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Sample records for johnnie boy crater

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-07-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 371, Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe, located within Areas 11 and 18 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 comprises two corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 371 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at both CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 8, 2009, through February 16, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 371 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface soil. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within the Johnnie Boy crater and the fissure at Pin Stripe. Due to the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 is located in Areas 11 and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 371 is comprised of the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 19, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 371. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 371 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Measure in situ external dose rates using thermoluminescent dosimeters or other dose measurement devices. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates. • Combine internal and external dose rates to determine whether total

  3. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officers report. Project 1. 9. Crater measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rooke, A.D.; Davis, L.K.; Strange, J.N.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of Project 1.9 were to obtain the dimensions of the apparent and true craters formed by the Small Boy event and to measure the permanent earth deformation occurring beyond the true crater boundary. Measurements were made of the apparent crater by aerial stereophotography and ground survey and of the true crater and subsurface zones of residual deformation by the excavation and mapping of an array of vertical, colored sand columns which were placed along one crater diameter prior to the shot. The results of the crater exploration are discussed, particularly the permanent compression of the medium beneath the true crater which was responsible for the major portion of the apparent and true crater volumes. Apparent and true crater dimensions are compared with those of previous cratering events.

  4. Why Johnny Won't Read: Schools Often Dismiss What Boys Like. No Wonder They're Not Wild about Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    It's not that boys can not read, they just do not read. Study after study reveals that boys read less than girls. And according to the U.S. Department of Education, school-age boys tend to read a grade and a half lower than girls. How can librarians get guys to turn the page? For starters, they need to move beyond their traditional "here is a book…

  5. Why Johnny Won't Read: Schools Often Dismiss What Boys Like. No Wonder They're Not Wild about Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    It's not that boys can not read, they just do not read. Study after study reveals that boys read less than girls. And according to the U.S. Department of Education, school-age boys tend to read a grade and a half lower than girls. How can librarians get guys to turn the page? For starters, they need to move beyond their traditional "here is a book…

  6. Johnny Appleseed Comes to Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Margaret; Peggy, Liggit

    2005-01-01

    Just imagine the excitement in the classroom when Johnny Appleseed strides in. Barefoot and dressed in a burlap sack, he-well, actually, it's you dressed up as Johnny-wears a tin pan for a hat and smiles as he relates the reason for his visit. Fall is apple season, and he's here to explain how all the beautiful fall apples were produced. The story…

  7. Johnny Appleseed Comes to Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Margaret; Peggy, Liggit

    2005-01-01

    Just imagine the excitement in the classroom when Johnny Appleseed strides in. Barefoot and dressed in a burlap sack, he-well, actually, it's you dressed up as Johnny-wears a tin pan for a hat and smiles as he relates the reason for his visit. Fall is apple season, and he's here to explain how all the beautiful fall apples were produced. The story…

  8. Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-13

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an example of a central peak crater. This unnamed crater is located on the floor of Newton Crater in Terra Sirenum. Orbit Number: 57962 Latitude: -42.1211 Longitude: 201.814 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-01-07 07:47 photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19200

  9. Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-03

    This relatively young crater is located on the northern plains of Arcadia Planitia. Orbit Number: 60388 Latitude: 61.6777 Longitude: 228.91 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-07-26 03:01 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19766

  10. Johnny M Administrative Order on Consent

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Settlement Agreement provides for the performance of a removal action and the reimbursement of certain response costs incurred by the United States at or in connection with the Johnny M Mine Area.

  11. 14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF FROM THE PATTERN ON THE MOLDING MACHINE, REVEALING THE CAVITY THAT WILL BE FILLED WITH MOLTEN IRON AFTER IT IS ASSEMBLED WITH THE OTHER MOLD HALF INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Camping under Western Stars: Joan Crawford in "Johnny Guitar."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Pamela

    1995-01-01

    Examines the dissonant and "camp" effect inherent in describing "Johnny Guitar" as a Joan Crawford western. Argues that the film's camp effect depends on its crossing of a female star vehicle with the western, a stereotypically masculine genre. Summarizes Crawford's childhood and rise to fame. Concludes by exploring the lesbian…

  13. 13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR HAND LEVELING FRESHLY DEPOSITED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR HAND LEVELING FRESHLY DEPOSITED SAND INTO A FLASK PRIOR TO COMPRESSION BY THE MOLDING MACHINE INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Henry Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-19

    Located in Arabia Terra, the crater shown in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft is known as Henry Crater. Like many other craters on Mars, the interior of Henry Crater is filled with a layered deposit.

  15. Crater on Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-07

    This VIS images shows part of two unnamed craters in Noachis Terra. The younger of the two craters is at the bottom of the image with one side visible in the image. The older and much larger crater has just part of the rim and floor visible towards the top of the image. The overlapping of one crater on top of another allows for relative dating to be done. We don't know the exact ages of each crater, but we can define which came first. Orbit Number: 65804 Latitude: -49.4751 Longitude: 14.2708 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-10-14 03:52 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21184

  16. Secondary Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-21

    This image of a southern mid-latitude crater was intended to investigate the lineated material on the crater floor. At the higher resolution of HiRISE, the image reveals a landscape peppered by small impact craters. These craters range from about 30 meters in diameter down to the resolution limit (about 2 meter diameter in this image acquired by averaging 2x2 picture elements). Such dense clusters of small craters are frequently formed by secondary craters, caused by the impact of material that was excavated and ejected from the surface of Mars during the creation of a larger nearby crater by the impact of a comet or an asteroid. Secondary impact craters are both interesting and vexing. They are interesting because they show the trajectories of the material that was ejected from the primary impact with the greatest speeds, typically material from near the surface of the blast zone. Secondary craters are often found along the traces of crater rays, linear features that extend radially from fresh impact craters and can reach many crater diameters in length. Secondary craters can be useful when crater rays are visible and the small craters can be associated with a particular primary impact crater. They can be used to constrain the age of the surface where they fell, since the surface must be older than the impact event. The age of the crater can be approximately estimated from the probability of an impact that produced a crater of such a size within a given area of Mars over a given time period. But these secondary craters can also be perplexing when no crater rays are preserved and a source crater is not easily identifiable, as is the case here. The impact that formed these secondary craters took place long enough ago that their association with a particular crater has been erased. They do not appear along the trace of a crater ray that is still apparent in visible or thermal infrared observations. These secondary craters complicate the task of estimating the age of

  17. Craters Filling Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In today's image the large crater retains its original bowl shaped interior and the radial surface pattern on the ejecta. Just to the south is a crater that has been infilled by ejecta from the larger crater. The overlapping of ejecta blankets can be used to get relative age relationships, in this case the smaller crater to the south formed first, and the larger crater formed sometime later.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 29.6, Longitude 96.3 East (263.7 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Deffenbaugh Industries, Inc. d/b/a Johnny on the Spot

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Deffenbaugh Industries, Inc. for alleged violations at its Johnny on the Spot Service and Maintenance Facility located at 10011 Woodend Rd. in Edwardsville, KS.

  19. Deffenbaugh Industries, Inc. d/b/a Johnny on the Spot. - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Deffenbaugh Industries, Inc. for alleged violations at its Johnny on the Spot Service and Maintenance Facility located at 10011 Woodend Rd. in Edwardsville, KS.

  20. Young Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-31

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows two craters in Terra Cimmeria just north of Kepler Crater. The small crater in the middle of the image is a relatively new crater. The interior rim has gullies, but the bowl shape shows that there has been very little deposition of materials. Additionally, the radial emplacement of thin ejecta is still identifiable, and can be seen in the larger crater in the top of the image. With time the crater floor will flatten due to influx of materials and the subtle radial ejecta will be hidden by dust. While the actual age of the small crater is not known, it is relatively younger than the larger crater. Orbit Number: 66523 Latitude: -44.3019 Longitude: 139.301 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-12-12 09:31 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21300

  1. Crater Ejecta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-02

    The craters in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are located in a region of prolonged wind action. The ejecta of the craters is more resistant to the wind than the materials around it.

  2. Canuleia Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-24

    This image from NASA Dawn spacecraft of asteroid Vesta shows Canuleia crater, a large, irregularly shaped crater. Other interesting features of Canuleia include the diffuse bright material that is both inside and outside of its rim.

  3. Freedom Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-20

    Freedom crater, located in Acidalia Planitia, exhibits a concentric ring pattern in its interior as seen in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, suggesting that there has been some movement of these materials towards the center of the crater.

  4. Flooded Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-04

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a flooded crater in Amazonis Planitia. This crater has been either flooded with mud and or lava. The fluid then ponded up, dried and formed the surface textures we see today.

  5. Impact Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-15

    The relatively flat floor and terrace walls of this impact crater imaged by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft suggest the crater was partly infilled with sediment and subsequently eroded to its present day form.

  6. Impact Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-22

    The fluidized impact crater ejecta and flat crater floors observed in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft suggest near-surface volatiles once played an important role in modifying the Martian surface.

  7. Doublet Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-22

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey is of a doublet crater located in Utopia Planitia, near the Elysium Volcanic region. Doublet craters are formed by simultaneous impact of a meteor that broke into two pieces prior to hitting the surface.

  8. Crater Ejecta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft contains a relatively young crater and its ejecta. Layering in the ejecta is visible and relates to the shock waves from the impact. This unnamed crater is located in Arabia Terra.

  9. Lismore Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-17

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is of Lismore Crater. This crater, located in Chryse Planitia, is relatively unmodified, meaning it appears very much like it did when it first formed.

  10. Crater Features

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-06

    Today's VIS image is of an unnamed crater located on the floor of the much larger Newton Crater. This crater had a central peak, gullies on the inner rim and dunes on the northern part of the crater floor. Orbit Number: 59391 Latitude: -41.9785 Longitude: 201.934 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-05-04 23:15 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19504

  11. Double Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-23

    A double crater, called a crater doublet, is seen in the bottom right part of this image from NASA Dawn spacecraft of asteroid Vesta. This crater doublet was likely formed by the simultaneous impact of two fragments of a split projectile.

  12. Cratering mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    Main concepts and theoretical models which are used for studying the mechanics of cratering are discussed. Numerical two-dimensional calculations are made of explosions near a surface and high-speed impact. Models are given for the motion of a medium during cratering. Data from laboratory modeling are given. The effect of gravitational force and scales of cratering phenomena is analyzed.

  13. Cydonia Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-22

    In this image from NASA Mars Odyssey, eroded mesas and secondary craters dot the landscape in an area of Cydonia Mensae. The single oval-shaped crater displays a butterfly ejecta pattern, indicating that the crater formed from a low-angle impact.

