Science.gov

Sample records for john kosak thomas

  1. An essay concerning human understanding: how the cerebri anatome of Thomas Willis influenced John Locke.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley C

    2006-03-01

    Neurosurgeons are familiar with the anatomic investigations of Thomas Willis, but his intellectual legacy actually extends into the arena of philosophy. John Locke was a student of Willis while at Oxford, and this essay explores how some of Willis's anatomic discoveries might have influenced the ideas Locke expressed in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding. It also includes historical information about 17th century England and the group of men (including Christopher Wren and Robert Boyle) who worked with Willis and founded the Oxford Experimental Philosophy Club, which became the Royal Society.

  2. Introduction: A Symposium in Honor of Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, P. L.; Saka, H.; Tomokiyo, Y.; Boyes, E. D.

    2002-02-01

    This issue is dedicated to Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas for his renowned contributions to electron microscopy in the chemical sciences. It is a collection of peer-reviewed leading articles in electron microscopy, based on the presentations at the Microscopy and Microanalysis (M&M) 2000 symposium, which was held to honor Professor Thomas's exceptional scientific leadership and wide-ranging fundamental contributions in the chemical applications of electron microscopy.The issue contains key papers by leading international researchers on the recent developments and applications of electron microscopy in the solid state and liquid state sciences. They include synthesis and characterization of silicon nitride nanorods, nanostructures of amorphous silica, electron microscopy studies of nanoscale structure and chemistry of Pt-Ru electrocatalysts of interest in direct methanol fuel cells, development of in situ wet-environmental transmission electron microscopy for the first nanoscale studies of dynamic liquid-catalyst reactions, strain analysis of silicon by finite element method and energy filtering convergent beam electron diffraction, applications of chemistry with electron microscopy, bismuth nanowires for applications in nanoelectronics technology, synthesis and characterization of quantum dots for superlattices and in situ electron microscopy at very high temperatures to study the motion of W5Si3 on [alpha][beta]-SiN3 substrates.We thank all the participants, including the invited speakers, contributors, and session chairs, who made the symposium successful. We also thank the authors and reviewers of the papers who worked assiduously towards the publication of this issue.We are very grateful to the Microscopy Society of America (MSA) for providing the opportunity to honor Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas. Organizational support from the MSA is also gratefully acknowledged.We thank Charles E. Lyman, editor in chief of Microscopy and Microanalysis for coordinating

  3. Overall view, looking northwest Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, looking northwest - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  4. Overall view, looking westsouthwest Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, looking west-southwest - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  5. Overall view with ditch lateral, looking north Thomas Murphy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view with ditch lateral, looking north - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  6. 16. Photocopy of photograph (from collection of Chester H. Thomas, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (from collection of Chester H. Thomas, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania) ca. 1930, photographer unknown WEST SIDE AND SOUTH FRONT - John Chad House, State Route 100, U.S. Route 1 vicinity, Chadds Ford, Delaware County, PA

  7. SOFIA Engineer Thomas Keilig

    NASA Video Gallery

    Thomas Keilig, the German Aerospace Agency's (DLR) chief telescope engineer for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), comments on technical details of the high-tech primary ...

  8. Astronaut John Young in Command Module Simulator during Apollo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, command module pilot, inside the Command Module Simulator in bldg 5 during an Apollo Simulation. Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot are out of the view.

  9. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 2, 1937 10:00 A. M. DETAIL OF CORNICE. - Thomas Law House, 1252 Sixth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 6, 1936 11:45 A. M. VIEW FROM WEST (front) - Thomas Law House, 1252 Sixth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Pumphouse/garage and shed, looking southwest Thomas Murphy Homestead, North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pumphouse/garage and shed, looking southwest - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  12. Teaching with Purpose: An Interview with Thomas E. Ludwig

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Timothy D.; Ludwig, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Thomas E. Ludwig is the John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology at Hope College, where he joined the faculty in 1977 after receiving his PhD in development and aging from Washington University in St. Louis. His research focuses on developmental issues in cognitive neuropsychology. He is also the author or coauthor of more than a dozen sets of…

  13. Thomas Jefferson's Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Catherine F.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that taken together, Thomas Jefferson's contributions to the history of writing technology demonstrate a virtual "computer." Links Jefferson's development of writing technology to his democratic political philosophy. Argues that this link should interest writing teachers. Suggests that Jeffersonian optimism effectively counters…

  14. Happy Birthday, Thomas Edison!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Edward A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the work and inventions of Thomas Edison and their use in making teachers and students aware of the importance of electrotechnology in their lives and in their futures. Enables students to learn about science, experimentation, research, the process of invention, and the thrill of discovery. Describes educational resources available from…

  15. Thomas Jack Lee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Thomas Jack Lee served as the sixth director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from July 6, 1989 to January 6, 1994. Prior to the appointment, Lee held positions as Center Deputy Director (1980 - 1989) and Spacelab Program Manager (1973 - 1980). Lee began his NASA career in July 1960 when he transferred to the newly formed MSFC from Redstone Arsenal's Army Ballistic Missile Agency.

  16. John Napier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Kylie; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    John Napier was born in 1550 in the Tower of Merchiston, near Edinburgh, Scotland. Napier's work on logarithms greatly influenced the work that was to be done in the future. The logarithm's ability to simplify calculations meant that Kepler and many others were able to find the relationships and formulas for motion of bodies. In turn, Kepler's…

  17. John Manke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    On October 1, 1981, John A. Manke was named to head the Directorate of Flight Operations, Ames Research Center, which resulted from the consolidation of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, and Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. He also served as site manager of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Prior to this assignment, he served as Director of the Flight Operations and Support Directorate at Dryden. Manke attended the University of South Dakota before joining the U.S. Navy in 1951. He graduated from Marquette University at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1956 with a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. While at school he was selected for the NROTC program and after graduating in 1956 entered flight training and served as a fighter pilot with the U.S. Marine Corps. John left the service in 1960, and prior to joining NASA, worked for Honeywell Corporation as a test engineer. John joined Dryden in 1962 as a research engineer and later became a research pilot, testing advanced craft such as the wingless lifting bodies, forerunners of the Space Shuttle. He was project pilot on the X-24B and also flew the M-2, HL-10 and the X-24A lifting bodies. Manke retired on April 27, 1984. John is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. He has been honored with two NASA Medals of Outstanding Leadership, two NASA Medals for Exceptional Service and was selected for the Aerospace Walk of Honor in 1997.

  18. Practicing like Thomas Edison.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil; Ornstein, Hal

    2013-01-01

    For many centuries, medicine has practiced in a vacuum, and the healthcare profession has been isolated from other scientific disciplines. Beginning in the 20th century, doctors and scientists have looked to others for ideas, suggestions, innovations, and new technologies. Probably no one in the past hundred years has done so much to change the world than Thomas Edison. This article will discuss eight principles of Edison and how they may apply to our profession and our practices.

  19. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, "the boy artist of Texas".

    PubMed

    Bryan, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Critics consider the 1908-1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it "the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen" and told Thomas "I am at your service." A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of "empathy." Thomas told his subject that "I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side." The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library.

  20. John Tracy Ellis and the Figure of the Catholic Intellectual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conniff, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Fifty years after John Tracy Ellis challenged the quality and character of Catholic intellectual life, much work remains to be done. This essay explores Ellis's original assertions and places them in an overarching historical context that involves Flannery O'Connor and Thomas Merton.

  1. APOLLO 13 CREW JOHN SWIGERT, JAMES LOVELL, AND FRED HAISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    John L. Swigert, Jr., left, the Apollo 13 backup crewman being considered as command module pilot in place of Thomas K. Mattingly II because of the latter's exposure to measles, has been training with the prime crew -- James A. Lovell, Jr., center and Fred W. Haise, Jr.

  2. [Thomas Fincke and trigonometry].

    PubMed

    Schönbeck, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Thomas Fincke (January 6th, 1561 - April 24th, 1650), born in Flensburg (Germany), was one of the very most important and significant scientists in Denmark during the seventeenth century, a mathematician and astrologer and physician in the beginning of modern science, a representative of humanism and an influentual academic organizer. He studied in Strasbourg (since 1577) and Padua (since 1583) and received his M.D. in Basel (1587), he practised as a physician throughtout his life (since 1587 or 1590) and became a professor at Copenhagen (1591). But he was best known because of his Geometriae rotundi libri XIIII (1583), a famous book on plane and spherical trigonometry, based not on Euclid but on Petrus Ramus. In this influentual work, in which Fincke introduced the terms tangent and secant and probable first noticed the Law of Tangents and the so-called Newton-Oppel-Mauduit-Simpson-Mollweide-Gauss-formula, he showed himself to be ,,abreast of the mathematics of his time".

  3. John Tyndall's religion: a fragment

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Both contemporaries and historians have focused on the high-profile 1874 Belfast Address in which John Tyndall was widely perceived as promulgating atheism. Although some historians have instead interpreted him as a pantheist or an agnostic, it is clear that any such labels do not accurately capture Tyndall's religious position throughout his life. By contrast, this paper seeks to chart Tyndall's religious journey from 1840 (when he was in his late teens) to the autumn of 1848 when he commenced his scientific studies at Marburg. Although he had been imbued with his father's stern conservative Irish Protestantism and opposition to Catholicism, as a youth he seems for a time to have been attracted to Methodism. Later, however, he questioned and rejected his father's religious views and was increasingly drawn to the more spiritual outlook of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Thomas Carlyle, along with a more radical attitude to politics.

  4. Thomas Jefferson and American Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonen, Lester P.; Porter, Charlotte M.

    1976-01-01

    Presented are the numerous contributions made by Thomas Jefferson to the fields of biological sciences. In addition to his actual contributions and discoveries, his extensive verbal and literacy support of the sciences is traced. (SL)

  5. Thomas Kuhn's Influence on Astronomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Harry L.

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the astronomical community on their familiarity with the work of Thomas Kuhn. Finds that for some astronomers, Kuhn's thought resonated well with their picture of how science is done and provided perspectives on their scientific careers. (Author/CCM)

  6. A Conversation with Donald Thomas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Ronald S.

    1986-01-01

    The former Salt Lake City (Utah) superintendent, Donald Thomas, now the deputy superintendent in South Carolina, is interviewed about educational reform and the role of state and federal policymaking in the reform movement. (MD)

  7. A gift from Oxford: the Osler-Thomas connection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In June 1926, Dr. Henry M. Thomas Jr. (“Hal”) received as a gift from Grace Osler in Oxford an Einhorn Duodenal Bucket Set that had belonged to Sir William Osler. The Thomases were a distinguished multigenerational physician family of Baltimore with high educational standards and major accomplishments in medicine and medical education. An extraordinary number of the Thomas women earned doctorates and made significant contributions in an era when this was a pioneering achievement. This is exemplified by Martha Carey Thomas, who earned a PhD in 1882 and served as dean and president of Bryn Mawr College for women. As a leading feminist and member of the Women's Fund Committee, she was a major force in providing the endowment that permitted the opening of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine under the strict stipulations that admission requirements include an undergraduate degree and that women be admitted on the basis of total equality with men. Osler established relationships that extended over three generations of the Thomas family during his Baltimore tenure, an influence that proved mutually beneficial. PMID:23077379

  8. Astronaut Thomas Mattingly performs EVA during Apollo 16 transearth coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 16 transearth coast. mattingly is assisted by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Mattingly inspected the SIM bay of the Service Module, and retrieved film from the Mapping and Panoramic cameras. Mattingly is wearing the helmet of Astronaut John W. Young, commander. The helmet's lunar extravehicular visor assembly helped protect Mattingly's eyes frmo the bright sun. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera.

  9. St. John's Wort (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or foods a ...

  10. The Vision of Thomas Jefferson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that it was the blend of public service and public interests that distinguish the life of Thomas Jefferson. Discusses Jefferson's political philosophy found in his writings. Explains that nearly all of his writing was done to accomplish specific goals, although it had significance far beyond the immediate context. (CFR)

  11. Thomas Jefferson and the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Thomas Jefferson's role in the making and interpretation of the United States Constitution. Discusses the dominant features of Jefferson's constitutional theory; the character of Jefferson's presidency; and Jefferson's ongoing concern about constitutional preservation and change. Lists important dates in the history of the constitution.…

  12. Confronting Thomas Jefferson, Slave Owner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Although Thomas Jefferson's view of freedom was the cornerstone of the Declaration of Independence, this founding father owned 170 slaves to run his 5,000 acre plantation. This article describes a unit developed by the Monticello (Virginia) Education Department that teaches secondary students about slave Isaac Jefferson while exposing them to…

  13. Astronaut Thomas Stafford and Snoopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission, takes time out from his preflight training activities to have his picture made with Snoopy, the character from Charles Schulz's syndicated comic strip, 'Peanuts'. During the Apollo 10 lunar orbit operations the Lunar Module will be called Snoopy when it is separated from the Command/Service Modules.

  14. Thomas Moran: "The Grand Canyon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for introducing students in grades four through six to Thomas Moran's painting, "The Grand Canyon." The goal of the lesson is to illustrate the importance of the American West as a subject for artists in the nineteenth century. (JDH)

  15. Thomas Paine: Eighteenth Century Feminist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbison, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Unlike Franklin, Jefferson, and Adams, Thomas Paine was a feminist, a revolutionary in his time for the cause of women's rights and their liberation from servility. While others considered women second-class citizens whose only place was in the home. Paine argued for the political, legal, economic, and social rights of women. (Author/BC)

  16. Doubting Thomas: Reading Between the Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, Bruce; Denscombe, Martyn

    1987-01-01

    Explains the continuing popularity of the Reverend W. Awdry's "Railway Series" featuring Thomas the Tank Engine. Argues that though the settings are anachronistic, the ideology expressed through Thomas the Tank Engine is congruent with that of the New Right. (SRT)

  17. [Thomas Hodgkin and his disease].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Hodgkin (1798-1866), born into a family of Quakers, would remain faithful all his life to the principles and rules of the 'Society of Friends'. He studied pharmacy and medicine in London, Edinburgh and Paris. As curator for the museum of pathological anatomy of Guy's Hospital (1825-1837) he introduced modern, organ-based, medicine in England, together with the clinicians Richard Bright and Thomas Addison. In 1832 Hodgkin reported autopsy findings of seven patients who had shown swollen lymph glands and an enlarged spleen, without evidence of tuberculosis, purulent inflammation or cancer. Later the diagnosis 'Hodgkin's disease' would be restricted to lymphomas with giant, multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells on microscopic examination. Especially in his later years, Hodgkin devoted much time and effort to the emancipation of oppressed or destitute minorities, especially abroad. He died of dysentery on a journey to Palestine and lies buried in Jaffa.

  18. Jim Thomas, 1946-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Maureen; Kasik, David; Bailey, Mike; van Dam, Andy; Dill, John; Rhyne, Theresa-Marie; Foley, Jim; Encarnacao, L. M.; Rosenblum, Larry; Earnshaw, Rae; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Wong, Pak C.; Encarnacao, Jose; Fellner, Dieter; Urban, Bodo

    2010-11-01

    Jim Thomas, a visionary scientist and inspirational leader, died on 6 August 2010 in Richland, Washington. His impact on the fields of computer graphics, user interface software, and visualization was extraordinary, his ability to personally change people’s lives even more so. He is remembered for his enthusiasm, his mentorship, his generosity, and, most of all, his laughter. This collection of remembrances images him through the eyes of his many friends.

  19. John Glenn - Mini Biography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From film to tape transfer of the film 'Friendship 7 - John Glenn' Depicts the historical orbital flight of John Glenn aboard 'Friendship 7', launched on February 20, 1962. Footage of staff at tracking stations worldwide and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Launch from cape canaveral. Flight tracking, re-entry, landing and recovery of Friendship 7.

  20. Medicine in John Locke's philosophy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, M A

    1990-12-01

    John Locke's philosophy was deeply affected by medicine of his times. It was specially influenced by the medical thought and practice of Thomas Sydenham. Locke was a personal friend of Sydenham, expressed an avid interest in his work and shared his views and methods. The influence of Sydenham's medicine can be seen in the following areas of Locke's philosophy: his "plain historical method"; the emphasis on observation and sensory experience instead of seeking the essence of things; the rejection of hypotheses and principles; the refusal of research into final causes and inner mechanisms; the ideal of irrefutable evidence and skepticism on the possibilities of certainty in science. The science which for Locke held the highest paradigmatic value in his theory of knowledge was precisely medicine. To a great extent, Locke's Essay on Human Understanding can be understood as an attempt to justify, substantiate, and promote Sydenham's medical method. This method, generalized, was then proposed as an instrument for the elaboration of all natural sciences.

  1. John Glenn: Friendship 7 Splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Splasdown of Freindship 7 From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  2. The Unretiring John Krumboltz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.; Neumann, Harly

    2002-01-01

    John D. Krumboltz continues to contribute to the field of counseling psychology, including the subspecialty of career counseling, after five decades of professional experience. Inspired by B. F. Skinner, John operationalized a behavioral approach to counseling. After 4 years at Michigan State University, where he initiated research on programmed…

  3. John Dewey, an Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the annual Presidential address of Phi Kappa Phi, presented on May 8, 1962, was John Dewey. Dewey is identified in the public mind chiefly as an educational philosopher. In this address, the author describes the life and work of John Dewey as an indefatigable student of life whose interests ranged, like those of Aristotle, over the…

  4. Jasper Johns' Painted Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinger, Esther

    1989-01-01

    States that the painted words in Jasper Johns' art act in two different capacities: concealed words partake in the artist's interrogation of visual perception; and visible painted words question classical representation. Argues that words are Johns' means of critiquing modernism. (RS)

  5. The Mind at Every Stage Has Its Own Logic: John Dewey as Genetic Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallace, Thomas Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this essay Thomas Fallace argues that John Dewey can best be described as a pragmatic historicist and a genetic psychologist. This means that Dewey believed that the best way to understand any idea, phenomenon, or entity is to trace its history, that the history of the individual and race pass through distinct stages of development, and that…

  6. APOLLO 16 ASTRONAUTS JOHN YOUNG AND CHARLES DUKE EXAMINE FAR ULTRAVIOLET CAMERA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 16 Lunar Module Pilot Charles M. Duke, Jr., left and Mission Commander John W. Young examine Far Ultraviolet Camera they will take to the Moon in March. They will measure the universe's ultraviolet spectrum. They will be launched to the Moon no earlier than March 17, 1972, with Command Module Pilot Thomas K. Mattingly, II.

  7. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, “the boy artist of Texas”

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Critics consider the 1908–1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it “the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen” and told Thomas “I am at your service.” A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of “empathy.” Thomas told his subject that “I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side.” The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library. PMID:27365894

  8. John Glenn OK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn and technicians inspect artwork that will be painted on the outside of his Mercury spacecraft. John Glenn nicknamed his capsule 'Friendship 7'. On February 20, 1962 astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. lifted off into space aboard his Mercury Atlas (MA-6) rocket and became the first American to orbit the Earth. After orbiting the Earth 3 times, Friendship 7 landed in the Atlantic Ocean 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds later, just East of Grand Turk Island in the Bahamas. Glenn and his capsule were recovered by the Navy Destroyer Noa, 21 minutes after splashdown.

  9. Astronaut John Young's Career

    NASA Video Gallery

    John Young served as a NASA astronaut for over four decades, flying on Gemini, Apollo and the Space Shuttle. He walked on the moon during Apollo 16 in 1972 and commanded the first shuttle mission, ...

  10. The Higher Education of Clarence Thomas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Jane; Abramson, Jill

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the higher educational background of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas from his acceptance at Holy Cross College through affirmative action through Yale University. The authors provide a description of Justice Thomas as a person who constantly felt he was being looked down upon and describe his bitterness and frustration following…

  11. John Dewey and early Chicago functionalism.

    PubMed

    Backe, A

    2001-11-01

    John Dewey and James Angell are regarded respectively as the founder and systematizer of the Chicago school of functional psychology. The early Chicago school traditionally has been portrayed as a unified theoretical approach based primarily on William James's naturalist theory of mental processes. It is argued in this article that although the psychology systematized by Angell bore a close affinity to James's naturalism, Dewey's own psychology was based primarily on the neo-Hegelian philosophy of Thomas Hill Green. Through a review of a number of Dewey's major writings, Green's neo-Hegelian philosophy is shown to have influenced Dewey's views on psychological concepts such as reaction, emotion, and perception during the formative period of the Chicago school. The interpretation of Dewey's psychology developed in this article leads to the conclusion that early Chicago functionalism should not be regarded as a unified theoretical approach.

  12. John Henry: Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikola-Lisa, W.

    1998-01-01

    Compares three children's books retelling the legend of John Henry: "John Henry: An American Legend" by Ezra Jack Keats (1965), "John Henry" by Julius Lester (1994), and "The Legend of John Henry" by Terry Small (1994). Differences in imagery, language, symbolism, and themes are discussed. (MAK)

  13. A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the play alerts Elizabethans not just to military and political threats, but to a changing cosmic world view, all especially threatening as they arise in Catholic countries. (a) Personification characterizes the play. John personifies the old order, while Arthur and the Dauphin's armies personify the new. I suggest that Shakespeare decenters King John just as Copernicus decentered the world. (b) Hubert menaces Arthur's eyes for a whole scene (4.1), but the need for such cruelty is not explained and is especially odd as Arthur is already under sentence of death (3.3.65-66). This hitherto unexplained anomaly suggests that the old order fears what the new might see. (c) Eleanor's confession is made only to Heaven and to her son the King (1.1.42-43), yet by echoing and word play the Messenger from France later reveals to John that he is privy to it (4.2.119-124). This circumstance has not been questioned heretofore. I suggest that the Messenger is like the wily Hermes (Mercury), chief communicator of the gods and patron of the sciences; by revealing that he moves in the highest circles, he tells John that he speaks with an authority that transcends even that of a king. The message from on high presages more than political change; it warns of a new cosmic and religious world order (d) Most agree that John is a weak king, so Shakespeare must have suspected flaws in the old ways. He would have known that Tycho Brahe's new star of 1572, the comet of 1577, and the 1576 model of his compatriot Thomas Digges, were shattering old ideas. (e) The tensions of the play are not resolved because in 1594 the new order was

  14. Commemorating John Dyson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, Julian M.

    2015-03-01

    John Dyson was born on the 7th January 1941 in Meltham Mills, West Yorkshire, England, and later grew up in Harrogate and Leeds. The proudest moment of John's early life was meeting Freddie Trueman, who became one of the greatest fast bowlers of English cricket. John used a state scholarship to study at Kings College London, after hearing a radio lecture by D. M. McKay. He received a first class BSc Special Honours Degree in Physics in 1962, and began a Ph.D. at the University of Manchester Department of Astronomy after being attracted to astronomy by an article of Zdenek Kopal in the semi-popular journal New Scientist. John soon started work with Franz Kahn, and studied the possibility that the broad emission lines seen from the Orion Nebula were due to flows driven by the photoevaporation of neutral globules embedded in a HII region. John's thesis was entitled ``The Age and Dynamics of the Orion Nebula`` and he passed his oral examination on 28th February 1966.

  15. Who was John Howard?

    PubMed

    Lasure, E A

    1999-08-01

    John Howard was an 18th-century English philanthropist who made significant contributions in prison reform. Despite personal tragedy and an oppositional social climate, he became an early promoter of humane treatment for prisoners. Other reformers followed John Howard, making valuable contributions, but many challenges remain in the management of forensic hospitals and prison systems. Howard's legacy is not only the modernization of prison structures and programs, but also the work of numerous worldwide societies and associations that provide services for communities and prisoners.

  16. Who's afraid Of Thomas Bayes?

    PubMed Central

    Lilford, R; Braunholtz, D.

    2000-01-01

    Sometimes direct evidence is so strong that a prescription for practice is decreed. Usually, things are not that simple—leaving aside the possibility that important trade offs may be involved, direct comparative data may be imprecise (especially in crucial sub-groups) or subject to possible bias, or there may be no direct comparative evidence; but still decisions have to be made. In these circumstances, indirect evidence—the plausibility of effects—enters the frame. But how should we describe the extent of plausibility and, having done so, how can this be integrated with any direct evidence that might exist. Also, how can allowance be made in a transparent (that is, explicit) way for perceptions of the size of bias in the direct evidence. Enter the Reverend Thomas Bayes; plausibility (however derived—laboratory experiment, qualitative study or just "experience") is captured numerically as degrees of belief ("prior" to the direct data) and updated (by the direct evidence) to yield "posterior" probabilities for use in decision making. The mathematical model used for this purpose must explicitly take account of assumptions about bias in the direct data. This paradigm bridges theory and practice, and provides the intellectual scaffold for those who recognise that (numerically definable) probabilities, and values (also numerically definable) underlie decisions, but who also realise that subjectivity is ineluctable in science.


Keywords: Bayesian statistics; research methods; decisions; Cochrane lecture PMID:10990474

  17. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grames, Joseph; Higinbotham, Douglas; Montgomery, Hugh

    2010-09-08

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  18. Thomas Jefferson and the Purposes of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Thomas O.

    1997-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson was the first conspicuous U.S. advocate of free education supported by local taxation and of state aid to higher education. He believed that only an educated citizenry could assume the responsibilities of self-government. (SK)

  19. Generalized Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing-Lu; Zhu, Jiong-Ming; Yan, Zong-Chao

    2006-01-01

    The generalized Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule is established for any Coulombic system with arbitrary masses and charges of its constituent particles. Numerical examples are given for the hydrogen molecular ions.

  20. Thomas Reid's Fundamental Rules of Eloquence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skopec, Eric W.

    1978-01-01

    Examines Thomas Reid's philosophy of rhetoric and identifies the principles to which he was committed, including his classification of knowledge, emphasis on artistic expression, and theory of natural signification. (JMF)

  1. Thomas Hart Benton's Home and Studio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on Thomas Hart Benton, describing his house and studio in Kansas City, Missouri. Considers issues such as his life as the child of a congressman, his formal and informal art education, and his artwork. (CMK)

  2. Earth Science Week 2012: Janel Thomas

    NASA Video Gallery

    A short video profile of Janel Thomas. She was a member of NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign in 2010 where she operated the dropsonde instrument on board NASA...

  3. Thomas precession, Wigner rotations and gauge transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.; Son, D.

    1987-01-01

    The exact Lorentz kinematics of the Thomas precession is discussed in terms of Wigner's O(3)-like little group which describes rotations in the Lorentz frame in which the particle is at rest. A Lorentz-covariant form for the Thomas factor is derived. It is shown that this factor is a Lorentz-boosted rotation matrix, which becomes a gauge transformation in the infinite-momentum or zero-mass limit.

  4. Conversations with John Williams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jack

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the views of John Williams, Hollywood's premier composer, who has written more than 300 scores, about the future of classical and film music. A gregarious person in a field requiring monklike isolation, Williams values the "association with the soloists, and the wonderful inspiration from players." His…

  5. Peter Pindar (John Wolcot).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vales, Robert L.

    This book is designed as an introduction to John Wolcot's works for the general reader, the college student, and the college teacher. Wolcot, whose pen name was Peter Pindar, wrote topical satire on public personalities of the eighteenth century, and his methods of criticism are the motif which guides each chapter and which unites all the satires…

  6. John Galen Howard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Joan

    1979-01-01

    A biographical sketch of John Galen Howard, founder of the Department of Architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, is presented. Howard's conservative outlook and idealistic nature are examined and his influence on the curriculum at the university is traced. (PHR)

  7. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  8. Who Killed John Keats?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Two months before he died, John Keats claimed he had been poisoned. Although most scholars and biographers have attributed Keats's fears of persecution, betrayal, and murder to consumptive dementia, Keats's suspicions had begun long before 1820 and were not without some justification. In this article, the author talks about the death of John…

  9. John Ross, Cherokee Chief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Gary Evan

    Emphasizing the dedication with which John Ross (1790-1866) labored to achieve Cherokee social and political cohesion, this biography details the historical and political events which influenced Ross's attempts to make the U.S. honor its treaty obligations and thwart the Federal "Removal Policy" (removal of American Indians from their…

  10. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  11. John Glenn's Space Ride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the accomplishments of John Glenn as a pilot, astronaut, senator, and pioneer in relation to his 1998 flight that made him the oldest person to ever travel into space. Includes photographs for students to study, and recommends classroom activities related to Glenn's career. (DSK)

  12. APOLLO 16 COMMANDER JOHN YOUNG ENTERS ALTITUDE CHAMBER FOR TESTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 16 commander John W. Young prepares to enter the lunar module in an altitude chamber in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at the spaceport prior to an altitude run. During the altitude run, in which Apollo 16 lunar module pilot Charles M. Duke also participated, the chamber was pumped down to simulate pressure at an altitude in excess of 200,000 feet. Young, Duke and command module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, are training at the Kennedy Space Center for the Apollo 16 mission. Launch is scheduled from Pad 39A, March 17, 1972.

