salary, history of job related stress, and sleeping disturbance related to the job. Being illiterate, having lower monthly income, and those who reported sleeping disturbance were significantly and positively associated with severe occupational injuries of solid waste collectors. The magnitude of occupational injuries among municipal solid waste collectors is lower than other similar studies conducted in Ethiopia. Based on the finding of this and other studies, job rotation among work components, improvement of employees' income, job specific guideline regarding maximum production limits, and replacement of bags and bins with wheeled containers are an interventions expected to cope with the problem. There is also a need of specific periodic health surveillance (PHS) for refuse collectors to detect early signs of work related complaints and

  15. The Relationship between Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction and Organizational Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porat, A. Ben

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between job involvement and satisfaction in white collar employees of an industrial organization in Israel was studied. Job involvement was related significantly to job satisfaction; however, the relationship was mediated by organizational factors. (Author/BEF)

  16. Ergonomic job design to accommodate and prevent musculoskeletal disabilities.

    PubMed

    Waters, T R; MacDonald, L A

    2001-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) account for a major portion of the cost of work-related injury and illness in the United States. Many of these injuries and illnesses lead to temporary or permanent disability. It is generally accepted that the incidence of MSDs increases when the demands of the job exceed the capabilities of the worker. As the workforce ages and physical capabilities decline, it is anticipated that many more Americans will request disability-related leave resulting from musculoskeletal disorders because they are unable to meet the demands of the job. To prevent these disabilities and to accommodate a wider range of people in the workforce, physical job demands may have to be reduced so that a larger portion of the population will be capable of working. Providing engineering controls or alternative work arrangements allows for accommodation of workers with a wide range of capabilities and can assist in rehabilitation and early return to work following injury.

  17. Ensuring that green jobs are good jobs.

    PubMed

    Beard, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    A priority of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences' (NIEHS's) Worker Education and Training Program (WETP) is to make sure that green jobs are good jobs: they must be safe jobs and must include strong safety training programs. The Laborers AGC Education and Training Fund (LAGC) of the Laborers International Union of North America has been a grantee of the WETP for years and has developed hands-on, peer-focused, state-of-the-art health and safety training for laborers in the environmental remediation field. NIEHS has worked with union President Terence O'Sullivan and the LAGC to train workers engaged in freeing our communities from the extensive legacy of industrial pollution.

  18. Observational study of job satisfaction in hospital pharmacy technicians.

    PubMed

    Sanford, M E; Facchinetti, N J; Broadhead, R S

    1984-12-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributing to job satisfaction of pharmacy technicians in two community hospitals were studied. A pharmacy student employed part-time as a pharmacy technician by one of the hospitals observed fellow technicians in a wide range of job activities for 22 months. In a second hospital, the same student conducted similar observations during one summer while posing as a social researcher. Both hospitals had technician training programs providing classroom instruction and on-the-job training. Data were gathered primarily from informal conversations with technicians and pharmacists and by recording activities through notetaking. Formal training programs, praise from pharmacists, opportunities to train other technicians, diversity of job activities, and autonomy in coordinating work with time demands were identified as factors contributing to job satisfaction of technicians. Negative aspects of the job that employers attempted to circumvent or clarify were the unchallenging nature of the work and the limited opportunities for advancement. Technicians' and pharmacists' attitudes toward job enrichment for technicians are discussed, and suggestions for improving technicians' intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction are provided. A reliable cadre of pharmacy technicians is necessary for further expansion of clinical pharmacy services under current hospital budgetary restraints. In addition to modifying job activities to promote technicians' intrinsic job satisfaction, pharmacy managers can improve extrinsic satisfaction by providing adequate salaries, job security, and flexible work schedules.

  19. Job Soup for Job Shoppers. 80 Job Bits You Can Sink Your Teeth into.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Melissa

    This guide contains 80 short items that provide information and insight to persons conducting a job search, as well as practical tips for keeping a job. The 80 items are organized into seven chapters that cover the following topics: (1) jobs and careers; (2) job skills; (3) job seekers; (4) paper power; (5) presentation package, "You"; (6) tool…

  20. The Interchangeability of Job Sample Tests and Job Knowledge Tests in Four Army Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vineberg, Robert; Taylor, Elaine N.

    Extensive job sample tests and multiple choice job knowledge tests were administered to approximately 370 men in each of four Army jobs: Armor Crewman, Repairman, Supply Specialist and Cook. Representative tasks in each job were analyzed and skill requirements were identified. This analysis and the correlations between job sample scores and job…

  1. Job characteristics: their relationship to job satisfaction, stress and depression.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Renier; Vawda, Naseema

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the influences of job characteristics on job satisfaction, stress and depression among South African white collar workers. Participants were managers in full-time employment with large organisations. They completed the Job Diagnostic Survey, the Perceived Stress Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory. A regression approach was used to predict job satisfaction, stress and depression from job characteristics. Job characteristics (skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy and feedback) predicted job satisfaction, as well as stress and depression. Job characteristics are weak predictors of perceived stress and depression. Work related factors, such as interpersonal relations and organisational culture, may better predict mental health in work settings.

  2. Get that Job!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Ingrid Udris

    This paper provides suggestions for obtaining a job--specifically, filling out employment applications, writing resumes, and going to job interviews. It lists tips for completing employment applications and includes samples of resumes as well as a step-by-step list of things to include in a resume. The section on employment interviews includes a…

  3. Writing job descriptions.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, M

    1990-01-01

    The skill of writing job descriptions begins with an understanding of the advantages, as well as the basic elements, of a well written description. The end result should be approved and updated as needed. Having a better understanding of this process makes writing the job description a challenge rather than a chore.

  4. Women's Job Training Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women Work! The National Network for Women's Employment, Washington, DC.

    The Coalition on Women and Job Training has developed a women's job training agenda that focuses on nine issues related to women's full participation in training and achievement of economic self-sufficiency. The issues highlighted in the agenda are as follows: (1) the need to make long-term economic self-sufficiency the goal of all employment and…

  5. Jobs for Renewing America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shatkin, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    As America emerges from recession, certain industries are expected to grow particularly fast and will present many job opportunities for both young people and career changers. This article looks at these high-opportunity industries and the kinds of jobs they are expected to open up. In the global economy of the 21st century, many low-skill jobs…

  6. Learning on the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Alyse; Winningham, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Many students recognizes the value of participating in an internship program. The experience benefits not only students and potential future employers, but colleges, too--not the mention the workforce. Internships often equip students with a competitive advantage over other job seekers. On-the-job programs not only allow students to discover the…

  7. Creative Job Search Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Vocational Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Creative Job Search Technique is based on the premise that most people have never learned how to systematically look for a job. A person who is unemployed can be helped to take a hard look at his acquired skills and relate those skills to an employer's needs. (Author)

  8. Learning on the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Alyse; Winningham, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Many students recognizes the value of participating in an internship program. The experience benefits not only students and potential future employers, but colleges, too--not the mention the workforce. Internships often equip students with a competitive advantage over other job seekers. On-the-job programs not only allow students to discover the…

  9. Job Training Partnership Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Lloyd W.; Hedberg, Sally B.

    1987-01-01

    The Job Training Partnership Act, which provides money to programs preparing disadvantaged (including disabled) individuals for entry into the labor force, has helped special education students in such programs as the Special Education Local Plan Areas Job Project and the Day Training Activity Center at the Las Trampas School, Inc. in Lafayette,…

  10. Designing job enrichment projects.

    PubMed

    Clakeley, G L

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for a job satisfaction program utilized in a large occupational therapy department. The goal of the program is to retain satisfied, productive employees and reduce attrition of therapists and assistants. The use of job enrichment projects for occupational therapy assistants will be presented with brief descriptions of two projects.

  11. Job Enrichment in Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourman, Louis S.; Jones, Jo

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 10 participants in Ohio State University's job enrichment program for midcareer extension agents found that 5 returned to their same jobs after the experience but only 2 felt challenged/renewed. Part-time participation while working made it difficult to balance responsibilities. More information and a structured orientation were…

  12. Job Redesign Improves Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, W. Philip; Williams, Kathleen L.

    1975-01-01

    The unique challenges presented in good banking business are approached through the concept of job enrichment. Described in this article is one consulting firm's experience with one bank--how they transformed job satisfaction, motivation, and performance into useable tools benefiting the individual and the organization. (Author)

  13. Job Placement Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Career and Continuing Education.

    Designed to serve as a guide for job placement personnel, this handbook is written from the point of view of a school or job preparation facility, based on methodology applicable to the placement function in any setting. Factors identified as critical to a successful placement operation are utilization of a systems approach, establishment of…

  14. Factors affecting individual injury experience among petroleum drilling workers.

    PubMed

    Mueller, B A; Mohr, D L; Rice, J C; Clemmer, D I

    1987-02-01

    To identify factors affecting the number of injuries experienced by petroleum drilling workers, we carried out a 44-month incidence density study on a cohort employed in January 1979 on mobile drilling units in the Gulf of Mexico. To control for job-related hazards, we computed a standardized ratio of observed to expected injuries for each worker based on his job history. The effect of personal and work history factors was then examined using analysis of variance. Age, rate of job changes, and rate of rig transfers had independent effects on injury rates. Length of service had little effect when age was controlled. The findings suggest that younger workers under stress such as job change may be more susceptible to injury than older workers, regardless of job. If so, targeted changes in procedures and environment which protect workers of all ages are important alternatives to reliance on supervision and experience in injury reduction.

  15. How to Get Yourself on the Door of a Job: A Cross-Cultural Contrastive Study of Arabic and English Job Application Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ali, Mohammed N.

    2004-01-01

    This cross-cultural study examined the generic structure of English and Arabic job application letters written by native Arabic speakers and English native speakers to find out the discourse genre text similarities and differences between them. A corpus of 60 job application letters written by 60 job applicants was subjected to the form of move…

  16. The prevalence and correlates of occupational injuries in small-scale manufacturing enterprises.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Akinori; Ikeda, Tomoko; Takahashi, Masaya; Haratani, Takashi; Hojou, Minoru; Swanson, Naomi G; Fujioka, Yosei; Araki, Shunichi

    2006-09-01

    Workers involved in small-scale manufacturing businesses are known to comprise a high-risk population for occupational injury. The present study investigated the prevalence and correlates of occupational injury in this population. A self-administered questionnaire that solicited answers about occupational information including injury, demographic characteristics, health conditions and lifestyle factors was collected from a sample of 1,298 workers in 228 small-scale manufacturing enterprises (defined as fewer than 50 workers) aged 16-78 (mean 46) yr in Yashio city, Saitama, Japan (response rate 65.5%). The enterprises were randomly selected from the 2000 edition of the city commercial directory corresponding to the distribution of types of businesses in the city. Occupational injury was assessed by asking subjects, ;Have you ever been injured during your work, including minor scratches and cuts in the previous 1-yr period?' The possible response was either ;yes' or ;no.' The prevalence of study-defined occupational injury among the workers was 35.6% (male 43.0%, female 17.9%). Among job types, manufacturing (44.2%) and driving (43.5%) had high rates of occupational injuries. Similarly, occupational injuries were high in the papermaking (54.5%) and machinery (47.7%) industries. For males, younger age, current or former smoking, insomnia symptoms, and disease(s) currently under treatment were correlated with injury, whereas for females, being unmarried, higher educational status, and insomnia symptoms were the correlating factors. Occupational injury is common among small-scale manufacturing businesses, and is associated with multiple controllable factors. Countermeasures such as prohibiting smoking during work, sleep health education, job safety training for young/inexperienced workers are appropriate methods for eliminating or reducing injuries.

  17. Accommodating Workers with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Denetta; Batiste, Linda; Whidden, Eddie

    1998-01-01

    Examination of over 1,000 calls to the Job Accommodation Network involving workers with spinal cord injury identified the nature of the industry, job, career progression, and accessibility solutions. The number of calls increased dramatically after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. (SK)

  18. Occupational injury fatalities--1994.

    PubMed

    Toscano, G; Jack, T

    1996-01-01

    Factory workers caught in machinery and construction workers falling or struck by huge beams are images that typically come to mind when considering serious hazards in the workplace. But these types of events account for only a small portion of job-related fatalities each year. Transportation-related fatalities, along with assaults and violent acts during work, made up almost two-thirds of the 6,588 fatal work injuries recorded in 1994. The majority of job-related fatal work events occurred on the streets and highways and in public buildings and in areas such as grocery stores and parking lots. Today the most deadly jobs are found in outdoor occupations such as fishing and timber cutting. In fact, in all 10 jobs studied that have high fatality rates, most workers are affected by severe weather conditions while driving on highways, performing farm chores and working at construction sites. Highway crashes are the primary cause of trucker fatalities; falls are the leading cause of death for roofers, construction laborers and structural metal workers, while tractor rollovers account for a third of farm worker fatalities. Another deadly contributing factor for some workers is homicide, which accounted for 16 percent of job-related fatalities in 1994. Workers most at risk are those who work alone, work late at night and handle varying sums of money. Taxicab drivers are the most susceptible and have a work injury fatality rate nine times higher than the national rate of 5 deaths per 100,000 workers. Others at high risk of homicide include gas station cashiers, grocery store employees and workers in retail eating and drinking establishments. Although the risk of a fatal injury at work varies greatly by occupation and industry, no one is immune. For prevention, workers and employers need to know what jobs are risky, what equipment is dangerous and what activities are hazardous. They also should understand that a fatal incident can happen to anyone.

  19. Intergenerational differences in occupational injury and fatality rates among Canada's immigrants.

    PubMed

    Tiagi, R

    2016-12-01

    Empirical evidence on occupational injury and/or fatality rates among Canada's immigrants has been largely mixed and has almost exclusively focused on the first generation. Over time, as immigrants assimilate into the economy, future generations may be expected to work in less hazardous occupations compared with prior generations. There has been no prior analysis of the differences in occupational injury and fatality rates among later generations. To analyse whether there are intergenerational differences in occupational injury and fatality rates among the first, second and third (or more) immigrant generations in Canada. Data drawn from the 2011 National Household Survey and the Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada were used to determine the difference in occupational injury and fatality rates between the first or the third generation and the second generation, using a Poisson regression framework. Second-generation immigrants worked in jobs with lower occupational injury rates compared with the first generation and the third generation (or more). Similar results were observed for occupational fatality rates. Second-generation immigrants worked in less hazardous jobs compared with the first generation and compared with the third (or more) generations. These results suggest that the second generation may not face the same economic hurdles and challenges, in terms of workplace injuries or fatalities, as those faced by the first or third (or more) generations of immigrants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Jobs in Public Service. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The booklet describes jobs in public service. The introductory chapter provides a definition and overview of public service work. Following chapters describe various levels of public service including: (1) neighborhood workers--letter carriers and postal employees, fire fighters, police officers, service repair workers, and bus drivers; (2) city…

  1. Jobs in Marine Science. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The instructional booklet explores various occupations in the job family of marine science. Following a brief introduction to the concept of occupational clusters, the student is given an overall orientation to the general area of oceanography and marine-related careers. A shore research station and the activities of a marine biologist are…

  2. Jobs in Manufacturing. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The instructional booklet explores various occupations in the occupational cluster of manufacturing. In the first chapter, the student is briefly introduced to the occupational cluster concept and to the general area of manufacturing. Chapter 2 describes jobs involved in the production of materials and processing of goods. Chapter 3 discusses…

  3. Job content and pharmacists' job attitudes.

    PubMed

    Quandt, W G; McKercher, P L; Miller, D A

    1982-02-01

    The relationships between job content and hospital pharmacists' work attitudes are examined. A 152-item questionnaire was mailed to 507 hospital pharmacists in southeastern Michigan. The questionnaire included measures of job dimensions, psychological states, and personal and work outcomes. Mean scores for 34 subscales consisting of 2-5 related items were computed. Background characteristics were also assessed. Using factor analysis, the respondents were categorized as clinical, inpatient, outpatient, or generalists depending on their reported relative time spent performing 23 nonadministrative job functions. Analysis of variance was performed across the four groups for each subscale; the level of significance was set at 0.001. The response rate was 56%, representing 283 completed questionnaires. The clinical, outpatient, inpatient, and generalist pharmacist groups consisted of 43, 36, 70, and 134 respondents, respectively. There was a prevalent trend in the rank order in which pharmacists in the four groups responded to various subscales. The clinical group had the highest scores for 13 of the 14 subscales that were significantly different across pharmacist groups. Alternatively, in all but one of the significantly different subscales the inpatient group ranked lowest. Because pharmacists in the clinical group consistently scored higher than the other groups on scales measuring components of job enrichment, the authors concluded that the challenge of hospital pharmacy managers is to adapt the positive features of clinical practice to other areas of the profession.

  4. Jobs in Manufacturing. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The instructional booklet explores various occupations in the occupational cluster of manufacturing. In the first chapter, the student is briefly introduced to the occupational cluster concept and to the general area of manufacturing. Chapter 2 describes jobs involved in the production of materials and processing of goods. Chapter 3 discusses…

  5. Jobs in Marine Science. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The instructional booklet explores various occupations in the job family of marine science. Following a brief introduction to the concept of occupational clusters, the student is given an overall orientation to the general area of oceanography and marine-related careers. A shore research station and the activities of a marine biologist are…

  6. The Sweet Spot of a Nonacademic Job Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Alexandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Because academic culture frowns on Ph.D.'s who consider leaving the ivory tower, most of those who jump ship find themselves at a loss as to where and how to begin a job search. Yet a nonacademic job search is actually quite similar to a standard research project. Both require advance planning, substantial research, collating evidence for an…

  7. Identification of Workplace Dress by Low-Income Job Seekers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiki, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The author examined how low-income job seekers participating in a workplace dress program identified traditional business and business casual dress. Seventy low-income job seekers identified clothing items as traditional business (e.g., suits, ties), similar to identifications made by professionals and image consultants in previous literature.…

  8. Identification of Workplace Dress by Low-Income Job Seekers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiki, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The author examined how low-income job seekers participating in a workplace dress program identified traditional business and business casual dress. Seventy low-income job seekers identified clothing items as traditional business (e.g., suits, ties), similar to identifications made by professionals and image consultants in previous literature.…

  9. Job Satisfaction Among Students in Work Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    1974-01-01

    Data were collected from 1016 students in grades 9-14 from 50 work education programs, and from 696 similar students who held part-time jobs but were not participating in work education programs. Participating students were significantly more satisfied with their jobs than were the nonparticipating students. (Author)

  10. Case Studies in Job Analysis and Training Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, Jack

    2001-01-01

    An information technology certification program was evaluated by 1,671 systems engineers using job analysis that rated task importance. Professional librarians (n=527) rated importance of their tasks in similar fashion. Results of scatter diagrams provided evidence to enhance training effectiveness by focusing on job tasks significantly related to…

  11. The Sweet Spot of a Nonacademic Job Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Alexandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Because academic culture frowns on Ph.D.'s who consider leaving the ivory tower, most of those who jump ship find themselves at a loss as to where and how to begin a job search. Yet a nonacademic job search is actually quite similar to a standard research project. Both require advance planning, substantial research, collating evidence for an…

  12. Factors Influencing the Job Satisfaction of Academics in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, S.

    2006-01-01

    Since there has not been much research focus on job satisfaction in Higher Education in South Africa, this article describes the job satisfaction of these academics in times of transformation. A survey design involved 94 respondents from similar departments at a residential and a distance education institution. A questionnaire focused on teaching,…

  13. Factors Influencing the Job Satisfaction of Academics in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, S.

    2006-01-01

    Since there has not been much research focus on job satisfaction in Higher Education in South Africa, this article describes the job satisfaction of these academics in times of transformation. A survey design involved 94 respondents from similar departments at a residential and a distance education institution. A questionnaire focused on teaching,…

  14. Job Satisfaction Among Students in Work Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    1974-01-01

    Data were collected from 1016 students in grades 9-14 from 50 work education programs, and from 696 similar students who held part-time jobs but were not participating in work education programs. Participating students were significantly more satisfied with their jobs than were the nonparticipating students. (Author)

  15. The Job Training and Job Satisfaction Survey Technical Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Job training has become an important aspect of an employee's overall job experience. However, it is not often called out specifically on instruments measuring job satisfaction. This technical manual details the processes used in the development and validation of a survey instrument to measure job training satisfaction and overall job…

  16. Job Placement: New Tactics for Securing Job Leads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.; Rubin, Donna C.

    1979-01-01

    This article is a compendium of strategies for rehabilitation counselors and their clients to secure job leads in relatively painless ways. Traditional job search mechanisms, such as want ads and state employment services, have been shown to be decidedly ineffective as compared to a good first-hand job lead. Job placement is not an exact science,…

  17. Job satisfaction developmental trajectories and health: A life course perspective.

    PubMed

    Dirlam, Jonathan; Zheng, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the health consequence of job dissatisfaction becomes increasingly important because job insecurity, stress and dissatisfaction have significantly increased in the United States in the last decade. Despite the extensive work in this area, prior studies nonetheless may underestimate the harmful effect of job dissatisfaction due to the cross-sectional nature of their data and sample selection bias. This study applies a life-course approach to more comprehensively examine the relationship between job satisfaction and health. Using data from the NLSY 1979 cohort, we estimate group based job satisfaction trajectories of respondents starting at age 25 and ending at age 39. Four job satisfaction trajectory groups are identified, a consistently high satisfaction group, a downward group, an upward group, and a lowest satisfaction group. We examine the effects of these trajectories on several physical and mental health outcomes of respondents in their early forties. We find membership in the lowest job satisfaction trajectory group to be negatively associated with all five mental health outcomes, supporting the accumulation of risks life course model. Those in the upward job satisfaction trajectory group have similar health outcomes to those in the high job satisfaction trajectory group, supporting the social mobility life course model. Overall, we find the relationship between job satisfaction trajectories and health to be stronger for mental health compared to physical health.

  18. The feasibility of adapting a population-based asthma-specific job exposure matrix (JEM) to NHANES.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Michelle K; Symanski, Elaine; Pompeii, Lisa A; Delclos, George L

    2010-12-01

    To determine the feasibility of applying a job exposure matrix (JEM) for classifying exposures to 18 asthmagens in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2004. We cross-referenced 490 National Center for Health Statistics job codes used to develop the 40 NHANES occupation groups with 506 JEM job titles and assessed homogeneity in asthmagen exposure across job codes within each occupation group. In total, 399 job codes corresponded to one JEM job title, 32 to more than one job title, and 59 were not in the JEM. Three occupation groups had the same asthmagen exposure across job codes, 11 had no asthmagen exposure, and 26 groups had heterogeneous exposures across jobs codes. The NHANES classification of occupations limits the use of the JEM to evaluate the association between workplace exposures and asthma and more refined occupational data are needed to enhance work-related injury/illness surveillance efforts.