  14. Fejokoo Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-17

    NASA's Dawn mission has found that craters on Ceres show a diversity of shapes that provide important clues about the structure of Ceres' subsurface. The bottom half of this pair of craters is called Fejokoo, named after the Nigerian god who supplied yams. The hexagonal shape of that 42-mile (68-kilometer) crater is probably due to the presence of fractures in the crust, along which the crater rims tend to align. Polygonal craters are frequent on Ceres. Most display six or seven sides, like in the case of Fejokoo, but a few nonagons -- nine-sided shapes -- have been discovered. Polygonal craters are also commonly found on other solar system bodies, such as Mars, Earth's moon and icy moons of giant planets. Dawn took this image on May 4, 2015, from an altitude of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers). The image has a resolution of 450 feet (140 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21399

  15. Crater Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-11

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows part of the interior of an unnamed crater in Arabia Terra. There are numerous hills and valleys in the crater, indicating depositional and erosional processes were active after the impact crater was formed. Orbit Number: 60714 Latitude: 38.7772 Longitude: 2.19471 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-08-21 22:51 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20090

  16. Tugaske Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-07

    Today's VIS image shows part of Tugaske Crater. The northern margin of this crater has been modified from a circular form, most likely related to the tectonic activity of Claritas Fossae, where this crater is located. Additionally there are several landslide deposits in the crater, perhaps also formed by tectonic instability in the local region. Orbit Number: 59439 Latitude: -31.581 Longitude: 258.918 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-05-08 22:03 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19505

  17. Exhumed Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    5 July 2004 Burial and exhumation is a theme that repeats itself, all over the surface of Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows several north mid-latitude meteor impact craters with bouldery ejecta deposits. Each of the craters was once buried and later exhumed. Mesas on the floors of these craters are remnants of the materials that once filled and covered them. The craters are located near 39.7oN, 206.0oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  18. Filled Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-11

    This MOC image shows adjacent impact craters located north-northwest of the Acheron Fossae region of Mars. The two craters are of similar size and formed by meteor impacts. However, one is much more filled than the other, indicating that it is older

  19. Meteorite craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Bazilevskiy, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and formation of various types of craters, both on the Earth and on other planetary bodies, are discussed. Various models are utilized to depict various potential causes of the types and forms of meteorite craters in our solar system, and the geological structures are also discussed.

  20. Young Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-12

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a young crater. Dark radial spokes are created by the explosive blast of an impact event. With time, only thick ejecta near the rim of the crater will be visible, and dark spokes will disappear.

  1. Grease Cowboy Fever; or, the making of Johnny T.

    PubMed

    Bradford, K

    2002-01-01

    Through a mix of theory, memoir and performance narrative, this chapter examines the making of drag persona Johnny T. as part of a king movement where the dominant cultural paradigm of gender is reconsidered and remastered. As seen in Grease, Saturday Night Fever and Urban Cowboy, pop culture icon John Travolta's particular blend of 50s greaser, faggy 70s disco, and 80s country masculinities are shown to be prime drag king conditions, particularly for a dyke who came of age during the 70s Travolta fever. While drawing from personal experience as a king, current trends in the king movement, and gender theory, this essay calls into question the lines between performing masculinity on and off the stage, inviting us to see both the work and play, the parody and realness, the struggle and liberation that make up the transgressive world of drag kinging and gender variance. Drawing upon gender theorists Judith Butler and Judith Halberstam, gender is exposed as a social construction both produced and performed, and as such, drag kinging is framed as an arena where gender is reconfigured.

  2. Buried Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-04

    With a location roughly equidistant between two of the largest volcanic constructs on the planet, the fate of the approximately 50 km 31 mile impact crater in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey was sealed. It has been buried to the rim by lava flows. The MOLA context image shows pronounced flow lobes surrounding the crater, a clear indication of the most recent episode of volcanism that could have contributed to its infilling. Breaches in the rim are clearly evident in the image and suggest locations through which lavas could have flowed. These openings appear to be limited to the west side of the crater. Other craters in the area are nearly obliterated by the voluminous lava flows, further demonstrating one of the means by which Mars renews its surface. The MOLA context image shows pronounced flow lobes surrounding the crater, a clear indication of the most recent episode of volcanism that could have contributed to its infilling. Breaches in the rim are clearly evident in the image and suggest locations through which lavas could have flowed. These openings appear to be limited to the west side of the crater. Other craters in the area are nearly obliterated by the voluminous lava flows, further demonstrating one of the means by which Mars renews its surface. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04018

  3. Why Johnny (and Jane) Read Whodunits in Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Barbara B.; Steinfirst, Susan

    1985-01-01

    Reviews series mysteries for children and adolescents in two categories: mysteries for girls ("Nancy Drew,""Doris Fein") and mysteries for boys ("Hardy Boys,""Race against Time"). Characters and plots, appeal of the series, and series books and adolescents are discussed. Eight sources are given. (EJS)

  4. Maunder Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-17

    This image taken by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a portion of Maunder Crater with a number of interesting features including a series of barchan dunes that are traveling from right to left and gullies.

  5. Crumpled Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-30

    It is no secret that Mercury's surface is scarred by abundant tectonic deformation, the vast majority of which is due to the planet's history of cooling and contraction through time. Yet Mercury is also heavily cratered, and hosts widespread volcanic plains. So it's perhaps unsurprising that these three types of landform often intersect-literally-as shown in this scene. Here, an unnamed crater, about 7.5 km (4.7 mi.) in diameter was covered, and almost fully buried, by lava. At some point after, compression of the surface formed scarps and ridges in the area that, when they reached the buried crater, came to describe its curved outline. Many arcuate ridges on Mercury formed this way. In this high-resolution view, we can also see the younger, later population of smaller craters that pock-mark the surface. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19263

  6. Nicholson Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    There is a large deposit of material on the floor of Nicholson Crater, as seen in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. This pile of material appears to be undergoing erosion by the wind.

  7. Occia Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-10

    This image from NASA Dawn spacecraft of asteroid Vesta shows Occia crater, located in Vesta Gegania quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. A distinctive butterfly pattern is seen consisting of two separate lobes of ejecta on the opposite sides.

  8. Cratered Crescent

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-25

    Quiet and cold, a crescent Tethys floats above the nearly edge-on rings of Saturn. The only surface features visible on Tethys 1,071 kilometers, or 665 miles across from this distance are a few impact craters

  9. Shackleton Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This visualization, created using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter laser altimeter data, offers a view of Shackleton Crater located in the south pole of the moon. Thanks to these measurements, we now h...

  10. Palikir Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-27

    Today's VIS image is of Palikir Crater in Terra Sirenum. The inner rim of the crater is dissected with numerous gullies. In higher resolution images from other imagers these gullies are the location of changing linea, which appear to grow and retreat as seasons change. Orbit Number: 65311 Latitude: -41.6177 Longitude: 202.206 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-09-03 13:12 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21152

  11. Henry Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Located in Arabia Terra, the crater shown here is known as Henry Crater. Like many other craters on Mars, the interior of Henry Crater is filled with a layered deposit. These materials were brought into the crater sometime after the impact formed the crater. The fine scale of layering can be seen in the right- center portion of the image.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Beyond Johnny Appleseed: Learning English as a New Language through Ethnically Diverse Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giambo, Debra; Gonzales, Maria Elizabeth; Szecsi, Tunde; Thirumurthy, Vidya

    2006-01-01

    The linguistic, cultural, and ethnic mixture in many countries, including the United States, is changing rapidly and varies significantly from such old standbys as "Johnny Appleseed" or "Dick and Jane." Learning to communicate effectively in a new language involves gaining familiarity with the present-day culture of the country in which one…

  13. Heeeere's Johnny: A Case Study in the Five Factor Model of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miserandino, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    I describe an assignment for personality psychology or introduction to psychology classes in which students used the Five Factor Model of personality to analyze the personality of entertainer Johnny Carson through his The New York Times obituary. Students evaluated this assignment highly: A majority indicated that the assignment was interesting,…

  14. Why Johnny Can't Read: An Applied Neurology Explanation Flesched Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preen, Bryan S.; Townsend, Diana O.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests that "Johnny can't read" because of high testosterone levels in fetal development and subsequent poor brain lateralization. Presents instructional strategies based on the principle of factorized teaching for each of three discrete lateralization categories. Notes that the use of factorized teaching appears to have improved diagnostic and…

  15. Beyond Johnny Appleseed: Learning English as a New Language through Ethnically Diverse Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giambo, Debra; Gonzales, Maria Elizabeth; Szecsi, Tunde; Thirumurthy, Vidya

    2006-01-01

    The linguistic, cultural, and ethnic mixture in many countries, including the United States, is changing rapidly and varies significantly from such old standbys as "Johnny Appleseed" or "Dick and Jane." Learning to communicate effectively in a new language involves gaining familiarity with the present-day culture of the country in which one…

  16. Why Johnny Can't Read: An Applied Neurology Explanation Flesched Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preen, Bryan S.; Townsend, Diana O.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests that "Johnny can't read" because of high testosterone levels in fetal development and subsequent poor brain lateralization. Presents instructional strategies based on the principle of factorized teaching for each of three discrete lateralization categories. Notes that the use of factorized teaching appears to have improved diagnostic and…

  17. Oudemans Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the interior of Oudemans Crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 1800 UTC (1:00 p.m. EDT) on October 2, 2006, near 9.8 degrees south latitude, 268.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Oudemans Crater is located at the extreme western end of Valles Marineris in the Sinai Planum region of Mars. The crater measures some 124 kilometers (77 miles) across and sports a large central peak.

    Complex craters like Oudemans are formed when an object, such as an asteroid or comet, impacts the planet. The size, speed and angle at which the object hits all determine the type of crater that forms. The initial impact creates a bowl-shaped crater and flings material (known as ejecta) out in all directions along and beyond the margins of the bowl forming an ejecta blanket. As the initial crater cavity succumbs to gravity, it rebounds to form a central peak while material along the bowl's rim slumps back into the crater forming terraces along the inner wall. If the force of the impact is strong enough, a central peak forms and begins to collapse back into the crater basin, forming a central peak ring.

    The uppermost image in the montage above shows the location of CRISM data on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data was taken inside the crater, on the northeast slope of the central peak.

    The lower left image is an infrared false-color image that reveals several distinctive deposits. The center of the image holds a ruddy-brown deposit that appears to correlates with a ridge running southwest to northeast. Lighter, buff-colored deposits occupy low areas interspersed within the ruddy-brown deposit. The southeast corner holds small hills that form part of the central peak complex.

    The lower right image shows spectral

  18. Oudemans Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the interior of Oudemans Crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 1800 UTC (1:00 p.m. EDT) on October 2, 2006, near 9.8 degrees south latitude, 268.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Oudemans Crater is located at the extreme western end of Valles Marineris in the Sinai Planum region of Mars. The crater measures some 124 kilometers (77 miles) across and sports a large central peak.

    Complex craters like Oudemans are formed when an object, such as an asteroid or comet, impacts the planet. The size, speed and angle at which the object hits all determine the type of crater that forms. The initial impact creates a bowl-shaped crater and flings material (known as ejecta) out in all directions along and beyond the margins of the bowl forming an ejecta blanket. As the initial crater cavity succumbs to gravity, it rebounds to form a central peak while material along the bowl's rim slumps back into the crater forming terraces along the inner wall. If the force of the impact is strong enough, a central peak forms and begins to collapse back into the crater basin, forming a central peak ring.

    The uppermost image in the montage above shows the location of CRISM data on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data was taken inside the crater, on the northeast slope of the central peak.

    The lower left image is an infrared false-color image that reveals several distinctive deposits. The center of the image holds a ruddy-brown deposit that appears to correlates with a ridge running southwest to northeast. Lighter, buff-colored deposits occupy low areas interspersed within the ruddy-brown deposit. The southeast corner holds small hills that form part of the central peak complex.