  13. Letter from Thomas Moran to Ferdinand Hayden and Paintings by Thomas Moran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann; Eder, Elizabeth K.; Hussey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medical doctor and geologist Dr. Ferdinand Vandiveer Hayden selected more than 30 scientists, technical personnel, and artists, including photographer William Henry Jackson and painter Thomas Moran, to join the survey of the Yellowstone region in northwest Wyoming territory. Thomas Moran was an accomplished artist when he joined the survey to…

  14. Thomas C. McMurtry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Thomas C. McMurtry in November 1982. He graduated in June 1957 from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. McMurtry had been part of the university's Navy ROTC program, and after graduation he joined the Navy as a pilot. Before retiring from the Navy in 1964 as a Lieutenant, he graduated from the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School, and had flown such aircraft as the F9F, A3D, A4D, F3D, F-8, A-6, and S-2. McMurtry was then a consultant for the Lockheed Corporation until joining NASA as a research pilot in 1967. While at the Dryden Flight Research Center, he was co-project pilot on the F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire program, and the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, as well as project pilot on the F-15 Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) project, the KC-135 Winglets, the F-8 Supercritical Wing project, and the AD-1 Oblique Wing Project. He also made research flights in NASA's YF-12C aircraft (actually a modified SR-71). McMurtry made the last glide flight of the X-24B lifting body on November 26, 1975, and was co-pilot of the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on the first free flight of the space shuttle Enterprise on August 12, 1977. He was involved in several remotely piloted research vehicle programs, including the FAA/NASA 720 Controlled Impact Demonstration and the 3/8 F-15 Spin Research Vehicle. During McMurtry's 32 years as a pilot and manager at Dryden, he received numerous awards. These include the NASA Exceptional Service Award for his work on the F-8 Supercritical Wing, and the Iven C. Kincheloe Award from the Society of Experimental Test Pilots for his role as chief pilot on the AD-1 project, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, and the 1999 Milton O. Thomson Lifetime Achievement Award. McMurtry also held a number of management positions at Dryden, including Chief Pilot, Director of Flight Operations, Associate Director of Flight Operations, and was the acting Chief Engineer at the time of his retirement on June 3, 1999

  15. John Adams' essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D; Kavanagh, Patricia

    2005-12-01

    John Adams (1735-1826), one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, was the second President of the United States. Adams had tremor for many years, about which little has been written. We examined John Adams' penmanship over a 62-year period and studied his correspondence and diaries. It is not clear when Adams' tremor began, although in a diary entry dated 6 December 1760, when Adams was 25 years old, there is evidence of low-amplitude kinetic tremor. The tremor continued in his written correspondence, becoming more persistent over time. Later in life, the clarity of his written correspondence diminished, with greater decomposition of characters and a reduction in the size of individual characters. This finding raises some speculation as to whether Adams could have been developing some parkinsonism, although the evidence in favor of this is not compelling. The most likely diagnosis was essential tremor.

  16. John Keats and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, M

    2001-05-01

    John Keats was trained as an apothecary, the general practitioner of the day. Precocious in his sensibilities and fluent in his imagery, he also was the model of the romantic poet. That he was a physician and a poet makes his early death from tuberculosis poignant and revealing. This history traces his life and death against the backdrop of medicine at the turn of the 19th century.

  17. John McCain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents speeches describing John McCain's position on education posted on the McCain campaign's official web site, www.johnmccain.com. These include McCain's speech to LaRaza convention, July 14; McCain's speech to the NAACP, July 16; McCain's speech at the Greater Columbus (Ohio) Convention Center, May 15; and McCain's speech at…

  18. Obituary: Thomas Michael Donahue, 1921-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, Tamás I.

    2004-12-01

    Thomas M. Donahue, one of the nation's leading space and planetary scientists and a pioneer of space exploration, died Saturday October 16, 2004, from complications following heart surgery. The Edward H. White II Distinguished University Professor of Planetary Science at the University of Michigan, Tom shaped space exploration through his scientific achievements and policy positions. His work started with the first use of sounding rockets following World War II and continued for almost 60 years. Tom was born in Healdton, Oklahoma on May 23, 1921 to Robert Emmet and Mary (Lyndon) Donahue. His father was a plumber in the oil fields when Tom was born (Healdton OK was an oil town) and worked as a plumber in Kansas City for a time. Tom grew up in Kansas City, graduating in 1942 from Rockhurst College in that city with degrees in classics and physics. His graduate work in physics at Johns Hopkins University was interrupted by service in the Army Signal Corps. He obtained his PhD degree in atomic physics from Hopkins in the fall of 1947. After three years as a post-doctoral research associate and assistant professor at Hopkins, Tom joined the University of Pittsburgh Physics Department in 1951. At Pittsburgh he organized an atomic physics and atmospheric science program that led to experimental and theoretical studies of the upper atmosphere of the Earth and other solar system planets with instruments flown on sounding rockets and spacecraft. He became Professor of Physics in 1959 and eventually Director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Sciences and the Space Research Coordination Center at the University. In 1960 he spent a sabbatical year on a Guggenheim Fellowship at the Service d'Aeronomie in Paris, which began collaborations with French colleagues that flourished for more than 40 years. In 1974 he became the Chairman of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Department, University of Michigan, a position he held until 1981. In 1986, he was named the Henry

  19. Cell scientist to watch - Thomas Wollert.

    PubMed

    Wollert, Thomas; Bobrowska, Anna

    2015-10-15

    Thomas Wollert pursued his PhD in the laboratories of Wolf-Dieter Schubert and Dirk Heinz at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig, Germany. In 2008, he moved to the USA for a postdoctoral position with James Hurley at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, as an EMBO Long Term Fellow. In 2010, Thomas returned to Germany to start his own group at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried. His work has been recognised with awards from the German Society for Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, and the German Genetics Society. More recently, Thomas received the 2014 Walter Flemming Medal from the German Society for Cell Biology, the 2015 EMBO Young Investigator Award and the 2015 Eppendorf Prize for Young European Investigators. His laboratory combines biophysics with cell biology in order to study the process of autophagosome formation.

  20. Reviews of the Book, "The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life"; "An Annotated Bibliography of Reviews of 'The Bell Curve'" (Lyle J. White); "A Statistical Critique of Herrnstein & Murray's 'The Bell Curve'" (Thomas R. Knapp); "A Response to 'The Bell Curve': Conversation with John Goodlad" (Mary R. Sudzina); "Voices in Education" (Marlene Schommer); "What Is 'Heritability' and What Is It Not?" (Lisabeth F. DiLalla, David L. DiLalla); "My Swing...!" (Dennis W. Leitner).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Dennis W., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Collection of reviews of the controversial book "The Bell Curve" includes an annotated bibliography of 36 reviews in professional journals, edited books, and the popular press; a critique of the book's statistical appendixes; comments from John Goodlad, Howard Gardner, and others; discussion of heritability estimates; and summaries of a…

  1. Parallelization of the Pipelined Thomas Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povitsky, A.

    1998-01-01

    In this study the following questions are addressed. Is it possible to improve the parallelization efficiency of the Thomas algorithm? How should the Thomas algorithm be formulated in order to get solved lines that are used as data for other computational tasks while processors are idle? To answer these questions, two-step pipelined algorithms (PAs) are introduced formally. It is shown that the idle processor time is invariant with respect to the order of backward and forward steps in PAs starting from one outermost processor. The advantage of PAs starting from two outermost processors is small. Versions of the pipelined Thomas algorithms considered here fall into the category of PAs. These results show that the parallelization efficiency of the Thomas algorithm cannot be improved directly. However, the processor idle time can be used if some data has been computed by the time processors become idle. To achieve this goal the Immediate Backward pipelined Thomas Algorithm (IB-PTA) is developed in this article. The backward step is computed immediately after the forward step has been completed for the first portion of lines. This enables the completion of the Thomas algorithm for some of these lines before processors become idle. An algorithm for generating a static processor schedule recursively is developed. This schedule is used to switch between forward and backward computations and to control communications between processors. The advantage of the IB-PTA over the basic PTA is the presence of solved lines, which are available for other computations, by the time processors become idle.

  2. Using THOMAS for Service Oriented Open MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, V.; Rebollo, M.; Argente, E.; Botti, V.; Carrascosa, C.; Giret, A.

    Recent technological advances in open systems have imposed new needs on multi-agent systems. Nowadays, open systems require open autonomous scenarios in which heterogeneous entities (agents or services) interact to fulfill the system goals. This impose the need for open architectures and computational models for large-scale open multi-agent systems based on service-oriented approaches. THOMAS is a new architecture specifically addressed for the design of virtual organizations for open systems. In this paper we present a case study that exemplifies the usage of THOMAS for implementing a management system of a travel agency.

  3. John Campbell Begg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Robert

    2002-03-01

    John Campbell Begg born in Dunedin in 1876 was the son of Alexander Campbell Begg and Katherine Begg, early Otago settlers. He studied physics and philosophy at the University of Otago before turning to business and rural pursuits. He died in Dunedin in 1965 age 89. The Begg family were foundation members of the Otago Astronomical Society. Visits to the Tanna Hill Observatory were made in 1915. The astronomical observatory which stands in Robin Hood Park, Roslyn, Dunedin bears his name; Beverly Begg Observatory

  4. Verse letters to T.W. from John Donne: "By you my love is sent".

    PubMed

    Klawitter, G

    1992-01-01

    Relying on an audience of one for their impact, the verse letters of John Donne are closer to autobiography than anything else in his poetry. Among the most tender of these lyrics are the verse letters written to a young man named Thomas Woodward, whose older brother was one of Donne's closest friends. Using sexual metaphors, the poems reflect a homoerotic undercurrent and demonstrate affection that most readers of Donne associate only with his heterosexual love poems.

  5. Nietzche's echo--a dialogue with Thomas Altizer.

    PubMed

    Moss, David M

    2010-03-01

    Prophets provoke psychological unrest, especially when exposing accepted beliefs as profound deceptions. The biblical prophets exemplify such confrontation as do certain atheists ardently opposed to the images of God created by those seers. The German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche dramatically illustrates this type of counterforce to the Judeo-Christian tradition. His prophet Zarathustra is intended to be a model for the modern mind, one free of superstitions inflicted by antiquated religious dogma. Nietzsche's credo "God is dead" served as a declaration for the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century, it became a theological diagnosis. As a "movement," or "tenor," the death of God or radical theology was spearheaded by Thomas Altizer, a well-published young professor center-staged during the turbulent 1960s. His work foreshadows a new strain of atheism currently represented by biologist Richard Dawkins (2006, The God delusion. New York: Houghton Mifflin), philosopher Daniel Dennett (2006, Breaking the spell. New York: Penquin), neuroscientist Sam Harris (2004, The end of faith. New York: W.W. Norton; 2008, Letter to a Christian nation. New York: Vintage), journalist Christopher Hitchens (2007, God is not great. New York: Twelve), and mathematician John Allen Paulos (Paulos 2008, Irreligion. New York: Hill & Wang). This twenty-first century crusade against belief in God is best understood as a psychodynamic ignited by Altizer's Christian atheism. The present dialogue reflects that dynamic while the prologue and epilogue reveal evidence of Providence amidst claims of God's demise in contemporary history.

  6. Thomas Jefferson and Architecture. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Robin H.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of architecture in Thomas Jefferson's life. Presents a lesson plan based on Jefferson's Monticello and designed to encourage students to identify and understand elements of classical architecture in their local area. Includes a photograph of Monticello and six architectural illustrations. (CFR)

  7. To: Thomas Jefferson. Re: Your Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyoe-Chiullan, Rita M.

    1993-01-01

    A tongue-in-check response claimed to be from the prime minister of England to Thomas Jefferson regarding the "Declaration of Independence." Claims that the declaration fails to meet recently adopted specifications for proposals to the Crown and lacks a line-item budget, citations from recent literature, and measurable goals. (MLF)

  8. Strategies: The Thomas Jefferson University Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Jane L.

    1991-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University (Pennsylvania) has two dental professional hygiene education programs, one a prelicensure, entry-level clinical education program and the other a postcertificate or baccalaureate degree completion program. Recruitment strategies include prerequisite restructuring and part-time programs, and retention efforts begin with…

  9. Thomas Jefferson versus Wellesley High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loss, Richard

    1983-01-01

    One reason for the concern with high schools is that their performance limits, sometimes severely, what the colleges and universities can accomplish. Thomas Jefferson's views of education are used as criteria to judge the quality of liberal education the author received from Wellesley (Massachusetts) High School. (RM)

  10. Thomas precession and squeezed states of light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Hardekopf, E. E.; Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    The Lorentz group, which is the language of special relativity, is a useful theoretical toll in modern optics. Optics experiments can therefore serve as analog computers for special relativity. Possible optics experiments involving squeezed states are discussed in connection with the Thomas precession and the Wigner rotation.

  11. Thomas Willis of the "circle of Willis".

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Kishor A; Sharma, Divyesh; Leyon, Joe J

    2008-12-01

    Thomas Willis is best known for the circle of Willis. The life story of this 17th- century medical genius, who remains an inspiration for all neuroscientists 300 years later, is summarized in this article. We outline his academic achievements, including his description of the famous basal arterial circle, and we attempt to obtain insight into his visionary thought process through this historical review.

  12. Dylan Thomas's "25 Poems": Paradox as Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bharadwaj, S.

    2014-01-01

    Irony, inclusiveness, and complexity are the chief criteria of value in the twentieth century intellectual poetry. These criteria, however, do not merely indicate qualities of craftsmanship; they reflect a sensibility, a particular way of experiencing reality. What really distinguishes Dylan Thomas is a capacity for self-analysis, a capacity for…

  13. Thomas Kuhn, Scientism, and English Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzell, Patricia

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes passages of Thomas Kuhn's "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions" in support of the plea that English teachers work toward a new paradigm which allows the examination of the ways language sharpens and directs critical analyses of the historical situation. (DD)

  14. New Jersey's Thomas Edison and the fluoroscope.

    PubMed

    Tselos, G D

    1995-11-01

    Thomas Edison played a major role in the development of early x-ray technology in 1896, notably increasing tube power and reliability and making the fluoroscope a practical instrument. Eventually, Edison would move x-ray technology from the laboratory to the marketplace.

  15. A Model Technology Educator: Thomas A. Edison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretzer, William S.; Rogers, George E.; Bush, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting back over a century ago to the small village of Menlo Park, New Jersey provides insight into a remarkable visionary and an exceptional role model for today's problem-solving and design-focused technology educator: Thomas A. Edison, inventor, innovator, and model technology educator. Since Edison could not simply apply existing knowledge…

  16. Thomas Piketty and the Justice of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bøyum, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-First Century" is best known for its documentation of increasing social inequality, but it also has a notable normative aspect. Although Piketty is far less clear on the normative level than on the empirical, his view of justice can be summarised as meritocratic luck egalitarianism. This leads him…

  17. Teaching the "Leviathan": Thomas Hobbes on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejan, Teresa M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers Thomas Hobbes's educational thought both in its historical context and in the context of his political philosophy as a whole. It begins with Hobbes's diagnosis of the English Civil War as the product of the miseducation of the commonwealth and shows that education was a central and consistent concern of his political theory…

  18. Evolution and Education: Lessons from Thomas Huxley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Sherrie Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Huxley more than anyone else was responsible for disseminating Darwin's theory in the western world and maintained that investigating the history of life should be regarded as a purely scientific question free of theological speculation. The content and rhetorical strategy of Huxley's defense of evolution is analyzed. Huxley argued that the…

  19. Thomas Clifford Allbutt and Comparative Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Danny C. K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reconceptualizes Thomas Clifford Allbutt's contributions to the making of scientific medicine in late nineteenth-century England. Existing literature on Allbutt usually describes his achievements, such as his design of the pocket thermometer and his advocacy of the use of the ophthalmoscope in general medicine, as independent events;…

  20. 2011 John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Awards. Individual Achievement. Interview by Eric J. Thomas.

    PubMed

    Shine, Kenneth

    2012-07-01

    Dr. Shine, who, as president, led the Institute of Medicine's focus on quality and patient safety, describes initiatives at the University of Texas System, including quality improvement training, systems engineering, assessment of projects' economic impact, and dissemination of good practices.

  1. Marcel Breuer at Saint John's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    A visitor to Saint John's University and Saint John's Abbey, in north-central Minnesota, sees something of Gothic heritage while standing in front of the abbey church, designed and built around 1960. The church's 112-foot campanile--a trapezoidal slab made of 2,500 tons of steel and concrete--stands boldly in front of a huge concrete honeycomb…

  2. The suicide of Thomas Wentworth Wills.

    PubMed

    de Moore, G M

    Thomas Wentworth Wills was the most important Australian sportsman of his time. He captained the Victorian colony at cricket and was the first hero of Australian Rules football. Although his picture now adorns the conservative Melbourne Cricket Club, he died in 1880, an isolated, destitute alcoholic, after stabbing himself in the heart. Wills embodied a tradition, as prevalent today as it was over 100 years ago, that weds sport with alcohol in Australian culture.

  3. What's in a Trend? A Comment on Gray, Goldstein and Thomas (2001), "Predicting the Future: The Role of Past Performance in Determining Trends in Institutional Effectiveness at A Level."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Geoff; Mangan, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Argues that although John Gray, Harvey Goldstein, and Sally Thomas treat the notion of trend in an unproblematic manner, as deterministic time trends, movements in data identified by Gray as school improvement trends may not be generated by the deterministic processes they assume. Opines these upward and downward movements may reflect a purely…

  4. John Herschel's Graphical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1833 John Herschel published an account of his graphical method for determining the orbits of double stars. He had hoped to be the first to determine such orbits, but Felix Savary in France and Johann Franz Encke in Germany beat him to the punch using analytical methods. Herschel was convinced, however, that his graphical method was much superior to analytical methods, because it used the judgment of the hand and eye to correct the inevitable errors of observation. Line graphs of the kind used by Herschel became common only in the 1830s, so Herschel was introducing a new method. He also found computation fatiguing and devised a "wheeled machine" to help him out. Encke was skeptical of Herschel's methods. He said that he lived for calculation and that the English would be better astronomers if they calculated more. It is difficult to believe that the entire Scientific Revolution of the 17th century took place without graphs and that only a few examples appeared in the 18th century. Herschel promoted the use of graphs, not only in astronomy, but also in the study of meteorology and terrestrial magnetism. Because he was the most prominent scientist in England, Herschel's advocacy greatly advanced graphical methods.

  5. John M. Eisenberg, MD.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J M

    1995-08-01

    The complicated interaction between government, academic medical centers, health care payers, and burgeoning market forces has tested the leadership skills of a generation of academicians with little formal training in economics. The emergence of a new breed of physician investigator with solid business credentials has therefore proved attractive to many segments of the medical community. John M. Eisenberg received his MD from Washington University in 1972, his MBA from the Wharton School in 1976, and shortly thereafter headed the division of general internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In addition to championing the role of the generalist in health care delivery, Eisenberg has also played a major part in the reformation of Medicare reimbursement. He has been a commissioner on the Congressional Physician Payment Review Commission since 1986, serving as chairman since 1993. After assuming the chairmanship of the department of medicine at Georgetown University in 1992, Eisenberg served as an advisor to the Clinton administration during its efforts towards national health care reform. Interviewed in his office in Georgetown, Eisenberg reflected on the economic forces twisting post-graduate medical education, the role of non-physician providers in future health care delivery, and the evolving relationship between specialists and generalists.

  6. Searching for John Goodricke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic figures in the history of astronomy. Deaf from the age of five, his observations of the light variation of Algol brought him acclaim and the Copley Medal of the Royal Society by the age of nineteen. Together with his neighbor, mentor, and distant relative Edward Pigott, he went on to discover and quantify the light variations of other stars, including Delta Cephei. Goodricke's careful accounts of his observations, and their accuracy, remain a model of clear scientific thinking and reporting. Goodricke's career was short, as was his time on Earth: he died before his 22nd birthday. He left few personal notes or letters, and even many basic circumstances of his life have been misunderstood or misinterpreted. I will discuss Goodricke's apparent change of mind regarding the variations of Algol. I will further describe recent research into his family circumstances and into the allegation advanced by Zdenek Kopal in the 1980s that Goodricke was buried apart from his family because they were ashamed of his deafness.

  7. John Beavan (1950-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Laura; Bilham, Roger; Darby, Desmond

    2013-01-01

    John Beavan passed away peacefully in Lower Hutt, New Zealand, on 19 November 2012 after having been diagnosed with cancer one year earlier. John's contributions to crustal deformation science, geodesy, and New Zealand's active tectonics were immense and form a legacy that will last many years. He is survived by his wife, Catherine (Cashy); his daughter Rhiannon; two step-daughters, Elli and Rosa; and his sister Sue. John also leaves a huge network of friends and colleagues around the world, all of whom will miss him greatly.

  8. John Hunter and venereal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    John Hunter's contribution to the understanding of venereal disease is reviewed. Hunter's evidence for the unitary nature of these diseases is examined and the advances he made in diagnosis, pathology, and management are considered. PMID:7018353

  9. John Glenn Entering Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Overall view of astronaut John Glenn, Jr., as he enters into the spacecraft Friendship 7 prior to MA-6 launch operations at Launch Complex 14. Astronaut Glenn is entering his spacecraft to begin the first American manned Earth orbital mission.

  10. John Adams - an outstanding career.

    PubMed

    Lewin, David

    2016-12-07

    A distinguished nurse, teacher, researcher and historian, John Adams was educated at Aylesbury Grammar School and graduated from Selwyn College, Cambridge, with a degree in theological and religious studies.

  11. An Interview with John Wilson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, J. Mark; McLaughlin, Terence H.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with John Wilson covering topics such as: addressing the people who influenced him, highlighting Wilson's career and home background, and providing discussions on his opinions related to religion, morality, moral education, and the concept of authority. (CMK)

  12. John Bardeen, 1908-1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrieffer, J. R.

    When one speaks with friends of John Bardeen they frequently use words such as brilliant, profound, practical, quiet, devoted, family, friends, golf, humor, wise, determined, generous and a man for all seasons…

  13. Magic moments with John Bell

    SciTech Connect

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.

    2015-07-15

    John Bell, with whom I had a fruitful collaboration and warm friendship, is best known for his seminal work on the foundations of quantum physics, but he also made outstanding contributions to particle physics and accelerator physics.

  14. John locke on personal identity.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body.

  15. Obituary: Thomas Gold, 1920-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2004-12-01

    Thomas "Tommy" Gold died of heart disease at Cayuga Medical Center, Ithaca NY on 22 June 2004 at the age of 84. He will be remembered as one of the most interesting, dynamic and influential scientists of his generation. Tommy's paradigm-changing ideas in astronomy and planetary science, while original and bold, were also highly controversial. With his radical work on the origin of natural gas and petroleum, the controversy is likely to continue. Tommy was born in Vienna, Austria on 22 May 1920, moving with his family to Berlin at age 10 and then, after the rise of Hitler in 1933, to England. His parents were Josephine (nee Martin) and Maximillian Gold, a successful steel magnate. Tommy was educated at Zuoz College in Switzerland where he became an expert skier and developed an athletic prowess that he maintained throughout his life, winning a NASTAR gold medal for skiing at the age of 65. He studied Mechanical Sciences at Trinity College, Cambridge, but much to his disgust his education was interrupted because of internment by the British as a suspected enemy alien. That unfortunate period (I remember him saying to me "Can you believe the stupidity, interring people like me who had fled from Nazi Germany?") had one good outcome: on his first night in camp he met Hermann Bondi who had an important influence on his early development as a scientist. They were both born in Vienna, their parents knew each other, and they were fellow students at Trinity, but this was their first meeting. On release, he went immediately into top-secret radar research for the British Admiralty, working as a team with Bondi and Fred Hoyle in a farm cottage in Dunsfold, Surrey. Tommy's first published research, which was a Nature paper with R.J. Pumphrey in 1947, was not in astronomy but physiology. He applied his engineer's understanding of positive feedback to develop and test a resonance model for how the human ear determines pitch. His conclusion that pitch discrimination occurs

  16. John Locke and the case of Anthony Ashley Cooper.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Peter R; Principe, Lawrence M

    2011-01-01

    In June 1668 Anthony Ashley Cooper, later to become the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, underwent abdominal surgery to drain a large abscess above his liver. The case is extraordinary, not simply on account of the eminence of the patient and the danger of the procedure, but also because of the many celebrated figures involved. A trove of manuscripts relating to this famous operation survives amongst the Shaftesbury Papers in the National Archives at Kew. These include case notes in the hand of the philosopher John Locke and advice from leading physicians of the day including Francis Glisson, Sir George Ent and Thomas Sydenham. The majority of this material has never been published before. This article provides complete transcriptions and translations of all of these manuscripts, thus providing for the first time a comprehensive case history. It is prefaced with an extended introduction.

  17. Thomas Jefferson's headaches: were they migraines?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gary L; Rolak, Loren A

    2006-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson had severe headaches on a number of occasions during his adult life, as noted by most of his biographers. Some occurred during important historical events, including the period just before the writing of the Declaration of Independence. Historians generally have considered these headaches to be migraines, while some physician authors have considered the alternative diagnoses of tension-type headaches and cluster headaches. A review of the literature, including Jefferson's many letters, suggests that they probably were migraines, although not all of the current diagnostic criteria can be met.

  18. Thomas Young and the Rosetta Stone.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Who deciphered the Rosetta Stone and the Egyptian hieroglyphs? The usual answer is Jean-François Champollion, beginning in 1822. But ever since that time, Egyptologists have debated the role of his rival, the polymath Thomas Young, the first person to publish a partially correct translation of the Rosetta Stone. A recent BBC television dramatisation rekindled the controversy by presenting Champollion as a 'lone genius' who succeeded independently of Young. While there is no doubt that Champollion deciphered the hieroglyphic script as a whole, the evidence suggests that Young's early detailed study of the Rosetta Stone created the conceptual framework that made possible Champollion's later breakthrough.

  19. Sir Thomas Brisbane - Patron of Colonial Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Peter J.

    British Army office Sir Thomas Makdougall Brisbane was sworn in as Governor of New South Wales on 1 December 1821. His appointment allowed him to pursue his plans for astronomical observations of the southern sky by setting up an observatory near his residence at Government House Parramatta. He also joined the Philosophical Society of Australasia and became Patron of the newly formed Agricultural Society of New South Wales. These societies were the precursors of many important later professional bodies, so that Brisbane's connection with them represents his most important contribution to Australian science.

  20. Physician, philosopher, and paediatrician: John Locke's practice of child health care.

    PubMed

    Williams, A N

    2006-01-01

    G.F. Still's History of Paediatrics restricted the philosopher John Locke's (1632-1704) influence in paediatrics to pedagology and specifically his Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693). This significantly limits Locke's immense ongoing influence on child health care and human rights. Locke was a physician and had a lifelong interest in medicine. His case records and journals relate some of his paediatric cases. His correspondence includes letters from Thomas Sydenham, the "English Hippocrates" (1624-89) when Locke has sought advice on a paediatric case as well as other correspondence from parents regarding child health care and management of learning disability. Locke assisted and influenced Thomas Sydenham with his writing, and Locke's own work, Two Treatises on Government, clearly stated the rights of children and limitation of parental authority. Furthermore, Locke's thoughts on Poor Law, making an economic case for a workhouse in every parish, were implemented from 1834.