  19. Development of physical profiles for specific jobs.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, E M; Bonanno, J

    1975-01-01

    Inherent risk of injury associated with heavy physical work tasks frequently obviates direct job analysis -- content validity -- for predictive or diagnostic purposes. A common alternative is an appraisal of the physical attributes manifest by the job requirements and the selection of tests of related physical factors. 241 job applicants were given a test battery composed of 40-items at the University of California Medical Center, Sacramento, California. A factor analysis reduced the initial 40-item test battery to an unweighted 6-item field test battery FTB. Standards scales were established for the FTB and applied to evaluate without prejudice a second group of 300 applicants. Since the present criterion for adequate job performance is simply the successful completion of climbing school, means for each test item of the FTB were evaluated for their predictive value. The mean scores for the step test and balance were found to be significantly different, smaller than .05 between the successful and unsuccessful applicants, whether male or female. Percent fat differed significantly only in the males and two strength tests and reaction times were not significant. Additional studies were conducted on two groups of young adults with known fitness levels to better characterize the strength factors which are considered essential to acceptable pole climb performance. Significant differences were found for both static and dynamic strengths, p equals smaller than .05. In summary, a FTB of simple, objective, job related test items can be identified and validated for predictive and diagnostic purposes. Probabilities for success can be established through a preliminary self-screening test program and administered by the employment office. The test items which comprise the FTB can be figuratively presented as a profile analysis and incorporated in the employee's medical file for longitudinalappraisal. If meaningful standards can be established for use in preemployment or job

  20. Race, Self-Selection, and the Job Search Process1

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Devah; Pedulla, David S.

    2015-01-01

    While existing research has documented persistent barriers facing African American job seekers, far less research has questioned how job seekers respond to this reality. Do minorities self-select into particular segments of the labor market to avoid discrimination? Such questions have remained unanswered due to the lack of data available on the positions to which job seekers apply. Drawing on two original datasets with application-specific information, we find little evidence that blacks target or avoid particular job types. Rather, blacks cast a wider net in their search than similarly situated whites, including a greater range of occupational categories and characteristics in their pool of job applications. Finally, we show that perceptions of discrimination are associated with increased search breadth, suggesting that broad search among African Americans represents an adaptation to labor market discrimination. Together these findings provide novel evidence on the role of race and self-selection in the job search process. PMID:26046224

  1. Forecasting of indirect consumables for a Job Shop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, M.; Khan, S.; Khan, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    A job shop has an arrangement where similar machines (Direct consumables) are grouped together and use indirect consumables to produce a product. The indirect consumables include hack saw blades, emery paper, painting brush etc. The job shop is serving various orders at a particular time for the optimal operation of job shop. Forecasting is required to predict the demand of direct and indirect consumables in a job shop. Forecasting is also needed to manage lead time, optimize inventory cost and stock outs. The objective of this research is to obtain the forecast for indirect consumables. The paper shows how job shop can manage their indirect consumables more accurately by establishing a new technique of forecasting. This results in profitable use of job shop by multiple users.

  2. Factors Contributing to Financial Aid Administrators' Job Satisfaction: NASFAA 2008 Financial Aid Administrators' Job Satisfaction Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    In what kind of job environment are financial aid administrators (FAA) currently working? How satisfied are they with their jobs? What motivates them and what factors are considered morale dampers? How are financial aid (FA) functions viewed by campus' top administrators? Does FA get similar respect and appreciation from their campus peer offices…

  3. Attribution of Responsibility and Hiring Recommendations for Job Applicants with Low Back Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordieri, James E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Supervisors and managers (N=108) reviewed cover letter and resume of job applicant with low back pain (source of which was systematically manipulated) and job description for simulated position. Found that, regardless of qualifications and source of injury, participants made more negative hiring recommendations for applicants with pain than for…

  4. Attribution of Responsibility and Hiring Recommendations for Job Applicants with Low Back Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordieri, James E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Supervisors and managers (N=108) reviewed cover letter and resume of job applicant with low back pain (source of which was systematically manipulated) and job description for simulated position. Found that, regardless of qualifications and source of injury, participants made more negative hiring recommendations for applicants with pain than for…

  5. Getting a Job in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachter, Joanne C.

    This book is designed to help education students, recent graduates, and experienced teachers attain new teaching positions. Chapter 1, "The Right Job," discusses the process of deciding what kind of job best suits the job seeker's talents and preferences. The chapter highlights exploring important aspects of the job, such as education…

  6. Getting a Job in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachter, Joanne C.

    This book is designed to help education students, recent graduates, and experienced teachers attain new teaching positions. Chapter 1, "The Right Job," discusses the process of deciding what kind of job best suits the job seeker's talents and preferences. The chapter highlights exploring important aspects of the job, such as education…

  7. Job Structure and Age Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, James S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    From research findings on job design and redesign, the authors conclude that all individuals may not approve job enrichment programs which may actually decrease job satisfaction. Although job satisfaction may increase with age, individual differences and other variables make research results inconclusive. (MF)

  8. Perceiving Jobs in the Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Robert; And Others

    Differential perceptions of standard, established jobs in a stable organization (telephone company plant department) were obtained for sixteen jobs rated by job incumbents, peers, and supervisors on eight characteristics (variety, autonomy, task identity, feedback, friendship opportunities, dealing with others, prestige compared to craft jobs, and…

  9. Video Job Shadows. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucinkas, Gene; Noyce, Gary

    Video Job Shadows encourages students to develop questions about a job and offers them the chance to videotape a business person answering those questions about his or her job. The program can be an effective method of teaching high school students about the world of work and the specific requirements and responsibilities of some jobs in their…

  10. "Ruralizing" Presidential Job Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leist, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Rural community college presidential job advertisements that focus on geography, politics, and culture can improve the likelihood of a good fit between the senior leader and the institution. (Contains 2 figures.)

  11. "Ruralizing" Presidential Job Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leist, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Rural community college presidential job advertisements that focus on geography, politics, and culture can improve the likelihood of a good fit between the senior leader and the institution. (Contains 2 figures.)

  12. Superintendent Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sidney G.

    1978-01-01

    Employing the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire, this study investigates the relationship between the job satisfaction of Georgia school superintendents and perceived leader behavior of Georgia school board presidents. (JC)

  13. Illusions of Job Segregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, James P.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of statistical analysis to identify patterns of discrimination in employment. Analyzes the effects of job segregation on women and minorities at the American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (FMW)

  14. Overcoming job stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... coworkers, deadlines, or possible layoffs. Some stress is motivating and can help you achieve. But when job ... or uncomfortable, work with your boss, management, or employee organizations to resolve the problem. If this does ...

  15. The effects of proximal withdrawal states on job attitudes, job searching, intent to leave, and employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Li, Junchao Jason; Lee, Thomas W; Mitchell, Terence R; Hom, Peter W; Griffeth, Rodger W

    2016-10-01

    We present the first major test of proximal withdrawal states theory (PWST; Hom, Mitchell, Lee, & Griffeth, 2012). In addition, we develop and test new ideas to demonstrate how PWST improves our understanding and prediction of employee turnover. Across 2 studies, we corroborate that reluctant stayers (those who want to leave but have to stay) are similar to enthusiastic leavers (those who want to leave and can leave) in affective commitment, job satisfaction, and job embeddedness, and that reluctant leavers (those who want to stay but have to leave) are similar to enthusiastic stayers (those who want to stay and can stay) on these dimensions. We find that job satisfaction and job embeddedness more strongly influence the intent to leave and job search behavior for enthusiastic stayers and leavers than for reluctant stayers and leavers. More important, we show that for those experiencing low control over their preference for leaving or staying (i.e., reluctant stayers and leavers), traditional variables such as job satisfaction, job embeddedness, and intent to leave are poor predictors of their turnover behavior. We further demonstrate that focusing on enthusiastic stayers and leavers can significantly enhance the accuracy of job satisfaction, job embeddedness, and intent to leave for predicting actual employee turnover. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. The Changing Distribution of Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamermesh, Daniel S.

    2001-01-01

    Satisfaction among male workers in upper earnings brackets increased from 1978-1996; similar results were found in Germany for 1984-1996. Little relationship between job satisfaction and persistent earnings inequality was found. Recent shocks to earnings mattered more to current and recent changes in satisfaction than did distant shocks.…

  17. Job enrichment, work motivation, and job satisfaction in hospital wards: testing the job characteristics model.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, M; Voutilainen, P; Koskinen, P

    1995-03-01

    This study investigated work motivation and job satisfaction at hospital wards with high and low levels of job enrichment. Primary nursing was assumed to represent a highly enriched job, whereas functional nursing represented a job with a low level of enrichment. Five surgical wards were divided into these two categories based on the structured interviews with head nurses. Work motivation and job satisfaction among ward personnel were assessed by a questionnaire. The ward personnel occupying highly enriched jobs reported significantly higher work motivation and satisfaction with the management than the personnel occupying jobs with a low level of enrichment.

  18. Gender differences in psychological morbidity, burnout, job stress and job satisfaction among Chinese neurologists: a national cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juncai; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Dan; Zhong, Xiaoni; Yang, Lining; Wang, Haiyang; Zhang, Yuqing; Fan, Songhua; Liu, Lanxiang; Xie, Peng

    2016-07-20

    Women are an important part of the medical workforce, yet little is known about gender differences in psychological morbidity, burnout, job stress and job satisfaction among neurologists. This study assessed gender differences in a large national sample of Chinese neurologists. Multivariate analyses were performed to examine associations. A total of 5558 neurologists were included in the analysis. Compared with their male counterparts, female neurologists were generally younger; were less likely to be married or to have children; had higher levels of education; were in practice for a shorter period of time; were less likely to hold senior roles; and had lower incomes. Male and female neurologists worked similar hours and spent a similar number of nights on call. No gender differences were found in psychological morbidity, burnout, and high levels of job stress for female and male, respectively. Women had higher emotional exhaustion scores, while men were more likely to have low levels of job satisfaction. The multivariate analysis showed that factors independently associated with psychological morbidity, burnout, high levels of job stress and low levels of job satisfaction were generally similar for women and men. These findings increase our understanding of gender differences in psychological morbidity, burnout, job stress, and job satisfaction among neurologists. As more women join the medical profession, these differences may be useful in designing medical training and practice.

  19. Job Hunting, Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, Ed; Stringer, Susan

    1998-05-01

    The AAS is again sponsoring a career workshop for Astronomers seeking employment. The workshop will cover a wide range of tools needed by a job seeker with a background in astronomy. There are increasingly fewer job opportunities in the academic areas. Today, astronomers need placement skills and career information to compete strongly in a more diversified jobs arena. The workshop will offer practical training on preparing to enter the job market. Topics covered include resume and letter writing as well as how to prepare for an interview. Advice is given on resources for jobs in astronomy, statistics of employment and education, and networking strategies. Workshop training also deals with a diverse range of career paths for astronomers. The workshop will consist of an two approximately three-hour sessions. The first (1-4pm) will be on the placement tools and job-search skills described above. The second session will be for those who would like to stay and receive personalized information on individual resumes, job search problems, and interview questions and practice. The individual appointments with Ed Goldin and Susan Stringer that will take place during the second session (6-9pm) will be arranged on-site during the first session. A career development and job preparation manual "Preparing Physicists for Work" will be on sale at the workshop for \\9.00. TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION: How to prepare an effective resume How to research prospective employers Interviewing skills Networking to uncover employment Job prospects present and future Traditional and non-traditional positions for astronomers This workshop will be presented by Ed Goldin and Susan Stringer of the American Institute of Physics. The cost of the workshop is \\15.00 which includes a packet of resource materials supporting the workshop presentation. Please send your request for attendance by 8 May 1998 to the Executive Office along with a check, payable to the AAS, for the fee. Credit cards will not be

  20. Selection bias in follow-up interviews with individuals attending the emergency department for occupational injuries.

    PubMed

    Oesterlund, Anna H; Lander, Flemming; Rytter, Søren; Lauritsen, Jens

    2017-06-01

    To examine whether supplementary interview participation was comparable for occupationally injured patients attending two hospital emergency departments and to investigate the magnitude of selection bias in relation to sex, age, severity, job tasks and industry risk level. Workers aged 18-70 years who contacted the two emergency departments for an acute occupational injury in 2013 were eligible and given a short questionnaire. Following written consent, a semi-structured interview concerning health and transient risk factors was conducted by telephone. The two departments were compared for study recruitment by age and sex. Respondents and non-respondents to the interview were compared for age, sex, injury severity, job tasks and industry risk level. Of 4002 patients attending the two hospitals, 1693 (42%) participated in the interview. One hospital had a markedly higher response rate to the questionnaire, but the proportions of participation in the interview were similar in the two hospitals. Patients aged <30 years were over-represented among non-respondents whereas sex, injury severity, job task and industry risk level were not significantly different between respondents and non-respondents. Despite a relatively low interview participation rate among injured individuals attending the emergency department, selection bias was limited. This indicates that results regarding injury risk patterns may be more widely generalisable when examining the causality of occupational injuries. However, the study also showed that young injured workers were less likely to participate in follow-up interviews, which is an important factor when interpreting age-related risk of injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Radiology Jobs: Uncovering Hidden and Not-So-Hidden Opportunities From the ACR Jobs Board.

    PubMed

    Misono, Alexander S; Saini, Sanjay; Prabhakar, Anand M

    2016-04-01

    The radiology job market remains daunting. Trainees choosing fellowships benefit from understanding employers' likely future needs. Radiology practices may similarly refine recruiting practices. This study quantitatively analyzes the current radiology job landscape. Job postings on the ACR Career Center online portal between June 2014 and June 2015 were reviewed. As entries are frequently added and removed, posts were manually collected weekly. Postings were recorded in a database and included date, practice, location, specialty/subspecialty, job type, years of experience, salary, and job description. The database was analyzed to characterize employer needs, salary, partnership track availability, and job availability by geography. A total of 1,778 jobs were posted during the study period. Of these, 1,529 (86.0%) were diagnostic; 240 (13.5%) were interventional; and 9 (0.5%) were administrative. Most jobs were in private practice (75.7%), compared with academic (16.3%) and other (7.9%). Although many did not require a specific specialty (46%), the most-frequent needs were breast (17%), neuroradiology (11%), musculoskeletal (8%), and body (7%). Of non-breast-imaging jobs, roughly 30% indicated an interest in breast-imaging skills. A minority (13%) requested prior experience of greater than 1 year, with some seeking 7-10 years of experience. Although most (87%) were full-time positions, part-time, temporary, and contractor roles were described in the remaining 13%. Salary data were rarely reported (7%), with a range of $98,967-$1,000,000. The most jobs were based in California (11%); New York (7%); Pennsylvania (7%); and Illinois (6%). However, when indexed per million population, the highest job rates were in Nevada (14.1); Washington DC (13.7); Hawaii (13.4); Montana (9.8); and Pennsylvania (9.1). Roughly 31% of postings described partnership tracks, with the highest rates in New England (58%), the Pacific Northwest (56%), the Midwest (40%), and Southern (40

  2. Job insecurity and health.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P

    2000-01-01

    As employers respond to new competitive pressures of global capitalism through layoffs and the casualization of labor, job insecurity affects a growing number of workers. It appears to harm mental health, but less is known about its effects on physical health and health behaviors and the mechanisms through which it may act. The prevailing individual-centered conceptualization of job insecurity as the perception of a threat to job continuity precludes systematic investigation of the social patterning of its health effects. Analysis of data from a 1994 Canadian national probability sample of adults determined that high levels of job insecurity lowered self-rated health and increased distress and the use of medications, but had no impact on heavy drinking. The findings support one possible mechanism of action whereby job insecurity reduces feelings of control over one's environment and opportunities for positive self-evaluation; these psychological experiences, in turn, have deleterious health consequences. There is little evidence of social patterning of this relationship by gender, education, household income, age, marital status, and social support at work.

  3. Estimating the full cost of workplace injuries.

    PubMed Central

    French, M T

    1990-01-01

    While many studies estimate medical costs and lost wages from workplace injuries, few have estimated pain and suffering costs. This study develops a wage-risk model for railroad workers and estimates the total cost of on-the-job injuries. On average, the total cost of an on-the-job injury to a railroad worker in 1980 was between $19,500 and $22,500. These estimates are substantially higher than the sum of medical costs plus lost wages. PMID:2382753

  4. Employees' Perceptions of Employers' Response after Workplace Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Nancy S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) explore the lived experiences of school district employees who have sustained on-the-job injuries with specific attention to employee perceptions of employer response after injury and (b) examine whether purposeful empathetic response from the employer after workplace injury was related to changes in employee…

  5. Employees' Perceptions of Employers' Response after Workplace Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Nancy S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) explore the lived experiences of school district employees who have sustained on-the-job injuries with specific attention to employee perceptions of employer response after injury and (b) examine whether purposeful empathetic response from the employer after workplace injury was related to changes in employee…

  6. Job strain in physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Campo, Marc A; Weiser, Sherri; Koenig, Karen L

    2009-09-01

    Job stress has been associated with poor outcomes. In focus groups and small-sample surveys, physical therapists have reported high levels of job stress. Studies of job stress in physical therapy with larger samples are needed. The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the levels of psychological job demands and job control reported by physical therapists in a national sample, (2) to compare those levels with national norms, and (3) to determine whether high demands, low control, or a combination of both (job strain) increases the risk for turnover or work-related pain. This was a prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up period. Participants were randomly selected members of the American Physical Therapy Association (n=882). Exposure assessments included the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), a commonly used instrument for evaluation of the psychosocial work environment. Outcomes included job turnover and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Compared with national averages, the physical therapists reported moderate job demands and high levels of job control. About 16% of the therapists reported changing jobs during follow-up. Risk factors for turnover included high job demands, low job control, job strain, female sex, and younger age. More than one half of the therapists reported work-related pain. Risk factors for work-related pain included low job control and job strain. The JCQ measures only limited dimensions of the psychosocial work environment. All data were self-reported and subject to associated bias. Physical therapists' views of their work environments were positive, including moderate levels of demands and high levels of control. Those therapists with high levels of demands and low levels of control, however, were at increased risk for both turnover and work-related pain. Physical therapists should consider the psychosocial work environment, along with other factors, when choosing a job.

  7. Physician job satisfaction related to actual and preferred job size.

    PubMed

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Borleffs, Jan C C; Stewart, Roy E; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna

    2017-05-11

    Job satisfaction is essential for physicians' well-being and patient care. The work ethic of long days and hard work that has been advocated for decades is acknowledged as a threat for physicians' job satisfaction, well-being, and patient safety. Our aim was to determine the actual and preferred job size of physicians and to investigate how these and the differences between them influence physicians' job satisfaction. Data were retrieved from a larger, longitudinal study among physicians starting medical training at Groningen University in 1982/83/92/93 (N = 597). Data from 506 participants (85%) were available for this study. We used regression analysis to investigate the influence of job size on physicians' job satisfaction (13 aspects) and ANOVA to examine differences in job satisfaction between physicians wishing to retain, reduce or increase job size. The majority of the respondents (57%) had an actual job size less than 1.0 FTE. More than 80% of all respondents preferred not to work full-time in the future. Respondents' average actual and preferred job sizes were .85 FTE and .81 FTE, respectively. On average, respondents who wished to work less (35% of respondents) preferred a job size reduction of 0.18 FTE and those who wished to work more (12%) preferred an increase in job size of 0.16 FTE. Job size influenced satisfaction with balance work-private hours most (β = -.351). Physicians who preferred larger job sizes were - compared to the other groups of physicians - least satisfied with professional accomplishments. A considerable group of physicians reported a gap between actual and preferred job size. Realizing physicians' preferences as to job size will hardly affect total workforce, but may greatly benefit individual physicians as well as their patients and society. Therefore, it seems time for a shift in work ethic.

  8. Is that really my job? A guide to job profiling.

    PubMed

    Savage, Yvonne

    2004-10-01

    'Agenda for Change' is fundamental to the NHS modernization agenda. It will lead to all non-medical NHS personnel being paid equal salaries for equal work. Key to the success of the changes will be the accurate evaluation of each individual's job (job profiling), so that people are properly rewarded for their work and responsibilities. This article discusses how community nurses can ensure that their job profile accurately represents their job, so that 'Agenda for Change' will work for them.

  9. Job satisfaction and job values among beginning nurses: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Daehlen, Marianne

    2008-12-01

    Concepts such as the theory-practice gap and reality shock call attention to the challenges nurses experience in their professional lives. These challenges seem to be particularly acute in the transition from nursing school to work. Based on an assumption that the theories and skills taught in school are not directly applicable to nursing practice, beginning nurses may find that they are not prepared to do the work for which they have trained. Consequently, nurses may experience challenges to their work ideals, and their level of job satisfaction may decline. In addition, major life changes, such as buying a house/apartment, becoming a parent or getting married are likely to occur in the first year after graduation. Consequently, the emphasis on economic rewards may increase in the transition from school to work. To examine the relationship between work ideals, experiences of work and job satisfaction through a vital period in nurses' careers. To compare beginning nurses' job satisfaction, perceived job rewards and values with those of beginning doctors and teachers. Survey data were collected from two cohorts of students in several educational programs in Norway. The survey was repeated among the same respondents, as workers, 3 years after graduation. Almost 3000 students were originally invited to participate. The response rate in the surveys varied from 59% to 80%. Tabular analyses and linear regression models. The results indicate similarities in nurses', doctors' and teachers' preferences for work, but differences in what they obtain. In the transition from school to work, nurses increase their emphasis on high income and job security, and 3 years after graduating, nurses' emphasis on these two job values is higher than that of doctors and teachers. Nurses were fairly satisfied with their present job. In terms of level of job satisfaction and their preferences for work, the transition from school to work for nurses seems less dramatic than initially assumed.