    The lower right image shows spectral

  19. Three Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] View the Movie Click on image to view the movie [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Three Craters: Above and Below Click on image for high resolution TIFF Three Craters: Below and Above Click on image for high resolution TIFF

    This computer graphic image shows three craters in the eastern Hellas region of Mars containing concealed glaciers detected by radar. The image shows how the surface looks today with the ice covered with a layer of Martian soil. The image was created using image data from the Context Camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft combined with results from the SHARAD radar sounder on MRO and HRSC digital elevation map from the Mars Express spacecraft. The color of the Martian surface and ice was estimated from MRO HiRISE color images of other Martian craters and the polar ice caps. The buried ice in these craters as measured by SHARAD is 250 meter thick on the upper crater and 300 and 450 meters on the middle and lower levels respectively. Each image is 20 km (12.8 mi.) across and extends to 50 km (32 mi) in the distance.

    Recent measurements from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter SHARAD radar sounder have detected large amounts of water ice in such deposits over widespread areas, arguing for the flow of glacial-like structures on Mars in the relatively recent geologic past. This suggests that snow and ice accumulated on higher topography, flowed downhill and is now protected from sublimation by a layer of rock debris and dust. Furrows and ridges on the surface were caused by deforming ice.

    About the Movie The movie begins with a view of how the surface looks today. A blue line is drawn on the image and an artist's concept then reveals what the ice may look like underneath. The movie was created using image data from the Context Camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft combined with results

  20. Meridiani Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 December 2004 A little over 11 months ago, the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, landed on Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small portion of Meridiani Planum -- too far from the rover for it to investigate--that has been peppered with small impact craters. The majority of craters, particularly those in the lower half of the image, are secondary impacts caused by the landing of rock and debris ejected from a much larger impact crater, located elsewhere in the region. The large, nearly circular depression at the top center of the image is the site of a much older crater that was filled and almost completely buried beneath the plains. As result of the rover's work in Meridiani Planum, it is now known that the bright rims and walls of the craters are, at least in part, exposures of sedimentary rock. The dark material covering the plains, according to rover results, is mostly very fine sand plus millimeter-sized granules. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across, and is located near 2.5oS, 3.3oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  1. Hakumyi Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft took this image of Hakumyi Crater on Ceres, visible left of center. The crater is named after a Paraguayan, Brazilian and Bolivian spirit said to be helpful in gardening. Hakumyi, 18 miles (29 kilometers) in diameter, is located about 43 miles (70 kilometers) west of Ernutet Crater. Ernutet is where scientists found evidence of organic material, thanks to Dawn's visible and infrared mapping spectrometer. Evidence for organics was also found at the 4-mile (6.5 kilometer) wide fresh crater on the southern rim of Hakumyi and on the lobe-shaped flow of material that runs into Hakumyi. These two features look relatively young in comparison to the rest of Hakumyi Crater, whose rims and overall shape are subdued. The lobate flow is reminiscent of the Type I flows identified in multiple places at high latitudes on Ceres, and suggests a significant amount of ice near the surface. Dawn took this image on August 20, 2015, from 915 miles (1,470 kilometers) altitude. The center coordinates of this image are 48.9 degrees north latitude and 27.0 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21413

  2. Dantu Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-27

    This image from NASA's Dawn spacecraft shows Dantu Crater, which is 78 miles (126 kilometers) across. Its shape is reminiscent of Occator Crater -- in particular, they both have shallow floors and central pits. This suggests melting and possibly some hydrothermal activity occurred following impact that formed Dantu. Part of the energy generated by the impact would have been turned into heat. The relatively warm temperatures found at the low latitudes of Dantu and Occator make it easier for Ceres' ice-rich material to melt as a consequence of impact-generated heat. The unnamed crater seen below Dantu in this image is smaller and has a much rougher floor. This is because the smaller impact event would not have generated as much heat. The numerous bright spots found across the crater suggest bright material may be just below the surface, exposed through small impacts and landslides. Ejected material from Dantu extends up to Kerwan crater, with a dark color reminiscent of material that came from Occator. Dantu was named for the Ghanaian god associated with the planting of the corn. This picture was taken by the Dawn framing camera on September 25, 2015, from 915 miles (1,470 kilometers) altitude. The center coordinates of this picture are 22 degrees north latitude, 133 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21412

  3. Inamahari Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-13

    Inamahari Crater on Ceres, the large well-defined crater at the center of this image, is one of the sites where scientists have discovered evidence for organic material. The crater, 42 miles (68 kilometers) in diameter, presents other interesting attributes. It has a polygonal shape and an association with another crater of similar size and geometry called Homshuk (center right), although the latter appears eroded and is likely older. Future studies of Inamahari crater and surroundings may help uncover the mechanisms involved in the exposure of organic material onto Ceres' surface. Inamahari was named for a pair of male and female deities from the ancient Siouan tribe of South Carolina, invoked for a successful sowing season. Homshuk refers to the spirit of corn (maize) from the Popoluca peoples of southern Mexico. Inamahari is located at 14 degrees north latitude, 89 degrees east longitude. This picture was taken by NASA's Dawn on September 25, 2015 from an altitude of about 915 miles (1,470 kilometers). It has a resolution of 450 feet (140 meters) per pixel. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21402

  4. Weepy Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 August 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies -- all of which head at the same level -- on a south mid-latitude crater wall. At the 6 meters (20 feet) per pixel scale at which this image was obtained, the gullies almost appear as if they are the product of a 'weeping layer,' a porous layer of rock through which a liquid such as water may have percolated until it came to the martian surface at this crater wall, then flowed downslope, toward the crater floor.

    Location near: 34.0oS, 208.4oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  5. Meridiani Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    31 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a crater formed in light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks in Meridiani Planum. This crater is located approximately 55 kilometers (34 miles) southwest of the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site. Erosion of sedimentary rock layers around the crater rim has caused an uneven retreat, resulting in the formation of U-shaped alcoves where undermining and collapse have occurred. Dark material in this scene is probably sand and granules, similar to the dark surfaces explored by the Opportunity rover.

    Location near: 3.1oS, 5.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  6. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today marks the 45th anniversary of the dawn of the Space Age (October 4, 1957). On this date the former Soviet Union launched the world's first satellite, Sputnik 1. Sputnik means fellow traveler. For comparison Sputnik 1 weighed only 83.6 kg (184 pounds) while Mars Odyssey weighs in at 758 kg (1,671 pounds).

    This scene shows several interesting geologic features associated with impact craters on Mars. The continuous lobes of material that make up the ejecta blanket of the large impact crater are evidence that the crater ejecta were fluidized upon impact of the meteor that formed the crater. Volatiles within the surface mixed with the ejecta upon impact thus creating the fluidized form. Several smaller impact craters are also observed within the ejecta blanket of the larger impact crater giving a relative timing of events. Layering of geologic units is also observed within the large impact crater walls and floor and may represent different compositional units that erode at variable rates. Cliff faces, dissected gullies, and heavily eroded impact craters are observed in the bottom half of the image at the terminus of a flat-topped plateau.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  7. Terby Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-13

    Perched on the northern rim of the enormous Hellas Basin, Terby Crater, imaged by NASA Mars Odyssey, is host to an impressive range of landforms. As is common for many Martian craters, Terby has been filled with layered material, presumably sediments. The process of erosion has exposed some of these layers along with strange, rectilinear ridges. Sinuous channels, collapse pits, and a scoured-looking cap rock are some of the other interesting landforms in Terby. Such a variety of landforms attests to a diversity of rock types and geologic processes in the relatively small area of this THEMIS image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04024

  8. Juling Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-25

    This high-resolution image of Juling Crater on Ceres reveals, in exquisite detail, features on the rims and crater floor. The crater is about 1.6 miles (2.5 kilometers) deep and the small mountain, seen left of the center of the crater, is about 0.6 miles (1 kilometers) high. The many features indicative of the flow of material suggest the subsurface is rich in ice. The geological structure of this region also generally suggests that ice is involved. The origin of the small depression seen at the top of the mountain is not fully understood but might have formed as a consequence of a landslide, visible on the northeastern flank. Dawn took this image during its extended mission on August 25, 2016, from its low-altitude mapping orbit at a distance of about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 36 degrees south latitude, 167 degrees east longitude. Juling is named after the Sakai/Orang Asli spirit of the crops from Malaysia. NASA's Dawn spacecraft acquired this picture on August 24, 2016. The image was taken during Dawn's extended mission, from its low altitude mapping orbit at about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 38 degrees south latitude, 165 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21754

  9. Tawals Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-03

    This image taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft shows a region located next to the northwestern rim of Urvara Crater on Ceres. This terrain displays a rugged texture also found within Urvara. Multiple Dawn observations, in particular neutron spectroscopy (which measures the hydrogen content in the regolith) and flow features, have shown that water ice is present near the surface above 40 degrees north latitude, where these features are found. Therefore, the rugged texture may result from the high strength exhibited by ice at the temperatures found at mid- and high latitudes on Ceres. The prominent crater (5.0 miles, 8.8 kilometers in diameter) at right in this picture is called Tawals. Its sharp rim suggests it was created by a relatively recent impact into a relatively strong material. A different view of this crater can be found in PIA20941. Tawals Crater is named after the Polish god of the fields and the tilling. Dawn took this image during its extended mission on August 25, 2016, from its low-altitude mapping orbit, or LAMO, at a distance of about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 40 degrees south latitude, 237 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21750

  10. Crater Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    These two craters show the two types of crater interiors found on Mars -- original and modified. The crater on the right has its original bowl shape. The crater of the left has had its interior modified by an infilling of lava.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 27.6, Longitude 194.5 East (165.5 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Lyell Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-15

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows numerous gullies are visible on the cliff face of a depression within the floor of Lyell Crater. Orbit Number: 58444 Latitude: -69.3387 Longitude: 346.015 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-02-16 00:08 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19280

  12. Doublet Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-14

    This doublet crater was formed when two meteorites impacted at the same time. The shock waves interact to form the straight central rim and the wings of ejecta on the outside of the rims. This image is from NASA Mars Odyssey.