  1. Physician, philosopher, and paediatrician: John Locke's practice of child health care

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A N

    2006-01-01

    G.F. Still's History of Paediatrics restricted the philosopher John Locke's (1632–1704) influence in paediatrics to pedagology and specifically his Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693).1 This significantly limits Locke's immense ongoing influence on child health care and human rights. Locke was a physician and had a lifelong interest in medicine. His case records and journals relate some of his paediatric cases. His correspondence includes letters from Thomas Sydenham, the “English Hippocrates” (1624–89) when Locke has sought advice on a paediatric case as well as other correspondence from parents regarding child health care and management of learning disability. Locke assisted and influenced Thomas Sydenham with his writing, and Locke's own work, Two Treatises on Government, clearly stated the rights of children and limitation of parental authority. Furthermore, Locke's thoughts on Poor Law, making an economic case for a workhouse in every parish, were implemented from 1834. PMID:16371386

  2. Dr. John Richardson: Arctic Doctor

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. Stuart

    1988-01-01

    Dr. John Richardson was foremost among a special breed of men, the surgeon-naturalists, one of whom accompanied every exploration party sent out by Great Britain. In addition to performing medical duties, the surgeon-naturalist was expected to identify and collect specimens of plants, animals, and rocks. Dr. Richardson was a member of two of the arctic expeditions led by Sir John Franklin, and participated in the search for the long-overdue third Franklin expedition. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21253036

  3. Public Financing of Religious Schools: Justice Clarence Thomas's "Bigotry Thesis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern

    2008-01-01

    United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, writing for a plurality of the Court in "Mitchell v. Helms" in 2000, advanced the idea that state constitutional prohibitions against public funding of religious schools were manifestations of anti-Catholic bigotry in the late 19th century. Thomas's reading of history and law led him to believe…

  4. 4. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING THOMAS G. WILSON (18981983) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING THOMAS G. WILSON (1898-1983) AT WORK IN THE MILL, ca. 1940. PHOTO OWNED BY THOMAS R. WILSON Photographer: Berni Rich, Score Photographers, September 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. Thomas Brown on the philosophy and psychology of perception.

    PubMed

    Mills, J A

    1987-01-01

    Thomas Brown's theory of perception is set in its philosophical context, and the influence of George Berkeley, David Hume, and Thomas Reid on Brown is discussed. Destutt de Tracy, who appears to have been an unacknowledged source for Brown's ideas, is also discussed. Brown's theory of perception is elaborated, and he is categorized both as a sense-datum theorist and as a phenomenalist.

  6. 76 FR 9012 - Favinger, Thomas G.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Favinger, Thomas G.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on January 31, 2011 Thomas G. Favinger submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking...

  7. Thomas Gordon's Communicative Pedagogy in Modern Educational Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshchenko, Maria; Isaieva, Svitlana

    2014-01-01

    In the article the principles, strategies, methods, techniques of communicative pedagogy of American scientist Thomas Gordon and system components of effective communication training for parents, teachers and administrators are enlightened. It has been determined that the main principle of Thomas Gordon's pedagogy is an interactive way of knowing…

  8. 75 FR 68350 - Fischer, Thomas J.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Fischer, Thomas J.; Notice of Filing October 29, 2010. Take notice that on October 29, 2010, Thomas J. Fischer filed an Application for Authorization to Hold Interlocking...

  9. Student Rights, Clarence Thomas, and the Revolutionary Vision of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.; Rowe, Bradley; Kim, Sang Hyun

    2009-01-01

    In his concurring opinion to the 2007 U.S. Supreme Court decision, "Morse v. Frederick," Justice Clarence Thomas argues that the "Tinker" decision, which granted students constitutional rights in public schools, should be overturned on originalist grounds. In this essay, Bryan Warnick, Bradley Rowe, and Sang Hyun Kim make the case that Thomas's…

  10. Contributions of Thomas Jefferson to American medicine.

    PubMed

    Cohn, L H

    1979-08-01

    Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States and author of the Declaration of Independence, had a consuming interest in all fields of education and science, including the practice of medicine and public health. He actively developed medical education, supported measures for public health, and encouraged scientific research supported by the government without policy intervention. Although a close friend of eminent physicians, his rationalism and scientific method placed him ahead of many practitioners of his time. He disparaged medical quackery but actively supported therapies such as vaccination that were based on research and careful observation. The School of Medicine at the University of Virginia was Jefferson's concrete contribution to the advancement of medical education in the United States and epitomized his preoccupation with medicine and science as important cornerstones of a healthy American nation.

  11. Optical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rules.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Stephen M; Loudon, Rodney

    2012-01-06

    The Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule is a fundamental consequence of the position-momentum commutation relation for an atomic electron and it provides an important constraint on the transition matrix elements for an atom. Analogously, the commutation relations for the electromagnetic field operators in a magnetodielectric medium constrain the properties of the dispersion relations for the medium through four sum rules for the allowed phase and group velocities for polaritons propagating through the medium. These rules apply to all bulk media including the metamaterials designed to provide negative refractive indices. An immediate consequence of this is that it is not possible to construct a medium in which all the polariton modes for a given wavelength lie in the negative-index region.

  12. Optical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn Sum Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Loudon, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    The Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule is a fundamental consequence of the position-momentum commutation relation for an atomic electron and it provides an important constraint on the transition matrix elements for an atom. Analogously, the commutation relations for the electromagnetic field operators in a magnetodielectric medium constrain the properties of the dispersion relations for the medium through four sum rules for the allowed phase and group velocities for polaritons propagating through the medium. These rules apply to all bulk media including the metamaterials designed to provide negative refractive indices. An immediate consequence of this is that it is not possible to construct a medium in which all the polariton modes for a given wavelength lie in the negative-index region.

  13. Thomas Bowdler: censor, philanthropist, and doctor.

    PubMed

    Jellineck, E H

    2001-09-29

    A recent biography of the physician William Osler credits him with having generated a verb, to "oslerize", as a synonym for euthanasia. Actually, Osler had been mocking his own impending senescent uselessness at the time of his move from Baltimore to Oxford. That neologism did not last. Two earlier doctors who did make it to the dictionaries in a verbally eponymous way were F A Mesmer and Thomas Bowdler, and Bowdler, at least, would not have liked the recognition. The first use of the verb to "bowdlerise" seems to have been in 1836, with a reference to "names in the writings of the apostles which modern ultrachristians would probably have Bowdlerized". However, Bowdler is better remembered for his cleaning up of the plays of Shakespeare.

  14. Thomas G. Pickering - a great mentor.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2010-04-01

    Professor Thomas G. Pickering passed away on 14 May 2009. I studied at the Hypertension Center, The New York Presbyterian Hospital/Cornell University Medical College, NY, USA from 1 September 1998 to 30 November 2000. Professor Pickering was a great mentor who showed how important the following issues were: (i) how important it is to stick to 'clinical viewpoint' and generate clinical ideas through 'words'. He introduced the beautiful medical words 'white-coat hypertension' and 'masked hypertension'; (ii) no man can do revolutionary research by himself, but the professional network; (iii) respect the independence of each researcher; and (iv) communications among different countries which represent the quality of the academic professionals and their warm personality, that transcended language differences.

  15. [Thomas Schwencke and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart].

    PubMed

    Hillen, Harry F P

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Schwencke (1694-1767) was Professor of Anatomy and Surgery and Lecturer in Obstetrics at the Surgical School in The Hague, the Netherlands. In 1743 he published the very first textbook on haematology. Furthermore, he described his observations on the variolation of smallpox, and published the design of a new obstetric instrument. Schwencke was physician of the city of The Hague and also physician at the court of the princes van Nassau-Weilburg. In 1765 Princess Caroline of Nassau-Weilburg invited the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to perform concerts. During his Dutch tour the young Mozart fell seriously ill, probably from typhoid fever. At the request of the court Mozart was seen for a second opinion and thereafter successfully treated by Schwencke. Mozart could continue his concert tour and Schwencke's reputation as Mozart's physician was established.

  16. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Curtis J. Bonk, Mimi Miyoung Lee, Thomas C. Reeves, & Thomas H. Reynolds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viner, Mark; Gardner, Ellen; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Curtis J. Bonk, is Professor of Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University and President of CourseShare. Mimi Miyoung Lee is Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum and instruction at the University of Houston. Thomas C. Reeves is Professor Emeritus of Learning, Design, and Technology at the University of Georgia. Thomas H.…

  17. John Swales: Some Personal Reminiscences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    The first doctoral student of linguist John Swales comments on three aspects of their advisor/advisee relationship: the relaxed atmosphere in which work was done; the collegial style of interaction; and the advisor's active participation with the student in the research process. (MSE)

  18. John Eliot in Recent Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogley, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the recent literature on John Eliot--seventeenth-century Massachusetts missionary, minister, and millenarian. Examines disagreements between Alden Vaughan's and Francis Jennings's interpretations of Eliot's missionary writings and Puritan-Indian relations. Discusses James Axtell's ethnohistorical interpretation of Eliot. Emphasizes the…

  19. John Webster: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Peter J

    2005-05-01

    A personal perspective of John Webster, with an emphasis of studies of aero-aquatic hyphomycetes and the techniques pioneered to enable them to be studied, illustrated by examples particularly from the genera with helicoid conidia, Helicodendron and Helicoon, showing flotation devices.

  20. An Interview with John Stokes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Ellen Bennett

    1996-01-01

    As teacher, musician, and performing artist, John Stokes has traveled widely in his efforts to promote awareness of the natural world and the integrity of indigenous peoples. In this interview, Stokes discusses life experiences that led him to establish the Tracking Project, a program that has taught traditional tracking and survival skills to…

  1. John G. Kemeny: Computing Pioneer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Lynn Arthur

    1983-01-01

    John G. Kemeny, co-author of the BASIC programing language and co-developer of the Dartmouth Time-Sharing System, is interviewed. He responds to questions on computer languages, the role of computer science, future uses of computers, and mathematics instruction. (MP)

  2. [History of St. Johns wort].

    PubMed

    Pöldinger, W

    2000-12-14

    St.-John's wort owes its name to the fact that it flowers at the time of the summer solstice on or around St. John's day on 24 June. Having been administered as a remedy by the Roman military doctor Proscurides as early as the 1st century AD, it was mainly used for magic potions during the Middle Ages. It was not only used to protect humans and animals against witches, demons and evil diseases, but it was also added to the fire when moulding "Freikugel" [1]. Paracelsus was one of the first doctors to concern themselves with St.-John's wort. However, where it had formerly been used for a plethora of indications, in more recent times it has found its place in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. In numerous clinical double-blind trials against placebo and other antidepressants the whole extract of St.-John's wort, e.g. as in Jarsin coated tablets, has proved to be just as effective as the other antidepressants for mild and moderate depression, but not for severe depression.

  3. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Network

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, Stephen G.; Barta, Wendy; Harkness, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital has initiated an ambitious program to apply modern technologies to the development of a new, comprehensive clinical information system. One component of this system is a networking technology for supporting the integration of diverse and functionally distinct information systems. This paper discusses the selection of the networking technology implemented at JHH, issues and problems, networking concepts, protocols and reliability.

  4. Symposium: John Dewey: Patron Saint?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York University Education Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    James E. Wheeler, Mortimer Smith, Walter Feinberg, and Christiana M. Smith comment on the work of John Dewey and its relevance to modern educators. They respectively judge Dewey as significant and enduring, anti-intellectual, biased, and ambiguous. (Editor/SJL)

  5. John James Audubon & the Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In the first half of the 1800s, John James Audubon roamed the wilds of America attempting to draw all the birds in their natural habitat. He published his life-sized paintings in a huge book entitled "Birds of America." Audubon developed a unique system of depicting the birds in natural poses, such as flying. After shooting the bird, he would wire…

  6. John Wilson as Moral Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John L.

    1977-01-01

    The work of John Wilson, now teaching at Oxford University, as moral educator is summarized and evaluated. His rationalist humanistic approach is based on a componential characterization of the morally educated person. The rationale and conceptual status of the components is discussed. His position is compared to that of Peter McPhail, R. S.…

  7. John Milton: A Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, for sources of criticism for the study of 17th-century British author John Milton. The guide is intended to help readers find critical and biographical information on Milton. It explains important reference sources in the…

  8. The Poetry of John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines the poetry of John Dewey, 101 poems in total. Characteristic of the rhymed and metered poetry of the period, they show a very human side of Dewey. This analysis argues that many of his poems deal with existential themes--love, finitude, and God, for example. On a deeper level these poems are also show connections to Dewey's…

  9. Action Learning in John Lewis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Chris

    2005-01-01

    A small group of training professionals within the John Lewis Partnership set up an action learning group about 2 years ago. The main aim was to explore the technique for our own learning and development. The timing and lifespan of the group reflected the generally strategic and long-term nature of our projects. One of these was to introduce…

  10. John Dewey, Gothic and Modern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, James S.

    2010-01-01

    It is argued here that understanding John Dewey's thought as that of a prodigal liberal or a fellow traveller does not capture the complexity of his work. It is also important to recognise the portion of his work that is "historie morale." In the very best sense it is epic, encapsulating the hopes and dreams of a history of the American people in…

  11. The Art of John Biggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In their 2005 exhibit of John Biggers' work, the New Orleans Museum of Art described it as being inspired by "African art and culture, the injustices of a segregated United States, the stoic women in his own family, and the heroes of everyday survival." In this article, the author describes how her students reinterpreted Biggers' work.…

  12. John Milton Oskison and Assimilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larre, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    John Milton Oskison (1874-1947) was a Cherokee writer, journalist, and activist and the author of novels and biographies as well as numerous short stories, essays, and articles about a great variety of subjects. Oskison thought of himself as "an interpreter to the world, of the modern, progressive Indian." The kind of representation Oskison gave…

  13. John Rawls and Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of John Rawls, asserting that although Rawls never wrote about affirmative action, his ideas are relevant to the issue. Rawls concentrated on "ideal theory," which he believed was the theory of what constituted a truly just society. He considered slavery and racial segregation paradigms of injustice. His ideal…

  14. An Interview with John Dixon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durbin, William

    1987-01-01

    Relates a question-and-answer interview with British educator John Dixon that addressed such issues as Dixon's motivations for his book "Growth through English," his personal growth model of English instruction, his idea of a learning community, and his view of the school system in America. (JD)

  15. John Milton's Rainbow: Sonnet XIX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scher, Amy

    John Milton presented a wide spectrum of materials and ideas illuminating the literary landscape like a rainbow which critics and authors have been discussing for centuries. One example of the multiple layers of meaning in Milton's poems is found in Sonnet XIX, which can be useful for both forensic discussion as well as for composition…

  16. John N Bahcall (1934 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    John Norris Bahcall, passed away on August 17, 2005, in NewYork City, USA. He was born on December 30, 1934, in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. He was Richard Black Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Natural Sciences at the Institute forAdvanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, USA and a recipient of the National Medal of Science. In addition, he was President of the American Astronomical Society, President-Elect of the American Physical Society, and a prominent leader of the astrophysics community. John had a long and prolific career in astronomy and astrophysics, spanning five decades and the publication of more than five hundred technical articles, books, and popular papers. John's most recognized scientific contribution was the novel proposal in 1964, together with Raymond Davis Jr, that scientific mysteries of our Sun `how it shines, how old it is, how hot it is' could be examined by measuring the number of neutrinos arriving on Earth from the Sun. Measuring the properties of these neutrinos tests both our understanding of how stars shine and our understanding of fundamental particle physics. However, in the 1960s and 1970s, the observations by Raymond Davis Jr showed a clear discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions, based on standard solar and particle physics models, and what was experimentally measured. This discrepancy, known as the `Solar Neutrino Problem', was examined by hundreds of physicists, chemists, and astronomers over the subsequent three decades. In the late 1990s through 2002, new large-scale neutrino experiments in Japan, Canada, Italy, and Russia culminated in the conclusion that the discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions and the experimental results required a modification of our understanding of particle physics: neutrinos must have a mass and `oscillate' among different particle states. In addition to neutrino astrophysics, John contributed to many areas of astrophysics including the study of dark matter in

  17. Thomas-Fermi and Thomas-Fermi-Dirac models in two-dimension - Effect of strong quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Sanchari; Chakrabarty, Somenath

    2017-01-01

    Using Thomas-Fermi (TF) and Thomas-Fermi-Dirac (TFD) models, we have investigated the properties of electron gas inside two-dimensional (2D) Wigner-Seitz (WS) cells in presence of a strong orthogonal quantizing magnetic field. The electron-electron Coulomb exchange interaction in quasi-2D case is obtained. The exact form of exchange term in 2D is derived making the width of the system tending to zero. Further, using the exchange term, the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac equation in 2D is established. It has been observed that only the ionized WS cell can have finite radius in the Thomas-Fermi model, even in presence of a strong quantizing magnetic field. On the other hand, in the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac model a neutral WS cell can have finite radius.

  18. 75 FR 434 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY... cultural items in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  19. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    John Pendry John Inglesfield and Pedro Echenique write: John Pendry's 65th birthday is on 4 July 2008, and this issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to him, with articles by friends, colleagues, and former students. By any standards, John Pendry is a great scientist, who has made—and continues to make—an enormous contribution to physics; the wide range of his interests is reflected in the scope of these articles. Not many scientists can establish a completely new and unexpected area of research, but this has been John's achievement in the last few years in the field of metamaterials, materials whose electromagnetic properties depend on their structure rather than the materials of which the structure is built. In this way, structures with effectively negative electrical permittivity and negative magnetic permeability can be constructed, demonstrating negative refraction; through metamaterials scientists now have access to properties not found in nature, and never previously explored experimentally. Never a week goes by without a potential new application of metamaterials, whether it is perfect lensing, or the cloak of invisibility. This has certainly led to tremendous visibility for John himself, with guest lectures all over the world, and radio and television appearances. John Pendry's first paper was published exactly 40 years ago, 'Analytic properties of pseudopotentials' [1], and since then he has published 310 articles at the latest count. But this first paper already reflected something of the way John works. His PhD project, with Volker Heine at the Cavendish Laboratory, was to interpret the scattering of low energy electrons from surfaces, the technique of LEED which was to become the method of choice for determining surface structure. Although the energy of the electrons in LEED is relatively low—say 50 eV—it is much higher than the energy of the conduction electrons, for which pseudopotentials had been devised, and John

  20. Thomas Kuhn as a Historian of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, Stephen G.

    Thomas S. Kuhn (1922-1996) exerted a strong force on intellectual discourse in the last third of the 20th century, by the publication of a book only 200 pages long. Why did Kuhn's publications in his own primary field, history of science, have so little impact on that field? Was The Structure of Scientific Revolutions so successful in accelerating the trend toward social history of science that his own internalist work seemed outmoded? Kuhn wrote incisive articles on a wide range of topics including Robert Boyle and structural chemistry, energy conservation as an example of simultaneous discovery, the Cagnard engine, and the historiography of science, as well as a book on the Copernican Revolution; they are rarely cited by historians of science. His most important historical contribution in later years was in the history of quantum theory; he led a project to collect and preserve source materials, and published a monograph on the origin of the quantum hypothesis. Why does he receive almost no recognition for his remarkable work on the history of quantum physics? Does everyone still believe (in spite of Kuhn) that Planck introduced a physical quantum discontinuity in 1900?

  1. Professor Thomas Lehner: archetypal translational scientist.

    PubMed

    Challacombe, S J

    2013-05-01

    Professor Thomas Lehner is one of the most distinguished oral and dental researchers to have come out of the UK. Over the past 40 years, he has made an astonishing number of discoveries which have had an impact on our understanding of the pathogenesis of a variety of mucosal diseases. He has consistently practiced both basic and clinical research and built an integrated group of clinical and non-clinical researchers, which allowed him easy transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Tom Lehner was among the early scientists studying mucosal immunology, initially exploring oral diseases, with special emphasis on the immunobiology of Streptococcus mutans, leading to active and passive vaccination against dental caries. He was the first to demonstrate cellular immunity as the immunopathological basis of periodontal diseases, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and candidiasis. Over the past 20 years, his expertise in mucosal immunobiology has been applied to the immunology of HIV/SIV infections. His seminal contributions include regional innate mucosal immunity, prevention of SIV infection in macaques by secretory IgA antibodies, up-regulation of CC chemokines, and the first demonstration of protective CCR5 antibodies. Arguably, his leadership, his students, and the establishment of immunology applied to oral mucosal diseases will be his greatest legacy. His contributions continue unabated.

  2. The nuclear Thomas-Fermi model

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1994-08-01

    The statistical Thomas-Fermi model is applied to a comprehensive survey of macroscopic nuclear properties. The model uses a Seyler-Blanchard effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, generalized by the addition of one momentum-dependent and one density-dependent term. The adjustable parameters of the interaction were fitted to shell-corrected masses of 1654 nuclei, to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface and to the measured depths of the optical model potential. With these parameters nuclear sizes are well reproduced, and only relatively minor deviations between measured and calculated fission barriers of 36 nuclei are found. The model determines the principal bulk and surface properties of nuclear matter and provides estimates for the more subtle, Droplet Model, properties. The predicted energy vs density relation for neutron matter is in striking correspondence with the 1981 theoretical estimate of Friedman and Pandharipande. Other extreme situations to which the model is applied are a study of Sn isotopes from {sup 82}Sn to {sup 170}Sn, and the rupture into a bubble configuration of a nucleus (constrained to spherical symmetry) which takes place when Z{sup 2}/A exceeds about 100.

  3. Regeneration: Thomas Hunt Morgan's window into development.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Early in his career Thomas Hunt Morgan was interested in embryology and dedicated his research to studying organisms that could regenerate. Widely regarded as a regeneration expert, Morgan was invited to deliver a series of lectures on the topic that he developed into a book, Regeneration (1901). In addition to presenting experimental work that he had conducted and supervised, Morgan also synthesized and critiqued a great deal of work by his peers and predecessors. This essay probes into the history of regeneration studies by looking in depth at Regeneration and evaluating Morgan's contribution. Although famous for his work with fruit fly genetics, studying Regeneration illuminates Morgan's earlier scientific approach which emphasized the importance of studying a diversity of organisms. Surveying a broad range of regenerative phenomena allowed Morgan to institute a standard scientific terminology that continues to inform regeneration studies today. Most importantly, Morgan argued that regeneration was a fundamental aspect of the growth process and therefore should be accounted for within developmental theory. Establishing important similarities between regeneration and development allowed Morgan to make the case that regeneration could act as a model of development. The nature of the relationship between embryogenesis and regeneration remains an active area of research.

  4. The Nuclear Thomas-Fermi Model

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Myers, W. D.; Swiatecki, W. J.

    1994-08-01

    The statistical Thomas-Fermi model is applied to a comprehensive survey of macroscopic nuclear properties. The model uses a Seyler-Blanchard effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, generalized by the addition of one momentum-dependent and one density-dependent term. The adjustable parameters of the interaction were fitted to shell-corrected masses of 1654 nuclei, to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface and to the measured depths of the optical model potential. With these parameters nuclear sizes are well reproduced, and only relatively minor deviations between measured and calculated fission barriers of 36 nuclei are found. The model determines the principal bulk and surface properties of nuclear matter and provides estimates for the more subtle, Droplet Model, properties. The predicted energy vs density relation for neutron matter is in striking correspondence with the 1981 theoretical estimate of Friedman and Pandharipande. Other extreme situations to which the model is applied are a study of Sn isotopes from {sup 82}Sn to {sup 170}Sn, and the rupture into a bubble configuration of a nucleus (constrained to spherical symmetry) which takes place when Z{sup 2}/A exceeds about 100.

  5. Evolution and Education: Lessons from Thomas Huxley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Sherrie Lynne

    2010-05-01

    Thomas Huxley more than anyone else was responsible for disseminating Darwin’s theory in the western world and maintained that investigating the history of life should be regarded as a purely scientific question free of theological speculation. The content and rhetorical strategy of Huxley’s defense of evolution is analyzed. Huxley argued that the classification of humans should be determined independent of any theories of origination of species. Besides providing evidence that demonstrated the close relationship between apes and humans, he also argued that a pithecoid ancestry in no way degraded humankind. In his broader defense of evolution he drew on his agnosticism to define what science could and could not explain. Theology made empirical claims and needed to be subject to the same standards of evidence as scientific claims. He maintained that even most scientific objections to evolution were religiously based. The objections to the theory fundamentally remain the same as in the nineteenth century and much can be learned from Huxley to develop effective strategies for educating the public about evolution. Huxley’s own scientific articles as well as his popular writings provide numerous examples that could be harnessed not only for the teaching of evolution, but also for understanding science as a process.

  6. EAARL topography: Thomas Stone National Historic Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (first return and bare earth) maps and GIS files for Thomas Stone National Historic Site in Maryland. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  7. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  8. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  9. 21. Photocopy of photograph, photographer: The Thomas Studios, Huntington, date ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph, photographer: The Thomas Studios, Huntington, date unknown. View northwest, rear elevation completed building. - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Spring Valley Drive, Huntington, Cabell County, WV

  10. 19. Photocopy of photograph, photographer: The Thomas Studios, Huntington, May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph, photographer: The Thomas Studios, Huntington, May 4, 1932. View east front elevation during construction. - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Spring Valley Drive, Huntington, Cabell County, WV

  11. "I Cannot Live Without Books": Thomas Jefferson, Bibliophile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladenson, Alex

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses Thomas Jefferson's preoccupation with collecting books and some of his other intellectual pursuits, including the classification scheme he developed for his personal library. The sale of his personal library to the federal government is briefly described. (JPF)

  12. Thomas Jefferson, the Community College and the Pursuit of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, George B.

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrates the strong philosophical ties between Thomas Jefferson's views on public education and the modern day community college. Reviews Jefferson's proposals for publicly financed education and for increased access to education and discusses the mission of the community college. (AYC)

  13. Biographical sketch: Thomas Callaway, FRCS (1822-1869).

    PubMed

    Brand, Richard A

    2011-12-01

    This biographical sketch on Thomas Callaway corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: A Dissertation Upon Dislocations and Fractures of the Clavicle and Shoulder-Joint (1849) available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-011-2098-1 .

  14. 2. Photocopy of circa 183839 engraving Thomas B. Ashton, Artist ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of circa 1838-39 engraving Thomas B. Ashton, Artist J. Sartain, Engraver SOUTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE CIRCA 1838 - West Chester Young Ladies Seminary, 300 Maple Avenue, West Chester, Chester County, PA

  15. Overall view, Chicken Coop and Windmill, looking northwest Thomas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, Chicken Coop and Windmill, looking northwest - Thomas Perry Homestead, East side of Mormon Row Road, approximately .6 miles south of Antelope Flats Road, bounded on the north by Ditch Creek, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  16. Overall view, looking southeast Thomas Perry Homestead, East side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, looking southeast - Thomas Perry Homestead, East side of Mormon Row Road, approximately .6 miles south of Antelope Flats Road, bounded on the north by Ditch Creek, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  17. Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas prepares to enter Columbia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-83 Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39A with assistance from white room closeout crew members (from left) Rick Welty, Bob Saulnier, and Rene Arriens.

  18. STS-80 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-80 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B, with assistance from white room closeout crew members (from left) Rick Welty and Bob Saulnier.

  19. STS-79 Mission Specialist Thomas Akers in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-79 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Akers shares a light moment with white room closeout crew members Rick Welty (left) and Travis Thompson, before entering the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A.

  20. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December 29, 1938 EAST TERMINAL SENTRY BOX IN FOREGROUND AND NORT DRY AND WALL LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Castillo de San Christobal, Boulevard Norzagaray, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  1. John Glenn: Post-Flight Recovery of Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  2. John Glenn: Enters Friendship 7 to Prepare for Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John glenn entering the capsule prior to the launch of Friendship 7 From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  3. 1990 astronaut candidate Thomas prepares bedding during wilderness training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a camouflage tarp, Donald A. Thomas assembles small pieces of wood for bedding during a wilderness survival training course at Fairchild Air Force Base in the state of Washington. Thomas, one of 23 1990 Group 13 astronaut candidates, participated in the training near Spokane, Washington, 08-26-90 through 08-30-90. The survival exercise is part of a year's evaluation and training program.