  10. Job Handbook. Suggestions To Help You Find & Keep a Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Barbara

    This document offers "how-to" advice to high school students on how to find and keep a job. The booklet discusses collecting personal information, writing a resume, providing references to potential employers, completing a job application, writing a letter of application, interviewing for a job, possible questions during an interview, possible…

  11. Job Characteristics, Work Involvement, and Job Performance of Public Servants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johari, Johanim; Yahya, Khulida Kirana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study is to assess the predicting role of job characteristics on job performance. Dimensions in the job characteristics construct are skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy and feedback. Further, work involvement is tested as a mediator in the hypothesized link. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  12. Job Characteristics and Job Attitudes: A Multivariate Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Lyman W.; Stone, Eugene F.

    Attitude data were obtained from 556 employees in a western telephone company. Respondents held one of sixteen "craft" jobs in the department selected for study. Multiple discriminant function analysis was performed using sixteen groups formed on the basis of subjects' job titles. Variables used in this primary analysis included job satisfaction,…

  13. Job Performance and Job Satisfaction of Beginning Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigge, Fred L.; Lovett, Martha T.

    This study sought to determine the relationships between various indices of job performance and job satisfaction of the first-year teacher. It also examined the possibility that job satisfaction of beginning teachers might vary among elementary, secondary, specialized and special education teaching fields. Subjects were 154 graduates of the…

  14. Job Characteristics, Work Involvement, and Job Performance of Public Servants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johari, Johanim; Yahya, Khulida Kirana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study is to assess the predicting role of job characteristics on job performance. Dimensions in the job characteristics construct are skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy and feedback. Further, work involvement is tested as a mediator in the hypothesized link. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  15. Readiness for work injury management and prevention: important attributes for early graduate occupational therapists and physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Adam, Kerry; Strong, Jenny; Chipchase, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Early graduate occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists (PTs) are routinely employed in work injury management and prevention in Australia. However, our understanding is limited about employer requirements for early graduates entering the field, and how commencing practitioners manage transition to practice. In addition, employers have expressed concerns anecdotally about the preparedness of early graduates for work injury management and prevention. However, evidence is limited about early gradutate preparedness for the field. The study aimed to develop a detailed qualitative account of the perceptions of employers and early graduates on the attributes required of early graduates in work injury management and prevention, and processes for effective transition to practice in this field. A purposive sample of 12 employers and 12 early graduates in work injury management and prevention participated in semi-structured interviews. Questions to employers focused on recruitment, supervision and readiness for practice. Questions to early graduates focused on challenges in transition and effective learning methods. Transcripts were analysed by Leximancer™ and supported by manual coding and synthesis. Four themes with findings were, 1) 'Job and workplace requirements'; skills required by employers and support needed for early graduates, 2) 'Learning for work injury management and prevention'; options for early graduate development and learning methods early graduates found effective, 3) 'Employer expectations of early graduates in transition to work injury management and prevention', responses to transition; and 4) 'Early graduate perceptions on transition to work injury management and prevention'; early graduates responses to transition. Findings for employers and early graduates were similar to those expected in other areas of practice for OTs and PTs. Work injury management and prevention skills were not expected of early graduates by employers. Employers and

  16. Job Interviewing: Process and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Harold H.

    1992-01-01

    Offers ways to amplify current instruction on the all-important job interview. Discusses resumes, job application letters, oral reports, preparing for the interview, mock interview checklist, doing the interview, sample interview questions, and leaving the interview. (SR)

  17. Gender, job authority, and depression.

    PubMed

    Pudrovska, Tetyana; Karraker, Amelia

    2014-12-01

    Using the 1957-2004 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we explore the effect of job authority in 1993 (at age 54) on the change in depressive symptoms between 1993 and 2004 (age 65) among white men and women. Within-gender comparisons indicate that women with job authority (defined as control over others' work) exhibit more depressive symptoms than women without job authority, whereas men in authority positions are overall less depressed than men without job authority. Between-gender comparisons reveal that although women have higher depression than men, women's disadvantage in depression is significantly greater among individuals with job authority than without job authority. We argue that macro- and meso-processes of gender stratification create a workplace in which exercising job authority exposes women to interpersonal stressors that undermine health benefits of job authority. Our study highlights how the cultural meanings of masculinities and femininities attenuate or amplify health-promoting resources of socioeconomic advantage.

  18. Job Search Sites on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discusses job search resources on the Internet, electronic resumes, and searching tricks. Features an annotated bibliography of Internet sites that provide links to job search sites, search tips, databanks of jobs, professional and "boutique" sites, and government jobs. (PEN)

  19. The impact of job crafting on job demands, job resources, and well-being.

    PubMed

    Tims, Maria; Bakker, Arnold B; Derks, Daantje

    2013-04-01

    This longitudinal study examined whether employees can impact their own well-being by crafting their job demands and resources. Based on the job demands-resources model, we hypothesized that employee job crafting would have an impact on work engagement, job satisfaction, and burnout through changes in job demands and job resources. Data was collected in a chemical plant at three time points with one month in between the measurement waves (N = 288). The results of structural equation modeling showed that employees who crafted their job resources in the first month of the study showed an increase in their structural and social resources over the course of the study (2 months). This increase in job resources was positively related to employee well-being (increased engagement and job satisfaction, and decreased burnout). Crafting job demands did not result in a change in job demands, but results revealed direct effects of crafting challenging demands on increases in well-being. We conclude that employee job crafting has a positive impact on well-being and that employees therefore should be offered opportunities to craft their own jobs.

  20. Sex Differences in Injury Patterns Among Workers in Heavy Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Oyebode A.; Cantley, Linda F.; Slade, Martin D.; Pollack, Keshia M.; Vegso, Sally; Cullen, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if female workers in a heavy manufacturing environment have a higher risk of injury compared with males when performing the same job and to evaluate sex differences in type or severity of injury. By use of human resources and incident surveillance data for the hourly population at 6 US aluminum smelters, injuries that occurred from January 1, 1996, through December 21, 2005, were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for job, tenure, and age category, was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for female versus male injury risk for all injuries, recordable injuries, and lost work time injuries. The analysis was repeated for acute injuries and musculoskeletal disorder-related injuries separately. Female workers in this industry have a greater risk for sustaining all forms of injury after adjustment for age, tenure, and standardized job category (odds ratio = 1.365, 95% confidence interval: 1.290, 1.445). This excess risk for female workers persisted when injuries were dichotomized into acute injuries (odds ratio = 1.2) and musculoskeletal disorder-related injuries (odds ratio = 1.1). This study provides evidence of a sex disparity in occupational injury with female workers at higher risk compared with their male counterparts in a heavy manufacturing environment. PMID:18996885

  1. Sex differences in injury patterns among workers in heavy manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, Oyebode A; Cantley, Linda F; Slade, Martin D; Pollack, Keshia M; Vegso, Sally; Fiellin, Martha G; Cullen, Mark R

    2009-01-15

    The objective of the study was to determine if female workers in a heavy manufacturing environment have a higher risk of injury compared with males when performing the same job and to evaluate sex differences in type or severity of injury. By use of human resources and incident surveillance data for the hourly population at 6 US aluminum smelters, injuries that occurred from January 1, 1996, through December 21, 2005, were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for job, tenure, and age category, was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for female versus male injury risk for all injuries, recordable injuries, and lost work time injuries. The analysis was repeated for acute injuries and musculoskeletal disorder-related injuries separately. Female workers in this industry have a greater risk for sustaining all forms of injury after adjustment for age, tenure, and standardized job category (odds ratio = 1.365, 95% confidence interval: 1.290, 1.445). This excess risk for female workers persisted when injuries were dichotomized into acute injuries (odds ratio = 1.2) and musculoskeletal disorder-related injuries (odds ratio = 1.1). This study provides evidence of a sex disparity in occupational injury with female workers at higher risk compared with their male counterparts in a heavy manufacturing environment.

  2. Training On the Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Diane

    This book provides training and development professionals with step-by-step guidelines for developing and delivering comprehensive structured the on-the-job training (OJT). Chapter 1 introduces the concept of team-driven structured OJT and discusses its philosophy and basic components in the context of fundamental concepts of human behavior and…

  3. The Job Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Donald R.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a Job Club for still-unemployed students after graduation. Informal monthly meetings allow students to network; obtain moral support and encouragement; and get ideas, suggestions, and leads. Department faculty serve as informal brokers in bringing employers and graduates together and provide a support system for students during their job…

  4. Historians' Rocky Job Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafton, Anthony; Townsend, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how the historians' job market is perennially rocky. The history profession had its "golden age" in the 1950s and early 1960s when a generation born in the demographic trench of the Depression entered the market just as the first of the baby boomers began to swell college enrollments. But that moment was…

  5. A Jobs Mismatch. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marina, Brenda L. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the article "A Jobs Mismatch", Jaschik has compiled the findings of a new report that was released by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The Georgetown University report claims that there is a severe shortage of college graduates in America, and that this shortage has the United States on a…

  6. Stress Management: Job Stress

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Job stress can be all-consuming — but it doesn't have to be. Address your triggers, keep perspective and ... stress triggers, it's often helpful to improve time management skills — especially if you tend to feel overwhelmed ...

  7. Job Aids and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grau, Joseph A.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests job aids have motivational benefits and discusses three ways in which they positively affect motivation: increases worker's confidence of success and amount of effort they are willing to invest in attempting tasks; increases expectancy while decreasing amount of motivation needed; and reinforces task importance. (MBR)

  8. What is Job Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke. Edwin A.

    Despite considerable interest in the study of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction, our understanding of these phenomena has not increased substantially in the past 30 years. It is argued that a major reason for this lack of progress is the implicit conception of casuality accepted by most psychologists. It is called the policy of "correlation…

  9. Will My Job Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    In an economic downturn that seems to defy fiscal doctrine, how can one be sure that an IT job will remain safe through the coming ups and downs? Since no one can guarantee that IT position will remain intact through a turbulent economy, the author discusses how one can plan now to protect himself/herself later.

  10. Historians' Rocky Job Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafton, Anthony; Townsend, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how the historians' job market is perennially rocky. The history profession had its "golden age" in the 1950s and early 1960s when a generation born in the demographic trench of the Depression entered the market just as the first of the baby boomers began to swell college enrollments. But that moment was…

  11. Predicting Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Psychological theories about human motivation and accommodation to environment can be used to achieve a better understanding of the human factors that function in the work environment. Maslow's theory of human motivational behavior provided a theoretical framework for an empirically-derived method to predict job satisfaction and explore the…

  12. Jobs Plan Highlights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2011-01-01

    President Barack Obama is putting new money to save educators' jobs and help states refurbish aging school facilities at the center of a nearly $450 billion plan to jump-start the sluggish economy. The author talks about the president's plan which is sure to face hurdles in a politically polarized Washington where one house of Congress is…

  13. Where the Jobs Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel Singer

    2004-01-01

    Despite the discussion about the greying of the profession, librarians seem to agree on little but this: the jobs being vacated are generally upper-level and the departure of retiring library managers fails to translate into a glut of entry level spots. This article describes how NextGens should prepare to move into management and other upper…

  14. Job-Market Blues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magner, Denise K.

    1994-01-01

    Graduate students told a few years ago that the academic job market would open up significantly are disappointed in the shortage of tenure-track openings and glut of candidates. White males feel women and minorities are favored. Some observers find it unethical for departments to continue producing doctoral recipients. (MSE)

  15. Applied Economics: Job Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trahern, Darlene

    1972-01-01

    The classroom became a working economics laboratory for third graders at Humboldt School in Canyon City, Oregon, beginning with their duties as classroom helpers. By giving the tasks the importance of real-life jobs, the youngsters soon discovered individual likes, dislikes, and capabilities which affected their attitudes toward work. (Author)

  16. Will My Job Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    In an economic downturn that seems to defy fiscal doctrine, how can one be sure that an IT job will remain safe through the coming ups and downs? Since no one can guarantee that IT position will remain intact through a turbulent economy, the author discusses how one can plan now to protect himself/herself later.

  17. Measuring Clerical Job Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronan, William W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes research which attempts to provide a solution to the performance criterion problem, concluding that is seems possible to measure many aspects of clerical work using psychometric measures that are highly job related; recommends that such devices be used to supplement ratings in the performance evaluation process.

  18. Enhancing Job Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The impact of the Self-Determined Career Development Model (hereafter called the Self-Determined Career Model) on the job performance of four adults with moderate intellectual disability employed in competitive work settings was examined. Employees learned to set work-related goals, develop an action plan, implement the plan, and adjust their…

  19. Communicating on the Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Lorna; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in on-the-job communication that was developed as a component of a workplace literacy program for persons employed in the manufacturing and service industries. The course is structured so that, upon its completion, students will be able to accomplish the following: identify different personality types and…

  20. Better Positioning Those Camp Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses summer camps' difficulties in recruiting college students as staff, suggesting camps have "image problem." Describes study of job descriptions to evaluate whether camps offer useful career experiences. Examines frequency and types of job tasks. Examines how camp directors might use job descriptions to recruit more effectively. (TES)

  1. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    PubMed

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  2. The DACUM Job Analysis Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dofasco, Inc., Hamilton (Ontario).

    This document explains the DACUM (Developing A Curriculum) process for analyzing task-based jobs to: identify where standard operating procedures are required; identify duplicated low value added tasks; develop performance standards; create job descriptions; and identify the elements that must be included in job-specific training programs. The…

  3. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  4. College Faculty and Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Thomas

    Attitudes of 277 faculty members about their work were surveyed in 1983. Herzberg and colleagues' theory that work satisfaction stems from the work itself and dissatisfaction from the work environment was also explored. Attention was directed to attitudes toward work, job stress, overall job satisfaction, and chief job satisfactions and…

  5. Job Satisfaction: An International Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    An international comparison of job satisfaction levels strongly suggests that the idea of job satisfaction as a gauge of well-being at the workplace should be rejected, but that workers' reactions to aspects of their jobs may be meaningful. The article presents data from national surveys of managers, workers, and trade unions to explain this…

  6. Job Ideas for Today's Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembeck, Ruth

    A women entering the job market for the first time, getting back to it, or changing jobs can encounter many problems. This step-by-step guide is designed to make this task easier. Of the 1,000 jobs listed there are several special interest areas covered: foods, parties, retailing, direct or mail-order selling, real estate, insurance, animals,…

  7. EEO Implications of Job Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, D. Patrick, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses job analyses as they relate to the requirements of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Argues that job analyses can establish the job-relatedness of entrance requirements and aid in defenses against charges of discrimination. Journal availability: see EA 511 615.

  8. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  9. Job Satisfaction: An International Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    An international comparison of job satisfaction levels strongly suggests that the idea of job satisfaction as a gauge of well-being at the workplace should be rejected, but that workers' reactions to aspects of their jobs may be meaningful. The article presents data from national surveys of managers, workers, and trade unions to explain this…

  10. Job satisfaction among recreation practitioners

    Treesearch

    Erin Parks; Andrew Holdnak

    2002-01-01

    Job satisfaction among recreation professionals can be affected by many working conditions. This study has investigated the impact fourteen variables had on the job satisfaction of recreation practitioners. The sample consisted of 106 responses from members of the Resort and Commercial Recreation Association (RCRA). The results of the regression analysis for job...

  11. College Faculty and Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Thomas

    Attitudes of 277 faculty members about their work were surveyed in 1983. Herzberg and colleagues' theory that work satisfaction stems from the work itself and dissatisfaction from the work environment was also explored. Attention was directed to attitudes toward work, job stress, overall job satisfaction, and chief job satisfactions and…

  12. EEO Implications of Job Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, D. Patrick, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses job analyses as they relate to the requirements of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Argues that job analyses can establish the job-relatedness of entrance requirements and aid in defenses against charges of discrimination. Journal availability: see EA 511 615.

  13. Injuries in women's basketball.

    PubMed

    Trojian, Thomas H; Ragle, Rosemary B

    2008-03-01

    Women's basketball has changed over time. It is a faster paced game than it was 30 years ago. Greatplayers, like Anne Meyers,who was the first, and only, woman to be signed to an NBA contract, would agree today's game is different. The game is played mostly "below the rim" but with players like Candice Parker, Sylvia Fowles and Maya Moore able to dunk the ball, the game is still changing. The one thing that remains constant in basketball, especially women's basketball, is injury. The majority of injuries in women's basketball are similar to those in men's basketball. Studies at the high school and college level show similar injury rates between women and men. ACL injuries are one exception, with female athletes having atwo to four times higher rate ofACL injuries. In this article, we review the common injuries in women's basketball. We discuss treatment issues and possible preventive measures.

  14. A multilevel examination of affective job insecurity climate on safety outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lixin; Probst, Tahira M

    2016-07-01

    Previous research has established a causal link between individual perceptions of job insecurity and safety outcomes. However, whether job insecurity climate is associated with safety outcomes has not been studied. The purpose of the current study was to explore the main and cross-level interaction effects of affective job insecurity climate on safety outcomes, including behavioral safety compliance, reporting attitudes, workplace injuries, experienced safety events, unreported safety events, and accident underreporting, beyond individual affective job insecurity. With 171 employees nested in 40 workgroups, multilevel analyses revealed that the negative impacts of individual affective job insecurity on safety outcomes are exacerbated when they occur in a climate of high affective job insecurity. These results are interpreted in light of safety management efforts and suggest that efforts to create a secure climate within one's workgroup may reap safety-related benefits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  16. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  17. Imaging of triathlon injuries.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Injuries in triathletes are common and are mostly overuse injuries. Rotator cuff tendinitis is the most common complaint from swimming, but the incidence of tendinopathy and rotator cuff tears on magnetic resonance imaging is comparable in triathletes without and with shoulder pain. Cycling injuries are mainly to the knee, including patellar tendinosis, iliotibial band syndrome, and patellofemoral stress syndrome, and to the Achilles tendon and the cervical and lumbar spine. Running is associated with most injuries in triathletes, during both training and racing, causing the athlete to discontinue the triathlon. In addition to knee injuries from running, triathletes may also develop foot and ankle, lower leg, and hip injuries similar to single-sport distance runners. Some injuries in triathletes may be mainly symptomatic during one of the three sports but are exacerbated by one or both of the other disciplines.

  18. Experimental evaluation of job provenance in ATLAS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Křenek, A.; Sitera, J.; Chudoba, J.; Dvořák, F.; Filipovič, J.; Kmuníček, J.; Matyska, L.; Mulaš, M.; Ruda, M.; Šustr, Z.; Campana, S.; Molinari, E.; Rebatto, D.

    2008-07-01

    Grid middleware stacks, including gLite, matured into the state of being able to process up to millions of jobs per day. Logging and Bookkeeping, the gLite job-tracking service, keeps pace with this rate; however, it is not designed to provide a long-term archive of information on executed jobs. ATLAS — representative of a large user community — addresses this issue with its own job catalogue (ProdDB). Development of such a customized service, not easily reusable, took considerable effort which is not affordable by smaller communities. On the contrary, Job Provenance (JP), a generic gLite service designed for long-term archiving of information on executed jobs focusing on scalability, extensibility, uniform data view, and configurability, allows more specialized catalogues to be easily built. We present the first results of an experimental JP deployment for the ATLAS production infrastructure where a JP installation was fed with a part of ATLAS jobs, and also stress tested with real production data. The main outcome of this work is a demonstration that JP can complement large-scale application-specific job catalogue services, while serving a similar purpose where there are none available.

  19. Table-top job analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to establish general training program guidelines for training personnel in developing training for operation, maintenance, and technical support personnel at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. TTJA is not the only method of job analysis; however, when conducted properly TTJA can be cost effective, efficient, and self-validating, and represents an effective method of defining job requirements. The table-top job analysis is suggested in the DOE Training Accreditation Program manuals as an acceptable alternative to traditional methods of analyzing job requirements. DOE 5480-20A strongly endorses and recommends it as the preferred method for analyzing jobs for positions addressed by the Order.

  20. Occupational stress and work-related unintentional injuries among Iranian car manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Soori, H; Rahimi, M; Mohseni, H

    2008-01-01

    This study in 2004 and 2005 aimed to present the pattern of job stress among car manufacturing workers in one factory in the Islamic Republic of Iran, and to assess its relationship with occupational injuries. Data were collected from 608 male workers (508 at-risk general workers and 100 with injuries in the last year). Job stress was assessed by the Belkic occupational stress index. The prevalence of job stress was 21.3%. The main occupational stressors were time pressure (78.5%), mode of payment and evaluation (56.4%), and interaction with people and machines (41.3%). The risk of injury among those with job stress was significantly higher than those without job stress (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.20-3.30). Job stress was responsible for 11.9% of all occupational injuries in this group.

  1. Jobs masonry in LHCb with elastic Grid Jobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Charpentier, Ph

    2015-12-01

    In any distributed computing infrastructure, a job is normally forbidden to run for an indefinite amount of time. This limitation is implemented using different technologies, the most common one being the CPU time limit implemented by batch queues. It is therefore important to have a good estimate of how much CPU work a job will require: otherwise, it might be killed by the batch system, or by whatever system is controlling the jobs’ execution. In many modern interwares, the jobs are actually executed by pilot jobs, that can use the whole available time in running multiple consecutive jobs. If at some point the available time in a pilot is too short for the execution of any job, it should be released, while it could have been used efficiently by a shorter job. Within LHCbDIRAC, the LHCb extension of the DIRAC interware, we developed a simple way to fully exploit computing capabilities available to a pilot, even for resources with limited time capabilities, by adding elasticity to production MonteCarlo (MC) simulation jobs. With our approach, independently of the time available, LHCbDIRAC will always have the possibility to execute a MC job, whose length will be adapted to the available amount of time: therefore the same job, running on different computing resources with different time limits, will produce different amounts of events. The decision on the number of events to be produced is made just in time at the start of the job, when the capabilities of the resource are known. In order to know how many events a MC job will be instructed to produce, LHCbDIRAC simply requires three values: the CPU-work per event for that type of job, the power of the machine it is running on, and the time left for the job before being killed. Knowing these values, we can estimate the number of events the job will be able to simulate with the available CPU time. This paper will demonstrate that, using this simple but effective solution, LHCb manages to make a more efficient use of

  2. Job Scope and Job Satisfaction: A Study of Urban Workers. Scientific Report 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Eugene F.; Porter, Lyman W.