  13. Kuiper Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Mariner 10 Television-Science Team has proposed the name 'Kuiper' for this very conspicuous bright Mercury crater (top center) on the rim of a larger older crater. Prof. Gerard P. Kuiper, a pioneer in planetary astronomy and a member of the Mariner 10 TV team, died December 23, 1973, while the spacecraft was enroute to Venus and Mercury. Mariner took this picture (FDS 27304) from 88,450 kilometers (55,000 miles) some 2 1/2 hours before it passed Mercury on March 29. The bright-floored crater, 41 kilometers (25 miles) in diameter, is the center of a very large bright are which could be seen in pictures sent from Mariner 10 while Mercury was more than two million miles distant. The larger crater is 80 kilometers (50 miles) across.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  14. Kuiper Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-08

    NASA Mariner 10 took this picture some 2 1/2 hours before it passed Mercury on March 29, 1974. The bright-floored crater is the center of a very large bright area which could be seen in pictures from more than two million miles distant

  15. Exhuming Craters in a Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 December 2004 Burial and exhumation of impact craters, and their destruction by erosion, are common and repeated themes all over the surface of Mars. Many craters in western Arabia Terra exhibit light-toned, layered outcrops of ancient sedimentary rock. Like the sedimentary rocks explored further to the south in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B), these intracrater sedimentary rocks may have been deposited in water. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example of light-toned sedimentary rocks outcropping in a crater that is much farther north than most of the similar examples in western Arabia. This one is located near 36.6oN, 1.4oW, and shows several old impact craters in various states of erosion and exhumation from beneath and within the sedimentary rock materials. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  16. Galle Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 June 2002) The Science This image is of part of Galle Crater, located at 51.9S, 29.5W. This image was taken far enough south and late enough into the southern hemisphere fall to catch observe water ice clouds partially obscuring the surface. The most striking aspect of the surface is the dissected layered unit to the left in the image. Other areas also appear to have layering, but they are either more obscured by clouds or are less well defined on the surface. The layers appear to be mostly flat lying and layer boundaries appear as topographic lines would on a map, but there are a few areas where it appears that these layers have been deformed to some level. Other areas of the image contain rugged, mountainous terrain as well as a separate pitted terrain where the surface appears to be a separate unit from the mountains and the layered terrain. The Story Galle Crater is officially named after a German astronomer who, in 1846, was the first to observe the planet Neptune. It is better known, however, as the 'Happy Face Crater.' The image above focuses on too small an area of the crater to see its beguiling grin, but you can catch the rocky line of a 'half-smile' in the context image to the right (to the left of the red box). While water ice clouds make some of the surface harder to see, nothing detracts from the fabulous layering at the center left-hand edge of the image. If you click on the above image, the scalloped layers almost look as if a giant knife has swirled through a landscape of cake frosting. These layers, the rugged, mountains near them, and pits on the surface (upper to middle section of the image on the right-hand side) all create varying textures on the crater floor. With such different features in the same place, geologists have a lot to study to figure out what has happened in the crater since it formed.

  17. Galle Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 June 2002) The Science This image is of part of Galle Crater, located at 51.9S, 29.5W. This image was taken far enough south and late enough into the southern hemisphere fall to catch observe water ice clouds partially obscuring the surface. The most striking aspect of the surface is the dissected layered unit to the left in the image. Other areas also appear to have layering, but they are either more obscured by clouds or are less well defined on the surface. The layers appear to be mostly flat lying and layer boundaries appear as topographic lines would on a map, but there are a few areas where it appears that these layers have been deformed to some level. Other areas of the image contain rugged, mountainous terrain as well as a separate pitted terrain where the surface appears to be a separate unit from the mountains and the layered terrain. The Story Galle Crater is officially named after a German astronomer who, in 1846, was the first to observe the planet Neptune. It is better known, however, as the 'Happy Face Crater.' The image above focuses on too small an area of the crater to see its beguiling grin, but you can catch the rocky line of a 'half-smile' in the context image to the right (to the left of the red box). While water ice clouds make some of the surface harder to see, nothing detracts from the fabulous layering at the center left-hand edge of the image. If you click on the above image, the scalloped layers almost look as if a giant knife has swirled through a landscape of cake frosting. These layers, the rugged, mountains near them, and pits on the surface (upper to middle section of the image on the right-hand side) all create varying textures on the crater floor. With such different features in the same place, geologists have a lot to study to figure out what has happened in the crater since it formed.

  18. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  19. Gusev Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-13

    This mosaic of daytime infrared images of Gusev Crater, taken by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, has been draped over topography data obtained by NASA Mars Global Surveyor. The daytime temperatures range from approximately minus 45 degrees C (black) to minus 5 degrees C (white). The temperature differences in these daytime images are due primarily to lighting effects, where sunlit slopes are warm (bright) and shadowed slopes are cool (dark). Gusev crater is a potential landing site for the Mars Exploration Rovers. The large ancient river channel of Ma'Adim that once flowed into Gusev can be seen at the top of the mosaic. This image mosaic covers an area approximately 180 kilometers (110 miles) on each side centered near 14 degrees S, 175 degrees E, looking toward the south in this simulated view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04260

  20. Palos Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Palos Crater has been suggested as a future landing site for Mars Missions. This crater has a channel called Tinto Vallis, which enters from the south. This site was suggested as a landing site because it may contain lake deposits. Palos Crater is named in honor of the port city in Spain from which Christopher Columbus sailed on his way to the New World in August of 1492. The floor of Palos Crater appears to be layered in places providing further evidence that this site may in fact have been the location of an ancient lake.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Pit Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-02

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is located in Noachis Terra. The unnamed crater at the bottom of the image contains a central pit. Central features such as pits and peaks can provide information about both the impacted surface and the size of the meteorite. Orbit Number: 65680 Latitude: -28.4965 Longitude: 349.805 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-10-03 22:49 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21180

  2. Refilled Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The interior of this crater has undergone at least two episodes of modification. At some time the crater interior was filled by material to approximately the high of the crater rim. Then erosion occurs, removing some of the infill but leaving the two plateaus in the center. Finally, the crater has been infilled a second time. The latest fill is lava.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 13.5, Longitude 284.3 East (75.7 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Buried Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With a location roughly equidistant between two of the largest volcanic constructs on the planet, the fate of the 50 km impact crater in this image was sealed. It has been buried to the rim by lava flows. The MOLA context image shows pronounced flow lobes surrounding the crater, a clear indication of the most recent episode of volcanism that could have contributed to its infilling. Breaches in the rim are clearly evident in the image and suggest locations through which lavas could have flowed. These openings appear to be limited to the west side of the crater. Other craters in the area are nearly obliterated by the voluminous lava flows, further demonstrating one of the means by which Mars renews its surface.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The fluidized impact crater ejecta and flat crater floors observed in this THEMIS image suggest near surface volatiles once played an important role in modifying the martian surface. Gullies observed in crater walls could possibly point to more recent volatile-rock interactions.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 13.9, Longitude 297.3 East (62.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  5. Crater Moreux

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-08

    Color image of part of the Ismenius Lacus region of Mars (MC-5 quadrangle) containing the impact crater Moreux (right center); north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands in the south on relatively smooth lowland plains in the north separated by a belt of dissected terrain, containing flat-floored valleys, mesas, and buttes. This image is a composite of Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 36 degrees N. to 50 degrees N. and from longitude 310 degrees to 340 degrees; Lambert conformal conic projection. The dissected terrain along the highlands/lowlands boundary consists of the flat-floored valleys of Deuteronilus Mensae (on left) and Prontonilus Mensae (on right) and farther north the small, rounded hills of knobby terrain. Flows on the mensae floors contain striae that run parallel to valley walls; where valleys meet, the striae merge, similar to medial moraines on glaciers. Terraces within the valley hills have been interpreted as either layered rocks or wave terraces. The knobby terrain has been interpreted as remnants of the old, densely cratered highland terrain perhaps eroded by mass wasting. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00420

  6. Cydonia Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Eroded mesas and secondary craters dot the landscape in this area of the Cydonia Mensae region. The single oval-shaped crater displays a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern, indicating that the crater formed from a low-angle impact.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 32.9, Longitude 343.8 East (16.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  7. Crater Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06085 Crater Clouds

    The crater on the right side of this image is affecting the local wind regime. Note the bright line of clouds streaming off the north rim of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -78.8N, Longitude 320.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06088 Crater Landslide

    This landslide occurs in an unnamed crater southeast of Millochau Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -24.4N, Longitude 87.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06088 Crater Landslide

    This landslide occurs in an unnamed crater southeast of Millochau Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -24.4N, Longitude 87.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Barrio Boy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto

    An autobiography, "Barrio Boy" is the story of Little Ernie, a boy born in the tiny mountain village of Jalcocotan in the State of Nayarit, Mexico. Divided into 5 parts, the book offers vivid descriptions of the author's early life--his family, his friends, his surroundings, as well as events in the journey from Jalcocotan that eventually ended in…

  11. Fresh Dark Ray Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-15

    The crater on asteroid Vesta shown in this image from NASA Dawn spacecraft was emplaced onto the ejecta blanket of two large twin craters. Commonly, rays from impact craters are brighter than the surrounding surface.

  12. Central Peak Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    As crater size increases, craters become more complex. This moderate size crater contains a central peak, created by rebound of molten material just following the impact. This image was captured by NASA Mars Odyssey on Sept. 8, 2010.

  13. Venus - Impact Crater Isabella

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-26

    Crater Isabella is seen in this radar image from NASA Magellan spacecraft. The second largest impact crater on Venus, the crater is named in honor of the 15th Century queen of Spain, Isabella of Castile.

  14. Should We Care that Johnny Can't Catch and Susie Can't Skip? What Should We Do about It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitall, Jill; Clark, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Physical and sport educators care that Johnny and Susie cannot move as well as their peers. They try their best to improve their skill levels because they value participation and skillfulness in sport and physical activity. However, many times there is a deeper problem as to why Johnny or Susie cannot move as well as their peers. Physical and…

  15. Should We Care that Johnny Can't Catch and Susie Can't Skip? What Should We Do about It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitall, Jill; Clark, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Physical and sport educators care that Johnny and Susie cannot move as well as their peers. They try their best to improve their skill levels because they value participation and skillfulness in sport and physical activity. However, many times there is a deeper problem as to why Johnny or Susie cannot move as well as their peers. Physical and…

  16. Cutting Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 November 2003

    The rims of two old and degraded impact craters are intersected by a graben in this THEMIS image taken near Mangala Fossa. Yardangs and low-albedo wind streaks are observed at the top of the image as well as interesting small grooves on the crater floor. The origin of these enigmatic grooves may be the result of mud or lava and volatile interactions. Variable surface textures observed in the bottom crater floor are the result of different aged lava flows.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -15.2, Longitude 219.2 East (140.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Unusual Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 15 May 2003

    This unusual crater northeast of Ascraeus Mons displays an ejecta blanket that appears turned up around its edges. This may be a type of rampart crater, or may instead be a crater with its ejecta blanket buried by lava flows. These flows were later eroded away in places leaving behind the scarp. Numerous lava flows are seen in this image as well as sinuous channels. These features appear to be both volcanic (rilles) and fluvial channels.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.8, Longitude 257.4East (102.6). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Cutting Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 November 2003

    The rims of two old and degraded impact craters are intersected by a graben in this THEMIS image taken near Mangala Fossa. Yardangs and low-albedo wind streaks are observed at the top of the image as well as interesting small grooves on the crater floor. The origin of these enigmatic grooves may be the result of mud or lava and volatile interactions. Variable surface textures observed in the bottom crater floor are the result of different aged lava flows.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -15.2, Longitude 219.2 East (140.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Crater Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    HUBBLE SHOOTS THE MOON in a change of venue from peering at the distant universe, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has taken a look at Earth's closest neighbor in space, the Moon. Hubble was aimed at one of the Moon's most dramatic and photogenic targets, the 58 mile-wide (93 km) impact crater Copernicus. The image was taken while the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph(STIS) was aimed at a different part of the moon to measure the colors of sunlight reflected off the Moon. Hubble cannot look at the Sun directly and so must use reflected light to make measurements of the Sun's spectrum. Once calibrated by measuring the Sun's spectrum, the STIS can be used to study how the planets both absorb and reflect sunlight.(upper left)The Moon is so close to Earth that Hubble would need to take a mosaic of 130 pictures to cover the entire disk. This ground-based picture from Lick Observatory shows the area covered in Hubble's photomosaic with the WideField Planetary Camera 2..(center)Hubble's crisp bird's-eye view clearly shows the ray pattern of bright dust ejected out of the crater over one billion years ago, when an asteroid larger than a mile across slammed into the Moon. Hubble can resolve features as small as 600 feet across in the terraced walls of the crater, and the hummock-like blanket of material blasted out by the meteor impact.(lower right)A close-up view of Copernicus' terraced walls. Hubble can resolve features as small as 280 feet across.