  4. John von Neumann Birthday Centennial

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2004-11-12

    In celebration of John von Neumann's 100th birthday, a series of four lectures were presented on the evening of February 10, 2003 during the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in San Diego. The venue was appropriate because von Neumann spent much of the later part of his life, in the 1950's, as an unofficial ambassador for computational science. He was then the only senior American scientist who had experience with the new computers (digital, electronic, and programmable) and a vision of their future importance. No doubt he would have relished the chance to attend a meeting such as this. The first speaker, William Aspray, described the ''interesting times'' during which computers were invented. His remarks were based on his history [1] of this period in von Neumann's life. We were honored to have John von Neumann's daughter, Marina von Neumann-Whitman, as our second speaker. Other accounts of von Neumann's life can be found in books by two of his colleagues [2] and [3]. Our third speaker, Peter Lax, provided both mathematical and international perspectives on John von Neumann's career. Finally, Pete Stewart spoke about von Neumann's numerical error analysis [4] in the context of later work; this talk did not lend itself to transcription, but readers may consult the historical notes in [5]. Our thanks to all the speakers for a remarkable evening. We are grateful to the DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences (AMS) program for partially supporting these lectures. Thanks are also due to SIAM and William Kolata, to our emcee, Gene Golub, to Paul Saylor for recording and editing, and to Barbara Lytle for the transcriptions. More about von Neumann's work can be learned from the recent American Mathematical Society proceedings [6].

  5. John Dalton (1766-1844).

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A E

    1988-01-01

    There is no doubt that John Dalton ranks among the great names in science, a position which rests on his enunciation of the Atomic Theory. However, his very first scientific paper in 1798 was concerned with his own affliction of colour blindness and was in fact the first clear description of the disorder. This publication stimulated much subsequent research into the pathophysiology and genetics of the condition. His recorded observations on colour blindness are detailed and precise and betoken the approach which was to characterise all his later research in chemistry. Images PMID:3294412

  6. John Bardeen: an extraordinary physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2008-04-01

    On the morning of 1 November 1956 the US physicist John Bardeen dropped the frying-pan of eggs that he was cooking for breakfast, scattering its contents on the kitchen floor. He had just heard that he had won the Nobel Prize for Physics along with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for their invention of the transistor. That evening Bardeen was startled again, this time by a parade of his colleagues from the University of Illinois marching to the door of his home bearing champagne and singing "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow".

  7. John W. Daly - An Appreciation

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    John W. Daly was engaged in groundbreaking basic research for nearly 50 years at NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. A primary focus of his research included the discovery, structure elucidation, synthesis and pharmacology of alkaloids and other biologically active natural products. However, he earned further acclaim in other areas that included the investigation of the structure-activity relationships for agonists/antagonists at adenosine, adrenergic, histamine, serotonin, and acetylcholine receptors. In addition he was a pioneer in studies of the modulation and functional relationships for systems involving calcium, cyclic nucleotides, ion channels and phospholipids and in the mechanism of actions of caffeine and other xanthines. PMID:26160996

  8. Obituary: Thomas Robert Metcalf, 1961-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    The astronomy community lost a good friend when Tom Metcalf was killed in a skiing accident on Saturday, 7 July 2007, in the mountains near Boulder, Colorado. Tom was widely known for prolific work on solar magnetic fields, hard-X-ray imaging of solar flares, and spectral line diagnostics. He was often characterized as "one of the nicest guys in science." Born October 5, 1961 in Cheverly, Maryland, to Fred and Marilyn, Thomas R. Metcalf joined his sister, Karen, two years his elder, in a close family that loved sailing, inquisitiveness, and the natural world. Sibling rivalry (usually a Tonka truck intruding on Barbie's sub-table "castle") melted when Tom and Karen collaborated on elaborately engineered room-sized blanket-forts. Tom confidently signed up at age of three to crew for his family's sailboat; when the family moved to California in 1966, as Tom's father took a Professor of Mathematics position at the University of California Riverside, Tom's love for sailing was well-established. Week-long cruises or short trips in the harbor were all fun; when school friends came aboard, it was even better--if "only slightly too crowded" from the adults' points of view. Tom's introduction to astronomy began one cold, very clear, December night in the early 1970s, on a family camping trip to Death Valley. The "Sidewalk Astronomers of San Francisco" had lined the sidewalk near the visitors' center with all sorts of telescopes for public viewing. Soon after, Tom and his boyhood friend Jim O'Linger were building their own scopes, attending "Amateur Telescope Makers" conferences, and Tom was setting up his scope on a sidewalk for public viewing. In 1986, Tom set up his telescope on the bluffs above Dana Point Harbor, and gave numerous strangers a stunning view of Halley's Comet. His interest in physics and mathematics became evident during Tom's last years in high school (Poly High in Riverside), and as a senior he qualified to take freshman Physics at the University of

  9. St. John's wort - an overview.

    PubMed

    Linde, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    This article aims to summarize the current state of knowledge on St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) which is one of the oldest and best investigated medicinal herbs. Dried alcoholic extracts are the most important preparations on the market although a variety of other preparations are available. Depressive disorders according to modern diagnostic standards are the best known and most widely investigated indication although the more traditional, broader indication of 'psycho-vegetative disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety and/or nervous agitation', including diagnoses such as somatoform disorders, might more adequately describe what Hypericum extracts are actually used for by many practitioners. The exact mechanisms of action are still unclear, but the available research clearly shows that various bioactive constituents contribute to the clinical effects reported, often in a synergistic manner. Hypericum extracts have consistently shown activity in pharmacological models related to antidepressant effects. Randomized clinical trials show that Hypericum extracts are more effective than placebo and similarly effective as standard antidepressants while having better tolerability in the acute treatment of major depressive episodes. The most important risk associated with Hypericum extracts are interactions with other drugs. Therefore, physicians need to be informed whether their patients take St. John's wort products. If the risk of interactions is adequately taken into account, high quality Hypericum extracts are an effective and safe tool in the hand of qualified health profession-als in primary care.

  10. John Bardeen and transistor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    John Bardeen and Walter Brattain invented the point-contact semiconductor amplifier (transistor action) in polycrystalline germanium (also observed in polycrystalline silicon) on Dec. 15, 1947, for which they received a patent on Oct. 3, 1950. Bill Shockley was not a co-patent holder on Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier patent since Julius Lilienfeld had already received a patent in 1930 for what would have been Shockley's contribution; namely, the field-effect methodology. Shockley received patents for both his minority-carrier injection concept and junction transistor theory, however, and deservedly shared the Nobel prize with Bardeen and Brattain for his seminal contributions of injection, p-n junction theory and junction transistor theory. We will review the events leading up to the invention of Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier during the magic month of November 17-December 16, 1947 and the invention of Shockley's junction semiconductor amplifier during his magic month of December 24, 1947-January 23, 1948. It was during the course of Bardeen and Brattain's research in November, 1947 that Bardeen also patented the essence of the MOS transistor, wherein the induced minority carriers were confined to the inversion layer enroute to the collector. C. T. Sah has described this device as a sourceless MOS transistor. Indeed, John Bardeen, co-inventor of the point-contact semiconductor amplifier and inventor of the MOS transistor, may rightly be called the father of modern electronics.

  11. John Greenleaf's life of science.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the life and career of John E. Greenleaf, PhD. It complements an interview of Dr. Greenleaf sponsored by the American Physiological Society Living History Project found on the American Physiological Society website. Dr. Greenleaf is a "thought leader" and internationally renowned physiologist, with extensive contributions in human systems-level environmental physiology. He avoided self-aggrandizement and believed that deeds rather than words define one's legacy. Viewed another way, however, Greenleaf's words define his deeds: 48% of his 185 articles are first author works, which is an unusually high proportion for a scientist of his stature. He found that writing a thorough and thoughtful discussion section often led to novel ideas that drove future research. Beyond Greenleaf's words are the many students, postdocs, and collaborators lucky enough to have worked with him and thus learn and carry on his ways of science. His core principles included the following: avoid research "fads," embrace diversity, be the first subject in your own research, adhere to rules of fiscal responsibility, and respect administrative forces-but never back down from them when you know you are right. Greenleaf's integrity ensured he was usually right. He thrived on the axiom of many successful scientists: avoid falling in love with hypotheses, so that when unexpected findings appear, they arouse curiosity instead of fear. Dr. Greenleaf's legacy will include the John and Carol Greenleaf Award for prolific environmental and exercise-related publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

  12. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a unauthorized piece he created and placed

  13. Water in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosner, O.J.

    1972-01-01

    Water for domestic and municipal supply on St. John, in the past, has been obtained from rain catchments, dug wells, and barge shipments from St. Thomas and Puerto Rico. As a result of this study, small ground-water supplies have been developed for the Virgin Islands National Park. Ground water occurs in significant but limited quantities in the fractured volcanic rock throughout most of the Island. Yield of wells in this aquifer ranges from less than 100 to about 2,000 gpd (gallons per day). The average long-term yield of the three drilled wells in use by the National Park Service in 1967 was about 1,000 gpd. Yield ofl,000 to 5,000 gpd may be expected in the Coral Bay and the Reef Bay areas. Estimated total recharge of the fractured volcanic rock on St. John, based on a recharge of 1 to 3 inches per year, is 1,000,000 to 3,000,000 gpd. Perhaps as much as a quarter to a third of this water could be developed practically, depending on the rainfall in a given year. The chemical quality of the ground water in the fractured-rock aquifer in areas uncontaminated by sea water ranges from 600 to 2,000 mg/l (milligrams per liter) or more dissolved solids. Water from-formations in the higher altitudes is of better quality than that in the lower formations. Small quantities of ground water are available from beach sand, alluvium, and fractured rock near the sea. However, these sources tend to be brackish and are subject to salt-water encroachment. There are no perennial streams on St. John. There are a few spring-fed pools in stream channels, however, that are sustained, except in severe drought. Storm runoff is estimated to average 1 inch over the island annually, and evaporation from open water surfaces is about 70 inches per year. Ponds can be developed, but because of the high .evaporation they may be unreliable during droughts. Rain water collected in cisterns from roofs and catchments yield about 50 gpd per 1,000 square feet of catch area during an average year of

  14. Changing Concepts of Equal Educational Opportunity: A Comparison of the Views of Thomas Jefferson, Horace Mann and John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brick, Blanche

    2005-01-01

    Current educational policies regarding equal educational opportunity are confused and often contradictory. There is no clear consensus as to what constitutes an equal opportunity. Most modern educators agree that the modern equal educational movement began in the 1950's with the Supreme Court decision in "Brown vs. the Board of…

  15. Two little-known nineteenth century collectors: Dr Thomas Dowler and John Keast Lord, Esq., F.Z.S.

    PubMed

    Baker, D B

    1996-10-01

    Neither Dowler nor Lord seems personally to have left any record in the entomological literature, but both made or obtained significant collections of insects in areas which at the time, and for a considerable period subsequently, were entomological terrae incognitae. Their collections were drawn on extensively by contemporary describers, for example, by Frederick Smith and Francis Walker, and what remains of their material is concentrated in the collections of The Natural History Museum, London. There is no entry for Dowler in D.N.B., and no entries for either in Horn and Kahle (1935-37), Gilbert (1977) or Horn, Kahle, Friese and Gaedike (1990), and an appeal for information published in Newsletter 51 (January 1995) of the Society for the History of Natural History elicited no response. The present note, which is written with particular reference to their Hymenoptera, is published with the intention of drawing attention to their material and in the hope that the wider circulation of the Archives may bring further biographical detail to light.

  16. Eponymous doctors associated with Edinburgh, part 3--Abraham Colles, Sir William Ferguson, John S Haldane, Argyll Robertson, Thomas Young.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2007-03-01

    In the first papers in this series, it was shown that eponyms were often bestowed on physicians and surgeons who were already famous, had made many discoveries never honoured with eponyms, and were often the leading doctors of their day. Only occasionally was the eponym suggested by a friend or colleague; more usually it was a doctor abroad who wanted to show respect to a great man but the choice of the particular syndrome or discovery was a random one. Eponyms may have had their uses. They were usually much shorter than a detailed description of a medical syndrome or anatomical feature and may sometimes have been used as euphemisms in much the same way as, until recently, bedside teachers protected the patients by speaking of 'mitotic lesions' or 'neoplasms', 'Hansen's Disease' or 'acid-fast bacilli'. The conferring and use of eponyms appears to be lessening but, as shown in this final paper, they are still used and possibly useful, and can tell us things of interest about the recipient and the proposer.

  17. John Kotter on Leadership, Management and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencivenga, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Excerpts from interview with John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership at the Harvard Business School, about his thoughts on the role of the superintendent as leader and manager. Describes his recent book "John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do," 1999. Lists eight-step change process from his book "Leading Change," 1996. (PKP)

  18. John Day Tailrace MASS2 Hydraulic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2003-06-03

    Recent biological results for the Juvenile Bypass System at John Jay Lock and Dam have raised concerns about the hydraulic conditions that are created in the tailrace under different project operations. This Memorandum for Record discusses the development and application of a truncated MASS2 model in the John Day tailrace.

  19. John Brown and the Abolitionist Ministry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knee, Stuart

    1982-01-01

    John Brown's death did not cause the Civil War; it precipitated the conflict. Many ministers anticipated the war and hurried its outbreak by canonizing a fanatic. By 1859, the abolitionists needed a martyr to infuse new emotion into their cause and seized upon John Brown to fill this role. (Author/GC)

  20. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  1. A to Z with Jasper Johns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2008-01-01

    One contemporary artist that kindergarten students can easily relate to is Jasper Johns. In this article, the author discusses how she introduced John's numeric and alphabetic paintings to her kindergarten students. The young artists were amazed that art can be created from the familiar symbols that they are learning to make in their regular…

  2. 75 FR 49497 - John Bonnes: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration John Bonnes: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an order under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) debarring John Bonnes for a period of 5 years...

  3. John Henry--The Steel Driving Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David E.; Gulley, Laura L.

    2005-01-01

    The story of John Henry provided the setting for sixth-grade class to participate in a John Henry Day of mathematics experiments. The students collected data from experiments where students competed against machines and technology. The student analyzed the data by comparing two box plots, a box plot of human data, and a box plot of machine or…

  4. John H. Reynolds (1923-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    John Reynolds, AGU Fellow since 1968 and a member of the Volcanology Geochemistry and Petrology section since 1961, died unexpectedly on November 4, 2000. John was a professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley and a pioneer in the development and application of noble gas mass spectrometry He was recovering from pneumonia when he suffered a pulmonary embolism.

  5. Thomas precession and spin interaction energy in very special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjitabar, Hassan; Shojai, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Very Special Relativity (VSR), proposed by Cohen and Glashow, considers one of the subgroups of Poincaré group as the symmetry of spacetime. This paper investigates the transformations of electromagnetic fields under boosts of VSR, and by the aid of them studies the interaction energy between spin of an electron and external electromagnetic fields. Here, we argue that Thomas precession, one of the consequences of Special Relativity (SR), does not exist in HOM(2) avatar of VSR. The predictions of SR and VSR about the spin interaction energy in a certain case are compared, and despite the absence of Thomas precession in VSR, no noticeable departure is seen.

  6. Pink topaz from the Thomas Range, Juab County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Chirnside, W.; Lichte, F.E.; Briggs, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomas Range is world-famous for its production of topaz Al2SiO4(F,OH)2, occurring in lithophysal cavities in rhyolite. Topaz Valley, at the southern end of the range, is perhaps the single most famous locality. While fine-quality, sherry-orange crystals to 5 cm or more in length occur at various localities, pale to medium pink crystals were first reported from the Thomas Range in 1934. The cause of the unusual coloration, unknown for 60 years, is now believed to be substitution of Mn3+ ?? Fe3+ for Al3+. -Authors

  7. John Bahcall and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta

    2016-03-01

    ``I feel like dancing'', cheered John Bahcall upon hearing the exciting news from the SNO experiment in 2001. The results confirmed, with remarkable accuracy, John's 40-year effort to predict the rate of neutrinos from the Sun based on sophisticated Solar models. What began in 1962 by John Bahcall and Ray Davis as a pioneering project to test and confirm how the Sun shines, quickly turned into a four-decade-long mystery of the `Solar Neutrino Problem': John's models predicted a higher rate of neutrinos than detected by Davis and follow-up experiments. Was the theory of the Sun wrong? Were John's calculations in error? Were the neutrino experiments wrong? John worked tirelessly to understand the physics behind the Solar Neutrino Problem; he led the efforts to greatly increase the accurately of the solar model, to understand its seismology and neutrino fluxes, to use the neutrino fluxes as a test for new physics, and to advocate for important new experiments. It slowly became clear that none of the then discussed possibilities --- error in the Solar model or neutrino experiments --- was the culprit. The SNO results revealed that John's calculations, and hence the theory of the Solar model, have been correct all along. Comparison of the data with John's theory demanded new physics --- neutrino oscillations. The Solar Neutrino saga is one of the most amazing scientific stories of the century: exploring a simple question of `How the Sun Shines?' led to the discovery of new physics. John's theoretical calculations are an integral part of this journey; they provide the foundation for the Solar Neutrino Problem, for confirming how the Sun shines, and for the need of neutrino oscillations. His tenacious persistence, dedication, enthusiasm and love for the project, and his leadership and advocacy of neutrino physics over many decades are a remarkable story of scientific triumph. I know John is smiling today.

  8. Obituary: Thomas Julian Ahrens (1936-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Asimow, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Thomas J. Ahrens, a leader in the use of shock waves to study planetary interiors and impact phenomena, died at his home in Pasadena, California on November 24, 2010, at the age of 74. He was the California Institute of Technology's Fletcher Jones Professor of Geophysics, formally emeritus since 2005 but professionally active to the end. Tom was a pioneer in experimental and numerical studies of the effects of hypervelocity impact, arguably the most important geophysical process in the formation, growth and - in many cases - surface evolution of planets. As a professor at Caltech, he established the foremost university laboratory for shock wave experiments, where students and research associates from around the world pursued basic research in geophysics, planetary science and other disciplines. Previously, high-pressure shock experiments were primarily conducted in national laboratories, where they were initially associated with development of nuclear weapons. The shock wave laboratory at Caltech was noted for key measurements addressing major questions in planetary geophysics. Equation-of-state studies on silicate melts showed that magma deep in Earth's mantle could be denser than the coexisting crystals, implying downward transport of melts (and associated heat) rather than the upward eruption of lavas observed in volcanic regions at Earth's surface. Shock-melting experiments on iron at pressures of Earth's core provide a crucial constraint on the temperature at the center of our planet. And studies of hydrous, carbonate and sulphate minerals under shock compression document how climate-altering molecules can be released by major impacts, such as the K/T event associated with the most recent mass extinction of biota in Earth history. In addition, Tom was a leader in numerical simulation of cratering, bringing the most recent laboratory measurements into the modeling of planetary impacts. Tom's training was in geophysics and applied experimental physics, as

  9. Public health assessment for Tutu Wellfield, St. Thomas, St. Thomas County, Virgin Islands. Cerclis No. VID982272569. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-14

    The Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site is in east-central St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Island. Twenty-two wells in the Turpentine Run Basin contain at minimum a trace of volatile organic contaminants. Volatile and chlorinated hydrocarbons including benzene; toluene; 1,2-trans-dichloroethene (DCE); trichloroethene (TCE); and tetrachloroethene (PCE) were detected in several of the wells. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, poses a public health hazard for past, present, and possible future ingestion of contaminated groundwater.

  10. Gender differences in flashbulb memories elicited by the Clarence Thomas hearings.

    PubMed

    Morse, C K; Woodward, E M; Zweigenhaft, R L

    1993-08-01

    American students and other adults aged 19-75 completed a questionnaire about flashbulb memories and recollections of autobiographical events elicited by the Senate hearings for confirmation of Clarence Thomas as a Supreme Court Justice. The respondents were less likely to recall vivid image memories than were respondents in earlier studies about memories of the assassinations of John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, and Martin Luther King. Women were significantly more likely than men to report vivid image memories and recall of autobiographical events elicited by the hearings, but they did not differ significantly from men in the ratings of these memories. Women were also significantly more likely than men to report specific memories of having been victims of sexual harassment and abuse. Women recalled reconsidering incidents in which they might have been victims of sexual harassment more often than men did. Exposure to media coverage did not differ by gender, although the amount of coverage paid attention to did correlate with the number of personal memories elicited.

  11. Fine Sediment Erosion and Transport to the Near Coastal Zone from Watersheds of St. Thomas, USVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, G.; Xuan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The US Virgin Islands' landscape is characterized by steep slopes and short distances from ridge peaks to fringing reefs. Fine-grained sediments eroded from predominantly thin soils may be transported rapidly by streams (locally called guts) to the sea and cause stress to corals. We have studied erosion and transport processes on St Thomas by three methods: (1) continuous monitoring of suspended matter in one of the island's few perennial streams, Dorothea Gut, (2) measurement of 137Cs inventories in soil cores taken across the landscape, and (3) evaluation of sediment captured in most of the island's coastal ponds, through which a significant portion of runoff must pass. We find that, for areas that have not been recently disturbed, watersheds retain fine sediments surprisingly well. On the other hand, small patches of land, like building lots that have been recently disturbed and poorly managed, can produce disproportionate amounts of fine sediment. These results differ somewhat from nearby St John, USVI, where unpaved roads are the major source of eroded sediments.

  12. Thomas Paine: An Englishman Who Became an American Patriot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Thomas M.

    The life of Thomas Paine had been one of constant failure and misfortune until he arrived in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) where he rose to fame as the politically astute author of "Common Sense." Published in January 1776, "Common Sense" called for the colonies' independence from England and was written in the simple,…

  13. The World of Thomas Jefferson: A Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valand, Elisabeth, Ed.

    This teaching guide contains two essays about Thomas Jefferson, along with teaching activities, resources and organizations, a chronology, and quotes. The two essays are: (1) "The Architect of Democracy" (Merrill D. Peterson); and (2) "Jefferson's Legacy: Civic Learning in Public Education" (R. Freeman Butts). Teaching…

  14. Thomas Jefferson: The Architect of Democracy. Classroom Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a biographical sketch and teaching activities on the life of Thomas Jefferson. Asserts that the world's political geography changed dramatically during his lifetime and presents a classroom lesson on this topic. Includes a chronology of Jefferson's life and six quotations exemplifying his political and social views. (CFR)

  15. Thomas Jefferson and Slaves: Teaching an American Paradox. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 primary sources that enable students to contemplate how Thomas Jefferson and his slaves produced a culture and community at Monticello (Virginia) and his other plantations. Focuses on Jefferson's relationship with his slaves, particularly addressing Sally Hemming's relationship with Jefferson, in order to study the complicated history…

  16. Thomas B. Fordham Foundation Sponsorship Accountability Report, 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report offers a comprehensive account of Thomas B. Fordham Foundation's sponsorship policies and practices, including a history of its sponsorship efforts, as well as individual profiles of all Fordham-sponsored schools in Ohio. Included in the profiles are in-depth descriptions of each school's educational program, school philosophy, and…

  17. Rediscovering Thomas Bailey Aldrich's "The Story of a Bad Boy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark I.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses Thomas Bailey Aldrich's "The Story of a Bad Boy" (written in 1868), one of the first children's books in the United States to introduce realism to children's literature. Describes the book's appealing qualities, and Aldrich's life and career. Lists classic elements of the book, and suggests six activities for stimulating…

  18. Thomas B. Greenfield: A Challenging Perspective of Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Organizations are not real; people are. Any science or theory of organizations must consider how the organization impinges, in a very real and tangible way, on the lives of its members. This article traces the development of one such theoretical branch of organizational science through the pioneering work of Thomas B. Greenfield. The author uses…

  19. Scientific Aspects of Two Theological Questions in Thomas Aquinas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattis, James M.

    1984-01-01

    An examination of how St. Thomas Aquinas makes use of science in his theological works provides an understanding of the relations of medieval science and the Christian theology of the Middle Ages. Two issues are examined: the problem of the nature and existence of God and the question of the eternity of the world. (RM)

  20. Paradigms and Problems: Thomas Kuhn and "Composition Revolutions".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, John Gary

    The arguments for and against Thomas Kuhn's paradigmatic thesis are presented in this paper as a means of discussing the appropriateness of Kuhn's thesis to the emerging composition discipline. Section one of the paper introduces the topic, noting how the term paradigm is used in composition to define a system of widely shared values, beliefs, and…

  1. The Invention Factory: Thomas Edison's Laboratories. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolger, Benjamin

    This lesson explores the group of buildings in West Orange, New Jersey, built in 1887, that formed the core of Thomas Edison's research and development complex. They consisted of chemistry, physics, and metallurgy laboratories; machine shop; pattern shop; research library; and rooms for experiments. The lesson explains that the prototypes (ideas…

  2. Biographical sketch: Thomas W. Huntington, MD (1849-1929).

    PubMed

    Brand, Richard A

    2012-10-01

    This biographical sketch on Thomas Huntington corresponds to the historic text, The classic: case of bone transference. use of a segment of fibula to supply a defect in the tibia (1905), available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-012-2496-z .

  3. Oscillations and Analogies: Thomas Young, MD, FRS, Genius.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, Colin

    2001-01-01

    Thomas Young was a renowned genius in his time who did important work in many scientific disciplines. In today's specialized environment, scientists in each discipline do not appreciate his work. Despite his current obscurity, Young exemplifies traits found in a first-order genius (analogical thinking, high intelligence, hard work, wide interests,…

  4. Education and Being: A Reflection of Thomas Merton's Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prete, Thomas Del

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the significance of Thomas Merton's life and work for education. Describes Merton as a Trappist monk who originally sought spiritual self-containment through monastic life only to reemerge to participate in the world through his writings. Suggests that Merton's contribution to education is the idea of orienting education along spiritual…

  5. The Basic Concepts in Thomas Pynchon's "Gravity's Rainbow".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokhadze, Lali

    This paper uses passages from Thomas Pynchon's novel, "Gravity's Rainbow," to examine basic concepts, explaining that the process of identifying the basic word-concepts in literary texts is to some extent a tension between anticipation and unexpected frustration. The paper focuses on an interpretation of the basic concept…

  6. Religious Conscience and Civic Conscience in Thomas Hobbes's Civic Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepperell, Keith C.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses Thomas Hobbes' concept of conscience, the historical context in which the concept was formulated, and Hobbes' conclusion that civil law takes precedence over religious conscience. Hobbes' views are related to the debate between Pratte and Losito over the interaction between religious and civic conscience. (IAH)

  7. The Sovereign as Educator: Thomas Hobbes's National Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Geraint

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on Thomas Hobbes, an English political philosopher who argued that the solution to civil disorders lay in a sovereign authority backed with force. Argues that education should be seen at the center of Hobbes's project of rescuing society from the disorders threatening civilization throughout 17th-century Europe. (CMK)

  8. Ethical Implications of Thomas Reid's Philosophy of Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skopec, Eric Wm.

    Eighteenth century Scottish philosopher Thomas Reid's emphasis on first principles of knowledge is fundamental to his ethics of rhetoric. Reid found the reduction of mental activities to material phenomena by Hobbes and others to be particularly odious and destructive of common sense. Turning to the analysis of human nature, he developed a radical…

  9. Thomas B. Fordham Foundation Sponsorship Accountability Report, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Thomas B. Fordham Foundation believes that all children deserve a high-quality K-12 education at the school of their choice. Nationally and in its home state of Ohio, the Foundation strives to close America's vexing achievement gaps by raising standards, strengthening accountability, and expanding education options for students and families.…

  10. Thomas Paine's "Common Sense": A Study in Polarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Carole

    Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," published in 1776, was a significant rhetorical event, having a polarizing effect on a situation marked by confusion and conflicting loyalties, in which prevailing views favored reconciliation of the American colonies with England. Paine's rhetoric intensified the conflict, forcing a cognitive restructuring…

  11. The medical history of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826).

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Norman G

    2008-05-01

    Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the USA, was often the victim of a panoply of disorders including episodic headaches, dysentery, rheumatism, multiple bone fractures, malaria, possibly tuberculosis, dental problems, diabetes and urinary tract obstruction. Intermittently he experienced anxiety, depression and insomnia; he was an anxious, striving perfectionist, a compulsively controlled man.