    The relationship between job scope and job satisfaction was examined for a sample of urban, predominantly blue-collar, employees. Incumbents in sixteen jobs provided data on job characteristics (N=164) and job satisfaction (N=593). Rank-order correlation coefficients were computed between mean job scope indices and mean job satisfaction levels for…

  3. An integrated job exposure matrix for electrical exposures of utility workers.

    PubMed

    Bracken, T Dan; Kavet, Robert; Patterson, Robert M; Fordyce, Tiffani A

    2009-08-01

    Electric utility workers may be exposed to any combination of magnetic fields, electric fields, nuisance shocks (from spark discharges and continuous currents), imperceptible contact currents, and electrical injuries. Collectively these exposures are referred to as EMF Factors. Previous occupational exposure assessments have mainly characterized the magnetic field, with less attention to the electric field. Nuisance shocks and electrical injuries, though palpable, have received little to no attention. This article presents a prototype job exposure matrix that addresses exposure to all EMF Factors taking into account job category, work environment, and occupied environment. Exposures for all factors were classified into three ordinal levels for 22 job categories. Electric and magnetic field exposures were classified by the geometric mean of daily average of personal exposure measurements. Although relatively sparse, survey data on nuisance shocks were adequate for exposure assignment by job category and indicate that the frequency of these exposures has diminished over time. The least information was available for imperceptible contact currents that are associated with electric field exposures and small contact voltages. Data for electrical injuries by job category were derived from the Electric Power Research Institute Occupational Health Surveillance Database, with exposure assignments based on combined injury rates for flash burn and electric shock/electrocution. The highest exposures for all EMF Factors are essentially limited to four job categories that work on or close to electrical equipment: (1) cable splicers, (2) electricians, (3) line workers, and (4) substation operators.

  4. Gender, technology and jobs.

    PubMed

    Brynin, Malcolm

    2006-09-01

    Men have traditionally gained more than women from access to technologies at work which bring prestige, job security, more satisfying work and higher pay. Typically female jobs have centred on technologies, if they have at all, which tend towards routine and possibly deskilled work. Typing is a prime example. It is possible that this is changing through computerization, which is extensive but also equally distributed by gender. Does the wage premium, which use of a computer has been found to confer on users, benefit women sufficiently to suggest some sort of equalization through technology, or possibly even a female advantage? This is tested using data from four European countries. There is no across-the-board benefit from the use of computers. For both men and women it depends on the nature of their occupation. Some, more routine usages of computers are associated with a negative outcome. However, this occupational balance itself varies by gender.

  5. Job hindrances, job resources, and safety performance: The mediating role of job engagement.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhenyu; Li, Yongjuan; Tetrick, Lois E

    2015-11-01

    Job engagement has received widespread attention in organizational research but has rarely been empirically investigated in the context of safety. In the present study, we examined the mediating role of job engagement in the relationships between job characteristics and safety performance using self-reported data collected at a coal mining company in China. Most of our study hypotheses were supported. Job engagement partially mediated the relationships between job resources and safety performance dimensions. Theoretical and practical implications and directions for future research are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Dimensions of Job Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    recognized as the optimum method for assessing the validity of performance measures ( Guion , 1980; James, 1973). The same model that is so highly...simulation. Also related to hands-on testing, this technique involves the use of pictorial or video materials in depicting aspects of the test or job...Fleishman, E., &: Quaintance, M. (1984). Taxonomies of human performance: The description of human tasks. New York: Academic Press. Guion , R. M. (1980

  7. Job Hazard Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    lifting heavy objects? • Do environmenta on, welding rays, heat, or excessiv Job Hazard Analysis U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration 200 Constitution Avenue Washington, DC...not itself alter or determine compliance responsibilities, which are set forth in OSHA standards themselves and the Occupational Safety and Health Act

  8. Aspects of job scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model for job scheduling in a specified context is presented. The model uses both linear programming and combinatorial methods. While designed with a view toward optimization of scheduling of facility and plant operations at the Deep Space Communications Complex, the context is sufficiently general to be widely applicable. The general scheduling problem including options for scheduling objectives is discussed and fundamental parameters identified. Mathematical algorithms for partitioning problems germane to scheduling are presented.

  9. Aspects of job scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model for job scheduling in a specified context is presented. The model uses both linear programming and combinatorial methods. While designed with a view toward optimization of scheduling of facility and plant operations at the Deep Space Communications Complex, the context is sufficiently general to be widely applicable. The general scheduling problem including options for scheduling objectives is discussed and fundamental parameters identified. Mathematical algorithms for partitioning problems germane to scheduling are presented.

  10. Job Knowledge Test Design: A Cognitively-Oriented Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    protocol analyses and related methods. We employed a plan-goal graph representation to capture the knowledge content and goal structure of the studied task...between job knowledge and hands-on performance from previous studies was .38. For the subset of Marines in this sample who had recently been examined...the job knowledge test provided similar results to conventional, total number correct scoring. Conclusion The evidence provided by this study supports

  11. Biosimilar Insulins: How Similar is Similar?

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Biosimilar insulins (BIs) are viewed as commercially attractive products by a number of companies. In order to obtain approval in the European Union or the United States, where there is not a single BI currently on the market, a manufacturer needs to demonstrate that a given BI has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the “original” insulin formulation that is already on the market. As trivial as this may appear at first glance, it is not trivial at all for a good number of reasons that will be discussed in this commentary. As with protein manufacturing, modifications in the structure of the insulin molecule can take place (which can have serious consequences for the biological effects induced), so a rigid and careful assessment is absolutely necessary. The example of Marvel's failed application with the European Medicines Agency provides insights into the regulatory and clinical challenges surrounding the matter of BI. Although a challenging BI approval process might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. PMID:21722590

  12. Job resources buffer the impact of job demands on burnout.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Arnold B; Demerouti, Evangelia; Euwema, Martin C

    2005-04-01

    This study tested and refined the job demands-resources model, demonstrating that several job resources play a role in buffering the impact of several job demands on burnout. A total of 1,012 employees of a large institute for higher education participated in the study. Four demanding aspects of the job (e.g., work overload, emotional demands) and 4 job resources (e.g., autonomy, performance feedback) were used to test the central hypothesis that the interaction between (high) demands and (low) resources produces the highest levels of burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, reduced professional efficacy). The hypothesis was rejected for (reduced) professional efficacy but confirmed for exhaustion and cynicism regarding 18 out of 32 possible 2-way interactions (i.e., combinations of specific job demands and resources). Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2011-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of chemical space. Although all three concepts - molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemical space - are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations that are of the same mathematical form into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another. An expanded account of the material on chemical spaces presented in the first edition of this book is also provided. It includes a discussion of the topography of activity landscapes and the role that activity cliffs in these landscapes play in structure-activity studies.

  14. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2004-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of a chemistry space. Although all three concepts molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemistry space are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations, that is, representations of the same mathematical form, into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another.

  15. The Gender Similarities Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-01-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses…

  16. Snowboarding injuries of the abdomen: comparison with skiing injuries.

    PubMed

    Machida, T; Hanazaki, K; Ishizaka, K; Nakamura, M; Kobayashi, O; Shibata, H; Nakafuji, H; Amano, J

    1999-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to identify the characteristics of snowboarding injury of the abdomen in comparison with those of alpine skiing injuries. Between December 1988 and April 1997, 1579 patients were treated for snowboarding injuries and 9108 patients were treated after skiing accidents. 19 patients (1.2%) in snowboarding and 64 (0.7%) in skiing had abdominal injuries. The abdominal injury rate in snowboarders was significantly higher than that in skiers. Snowboarders with abdominal injuries were similar to skiers with respect to epidemiology but the patterns of injury in the two groups showed several distinct differences. Riding mistakes after jumping for the snowboarders (31.6%) was significantly higher than that for the skiers (0%). The main organs involved in snowboarding and skiing injuries were kidney, liver and spleen. The incidence of solitary renal injury in snowboarding (68.4%) was significantly higher than that in skiing (29.7%).

  17. Mobilization of the obese patient and prevention of injury.

    PubMed

    Walden, Christine M; Bankard, Scott B; Cayer, Bradford; Floyd, William B; Garrison, Herbert G; Hickey, Todd; Holfer, Linda D; Rotondo, Michael F; Pories, Walter J

    2013-10-01

    Obese patients are difficult to transport between emergency departments, imaging facilities, operating rooms, intensive care units, acute care units, and rehabilitation facilities. Each move, along with turning, bathing, and access to bathrooms, poses risks of injury to patients and personnel. Similarly, inadequate mobilization raises the risk of pressure ulcers. The costs can be prohibitive. On 6 pilot units, mobilization of patients was delegated to trained lift team technicians who covered the units in pairs, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, to assist with moving and lifting of patients weighing 200 pounds or more, with a Braden Scale score of 18 or less and/or the presence of pressure ulcers. In fiscal year 2012, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers on pilot units decreased by 43% (from 61 to 35). Patient handling-related employee injuries on pilot units decreased by 38.5% (from 13 to 8). Employee satisfaction related to organizational commitment to employee safety and impact on job satisfaction was positively impacted by implementation of the lift team. With the reduction in employee injuries and the fall in the prevalence of pressure ulcers, the adoption of the lift team program decreased costs by $493,293.00. Implementation of lift teams on pilot nursing units decreased patient handling-related employee injuries, resulting in sharp improvements in quality patient care and reduced costs.

  18. Job satisfaction among hospital nurses revisited: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Barriball, K Louise; Zhang, Xian; While, Alison E

    2012-08-01

    The current nursing shortage and high turnover is of great concern in many countries because of its impact upon the efficiency and effectiveness of any healthcare delivery system. Recruitment and retention of nurses are persistent problems associated with job satisfaction. To update review paper published in 2005. This paper analyses 100 papers relating to job satisfaction among hospital nurses derived from systematic searches of seven databases covering English and Chinese language publications 1966-2011 (updating the original paper with 46 additional studies published 2004-2011). Despite varying levels of job satisfaction across studies, sources and effects of job satisfaction were similar. Hospital nurse job satisfaction is closely related to working conditions and the organizational environment, job stress, role conflict and ambiguity, role perception and role content, organizational and professional commitment. More research is required to understand the relative importance of the many identified factors relating to job satisfaction of hospital nurses. It is argued that the absence of a robust causal model reflecting moderators or moderator is undermining the development of interventions to improve nurse retention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The gender similarities hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-09-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships.

  20. Parallel job-scheduling algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis, we consider solving job scheduling problems on the CREW PRAM model. We show how to adapt Cole's pipeline merge technique to yield several efficient parallel algorithms for a number of job scheduling problems and one optimal parallel algorithm for the following job scheduling problem: Given a set of n jobs defined by release times, deadlines and processing times, find a schedule that minimizes the maximum lateness of the jobs and allows preemption when the jobs are scheduled to run on one machine. In addition, we present the first NC algorithm for the following job scheduling problem: Given a set of n jobs defined by release times, deadlines and unit processing times, determine if there is a schedule of jobs on one machine, and calculate the schedule if it exists. We identify the notion of a canonical schedule, which is the type of schedule our algorithm computes if there is a schedule. Our algorithm runs in O((log n){sup 2}) time and uses O(n{sup 2}k{sup 2}) processors, where k is the minimum number of distinct offsets of release times or deadlines.

  1. A Conceptual Framework for Job Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughead, Teri A.; Black, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Outlines a conceptual framework for job change analogous to a thermostat, in which job satisfaction is the "thermometer," change in a job or between jobs is the "adjustment lever," and values, life status, readiness to change, and job opportunities are the "controls." (26 references) (SK)

  2. Prototype Procedures to Describe Army Jobs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    D. (2009). Assessing professional competence by using occupational judgment tests derived from job analysis questionnaires (Technical Report 1242...occupation/ job and that differentiate an Army occupation/ job , or cluster of occupations/ jobs , from others (e.g., performing operator maintenance ...wheeled vehicle. 1 Obtain service box and read orders for maintenance job . 2 Perform routine inspection and checks of wheeled vehicle. 3

  3. A Comprehensive Look at Job Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodman, Richard W.; Sherwood, John J.

    1977-01-01

    Job design or redesign (intended to create a more meaningful working environment that meets the needs of people as well as the organization) is discussed in terms of job rotation, work simplification, job enlargement, job enrichment, and other concepts relating to successfully redesigning other's jobs as part of effective management. (TA)

  4. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with § 1656.5...

  5. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with § 1656.5...

  6. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with § 1656.5...

  7. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with § 1656.5...

  8. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with § 1656.5...

  9. Trait Affect and Job Search Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Stephane; Saks, Alan M.; Zikic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the role of trait affect in job search. One hundred and twenty-three university students completed measures of positive and negative affectivity, conscientiousness, job search self-efficacy, job search clarity, and job search intensity during their last year of school while on the job market. At the end of the school…

  10. A Comprehensive Look at Job Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodman, Richard W.; Sherwood, John J.

    1977-01-01

    Job design or redesign (intended to create a more meaningful working environment that meets the needs of people as well as the organization) is discussed in terms of job rotation, work simplification, job enlargement, job enrichment, and other concepts relating to successfully redesigning other's jobs as part of effective management. (TA)

  11. A Conceptual Framework for Job Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughead, Teri A.; Black, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Outlines a conceptual framework for job change analogous to a thermostat, in which job satisfaction is the "thermometer," change in a job or between jobs is the "adjustment lever," and values, life status, readiness to change, and job opportunities are the "controls." (26 references) (SK)

  12. Gender similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2014-01-01

    Whether men and women are fundamentally different or similar has been debated for more than a century. This review summarizes major theories designed to explain gender differences: evolutionary theories, cognitive social learning theory, sociocultural theory, and expectancy-value theory. The gender similarities hypothesis raises the possibility of theorizing gender similarities. Statistical methods for the analysis of gender differences and similarities are reviewed, including effect sizes, meta-analysis, taxometric analysis, and equivalence testing. Then, relying mainly on evidence from meta-analyses, gender differences are reviewed in cognitive performance (e.g., math performance), personality and social behaviors (e.g., temperament, emotions, aggression, and leadership), and psychological well-being. The evidence on gender differences in variance is summarized. The final sections explore applications of intersectionality and directions for future research.

  13. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  14. 30 CFR 50.20-2 - Criteria-“Transfer to another job.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criteria-âTransfer to another job.â 50.20-2 Section 50.20-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACCIDENTS..., Injuries, and Illnesses § 50.20-2 Criteria—“Transfer to another job.” “Transfer to another job” means...

  15. 30 CFR 50.20-2 - Criteria-“Transfer to another job.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria-âTransfer to another job.â 50.20-2 Section 50.20-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACCIDENTS..., Injuries, and Illnesses § 50.20-2 Criteria—“Transfer to another job.” “Transfer to another job” means...

  16. 30 CFR 50.20-2 - Criteria-“Transfer to another job.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criteria-âTransfer to another job.â 50.20-2 Section 50.20-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACCIDENTS..., Injuries, and Illnesses § 50.20-2 Criteria—“Transfer to another job.” “Transfer to another job” means...

  17. 30 CFR 50.20-2 - Criteria-“Transfer to another job.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria-âTransfer to another job.â 50.20-2 Section 50.20-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACCIDENTS..., Injuries, and Illnesses § 50.20-2 Criteria—“Transfer to another job.” “Transfer to another job” means...

  18. 30 CFR 50.20-2 - Criteria-“Transfer to another job.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria-âTransfer to another job.â 50.20-2 Section 50.20-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACCIDENTS..., Injuries, and Illnesses § 50.20-2 Criteria—“Transfer to another job.” “Transfer to another job” means...

  19. Safe and healthy integration into semiskilled jobs: does gender matter?

    PubMed

    Laberge, Marie; Vézina, Nicole; Saint-Charles, Johanne

    2012-01-01

    Women report fewer injuries than men when they are young, but report a higher proportion of professional diseases later in life (35 years +). Understanding early work conditions that lead to postponed health outcomes is necessary if we are to prevent women's injury as well as men's. Introduction to work and safe integration programs are often put forward to prevent injuries among youth. This paper aims to illustrate some differences in the job introduction / integration process for men and women and to discuss some gender-based Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) implications. Data come from two waves of interviews with 31 students enrolled in vocational training for a semiskilled trade. Results demonstrated differences between men and women: trades chosen, OHS complaints, supervising patterns, integration to work, etc. Women often choose customer service jobs, have less formal supervision and are often left to themselves when learning to do their job. Men declared more accidents while women reported more musculoskeletal symptoms. Findings from this research suggest young women's OHS issues should not be trivialized and that specific youth prevention programs for sectors where women are more present, such as customer service, should be developed.

  20. Selected Job Title Description for Nonfarm Agricultural Jobs in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondart, C. L., Jr.; And Others

    Job information, presented for use by high school counselors, was derived from a statewide study of nonfarm agricultural occupations which revealed that 20,025 Louisiana workers in 1,699 job titles were doing work demanding some specialized training in agriculture. Information includes a description, employee qualifications, employment…

  1. Jobs in Business and Office. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The booklet describes business and office occupations related to management (including personnel), records planning and control, clerical and secretarial jobs, owning your own business, and the teaching of business subjects. For each occupation, duties are outlined and working conditions discussed. Techniques used to complete the job descriptions…

  2. Good Jobs, Bad Jobs: Workers' Evaluations in Five Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Joseph A.; Anker, Richard

    2002-01-01

    A study of workers from Argentina (n=2,920), Brazil (n=4,000), Chile (n=1,188), Hungary (1,000), and the Ukraine (n=8,099) examined relationships between job satisfaction and employee and employer characteristics. Satisfaction was related to job security, perceptions of workplace safety, higher education, and employer attitudes. (Contains 17…

  3. Jobs in Business and Office. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The booklet describes business and office occupations related to management (including personnel), records planning and control, clerical and secretarial jobs, owning your own business, and the teaching of business subjects. For each occupation, duties are outlined and working conditions discussed. Techniques used to complete the job descriptions…

  4. Good Jobs, Bad Jobs: Workers' Evaluations in Five Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Joseph A.; Anker, Richard

    2002-01-01

    A study of workers from Argentina (n=2,920), Brazil (n=4,000), Chile (n=1,188), Hungary (1,000), and the Ukraine (n=8,099) examined relationships between job satisfaction and employee and employer characteristics. Satisfaction was related to job security, perceptions of workplace safety, higher education, and employer attitudes. (Contains 17…

  5. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  6. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  7. The importance of job autonomy, cognitive ability, and job-related skill for predicting role breadth and job performance.

    PubMed

    Morgeson, Frederick P; Delaney-Klinger, Kelly; Hemingway, Monica A

    2005-03-01

    Role theory suggests and empirical research has found that there is considerable variation in how broadly individuals define their jobs. We investigated the theoretically meaningful yet infrequently studied relationships between incumbent job autonomy, cognitive ability, job-related skill, role breadth, and job performance. Using multiple data sources and multiple measurement occasions in a field setting, we found that job autonomy, cognitive ability, and job-related skill were positively related to role breadth, accounting for 23% of the variance in role breadth. In addition, role breadth was positively related to job performance and was found to mediate the relationship between job autonomy, cognitive ability, job-related skill, and job performance. These results add to our understanding of the factors that predict role breadth, as well as having implications for how job aspects and individual characteristics are translated into performance outcomes and the treatment of variability in incumbent reports of job tasks.

  8. Acute injuries in orienteerers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Nylund, T; Taimela, S

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.

  9. Hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ropiak, Christopher R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are a frequent injury in athletes. Proximal injuries are common, ranging from strain to complete tear. Strains are managed nonoperatively, with rest followed by progressive stretching and strengthening. Reinjury is a concern. High grade complete tears are better managed surgically, with reattachment to the injured tendon or ischial tuberosity. Distal hamstring injury is usually associated with other knee injuries, and isolated injury is rare.

  10. Academics Job Satisfaction and Job Stress across Countries in the Changing Academic Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined job satisfaction and job stress across 19 higher education systems. We classified the 19 countries according to their job satisfaction and job stress and applied regression analysis to test whether new public management has impacts on either or both job satisfaction and job stress. According to this study, strong market driven…

  11. Your Job Search Organiser. The Essential Guide for a Successful Job Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Paul

    This publication organizes job searches in Australia by creating a paperwork system and recording essential information. It is organized into two parts: career planning and job search management. Part 1 contains the following sections: job evaluation, goal setting, job search obstacles--personal constraints and job search obstacles; and job search…

  12. Academics Job Satisfaction and Job Stress across Countries in the Changing Academic Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined job satisfaction and job stress across 19 higher education systems. We classified the 19 countries according to their job satisfaction and job stress and applied regression analysis to test whether new public management has impacts on either or both job satisfaction and job stress. According to this study, strong market driven…

  13. Incidence of injury in elite Gaelic footballers.

    PubMed

    Newell, M; Grant, S; Henry, A; Newell, J

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to undertake a comprehensive prospective epidemiological study of injuries sustained by elite Gaelic Football players over one season. The pattern of injury is strikingly similar across all teams with 47% of all injuries occurring in the final quarter of games and training. Injuries to the lower limb, particularly the hamstrings muscles accounted for the majority of injuries. 65% of players were unable to participate fully in Gaelic Football activity for between one and three weeks as a result of injury. The high incidence of injury especially hamstrings injuries in the latter stages of training and games warrants further investigation.