  20. Gusev Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-13

    Images from NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft were used to create this mosaic of nighttime infrared images of Gusev Crater, which has been draped over topography data obtained by NASA Mars Global Surveyor. Variations in nighttime temperatures are due to differences in the abundance of rocky materials that retain their heat at night and stay relatively warm (bright). Fine grained dust and sand (dark) cools off more rapidly at night. This image mosaic covers an area approximately 180 kilometers (110 miles) on each side centered near 14 degrees S, 175 degrees E, looking toward the south in this simulated view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04261

  1. Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows two circular features on the plains of northern Utopia. A common sight on the martian northern plains, these rings indicate the locations of buried impact craters.

    Location near: 65.1oN, 261.2oW Image width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  2. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The relatively flat floor and terrace walls of this impact crater suggest the crater was partly infilled with sediment and subsequently eroded to its present day form. This type of observation is evidence for environmental change throughout the geologic history of Mars.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 18.1, Longitude 136.3 East (223.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  3. Maunder Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 24 May 2002) The Science This image is of a portion of Maunder Crater located at about 49 S and 358 W (2 E). There are a number of interesting features in this image. The lower left portion of the image shows a series of barchan dunes that are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes as can be seen in the dark and diffuse areas surrounding the dune field. The other interesting item in this image are the gullies that can be seen streaming down from just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first seen by the MOC camera on the MGS spacecraft and it is though that they formed by groundwater leaking out of the rock layers on the walls of craters. The water runs down the slope and forms the fluvial features seen in the image. Other researchers think that these features could be formed by other fluids, such as CO2. These features are typically seen on south facing slopes in the southern hemisphere, though this image has gullies on north facing slopes as well. The Story Little black squigglies seem to worm their way down the left-hand side of this image. These land features are called barchan (crescent-shaped) dunes. Barchan dunes are found in sandy deserts on Earth, so it's no surprise the Martian wind makes them a common site on the red planet too. They were first named by a Russian scientist named Alexander von Middendorf, who studied the inland desert dunes of Turkistan. The barchan dunes in this image occur in the basin of Maunder crater on Mars, and are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes, though, as can be seen in the dark areas of scattered sand surrounding the dune field. Look for the streaming gullies that appear just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first discovered by the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. While most crater gullies are found on south

  4. Maunder Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 24 May 2002) The Science This image is of a portion of Maunder Crater located at about 49 S and 358 W (2 E). There are a number of interesting features in this image. The lower left portion of the image shows a series of barchan dunes that are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes as can be seen in the dark and diffuse areas surrounding the dune field. The other interesting item in this image are the gullies that can be seen streaming down from just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first seen by the MOC camera on the MGS spacecraft and it is though that they formed by groundwater leaking out of the rock layers on the walls of craters. The water runs down the slope and forms the fluvial features seen in the image. Other researchers think that these features could be formed by other fluids, such as CO2. These features are typically seen on south facing slopes in the southern hemisphere, though this image has gullies on north facing slopes as well. The Story Little black squigglies seem to worm their way down the left-hand side of this image. These land features are called barchan (crescent-shaped) dunes. Barchan dunes are found in sandy deserts on Earth, so it's no surprise the Martian wind makes them a common site on the red planet too. They were first named by a Russian scientist named Alexander von Middendorf, who studied the inland desert dunes of Turkistan. The barchan dunes in this image occur in the basin of Maunder crater on Mars, and are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes, though, as can be seen in the dark areas of scattered sand surrounding the dune field. Look for the streaming gullies that appear just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first discovered by the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. While most crater gullies are found on south

  5. A Crater on a Crater Wall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-13

    It's not that common to see craters on steep hills, partly because rocks falling downhill can quickly erase such craters. Here, however, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) observes a small impact has occurred on the sloping wall of a larger crater and is well-preserved. Dark, blocky ejecta from the smaller crater has flowed downhill (to the west) toward the floor of the larger crater. Understanding the emplacement of such ejecta on steep hills is an area of ongoing research. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21758

  6. Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 25 July 2003

    Wrinkle ridges deform the plains in the bottom of Gusev crater, destination of the MER 'Spirit' rover. The plains were likely created from a flood basalt with ridges forming where there were compressional forces. Dark wind streaks come together to form a dark spot at the bottom of the image where the wind has removed a thin layer of bright dust off a dark surface. On the left side of the image a portion of a lobe of material is visible, which may have resulted from a mud or debris flow. This feature was recently identified by the THEMIS team and may represent the most recent deposit in the crater involving water.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -13.9, Longitude 175.4 East (184.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Arkhangelsky Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 September 2003

    Arkhangelsky crater is just to the northeast of the giant Argyre impact basin in the southern hemisphere of Mars. This THEMIS visible image shows the floor of this crater with a few dark barchan dunes. Dunes form when wind blows sand across a surface. The barchan dunes shown here form when there isn't a whole lot of sand to start with. If there were, other dune forms would be visible.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -41.2, Longitude 334.9 East (25.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Rampart Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Rampart crater in Utopia Planitia west of the Viking 2 landing site.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The irregularly shaped rim of this bowl shaped impact crater is most likely due to erosion and the subsequent infilling of sediment.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Venus - Transitional Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-10-23

    During orbits 423 through 424 on 22 September 1990, NASA's Magellan imaged this impact crater that is located at latitude 10.7 degrees north and longitude 340.7 degrees east. This crater is shown as a representative of Venusian craters that are of the proper diameter (about 15 kilometers) to be 'transitional' in their morphology between 'complex' and irregular' craters. Complex craters account for about 96 percent of all craters on Venus with diameters larger than about 15 kilometers; they are thought to have been formed by the impact of a large, more or less intact, mass of asteroidal material that has not been excessively effected during its passage through the dense Venusian atmosphere. Complex craters are characterized by circular rims, terraced inner wall slopes, well developed ejecta deposits, and flat floors with a central peak or peak ring. Irregular craters make up about 60 percent of the craters with diameters less than about 15 kilometers. Irregular craters are thought to form as the result of the impact of asteroidal projectiles that have been aerodynamically crushed and fragmented during their passage through the atmosphere. Irregular craters are characterized by irregular and/or discontinuous rims and hummocky or multiple floors. The 'transitional' crater shown here has a somewhat circular rim like larger complex craters, but has the hummocky floor and asymmetric ejecta characteristic of smaller irregular craters. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00468

  11. Changing Course: Thurgood Marshall College Fund President Johnny Taylor Seeks New Partnerships and Avenues of Support for Public HBCUs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2011-01-01

    When veteran educator Dr. N. Joyce Payne handed the reins of the organization she founded, the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, to entertainment lawyer and board member Johnny Taylor, Taylor began pursuing a remake of the prestigious group that has turned it on its head in just a matter of months. Today, with just more than a year of leading the…

  12. Changing Course: Thurgood Marshall College Fund President Johnny Taylor Seeks New Partnerships and Avenues of Support for Public HBCUs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2011-01-01

    When veteran educator Dr. N. Joyce Payne handed the reins of the organization she founded, the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, to entertainment lawyer and board member Johnny Taylor, Taylor began pursuing a remake of the prestigious group that has turned it on its head in just a matter of months. Today, with just more than a year of leading the…

  13. Fluidized crater ejecta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-13

    The ejecta blanket of the crater in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft does not resemble the blocky, discontinuous ejecta associated with most fresh craters on Mars. Rather, the continuous lobes of material seen around this crater are evidence that the crater ejecta were fluidized upon impact of the meteor that formed this crater. Impact ejecta become fluidized when a meteor strikes a surface that has a considerable volatile content. The volatiles mixed with the ejecta form a flow of material that moves outward from the crater and produces the morphology seen in this THEMIS visible image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04025

  14. Martian Meteor Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fairly young meteor impact crater on Mars that is about the same size ( 1 kilometer; 0.62 miles) as the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona, U.S.A. Like the Arizona crater, boulders of ejected bedrock can be seen on the crater's ejecta blanket and in the crater itself. This crater is located in the Aethiopis region of Mars near 4.7oN, 224.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  15. Martian Meteor Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fairly young meteor impact crater on Mars that is about the same size ( 1 kilometer; 0.62 miles) as the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona, U.S.A. Like the Arizona crater, boulders of ejected bedrock can be seen on the crater's ejecta blanket and in the crater itself. This crater is located in the Aethiopis region of Mars near 4.7oN, 224.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  16. Huygens Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 15 July 2003

    The floor of the 450 km diameter crater named after Dutch astronomer Christian Huygens (1629-1695) shows an unusual texture. Smooth-topped mesas are scattered across a more rugged surface. The mesas are testament to a former smooth layer of material that is in the process of eroding away.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -16.2, Longitude 54.5 East (305.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Automated Crater Delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. S.; Pina, P.

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm to delineate impact craters based on Edge Maps and Dynamic Programming is presented. The global performance obtained on 1045 craters from Mars (5 m to about 200 km in diameter), achieved 96% of correct contour delineations.

  18. Crater Wall and Floor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-18

    The impact crater observed in this NASA Mars Odyssey image taken in Terra Cimmeria suggests sediments have filled the crater due to the flat and smooth nature of the floor compared to rougher surfaces at higher elevations.

  19. Fresh Crater with Gullies

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-12

    The crater shown in this image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has very few craters superposed on it, which attests to its youth. It also has very steep slopes and a sharp rim; more evidence of its young age.

  20. Rabe Crater Dunes IR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-20

    The Thermal Emission Imaging System aboard NASA Mars Odyssey captured this daytime infrared image of Rabe Crater shows the large dune field located within the crater. Note that the dunes are not confined to the lowest elevation depressions on the

  1. A Triple Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows an elongated depression from three merged craters. The raised rims and ejecta indicate that these are impact craters rather than collapse or volcanic landforms. The pattern made by the ejecta and the craters suggest this was a highly oblique (low angle to the surface) impact, probably coming from the west. There may have been three major pieces flying in close formation to make this triple crater. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21652

  2. Dome craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Malin, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    Voyager observations reveal impact craters on Ganymede that are characterized by the presence of broad, high albedo, topographic domes situated within a central pit. Fifty-seven craters with central domes were identified in images covering approx. 50% of the surface. Owing to limitations in resolution, and viewing and illumination angles, the features identified are most likely a subset of dome craters. The sample appears to be sufficiently large to infer statistically meaningful trends. Dome craters appear to fall into two distinct populations on plots of the ratio of dome diameter to crater rim diameter, large-dome craters and small-dome craters. The two classes are morphologically distinct from one another. In general, large dome craters show little relief and their constituent landforms appear subdued with respect to fresh craters. The physical attributes of small-dome craters are more sharply defined, a characteristic they share with young impact craters of comparable size observed elsewhere in the solar system. Both types of dome craters exhibit central pits in which the dome is located. As it is difficult to produce domes by impact and/or erosional processes, an endogenic origin for the domes is reasonably inferred. Several hypotheses for their origin are proposed. These hypotheses are briefly reviewed.