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, Chief of Design and Construction, National Park Service, Washington, D.C., view of 1892, photocopied 1960, LAYING THE CAP STONE OF THE TEMPLE. - Salt Lake Temple, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  13. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, Chief of Design and Construction, National Park Service, Washington, D.C., view of 1892, photocopied 1960, CAP STONE OF THE TEMPLE TAKEN A FEW SECONDS BEFORE THE STONE DROPPED INTO POSITION. - Salt Lake Temple, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  14. Thomas Hopley and Mid-Victorian Attitudes to Corporal Punishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the trial of Thomas Hopley, accused of killing his pupil Reginald Cancellor in 1860 during an act of corporal punishment. The case provoked immediate sensational interest and became an important defining point in how corporal punishment is treated in British law. Established by this trial was the test that any corporal…

  15. Literature and Tolerance at the University of St. Thomas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikolajczak, Michael Allen

    2001-01-01

    Describes the controversy and eventual success of the use of "Heaven's Coast" by Mark Doty (an account of the author's mourning of the loss of his partner Wally to AIDS) as a common text for students at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. (EV)

  16. 9. Photocopy of photograph (location of original negative unknown) Thomas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph (location of original negative unknown) Thomas G. Pratt, Photographer, c. 1890 PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH SIDE AS LOCATED AND ALTERED AT PRESENT SITE - Hamilton Grange, (Moved From) 237 West 141 Street to 141st Street & Amsterdam, New York County, NY

  17. The Fallacies of Flatness: Thomas Friedman's "The World Is Flat"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight; Roberts, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Thomas Friedman's best-selling "The World is Flat" has exerted much influence in the west by providing both an accessible analysis of globalization and its economic and social effects, and a powerful cultural metaphor for globalization. In this review, we more closely examine Friedman's notion of the social contract, the moral center of his…

  18. Cosmonaut Aleksey Leonov displays drawing of Astronaut Thomas Stafford

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, commander of the Soviet ASTP crew, displays a drawing of Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford during the joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. Apollo-Soyuz Test Project docking in Earth orbit mission. He is in the Soyuz Orbital module. This picture was taken by an American ASTP crewmen with a 35mm camera.

  19. Matrix models and stochastic growth in Donaldson-Thomas theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Richard J.; Tierz, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    We show that the partition functions which enumerate Donaldson-Thomas invariants of local toric Calabi-Yau threefolds without compact divisors can be expressed in terms of specializations of the Schur measure. We also discuss the relevance of the Hall-Littlewood and Jack measures in the context of BPS state counting and study the partition functions at arbitrary points of the Kähler moduli space. This rewriting in terms of symmetric functions leads to a unitary one-matrix model representation for Donaldson-Thomas theory. We describe explicitly how this result is related to the unitary matrix model description of Chern-Simons gauge theory. This representation is used to show that the generating functions for Donaldson-Thomas invariants are related to tau-functions of the integrable Toda and Toeplitz lattice hierarchies. The matrix model also leads to an interpretation of Donaldson-Thomas theory in terms of non-intersecting paths in the lock-step model of vicious walkers. We further show that these generating functions can be interpreted as normalization constants of a corner growth/last-passage stochastic model.

  20. 76 FR 26223 - Petition for Rulemaking Submitted by Thomas Popik

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... that large U.S. land areas do not become contaminated with nuclear radiation and, therefore... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 Petition for Rulemaking Submitted by Thomas Popik AGENCY: Nuclear...

  1. Thomas Aquinas: Integrating Faith and Reason in the Catholic School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Dennis M.

    2007-01-01

    The Second Vatican Council, social upheaval, and quickly changing cultural norms were a part of the fabric of life in the 1960s. Values and beliefs held firmly for generations were called into question. Faith, once solid, appeared to some Catholics to turn fluid and doubtful. Though now well over seven centuries old, the work of Thomas Aquinas can…

  2. Matrix models and stochastic growth in Donaldson-Thomas theory

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, Richard J.; Tierz, Miguel

    2012-10-15

    We show that the partition functions which enumerate Donaldson-Thomas invariants of local toric Calabi-Yau threefolds without compact divisors can be expressed in terms of specializations of the Schur measure. We also discuss the relevance of the Hall-Littlewood and Jack measures in the context of BPS state counting and study the partition functions at arbitrary points of the Kaehler moduli space. This rewriting in terms of symmetric functions leads to a unitary one-matrix model representation for Donaldson-Thomas theory. We describe explicitly how this result is related to the unitary matrix model description of Chern-Simons gauge theory. This representation is used to show that the generating functions for Donaldson-Thomas invariants are related to tau-functions of the integrable Toda and Toeplitz lattice hierarchies. The matrix model also leads to an interpretation of Donaldson-Thomas theory in terms of non-intersecting paths in the lock-step model of vicious walkers. We further show that these generating functions can be interpreted as normalization constants of a corner growth/last-passage stochastic model.

  3. African-American Press Coverage of Clarence Thomas Nomination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearn-Banks, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Examines pressures facing the African American press by focusing on its coverage of the 1991 nomination of Clarence Thomas to the United States Supreme Court. Discusses the dilemma these newspapers faced in choosing between supporting African Americans and supporting civil rights, with their mixed coverage of the story reflecting this dilemma. (SR)

  4. Thomas Huckle Weller MD: Nobel Laureate and research pioneer in poliomyelitis, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, rubella, and other infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Ligon, B Lee

    2002-01-01

    In 1954, the Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to Drs John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins for their watershed discovery that growth of poliomyelitis virus occurred in cultures of cells of extraneural origin, first reported in 1949. Their demonstration in 1949 that the Lansing type II strain of poliomyelitis could be grown in cultures of human embryonic tissue set into motion a race to develop a vaccine for the disease that had crippled countless thousands of individuals. The discovery and subsequent recognition were only the beginning of a prolific career for Thomas Huckle Weller, who made numerous contributions to the field of virology, including isolating the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) from cases of chickenpox and zoster, providing suggestive evidence that the same virus is responsible for both diseases; isolating the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) for the first time in tissue culture and suggesting the descriptive name now used for it; establishing Coxsackie viruses as the cause of epidemic pleurodynia: and first isolating rubella virus, the cause of German measles. This article presents a brief biography of Dr Thomas Huckle Weller, one of the field's most important figures, with primary focuses on his work on poliomyelitis, varicella-zoster virus, rubella virus, and cytomegalovirus.

  5. John Keats: poet, patient, physician.

    PubMed

    Smith, H

    1984-01-01

    John Keats, son of an ostler , was born in London in 1795. Despite an early interest in literature he was, surprisingly, apprenticed to an apothecary and continued his medical training at Guy's Hospital, obtaining the Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1816. He never practiced medicine. His early poems were not well received, and for the young poet with very slender means, life was difficult. Tragedy was added to difficulty when tuberculosis, which had already caused the death of his mother and uncle, became apparent in his brother Tom, whom Keats nursed through his illness when the brothers were living together in Hampstead . Subsequently Keats developed the disease, but despite its rapid progress, he managed in a single year - 1819 - to produce some of the finest lyrical poetry in the language. He went to Italy in the hope of obtaining a cure but died in Rome in 1821, aged 25. Medicine certainly contributed to the man, but also something to the poet, Keats; his training and his family and personal experience of tuberculosis speak for themselves. More subtly , his medical experience influenced in some degree his ideas and even his choice of words. The interrelations of poet-patient and trainee-physician are examined in this essay.

  6. John Peter Zenger, Battler for Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Gerry

    1974-01-01

    Examines the freedom of the press precedent set by the John Peter Zenger case in 1743 and considers its application to such current events as the jailing of reporters for not disclosing news sources. (RB)

  7. Archival Footage: John Glenn's Mercury Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    Archival films document John Glenn's historic Feb. 20, 1962 Mercury flight in his Friendship 7, in which he became the first American to orbit the Earth. Clips include boarding the capsule, splashd...

  8. Corporate Perspective: An Interview with John Sculley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temares, M. Lewis

    1989-01-01

    John Sculley, the chairman of the board of Apple Computer, Inc., discusses information technology management, management strategies, network management, the Chief Information Officer, strategic planning, back-to-the-future planning, business and university joint ventures, and security issues. (MLW)

  9. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix (1926-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, W.

    2005-12-01

    On 27 June 2005 the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage lost its founder and Australia lost one of its leading historians of astronomy when John Louis Perdrix died in Dubai after a brief battle with cancer.

  10. John Dewey--Philosopher and Educational Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talebi, Kandan

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey was an American philosopher and educator, founder of the philosophical movement known as pragmatism, a pioneer in functional psychology, and a leader of the progressive movement in education in the United States.

  11. John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49

  12. Johne's Disease (Paratuberculosis) in a Goat

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Cara L.

    1982-01-01

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) was diagnosed as the cause of chronic weight loss and intermittent diarrhea in a five year old Saanen doe. Confirmatory necropsy findings included granulomatous enteritis, lymphadenitis, lymphangitis and the demonstration of abundant acid fast organisms within macrophages in impression smears of intestinal mucosa. Some of the difficulties encountered in diagnosing and controlling Johne's disease are discussed with emphasis given to the disease in small ruminants. PMID:17422113

  13. [Dr. John Argyropulos (1410-1492)].

    PubMed

    Colović, Radoje

    2008-01-01

    Dr. John Argyropulos (Dr. John Argyropulus, Dr. John Argyropoulos) was the last but, along with Dr. John Hortazmen, the most well known professor of Medical School, founded in 1308 by the Serbian king Stefan Uro II Milutin at the Hospital of St. John the Baptist monastery in Constantinople. After the town fell to the Turkish hands, Dr. Argyropulos stayed at Peloponnesus from 1453 to 1456, when he moved to Italy, in which he spent the rest of his life. He is not important only for the Serbs, he is more important for the Greeks and particularly for the Italians and Italy, in which he spent the largest part of his life, in which he achieved the university education, taught the Greek philosophy, language and literature, as well as translated a number of Aristotle's works from old Greek to Latin and New Greek, wrote a number of poems, letters and notes and made a strong influence on a number of Renaissance humanists in Florence, Italy, as well as on a number of intelectuals throghout Europe. We found no evidence that Dr. John Argiropulos either practised medicine in Italy, or that he taught medicine at the Italian medical schools.

  14. Fractional-step Tow-Thomas biquad filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeborn, Todd J.; Maundy, Brent; Elwakil, Ahmed

    In this paper we propose the use of fractional capacitors in the Tow-Thomas biquad to realize both fractional lowpass and asymmetric bandpass filters of order 0<α1+α2≤2, where α1 and α2 are the orders of the fractional capacitors and 0<α1,2≤1. We show how these filters can be designed using an integer-order transfer function approximation of the fractional capacitors. MATLAB and PSPICE simulations of first order fractional-step low and bandpass filters of order 1.1, 1.5, and 1.9 are given as examples. Experimental results of fractional low pass filters of order 1.5 implemented with silicon-fabricated fractional capacitors verify the operation of the fractional Tow-Thomas biquad.

  15. General Thomas Dresser White: Renaissance Man in a Dark Age

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    GENERAL THOMAS DRESSER WHITE: RENAISSANCE MAN IN A DARK AGE BY CHRIS WINKLEPLECK A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE FACULTY OF...remain a plebe but for a matter of months due to the shortened program. In all, his class spent only two years at the...short of swamp. No injury except for skinned finger and stiff back. Ambassador apparently calm and very decent about matter . He sent wires to the

  16. Losing Thomas & Ella: A Father's Story (A Research Comic).

    PubMed

    Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B

    2015-10-14

    "Losing Thomas & Ella" presents a research comic about one father's perinatal loss of twins. The comic recounts Paul's experience of the hospital and the babies' deaths, and it details the complex grieving process afterward, including themes of anger, distance, relationship stress, self-blame, religious challenges, and resignation. A methodological appendix explains the process of constructing the comic and provides a rationale for the use of comics-based research for illness, death, and grief among practitioners, policy makers, and the bereaved.

  17. [Medical practice in the thought of Thomas Aquinas].

    PubMed

    Fagiolo, Enzo

    2007-01-01

    In the works of St. Thomas Aquinas there are many examples of medical practice, in the discussion of philosophical and theological questions. St. Thomas asserts that like the doctor causes the recovery of the patient, although it is the power of nature to perform, so does the teacher with his student; the teacher raises the knowledge in the student, even if it is the own reason to act. Like the patient can be recovered only by natural force or by this force with the help of the doctor, in the same way, knowledge can be achieved only through the natural reason of the student or with the help of the teacher. To define the relationship between the desired aim and the means to achieve it, St. Thomas suggests a fundamental principle of medical ethics. The doctor, which is minister of nature, if has no limit wishing the recovery of the patient, must have a measure in relation to the means used to obtain that goal. In fact, he must try to cure the patient in the best way he can, not using the "strongest" drug; in fact, the drug is not the aim but it is only one of the means to obtain health.

  18. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    John W. Firor, a former Director of the High Altitude Observatory and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and a founder of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, died of Alzheimer's disease in Pullman, Washington on November 5, 2007, he was 80. He was born in Athens Georgia on October 18, 1927, where his father was a professor of agricultural economics. John had an unusually diverse scientific career. His interest in physics and astrophysics began while serving in the army, during which time he was assigned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he guarded highly radioactive materials (many have heard him describe how informal the protections were compared to later times). After his service he returned to college and graduated in physics from Georgia Tech in 1949. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1954, writing his thesis on cosmic rays under John Simpson. John Firor would later remark that: "If you needed cosmic rays to actually do anything, you are sunk." That thought, partly in jest, may help explain his motivation for moving to so many new scientific and management pursuits. John moved from cosmic ray physics to radio astronomy (particularly of the Sun) when he began work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, where he remained until 1961. During this time, he met Walter Orr Roberts, then the Director of the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) in Boulder, Colorado. HAO was then affiliated with the University of Colorado. In 1959, a movement began to upgrade the atmospheric sciences in the United States by establishing a National Center, where the largest, most important atmospheric research problems could be addressed. Roberts became the first Director of NCAR, as well as the first president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the consortium of universities that was commissioned to manage and staff the new Center. HAO became a

  19. Conceptions of Childhood in the Educational Philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2015-01-01

    This article compares progressive conceptions of childhood in the educational philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey. Although the lives of the two philosophers were separated by an ocean and two centuries of history, they had in common the following things: (1) a relatively high level of experience working with, and observing, children that is…

  20. Influences on the Founder of the Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    1994-01-01

    Explains how George Peabody, self-made millionaire and educational philanthropist, was one of three powerful men who influenced Johns Hopkins in founding Johns Hopkins University (the other two being Dr. Joseph Parrish and Dr. Patrick Macaulay). The article looks at how Hopkins, like Peabody, used his wealth for philanthropic purposes. (SM)

  1. Sir John Gurdon: Father of nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  2. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin hands Mrs. Dianne Holliman a plaque honoring her late husband, John Holliman, a CNN national correspondent. Standing behind Goldin is Center Director Roy Bridges. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  3. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left, Center Director Roy Bridges and NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin applaud as Jay Holliman, with the help of his mother, Mrs. Dianne Holliman, unveils a plaque honoring his father, the late John Holliman. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. The occasion was the dedication of the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the CNN national correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  4. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    John Perdrix, astronomical historian and co-founder of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, died on 27 June 2005. John Louis Perdrix was born in Adelaide, Australia, on 30 June 1926. After studying chemistry at Melbourne Technical College and working in industry, he joined the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Division of Minerals and Geochemistry. In 1974 the Division relocated to the Western Australian capital, Perth, and John spent the rest of his working life there involved in geochemical research. From his teenage years John had a passion for astronomy, which he fine-tuned through the Astronomical Society of Victoria and the Victorian Branch of the British Astronomical Association. He was very active in both groups, serving as President of the former and Secretary/Treasurer of the latter. He was also an FRAS, and a member of the AAS, the BAA parent body, and the IAU (Commission 41)?no mean feat for an Australian amateur astronomer. Throughout his life, he was a strong advocate of close amateur-professional relations. John's main research interest was history of astronomy, and over the years he wrote a succession of research papers, mainly about aspects of Australian astronomy. His well-researched and neatly-illustrated papers on the Melbourne Observatory and the Great Melbourne Telescope are classics, and when the Observatory's future was in the balance they played a key role in the State Government's decision to convert this unique facility into a museum precinct. To support his research activities, John built up an amazing library that developed its own distinctive personality and quickly took over his house and garage before invading commercial storage facilities! Apart from writing papers, John had an even greater passion for editing and publishing. From 1985 to 1997 he produced the Australian Journal of Astronomy, and in 1998 this was replaced by the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage (JAH2). Both

  5. Local Lorentz transformations and Thomas effect in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silenko, Alexander J.

    2016-06-01

    The tetrad method is used for an introduction of local Lorentz frames and a detailed analysis of local Lorentz transformations. A formulation of equations of motion in local Lorentz frames is based on the Pomeransky-Khriplovich gravitoelectromagnetic fields. These fields are calculated in the most important special cases and their local Lorentz transformations are determined. The local Lorentz transformations and the Pomeransky-Khriplovich gravitoelectromagnetic fields are applied for a rigorous derivation of a general equation for the Thomas effect in Riemannian spacetimes and for a consideration of Einstein's equivalence principle and the Mathisson force.

  6. Lessons from an English opium eater: Thomas De Quincey reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Strang, J

    1990-12-01

    Thomas De Quincey published his autobiographical Confessions of an English Opium Eater in 1821. The publication both fascinated and outraged its 19th-century readers. Heated debate followed on such topics as: the causality of opiate use; self-inflicted suffering and responsibility; the impact of availability and environment; therapeutic addiction; controlled use; the emergence of dependence; tolerance; withdrawal techniques; hazards; the impact of advertising. Many of these topics remain subjects of debate and causes for concern today. We would be well advised to study the questions and debates of a century and a half ago.

  7. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  8. An Interview with John Trim at 80

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Nick

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. John Trim, which was recorded at his home in Cambridge on January 21, 2005, not long after his 80th birthday in October 2004. Although he would not consider himself a language tester, Dr. Trim has followed the trends in language assessment since the 1960s and his own work, particularly as a coauthor of…

  9. John Hull and the Money Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attfield, David

    2008-01-01

    John Hull's recent educational writings have included several on what he calls the "money culture". This is analysed and criticised in this article. Hull offers a Marxist and a neo-Marxist account of the role of money in western societies utilising the labour theory of value, false consciousness and the materialist interpretation of history. It is…

  10. John B. Watson's Legacy: Learning and Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Frances Degen

    1992-01-01

    Evaluates John B. Watson's contributions to developmental psychology. Watson's insistence on objective methodology in psychology retains its influence, but his extreme environmentalism has been rejected. His concern with the principles of learning is reflected in the work of Hull and Skinner. (BC)

  11. John Furlong and the "University Project"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2014-01-01

    Like many senior teacher-educators and educational researchers, John Furlong has faced in several directions throughout his career, sometimes simultaneously. He has clearly not lost his enthusiasm for what happens in the classroom: he strongly appreciates those magical moments which can happen at any time, and which keep teachers going. He loves…

  12. John W. Thoburn: International Humanitarian Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's International Humanitarian Award. The 2012 winner, John W. Thoburn, is an extraordinary psychologist who devotes himself consistently to service to underserved populations, especially in the aftermath of natural or human-induced disasters. He exemplifies a genuine…

  13. John Dewey on Philosophy and Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Maughn; Granger, David

    2012-01-01

    John Dewey was not a philosopher of education in the now-traditional sense of a doctor of philosophy who examines educational ends, means, and controversies through the disciplinary lenses of epistemology, ethics, and political theory, or of agenda-driven schools such as existentialism, feminism, and critical theory. Rather, Dewey was both an…

  14. Speaking Personally--With John Seely Brown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with John Seely Brown, a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California and a former chief scientist of Xerox Corporation and director of its Palo Alto Research Center (PARC)--a position he held for nearly two decades. While head of PARC, Brown expanded the role of corporate research to include such…

  15. John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nufrio, Ronald M.

    The 1865 conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln also included plans to assassinate other government officials on that same April evening. The actor, John Wilkes Booth, succeeded in killing Lincoln, but his fellow conspirators bungled their attempts to kill William Seward, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, and possibly Edwin Stanton. In…

  16. HARPERS FERRY, A PLAY ABOUT JOHN BROWN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STAVIS, BARRIE

    THIS PLAY IS A DRAMATIC RENDERING OF JOHN BROWN'S ATTACK ON THE ARMORY AT HARPERS FERRY AND HIS SUBSEQUENT TRIAL FOR TREASON. ALTHOUGH IT ADHERES TO THE FACTS OF HISTORY, THEY ARE NOT TREATED REALISTICALLY. "HARPERS FERRY" PORTRAYS BROWN AS POSSESSING A PURE IDEALISM UNTAINTED IN THE SLIGHTEST DEGREE BY MATERIALISM OR SELF-SEEKING, WHICH…

  17. John Dewey and Adult Learning in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate learning in museums through the lens of John Dewey's philosophy of education and experiential learning. The influence of Dewey's philosophy of education is widespread and resounding. In this article, I examine the experiential qualities of Dewey's philosophy and compare it with the objectives of the…

  18. John F. Kennedy School and Community Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    Located near an existing neighborhood health clinic, the John F. Kennedy School and Community Center provides a neighborhood base for numerous educational, health, and social agencies. The middle school can accommodate over 1,000 students in grades six through eight. The community center fills the need for civic and social organizations often…

  19. John R. Commons: Pioneer in Labor Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbash, Jack

    1989-01-01

    John R. Commons has contributed in one way or another to pratically every piece of social and labor legislation that has been enacted in the twentieth century. He has made his mark on such diverse aspects of American labor as apprenticeship, vocational education, workers' compensation, and the administration of labor law. (Author/JOW)

  20. Astronaut John Glenn Enters Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn enters the Mercury spacecraft, Friendship 7, prior to the launch of MA-6 on February 20, 1961 and became the first American who orbited the Earth. The MA-6 mission was the first manned orbital flight boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile), lasted for five hours, and orbited the Earth three times.

  1. Astronaut Virgil Grissom and Astronaut John Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Virgil Grissom chats with Astronaut John Glenn prior to entering the Liberty Bell 7 capsule for the MR-4 Mission. The MR-4 mission was the second manned suborbital flight using the Mercury-Redstone booster, which was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Capitalism in Six Westerns by John Ford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Carlos Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The economic and institutional analysis of capitalism can be illustrated through John Ford's Westerns. This article focuses on six classics by Ford that show the move toward modern order, the creation of a new society, and the rule of law. Economic features are pervading, from property rights and contracts to markets, money, and trade. Ford has…

  3. Securing the Republic: John Dickinson and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisey, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a brief history of John Dickinson, Charles Nisbet, Benjamin Rush and educational philosophies of the late eighteenth century. Discusses the traditional "classical" education of Dickinson and Nisbet and the more practical theories of Rush, who advocated "instruction in the useful arts and sciences" in order to…

  4. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  5. Obituary: John Leroy Climenhaga, 1916-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfe, Colin

    2009-01-01

    John Leroy Climenhaga was born on 7 November 1916 on a farm some 10 km from Delisle, a small town on the Canadian prairies, located about 50 km south-west of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and died at his home in Victoria, British Columbia, on 27 May 2008. His parents, Reuben and Elizabeth (nee Bert) Climenhaga, were farming folk, and he carried their honest and open attitude to the world throughout his life. John was the seventh born, and last to die, of their ten children. His father also served as an ordained minister of the Brethren in Christ. In early adulthood, John worked on his father's farm, but then attended the University of Saskatchewan, obtaining a B.A. with Honors in Mathematics and Physics and an M.A. in Physics, in 1945 and 1949 respectively. Between these events he worked as a Physics Instructor at Regina College from 1946 to 1948. In 1949 Climenhaga joined the faculty of Victoria College, as one of only two physicists in a small institution that was then part of the University of British Columbia. He remained in Victoria for the rest of his career, playing a major role in the College's growth into a full-fledged university, complete with thriving graduate programs in physics and astronomy as well as in many other fields. He served as Head of the Physics Department during the 1960s, a period which saw the College become the University of Victoria, with a full undergraduate program in Physics, and campaigned successfully for the establishment of a program in Astronomy, which began in 1965. From 1969 until 1972 he held the position of Dean of Arts and Science, and championed the university's participation in the Tri-University Meson Facility, whose high-current medium-energy beam was ideal for the production and study of mesons and their physics. That period was a turbulent one in the university's history, but John's integrity and his balanced and fair-minded approach to conflicts were of immeasurable importance in steering the young institution through it

  6. John Herschel, photography and the camera lucida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, L. J.

    John Herschel's use of the camera lucida as a drawing aid and the part played by this instrument in Henry Fox Talbot's motivation to invent photography are described. Herschel's seminal contributions to the early progress of photography, his attempts at colour photography, his invention of the "blueprint" process and his assistance to other photographic pioneers are discussed.

  7. Remembrances of John Madey and Rodolfo Bonifacio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2017-02-01

    This year the international photon science community lost two giants in the field of quantum optics. The American physicist, John Madey, and the Italian theoretician, Rodolfo Bonifacio, were indispensible motive forces in the development of the free electron laser (FEL), vital tool in photon science.

  8. John Dewey's Concept of the Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Douglas J.

    2001-01-01

    Examines John Dewey's concept of the student through the lens of his poetry and prose to show that the poetry clarifies the prose. The poetry reveals a concept of the student as more fragile and more in need of guidance than the prose might suggest. (SLD)

  9. John Rogers: "Checkers Up at the Farm."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeller, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Based on John Rogers' 1887 painted plaster sculpture called "Checkers Up at the Farm," this lesson seeks to introduce primary-level students to the idea of sculpture in the round and how sculpture can communicate ideas, emotions, and values. (JDH)

  10. Speaking Personally--With John "Pathfinder" Lester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaubois, Terry

    2013-01-01

    John Lester is currently the chief learning officer at ReactionGrid, a software company developing 3-D simulations and multiuser virtual world platforms. Lester's background includes working with Linden Lab on Second Life's education activities and neuroscience research. His primary focus is on collaborative learning and instructional…

  11. Preparing for Citizenship: Bring Back John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The paper traces the development of citizenship in the curriculum in England since the 1960s, emerging particularly from the Crick report. It argues for lessons to be learnt from John Dewey's "Democracy and education", the centenary of which is being celebrated this year.

  12. John Todd--Numerical Mathematics Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Don

    2007-01-01

    John Todd, now in his mid-90s, began his career as a pure mathematician, but World War II interrupted that. In this interview, he talks about his education, the significant developments in his becoming a numerical analyst, and the journey that concluded at Caltech. Among the interesting stories are how he met his wife-to-be the mathematician Olga…

  13. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  14. The Life and Work of John Snow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Fazio, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Due to his work to determine how cholera was spread in the 18th century, John Snow (1813-1858) has been hailed as the father of modern epidemiology. This article presents an inquiry model based on his life and work, which teachers can use to develop a series of biology lessons involving the history and nature of science. The lessons presented use…

  15. John Paul College: The Professional Renewal Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundie, Pauline; Marr, Robert

    2014-01-01

    John Paul College, a K-12 School in Queensland, Australia, recognises the centrality of classroom teachers to the ongoing improvement of student outcomes. The College has implemented a multi-tiered "professional renewal and assessment process." These changes of emphasis are the result of significant research and subsequent/associated…

  16. Generalized Thomas-Fermi equations as the Lampariello class of Emden-Fowler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, Haret C.; Mancas, Stefan C.

    2017-04-01

    A one-parameter family of Emden-Fowler equations defined by Lampariello's parameter p which, upon using Thomas-Fermi boundary conditions, turns into a set of generalized Thomas-Fermi equations comprising the standard Thomas-Fermi equation for p = 1 is studied in this paper. The entire family is shown to be non integrable by reduction to the corresponding Abel equations whose invariants do not satisfy a known integrability condition. We also discuss the equivalent dynamical system of equations for the standard Thomas-Fermi equation and perform its phase-plane analysis. The results of the latter analysis are similar for the whole class.