  14. Physically and psychologically hazardous jobs and mental health in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Strazdins, Lyndall; Lim, Lynette L-Y; Kelly, Matthew; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian C

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates associations between hazardous jobs, mental health and wellbeing among Thai adults. In 2005, 87 134 distance-learning students from Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University completed a self-administered questionnaire; at the 2009 follow-up 60 569 again participated. Job characteristics were reported in 2005, psychological distress and life satisfaction were reported in both 2005 and 2009. We derived two composite variables grading psychologically and physically hazardous jobs and reported adjusted odds ratios (AOR) from multivariate logistic regressions. Analyses focused on cohort members in paid work: the total was 62 332 at 2005 baseline and 41 671 at 2009 follow-up. Cross-sectional AORs linking psychologically hazardous jobs to psychological distress ranged from 1.52 (one hazard) to 4.48 (four hazards) for males and a corresponding 1.34-3.76 for females. Similarly AORs for physically hazardous jobs were 1.75 (one hazard) to 2.76 (four or more hazards) for males and 1.70-3.19 for females. A similar magnitude of associations was found between psychologically adverse jobs and low life satisfaction (AORs of 1.34-4.34 among males and 1.18-3.63 among females). Longitudinal analyses confirm these cross-sectional relationships. Thus, significant dose-response associations were found linking hazardous job exposures in 2005 to mental health and wellbeing in 2009. The health impacts of psychologically and physically hazardous jobs in developed, Western countries are equally evident in transitioning Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand. Regulation and monitoring of work conditions will become increasingly important to the health and wellbeing of the Thai workforce. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Physically and psychologically hazardous jobs and mental health in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Strazdins, Lyndall; Lim, Lynette L.-Y.; Kelly, Matthew; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates associations between hazardous jobs, mental health and wellbeing among Thai adults. In 2005, 87 134 distance-learning students from Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University completed a self-administered questionnaire; at the 2009 follow-up 60 569 again participated. Job characteristics were reported in 2005, psychological distress and life satisfaction were reported in both 2005 and 2009. We derived two composite variables grading psychologically and physically hazardous jobs and reported adjusted odds ratios (AOR) from multivariate logistic regressions. Analyses focused on cohort members in paid work: the total was 62 332 at 2005 baseline and 41 671 at 2009 follow-up. Cross-sectional AORs linking psychologically hazardous jobs to psychological distress ranged from 1.52 (one hazard) to 4.48 (four hazards) for males and a corresponding 1.34–3.76 for females. Similarly AORs for physically hazardous jobs were 1.75 (one hazard) to 2.76 (four or more hazards) for males and 1.70–3.19 for females. A similar magnitude of associations was found between psychologically adverse jobs and low life satisfaction (AORs of 1.34–4.34 among males and 1.18–3.63 among females). Longitudinal analyses confirm these cross-sectional relationships. Thus, significant dose–response associations were found linking hazardous job exposures in 2005 to mental health and wellbeing in 2009. The health impacts of psychologically and physically hazardous jobs in developed, Western countries are equally evident in transitioning Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand. Regulation and monitoring of work conditions will become increasingly important to the health and wellbeing of the Thai workforce. PMID:24218225

  16. Job demands × job control interaction effects: do occupation-specific job demands increase their occurrence?

    PubMed

    Brough, Paula; Biggs, Amanda

    2015-04-01

    Despite evidence that the accurate assessment of occupational health should include measures of both generic job demands and occupation-specific job demands, most research includes only generic job demands. The inclusion of more focused occupation-specific job demands is suggested to explain a larger proportion of variance for both direct effects and job demands × job control/support interaction effects, as compared with the inclusion of generic job demands. This research tested these two propositions via a self-report survey assessing key psychological job characteristics administered twice to a sample of correctional workers (N = 746). The research clearly identified that the assessment of correctional-specific job demands (CJD) was more strongly associated with job satisfaction, work engagement, turnover intentions and psychological strain, as compared with an assessment of generic job demands. However, the CJD did not produce a greater proportion of significant job demands × job control/support interaction effects, as compared with the generic job demands measure. The results thereby provide further support for the acknowledged 'elusiveness' of these theoretical interactions. Overall, however, the results did support the inclusion of occupation-specific measures of job demands for the accurate assessment of the health and job performance of high-risk workers. The implications for theoretical discussions that describe how high job demands are moderated by job resources are discussed.

  17. Rugby injuries.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Andrew S

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review critically the existing studies on the epidemiology of pediatric rugby injuries and discuss suggestions for injury prevention and further research. Data were sourced from the sports medicine and science literature mainly since 1990, and from a prospective injury surveillance project in rugby undertaken by the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney during 2002. Literature searches were performed using Medline and SportsDiscus. Reported injury rates were between 7 and 18 injuries per 1,000 hours played, with the rate of injuries resulting in loss of playing or training time measured at 6.5-10.6 per 1,000 hours played. Injury rates increased with age and level of qualification. Head injury and concussion accounted for 10-40% of all injuries. In the UNSW study, concussion accounted for 25% of injuries resulting in loss of playing or training time in the under 13 year age group. Upper and lower extremity injuries were equally apportioned, with musculoskeletal injuries being the main type of injury. Fractures were observed in the upper extremity and ankle, and joint/ligament injuries affected the shoulder, knee and ankle. The tackle was associated with around 50% of all injuries. The scrum produced fewer injuries, but is historically associated with spinal cord injury. Rugby is a contact sport with injury risks related to physical contact, primarily in the tackle. Most injuries affect the musculoskeletal system, with the exception of concussion. Spinal cord injury is rare, but catastrophic. Research is required to understand better injury risks and to reduce the incidence of shoulder, knee and ankle joint injuries, concussion and spinal injury.

  18. A Guide to Job Enrichment and Redesign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, J. Barton; Eberle, Ted

    1990-01-01

    Describes job design alternatives--job enrichment, the job characteristics model, Japanese style management, and quality-of-worklife approaches. Focuses on the problems that human resources professionals may encounter when attempting to implement these approaches. (Author/JOW)

  19. A Guide to Job Enrichment and Redesign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, J. Barton; Eberle, Ted

    1990-01-01

    Describes job design alternatives--job enrichment, the job characteristics model, Japanese style management, and quality-of-worklife approaches. Focuses on the problems that human resources professionals may encounter when attempting to implement these approaches. (Author/JOW)

  20. Improvement of Job Placement Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    The Improvement of Job Placement Services Project was undertaken to examine and strengthen job placement services and programs in the California community colleges. Specific objectives of the project were to: (1) select and convene a 12-member representative advisory committee to oversee project operations working with the California Placement…

  1. The Job Outlook in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    Most occupations are projected to experience sustained growth during the 1980s; service jobs will grow the fastest and white-collar jobs will provide the most openings. Prospects for more than 250 occupations are given here, along with each occupation's estimated employment in 1980. (Author/CT)

  2. Job Search Guide. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golembeski, Marcia; And Others

    This workbook is designed to aid women in finding ways to prepare for work, deciding on the right work for them, and getting the job. Questionnaires and forms with instructions are provided in each section to aid the user in a job search. Section I is a preface. Section II concerns preparing for work. Questions elicit information on life and work…

  3. Job Assistance for Battered Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, Susan; And Others

    This manual provides information, guidelines, and workshop materials for organizations interested in developing job assistance programs for battered women. First, introductory material discusses the economic situation of battered women and their special needs for support, skills development, job referrals, and training. Next, guidelines for…

  4. Job Satisfaction in Fisheries Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollnac, Richard; Bavinck, Maarten; Monnereau, Iris

    2012-01-01

    This article draws comparative lessons from seven job satisfaction studies on marine capture fishing that were recently carried out in nine countries and three geographical regions--Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The seven studies made use of an identical job satisfaction assessment tool and present information on a selection of metiers mainly…

  5. Strong Ties and Job Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Stephen O.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This study of 299 social and physical scientists at universities reveals that strong personal contacts were more useful than reliance on weak ties (acquaintances) for job information. Using personal connections for employment information is thus an efficient job seeking method. (SK)

  6. Job Prospects for Aerospace Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the recent trends in job opportunities for aerospace engineers. Mentions some of the political, technological, and economic factors affecting the overall employment picture. Includes a description of the job prospects created by the general upswing of the large commercial aircraft market. (TW)

  7. Job Satisfaction Among College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaeth, Joe L.; Handler, Lynn P.

    Job satisfaction for college graduates is examined in this report that focuses on subjective determinants. It is contended that many objective characteristics, such as education and earnings, have little impact on job satisfaction. Data are taken from the National Opinion Research Center longitudinal survey of college graduates from the class of…

  8. Community College Faculty Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Presents survey findings regarding community college faculty members' job satisfactions and dissatisfactions. Finds faculty deriving high satisfaction from student achievement, their own intellectual growth, flexible and autonomous working conditions, and association with stimulating peers while expressing dissatisfaction with job conditions,…

  9. How to leave your job.

    PubMed

    Gurden, Dean

    2016-08-10

    'Leaving a job is never a decision you should take lightly,' says Nick Simpson, CEO of health recruitment agency MSI Group. 'Every nursing professional has things about their job they find frustrating and daily tasks they may not necessarily enjoy doing, but it's important to consider the positive aspects of your current role before you make a decision.'

  10. Job Satisfaction of University Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onuoha, Alphonso R. A.

    1980-01-01

    In testing Herzberg's two-factor theory of job satisfaction, it was found that theories of job satisfaction may be closely related to the methods used in collecting data; hence, the results of studies employing different methods raise questions about the validity of a particular theory. (Author/IRT)

  11. The Job Outlook in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    Most occupations are projected to experience sustained growth during the 1980s; service jobs will grow the fastest and white-collar jobs will provide the most openings. Prospects for more than 250 occupations are given here, along with each occupation's estimated employment in 1980. (Author/CT)

  12. Improvement of Job Placement Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    The Improvement of Job Placement Services Project was undertaken to examine and strengthen job placement services and programs in the California community colleges. Specific objectives of the project were to: (1) select and convene a 12-member representative advisory committee to oversee project operations working with the California Placement…

  13. On-the-Job Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, James

    1976-01-01

    Employers must take into consideration (1) that workers have an innate desire to learn and to grow on the job and (2) that college graduates take jobs previously held by those with less formal education, if they are to attract, motivate, and retain workers. (AG)

  14. Job Analysis for Continuous Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, William E.; Herrmann, Barbara Ann

    This booklet describes Job Analysis for Continuous Improvement (JACI), a five-step process incorporating strategic planning, job task identification, needs assessment, solutions, and evaluation. The JACI was developed as a result of a collaboration between the Minnesota Technical College System and 3M's Corporate Plant Engineering Services…

  15. Job Satisfaction in Fisheries Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollnac, Richard; Bavinck, Maarten; Monnereau, Iris

    2012-01-01

    This article draws comparative lessons from seven job satisfaction studies on marine capture fishing that were recently carried out in nine countries and three geographical regions--Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The seven studies made use of an identical job satisfaction assessment tool and present information on a selection of metiers mainly…

  16. Job Prospects for Nuclear Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    As the debate over nuclear safety continues, the job market remains healthy for nuclear engineers. The average salary offered to new nuclear engineers with bachelor's degrees is $27,400. Salary averages and increases compare favorably with other engineering disciplines. Various job sources in the field are noted. (JN)

  17. School Nurses Share a Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwin, Elizabeth G.; Voss, Sondra

    1981-01-01

    Job sharing is a relatively new idea in which two or more people share the hours, the work, and the responsibilities of one job. Advantages and disadvantages to this situation are discussed in relation to the experiences of two nurses who shared a position as district nurse. (JN)

  18. Implementation of Job Development Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliore, Alberto; Butterworth, John; Nord, Derek; Cox, Monica; Gelb, Amy

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which employment consultants implemented job development practices recommended in the literature when assisting job seekers with intellectual or developmental disabilities. We contacted 83 employment consultants from 25 employment programs in Minnesota and Connecticut. Fifty-nine participants were eligible and…

  19. Job satisfaction of nursing assistants.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Nancy; Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Flynn, Linda

    2011-11-01

    This secondary data analysis explored factors influencing job satisfaction in a sample of nursing assistants employed in Maryland skilled nursing facilities. Multiple factors have been shown to affect job satisfaction and turnover in nursing assistants (NAs), but the problem of turnover persists in skilled nursing facility environments affecting quality of care. An existing data set of 556 nursing assistants from 12 Maryland skilled nursing facilities was used. To explore factors found to influence job satisfaction from other studies, a multiple regression analysis was performed. Nine dependent variables previously shown to affect job satisfaction were used. Of these variables, only years of experience (β = .230) and performance of restorative care (β = .095) were found to be positively associated with job satisfaction. Self-esteem (β = -.094) was found to be negatively associated with job satisfaction. Only length of experience and exemplary care as evidenced by the performance of restorative care were associated with job satisfaction. These results mirror results found in other studies. Self-esteem was negatively associated with job satisfaction in this population, a finding needing further study. Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  20. Job Prospects for Nuclear Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    As the debate over nuclear safety continues, the job market remains healthy for nuclear engineers. The average salary offered to new nuclear engineers with bachelor's degrees is $27,400. Salary averages and increases compare favorably with other engineering disciplines. Various job sources in the field are noted. (JN)

  1. Job Prospects for Industrial Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    Discusses 1987 statistics from the College Placement Council regarding new job offers to graduating industrial engineers. Identifies trends in hiring in the field. Describes several issues that will face industrial engineers. States that the industrial engineers most likely to win jobs are those with good basic mathematics and communications…

  2. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  3. Experience with Remote Job Execution

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Vickie E; Cobb, John W; Green, Mark L; Kohl, James Arthur; Miller, Stephen D; Ren, Shelly; Smith, Bradford C; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron Science Portal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory submits jobs to the TeraGrid for remote job execution. The TeraGrid is a network of high performance computers supported by the US National Science Foundation. There are eleven partner facilities with over a petaflop of peak computing performance and sixty petabytes of long-term storage. Globus is installed on a local machine and used for job submission. The graphical user interface is produced by java coding that reads an XML file. After submission, the status of the job is displayed in a Job Information Service window which queries globus for the status. The output folder produced in the scratch directory of the TeraGrid machine is returned to the portal with globus-url-copy command that uses the gridftp servers on the TeraGrid machines. This folder is copied from the stage-in directory of the community account to the user's results directory where the output can be plotted using the portal's visualization services. The primary problem with remote job execution is diagnosing execution problems. We have daily tests of submitting multiple remote jobs from the portal. When these jobs fail on a computer, it is difficult to diagnose the problem from the globus output. Successes and problems will be presented.

  4. Learning and Job Satisfaction. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on learning and job satisfaction. "The Relationship Between Workplace Learning and Job Satisfaction in United States Small to Mid-Sized Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden) reports findings that revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that learning is pervasive in the small to mid-sized businesses…

  5. Job's story and family health.

    PubMed

    Badalamenti, Anthony F

    2009-06-01

    This paper examines the book of Job for encoded psychological meaning. Its main conclusion is that the story imagery expresses a need to rectify fatherly and parental oblivion for a child who is the object of the destructive envy of a sibling. A family dynamic is constructed from the story's repeated emphasis of Job's blamelessness and the story's position that Satan both proposes and causes Job's sufferings. The emergent family model sees Job as representing a son, Satan an envious rival, and God a father or parent(s). This paper proposes that Job's story may be reactive to a period where male authority was at risk of becoming excessive, threatening family and community health.

  6. The Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Peter V.; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within…

  7. Pink and blue collar jobs: children's judgments of job status and job aspirations in relation to sex of worker.

    PubMed

    Liben, L S; Bigler, R S; Krogh, H R

    2001-08-01

    Past work shows that even young children know that occupations are differentially linked to men and women in our society. In our research, we studied whether 6- and 11-year-old children's (a) beliefs about job status and (b) job interests would be affected by the gendered nature of jobs. When asked about familiar occupations, children gave higher status ratings to masculine jobs and expressed greater interest in jobs culturally associated with their own sex. To circumvent the extant confounds between job gender and job status in our culture, we also developed a new methodology in which novel jobs were portrayed with either male or female workers. Older children rated novel jobs portrayed with male workers as having higher status than the identical jobs portrayed with female workers. Portrayal sex had no effect on children's own interests in these novel jobs at either age. Methodological, theoretical, and educational issues are discussed in relation to sex-role development and vocational aspirations.

  8. Job stress reduction therapies.

    PubMed

    Field, T; Quintino, O; Henteleff, T; Wells-Keife, L; Delvecchio-Feinberg, G

    1997-07-01

    Job stress among healthcare workers has received more attention in recent years, perhaps because these professionals are prime candidates for high stress levels. The immediate effects of brief massage therapy, music relaxation with visual imagery, muscle relaxation, and social support group sessions were assessed in 100 hospital employees at a major public hospital. The effects of the therapies were assessed using a within-subjects pre-post test design and by comparisons across groups. Groups reported decreases in anxiety, depression, fatigue, and confusion, as well as increased vigor following the sessions. That the groups did not differ on these variables suggests that these particular therapies, when applied for short periods of time, are equally effective for reducing stress among hospital employees.

  9. Reclaim your job.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Sumantra; Bruch, Heike

    2004-03-01

    Ask most managers what gets in the way of their success, and you'll hear the familiar litany of complaints: Not enough time. Limited resources. No clear sense of how their work fits into the grand corporate scheme. These are, for the most part, excuses. What really gets in the way of managers' success is fear of making their own decisions and acting accordingly. Managers must overcome the psychological desire to be indispensable. In this article, the authors demonstrate how managers can become more productive by learning to manage demands, generate resources, and recognize and exploit alternatives. To win the support they want, managers must develop a long-term strategy and pursue their goals slowly, steadily, and strategically. To expand the range of opportunities, for their companies and themselves, managers must scan the environment for possible obstacles and search for ways around them. Fully 90% of the executives the authors have studied over the past few years wasted their time and frittered away their productivity, despite having well-defined projects, goals, and the necessary knowledge to get their jobs done. Such managers remain trapped in inefficiency because they assume they do not have enough personal discretion or control. They forget how to take initiative--the most essential quality of any truly successful manager. Effective managers, by contrast, are purposeful corporate entrepreneurs who take charge of their jobs by developing trust in their own judgment and adopting long-term, big-picture views to fulfill personal goals that match those of the organization.

  10. Predicting Job Entry, Job Satisfaction, and Job Performance of Graduates from Wisconsin Secondary School Vocational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Philip A.

    This report is concerned with the role of the secondary schools in implementing vocational direction. It contains a two-year follow up which sought self reports of on-the-job satisfaction and evaluations by immediate job supervisors. Thirty pilot programs in high school vocational education were started in 1964-65; 444 graduates of these programs…

  11. Good Jobs or Bad Jobs? Evaluating the American Job Creation Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveman, Gary W.; Tilly, Chris

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss the rate of job creation in the United States between 1973 and 1985. The controversy regarding the quality of the new jobs is emphasized. Four points of view on this controversy are reviewed. The authors also present recent research findings concerning average earnings and earnings inequality. (CH)

  12. Job Demands, Job Resources, and Job Performance in Japanese Workers: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    NAKAGAWA, Yuko; INOUE, Akiomi; KAWAKAMI, Norito; TSUNO, Kanami; TOMIOKA, Kimiko; NAKANISHI, Mayuko; MAFUNE, Kosuke; HIRO, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the cross-sectional association of job demands (i.e., psychological demands) and job resources (i.e., decision latitude, supervisor support, co-worker support, and extrinsic reward) with job performance. A total of 1,198 workers (458 males and 740 females) from a manufacturing company in Japan completed a self-administered questionnaire that included the Job Content Questionnaire, Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire, World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, and demographic survey. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, decision latitude (β=0.107, p=0.001) and extrinsic reward (β=0.158, p<0.001) were positively and significantly associated with job performance while supervisor support (β=−0.102, p=0.002) was negatively and significantly associated with job performance. On the other hand, psychological demands or co-worker support was not significantly associated with job performance. These findings suggest that higher decision latitude and extrinsic reward enhance job performance among Japanese employees. PMID:25016948

  13. Job demands, job resources, and job performance in japanese workers: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Inoue, Akiomi; Kawakami, Norito; Tsuno, Kanami; Tomioka, Kimiko; Nakanishi, Mayuko; Mafune, Kosuke; Hiro, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the cross-sectional association of job demands (i.e., psychological demands) and job resources (i.e., decision latitude, supervisor support, co-worker support, and extrinsic reward) with job performance. A total of 1,198 workers (458 males and 740 females) from a manufacturing company in Japan completed a self-administered questionnaire that included the Job Content Questionnaire, Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire, World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, and demographic survey. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, decision latitude (β=0.107, p=0.001) and extrinsic reward (β=0.158, p<0.001) were positively and significantly associated with job performance while supervisor support (β=-0.102, p=0.002) was negatively and significantly associated with job performance. On the other hand, psychological demands or co-worker support was not significantly associated with job performance. These findings suggest that higher decision latitude and extrinsic reward enhance job performance among Japanese employees.

  14. Good Jobs or Bad Jobs? Evaluating the American Job Creation Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveman, Gary W.; Tilly, Chris

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss the rate of job creation in the United States between 1973 and 1985. The controversy regarding the quality of the new jobs is emphasized. Four points of view on this controversy are reviewed. The authors also present recent research findings concerning average earnings and earnings inequality. (CH)

  15. Welder eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Reesal, M R; Dufresne, R M; Suggett, D; Alleyne, B C

    1989-12-01

    During 1985, welders submitted 21% of all claims for eye injuries received by the Workers' Compensation Board of Alberta. Since then the proportion of similar claims has remained high. A descriptive study of welder eye injury claims reveals that, although most injuries are reversible (55% of workers return to work in less than 2 days and 95% in less than 7 days), some workers sustain permanent visual impairment. Eye injuries occur most frequently in metal-work industries, and cold particles, most often metal, are the most common source of injury. Preventive measures should stress the importance of wearing eye protection constantly while working with metal pieces and in metal industries. Goggles probably should not be removed upon extinguishing the welding torch.

  16. Occupational stress and constructive thinking: health and job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R; Tróccoli, Bartholomeu Torres

    2004-06-01

    Occupational stress is associated with specific situations, characteristics of the work environment, and individual perceptions and reactions in the context of the workplace, but many nursing studies of occupational stress have tended to analyse aspects related to the job itself. In Brazil nursing is acknowledged as a stressful occupation whose stresses are generally associated with the job itself, while the effects of personal characteristics on an individual's response to occupational stress are dismissed. The aim of this paper is to describe: (1) occupational stress, job satisfaction and state of health in Brazilian nurses, and (2) the relationship of these variables to a constructive thinking coping style. A correlational study was performed during 1999 with 461 nurses recruited from the public health and education system in the Federal District of Brazil. Instruments used were the Nursing Stress Inventory, Constructive Thinking Inventory, subscales of the Occupational Stress Indicator, and a researcher-designed questionnaire. Normal distributions were found for occupational stress, state of health (physical and psychological), and job satisfaction. Results suggest that nurses have fewer psychological health problems and similar job satisfaction compared with other Brazilian government white-collar workers. Occupational stress was directly associated with state of health, and inversely associated with global constructive thinking and job satisfaction. Brazilian nurses in this study seem to have adapted satisfactorily to their profession, but the finding that constructive thinking was significantly related to psychological ill-health, occupational stress and physical ill-health highlights a need to value individual coping styles in the work environment.