  3. Dione Ray Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-01

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks at an example of a ray crater on the leading hemisphere of Saturn moon Dione. The ray crater is in the upper-left of the image and ejecta rays show up as brighter material emanating from the crater.

  4. Venus - Stein Triplet Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    NASA Magellan synthetic aperture radar SAR imaged this unique triplet crater, or crater field during orbits 418-421 on Sept. 21, 1990. The three craters appear to have relatively steep walls. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00088

  5. Venus - Adivar Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-07

    Many of the impact craters of Venus revealed by NASA Magellan spacecraft have characteristics unlike craters on any other planetary body. This crater, named Adivar, is located just north of the western Aphrodite highland. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00083

  6. Crater Impacts on Vesta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-10

    This graphic shows the global distribution of craters that hit the giant asteroid Vesta, based on data from NASA Dawn mission. The yellow circles indicate craters of 2 miles or wider, with the size of the circles indicating the size of the crater.

  7. Vesta Cratered Landscape: Double Crater and Craters with Bright Ejecta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-23

    This image from NASA Dawn spacecraft is dominated by a double crater which may have been formed by the simultaneous impact of a binary asteroid. Binary asteroids are asteroids that orbit their mutual center of mass.

  8. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.A.; Lorenz, R.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Mitchell, Ken; Stofan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; ,

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  10. Degraded Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 3 May 2002) The Science The eastern rim of this unnamed crater in Southern Arabia Terra is very degraded (beaten up). This indicates that this crater is very ancient and has been subjected to erosion and subsequent bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. One of these later (younger) craters is seen in the upper right of this image superimposed upon the older crater rim material. Note that this smaller younger crater rim is sharper and more intact than the older crater rim. This region is also mantled with a blanket of dust. This dust mantle causes the underlying topography to take on a more subdued appearance. The Story When you think of Arabia, you probably think of hot deserts and a lot of profitable oil reserves. On Mars, however, Southern Arabia Terra is a cold place of cratered terrain. This almost frothy-looking image is the badly battered edge of an ancient crater, which has suffered both erosion and bombardment from asteroids, comets, or other impacting bodies over the long course of its existence. A blanket of dust has also settled over the region, which gives the otherwise rugged landscape a soft and more subdued appearance. The small, round crater (upper left) seems almost gemlike in its setting against the larger crater ring. But this companionship is no easy romance. Whatever formed the small crater clearly whammed into the larger crater rim at some point, obliterating part of its edge. You can tell the small crater was formed after the first and more devastating impact, because it is laid over the other larger crater. How much younger is the small one? Well, its rim is also much sharper and more intact, which gives a sense that it is probably far more youthful than the very degraded, ancient crater.

  11. Planetary cratering - Statistical recognition of secondary-crater fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulchignoni, M.; Poscolieri, M.

    1980-06-01

    A statistical model of a cratered planetary surface is developed for the cases of primary impact events and a secondary crater field. The method of the strictly reflexive closeness of crater centers is used to test the crater-grouping tendency. Results show the differences, with regard to grouping probability, between a population of fictitious craters and that including a secondary field. Several crater surfaces on Mars and Mercury were studied by this method, and an upper limit for crater density was determined.

  12. Large Crater Clustering tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura, Jason; Skinner, James A.; Hunter, Marc A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present the Large Crater Clustering (LCC) tool set, an ArcGIS plugin that supports the quantitative approximation of a primary impact location from user-identified locations of possible secondary impact craters or the long-axes of clustered secondary craters. The identification of primary impact craters directly supports planetary geologic mapping and topical science studies where the chronostratigraphic age of some geologic units may be known, but more distant features have questionable geologic ages. Previous works (e.g., McEwen et al., 2005; Dundas and McEwen, 2007) have shown that the source of secondary impact craters can be estimated from secondary impact craters. This work adapts those methods into a statistically robust tool set. We describe the four individual tools within the LCC tool set to support: (1) processing individually digitized point observations (craters), (2) estimating the directional distribution of a clustered set of craters, back projecting the potential flight paths (crater clusters or linearly approximated catenae or lineaments), (3) intersecting projected paths, and (4) intersecting back-projected trajectories to approximate the local of potential source primary craters. We present two case studies using secondary impact features mapped in two regions of Mars. We demonstrate that the tool is able to quantitatively identify primary impacts and supports the improved qualitative interpretation of potential secondary crater flight trajectories.

  13. Impact Crater Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Ivanov, B. A.

    The detailed morphology of impact craters is now believed to be mainly caused by the collapse of a geometrically simple, bowl-shaped "transient crater." The transient crater forms immediately after the impact. In small craters, those less than approximately 15 km diameter on the Moon, the steepest part of the rim collapses into the crater bowl to produce a lens of broken rock in an otherwise unmodified transient crater. Such craters are called "simple" and have a depth-to-diameter ratio near 1:5. Large craters collapse more spectacularly, giving rise to central peaks, wall terraces, and internal rings in still larger craters. These are called "complex" craters. The transition between simple and complex craters depends on 1/g, suggesting that the collapse occurs when a strength threshold is exceeded. The apparent strength, however, is very low: only a few bars, and with little or no internal friction. This behavior requires a mechanism for temporary strength degradation in the rocks surrounding the impact site. Several models for this process, including acoustic fluidization and shock weakening, have been considered by recent investigations. Acoustic fluidization, in particular, appears to produce results in good agreement with observations, although better understanding is still needed.

  14. Visible-Near Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Data of Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    In a continuing study to capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained new high resolution visible-near infrared images of several explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to obtain images in 224 spectral bands from 0.4-2.5 microns [1]. The main craters that were imaged were Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, Buggy, and Danny Boy [2]. The 390 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of the detonation of a 104 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a "simple" crater [2]. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology [3] and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also imaged by AVIRIS. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m, Fig. 1) craters were also important targets for AVIRIS as they were excavated in hard welded tuff and basaltic andesite, respectively [3, 4]. This variation in targets will allow the study of ejecta patterns, compositional modifications due to the explosions, and the role of craters as subsurface probes.

  15. Visible-Near Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Data of Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    In a continuing study to capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained new high resolution visible-near infrared images of several explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to obtain images in 224 spectral bands from 0.4-2.5 microns [1]. The main craters that were imaged were Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, Buggy, and Danny Boy [2]. The 390 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of the detonation of a 104 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a "simple" crater [2]. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology [3] and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also imaged by AVIRIS. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m, Fig. 1) craters were also important targets for AVIRIS as they were excavated in hard welded tuff and basaltic andesite, respectively [3, 4]. This variation in targets will allow the study of ejecta patterns, compositional modifications due to the explosions, and the role of craters as subsurface probes.

  16. A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Music is among all cultures an important part of the live of most people. Music has psychological benefits and may generate strong emotional and physiological responses. Recently, neuroscientists have discovered that music influences the reward circuit of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), even when no explicit reward is present. In this clinical case study, we describe a 60-year old patient who developed a sudden and distinct musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeted at the NAcc. This case report substantiates the assumption that the NAcc is involved in musical preference, based on the observation of direct stimulation of the accumbens with DBS. It also shows that accumbens DBS can change musical preference without habituation of its rewarding properties. PMID:24834035

  17. Martian Central Pit Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillman, E.; Barlow, N. G.

    2005-01-01

    Impact craters containing central pits are rare on the terrestrial planets but common on icy bodies. Mars is the exception among the terrestrial planets, where central pits are seen on crater floors ( floor pits ) as well as on top of central peaks ( summit pits ). Wood et al. [1] proposed that degassing of subsurface volatiles during crater formation produced central pits. Croft [2] argued instead that central pits might form during the impact of volatile-rich comets. Although central pits are seen in impact craters on icy moons such as Ganymede, they do show some significant differences from their martian counterparts: (a) only floor pits are seen on Ganymede, and (b) central pits begin to occur at crater diameters where the peak ring interior morphology begins to appear in terrestrial planet craters [3]. A study of craters containing central pits was conducted by Barlow and Bradley [4] using Viking imagery. They found that 28% of craters displaying an interior morphology on Mars contain central pits. Diameters of craters containing central pits ranged from 16 to 64 km. Barlow and Bradley noted that summit pit craters tended to be smaller than craters containing floor pits. They also noted a correlation of central pit craters with the proposed rings of large impact basins. They argued that basin ring formation fractured the martian crust and allowed subsurface volatiles to concentrate in these locations. They favored the model that degassing of the substrate during crater formation was responsible for central pit formation due to the preferential location of central pit craters along these basin rings.

  18. Impact cratering: A geologic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of impact craters are examined theoretically, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include crater morphology, stress waves in solids, the contact and compression stage, the excavation stage, and ejecta deposits. Consideration is given to the scaling of crater dimensions, the crater modification stage, multiring basins, cratered landscapes, atmospheric interactions, and the implications of impact cratering for planetary evolution. Extensive diagrams, graphs, tables, and images of typical craters are provided.

  19. Impact cratering: A geologic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of impact craters are examined theoretically, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include crater morphology, stress waves in solids, the contact and compression stage, the excavation stage, and ejecta deposits. Consideration is given to the scaling of crater dimensions, the crater modification stage, multiring basins, cratered landscapes, atmospheric interactions, and the implications of impact cratering for planetary evolution. Extensive diagrams, graphs, tables, and images of typical craters are provided.

  20. Impact cratering on slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschauer, Johannes; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    The majority of impact craters have circular outlines and axially symmetric morphologies. Deviation from crater circularity is caused by either target heterogeneity, a very oblique impact incidence, post-impact deformation, or by topography. Here, we investigate the effect of topography on crater formation and systematically study impact cratering processes on inclined hillsides up to 25° slope utilizing analogue experiments. A spring-driven air gun mounted in a vertical position shoots into three different types of granular bulk solids (two sorts of glass beads, quartz sand) to emulate impact cratering on slopes. In all, 170 experiments were conducted. The transient crater develops roughly symmetrically perpendicular to the slope plane, resulting in higher ejection angles uphill than downhill when measured with respect to a horizontal plane. Craters become increasingly elliptical with increasing slope angle. At slope angles close to angle of repose of the respective bulk solids, aspect ratios of the craters reach ∼1.7. Uphill-downhill cross sections become increasingly asymmetric, the depth-diameter ratio of the craters decreases, and the deepest point shifts downhill with increasing slope angle. Mass wasting is initiated both in the uphill and downhill sectors of the crater rim. For steep slopes the landslides that emanate from the uphill rim can overshoot the crater cavity and superpose the downhill crater rim in a narrow tongue. Mass wasting initiated at the downhill sector forms broader and shallower tongues and is triggered by the deposition of ejecta on the inclined slope. Our experiments help to explain asymmetric crater morphologies observed on asteroids such as Ceres, Vesta, Lutetia, and also on Mars.