  17. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    John J. Hillman, a dedicated NASA civil servant, spectroscopist, astrophysicist, planetary scientist, and mentor, died on February 12, 2006 of ocular melanoma at his home in Columbia, Maryland. His professional and personal interests were wide-reaching and varied, and he devoted his career to the advancement of our understanding of the beauty and wonder in the world around us. His love of nature, art, and science made him a true Renaissance man. John was born in Fort Jay, New York, on November 22, 1938, and was raised in Washington, D.C. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from American University in 1967, 1970, and 1975, respectively. He began working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, then in its infancy, in 1969, juggling a full-time position as a Research Physicist, the completion of his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, and a young family. His background in molecular spectroscopy enabled him to apply his skills to numerous disciplines within NASA: infrared and radio astronomy; electronic, vibrational, and rotational structure of interstellar molecules; solar and stellar atmospheres; and planetary atmospheres. He published more than 70 journal papers in these disciplines. He was a frequent contributor to the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, and possessed a rare ability to bridge the gap between laboratory and remote sensing spectroscopy, bringing scientists from different disciplines together to understand our Universe. The last fifteen years of John's career were devoted to the development of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) cameras. He championed this technology as a low-cost, low-power alternative to traditional imaging cameras for in situ or remotely sensed planetary exploration. It was within this context that I got to know John, and eventually worked closely with him on the demonstration and application of this technology for planetary science using ground-based telescopes in New Mexico, California

  18. Paradigms in epidemiology textbooks: in the footsteps of Thomas Kuhn.

    PubMed

    Bhopal, R

    1999-08-01

    This article attempts to contribute to the debate on the future of epidemiology by combining Thomas Kuhn's ideas on scientific paradigms with the author's observations on some epidemiology textbooks. The author's interpretations were based on his readings of Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, epidemiology textbooks, and papers on the future of epidemiology. Thomas Kuhn's view is that sciences mostly work with a single paradigm driven by exemplars of successful work, and that proposals for paradigm change are resisted. Sciences that are maturing or changing do not have a dominant paradigm. Epidemiology textbooks showed diversity in their concepts, content, and approach. Most exemplars related to etiologic research rather than public health practice. One key focus of the recent controversy regarding the role of epidemiology has been the increasing inability of epidemiology to solve socially based public health problems. Kuhn's views help explain the polarization of views expressed. Kuhn's philosophy of science offers insights into controversies such as whether a paradigm shift is needed or imminent and the gap between epidemiology and public health practice. Interaction between science philosophers, epidemiologists, and public health practitioners may be valuable.

  19. Instantons, quivers and noncommutative Donaldson-Thomas theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirafici, Michele; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Szabo, Richard J.

    2011-12-01

    We construct noncommutative Donaldson-Thomas invariants associated with abelian orbifold singularities by analyzing the instanton contributions to a six-dimensional topological gauge theory. The noncommutative deformation of this gauge theory localizes on noncommutative instantons which can be classified in terms of three-dimensional Young diagrams with a colouring of boxes according to the orbifold group. We construct a moduli space for these gauge field configurations which allows us to compute its virtual numbers via the counting of representations of a quiver with relations. The quiver encodes the instanton dynamics of the noncommutative gauge theory, and is associated to the geometry of the singularity via the generalized McKay correspondence. The index of BPS states which compute the noncommutative Donaldson-Thomas invariants is realized via topological quantum mechanics based on the quiver data. We illustrate these constructions with several explicit examples, involving also higher rank Coulomb branch invariants and geometries with compact divisors, and connect our approach with other ones in the literature.

  20. The Thomas and Effimov Effects for General Partial Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, James; Macek, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    Description of the two-body interactions between particles is a fundamental step in modeling many-body systems. Because s-wave scattering dominates at ultra-cold temperatures, zero-range potentials (ZRPs) have been a popular way to describe the two-body interactions. Recent experiments enhance higher partial waves and this has led to interest in extending the zero-range model beyond l=0Stock:2005. In this work we use a ZRP model to examine three body systems. Of particular importance in these systems is the Thomas effect, which is the divergence of the wave function when all three particles are close together. The Thomas effect is known for spin zero particles when l=0. In addition there is the Effimov effect, in which there are an infinite number of three body bound states if the zero-range potential boundary conditions separate in hyperspherical coordinates as the scattering length al->∞. We show that the Effimov effect occurs for not only the well-known l=0 case, but for spin 1/2 fermions via the l=1 pseudopotential of ref. [1] This research is supported by Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-02ER15283 [1] Ren'e Stock, Andrew Silberfarb, Eric. L. Bolda, and Ivan H. Deutsch, Phys Rev. Lett. 94 023202 (2005)

  1. Revised Thomas-Fermi approximation for singular potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufty, James W.; Trickey, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    Approximations for the many-fermion free-energy density functional that include the Thomas-Fermi (TF) form for the noninteracting part lead to singular densities for singular external potentials (e.g., attractive Coulomb). This limitation of the TF approximation is addressed here by a formal map of the exact Euler equation for the density onto an equivalent TF form characterized by a modified Kohn-Sham potential. It is shown to be a "regularized" version of the Kohn-Sham potential, tempered by convolution with a finite-temperature response function. The resulting density is nonsingular, with the equilibrium properties obtained from the total free-energy functional evaluated at this density. This new representation is formally exact. Approximate expressions for the regularized potential are given to leading order in a nonlocality parameter, and the limiting behavior at high and low temperatures is described. The noninteracting part of the free energy in this approximation is the usual Thomas-Fermi functional. These results generalize and extend to finite temperatures the ground-state regularization by R. G. Parr and S. Ghosh [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 3577 (1986), 10.1073/pnas.83.11.3577] and by L. R. Pratt, G. G. Hoffman, and R. A. Harris [J. Chem. Phys. 88, 1818 (1988), 10.1063/1.454105] and formally systematize the finite-temperature regularization given by the latter authors.

  2. STS-114: Crew Interviews 1. Andy Thomas 2. Steve Robinson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    STS-114 Mission Specialists, Andy Thomas and Steve Robinson, are seen in this pre-flight interview. Andy Thomas begins by talking about his interest in spaceflight as a young boy growing up in Australia. He expresses that the chances of an Australian boy studying to eventually become an astronaut was very remote. His Mechanical Engineering Degree in Australia and a Doctorate enabled him to acquire unique skills to come to the United States to work for Lockheed Martin. On the topic of return to flight, he reflects on experiences that he had working with the Michael Anderson and Kalpana Chawla of the ill-fated Space Shuttle Columbia. He also talks about the safety of the Space Shuttle Discovery and repairs to its Thermal Protection system. He explains in detail the Logistics Flight (LF) 1, spacewalks, Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform (ESP)-2. Steve Robinson expresses that he had many interests as a child and becoming an astronaut was one of them. He was fascinated with things that fly and wanted to find out how they flew. He also designed hang gliders as a teenager. He expresses how his family feels about the risky business of spaceflight. He talks about how the space shuttle discovery crew will remember the Columbia crew by including seven stars on their patch so that they can bring them into orbit and then back home. Robinson also talks about his primary job, and the spacewalks that he and Soichi Noguchi will be performing.

  3. John Moulton Homestead, water channel with board cover for walkway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Moulton Homestead, water channel with board cover for walkway to house, looking east - John Moulton Homestead, Northwest corner of Mormon Row Road and Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  4. 76 FR 4939 - John M. Chois; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Enforcement Administration John M. Chois; Decision and Order On September 27, 2010, the Deputy Assistant... John M. Chois, D.O. (Registrant), of Orlando, Florida. The Show Cause Order proposed the revocation of... of Registration, BC6071904, issued to John M. Chois, D.O., be, and it hereby is, revoked. I...

  5. An assessment of chemical contaminants in sediments from the St. Thomas East End Reserves, St. Thomas, USVI.

    PubMed

    Pait, Anthony S; Hartwell, S Ian; Mason, Andrew L; Warner, Robert A; Jeffrey, Christopher F G; Hoffman, Anne M; Apeti, Dennis A; Pittman, Simon J

    2014-08-01

    The St. Thomas East End Reserves or STEER is located on the southeastern end of the island of St. Thomas, USVI. The STEER contains extensive mangroves and seagrass beds, along with coral reefs, lagoons, and cays. Within the watershed, however, are a large active landfill, numerous marinas, resorts, various commercial activities, an EPA Superfund Site, and residential areas, all of which have the potential to contribute pollutants to the STEER. As part of a project to develop an integrated assessment for the STEER, 185 chemical contaminants were analyzed in sediments from 24 sites. Higher levels of chemical contaminants were found in Mangrove Lagoon and Benner Bay in the western portion of the study area. The concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), zinc, copper, lead, and mercury were above a NOAA Effects Range-Low (ERL) sediment quality guideline at one or more sites, indicating impacts may be present in more sensitive species or life stages. Copper at one site in Benner Bay was above a NOAA Effects Range-Median (ERM) guideline indicating effects on benthic organisms were likely. The antifoulant boat hull ingredient tributyltin (TBT) was found at the third highest concentration in the history of NOAA's National Status and Trends (NS&T) Program, which monitors the nation's coastal and estuarine waters for chemical contaminants and bioeffects. The results from this project will provide resource managers with key information needed to make effective decisions affecting coral reef ecosystem health and gauge the efficacy of restoration activities.

  6. John Holt Stanway: Gone to Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, J.

    2008-01-01

    John Holt Stanway (1799Ð1872) was an amateur astronomer who lived in Manchester, England until 1845. He was in contact with the English Ôgrand amateurÕ astronomer, William Henry Smyth, who supported him for Fellowship of the Royal Astronomical Society and evidently advised him on how to build and equip an observatory. Apparently, Stanway had an observatory at Chorlton-cum-Hardy in 1837. In 1845, Stanway left for the United States in response to serious business problems. En route, he met Ashbel Smith, a representative of the government of the Republic of Texas, who convinced Stanway to go to Texas. There he changed his name to John H. Smythe Stanley and settled in Houston, where he re-established his observatory. He became a commercial photographer and wrote about astronomy and other scientific subjects in Houston newspapers until his death in 1872.

  7. John Banister: an Elizabethan surgeon in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mello, Amílcar D'Avila de

    2011-03-01

    In Brazil's sixteenth-century history, very few references are made to health professionals. On the expedition of Edward Fenton, dispatched by the English Crown in 1582 to set up a trading post in Asia, was the famous barber-surgeon and physician John Banister. The naval squadron, diverted from its original route to repeat the feats of Sir Francis Drake, stopped over in Africa, crossed the Atlantic and anchored off the Santa Catarina coast in Brazil. In these waters, the expedition degenerated into piracy and returned unsuccessful to Europe. John Banister is considered the person who liberated English anatomy from mediaeval slavery, shedding upon it the light of the Renaissance. It was the first time that anyone of this importance in the area of health had visited these latitudes.

  8. 33 CFR 110.250 - St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie, V.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.250 St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie... the harbor of Charlotte Amalie. (6) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed in the...

  9. 33 CFR 110.250 - St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie, V.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.250 St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie... the harbor of Charlotte Amalie. (6) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed in the...

  10. Thomas Jefferson's Plan for the University of Virginia: Lessons from the Lawn. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Mary; Wilson, Sara

    This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file, "University of Virginia Historic District," and other primary and secondary materials about Thomas Jefferson and the ctreation of the University of Virginia. Thomas Jefferson did not begin the effort of designing the University of Virginia…

  11. Public Financing of Religious Schools: James G. Blaine and Justice Clarence Thomas' "Bigotry Thesis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern

    2007-01-01

    United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas writing for a plurality of the Court in "Mitchell v. Helms" in 2000 advanced the idea that state constitutional prohibitions against public funding of religious schools were manifestations of anti-Catholic bigotry in the late 19th century. Thomas' reading of history and law led him to…

  12. 78 FR 65511 - Death of Thomas S. Foley Former Speaker of the House of Representatives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Vol. 78 Thursday, No. 211 October 31, 2013 Part IV The President Proclamation 9046--Death of Thomas S. Foley Former Speaker of the... ] Proclamation 9046 of October 28, 2013 Death of Thomas S. Foley Former Speaker of the House of...

  13. John Wesley Powell: soldier, explorer, scientist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1969-01-01

    One hundred years ago John Wesley Powell and nine adventure-seeking companions completed the first exploration of the dangerous and almost uncharted canyons of the Green and Colorado Rivers. By this trip, Powell, a 35-year old teacher of natural history, apparently unhampered by the lack of his right forearm (amputated after the Battle of Shiloh) opened up a large unknown part of continental United States and brought to a climax the era of western exploration.

  14. STS-100 Crew Interview: John Phillips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist John Phillips is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Phillips then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  15. John Wesley Powell: soldier, explorer, scientist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1970-01-01

    One hundred years ago John Wesley Powell and nine adventure-seeking companions completed the first exploration of the dangerous and almost uncharted canyons of the Green and Colorado Rivers. By this trip, Powell, a 35-year old teacher of natural history, apparently unhampered by the lack of his right forearm (amputated after the Battle of Shiloh) opened up a large unknown part of continental United States and brought to a climax the era of western exploration.

  16. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  17. Astronaut John Young photographed collecting lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples near North Ray crater during the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This picture was taken by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Young is using the lunar surface rake and a set of tongs. The Lunar Roving Vehicle is parked in the field of large boulders in the background.

  18. Astronaut John Young displays drawing of Snoopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, displays drawing of Snoopy in this color reproduction taken from the fourth telecast made by the color television camera aboard the Apollo 10 spacecraft. When this picture was made the Apollo 10 spacecraft was about half-way to the moon, or approximately 112,000 nautical miles from the earth. Snoopy will be the code name of the Lunar Module (LM) during Apollo 10 operations when the LM and CM are separated.

  19. Dr. William Briggs: ophthalmic physician at St. Thomas' Hospital, London.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, J

    2001-01-01

    William Briggs, MD, established himself as one of the first ophthalmic physicians, whom today we would call a neuro-ophthalmologist, to practice in the United Kingdom. After graduating with an MD from Cambridge in 1677, and while a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, he carried out original studies in visual anatomy and physiology. He described and named the optic papilla and the retinal nerve fibers in his book Ophthalmographia, published in 1676. He published his New Theory of Vision in 1682. While at Cambridge, he was a contemporary and a friend of Isaac Newton, with whom Briggs worked but who, in matters of visual anatomy and physiology, came to reach different conclusions from Briggs. In 1683, Briggs came to London to practice as a physician at St. Thomas' Hospital, where he established a considerable reputation as an ophthalmologist. For political reasons he was forced to resign from the Hospital prematurely.

  20. A Tony Thomas-Inspired Guide to INSPIRE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Heath B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    The SPIRES database was created in the late 1960s to catalogue the high energy physics preprints received by the SLAC Library. In the early 1990s it became the first database on the web and the first website outside of Europe. Although indispensible to the HEP community, its aging software infrastructure is becoming a serious liability. In a joint project involving CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, a new database, INSPIRE, is being created to replace SPIRES using CERN's modern, open-source Invenio database software. INSPIRE will maintain the content and functionality of SPIRES plus many new features. I describe this evolution from the birth of SPIRES to the current day, noting that the career of Tony Thomas spans this timeline.

  1. Green leviathan? Thomas hobbes, joel bakan and Arnold schwarzenegger.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert G

    2007-02-01

    Thomas Hobbes postulates that men are driven by "a perpetual and restless desire of power after power, that ceaseth only in death." The miserable consequences of this drive for power and the competing "desire of ease and sensual delight" and "fear of death and wounds" lead them to establish and obey. Substituting "profit" for "power" yields a description of the modern corporation, but without the desires or fears of natural persons. Such "unnatural persons" lack the Hobbesian ground of obligation, yet have appropriated the privileges and protections of natural persons. They challenge or undermine the sovereign wherever it limits their profits. Governor Schwarzenegger's re-election in California, however, on a strong anti-CO(2) program, suggests a willingness by threatened natural persons to re-empower Leviathan.

  2. Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center, Thomas Jefferson University.

    PubMed

    Arenson, Christine; Rose, Molly; Lyons, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University initiated the Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center in early 2007. The Center facilitates many diverse student and faculty projects on interprofessional education yearly. Faculty development programs include, most recently, the second Jefferson Interprofessional Education conference, IPE scholarly lecture series, an IPE and care practicum, and multiple lecture/discussions to select faculty/administrative groups. At present, there is no external funding for any of the programs. The Health Mentor Program is one of the major student programs. It is a required two-year longitudinal interprofessional chronic illness program for all medical, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, pharmacy and couples and family therapy students. It began in the fall of 2007 and is integrated into existing coursework in each of the participating disciplines.

  3. Associationism without associative links: Thomas Brown and the associationist project.

    PubMed

    Dacey, Mike

    2015-12-01

    There are two roles that association played in 18th-19th century associationism. The first dominates modern understanding of the history of the concept: association is a causal link posited to explain why ideas come in the sequence they do. The second has been ignored: association is merely regularity in the trains of thought, and the target of explanation. The view of association as regularity arose in several forms throughout the tradition, but Thomas Brown (1778-1820) makes the distinction explicit. He argues that there is no associative link, and association is mere sequence. I trace this view of association through the tradition, and consider its implications: Brown's views, in particular, motivate a rethinking of the associationist tradition in psychology. Associationism was a project united by a shared explanandum phenomenon, rather than a theory united by a shared theoretical posit.

  4. [Is there still a soul? Thomas Aquinas and modern psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Koehler, K

    1984-10-01

    The various solutions that have been proposed with respect to the body-mind problem can be more or less regarded as variations on three traditional models. Since the time of Descartes the philosophical position of hylomorphism has been almost forgotten and the influence of the dualist point of view has also been greatly reduced. In contrast, reductionism in the form of materialistic monism has gained immense popularity, especially in psychiatric circles. The present paper summarizes these different approaches but primarily focuses on certain aspects of a modified form of hylomorphism as developed by Thomas Aquinas. These latter considerations are then drawn upon as the basis for a critique of Kurt Schneiders so-called aristotelean-scholastic or metagenic interpretation with regard to the endogenous psychoses.

  5. John N. Brady (1952-2009): a Generous Spirit

    PubMed Central

    Enquist, Lynn W.

    2009-01-01

    John N. Brady, Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, National Institutes of Health, died of cancer on 27 April 2009. John was a stellar member of the virology community. He was a longtime Journal of Virology reviewer and a member of the editorial board. He will be missed. Fatah Kashanchi of the George Washington University Medical Center has written John's memorial. Fatah worked with John at the NIH and published more than 30 papers with him. Fatah thanks all the people who contributed to John's obituary, including Kuan-Teh Jeang, Lou Laimins, Mary Loeken, Renaud Mehieux, Paul Lambert, Graziella Piras, Scott Gitlin, Paul Lindholm, Nadia Rosenthal, Sergi Nekhai, Brian Wigdahl, David Price, Susan J. Marriott, Cynthia Masison, Jurgen Dittmer, Eric Verdin, Bassel E. Sawaya, and John's longtime assistants Janet Duvall Grimm and Michael Radonovich, who gave immense support to all the individuals who went through John's lab. PMID:19474098

  6. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  7. John Ray in Italy: lost manuscripts rediscovered

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper discloses the content of two manuscripts of John Ray that have hitherto been unknown to Ray scholars. The manuscripts survive in the Hampshire Record Office, having descended through the Prideaux-Brune family. They record information about Ray's tour of Italy in the 1660s that does not appear in his Observations … made in a journey through … the Low-countries, Germany, Italy and France (1673), including a visit to the museum of Athanasius Kircher in Rome, and provide clues concerning the composition of Ray's 1673 book. PMID:24921104

  8. John Vetch and the Egyptian ophthalmia.

    PubMed

    Feibel, R M

    1983-01-01

    During the Napoleonic Wars from 1798-1815, severe epidemics of keratoconjunctivitis affected the military and civilian populations of Western Europe. This disease was known as the Egyptian ophthalmia because it was first described in troops stationed in Egypt. Most physicians believed this condition was not infectious, but caused by various climatological factors. John Vetch, a British physician, emphasized that this disease was spread by direct conveyance of pus from the diseased to the healthy eye. His insistence that the ophthalmia was contagious, and his suggestions for prevention and treatment were milestones in the history of ophthalmology.

  9. The healing philosopher: John Locke's medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Short, Bradford William

    2004-01-01

    This article examines a heretofore unexplored facet of John Locke's philosophy. Locke was a medical doctor and he also wrote about medical issues that are controversial today. Despite this, Locke's medical ethics has yet to be studied. An analysis of Locke's education and his teachers and colleagues in the medical profession, of the 17th century Hippocratic Oath, and of the reaction to the last recorded outbreak of the bubonic plague in London, shines some light on the subject of Locke's medical ethics. The study of Locke's medical ethics confirms that he was a deontologist who opposed all suicide and abortion through much of pregnancy.

  10. John Hughlings-Jackson: a sesquicentennial tribute.

    PubMed Central

    Swash, M

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years have elapsed since the birth of John Hughlings-Jackson, a pivotal figure in the development of clinical neuroscience. In this review the origin of Jackson's postulate of a hierarchical organisation of function in the nervous system is described in the context of his education and his contacts with contemporaries, both in his clinical practice at The London Hospital and at the National Hospital, Queen Square, and in relation to the evolutionary approach to the organisation and ideas on biology and society set out by the philosopher Herbert Spencer. Images PMID:3531410

  11. John Ray in Italy: lost manuscripts rediscovered.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Michael

    2014-06-20

    This paper discloses the content of two manuscripts of John Ray that have hitherto been unknown to Ray scholars. The manuscripts survive in the Hampshire Record Office, having descended through the Prideaux-Brune family. They record information about Ray's tour of Italy in the 1660s that does not appear in his Observations... made in a journey through... the Low-countries, Germany, Italy and France (1673), including a visit to the museum of Athanasius Kircher in Rome, and provide clues concerning the composition of Ray's 1673 book.

  12. John Day Dam - Underwater video inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    An underwater video inspection device has recently been designed and built for use at John Day Powerhouse on the Columbia River. It is used to inspect for damage on the submerged traveling screens, vertical barrier screens and orifices which are used to guide juvenile fish away from the turbines. The Corps of Engineers is legally required to inspect this equipment once per month. It is possible but time consuming to perform the inspections on submerged traveling screens by removing them. The removal of screens requires a six person crew and gantry crane. The time to remove and install a screen is about 3 hours. A typical plant such as John Day has 48 screens. On most power plants, it is not practical to remove the vertical barrier screens because it is so time consuming. These were formerly inspected by shutting down the generating units and using a camera on a tether to inspect. The new inspection device uses minimal crew and doesn`t require shutting down generating units. This system is intended to be a prototype and it is expected that some improvements to the system will be developed as the system is used.

  13. MPI Enhancements in John the Ripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Edward R.; Lin, Michael; Skoczen, Wesley

    2010-11-01

    John the Ripper (JtR) is an open source software package commonly used by system administrators to enforce password policy. JtR is designed to attack (i.e., crack) passwords encrypted in a wide variety of commonly used formats. While parallel implementations of JtR exist, there are several limitations to them. This research reports on two distinct algorithms that enhance this password cracking tool using the Message Passing Interface. The first algorithm is a novel approach that uses numerous processors to crack one password by using an innovative approach to workload distribution. In this algorithm the candidate password is distributed to all participating processors and the word list is divided based on probability so that each processor has the same likelihood of cracking the password while eliminating overlapping operations. The second algorithm developed in this research involves dividing the passwords within a password file equally amongst available processors while ensuring load-balanced and fault-tolerant behavior. This paper describes John the Ripper, the design of these two algorithms and preliminary results. Given the same amount of time, the original JtR can crack 29 passwords, whereas our algorithms 1 and 2 can crack an additional 35 and 45 passwords respectively.

  14. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Carlo Ghirardi, Gian

    2007-03-01

    Delivered at Trieste on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 2 November 1989 The video of this lecture is available here. Please see the PDF for the transcript of the lecture. General remarks by Angelo Bassi and GianCarlo Ghirardi During the autumn of 1989 the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its creation. Among the many prestigious speakers, who delivered extremely interesting lectures on that occasion, was the late John Stewart Bell. All lectures have been recorded on tape. We succeeded in getting a copy of John's lecture. In the lecture, many of the arguments that John had lucidly stressed in his writings appear once more, but there are also extremely interesting new remarks which, to our knowledge, have not been presented elsewhere. In particular he decided, as pointed out by the very choice of the title of his lecture, to call attention to the fact that the theory presents two types of difficulties, which Dirac classified as first and second class. The former are those connected with the so-called macro-objectification problem, the latter with the divergences characterizing relativistic quantum field theories. Bell describes the precise position of Dirac on these problems and he stresses appropriately how, contrary to Dirac's hopes, the steps which have led to a partial overcoming of the second class difficulties have not helped in any way whatsoever to overcome those of the first class. He then proceeds to analyse the origin and development of the Dynamical Reduction Program and draws attention to the problems that still affect it, in particular that of a consistent relativistic generalization. When the two meetings Are there quantum jumps? and On the present status of Quantum Mechanics were organized in Trieste and Losinj (Croatia), on 5 10 September 2005, it occurred to us that this lecture, which has never been published, might represent an

  15. Sources of variability in John Henryism.

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Keith E.; Brandon, Dwayne T.; Robinson, Elwood; Bennett, Gary; Merritt, Marcellus; Edwards, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To decompose sources of individual differences in coping as measured by John Henryism among African Americans. METHODS: Analyses described in this study are based on the pairwise responses from 180 pairs of same-sex, African-American twin pairs who participated in the Carolina African-American Twins Study of Aging (CAATSA). The sample consisted of 85 monozygotic (MZ) and 95 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. RESULTS: Environmental factors account for most of the variance (65%) in John Henryism scores, with the remaining variance attributable to additive genetic factors (35%). The test of the genetic component suggested that the 35% represented a statistically significant proportion of variance. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of recent studies on African Americans and health outcomes have focused on the impact of psychosocial factors on diseases such as hypertension and diabetes, with relatively little attention to possible genetic contributors. Previous research on psychosocial indices and their relationship to cardiovascular health among African Americans has focused on assessment and epidemiological explorations rather than understanding the etiology of variability in such measures. PMID:16623079

  16. John Lubbock, science, and the liberal intellectual

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. F. M.

    2014-01-01

    John Lubbock's longest-standing scientific research interest was entomology. Some of his earliest systematic investigations of insect and marine life began under the tutelage of Darwin. Darwin shaped the trajectory of, and the programme for, Lubbock's natural history work. However, to understand John Lubbock's identity as a scientist, he must be located within the context of the Victorian ‘intellectual’. This paper traces Lubbock's entomological work from its early development under Darwin to his later work on insect sensory physiology and comparative psychology. Far from being the death of his scientific career, Lubbock's entry into Parliament marked the pinnacle of his career as a scientific intellectual. He built on his early work on invertebrate anatomy, physiology and taxonomy, and on his archaeological and anthropological research to expound his vision of mental evolution. His research on ‘savages’, on ants, bees and wasps, and on his dog, ‘Van’, permitted him to expatiate upon the psychic unity of all sentient beings, which, in turn, underpinned his overarching educational programme.

  17. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  18. Truncated ambition: Thomas King Chambers, MD (1817-1889).

    PubMed

    Drain, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Thomas King Chambers clearly intended to be a physician of note and at times indeed he was mentioned in the same breath as Sir James Paget (1814-1899), Sir Henry Acland (1815-1900) and Francis Anstie (1833-1874). At the time of his death his career was pronounced 'less than brilliant though far from inglorious'. He had made all the right political moves-networking through the medical societies, marrying well and even accompanying the Prince of Wales on his first foreign tour. He wanted to be more than a society doctor, however: he published his clinical lectures and original research, proposed a new paradigm for medicine that he dubbed 'the renewal of life' and found his ideas taken up enthusiastically in the United States. Alas, his career foundered when he suffered an aneurysm and underwent amputation through the thigh. Nevertheless, he made significant contributions to the profession through his service on the General Medical Council and to medical education, in particular to medical education for women, through his strong support of the London School of Medicine for Women. To examine his life is to revisit what makes a life meaningful and worthwhile, for Chambers' life, unlike his body, is remarkably whole.

  19. Publish or Perish: The Case of Thomas Harriot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2007-12-01

    In 1585 the 25-year old Thomas Harriot set foot on Roanoke Island, just inside the barrier island of what is now North Carolina but what was then called Virginia. Harriot, under the patronage of Sir Walter Raleigh, was the cartographer and navigational expert on a colonizing expedition, and he was perhaps the first scientist to take up temporary residence in North America. On his return to Britain he published, at the insistence of Raleigh, a now quite rare promotional pamphlet, A briefe and true report of the New Found Land of Virginia (1588). This was the only thing he published in his lifetime, so his reputation virtually perished. Centuries later his 10,000 pages of manuscripts began to be investigated, so we now know that he anticipated Galileo in the discovery of sunspots, though his telescopic drawings of the moon were strongly influenced by what he saw in Galileo's Sidereus nuncius. Harriot corresponded briefly with Kepler, and had he shared his optical observations, the law of refraction might have become available much earlier. Harriot died in 1621 of cancer of the nose, possibly exacerbated by a habit he helped to import from America, "drinking” tobacco fumes.