  17. Brain injuries from blast.

    PubMed

    Bass, Cameron R; Panzer, Matthew B; Rafaels, Karen A; Wood, Garrett; Shridharani, Jay; Capehart, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) from blast produces a number of conundrums. This review focuses on five fundamental questions including: (1) What are the physical correlates for blast TBI in humans? (2) Why is there limited evidence of traditional pulmonary injury from blast in current military field epidemiology? (3) What are the primary blast brain injury mechanisms in humans? (4) If TBI can present with clinical symptoms similar to those of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), how do we clinically differentiate blast TBI from PTSD and other psychiatric conditions? (5) How do we scale experimental animal models to human response? The preponderance of the evidence from a combination of clinical practice and experimental models suggests that blast TBI from direct blast exposure occurs on the modern battlefield. Progress has been made in establishing injury risk functions in terms of blast overpressure time histories, and there is strong experimental evidence in animal models that mild brain injuries occur at blast intensities that are similar to the pulmonary injury threshold. Enhanced thoracic protection from ballistic protective body armor likely plays a role in the occurrence of blast TBI by preventing lung injuries at blast intensities that could cause TBI. Principal areas of uncertainty include the need for a more comprehensive injury assessment for mild blast injuries in humans, an improved understanding of blast TBI pathophysiology of blast TBI in animal models and humans, the relationship between clinical manifestations of PTSD and mild TBI from blunt or blast trauma including possible synergistic effects, and scaling between animals models and human exposure to blasts in wartime and terrorist attacks. Experimental methodologies, including location of the animal model relative to the shock or blast source, should be carefully designed to provide a realistic blast experiment with conditions comparable to blasts on humans. If traditional blast scaling is

  18. How Times Change: Secondary Teachers' Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction in 1962 and 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.; Anderson, Colin J. K.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we explore the level of job satisfaction and the sources of job dissatisfaction for 210 secondary school teachers in southwest England and compare our results with the results from a similar study published in 1962. Using anonymous questionnaires, we asked 210 secondary teachers in southwest England (63% female) to rate their level…

  19. The collagenous gastroenteritides: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Purva; McKenna, Barbara J

    2010-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and collagenous colitis share striking histologic similarities and occur together in some patients. They also share some drug and disease associations. Pediatric cases of collagenous gastritis, however, lack most of these associations. The etiologies of the collagenous gastroenteritides are not known, so it is not clear whether they are similar because they share pathogeneses, or because they indicate a common histologic response to varying injuries. The features, disease and drug associations, and the inquiries into the pathogenesis of these disorders are reviewed.

  20. [Job satisfaction. Use of the Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS)].

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A; Magnavita, L; Mammi, F; Roccia, K; De Matteis, B; Colozza, V; Vitale, M V

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important determinant of wellbeing and a moderator of stress at work. The Warr's Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS) is probably the most used questionnaire to assess job satisfaction. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the Italian version of the JSS. The questionnaire has been distributed to 632 health care workers. Results show that the Italian version of JSS has good reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94). Principal component analysis revealed that a significant percentage of the variance (52%) was explained by a single factor which included all the 16 items. Varimax orthogonal rotation yielded the same two factors observed in the original questionnaire: intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction. The JSS may be an useful tool in the assessment of psychosocial risk at work.

  1. The health effects of jobs: status, working conditions, or both?

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Rennie M; Strazdins, Lyndall; Clements, Mark S; Broom, Dorothy H; Parslow, Ruth; Rodgers, Bryan

    2005-06-01

    This study investigates whether the association of job strain and insecurity with health differs by status. A cross-sectional study of 2,249 employed workers aged 40-44 years conducted in two regions in south-east Australia in 2000 used a self-completed questionnaire to collect data. Multivariate analyses were used to compare depression, anxiety, physical health and general practitioner (GP) visits over 12 months across categories of job strain and insecurity for three status groups (high, middle and low). High job strain and job insecurity were independently associated with poor mental health, poor physical health and visits to the GP for all status groups when adjusted for confounders. High job strain was associated with depression (OR = 2.46, 95% CI 1.96-3.07), anxiety (OR = 2.56, 95% Cl 2.05-3.20), lower mean physical health scores (-1.11, 95% CI -1.98 - -0.23), and more visits to the GP (IRR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.05-1.37). High job insecurity also showed significant associations with depression (OR = 3.03, 95% Cl 2.03-4.53), anxiety (OR = 2.66, 95% CI 1.81-3.91), and GP visits (IRR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.01-1.60). There were no significant differences by status in the associations of job strain and insecurity with outcomes. High-status workers were just as likely as low-status workers to be exposed to adverse work conditions and both status groups showed similar health effects. Exposure to insecure and high-strain jobs is likely to rise as economies and labour markets respond to globalisation and political change. High status may not protect employees from either exposure or impact, thus widening the population health consequences of adverse work conditions.

  2. Similar enzymes, different structures

    PubMed Central

    Tarasev, Michael; Kaddis, Catherine S.; Yin, Sheng; Loo, Joseph A.; Burgner, John; Ballou, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Phthalate dioxygenase (PDO) is a member of a class of bacterial oxygenases that contain both Rieske [2Fe-2S] and Fe(II) mononuclear centers. Recent crystal structures of several Rieske dioxygenases showed that they exist as α3β3 multimers with subunits arranged head-to-tail in α and β stacked planar consists of only α-subunits, remains to be solved. Although similar to other Rieske dioxygenases in many aspects, PDO was shown to differ in the mechanism of catalysis. Gel filtration and analytical centrifugation experiments, supplemented with mass spectrometric analysis (both ESI-MS and ESI-GEMMA), in this work showed a hexameric arrangement of subunits in the PDO multimer. Our proposed model for the subunit arrangement in PDO postulates two α3 planar rings one on top the other, similar to the α3β3 arrangement in other Rieske dioxygenases. Unlike other Rieske dioxygenases, this arrangement brings two Rieske and two mononuclear centers, all on separate subunits, into proximity, allowing their cooperation for catalysis. Potential reasons necessitating this unusual structural arrangement are discussed. PMID:17764654

  3. Cracking the Hidden Job Market. Pocket Job Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Amy

    This book is the third in a series of six pocket-sized books written for career changers and laid-off workers. Each book is written at a 7th- to 10th-grade reading level and contains examples, hands-on self-discovery exercises, and step-by-step advice for a successful job search. This book identifies steps for finding the unadvertised jobs--80-95…

  4. High Job Demands and Low Job Control Increase Nurses' Professional Leaving Intentions: The Role of Care Setting and Profit Orientation.

    PubMed

    Wendsche, Johannes; Hacker, Winfried; Wegge, Jürgen; Rudolf, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    We investigated how two types of care setting (home care and nursing home) and type of ownership (for-profit vs. public/non-profit) of geriatric care services interacted in influencing registered nurses' intention to give up their profession. In prior research, employment in for-profit-organizations, high job demands, and low job control were important antecedents of nurses' intent to leave. However, the impact of care setting on these associations was inconclusive. Therefore, we tested a mediated moderation model predicting that adverse work characteristics would drive professional leaving intentions, particularly in for-profit services and in nursing homes. A representative German sample of 304 registered nurses working in 78 different teams participated in our cross-sectional study. As predicted, lower job control and higher job demands were associated with higher professional leaving intentions, and nurses reported higher job demands in public/non-profit care than in for-profit care, and in nursing homes compared to home care. Overall, RNs in nursing homes and home care reported similar intent to leave, but in for-profit settings only, nurses working in nursing homes reported higher professional leaving intentions than did nurses in home care, which was linked to lower job control in the for-profit nursing home setting, supporting mediated moderation. Taken together, our results indicate that the interplay of care setting and type of ownership is important when explaining nurses' intentions to give up their profession. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Job burnout: focusing on occupational differences of enthusiasm for job].

    PubMed

    Igawa, Junichi; Nakanishi, Daisuke; Shiwa, Shiro

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates characteristics of burnout, as related to job descriptions in mental hospitals and presuppositions of the concept of burnout (burnout is caused as a result of having enthusiasm for a job). The results of a questionnaire survey (burnout tendency, Japanese Burnout Scale, enthusiasm for a job in the past, modified Enthusiasm scale) with 781 workers at mental hospitals showed that burnout characteristics varied according to job descriptions. Specifically, psychiatric social workers, medical assistants, and nurses fell into the high-burnout category, whereas doctors, occupational therapists, and pharmacists fell into the low-burnout category. In addition, in order to compare enthusiasm for a job in the past with current burnout tendencies, factor scores for the respective scales were classified into a low group or a high group and were cross tabulated. The numbers in the cells of the groups indicating the opposite of the definition of burnout (low enthusiasm-high burnout tendency, high enthusiasm-low burnout tendency) were larger. This indicates that having enthusiasm for a job is not a direct factor for burnout, which is different from the presupposition about burnout.

  6. Jobs: women's double burden.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Whereas international conventions and national laws provide equal opportunities for women in employment, the reality of women's lives keeps a disproportionate number of women unemployed, underemployed, and living in poverty. The UN itself, which officially is working toward equity among its employees, has a staff composed of just 32.6% women, and women comprise only 10.5% of the top end of the hierarchy. In areas where women's labor force participation has increased dramatically, women typically earn 30-40% less than men doing the same job or else their employment is limited to "traditional female" service positions. The fact that women and girls have received an inadequate education makes it extremely difficult to break the barriers of discrimination in developing countries. The empowerment of women will break the education barrier, and, when that falls, many other barriers will follow suit. Efforts are already underway to break structural barriers caused by economic and social policies. For example, a more flexible pattern of work has been proposed which will include the voluntary assumption of flexible hours, job-sharing, and part-time work. The concept of work is also being broadened to include the important human services that women traditionally provide on a volunteer basis. This will lead to a valuation of women's contribution to society which can be added to calculations of gross domestic product. Women also need protection as they attempt to eke out a living in the informal sector which has been the traditional avenue for women to earn money. This sector is not protected by law and is subject to extortion by officials and by male competitors. A variety of measures is under consideration to increase the protection of informal sector workers. Women also need protection in the conventional work place, especially as they enter fields traditionally reserved for men. These questions are important even in the context of global unemployment because these issues

  7. Factors underlying observed injury rate differences between temporary workers and permanent peers.

    PubMed

    Foley, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Temporary workers face increased risk of injury as compared to permanent workers in similar occupations. This study explores the role played by several potential risk factors. Injured temporary and permanent workers, matched by industry, tenure and demographic characteristics, were interviewed to isolate the association of temporary employment with several injury risk factors. Temporary workers had higher workers' compensation claims rates than their permanent worker-peers. In interviews temporary workers a reported a lower frequency of exposure to hazards. However, they also reported being less likely to be equipped to cope with hazards by such countermeasures as experience screening, safety training and task control. Policies are needed to improve screening and training of temporary workers to assigned tasks, to discourage job-switching, to improve temporary workers' hazard awareness, to protect their right to report unsafe conditions. The responsibilities of agencies and host employers for ensuring the safety of their temporary workers need clarification in regulatory policy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Job characteristics, satisfaction, and burnout across hospitalist practice models.

    PubMed

    Hinami, Keiki; Whelan, Chad T; Miller, Joseph A; Wolosin, Robert J; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2012-01-01

    Nearly two-thirds of hospitals in the United States are served by hospitalist physicians. How hospitalist work patterns and job satisfaction vary across various practice models is unknown. We administered the Hospitalist Worklife Survey to a randomized stratified sample of 3105 potential hospitalists and 662 hospitalist members of 3 multistate hospitalist companies. Details about respondents' hospitalist group characteristics, their work patterns, and satisfaction with 2 global and 11 domain measures were assessed. Factors influencing job satisfaction were also solicited. These factors, job characteristics, job satisfaction, and burnout were compared across predefined practice models. The adjusted response rate was 25.6%. Among the respondents, 44% were employed by a hospital, 15% by a multispecialty physician group, 14% by a multistate hospitalist group, 14% by a university or medical school, 12% by a local hospitalist group, and 2% by other. Hospitalists of local groups reported more clinical shifts per month, and hospitalists of local and multistate groups reported more billable encounters per shift compared to other practice models. Academic hospitalists reported fewer night shifts, fewer billable encounters per shift, more nonclinical work hours, and lower earnings compared to other practice models. Differences in clinical and nonclinical responsibilities, and differences in factors most important to job satisfaction, were noted across the 5 models. Despite these differences, levels of global job satisfaction and burnout were similar across the practice models. Work patterns, compensation, and hospitalists' priorities varied significantly across practice models. Overall job satisfaction and burnout were similar across models, despite these differences. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. Tendon injuries

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Nerlich, Michael; Docheva, Denitsa

    2017-01-01

    Tendons connect muscles to bones, ensuring joint movement. With advanced age, tendons become more prone to degeneration followed by injuries. Tendon repair often requires lengthy periods of rehabilitation, especially in elderly patients. Existing medical and surgical treatments often fail to regain full tendon function. The development of novel treatment methods has been hampered due to limited understanding of basic tendon biology. Recently, it was discovered that tendons, similar to other mesenchymal tissues, contain tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) which possess the common stem cell properties. The current strategies for enhancing tendon repair consist mainly of applying stem cells, growth factors, natural and artificial biomaterials alone or in combination. In this review, we summarise the basic biology of tendon tissues and provide an update on the latest repair proposals for tendon tears. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:332-342. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160075 PMID:28828182

  10. Storage element performance optimization for CMS analysis jobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, G.; Dahlblom, J.; Guldmyr, J.; Happonen, K.; Lindén, T.

    2012-12-01

    Tier-2 computing sites in the Worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (WLCG) host CPU-resources (Compute Element, CE) and storage resources (Storage Element, SE). The vast amount of data that needs to processed from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments requires good and efficient use of the available resources. Having a good CPU efficiency for the end users analysis jobs requires that the performance of the storage system is able to scale with I/O requests from hundreds or even thousands of simultaneous jobs. In this presentation we report on the work on improving the SE performance at the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP) Tier-2 used for the Compact Muon Experiment (CMS) at the LHC. Statistics from CMS grid jobs are collected and stored in the CMS Dashboard for further analysis, which allows for easy performance monitoring by the sites and by the CMS collaboration. As part of the monitoring framework CMS uses the JobRobot which sends every four hours 100 analysis jobs to each site. CMS also uses the HammerCloud tool for site monitoring and stress testing and it has replaced the JobRobot. The performance of the analysis workflow submitted with JobRobot or HammerCloud can be used to track the performance due to site configuration changes, since the analysis workflow is kept the same for all sites and for months in time. The CPU efficiency of the JobRobot jobs at HIP was increased approximately by 50 % to more than 90 %, by tuning the SE and by improvements in the CMSSW and dCache software. The performance of the CMS analysis jobs improved significantly too. Similar work has been done on other CMS Tier-sites, since on average the CPU efficiency for CMSSW jobs has increased during 2011. Better monitoring of the SE allows faster detection of problems, so that the performance level can be kept high. The next storage upgrade at HIP consists of SAS disk enclosures which can be stress tested on demand with HammerCloud workflows, to make sure that the I

  11. The qualitative similarity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Peter V; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within the purview of two groups of cognitive models: those that emphasize the cognitive development of individuals and those that pertain to disciplinary or knowledge structures. It is argued that the QSH has scientific merit with implications for classroom instruction. Future research should examine the validity of the QSH in other disciplines such as mathematics and science and should include perspectives from social as well as cognitive models.

  12. Retrieving similar color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Isabella; Schettini, Raimondo

    1998-09-01

    There is a great demand for efficient tools that can, on the basis of the pictorial content, organize large quantities of images and rapidly retrieve those of interest. With that goal in mind we present a method for indexing complex color images. The basic idea is to exploit image data decomposition and compression based on the standard Haar multiresolution wavelet transform to describe image content. In this way we are able to effectively eliminate data redundancy and concisely represent the salient features of the image in image signatures of predefined lengths. In the retrieval phase image signatures are compared using a similarity measure that the system has 'learned' from user's. Experimental results confirm the feasibility of our approach, which outperforms more standard procedures, in retrieval accuracy and at lower computational costs.

  13. Similarity transformed semiclassical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Voorhis, Troy; Heller, Eric J.

    2003-12-01

    In this article, we employ a recently discovered criterion for selecting important contributions to the semiclassical coherent state propagator [T. Van Voorhis and E. J. Heller, Phys. Rev. A 66, 050501 (2002)] to study the dynamics of many dimensional problems. We show that the dynamics are governed by a similarity transformed version of the standard classical Hamiltonian. In this light, our selection criterion amounts to using trajectories generated with the untransformed Hamiltonian as approximate initial conditions for the transformed boundary value problem. We apply the new selection scheme to some multidimensional Henon-Heiles problems and compare our results to those obtained with the more sophisticated Herman-Kluk approach. We find that the present technique gives near-quantitative agreement with the the standard results, but that the amount of computational effort is less than Herman-Kluk requires even when sophisticated integral smoothing techniques are employed in the latter.

  14. [Application of job demands-resources model in research on relationships between job satisfaction, job resources, individual resources and job demands].

    PubMed

    Potocka, Adrianna; Waszkowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between job demands, job resourses, personal resourses and job satisfaction and to assess the usefulness of the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model in the explanation of these phenomena. The research was based on a sample of 500 social workers. The "Psychosocial Factors" and "Job satisfaction" questionnaires were used to test the hypothesis. The results showed that job satisfaction increased with increasing job accessibility and personal resources (r = 0.44; r = 0.31; p < 0.05). The analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that job resources and job demands [F(1.474) = 4.004; F(1.474) = 4.166; p < 0.05] were statistically significant sources of variation in job satisfaction. Moreover, interactions between job demands and job resources [F(3,474) = 2.748; p <0.05], as well as between job demands and personal resources [F(3.474) = 3.021; p <0.05] had a significant impact on job satisfaction. The post hoc tests showed that 1) in low job demands, but high job resources employees declared higher job satisfaction, than those who perceived them as medium (p = 0.0001) or low (p = 0.0157); 2) when the level of job demands was perceived as medium, employees with high personal resources declared significantly higher job satisfaction than those with low personal resources (p = 0.0001). The JD-R model can be used to investigate job satisfaction. Taking into account fundamental factors of this model, in organizational management there are possibilities of shaping job satisfaction among employees.

  15. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  16. Suggestions for Career Exploration and Job Seeking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Labor, Albany.

    This booklet, which is intended for individuals seeking jobs in New York State, consists of suggestions for career exploration and job seeking. The booklet begins with a brief discussion of places to begin a job search: New York State Job Service and community service centers; schools and community organizations providing free advice; libraries;…

  17. Merchandising Your Job Talents. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This booklet is a guide for job applicants. It offers suggestions on (1) how to perform a self-appraisal and where to find out about job qualifications, (2) how to prepare a resume, (3) how to write a letter of application, (4) where to go for information on job opportunities, and (5) how to present employment qualifications in the job interview.…

  18. Win That Job! 10th Anniversary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Paul

    This book provides practical information on obtaining a job. Though it is published in Australia, 11 chapters introduce a universal range of job search methods, presenting: the importance of goals and self-knowledge; the resume; preparing job search correspondence; the interview; self-promotion; job search tips and unusual strategies; networking;…

  19. Finding, Getting, and Keeping a Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heenan, Edward W.

    This booklet is intended to help young people entering the job market devise a plan and strategy for finding, getting, and keeping a job. Introductory materials include a letter (from an employer) to a young person looking for a job and the 10 commandments of job hunting. Other contents are a listing of sources for potential employers, a sample…

  20. Janus Job Interview Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Arnold

    Designed for below-average-reading-level students, the purpose of this interview guide is to help young job seekers prepare for the job interview process. The first three chapters explain the nature of the personal job interview, the steps to be followed in preparing for a job interview, and the do's and don't's of the interview itself. The…

  1. The Assertive Job-Hunting Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Heather A.

    1980-01-01

    Described the development of the Assertive Job Hunting Survey which assessed self-reported job-hunting attitudes. The survey met standards for internal consistency and stability. Students demonstrated significant increases in Assertive Job Hunting Survey scores from beginning to end of classes, which applied assertiveness to job-hunting behaviors.…

  2. The EFL/ESL Job Search Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Adelaide, Ed.

    This handbook offers step-by-step advice to teachers of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and English as a Second Language (ESL) for job searchers entering the job market and finding and accepting a job in the field. The goal is to find a job that matches the searcher's interests, skills, goals, and preparation with those of the employer. Topics…

  3. Administrative Job Level Study and Factoring System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Community Coll., OR.

    The administrative job classification system and generic job descriptions presented in this report were developed at Portland Community College (PCC) as management tools. After introductory material outlining the objectives of and criteria used in the administrative job-level study, and offering information on the administrative job factoring…

  4. 29 CFR 32.14 - Job qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Job qualifications. 32.14 Section 32.14 Labor Office of the... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices and Employment Related Training Participation § 32.14 Job... appropriateness of all job qualifications to ensure that to the extent job qualifications tend to exclude...

  5. 29 CFR 32.14 - Job qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job qualifications. 32.14 Section 32.14 Labor Office of the... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices and Employment Related Training Participation § 32.14 Job... appropriateness of all job qualifications to ensure that to the extent job qualifications tend to exclude...

  6. 29 CFR 32.14 - Job qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job qualifications. 32.14 Section 32.14 Labor Office of the... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices and Employment Related Training Participation § 32.14 Job... appropriateness of all job qualifications to ensure that to the extent job qualifications tend to exclude...

  7. 29 CFR 32.14 - Job qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Job qualifications. 32.14 Section 32.14 Labor Office of the... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices and Employment Related Training Participation § 32.14 Job... appropriateness of all job qualifications to ensure that to the extent job qualifications tend to exclude...

  8. 29 CFR 32.14 - Job qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job qualifications. 32.14 Section 32.14 Labor Office of the... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices and Employment Related Training Participation § 32.14 Job... appropriateness of all job qualifications to ensure that to the extent job qualifications tend to exclude...