  1. Simulated Craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The thick atmosphere of Venus prevents all but the largest impactors from cratering the surface. The number of small craters on Venus provides an interesting, and statistically significant test of models for the disruption and deceleration of impacting bodies. Here we compare Monte Carlo simulated crater distributions to the observed crater distribution on Venus. The simulation assumes: (1) a power law mass distribution for impactors of the form N(sub cum) alpha m (exp-b) where b=0.8; (2) isotropic incidence angles; (3) velocity at the top of the atmosphere of 20 kilometers per second (more realistic velocity distributions are also considered); (4) Schmidt-Housen crater scaling, modified such that only the normal component of the impact velocity contributes to cratering, and using crater slumping as parameterized (5) and modern populations (60% carbonaceous, 40% stone, 3% iron) and fluxes of asteroids. We use our previously developed model for the disruption and deceleration of large bodies striking thick planetary atmospheres to calculate the impact velocity at the surface as a function of impactor mass, incident velocity, and incident angle. We use a drag coefficient c(sub d) =1; other parameters are as described in Chyba et al. We set a low velocity cutoff of 500 meters per second on crater-forming impacts. Venus's craters are nicely matched by the simulated craters produced by 700 million years of striking asteroids. Shown for comparison are the simulated craters produced by incident comets over the same period, where for comets we have assumed b=0.7 and a flux at 10(exp 14) g 30% that of asteroids. Systematic uncertainties in crater scaling and crater slumping may make the surface age uncertain by a factor of two.

  2. Shadowed Craters on Ceres

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-08

    At the poles of Ceres, scientists have found craters that are permanently in shadow (indicated by blue markings). Such craters are called "cold traps" if they remain below about minus 240 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 151 degrees Celsius). These shadowed craters may have been collecting ice for billions of years because they are so cold. This image was created using data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20696

  3. Coral Cratering Phenomenology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-31

    effect for producing the final crater volumes. Based on a known relationship between high-explosive cratering in coral and a similar continen- tal...mhh|hhMENENEinllmiEilEEE- IIIELJEIEOIOEIII E~hhhhhEE|hlhI �oo 96 3 DNA 5813T 0 4f CORAL CRATERING PHENOMENOLOGY R. L. LaFrenz Systems, Science...PERIOD COVERED Topical Report for Perio CORAL CRATERING PHENOMENOLOGY 1 May 77-31 Oct 80 S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR

  4. Messor Crater from LAMO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-12

    This image from NASA's Dawn spacecraft shows part of Messor Crater (25 miles or 40 kilometers, wide), located at northern mid-latitudes on Ceres. The scene shows an older crater in which a large lobe-shaped flow partly covers the northern (top) part of the crater floor. The flow is a mass of material ejected when a younger crater formed just north of the rim. Dawn took this image on Dec. 19 from its low-altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) from an approximate altitude of 240 miles (385 kilometers) above Ceres. The image resolution is 120 feet (35 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20191

  5. Crater Rays on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic of Voyager 2 images taken July 9, 1979, shows a prominent rayed crater on Jupiter's icy moon, Ganymede. The view on the left is a monochrome image, and that on the right is the same scene shown in false color designed to accentuate the icy ejecta rays splashed out by the impact. This crater is about 150 km (93 miles) across. Like several other large craters in this scene, the rayed one has a central pit, whose origins remain speculative but may involve impact melting or solid-state fluidization of the icy crust. Bright crater rays on Ganymede, like those on our own Moon, are useful to geologists because they constitute a set of features that were laid across the moon's surface at a discrete point in time--thus they serve as time markers that can be used to establish the sequence of events that shaped Ganymede's surface. For instance, the crater rays appear to be painted over, hence are younger than, areas of grooved terrain (lower left quadrant), whereas a somewhat smaller crater at the center of the scene has icy ejecta that appears to bury (hence, post-dates) the large crater ray system. One can conclude that the grooved terrain formed first, then the large crater and its rays, and then the smaller crater and its fresh icy ejecta deposits.

  6. Venus - Stein Triplet Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaged this unique 'triplet crater,' or 'crater field' during orbits 418-421 on 21 September 1990. These craters are 14 kilometers, 11 kilometers, and 9 kilometers in diameter, respectively, and are centered at latitude -30.1 degrees south and longitude 345.5 degrees east. The Magellan Science Team has proposed the name Stein for this crater field after the American author, Gertrude Stein. This name has not yet been approved by the International Astronomical Union. The crater field was formed on highly fractured plains. The impacts generated a considerable amount of low viscosity 'flows' thought to consist largely of shock-melted target material along with fragmented debris from the crater. The three craters appear to have relatively steep walls based on the distortion in the image of the near and far walls of the craters in the Magellan radar look direction (from the left). The flow deposits from the three craters extend dominantly to the northeast (upper right).

  7. Planetary cratering mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a quantitative understanding of the cratering process over a broad range of conditions. Our approach was to numerically compute the evolution of impact induced flow fields and calculate the time histories of the key measures of crater geometry (e.g., depth, diameter, lip height) for variations in planetary gravity (0 to 109 cm/s2), material strength (0 to 2400 kbar), and impactor radius (0.05 to 5000 km). These results were used to establish the values of the open parameters in the scaling laws of Holsapple and Schmidt (1987). We describe the impact process in terms of four regimes: (1) penetration, (2) inertial, (3) terminal, and (4) relaxation. During the penetration regime, the depth of impactor penetration grows linearly for dimensionless times τ=(Ut/a)<5.1. Here, U is projectile velocity, t is time, and a is projectile radius. In the inertial regime, τ>5.1, the crater grows at a slower rate until it is arrested by either strength or gravitational forces. In this regime, the increase of crater depth, d, and diameter, D, normalized by projectile radius is given by d/a=1.3 (Ut/a)0.36 and D/a=2.0(Ut/a)0.36. For strength-dominated craters, growth stops at the end of the inertial regime, which occurs at τ=0.33 (Yeff/ρU2)-0.78, where Yeff is the effective planetary crustal strength. The effective strength can be reduced from the ambient strength by fracturing and shear band melting (e.g., formation of pseudo-tachylites). In gravity-dominated craters, growth stops when the gravitational forces dominate over the inertial forces, which occurs at τ=0.92 (ga/U2)-0.61. In the strength and gravity regimes, the maximum depth of penetration is dp/a=0.84 (Y/ρ U2)-0.28 and dp/a=1.2 (ga/U2)-0.22, respectively. The transition from simple bowl-shaped craters to complex-shaped craters occurs when gravity starts to dominate over strength in the cratering process. The diameter for this transition to occur is given by Dt=9.0 Y/ρg, and

  8. Impact Crater with Smoothed Rim

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-01

    This image from NASA Dawn spacecraft of asteroid Vesta shows hows a large impact crater whose rim is rather smoothed and degraded. There are many smaller, younger craters surrounding and inside of this crater and these have sharper, fresher rims.

  9. Shirakatsi Crater on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, G. S.

    2014-10-01

    One of the Moon's craters is named after Anania Shirakatsi. It was named due to Viktor Ambartsumian's application to the International Astronomical Union. The crater has 51km diameter and is coupled with the neighboring crater Dobrovolski.

  10. High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.; Krabill, W.; Garvin, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to effectively capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained high resolution digital elevation models of several pristine explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM), operated by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to obtain DEMs with 1 m spacing and 10 cm vertical errors of 4 main craters and many other craters and collapse pits. The main craters that were mapped are Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, and Danny Boy. The 370 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of a controlled detonation of a 100 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a simple crater. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also mapped by ATM. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m) craters were also important targets for ATM as they were excavated in hard basalt and therefore have much rougher ejecta. This will allow study of ejecta patterns in hard rock as well as engineering tests of crater and rock avoidance and rover trafficability. In addition to the high resolution DEMs, crater geometric characteristics, RMS roughness maps, and other higher-order derived data products will be generated using these data. These will provide constraints for models of landing hazards on Mars and for rover trafficability. Other planned studies will include ejecta size-frequency distribution at the resolution of the DEM and at finer resolution through air photography and field measurements

  11. High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.; Krabill, W.; Garvin, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to effectively capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained high resolution digital elevation models of several pristine explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM), operated by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to obtain DEMs with 1 m spacing and 10 cm vertical errors of 4 main craters and many other craters and collapse pits. The main craters that were mapped are Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, and Danny Boy. The 370 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of a controlled detonation of a 100 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a simple crater. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also mapped by ATM. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m) craters were also important targets for ATM as they were excavated in hard basalt and therefore have much rougher ejecta. This will allow study of ejecta patterns in hard rock as well as engineering tests of crater and rock avoidance and rover trafficability. In addition to the high resolution DEMs, crater geometric characteristics, RMS roughness maps, and other higher-order derived data products will be generated using these data. These will provide constraints for models of landing hazards on Mars and for rover trafficability. Other planned studies will include ejecta size-frequency distribution at the resolution of the DEM and at finer resolution through air photography and field measurements

  12. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-04

    The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this NASA Mars Odyssey image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo brightness and low thermal inertia values.

  13. Gale Crater Mound

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-27

    The eroded, layered deposit in this NASA Mars Odyssey image of Gale Crater is a mound of material rising 3 km about 2 miles above the crater floor. It has been sculpted by wind and possibly water to produce the dramatic landforms seen today.

  14. Proctor Crater Dune Field

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-16

    This observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the edge of a dark dune field on the floor of Proctor Crater in the Southern highlands of Mars. The dark dunes are composed of basaltic sand that has collected on the bottom of the crater.

  15. 'Endurance Crater' Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overview of 'Endurance Crater' traces the path of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from sol 94 (April 29, 2004) to sol 205 (August 21, 2004). The route charted to enter the crater was a bit circuitous, but well worth the extra care engineers took to ensure the rover's safety. On sol 94, Opportunity sat on the edge of this impressive, football field-sized crater while rover team members assessed the scene. After traversing around the 'Karatepe' region and past 'Burns Cliff,' the rover engineering team assessed the possibility of entering the crater. Careful analysis of the angles Opportunity would face, including testing an Earth-bound model on simulated martian terrain, led the team to decide against entering the crater at that particular place. Opportunity then backed up before finally dipping into the crater on its 130th sol (June 5, 2004). The rover has since made its way down the crater's inner slope, grinding, trenching and examining fascinating rocks and soil targets along the way. The rover nearly made it to the intriguing dunes at the bottom of the crater, but when it got close, the terrain did not look safe enough to cross.

  16. Fresh Copernican Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    A subset of NAC Image M112162602L showing landslides bottom covering impact melt on the floor top of a fresh Copernican-age crater at the edge of Oceanus Procellarum and west of Balboa crater taken by NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  17. Dunes in Herschel Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-14

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows dunes on the floor of Herschel Crater. Steep faces lipfaces are oriented downwind, in the direction of motion of the dunes. A dune-free area downwind of the crater is seen at the image center.

  18. Venus - Mead Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-07

    NASA's Magellan image mosaic shows the largest impact crater known to exist on Venus at this point in the Magellan mission. The crater is located north of Aphrodite Terra and east of Eistla Regio and was imaged during orbit 804 on November 12, 1990. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00148

  19. Topography of Gale Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-21

    Color coding in this image of Gale Crater on Mars represents differences in elevation. The vertical difference from a low point inside the landing ellipse for NASA Mars Science Laboratory yellow dot to a high point on the mountain inside the crater.