  20. The many encounters of Thomas Kuhn and French epistemology.

    PubMed

    Simons, Massimiliano

    2017-02-01

    The work of Thomas Kuhn has been very influential in Anglo-American philosophy of science and it is claimed that it has initiated the historical turn. Although this might be the case for English speaking countries, in France an historical approach has always been the rule. This article aims to investigate the similarities and differences between Kuhn and French philosophy of science or 'French epistemology'. The first part will argue that he is influenced by French epistemologists, but by lesser known authors than often thought. The second part focuses on the reactions of French epistemologists on Kuhn's work, which were often very critical. It is argued that behind some superficial similarities there are deep disagreements between Kuhn and French epistemology. This is finally shown by a brief comparison with the reaction of more recent French philosophers of science, who distance themselves from French epistemology and are more positive about Kuhn. Based on these diverse appreciations of Kuhn, a typology of the different positions within the philosophy of science is suggested.

  1. Thomas Jefferson's Y chromosome belongs to a rare European lineage.

    PubMed

    King, Turi E; Bowden, Georgina R; Balaresque, Patricia L; Adams, Susan M; Shanks, Morag E; Jobling, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    We have characterized the Y chromosome carried by President Thomas Jefferson, the general rarity of which supported the idea that he, or a patrilineal relative, fathered the last son of his slave Sally Hemings. It belongs to haplogroup K2, a lineage representing only approximately 1% of chromosomes worldwide, and most common in East Africa and the Middle East. Phylogenetic network analysis of its Y-STR (short tandem repeat) haplotype shows that it is most closely related to an Egyptian K2 haplotype, but the presence of scattered and diverse European haplotypes within the network is nonetheless consistent with Jefferson's patrilineage belonging to an ancient and rare indigenous European type. This is supported by the observation that two of 85 unrelated British men sharing the surname Jefferson also share the President's Y-STR haplotype within haplogroup K2. Our findings represent a cautionary tale in showing the difficulty of assigning individual ancestry based on a Y-chromosome haplotype, particularly for rare lineages where population data are scarce.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: 400 episodes in St Thomas's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Gransden, W R; Eykyn, S J; Phillips, I

    1984-01-28

    Four hundred episodes of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia occurred in St Thomas's Hospital from 1969 to 1983, accounting for 17.5% of all episodes of bacteraemia. The mortality was 24%, half attributable to underlying disease, and was highest in patients over 50. Almost 60% of the bacteraemias were acquired in hospital, and the source of the organism was generally obvious, with vascular access sites the most common (37%). Bone and joint infections accounted for 11.5% of episodes and endocarditis for 7%. Most staphylococci were resistant to penicillin only; three isolates were resistant to methicillin and five to fusidic acid. Microbiologists seldom influenced directly the choice of initial antibiotic treatment (though this usually conformed to the hospital's antibiotic prescribing policy) but had considerable influence over definitive treatment, usually cloxacillin or flucloxacillin alone or in combination with fusidic acid. S aureus bacteraemia is easy to identify and treat, though underlying disease may influence the outcome. Efforts should be made to prevent the largely iatrogenic disease.

  3. Dr Thomas Beddoes: chemistry, medicine, and the perils of democracy.

    PubMed

    Levere, Trevor H

    2009-09-20

    Beddoes lectured on chemistry at Oxford in the years that included the French Revolution, the Terror, and the outbreak of war with France, as well as the success in France of the chemical revolution. The very public dispute between Edmund Burke and Joseph Priestley meant that the latter's study of different kinds of air was politically tainted. Beddoes's democratic beliefs and his support for the new chemistry of Lavoisier meant that as chemist and physician he had to deal with complaints that he was potentially seditious and pro-French. His medical theories, allied to pneumatic chemistry and building on the work of Priestley, were accordingly suspect. In spite of that, he became the physician and friend to several members of the Lunar Society of Birmingham and to members of their family, and they in return became his patrons. His collaboration with James Watt was crucial for his development of pneumatic medicine. The full extent of Lunar patronage, and especially that of James Keir and Thomas Wedgwood, has hitherto not been recognized, but it was the concealed scale of that patronage that made possible the execution of Beddoes's ambitious programme of treatment and research.

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John Jennings, Photographer December 27, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John Jennings, Photographer December 27, 1934 EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH ELEVATIONS. - Hanover Green Meetinghouse, Nanticoke vicinity, Hanover Green, Luzerne County, PA

  5. The Winds of Change: Thomas Kuhn and the Revolution in the Teaching of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hairston, Maxine

    1982-01-01

    Uses Thomas Kuhn's hypothesis on paradigm shifts--changes in a discipline from established models to newer ones--to examine the developing shift in writing instruction from the product-oriented to the process-oriented model. (RL)

  6. [Book review] The youngest science: notes of a medicine-watcher, by Lewis Thomas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Review of: The youngest science: notes of a medicine-watcher. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Series. Lewis Thomas. Penguin Books, 1995. Pennsylvania State University. 270 pp. ISBN: 0140243275, 9780140243277.

  7. Astronaut Thomas Stafford during water egress training in Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, Gemini 6 prime crew pilot, climbs out of a boilerplate model of a Gemini spacecraft during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. A NASA swimmer in the water nearby assists in the exercise.

  8. DC66820 VISTA EAST ALONG M STREET TO THOMAS CIRCLE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-20 VISTA EAST ALONG M STREET TO THOMAS CIRCLE FROM RESERVATION NO. 14 0 AT NEW HAMPSHIRE AVENUE AND 21ST STREET, NW - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Astronaut Andy Thomas holds facsimile Olympic torch like one to fly on STS-101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut Andy Thomas holds a facsimile of the Olympic torch that is being carried on Space Shuttle Atlantis during mission STS- 101. Thomas is from Australia, which is the site of the 2000 Olympics. He coordinated the effort to have the torch added to the manifest so that it would truly circle the Earth in the spirit of the worldwide sporting event. The Sydney Olympic Torch Relay will arrive in Australia on June 8. The games begin Sept. 1.

  10. An improved Combes-Thomas estimate of magnetic Schrödinger operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhongwei

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, we prove an improved Combes-Thomas estimate, viz. the Combes-Thomas estimate in trace-class norms, for magnetic Schrödinger operators under general assumptions. In particular, we allow for unbounded potentials. We also show that for any function in the Schwartz space on the reals the operator kernel decays, in trace-class norms, faster than any polynomial.

  11. Region of validity of the Thomas-Fermi model with corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachkov, Sergey; Levashov, Pavel; Minakov, Dmitry

    2016-11-01

    A new method to calculate thermodynamically consistent shell corrections in a wide range of parameters is used to predict the region of validity of the Thomas-Fermi approach. The method is applicable both at low and high density. Thermodynamic functions of electrons calculated by the Thomas-Fermi model are compared with quantum, exchange, and shell corrections. The corrections become quite big at moderate and low densities and low temperatures in the region of strongly coupled plasma.

  12. Questions and Answers for Ken Thomas' "Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian and Gemini Spacesuits" Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian & Gemini spacesuits. While the United States and Russia adapted to existing launch- and reentry-type suits to allow the first human ventures into the vacuum of space, there were differences in execution and capabilities. Mr. Thomas will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach compared to exclusively intravehicular or extra-vehicular suit systems.

  13. History and evolution of surgical ethics: John Gregory to the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Namm, Jukes P; Siegler, Mark; Brander, Caroline; Kim, Tae Yeon; Lowe, Christian; Angelos, Peter

    2014-07-01

    As surgery grew to become a respected medical profession in the eighteenth century, medical ethics emerged as a response to the growing need to protect patients and maintain the public's trust in physicians. The early influences of John Gregory and Thomas Percival were instrumental in the formulation of patient-centered medical ethics. In the late nineteenth century, the modern surgical advances of anesthesia and antisepsis created the need for a discipline of ethics specific to surgery in order to confront new and evolving ethical issues. One of the founding initiatives of the American College of Surgeons in 1913 was to eliminate unethical practices such as fee-splitting and itinerant surgery. As surgery continued to advance in the era of solid organ transplantation and minimally invasive surgery in the latter half of the twentieth century, surgical innovation and conflict of interest have emerged as important ethical issues moving forward into the twenty-first century. Surgical ethics has evolved into a distinct branch of medical ethics, and the core of surgical ethics is the surgeon-patient relationship and the surgeon's responsibility to advance and protect the well-being of the patient.

  14. John Elliott Nafe (1914-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert J.

    John Elliott Nafe, known for his many pioneering contributions to seismological research, died on April 6 at his home in Vancouver, British Columbia. He had been an AGU Fellow since 1962. A physicist by training, Nafe proposed several important seismological concepts. In 1958, he was the first to demonstrate that sound waves could travel around the globe through the ocean. With colleague Charles L. Drake, he developed the Nafe-Drake Curve, which relates the velocity of sound through rock to the rock's density. He was one of several pioneering researchers at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who in the 1940s and 1950s began profiling the Earth's crust at different points around the globe—an effort that eventually resulted in the tectonic plate theory of continental movement.

  15. Variable pitch reconstruction using John's equation.

    PubMed

    Karbeyaz, Başak Ulker; Naidu, Ram C; Ying, Zhengrong; Simanovsky, Sergey B; Hirsch, Matthew W; Schafer, David A; Crawford, Carl R

    2008-01-01

    We present an algorithm to reconstruct helical cone beam computed tomography (CT) data acquired at variable pitch. The algorithm extracts a halfscan segment of projections using an extended version of the advanced single slice rebinning (ASSR) algorithm. ASSR rebins constant pitch cone beam data to fan beam projections that approximately lie on a plane that is tilted to optimally fit the source helix. For variable pitch, the error between the tilted plane chosen by ASSR and the source helix increases, resulting in increased image artifacts. To reduce the artifacts, we choose a reconstruction plane, which is tilted and shifted relative to the source trajectory. We then correct rebinned fan beam data using John's equation to virtually move the source into the tilted and shifted reconstruction plane. Results obtained from simulated phantom images and scanner images demonstrate the applicability of the proposed algorithm.

  16. John Shaw Billings as a Bibliographer

    PubMed Central

    Marson, Joyce

    1969-01-01

    The influences that a man's childhood have on his life are, it is well known, great. Life is essentially a part of the things that happen to the individual and it is the manner in which one relates oneself to these things that determines what one is. With these facts in mind this study of John Shaw Billings as a bibliographer has been approached. His early life has been reviewed as an influence on his later achievements. Stress has been placed on those events which led to his bibliographic activities. Dr. Billings was prolific in many fields. Others have given detailed analyses of his writings (1, 2). The present study will consider only his bibliographic works. The description of these follows the brief outline of his childhood and youth. PMID:4898628

  17. John Quincy Adams's rhetorical crusade for astronomy.

    PubMed

    Portolano, M

    2000-09-01

    Astronomy thrived in Europe during the early nineteenth century, but in the United States a utilitarian mind-set opposed it. John Quincy Adams's oratory in support of American astronomical discovery reached its peak during congressional debate over the Smithsonian Institution (1838-1846). During this debate Adams countered proposals to found a university with plans for an observatory. His addresses to congressional and public audiences about observatories and astronomy were intended to foster interest in the science and encourage the growing astronomical community in America. Although the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., was established before the Smithsonian debate ended, many considered Adams its political father. Adams composed his speeches on astronomy in a systematic manner, following neoclassical principles of rhetoric that he had taught at Harvard University. His speeches both in and outside of Congress show evidence of the rhetorical principles he conscientiously used in the service of astronomy.

  18. John Herschel on the Discovery of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerstrom, Nicholas

    2006-12-01

    The letters of John Herschel that concern the discovery of the planet Neptune have not been greatly discussed by historians of science. I have transcribed these in the course of archiving the British Neptune-discovery documents. Herschel tends to be depicted as a background figure in narrations of the story of Neptune's discovery, whereas the present account focuses upon his evolving view of the topic: the rival merits of the two main protagonists, and the startling manner in which an obscure branch of mathematics (perturbation theory) was able to pinpoint the position of a new sphere in the sky. As the son of the man who found Uranus, his views have a special relevance. Also, I suggest that his eloquent prose style may still be enjoyed today.

  19. Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, Floyd Michael

    2010-10-01

    The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly during his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

  20. Johns Hopkins APL paradigm in smallsat management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Coughlin, T. B.; Cameron, G. E.

    2000-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has designed, built, flown, and operated 57 satellites over the past 40 years, utilizing the methodology currently captured by the phrase "better, faster, smaller, cheaper" for all but one of these missions. In so doing, a management culture evolved that resulted in successful meeting of technical requirements within short schedules, often below originally estimated costs. The basic guidelines used in this approach are presented and illustrated with examples from recent or ongoing programs. The practical implementation of these guidelines varies from one program to another. A case in point is the recent trend to minimize mission operations costs. A good example of innovative architecture is the one employed on TIMED. It combines a Global Positioning System (GPS)-linked transponder, to enable time, velocity, and position for data tagging and autonomous orbit determination and propagation, with a ground system that enables separate operation of instruments from any of the spacecraft subsystems.

  1. John B. Little Center Annual Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Demple, Bruce F.

    2007-11-02

    The Annual Symposium of the John B. Little Center for Radiation Sciences and Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health seeks to educate radiobiologists and biomedical scientists in related areas on the leading research related to the effects of ionizing radiation and related environmental agents in biological systems. This effort seeks to further the training of individuals in this field, and to foment productive interactions and collaborations among scientists at Harvard and with other institutions. The Symposium attracts world-class scientists as speakers, and a broad cross-section of attendees from academic, government, and industrial research centers, as well as editorial staff from leading scientific publications. In order to maintain this quality, funding to support the travel and local expenses of invited speakers is sought, along with funds to allow use of appropriate conference facilities.

  2. URobotics--Urology Robotics at Johns Hopkins.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, D

    2001-01-01

    URobotics (Urology Robotics) is a program of the Urology Department at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions dedicated to the development of new technology for urologic surgery (http://urology.jhu.edu/ urobotics). The program is unique in that it is the only academic engineering program exclusively applied to urology. The program combines efforts and expertise from the medical and engineering fields through a close partnership of clinical and technical personnel. Since its creation in 1996, the URobotics lab has created several devices, instruments, and robotic systems, several of which have been successfully used in the operating room. This article reviews the technology developed in our laboratory and its surgical applications, and highlights our future directions.

  3. Thomas Willis, the Restoration and the First Works of Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Louis

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a new consideration of how Thomas Willis (1621–75) came to write the first works of ‘neurology’, which was in its time a novel use of cerebral and neural anatomy to defend philosophical claims about the mind. Willis’s neurology was shaped by the immediate political and religious contexts of the English Civil War and Restoration. Accordingly, the majority of this paper is devoted to uncovering the political necessities Willis faced during the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, with particular focus on the significance of Willis’s dedication of his neurology and natural philosophy to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Gilbert Sheldon. Because the Restoration of Charles II brought only a semblance of order and peace, Willis and his allies understood the need for a coherent defense of the authority of the English church and its liturgy. Of particular importance to Sheldon and Willis (and to others in Sheldon’s circle) were the specific ceremonies described in the Book of Common Prayer, a manual that directed the congregation to assume various postures during public worship. This article demonstrates that Willis’s neurology should be read as an intervention in these debates, that his neurology would have been read at the time as an attempt to ground orthodox worship in the structure of the brain and nerves. The political necessities that helped to shape Willis’s project also help us to better understand Willis’s innovative insistence that philosophical statements about the mind should be formulated only after a comprehensive anatomical investigation of the brain and nerves. PMID:26352303

  4. John Bryant Curtis: neurosurgeon, leader and mentor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Leon; Kaye, Andrew H; Buckley, Penelope

    2009-10-01

    In every generation of neurosurgeons, there are those whose judgment and professional accomplishments gain distinction among their peers. Such exceptional leaders often exhibit unique talent and inevitably, they exert a lasting influence on their field of endeavour. John Bryant Curtis was one of these. Rising from humble roots, Curtis made his impact in neurosurgery starting at the age of 36. A legendary and a master neurosurgeon for his period, he became the second director of Neurosurgery at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, succeeding R. S. Hooper in 1967. Like Hooper, Curtis had undertaken a three years Fellowship in Oxford at the Radcliffe Infirmary to train under Sir Hugh Cairns in 1947. On his return to Australia in 1950, he was among the pioneers in introducing percutaneous angiography into the country, which earned him the honourable Hunterian Professorship at the Royal College of Surgeons of England in 1958. This was in recognition for his contribution to the investigation of intracranial aneurysms. Among the many neurosurgeons whom John Bryant Curtis trained at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and at the Prince Henry Hospital, he was considered, by a few, a controversial figure. Others found the experience very positive. He was a distinguished neurosurgeon with expert clinical judgment, but simultaneously a stern and formidable character who demanded only the best from his staff and trainees. He was contrastingly thoughtful and gentle to his patients. Behind every great leader, there is a personal side, often more gentle and vulnerable than the public persona. Curtis was a generous, loving, funny, although at times eccentric human being. Although he died in 1989, ironically from metastatic brain tumours, his dynamic personality and work ethic imprinted a lasting impression on those who had met him.

  5. VIEW SOUTHEASTLEFTBUILDING 3 ROPE SHOP (1929) CENTERBUILDING 1 JOHN A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTHEAST-LEFT-BUILDING 3 ROPE SHOP (1929) CENTER-BUILDING 1 JOHN A ROEBLING'S HOUSE (1857)/OFFICE (1900&1928) RIGHT-BUILDING 1A GENERAL OFFICE (1928) FAR RIGHT-BUILDING 5 RESEARCH (1930) - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  6. John Dewey's Experiential Theories and Leadership Preparation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which John Dewey's experiential theories were embedded in leadership preparation curricula in departments of leadership and college student personnel administration at universities in the Midwestern United States. John Dewey, who is considered to be America's greatest philosopher, defined…

  7. 77 FR 27766 - Jamar, John P.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Jamar, John P.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 3, 2012, John P...-8659. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on May 24, 2012. Dated: May 4, 2012. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. BILLING CODE 6717-01-P...

  8. IMANIN: AN ANTIBIOTIC FROM ST. JOHN’S WORT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report contains a number of articles on imanin -- a new antibiotic preparation from St . John’s wort . Data are presented on imanin, its effect on...practice and on the chemical nature of biologically active substances from St . John’s wort . (Author)

  9. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  10. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Joyce and James Herrington, parents of John Herrington, accept a gift during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. They are the parents of John Herrington, mission specialist on mission STS-113. Herrington is the first Native American to be going into space.

  11. A Lifetime of Service: Dr. John Arthur Henschke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Mary

    2008-01-01

    John Henschke is a lifelong learner who studied with Malcolm Knowles and who interviewed and knew such adult educators as Cyril Houle and his contemporaries. John has devoted his life to service both in the ministry and in education; he has traveled the globe with a view to encouraging lifelong learning and the concepts of andragogy for all. His…

  12. 46 CFR 7.90 - St. Johns River, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Johns River, FL. 7.90 Section 7.90 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.90 St. Johns River, FL. A line drawn from the southeasternmost extremity of Little Talbot...

  13. 67. Historic American Buildings Survey John Oliver Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. Historic American Buildings Survey John Oliver Brostrup, Photographer August 12,1936 1:35 P. M. VIEW OF C.C.C. BOYS SCREENING FOR ARTIFACTS. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 76 FR 39867 - Russell, John G.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Russell, John G.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on June 29, 2011, John G. Russell submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions, pursuant...

  15. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  16. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  17. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  18. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  19. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  20. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  1. Chemistry of St. John's Wort: Hypericin and Hyperforin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, John J.; Rosenson, Jon

    2004-01-01

    The appeal as natural antidepressant is the major selling point of St. John's Wort, which is referred to as "Prozac from the plant kingdom". Hypericin and hyperforin, two major constituents with significant biological activity of St. John's Wort and which are complex molecules with unusual features, are examined.

  2. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 79K00088, John F. Kennedy Space Center, November 1969. SYS FUNCTIONAL DRAWING. Sheet 6 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Crawler Transporters, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 79K00081, John F. Kennedy Space Center, December 1969. SYS FUNCTIONAL DRAWING. Sheet 3 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Crawler Transporters, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 79K00088, John F. Kennedy Space Center, November 1969. SYS FUNCTIONAL DRAWING. Sheet 5 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Crawler Transporters, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. In memoriam - John M. Young (1942-2013)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is with sadness that friends and colleagues of John Young learnt of his death at home in Auckland, New Zealand on 30th September 2013. John began his scientific career at the Plant Diseases Division (PDD) of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR), New Zealand after completing...

  6. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false John Day River. 117.881 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.881 John Day River. The draw of the... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River...

  7. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false John Day River. 117.881 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.881 John Day River. The draw of the... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River...

  8. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false John Day River. 117.881 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.881 John Day River. The draw of the... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River...

  9. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false John Day River. 117.881 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.881 John Day River. The draw of the... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River...

  10. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false John Day River. 117.881 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.881 John Day River. The draw of the... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River...

  11. 39. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 13, 1936 1:30 P. M. DETAIL OF SOUTH WALL-CENTRAL ROOM OF BASEMENT-UNIT B-BEFORE CHALKING. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 40. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 13, 1936 1:50 P. M. DETAIL OF SOUTH WALL-CENTRAL ROOM OF BASEMENT-UNIT B-AFTER CHALKING - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. Familiar-Strange: Teaching the Scripture as John Would Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Tung-Chiew

    2014-01-01

    The Gospel of John teaches through telling the story of Jesus in light of the familiar Hebrew faith stories. It is an interpretive task that presents Jesus to his audience and teaches them adequate faith. John the Teacher skillfully uses narrative skills to create the familiar-strange effect in his storytelling. Each story is followed by a…

  14. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy by John O. Brostrup, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy by John O. Brostrup, Photographer of sketch loaned by Mrs. Cooper Davison August 27, 1936 4:30 P. M. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 81. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy by John O. Brostrup, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy by John O. Brostrup, Photographer of sketch loaned by Mrs. Cooper Davison August 27, 1936 4:15 A. M. VIEW FROM . - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 19. John and James Dobson Carpet Mills, West parcel, topographical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. John and James Dobson Carpet Mills, West parcel, topographical plan, 1986. Barton and Martin, Engineers. 'Topographical Plan for Dobson Mills.' Prepared for Rouse Urban Housing, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1986. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chickasaw Dance Troupe performs an Honor Dance for John Herrington's parents during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  18. 71. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 12, 1936 1:30 P. M. VIEW OF C.C.C. BOYS EXCAVATING IN UNIT A. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Logos Announced the Light of Salvation: Interpreting How John Presented His Message in John 1:1-18, According to Functional Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollinger, Seth

    2014-01-01

    This study of John 1:1-18 describes how John (the speaker) presented his message to his audience within their activity of verbal communication. By focusing on verbal meaning, this interpretation analyzes how John presented and expressed his meanings through language by interpreting this text based on the seamless interrelation between John's…

  20. John Dewey: Su filosofia y filosofia de la educacion (John Dewey: His Philosophy and Philosophy of Education). Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    This paper forms part of an investigation about how the philosophy of John Dewey (1859-1952) can illuminate the practice of the teaching of English as a foreign language. The paper seeks to interpret and synthesize John Dewey's philosophical works to construct a "Deweyian lens" with which to analyze and evaluate the field of the teaching…

  1. Obituary: John Norris Bahcall, 1934-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striker, Jeremiah P.; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2007-12-01

    John Norris Bahcall, one of the most creative and influential astrophysicists of his generation — a scientist who helped prove what makes the Sun shine and helped make the Hubble Space Telescope a reality — passed away in Pasadena, California, on 17 August 2005. Bahcall died peacefully in his sleep from a rare blood disorder. For the past 35 years, Bahcall was the Richard Black Professor of Natural Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, where he created one of the leading astrophysics programs in the world. Active and working to the end, Bahcall said that he was always grateful for a full and happy life that exceeded his wildest expectations. Bahcall died as he lived, surrounded by the family he loved, embracing life to its fullest, happy, working and joking to the end. Bahcall's stellar career encompassed seminal contributions in numerous fields of astrophysics as well as extraordinary leadership on behalf of the scientific community, including the American Astronomical Society, the American Physical Society, the National Academy of Sciences, NASA, and Congress. Bahcall's contributions made him one of the scientific leaders of his time. He had been recognized by numerous awards including the 1998 National Medal of Science from President Clinton, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society, the Medal of the Swedish Royal Academy, the Dan David Award, the Fermi Award, the first Hans Bethe Prize, the Franklin Medal, the Comstock Prize in physics, NASA's Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal, and the top awards of the American Astronomical Society — including the Russell Award, the Heineman Prize, and the Warner Prize. Bahcall was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1976 and to the American Philosophical Society in 2001. He was the recipient of Honorary Degrees from numerous universities around the world. Bahcall's scientific interests and expertise ranged from neutrino

  2. John Gregory (1724-1773) and his lectures on the duties and qualifications of a physician establishing modern medical ethics on the base of the moral philosophy and the theory of science of the empiric British Enlightenment.

    PubMed

    Strätling, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1769/70 the Scottish physician and philosopher John Gregory (1724-1773) published Lectures On the Duties and Qualifications of a Physician. Gregory developed a truely ethical - in the sense of (moral) philosophically based - system of conduct in a physician. His concept of practising and teaching ethics in medicine and science is established on a very broad footing: combining Bacon's (1561-1626) general philosophy of nature and science with both, the general, likewise empirically based moral philosophy of his personal friend David Hume (1711-1776), and with the principles upheld by the so-called Common-Sense Philosophy. His Lectures had - particularly via the famous Code of Medical Ethics of Thomas Percival (1740-1804) - a decisive influence on our contemporary concepts of ethics in medicine and science. John Gregory is, without doubt, one of the most important and certainly the most comprehensive among the founders of what is known today as modern Bioethics.

  3. St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) in major depression.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    The herb St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) has been used for centuries to treat a variety of medical illnesses. In certain areas of Europe, St John's wort has been a commonly prescribed treatment for depression, but, in the United States, it is available for purchase over the counter as an herbal supplement. Some researchers believe that specific chemical constituents of St John's wort produce change in depression in a way similar to that of antidepressant medications, yet this hypothesis is problematic. In addition, studies that support the efficacy of St John's wort in patients with mild-to-moderate depression have limitations that may affect the accuracy of their conclusions. Studies measuring the effect of St John's wort in major depression have reported conflicting results and need to be reexamined. Because St John's wort is considered by some to be an alternative to conventional therapies, clinicians need to know whether it is an effective and safe treatment for different levels of severity of depression. Current evidence does not support its use, and, because of potential drug interactions, St John's wort is not a benign treatment.

  4. Reliability of the modified Thomas test using a lumbo-plevic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability of the modified Thomas test using lumbo-pelvic stabilization. [Subjects] Thirteen subjects (male=10, female=3) with hip flexor tightness voluntarily participated in the study. [Methods] The participants underwent the modified Thomas test under three conditions: 1) the general modified Thomas test (GM), 2) active lumbo-pelvic stabilization (ALS), and 3) passive lumbo-pelvic stabilization (PLS). Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to determine the test-retest reliability of the knee joint angle measurement under three conditions. The standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable difference (95% confidence interval) (MDD95) were calculated for each measurement to assess absolute consistency. [Results] The ALS (ICC = 0.99) and PLS (ICC = 0.98) methods for the modified Thomas test were more reliable than GM method (ICC = 0.97). The MDD95 score for the ALS method, 2.35 degrees, indicated that a real difference existed between two testing sessions compared with the scores for the PLS (3.70 degrees) and GM methods (4.17 degrees) [Conclusion] Lumbo-pelvic stabilization is one of the considerations for precise measurement and may help to minimize measurement error when evaluating hip flexor tightness using the modified Thomas test. PMID:25729187

  5. John Wheeler, 1933 - 1959: Particles and Weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kenneth

    2009-05-01

    During the early part of his career, John Archibald Wheeler made an astonishing number of contributions to nuclear and particle physics, as well as to classical electrodynamics, often in collaboration with another physicist. He was also a major contributor to the Manhattan Project (in Chicago and Hanford rather than Los Alamos), and, following World War II, became an influential scientific cold warrior. His early achievements in physics include the calculated scattering of light by light (with Gregory Breit), the prediction of nuclear rotational states (with Edward Teller), the theory of fission (with Niels Bohr), action-at-a-distance electrodynamics (with Richard Feynman), the theory of positronium, the universal weak interaction (with Jayme Tiomno), and the proposed use of the muon as a nuclear probe particle. He gained modest fame as the person who identified xenon 135 as a reactor poison. His Project Matterhorn contributed significantly to the design of the H bomb, and his Project 137, which he had hoped would flower into a major defense lab, served as the precursor to the Jason group.