  9. Janus Job Interview Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Arnold

    Designed for below-average-reading-level students, the purpose of this interview guide is to help young job seekers prepare for the job interview process. The first three chapters explain the nature of the personal job interview, the steps to be followed in preparing for a job interview, and the do's and don't's of the interview itself. The…

  10. Cooperative Planning for Rural Job Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Rural school districts across the country have seen a serious loss of employment opportunities for families in their communities. Even when jobs exist, they are often low-level service jobs that do not provide wages that encourage young people to grow roots. When good jobs are available, often those jobs are outsourced to other low-wage areas,…

  11. Job Satisfaction of Women in Nontraditional Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Hester R.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated factors influencing job satisfaction of 217 women working in 51 nontraditional occupations. Explored the occupational unique experiences confronted by women in nontraditional occupations. Identified job location, job awareness and changes, work and family roles, income and earnings, and preparation for a job as important…

  12. New Blood for Health Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troxell, Margaret M.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a Job Corps Program to train the disadvantaged in health occupations. Programs at two of the residential centers, the Blue Ridge Center at Marion, Virginia and the Jersey City Center for Women are summarized. (BC)

  13. The Job Outlook in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Tom

    1984-01-01

    Describes factors affecting employment in various occupational categories and presents the "Job Outlook in Brief," a 16-page listing of changes in employment, 1982-1995, as well as employment prospects, arranged by occupational clusters. (SK)

  14. How Safe Is Your Job?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nocera, Joseph; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Five articles address the realities of coping with downsizing: "Living with Layoffs" (Nocera); "How Safe Is Your Job?" (Lieber); "Career Makeover" (Robinson); "Ma Bell's Orphans" (O'Reilly); and "Where Are They Now?" (Martin). (SK)

  15. Job Enlargement: A Multidimensional Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Lex

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation study into the effects of a job enlargement exercise indicates that the expected increases in satisfaction associated with greater work variety, novelty, and felt use of abilities were achieved. (Author/MLF)

  16. The Job Outlook in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Tom

    1984-01-01

    Describes factors affecting employment in various occupational categories and presents the "Job Outlook in Brief," a 16-page listing of changes in employment, 1982-1995, as well as employment prospects, arranged by occupational clusters. (SK)

  17. LABCON - Laboratory Job Control program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reams, L. T.

    1969-01-01

    Computer program LABCON controls the budget system in a component test laboratory whose workload is made up from many individual budget allocations. A common denominator is applied to an incoming job, to which all effort is charged and accounted for.

  18. New Blood for Health Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troxell, Margaret M.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a Job Corps Program to train the disadvantaged in health occupations. Programs at two of the residential centers, the Blue Ridge Center at Marion, Virginia and the Jersey City Center for Women are summarized. (BC)

  19. Job Enlargement: A Multidimensional Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Lex

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation study into the effects of a job enlargement exercise indicates that the expected increases in satisfaction associated with greater work variety, novelty, and felt use of abilities were achieved. (Author/MLF)

  20. Planning for the Job Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close, Elizabeth, Ed.; Ramsey, Katherine, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Offers advice from middle school educators (a principal, a supervisor, and a teacher) on job interviews for teaching positions: how applicants are selected from the stack of applications, what happens during an interview, and what truly makes a difference. (SR)

  1. Job Interviewing? Try the Telephone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegel, Paul L.

    1979-01-01

    Telephone interviews can save college and candidates time and money while precluding the judging of job candidates by extraneous factors. A format for a successful telephone interview is suggested. (Author/MLF)

  2. The Job Corps at Ten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shales, Tom

    1975-01-01

    Job Corps programs have changed during its ten years, and include new residential manpower centers, support centers, coeducational centers, and civilian conservation centers. The article traces the history and development of this vital educational program. (MW)

  3. Job Satisfaction Among Army Pharmacists.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    them.1 George Orwell , Animal Farm Job satisfaction is a critical element of any work environment. As defined by Edwin A. Locke, "Overall job...support a more patient-centered pharmacy practice. George Orwell , Animal Farm (New York: New American Library, 1959), 63. 2 Edwin A. Locke, "What is...1986. Orwell , George. Animal Farm. New York: New American Library, 1959. Pharmacy Branch, AMEDD Center and School. Pharmacy Officer and NCO

  4. Job scheduling on a hypercube

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yahui.

    1990-01-01

    The author studies the scheduling of independent jobs on hypercube multiprocessors. He assumes that the hypercube system supports space-sharing for multiprogramming, i.e., a hypercube is partitioned into subcubes and each job is assigned to a dedicated subcube and many jobs can be running simultaneously without interfering with each other. Then the problem of how to schedule a set of jobs so that they can be finished as early as possible becomes important. He investigates two kinds of scheduling algorithms for the problem. The first one is nonpreemptive scheduling, i.e., no job is allowed to be interrupted during its execution. In this case, the problem is NP-Complete. He proposes an approximation algorithm called LDF, which generates a schedule with a finish time less than twice that of an optimal schedule. Compared with the earlier proposed algorithm, his algorithm is simpler and has almost the same performance. More importantly, his LDF algorithm can achieve this performance without knowing the job processing times, which may be hard to obtain in practice. Also he proves a lower bound result which implies that it is unlikely to find simple heuristic algorithms that can perform much better than the existing algorithms including LDF. The second kind is preemptive scheduling, i.e., a job can be preempted during its execution and rescheduled later. He develops a feasibility algorithm that runs in O (n log n) time and generates a schedule with at most min{l brace}n-2, 2{sup m}-1{r brace} preemptions. It can generate a feasible schedule for the given job set if there exists one. This improvement is important because many scheduling algorithms depend on a feasibility algorithm as a building block. Furthermore, based on an advanced search technique, he presents an algorithm that can find the optimal schedule in O(n{sup 2} log {sup 2}n) time.

  5. The Experience of Emotions during the Job Search and Choice Process among Novice Job Seekers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaccio, Silvia; Gauvin, Natalie; Reeve, Charlie L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigate the role of emotions in the job search and choice process of novice job seekers. Results of qualitative analyses of the first-person accounts of 41 job seekers indicate that participants whose recollections of their job search contained emotional language were more likely to display a haphazard job search strategy than…

  6. A Guide to Job Analysis for the Preparation of Job Training Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    The paper deals with job analysis for the preparation of job training programs. The analytical approach involves five steps: enlisting support, examining the job, describing the job, analyzing training requirements, and planning the programs. Appendixes include methods of producing training schemes--the simple job breakdown, straightforward…

  7. Engineering Your Job Search: A Job-Finding Resource for Engineering Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    This guide, which is intended for engineering professionals, explains how to use up-to-date job search techniques to design and conduct an effective job hunt. The first 11 chapters discuss the following steps in searching for a job: handling a job loss; managing time and financial resources while conducting a full-time job search; using objective…

  8. Engineering Your Job Search: A Job-Finding Resource for Engineering Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    This guide, which is intended for engineering professionals, explains how to use up-to-date job search techniques to design and conduct an effective job hunt. The first 11 chapters discuss the following steps in searching for a job: handling a job loss; managing time and financial resources while conducting a full-time job search; using objective…

  9. The Experience of Emotions during the Job Search and Choice Process among Novice Job Seekers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaccio, Silvia; Gauvin, Natalie; Reeve, Charlie L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigate the role of emotions in the job search and choice process of novice job seekers. Results of qualitative analyses of the first-person accounts of 41 job seekers indicate that participants whose recollections of their job search contained emotional language were more likely to display a haphazard job search strategy than…

  10. Snowboarding injuries.

    PubMed

    Sachtleben, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Snowboarding has gained immense popularity during the past 30 years and continues to appeal to many young participants. Injury patterns and characteristics of injuries seen commonly in snowboarders have rapidly evolved during this time. Risk factors have emerged, and various methods of reducing injuries to snowboarders have been investigated. It is important that medical providers are knowledgeable about this growing sport and are prepared to adequately evaluate and treat snowboarding injuries. This article will review the issues and discuss diagnostic and treatment principles regarding injuries seen commonly in snowboarders. Injury prevention should be emphasized, particularly with young riders and beginners.

  11. Gender, Jobs and Working Conditions in the European Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Colette; Burchell, Brendan

    Trends in gender, jobs, and working conditions in the European Union (EU) were examined. In 2000, representative samples of approximately 1,500 workers in each of the EU member states (500 in Luxembourg) were surveyed. To identify trends, the survey findings were compared with those of similar surveys conducted in 1991 and 1996. The comparison…

  12. Job Satisfaction among Industrial and Technical Teacher Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Ernest W.; McMahan-Landers, Jama

    2003-01-01

    A study of 133 industrial technical teacher educators found that demographic factors (age, years in position, years in teacher education) explain only a small amount of variance in job satisfaction. Results were similar to a 1997 sample, except the current group was more satisfied with the nature of work and less with operating conditions.…

  13. JOB CORPS TRAINEES AS A SAMPLE OF THE POPULATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDGERTON, HAROLD A.; SYLVESTER, ROBERT W.

    THE SIMILARITY OF JOB CORPS TRAINEES TO THE POPULATION OF THE SAME AGE FROM WHICH THEY WERE DRAWN AND PROPORTION OF TRAINEES COMING FROM EACH STATE WERE DETERMINED. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM PREENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS, CENSUS REPORTS, AND PUBLICATIONS. FINDINGS INCLUDED -- (1) THE NUMBER OF 16- TO 17-YEAR-OLD MALE TRAINEES WAS DISPROPORTIONATELY…

  14. Applying for Your Own Job: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Elizabeth Reid

    2008-01-01

    This study undertook a small preliminary investigation of the contemporary employment practice of "applying for your own job". There has not yet been a specific study into the effect upon individuals and organisations of the practice of existing employees being required to apply for the same or a similar position in a competitive…

  15. Productivity and Job Security: Attrition--Benefits and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Productivity and Quality of Working Life, Washington, DC.

    Three case studies are presented to document different approaches to providing the job security which would encourage acceptance of technological changes that could result in productivity improvements. The intent is to assist union and management practitioners in handling similar problems in their own firms. Focus is on the utility of attrition…

  16. Productivity and Job Security: Attrition--Benefits and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Productivity and Quality of Working Life, Washington, DC.

    Three case studies are presented to document different approaches to providing the job security which would encourage acceptance of technological changes that could result in productivity improvements. The intent is to assist union and management practitioners in handling similar problems in their own firms. Focus is on the utility of attrition…

  17. Does job insecurity deteriorate health?

    PubMed

    Caroli, Eve; Godard, Mathilde

    2016-02-01

    This paper estimates the causal effect of perceived job insecurity - that is, the fear of involuntary job loss - on health in a sample of men from 22 European countries. We rely on an original instrumental variable approach on the basis of the idea that workers perceive greater job security in countries where employment is strongly protected by the law and more so if employed in industries where employment protection legislation is more binding; that is, in induastries with a higher natural rate of dismissals. Using cross-country data from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey, we show that, when the potential endogeneity of job insecurity is not accounted for, the latter appears to deteriorate almost all health outcomes. When tackling the endogeneity issue by estimating an instrumental variable model and dealing with potential weak-instrument issues, the health-damaging effect of job insecurity is confirmed for a limited subgroup of health outcomes; namely, suffering from headaches or eyestrain and skin problems. As for other health variables, the impact of job insecurity appears to be insignificant at conventional levels.

  18. Predictors of Intent to Leave the Job Among Home Health Workers: Analysis of the National Home Health Aide Survey.

    PubMed

    Stone, Robyn; Wilhelm, Jess; Bishop, Christine E; Bryant, Natasha S; Hermer, Linda; Squillace, Marie R

    2017-10-01

    To identify agency policies and workplace characteristics that are associated with intent to leave the job among home health workers employed by certified agencies. Data are from the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey/National Home Health Aide Survey, a nationally representative, linked data set of home health and hospice agencies and their workers. Logistic regression with survey weights was conducted to identify agency and workplace factors associated with intent to leave the job, controlling for worker, agency, and labor market characteristics. Job satisfaction, consistent patient assignment, and provision of health insurance were associated with lower intent to leave the job. By contrast, being assigned insufficient work hours and on-the-job injuries were associated with greater intent to leave the job after controlling for fixed worker, agency, and labor market characteristics. African American workers and workers with a higher household income also expressed greater intent to leave the job. This is the first analysis to use a weighted, nationally representative sample of home health workers linked with agency-level data. The findings suggest that intention to leave the job may be reduced through policies that prevent injuries, improve consistency of client assignment, improve experiences among African American workers, and offer sufficient hours to workers who want them.

  19. Effect of systematic ergonomic hazard identification and control implementation on musculoskeletal disorder and injury risk

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Linda F; Taiwo, Oyebode A; Galusha, Deron; Barbour, Russell; Slade, Martin D; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Cullen, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine the effect of an ergonomic hazard control (HC) initiative, undertaken as part of a company ergonomics standard, on worker injury risk. Methods Using the company's ergonomic hazards database to identify jobs with and without ergonomic HC implementation and linking to individual job and injury histories, injury risk among person-jobs with HC implementation (the HC group) was compared to those without HC (NoHC group) using random coefficient models. Further analysis of the HC group was conducted to determine the effect of additional ergonomic hazards controlled on injury risk. Results Among 123jobs at 17 plant locations, 347 ergonomic hazards were quantitatively identified during the study period. HC were implemented for 204 quantified ergonomic hazards in 84 jobs, impacting 10 385 persons (12 967 person-jobs). No HC were implemented for quantified ergonomic hazards in the remaining 39 jobs affecting 4155 persons (5046 person-jobs). Adjusting for age, sex, plant origin, and year to control for any temporal trend in injury risk, the relative risk (RR) for musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) was 0.85 and the RR for any injury or MSD was 0.92 in the HC compared to NoHC group. Among the HC group, each ergonomic hazard controlled was associated with risk reduction for MSD and acute injury outcomes (RR 0.93). Conclusion Systematic ergonomic HC through participatory ergonomics, as part of a mandatory company ergonomics standard, is associated with MSD and injury risk reduction among workers in jobs with HC implemented. PMID:24142048

  20. Skateboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Cass, D T; Ross, F

    1990-08-06

    The recent increase in skateboard injuries is causing concern. Over a 30-month period there were 80 admissions (69 children) to Westmead Hospital because of skateboard injuries. Among children most injuries were minor, involving fractures to the upper limbs (47) or minor head injuries (8). The only serious injuries were a ruptured urethra and a closed head injury. Over the same time period skateboard riding caused five deaths in New South Wales. These all involved head injuries and in four instances collisions with cars. The data strongly support other studies that show skateboard riding is particularly dangerous near traffic and should be proscribed. However, in parkland and around the home the skateboard is an enjoyable toy with an acceptable risk of minor injury. Helmets should be worn and would have prevented all the head injury admissions in this series. Children under 10 have a higher risk of fractures and head injuries due to insufficient motor development to control the boards and the resultant falls. Skateboard injuries are an example of injuries caused by a "fad epidemic". To cope with these types of periodic events up-to-date data collection is needed, followed rapidly by an intervention programme so that serious injuries can be kept to a minimum.

  1. Engaging in Personal Business on the Job: Extending the Presenteeism Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Abate, Caroline P.; Eddy, Erik R.

    2007-01-01

    Presenteeism describes the situation when workers are on the job but, because of illness, injury, or other conditions, they are not functioning at peak levels. Although much of the research on presenteeism appears in the medical literature, we argue that presenteeism also occurs when employees go to work but spend a portion of the workday engaging…

  2. Engaging in Personal Business on the Job: Extending the Presenteeism Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Abate, Caroline P.; Eddy, Erik R.

    2007-01-01

    Presenteeism describes the situation when workers are on the job but, because of illness, injury, or other conditions, they are not functioning at peak levels. Although much of the research on presenteeism appears in the medical literature, we argue that presenteeism also occurs when employees go to work but spend a portion of the workday engaging…

  3. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your knee, like keeping it from bending outward. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL): The ACL connects your femur to your ... Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Osgood-Schlatter Disease Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Bones, Muscles, and Joints Meniscus Tears ...

  4. Birth Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Up to Date Additional Content Medical News Birth Injury By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD, Professor of ... Problems in Newborns Overview of Problems in Newborns Birth Injury Prematurity Postmaturity Small for Gestational Age (SGA) ...

  5. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  6. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  7. Urethral Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Related Injuries (Video) Rotator Cuff Injury (News) Violent Video Games May Not 'Desensitize' Players, Brain Scans ... Comfort Am I Correct? More Videos News HealthDay Violent Video Games May Not 'Desensitize' Players, Brain Scans ...

  8. Do job demands and job control affect problem-solving?

    PubMed

    Bergman, Peter N; Ahlberg, Gunnel; Johansson, Gun; Stoetzer, Ulrich; Aborg, Carl; Hallsten, Lennart; Lundberg, Ingvar

    2012-01-01

    The Job Demand Control model presents combinations of working conditions that may facilitate learning, the active learning hypothesis, or have detrimental effects on health, the strain hypothesis. To test the active learning hypothesis, this study analysed the effects of job demands and job control on general problem-solving strategies. A population-based sample of 4,636 individuals (55% women, 45% men) with the same job characteristics measured at two times with a three year time lag was used. Main effects of demands, skill discretion, task authority and control, and the combined effects of demands and control were analysed in logistic regressions, on four outcomes representing general problem-solving strategies. Those reporting high on skill discretion, task authority and control, as well as those reporting high demand/high control and low demand/high control job characteristics were more likely to state using problem solving strategies. Results suggest that working conditions including high levels of control may affect how individuals cope with problems and that workplace characteristics may affect behaviour in the non-work domain.

  9. Flexible Job Shop Scheduling with Multi-level Job Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yang-Ja; Kim, Ki-Dong; Jang, Seong-Yong; Park, Jinwoo

    This paper deals with a scheduling problem in a flexible job shop with multi-level job structures where end products are assembled from sub-assemblies or manufactured components. For such shops MRP (Material Requirement Planning) logic is frequently used to synchronize and pace the production activities for the required parts. However, in MRP, the planning of operational-level activities is left to short term scheduling. So, we need a good scheduling algorithm to generate feasible schedules taking into account shop floor characteristics and multi-level job structures used in MRP. In this paper, we present a GA (Genetic Algorithm) solution for this complex scheduling problem based on a new gene to reflect the machine assignment, operation sequences and the levels of the operations relative to final assembly operation. The relative operation level is the control parameter that paces the completion timing of the components belonging to the same branch in the multi-level job hierarchy. We compare the genetic algorithm with several dispatching rules in terms of total tardiness and the genetic algorithm shows outstanding performance for about forty modified standard job-shop problem instances.

  10. Analyzing data flows of WLCG jobs at batch job level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    With the introduction of federated data access to the workflows of WLCG, it is becoming increasingly important for data centers to understand specific data flows regarding storage element accesses, firewall configurations, as well as the scheduling of batch jobs themselves. As existing batch system monitoring and related system monitoring tools do not support measurements at batch job level, a new tool has been developed and put into operation at the GridKa Tier 1 center for monitoring continuous data streams and characteristics of WLCG jobs and pilots. Long term measurements and data collection are in progress. These measurements already have been proven to be useful analyzing misbehaviors and various issues. Therefore we aim for an automated, realtime approach for anomaly detection. As a requirement, prototypes for standard workflows have to be examined. Based on measurements of several months, different features of HEP jobs are evaluated regarding their effectiveness for data mining approaches to identify these common workflows. The paper will introduce the actual measurement approach and statistics as well as the general concept and first results classifying different HEP job workflows derived from the measurements at GridKa.

  11. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  12. [Influence of job-hunting anxiety on job-hunting: from the viewpoint of coping].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yuko; Nagasaku, Minoru; Arai, Kunijiro

    2010-02-01

    The present study developed a job-hunting anxiety scale and investigated the influence of job-hunting anxiety on coping, number of job-hunting applications, and satisfaction with job-hunting. Questionnaires were completed by 306 college students who had started job-hunting. Explorative factor analysis extracted five factors such as "appeal anxiety", "support anxiety", "activity persistence anxiety", "test anxiety", and "a lack of readiness anxiety". Analysis of covariance structures indicated that (a) job-hunting anxiety was negatively related to problem-focused coping, the number of job-hunting applications, and the satisfaction with job-hunting, and (b) problem-focused coping was positively related to the number of job-hunting applications and the satisfaction with job-hunting. These results suggest that reduction of job-hunting anxiety and the use of problem-focused coping facilitated job-hunting.

  13. Job-Relatedness of a Posttraining Job Knowledge Criterion Used to Assess Validity and Test Fairness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distefano, M. K., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Significant job-relatedness was found for a posttraining job knowledge test criterion. Content validity methods may be able to help solve the problem of criterion relevance in validation research by providing quantitative evidence of job-relatedness. (Author)

  14. Electric shocks at work in Europe: development of a job exposure matrix.

    PubMed

    Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel; Bowman, Joseph D; Kheifets, Leeka; Kromhout, Hans

    2013-04-01

    Electric shocks have been suggested as a potential risk factor for neurological disease, in particular for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. While actual exposure to shocks is difficult to measure, occurrence and variation of electric injuries could serve as an exposure proxy. We assessed risk of electric injury, using occupational accident registries across Europe to develop an electric shock job-exposure-matrix (JEM). Injury data were obtained from five European countries, and the number of workers per occupation and country from EUROSTAT was compiled at a 3-digit International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988 level. We pooled accident rates across countries with a random effects model and categorised jobs into low, medium and high risk based on the 75th and 90th percentile. We next compared our JEM to a JEM that classified extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure of jobs into low, medium and high. Of 116 job codes, occupations with high potential for electric injury exposure were electrical and electronic equipment mechanics and fitters, building frame workers and finishers, machinery mechanics and fitters, metal moulders and welders, assemblers, mining and construction labourers, metal-products machine operators, ships' decks crews and power production and related plant operators. Agreement between the electrical injury and magnetic field JEM was 67.2%. Our JEM classifies occupational titles according to risk of electric injury as a proxy for occurrence of electric shocks. In addition to assessing risk potentially arising from electric shocks, this JEM might contribute to disentangling risks from electric injury from those of extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure.