  6. John Snow's legacy: epidemiology without borders.

    PubMed

    Fine, Paul; Victora, Cesar G; Rothman, Kenneth J; Moore, Patrick S; Chang, Yuan; Curtis, Val; Heymann, David L; Slutkin, Gary; May, Robert M; Patel, Vikram; Roberts, Ian; Wortley, Richard; Torgerson, Carole; Deaton, Angus

    2013-04-13

    This Review provides abstracts from a meeting held at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, on April 11-12, 2013, to celebrate the legacy of John Snow. They describe conventional and unconventional applications of epidemiological methods to problems ranging from diarrhoeal disease, mental health, cancer, and accident care, to education, poverty, financial networks, crime, and violence. Common themes appear throughout, including recognition of the importance of Snow's example, the philosophical and practical implications of assessment of causality, and an emphasis on the evaluation of preventive, ameliorative, and curative interventions, in a wide variety of medical and societal examples. Almost all self-described epidemiologists nowadays work within the health arena, and this is the focus of most of the societies, journals, and courses that carry the name epidemiology. The range of applications evident in these contributions might encourage some of these institutions to consider broadening their remits. In so doing, they may contribute more directly to, and learn from, non-health-related areas that use the language and methods of epidemiology to address many important problems now facing the world.

  7. St. John's Wort for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Alicia Ruelaz; Hempel, Susanne; Apaydin, Eric; Shanman, Roberta M.; Booth, Marika; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Sorbero, Melony E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract RAND researchers conducted a systematic review that synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials of St. John's wort (SJW)—used adjunctively or as monotherapy—to provide estimates of its efficacy and safety in treating adults with major depressive disorder. Outcomes of interest included changes in depressive symptomatology, quality of life, and adverse effects. Efficacy meta-analyses used the Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method for random-effects models. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. In total, 35 studies met inclusion criteria. There is moderate evidence, due to unexplained heterogeneity between studies, that depression improvement based on the number of treatment responders and depression scale scores favors SJW over placebo, and results are comparable to antidepressants. The existing evidence is based on studies testing SJW as monotherapy; there is a lack of evidence for SJW given as adjunct therapy to standard antidepressant therapy. We found no systematic difference between SJW extracts, but head-to-head trials are missing; LI 160 (0.3% hypericin, 1–4% hyperforin) was the extract with the greatest number of studies. Only two trials assessed quality of life. SJW adverse events reported in included trials were comparable to placebo, and were fewer compared with antidepressant medication; however, adverse event assessments were limited, and thus we have limited confidence in this conclusion. PMID:28083422

  8. John Humphrey Noyes and the stirpicultural experiment.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, P R

    1976-01-01

    The Perfectionist religious Oneida Community was founded by John Humphrey Noyes at Putney, Vermont, in 1841. Due to unpopularity of some of its beliefs, the Community was forced to migrate to Oneida, New York, in 1848. The community practiced male continence, complex marriage, community child care, and stirpicultural childbreeding. These 4 aspects of community behavior were aimed at self-perfection within the community and production of healthier and more moral offspring. Male continence was necessary as a method of birth control in a community which practiced sexual communism and as a means of freeing women from family responsibilities. It was evidently successful because there were only 43 births in the community during the period from 1846 to 1869. All adult members participated as a large married family, sharing economic, social, cultural, and sexual benefits of such an arrangement. Communal child care allowed all the other members of the community to contribute to its economic cooperative efforts. A stirpicultural committee controlled the matings within the community with a view to the production of perfect children. The experiment suffered a remarkably low mortality among the children born. Follow-up shows them to have been remarkably healthy. Such success can probably be attributed to a combination of the community care and stirpicultural breeding programs within the Oneida Community.

  9. John Beebe in conversation with Beverley Zabriskie.

    PubMed

    Beebe, John; Zabriskie, Beverley

    2011-06-01

    John Beebe speaks with Beverley Zabriskie about the central motifs of his life and depth psychological experience, and how these informed his choice of vocation as psychiatrist, Jungian analyst, educator and author. Dr. Beebe narrates how he moved beyond the fate assigned the son of a needy mother and abandoning father. He illustrates how the role his family expected him to fill constellated archetypal motifs--the magical or divine curative child, the whiz kid--from which he had then to disidentify for the sake of becoming an individual with a personal voice and capacity to express his own true values. He tells of his differentiation and search for completion through the perspective of Jung's psychological types theory. He also reflects on the evolution of Jungian analytic theory and practice generally, his editorship of the JAP and the San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal, his confrontation with analytic homophobia, and the emerging quality of professional and personal relationships in relation to ethics and to love. He assesses Jung's courage and integrity as displayed through the release of Jung's Red Book, and his own quest for an organic and psychological moral stance expressed in his benchmark book, Integrity in Depth.

  10. John Bardeen and the theory of superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schrieffer, J.R. )

    1992-04-01

    Bardeen's knowledge of the experimental data had bounded the theory of superconductivity quite tightly before B, C and S developed their theory. When one speaks with John Bardeen's friends about him, one frequently hears words such as brilliant, quiet, persistent, generous, visionary, athletic, kind, thoughtful and remarkable. It is the author's good fortune to have the chance to recount some incidents from his life that are connected with the theory of superconductivity. This article draws on the author's personal memories; his many other friends and colleagues will set down their own recollections elsewhere. The evolution of the microscopic theory of superconductivity closely parallels the scientific life of Joh Bardeen. Starting with his PhD dissertation, done under the guidance of Eugene Wigner, he spent much of his life developing an understanding of electron interaction effects and transport properties of metals, semiconductors and superconductors. His fascination with the remarkable phenomenon of superconductivity goes back to his graduate student days at Princeton. Although interrupted during the war years and in the late 1940's at Bell Labs, he returned to this perplexing topic when he moved to the University of Illinois in 1951. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  11. PREFACE: John Desmond Bernal: Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Vincent

    2007-02-01

    This meeting, held in the Limerick Institute of Technology, on Thursday 1 June 2006, was organised by the Munster Group of the Institute of Physics in Ireland to commemorate the life and work of John Desmond Bernal. Bernal, was born in Nenagh in 1901. Alan Mackay, who worked with Bernal at Birkbeck College coins the word 'Polytropic' to describe Bernal. He was active and hugely influential in a wide range of areas such as science, politics and society, and was instrumental in the creation of whole new areas of intellectual endeavour such as the 'science of science', molecular biology, and operations research. Andrew Brown's analogy for Bernal's mind is that 'it was like a diamond—beautifully structured, multifaceted and dazzling to behold'. In relation to Bernal, Helena Sheehan states that: 'His legacy is complex. All the more so because he was marxist in philosophy, communist in politics, polyamorous in sexuality.'. Like religion, these are areas that conventional scientists tend to shy away from or at the very least consign to very separate and often neglected 'compartments'. According to Sheehan, 'Bernal came to marxism seriously and intelligently. He found in its philosophical framework a structure in which he could live, think, create, pursue science, act politically and develop further. It opened him radically to the world, rather than closing him down or constricting him, as critics imply.'. And his contributions to science and to society are significant and enduring. Just two areas of 'his science' were addressed in some detail at this meeting. Martin Caffrey treats the area of structural biology in the context of modern developments but focusing on Bernal's role in its evolution. John Finney gives an account of Bernal's 'two bouts of activity' on the structure of water and as Bernal's last PhD student he gives unique insights on how Bernal worked and why he 'did science'. Bernal writes in response to a well wisher on his 70th birthday: 'I am sure that

  12. John S. Bell's concept of local causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis

    2011-12-01

    John Stewart Bell's famous theorem is widely regarded as one of the most important developments in the foundations of physics. Yet even as we approach the 50th anniversary of Bell's discovery, its meaning and implications remain controversial. Many workers assert that Bell's theorem refutes the possibility suggested by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) of supplementing ordinary quantum theory with ``hidden'' variables that might restore determinism and/or some notion of an observer-independent reality. But Bell himself interpreted the theorem very differently--as establishing an ``essential conflict'' between the well-tested empirical predictions of quantum theory and relativistic local causality. Our goal is to make Bell's own views more widely known and to explain Bell's little-known formulation of the concept of relativistic local causality on which his theorem rests. We also show precisely how Bell's formulation of local causality can be used to derive an empirically testable Bell-type inequality and to recapitulate the EPR argument.

  13. John S. Bell's concept of local causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis

    2011-12-01

    John Stewart Bell's famous theorem is widely regarded as one of the most important developments in the foundations of physics. Yet even as we approach the 50th anniversary of Bell's discovery, its meaning and implications remain controversial. Many workers assert that Bell's theorem refutes the possibility suggested by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) of supplementing ordinary quantum theory with "hidden" variables that might restore determinism and/or some notion of an observer-independent reality. But Bell himself interpreted the theorem very differently—as establishing an "essential conflict" between the well-tested empirical predictions of quantum theory and relativistic local causality. Our goal is to make Bell's own views more widely known and to explain Bell's little-known formulation of the concept of relativistic local causality on which his theorem rests. We also show precisely how Bell's formulation of local causality can be used to derive an empirically testable Bell-type inequality and to recapitulate the EPR argument.

  14. Did John B. Watson Really "Found" Behaviorism?

    PubMed

    Malone, John C

    2014-05-01

    Developments culminating in the nineteenth century, along with the predictable collapse of introspective psychology, meant that the rise of behavioral psychology was inevitable. In 1913, John B. Watson was an established scientist with impeccable credentials who acted as a strong and combative promoter of a natural science approach to psychology when just such an advocate was needed. He never claimed to have founded "behavior psychology" and, despite the acclaim and criticism attending his portrayal as the original behaviorist, he was more an exemplar of a movement than a founder. Many influential writers had already characterized psychology, including so-called mental activity, as behavior, offered many applications, and rejected metaphysical dualism. Among others, William Carpenter, Alexander Bain, and (early) Sigmund Freud held views compatible with twentieth-century behaviorism. Thus, though Watson was the first to argue specifically for psychology as a natural science, behaviorism in both theory and practice had clear roots long before 1913. If behaviorism really needs a "founder," Edward Thorndike might seem more deserving, because of his great influence and promotion of an objective psychology, but he was not a true behaviorist for several important reasons. Watson deserves the fame he has received, since he first made a strong case for a natural science (behaviorist) approach and, importantly, he made people pay attention to it.

  15. Clinical and pathological insights into Johne's disease in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Dalto, André Cabrera; Bandarra, Paulo Mota; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Boabaid, Fabiana Marques; de Bitencourt, Ana Paula Gobbi; Gomes, Marcos Pereira; Chies, José; Driemeier, David; da Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias

    2012-12-01

    Alternative diagnostic tools and interesting epidemiological assumptions were associated with an outbreak of Johne's disease. In a buffalo herd infected with paratuberculosis, seven clinically affected animals and 21 animals with anti-Mycobacterium avium ELISA reactions were identified. Total herd included 203 buffaloes. Most lesions were comparable to those described in buffaloes and cattle affected by Johne's disease. Water buffalo behaviors such as communal nursing and allosuckling may be additional risk factors for this disease. Detection of positive Ziehl-Neelsen staining and anti-M. avium immunolabeling in rectal biopsies from one buffalo with paratuberculosis are highlighted as auxiliary diagnostic tools for Johne's disease in live animals.

  16. Dr. John Frederick May and the identification of John Wilkes Booth's body.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D

    1998-10-01

    Shortly after President Abraham Lincoln's assassin was killed on April 26, 1865, a formal inquest was held to positively identify the body. Dr. John Frederick May, a leading surgeon in the District of Columbia, was summoned to examine the remains. Two years earlier, Dr. May had removed a fibroid tumor from the back of the assassin's neck and an identifiable large ugly scar resulted when the wound inadvertently opened and healed by granulation. Based upon the recognition of the scar made by his scalpel, Dr. May made a positive identification.

  17. Relativistic equation of state at subnuclear densities in the Thomas-Fermi approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. W.; Shen, H.

    2014-06-20

    We study the non-uniform nuclear matter using the self-consistent Thomas-Fermi approximation with a relativistic mean-field model. The non-uniform matter is assumed to be composed of a lattice of heavy nuclei surrounded by dripped nucleons. At each temperature T, proton fraction Y{sub p} , and baryon mass density ρ {sub B}, we determine the thermodynamically favored state by minimizing the free energy with respect to the radius of the Wigner-Seitz cell, while the nucleon distribution in the cell can be determined self-consistently in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. A detailed comparison is made between the present results and previous calculations in the Thomas-Fermi approximation with a parameterized nucleon distribution that has been adopted in the widely used Shen equation of state.

  18. STS-89 M.S. Andrew Thomas, poses the day before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., poses at KSC's Launch Pad 39A wearing a miniature koala bear on the day before the scheduled launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour that will carry him up to the Russian Space Station Mir. Final preparations are under way toward liftoff on Jan. 22 on the eighth mission to dock with Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas, who was born and educated in South Australia, will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST.

  19. Binding of atoms and stability of molecules in Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, I.; Lions, P.L. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the third of a series devoted to the study of the binding of atoms, molecules and ions and of the stability of general molecular systems including molecular ions, in the context of Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories. For Thomas-Fermi-von Weizsaecker or Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-von Weizsaecker models, it is proven here that neutral systems can be bound and in view of the results shown in the preceding parts this yields the stability of arbitrary molecules (general neutral molecular systems). For the Hartree and Hartree-Fock models, it is proven that neutral planar systems can be bound and this yields the stability of arbitrary tetraatomic molecules for instance. Various variants and extensions are also considered. 24 refs.

  20. Obituary: Thomas C. Van Flandern (1940-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, David; Slabinski, Victor

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Thomas Charles Van Flandern, an expert in celestial mechanics and cosmology, died January 9, 2009 in Seattle, Washington, of colon cancer. He was 68. Van Flandern was an astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory from 1963 to 1983. He developed software to predict and analyze lunar occultations to improve lunar orbital and fundamental star catalog data. In later years he championed increasingly controversial theories. But his 1978 prediction that some asteroids have natural satellites, which was almost universally rejected, was verified when the Galileo spacecraft photographed Dactyl, a satellite of (243) Ida, during its flyby in 1993. Besides astronomy and computers, he had strong interests in biochemistry and nutrition, and he ran a business selling personal computers in the 1980s. Tom Van Flandern was born June 26, 1940 in Cleveland, Ohio, the first child of Robert F. Van Flandern and Anna Mary Haley. His father, a police officer, left the family when Tom Van Flandern was 5. His mother died when he was 16; he and his siblings then lived with their grandmother, Margery Jobe, until he went to college. Tom Van Flandern became interested in astronomy as a child. He used his first telescope, purchased with newspaper delivery earnings, to observe lunar occultations, and then learned how to predict them, sparking a life-long passion for dynamical astronomy. While attending St. Ignatius High School, Van Flandern and fellow student Thomas Petrie organized the Cleveland Moonwatch team to observe the first artificial satellites, the only team without an adult organizer. In 1958, Tom Van Flandern entered Xavier University where he led the Cincinnati Moonwatch team. He learned computer programming at a summer job with General Electric and wrote software to calculate "look angles" from orbital elements. The Cincinnati team became a top producer of observations using these predictions. Tom obtained a B.S. in mathematics from Xavier in 1962. He spent the next year at

  1. 1893 ROPE ROOM189380 TON ROPE MACHINEUPPER STRAND GUIDE John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1893 ROPE ROOM-1893-80 TON ROPE MACHINE-UPPER STRAND GUIDE - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  2. "John Dollar": Marianne Wiggins' Anti-Utopian Novel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohrmann, Gail V.

    1991-01-01

    Advocates inclusion of Marianne Wiggins' novel "John Dollar" in high school reading lists and literature classes. Notes that the novel is an allegory rich in poetic suggestion, metaphorical language, and symbolic meaning. (RS)

  3. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 4, 1937 2:15 P.M. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST. - REAR - National Zoological Park, Holt House, Adams Mill Road Vicinity, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 4, 1937 1:45 P.M. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST (front). - National Zoological Park, Holt House, Adams Mill Road Vicinity, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 4, 1937 2:00 P.M. VIEW FROM WEST. - REAR - National Zoological Park, Holt House, Adams Mill Road Vicinity, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. VIEW NORTHWESTBUILDING 35 CLINTON STREET WIRE MILL (1899) John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW NORTHWEST-BUILDING 35 CLINTON STREET WIRE MILL (1899) - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  7. Interaction of St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) with clozapine.

    PubMed

    Van Strater, Annelies C P; Bogers, Jan P A M

    2012-03-01

    St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is notorious for its ability to induce the enzymes of the P450 system. Especially, it induces CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, enzymes that are closely involved in the metabolism of clozapine. We present a patient with schizophrenia, who was stable on a fixed dose with stable plasma level of clozapine, and who deteriorated after she started self-medicating with St John's wort. The reduced plasma clozapine level and the psychiatric condition normalized after the withdrawal of St John's wort. It is possible that, beside the induction of P450-enzymes, the induction of P-glycoprotein by St John's wort aggravated psychiatric deterioration of the patient. Physicians should be alert to patients self-medicating with over-the-counter medicines, especially when these medicines can lower clozapine concentrations below the therapeutic range.

  8. FLAT MARBLE MARKER WITH CONCRETE COLLAR – JOHN C. DURBIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLAT MARBLE MARKER WITH CONCRETE COLLAR – JOHN C. DURBIN (ONLY CONFEDERATE BURIAL IN CEMETERY) IN SECTION 1. VIEW TO EAST. - Danville National Cemetery, 1900 East Main Street, Danville, Vermilion County, IL

  9. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 15, 1936 12:05 P.M. View of Burial Ground From Southwest. - Fairview, 4410 Church Road, Collington, Prince George's County, MD

  10. 11. Photocopy of 1893 photograph. Original in library of John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of 1893 photograph. Original in library of John S. Lehmann Building, Missouri Botanical Garden. MUSEUM AND GARDEN GATE FROM THE NORTHEAST - Missouri Botanical Garden, Museum, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  11. STS-9 commander John Young gets help adjusting headwear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Preparing for a training session is Astronaut John Young, commander of STS-9 Young gets help with his Snoopy cap or headwear housing communications gear, while one of his five fellow crewmembers, Dr. Ulf Merbold, looks on in the background.

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer September 17, 1936 10:45 A. M. VIEW OF 1315 4th St., S. W., FROM NORTHEAST (front) - Wheat Row, 1315 Fourth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer December 29, 1936 10:45 A. M. DETAIL OF MANTEL, 1321 HOUSE, SECOND FLOOR FRONT ROOM NORTH WALL - Wheat Row, 1321 Fourth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer September 17, 1936 VIEW FROM NORTHEAST (front) - Wheat Row, 1315-1321 Fourth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Mercury astronaut John Glenn and President Kennedy at survival display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Mercury astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. gives President Kennedy a quick run-down on the display of survival gear. The Chief Executive took a quick tour of a dozen displays set up for him after the classified briefing.

  16. Microfilmed Records in the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whealan, Ronald E.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the planning and implementation of a program to acquire copies of personal papers and federal records for deposit in the John F. Kennedy Library. The current status of the library's microfilm collections is described. (nine references) (MES)

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey John R. Stinson, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey John R. Stinson, Photographer May 2, 1978 SOUTH (SIDE) ELEVATION SHOWING RELATIONSHIP TO URBAN ENVIRONMENT - Central School, 14403 East Pacific Avenue, Baldwin Park, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. A Curriculum for Peace: A Conversation with Sir John Daniel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah; Lindfors, Sally; Ernst, Don

    2002-01-01

    Interview with Sir John Daniel, Assistant Director-General for Education of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Discusses UNESCO's role in promoting a peace curriculum in schools throughout the world. (PKP)

  19. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 4:00 P.M. VIEW OF NORTHEAST WALL OF BEDROOM. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  20. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 2:45 P.M. DETAIL OF GRAINING ON PANELED DOOR. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  1. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 2:30 P.M. DETAIL OF PANELED DOOR. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  2. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 1:15 P.M. DETAIL OF DOOR, NORTHEAST ELEVATION. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  3. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 30, 1936 12:50 P. M. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  4. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 4:30 P.M. DETAIL OF WINDOW, NORTHWEST WALL. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  5. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 30, 1936 10:00 A.M. DETAIL FROM SOUTHEAST - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  6. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 2:15 P.M. VIEW OF STAIR, WEST CORNER OF ENTRANCE HALL. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  7. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 20, 1936 9:30 A.M. BRICK (east) GABLE VIEW - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  8. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 20, 1936 9:50 A.M. ® NORTHEAST BEDROOM (east wall) - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  9. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 20, 1936 9:45 A.M. ® NORTHEAST BEDROOM (north wall) - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  10. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 1:45 P.M. DETAIL OF SOUTHEAST ELEVATION. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  11. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 29, 1936 11:10 A.M. VIEW FROM NORTHEAST (front) - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  12. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 20, 1936 10:00 A.M. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  13. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Oct. 12, 1936 9:25 A.M. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  14. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 3:15 P.M. DETAIL OF DOOR, ENTRANCE HALL, SOUTHEAST WALL. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  15. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Oct. 12, 1936 9:15 A.M. Detail of West Wall of Basement - Friendship, Kolbies Corner, State Routes 214 & 556, Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  16. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 3:25 P.M. DETAIL OF ARCH, ENTRANCE HALL, SOUTHEAST WALL. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  17. Astronaut John Glenn in a State of Weightlessness During Friendship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn photographed in space by an automatic sequence motion picture camera during his flight on 'Friendship 7.' Glenn was in a state of weightlessness traveling at 17,500 mph as these pictures were taken.

  18. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 3:45 P.M. DETAIL OF DOOR, NORTHEAST WALL. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  19. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937 12:30 P.M. DETAIL OF WINDOWS FROM SOUTH. - Holly Hill, Southeast of Friendship off MD 631, Friendship, Anne Arundel County, MD

  20. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 1:45 P.M. COPY OF TEXT, NORTH END OF EAST WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  1. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 1:30 P.M. COPY TEXT, EAST END OF NORTH WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  2. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 12:05 COPY OF TEXT, CENTER OF NORTH WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  3. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 2:30 P.M. COPY OF TEXT, SOUTH END OF EAST WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  4. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 11:45 A.M. COPY OF TEXT, WEST END OF NORTH WALL IN THE CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  5. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 2:45 P.M. COPY OF TEXT, EAST END OF SOUTH WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  6. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 2:15 P.M. COPY OF TEXT OVER PULPIT, EAST WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  7. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 11:35 A.M. COPY OF TEXT, NORTH END OF WEST WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  8. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 2:00 P.M. COPY OF TEXT, OVER DOOR, EAST WALL IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  9. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer January 13, 1937 3:15 P.M. COPY OF TEXT, CENTER OF SOUTH WALL, IN CHAPEL OF SAAL. - The Cloisters, Saal, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  10. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer November ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey, John O. Brostrup, Photographer November 4, 1937 1:40 P.M. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SPINNING ROOM ON THIRD FLOOR OF SARON. - The Cloisters, Saron, Ephrata, Lancaster County, PA

  11. Meteor Beliefs Project: meteors in the poems of John Donne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2004-07-01

    An examination of the uses of meteor imagery in the poems of Englishman John Donne (1572-1631) is made, revealing a set of beliefs reflecting the period when ideas about astronomy, including meteors, were beginning to undergo radical change.

  12. Biographical sketch: John Royal Moore, MD 1899-1988.

    PubMed

    Brand, Richard A

    2011-10-01

    This biographical sketch on John R. Moore corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Cartilaginous-cup Arthroplasty in Ununited Fractures of the Neck of the Femur (1948), available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-011-1974-z.

  13. Biographical sketch: John Caffey, MD (1895-1978).

    PubMed

    Brand, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    This biographical sketch on John Caffey corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Multiple Fractures in the Long Bones of Infants Suffering From Chronic Subdural Hematoma (1946), available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1666-0 .

  14. Biographical sketch: John Albert Key, 1890-1955.

    PubMed

    Brand, Richard A

    2013-07-01

    This biographical sketch on John Albert Key corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Epiphyseal coxa vara or displacement of the capital epiphysis of the femur in adolescence, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-2913-y.

  15. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING STRUCTURAL PIERS AND FLORESCENT LIGHTS, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING WOOD AND GLASS PARTITIONS, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Nov. 17, 1936 9:30 A.M. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SOUTHEAST ROOM (DRAWING ROOM) - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Nov. 17, 1936 9:10 A.M. DETAIL OF STAIR -- Entrance Hall. - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer Nov. 17, 1936 9:40 A.M. DETAIL OF DOOR TO BALL ROOM (OR MUSIC ROOM) - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 21. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup Nov. 17, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup Nov. 17, 1936 10:00 A.M. DETAIL OF INTERIOR SIDE OF ENTRANCE DOOR - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October 12, 1936 11:40 A. M. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST (front) - Partnership, Central Avenue (State Route 214), Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October 12, 1936 11:50 A. M. DETAIL OF BRICKWORK, WEST END OF NORTH WALL - Partnership, Central Avenue (State Route 214), Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  4. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 13, 1936 9:20 A.M. ENTRANCE HALL (general view) - Partnership, Central Avenue (State Route 214), Largo, Prince George's County, MD

  5. 12. Photocopy of 1889 photograph. Original in library of John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of 1889 photograph. Original in library of John S. Lehmann Building, Missouri Botanical Garden. HENRY SHAW LYING IN STATE, SHOWING STAIRWAY BEFORE ALTERATION - Missouri Botanical Garden, Museum, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October 20, 1936 12:50 P. M. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST (front) - Samuel Gaither House, 3101 Mount Carmel Cemetery Road, Unity, Montgomery County, MD

  7. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer October 20, 1936 12:55 P. M. VIEW OF BARN FROM SOUTHWEST - Samuel Gaither Barn, 3101 Mount Carmel Cemetery Road, Unity, Montgomery County, MD

  8. STS-79 Mission Specialist John Blaha in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-79 Mission Specialist John E. Blaha shares a light moment with white room closeout crew members Rick Welty (No. 1) and Jim Davis (right), before entering the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A.

  9. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING PARTITIONS, WINDOWS AND RADIATOR, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING RADIATOR AND WINDOWS, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TENTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING RADIATOR AND WINDOW, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. John Ash, ALA., Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, ALA., Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING PARTITIONS, WINDOWS AND RADIATOR, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 22, 1937 10:00 A.M. DETAIL OF ENTRANCE (south elevation). - Timothy Caldwell House, 2017 "Eye" Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 22, 1937 9:40 A.M. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST (front). - Timothy Caldwell House, 2017 "Eye" Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 22, 1937 10:20 A.M. DETAIL OF SHOE SCRAPER. - Timothy Caldwell House, 2017 "Eye" Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 22, 1937 9:30 A.M. VIEW FROM SOUTH (front). - Timothy Caldwell House, 2017 "Eye" Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 22, 1937 10:10 A.M. DETAIL OF ARCH. - Timothy Caldwell House, 2017 "Eye" Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Micmac People of Newfoundland: An Interview with Marilyn John

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Viviane

    1976-01-01

    Marilyn John, vice-president of the Native Association of Newfoundland and Labrador discusses what the Native Association is doing for the Micmac Indians, the Micmacs' attitudes about their old cultural ways, the Micmac language, and the Micmacs' future. (NQ)

  19. "Thoughts Concerning Education": John Locke On Teaching Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, John E.

    1971-01-01

    Locke's suggestions for more effective speech instruction have gone largely unnoticed. Consequently, it is the purpose of this article to consider John Locke's criticisms, theory and specific methods of speech education. (Author)

  20. Great Lakes Construction/John Robichaud Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    R5 Great Lakes Construction/John Robichaud (the Company) is located in Monroe, Michigan. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Monroe, Michigan.