  15. National collegiate athletic association division and primary job title of athletic trainers and their job satisfaction or intention to leave athletic training.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Aaron B; Henning, Jolene M

    2011-01-01

    Membership in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has declined in recent years, generating much debate about professional commitment. To compare the contributing factors of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training of certified athletic trainers (ATs) employed in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions. Cross-sectional study. A link to a Web-based questionnaire containing the Spector Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) and an original Intention to Leave Survey (ITLS) was distributed by e-mail to 1003 certified members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. A total of 191 certified members of the NATA employed in a college or university setting in a primarily clinical capacity; representing all NCAA divisions; and having the job title of head athletic trainer, associate/assistant athletic trainer, or graduate assistant/intern athletic trainer. We used separate 3 x 3 factorial analyses of variance to compare the mean scores of each JSS subscale and of the ITLS with NCAA division and job title. A stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the strength of the relationships between the JSS subscales and the ITLS. We found differences for job title in the subscales of Fringe Benefits (F(2182) = 7.82, P = .001 ) and Operating Conditions (F(2,182) = 12.01, P < .001). The JSS subscale Nature of Work was the'greatest indicator of intention to leave (β = -0.45). We found a strong negative correlation between various facets of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training. The NCAA division seemed to have no effect on an individual's job satisfaction or intention to leave the profession. In addition, only Fringe Benefits and Operating Conditions seemed to be affected by job title. The ATs had similar levels of job satisfaction regardless of NCAA division, and their job titles were not a major factor in job satisfaction.

  16. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division and Primary Job Title of Athletic Trainers and Their Job Satisfaction or Intention to Leave Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Aaron B.; Henning, Jolene M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Membership in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has declined in recent years, generating much debate about professional commitment. Objective: To compare the contributing factors of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training of certified athletic trainers (ATs) employed in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A link to a Web-based questionnaire containing the Spector Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) and an original Intention to Leave Survey (ITLS) was distributed by e-mail to 1003 certified members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 191 certified members of the NATA employed in a college or university setting in a primarily clinical capacity; representing all NCAA divisions; and having the job title of head athletic trainer, associate/assistant athletic trainer, or graduate assistant/intern athletic trainer. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used separate 3 × 3 factorial analyses of variance to compare the mean scores of each JSS subscale and of the ITLS with NCAA division and job title. A stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the strength of the relationships between the JSS subscales and the ITLS. Results: We found differences for job title in the subscales of Fringe Benefits (F2,182 = 7.82, P = .001) and Operating Conditions (F2,182 = 12.01, P < .001). The JSS subscale Nature of Work was the greatest indicator of intention to leave (β = −0.45). Conclusions: We found a strong negative correlation between various facets of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training. The NCAA division seemed to have no effect on an individual's job satisfaction or intention to leave the profession. In addition, only Fringe Benefits and Operating Conditions seemed to be affected by job title. The ATs had similar levels of job satisfaction regardless of NCAA division, and their job titles were not a

  17. Skateboard injuries

    PubMed Central

    Christian, M. Sheila; Khan, O.

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and nineteen cases of injuries sustained by skateboard users are reviewed. A significant proportion of the injuries sustained were fractures. The absence of adequate protective measures was noted. A decrease in the popularity of the sport, as judged by the annual incidence of skateboard injuries, is apparent in this series. Imagesp102-ap102-b PMID:7407446

  18. Orienteering injuries

    PubMed Central

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering. Imagesp236-ap237-ap237-bp238-ap239-ap240-a PMID:7159815

  19. Does aging make employees more resilient to job stress? Age as a moderator in the job stressor-well-being relationship in three Finnish occupational samples.

    PubMed

    Mauno, Saija; Ruokolainen, Mervi; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether an employee's age moderates the relationships between job stressors (i.e. job insecurity, workload, work-family conflict) and self-rated well-being (i.e. work-family enrichment, life satisfaction, job satisfaction, vigor at work). Analysis of covariance and moderated hierarchical regression analysis were used to examine the cross-sectional Finnish data collected among service sector employees (N = 1037), nurses (N = 1719), and academic employees (N = 945). In a situation of high job insecurity, the younger nurses reported higher work-family enrichment, job satisfaction, and vigor compared to their older colleagues. A similar result was also found among the service sector workers in relation to vigor at work. Thus, young age buffered against negative outcomes related to job insecurity. Moreover, older age buffered against the negative effect of high workload on job satisfaction among the service sector and against high work-family conflict on life satisfaction among the academic employees. More attention should be paid to the ability of younger employees to manage problems related to work-family imbalance and high workload, and to older employees' ability to cope with job insecurity. The findings of this study recommend different stress management interventions for older and younger employees.

  20. Survey of laser injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Dunn, J. C., II; Roach, William P.

    2002-06-01

    Laser use is pervasive and steadily expanding both in the private sector and the Department of Defense (DoD). For more than 20 years, Rockwell Laser Industries, the U.S. Army, and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health have separately collected data on injuries occurring during, or resultant from, the use of lasers. However, data from these sources is incomplete and has not recently undergone a thorough compiling, statistical analysis, review and summarization. It is our belief that in order to evaluate current related medical surveillance, safety and training procedures, this data needs such an examination. Persons maintaining these databases were contacted and any available data on laser injury was collected. The data was analyzed and examined for pertinent similarities and differences among a wide range of parameters. We summarize these findings in this paper and also comment on the injuries, current safety measures and injury reporting protocols associated with laser use.

  1. A Job Classification Scheme for Health Manpower

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jeffrey H.

    1968-01-01

    The Census Bureau's occupational classification scheme and concept of the “health services industry” are inadequate tools for analysis of the changing job structure of health manpower. In an attempt to remedy their inadequacies, a new analytical framework—drawing upon the work of James Scoville on the job content of the U.S. economy—was devised. The first stage in formulating this new framework was to determine which jobs should be considered health jobs. The overall health care job family was designed to encompass jobs in which the primary technical focus or function is oriented toward the provision of health services. There are two dimensions to the job classification scheme presented here. The first describes each job in terms of job content; relative income data and minimum education and training requirements were employed as surrogate measures. By this means, health care jobs were grouped by three levels of job content: high, medium, and low. The other dimension describes each job in terms of its technical focus or function; by this means, health care jobs were grouped into nine job families. PMID:5673666

  2. Waterbike injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, R S; Caiach, S

    1991-01-01

    Jet skiing is a rapidly growing sport. The craft incorporate safety features and the manufacturers issue detailed safety instructions. Racing is conducted with adequate attention to clothing, safety and insurance. However, casual use is widespread and is sometimes irresponsible. Serious injuries to riders are uncommon: dental and knee injuries are described. A case of renal contusion and a head injury were caused by other riders and two potentially fatal injuries illustrate the risk for other water users. The number of injuries associated with the use of personal watercraft is likely to increase and may be influenced by appropriate organization or regulation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1810620

  3. Job satisfaction in psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Ward, M; Cowman, S

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, mental health services across Europe have undergone major organizational change with a move from institutional to community care. In such a context, the impact of change on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses has received little attention in the literature. This paper reports on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses and data were collected in 2003. The population of qualified psychiatric nurses (n = 800) working in a defined geographical health board area was surveyed. Methodological triangulation with a between-methods approach was used in the study. Data were collected on job satisfaction using a questionnaire adopted from the Occupational Stress Indicator. A response rate of 346 (43%) was obtained. Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data. Factors influencing levels of job satisfaction predominantly related to the nurses work location. Other factors influencing job satisfaction included choice of work location, work routine, off duty/staff allocation arrangements, teamwork and working environment. The results of the study highlight to employers of psychiatric nurses the importance of work location, including the value of facilitating staff with choices in their working environment, which may influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in mental health services.

  4. Running Jobs in the Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Ubeda Garcia, M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a model for the operation of computing nodes at a site using Virtual Machines (VMs), in which VMs are created and contextualized for experiments by the site itself. For the experiment, these VMs appear to be produced spontaneously "in the vacuum" rather having to ask the site to create each one. This model takes advantage of the existing pilot job frameworks adopted by many experiments. In the Vacuum model, the contextualization process starts a job agent within the VM and real jobs are fetched from the central task queue as normal. An implementation of the Vacuum scheme, Vac, is presented in which a VM factory runs on each physical worker node to create and contextualize its set of VMs. With this system, each node's VM factory can decide which experiments' VMs to run, based on site-wide target shares and on a peer-to-peer protocol in which the site's VM factories query each other to discover which VM types they are running. A property of this system is that there is no gate keeper service, head node, or batch system accepting and then directing jobs to particular worker nodes, avoiding several central points of failure. Finally, we describe tests of the Vac system using jobs from the central LHCb task queue, using the same contextualization procedure for VMs developed by LHCb for Clouds.

  5. Jobs and Renewable Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sterzinger, George

    2006-12-19

    Early in 2002, REPP developed the Jobs Calculator, a tool that calculates the number of direct jobs resulting from renewable energy development under RPS (Renewable Portfolio Standard) legislation or other programs to accelerate renewable energy development. The calculator is based on a survey of current industry practices to assess the number and type of jobs that will result from the enactment of a RPS. This project built upon and significantly enhanced the initial Jobs Calculator model by (1) expanding the survey to include other renewable technologies (the original model was limited to wind, solar PV and biomass co-firing technologies); (2) more precisely calculating the economic development benefits related to renewable energy development; (3) completing and regularly updating the survey of the commercially active renewable energy firms to determine kinds and number of jobs directly created; and (4) developing and implementing a technology to locate where the economic activity related to each type of renewable technology is likely to occur. REPP worked directly with groups in the State of Nevada to interpret the results and develop policies to capture as much of the economic benefits as possible for the state through technology selection, training program options, and outreach to manufacturing groups.

  6. 45 CFR 286.105 - What limitations concerning vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., job search and job readiness assistance exist with respect to the work participation rate? 286.105... vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist with respect to the work participation... 12 months. (b) There are two limitations concerning job search and job readiness: (1) Job search and...

  7. 45 CFR 286.105 - What limitations concerning vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., job search and job readiness assistance exist with respect to the work participation rate? 286.105... vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist with respect to the work participation... 12 months. (b) There are two limitations concerning job search and job readiness: (1) Job search...

  8. 45 CFR 286.105 - What limitations concerning vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., job search and job readiness assistance exist with respect to the work participation rate? 286.105... vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist with respect to the work participation... 12 months. (b) There are two limitations concerning job search and job readiness: (1) Job search and...

  9. Resilience as a moderator of the indirect effects of conflict and workload on job outcomes among nurses.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Julie Jean; Bruk-Lee, Valentina

    2017-07-16

    To examine the relative effects of interpersonal conflict and workload on job outcomes (turnover intentions, burnout, injuries) and examine if resilience moderates the indirect effects of conflict and workload on job outcomes via job-related negative effect. There is interest in understanding resilience in the nursing profession. Placing resilience in the context of the Emotion-Centred Model of Occupational Stress (Spector, ) is a novel approach to understanding how resilience ameliorates the negative effects of workplace stressors. This study used a two-wave survey design to collect data from 97 nurses across medical units. Nurses working in the US were recruited in June 2014 using Qualtrics Panels, an online survey platform service that secures participants for research. Nurses were contacted via email at two time points, two weeks apart and provided a link to an online survey. SPSS v. 23 and PROCESS v2.15 were used to analyse regressions and moderated mediation. Interpersonal conflict predicted turnover intentions and burnout; workload predicted injuries. Job-related negative affect mediated the relationships between stressors and job outcomes except for the direct effect of workload on injuries. Low resilience increased the magnitude of the indirect effects of conflict on job outcomes. Job characteristics like workload predicted unique variability in self-reported physical injuries. Conflict at work, a social stressor, predicted well-being and job attitudes. Highly resilient nurses bounced back after experiencing conflict in the workplace. Resilience should be explored for its potential as a method to reduce the negative effects of social stressors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Managing job stress in nursing: what kind of resources do we need?

    PubMed

    van den Tooren, Marieke; de Jonge, Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study to investigate the functionality of different kinds of job resources for managing job stress in nursing. There is increasing recognition that healthcare staff, and especially nurses, are at high risk for burnout and physical complaints. Several researchers have proposed that job resources moderate the relationship between job demands and job-related outcomes, particularly when there is a match between the type of demands, resources, and outcomes. Based on the Demand-Induced Strain Compensation Model, cross-sectional survey data were collected between November 2006 and February 2007 by a paper-and-pencil questionnaire. The final sample consisted of 69 nurses from a Dutch nursing home (response rate 59.4%). Data were analyzed by hierarchical regression analyses. High physical demands had adverse effects on both physical complaints and emotional exhaustion (i.e. burnout), unless employees had high physical resources. A similar pattern was found for high physical demands and emotional resources in predicting emotional exhaustion. The likelihood of finding theoretically-valid moderating effects was related to the degree of match between demands, resources, and outcomes. Job resources do not randomly moderate the relationship between job demands and job-related outcomes. Both physical and emotional resources seem to be important stress buffers for human service employees such as nurses, and their moderating effects underline the importance of specific job resources in healthcare work. Job redesign in nursing homes should therefore primarily focus on matching job resources to job demands in order to diminish poor health and ill-being.

  11. Meaningful work and mental health: job satisfaction as a moderator.

    PubMed

    Allan, Blake A; Dexter, Chelsea; Kinsey, Rebecca; Parker, Shelby

    2016-11-12

    Depression, anxiety and stress are common problems for modern workers. Although having meaningful work, or work that is significant, facilitates personal growth, and contributes to the greater good, has been linked to better mental health, people's work might also need to be satisfying or enjoyable to improve outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to examine meaningful work's relation to mental health (i.e. depression, anxiety and stress) and investigate job satisfaction as a moderator of this relation. The study hypotheses were tested with a large, diverse sample recruited from an online source. Partially supporting hypotheses, when controlling for job satisfaction, meaningful work negatively correlated with depression but did not have a significant relation with anxiety and stress. Similarly, job satisfaction negatively predicted depression and stress. Furthermore, the relations between meaningful work and both anxiety and stress were moderated by job satisfaction. Specifically, only people perceiving their work as meaningful and satisfying reported less anxiety and stress. Although continued research is needed, employers and employees may have to target both the meaningfulness and job satisfaction to address the issues of stress and anxiety among working adults.

  12. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  13. Psychosocial work factors in new or recurrent injuries among hospital workers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Jeong; You, Doohee; Gillen, Marion; Blanc, Paul D

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for psychosocial work factors in injury, but little is known about the interaction between psychosocial factors and previous injury experience on subsequent injury risk. We examined the relationships between psychosocial work factors and new or recurrent injury among hospital workers. We studied 492 hospital workers including 116 cases with baseline injury and 376 injury-free referents at baseline over follow-up. Job strain, total support, effort-reward imbalance, overcommitment, and musculoskeletal injury at baseline were examined in logistic regression models as predictors of new or recurrent injury experienced during a 2-year follow-up period. The overall cumulative incidence of injury over follow-up was 35.6 % (51.7 % for re-injury among baseline injury cases; 30.6 % for new injury among referents). Significantly increased risks with baseline job strain (OR 1.26; 95 % CI 1.02-1.55) and effort-reward imbalance (OR 1.42; 95 % CI 1.12-1.81) were observed for injury only among the referents. Overcommitment was associated with increased risk of injury only among the cases (OR 1.58; 95 % CI 1.05-2.39). The effects of psychosocial work factors on new or recurrent injury risk appear to differ by previous injury experience, suggesting the need for differing preventive strategies in hospital workers.

  14. Occupational injury disparities in the US hotel industry.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Susan; Vossenas, Pamela; Krause, Niklas; Moriarty, Joan; Frumin, Eric; Shimek, Jo Anna M; Mirer, Franklin; Orris, Peter; Punnett, Laura

    2010-02-01

    Hotel employees have higher rates of occupational injury and sustain more severe injuries than most other service workers. OSHA log incidents from five unionized hotel companies for a three-year period were analyzed to estimate injury rates by job, company, and demographic characteristics. Room cleaning work, known to be physically hazardous, was of particular concern. A total of 2,865 injuries were reported during 55,327 worker-years of observation. The overall injury rate was 5.2 injuries per 100 worker-years. The rate was highest for housekeepers (7.9), Hispanic housekeepers (10.6), and about double in three companies versus two others. Acute trauma rates were highest in kitchen workers (4.0/100) and housekeepers (3.9/100); housekeepers also had the highest rate of musculoskeletal disorders (3.2/100). Age, being female or Hispanic, job title, and company were all independently associated with injury risk. Sex- and ethnicity-based disparities in injury rates were only partially due to the type of job held and the company in which the work was performed. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. An overview of job embeddedness.

    PubMed

    Reitz, O Ed; Anderson, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Nursing turnover in health care organizations is a considerable problem that needs to be reframed within the context of "nurse retention" and "job embeddedness" (JE). A construct from the business literature, JE has been associated with "retention" or "antiwithdrawal." Conversely, turnover encompasses the process of quitting. This distinction is significant. JE represents a mediating construct between various "on-the-job" (organizational) factors, "off-the-job" (community) factors, and employee retention. This article presents an overview of JE including the dimensions, the related concepts of turnover and retention, and associated research. JE may be used to develop specific nurse-retention strategies following careful organizational and community assessment. With the current and looming nursing shortage, perhaps it is time for health care institutions to consider the adaptation of JE tenets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Beyond the fireground: injuries in the fire service.

    PubMed

    Poplin, Gerald S; Harris, Robin B; Pollack, Keshia M; Peate, Wayne F; Burgess, Jefferey L

    2012-08-01

    Background Although firefighting and emergency medical services are high-risk professions, few studies have identified the aetiology of injury in the fire service beyond the fireground. Methods Data were collected for work-related injuries in a medium-sized metropolitan fire department. In a descriptive study, the factors explored included the nature of injury, agent, mechanism, body location, environment, abbreviated injury scale (AIS), functional capacity index (FCI) and lost time status. Results From 2004 to 2009, the annual injury incidence rate averaged 17.7 per 100 employees. One-third of all injuries (32.9%) resulted from physical exercise activities, while patient transport, training drills and fireground operations resulted in 16.9%, 11.1% and 10.2% of injuries, respectively. For all job operations, sprains and strains were the most prevalent type of injury (40.2-85.2%), followed by contusions and lacerations (7.7-26.1%). The third most common injury was related to the conventional hazards of the individual job operation. Most injuries (n=862, 95.6%) were minor in severity, while 4.3% of injuries were classified as having some impedance of normal function (FCI 3). Moderate injuries (AIS 2) were infrequent, but comprised a greater proportion of fireground injuries (8.7%) than the other activities (1.0-4.1%); however, lost time injuries were more frequent for patient transport (46.1%) than other operations (22.0-29.1%). Conclusions Physical exercise, patient transport and training activities were responsible for a greater percentage of injuries than fireground operations. Focused efforts to improve the characterisation of risks during these more diverse set of work processes should help guide the development of salient strategies for injury prevention.

  17. Relationship of safety climate perceptions and job satisfaction among employees in the construction industry: the moderating role of age.

    PubMed

    Stoilkovska, Biljana Blaževska; Žileska Pančovska, Valentina; Mijoski, Goran

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which construction sector employees perceive that safety is important in their organizations/sites and how job satisfaction affects these perceptions when age is introduced as a moderator variable. Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated that job satisfaction has a strong effect on perceived management commitment to work safety and that this relationship was moderated by respondents' age. Job satisfaction was associated with perceived accident rate and safety inspection frequency, but the proposed role of age in this linkage was not confirmed. Consequently, the findings indicated that by increasing the level of job satisfaction, perceptions of these safety climate aspects proved to be more positive. The conclusion is that these relationships could further lead to a lower percentage of accidents and injuries in the workplace and better health among employees. A significant relationship between job satisfaction, age and perceived co-workers' commitment to work safety was not found.

  18. Examining job tenure and lost-time claim rates in Ontario, Canada, over a 10-year period, 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    Morassaei, Sara; Breslin, F Curtis; Shen, Min; Smith, Peter M

    2013-03-01

    We sought to examine the association between job tenure and lost-time claim rates over a 10-year period in Ontario, Canada. Data were obtained from workers' compensation records and labour force survey data from 1999 to 2008. Claim rates were calculated for gender, age, industry, occupation, year and job tenure group. A multivariate analysis and examination of effect modification were performed. Differences in injury event and source of injury were also examined by job tenure. Lost-time claim rates were significantly higher for workers with shorter job tenure, regardless of other factors. Claim rates for new workers differed by gender, age and industry, but remained relatively constant at an elevated rate over the observed time period. This study is the first to examine lost-time claim rates by job tenure over a time period during which overall claim rates generally declined. Claim rates did not show a convergence by job tenure. Findings highlight that new workers are still at elevated risk, and suggest the need for improved training, reducing exposures among new workers, promoting permanent employment, and monitoring work injury trends and risk factors.

  19. Railing for safety: job demands, job control, and safety citizenship role definition.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nick; Chmiel, Nik; Walls, Melanie

    2005-10-01

    This study investigated job demands and job control as predictors of safety citizenship role definition, that is, employees' role orientation toward improving workplace safety. Data from a survey of 334 trackside workers were framed in the context of R. A. Karasek's (1979) job demands-control model. High job demands were negatively related to safety citizenship role definition, whereas high job control was positively related to this construct. Safety citizenship role definition of employees with high job control was buffered from the influence of high job demands, unlike that of employees with low job control, for whom high job demands were related to lower levels of the construct. Employees facing both high job demands and low job control were less likely than other employees to view improving safety as part of their role orientation. Copyright (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Miners' return to work following injuries in coal mines.

    PubMed

    Bhattacherjee, Ashis; Kunar, Bijay Mihir

    2016-12-22

    The occupational injuries in mines are common and result in severe socio-economical consequences. Earlier studies have revealed the role of multiple factors such as demographic factors, behavioral factors, health-related factors, working environment, and working conditions for mine injuries. However, there is a dearth of information about the role of some of these factors in delayed return to work (RTW) following a miner's injury. These factors may likely include personal characteristics of injured persons and his or her family, the injured person's social and economic status, and job characteristics. This study was conducted to assess the role of some of these factors for the return to work following coal miners' injuries. A study was conducted for 109 injured workers from an underground coal mine in the years 2000-2009. A questionnaire, which was completed by the personnel interviews, included among others age, height, weight, seniority, alcohol consumption, sleeping duration, presence of diseases, job stress, job satisfaction, and injury type. The data was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier estimates and the Cox proportional hazard model. According to Kaplan-Meier estimate it was revealed that a lower number of dependents, longer sleep duration, no job stress, no disease, no alcohol addiction, and higher monthly income have a great impact on early return to work after injury. The Cox regression analysis revealed that the significant risk factors which influenced miners' return to work included presence of disease, job satisfaction and injury type. The mine management should pay attention to significant risk factors for injuries in order to develop effective preventive measures. Med Pr 2016;67(6):729-742.