  20. Centrifuge Impact Cratering Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Housen, K. R.; Bjorkman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The kinematics of crater growth, impact induced target flow fields and the generation of impact melt were determined. The feasibility of using scaling relationships for impact melt and crater dimensions to determine impactor size and velocity was studied. It is concluded that a coupling parameter determines both the quantity of melt and the crater dimensions for impact velocities greater than 10km/s. As a result impactor radius, a, or velocity, U cannot be determined individually, but only as a product in the form of a coupling parameter, delta U micron. The melt volume and crater volume scaling relations were applied to Brent crater. The transport of melt and the validity of the melt volume scaling relations are examined.

  1. Occator Crater in Perspective

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-09

    An image of Occator Crater draped over a digital terrain model provides a 3-D-like perspective view of the impact structure. Several bright areas can be seen in this crater. The inner part of the crater forms a type of "crater within a crater" measuring about 6 miles (10 kilometers) in diameter and 0.3 miles (0.5 miles) in depth, and contains the brightest material on all of Ceres. Occator measures about 60 miles (90 kilometers) wide. With its sharp rim and walls, and abundant terraces and landslide deposits, Occator appears to be among the youngest features on Ceres. Dawn mission scientists estimate its age to be about 78 million years old. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20179

  2. Buried Craters of Utopia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-365, 19 May 2003

    Beneath the northern plains of Mars are numerous buried meteor impact craters. One of the most heavily-cratered areas, although buried, occurs in Utopia Planitia, as shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. The history of Mars is complex; impact craters provide a tool by which to understand some of that history. In this case, a very ancient, cratered surface was thinly-buried by younger material that is not cratered at all. This area is near 48.1oN, 228.2oW; less than 180 km (112 mi) west of the Viking 2 lander site. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  3. Pedestal Crater Development

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-01

    In this image, we see an approximately 500-meter crater that is fairly fresh (in geological terms), but the ejecta is already high-standing. Could this be an indication of early stage of pedestal development? A pedestal crater is when the ejecta from an impact settles around the new crater and is more erosion-resistant than the surrounding terrain. Over time, the surrounding terrain erodes much faster than the ejecta; in fact, some pedestal craters are measured to be hundreds of meters above the surrounding area. HiRISE has imaged many other pedestal craters before, and the ejecta isn't always symmetrical, as in this observation. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19849

  4. Yalode Crater on Ceres

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-28

    Yalode crater is so large -- at 162 miles, 260 kilometers in diameter -- that a variety of vantage points is necessary to understand its geological context. This view of the northern portion of Yalode is one of many images NASA's Dawn spacecraft has taken of this crater. The large impact that formed the crater likely involved a lot of heat, which explains the relatively smooth crater floor punctuated by smaller craters. A couple of larger craters in Yalode have polygonal shapes. This type of crater shape is frequently found on Ceres and may be indicative of extensive underground fractures. The larger crater to the right of center in this image is called Lono (12 miles, 20 kilometers in diameter) and the one below it is called Besua (11 miles, 17 kilometers). Some of the small craters are accompanied by ejecta blankets that are more reflective than their surroundings. The strange Nar Sulcus fractures can be seen in the bottom left corner of the picture. Linear features seen throughout the image may have formed when material collapsed above empty spaces underground. These linear features include linear chains of craters called catenae. Dawn took this image on September 27, 2015, from 915 miles (1,470 kilometers) altitude. The center coordinates of this image are 32 degrees south latitude and 300 degrees east longitude. Yalode gets its name from a goddess worshipped by women at the harvest rites in the Dahomey culture of western Africa. Besua takes its name from the Egyptian grain god, and Lono from the Hawaiian god of agriculture. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21410

  5. Eagle Crater Traverse Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows an overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landing site at Meridiani Planum, nicknamed 'Eagle Crater.' Scientists are conducting a soil survey here to see how the soils in this crater relate to the soils near the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop, as well as on the plains outside the crater. Scientists have studied the soils in great detail on the north and west sides of the crater, and plan to study five more locations before Opportunity exits the crater. As of sol 54 of Opportunity's journey (March 18, 2004), the rover is stationed at the sol 53 stop, located in the bottom right quadrant of this image. Scientists are examining light and dark soil targets at this spot, dubbed 'Neopolitan' because it is a triple boundary between light soil, dark soil, and an airbag bounce mark.

    This 3-D visualization was displayed using software developed by NASA's Ames Research Center and images from Opportunity's panoramic camera, taken while the rover was still on the lander.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Eagle Crater Traverse Map Figure 1 shows an overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landing site at Meridiani Planum, nicknamed 'Eagle Crater.' Scientists are conducting a soil survey here to see how the soils in this crater relate to the soils by the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop, as well as on the plains outside the crater. They have studied the soils in great detail on the north and west sides of the crater. Locations within the crater where scientists have taken microscopic images of the soil are shown in blue.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    Sampling 'Eagle Crater' Scientists have studied five unique target soil patches on the south and east sides of the crater using the microscopic imager and Moessbauer spectrometer. 'Goal 5' is a wind-rippled spot on the upper part of the crater, which the miniature thermal emission spectrometer shows is

  6. Mistletoe specialist frugivores: latterday "Johnny Appleseeds" or self‑serving market gardeners?

    PubMed

    Watson, David M; Rawsthorne, John

    2013-08-01

    Many plants use birds to disperse their propagules, but mistletoes are especially reliant on their services. As aerial parasites, mistletoe seeds need to be deposited upon branches of suitable hosts, and mistletoe specialist frugivores (from eight different avian families) have long been regarded as their coevolved dispersers. Like the pioneer Johnny 'Appleseed' Chapman who established nurseries that helped open up land for settlement, these birds are considered benevolent dispersers of this keystone resource and often invoked as illustrative examples of mutualistic interactions. We have compared recent research on these specialists with studies of other birds with broader diets (generalists) which also disperse mistletoe seed. Rather than mutualists, we suggest that mistletoe specialist frugivores are better considered exploitative, with multiple lineages evolving independently to capitalize on this reliable, nutritious resource. Although mistletoe specialist frugivores are quantitatively important seed dispersers in some regions, their specialized diet restricts them to areas with high mistletoe densities, resulting in contagious dispersal patterns. By intensifying existing infections, mistletoe specialist frugivores increase their own medium-term food security-akin to market gardeners profiting from intensive cultivation. Exploring the ecological and evolutionary implications of this proposition, we evaluate the consequences of different dispersal patterns on mistletoe fitness and highlight the neglected role of dietary generalists in the stabilization of plant-animal interactions.

  7. Venus - Impact Crater 'Jeanne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution image shows Jeanne crater, a 19.5 kilometer (12 mile) diameter impact crater. Jeanne crater is located at 40.0 degrees north latitude and 331.4 degrees longitude. The distinctive triangular shape of the ejecta indicates that the impacting body probably hit obliquely, traveling from southwest to northeast. The crater is surrounded by dark material of two types. The dark area on the southwest side of the crater is covered by smooth (radar-dark) lava flows which have a strongly digitate contact with surrounding brighter flows. The very dark area on the northeast side of the crater is probably covered by smooth material such as fine-grained sediment. This dark halo is asymmetric, mimicking the asymmetric shape of the ejecta blanket. The dark halo may have been caused by an atmospheric shock or pressure wave produced by the incoming body. Jeanne crater also displays several outflow lobes on the northwest side. These flow-like features may have formed by fine-grained ejecta transported by a hot, turbulent flow created by the arrival of the impacting object. Alternatively, they may have formed by flow of impact melt.

  8. Venus - Impact Crater Jeanne

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-20

    This full-resolution image from NASA Magellan spacecraft shows Jeanne crater, a 19.5 kilometer (12 mile) diameter impact crater. Jeanne crater is located at 40.0 degrees north latitude and 331.4 degrees longitude. The distinctive triangular shape of the ejecta indicates that the impacting body probably hit obliquely, traveling from southwest to northeast. The crater is surrounded by dark material of two types. The dark area on the southwest side of the crater is covered by smooth (radar-dark) lava flows which have a strongly digitate contact with surrounding brighter flows. The very dark area on the northeast side of the crater is probably covered by smooth material such as fine-grained sediment. This dark halo is asymmetric, mimicking the asymmetric shape of the ejecta blanket. The dark halo may have been caused by an atmospheric shock or pressure wave produced by the incoming body. Jeanne crater also displays several outflow lobes on the northwest side. These flow-like features may have formed by fine-grained ejecta transported by a hot, turbulent flow created by the arrival of the impacting object. Alternatively, they may have formed by flow of impact melt. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00472

  9. Crater with Exposed Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-17

    On Earth, geologists can dig holes and pull up core samples to find out what lies beneath the surface. On Mars, geologists cannot dig holes very easily themselves, but a process has been occurring for billions of years that has been digging holes for them: impact cratering. Impact craters form when an asteroid, meteoroid, or comet crashes into a planet's surface, causing an explosion. The energy of the explosion, and the resulting size of the impact crater, depends on the size and density of the impactor, as well as the properties of the surface it hits. In general, the larger and denser the impactor, the larger the crater it will form. The impact crater in this image is a little less than 3 kilometers in diameter. The impact revealed layers when it excavated the Martian surface. Layers can form in a variety of different ways. Multiple lava flows in one area can form stacked sequences, as can deposits from rivers or lakes. Understanding the geology around impact craters and searching for mineralogical data within their layers can help scientists on Earth better understand what the walls of impact craters on Mars expose. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12328

  10. Pedestal Crater and Yardangs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-444, 6 August 2003

    This April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small meteor impact crater that has been modified by wind erosion. Two things happened after the crater formed. First, the upper few meters of surface material into which the meteor impacted was later eroded away by wind. The crater ejecta formed a protective armor that kept the material under the ejecta from been blown away. This caused the crater and ejecta to appear as if standing upon a raised platform--a feature that Mars geologists call a pedestal crater. Next, the pedestal crater was buried beneath several meters of new sediment, and then this material was eroded away by wind to form the array of sharp ridges that run across the pedestal crater's surface. These small ridges are known as yardangs. This picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left; it is located in west Daedalia Planum near 14.6oS, 131.9oW.

  11. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  12. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  13. Venus - Mead Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan image mosaic shows the largest (275 kilometers in diameter [170 miles]) impact crater known to exist on Venus at this point in the Magellan mission. The crater is located north of Aphrodite Terra and east of Eistla Regio at latitude 12.5 degrees north and longitude 57.4 degrees east, and was imaged during Magellan orbit 804 on November 12, 1990. The Magellan science team has proposed to name this crater Mead, after Margaret Mead, the American Anthropologist (1901- 1978). All Magellan-based names of features on Venus are, of course, only proposed until final approval is given by the International Astronomical Union-Commission on Planetary Nomenclature. Mead is classified as a multi-ring crater with its innermost, concentric scarp being interpreted as the rim of the original crater cavity. No inner peak-ring of mountain massifs is observed on Mead. The presence of hummocky, radar-bright crater ejecta crossing the radar-dark floor terrace and adjacent outer rim scarp suggests that the floor terrace is probably a giant rotated block that is concentric to, but lies outside of, the original crater cavity. The flat, somewhat brighter inner floor of Mead is interpreted to result from considerable infilling of the original crater cavity by impact melt and/or by volcanic lavas. To the southeast of the crater rim, emplacement of hummocky ejecta appears to have been impeded by the topography of preexisting ridges, thus suggesting a very low ground-hugging mode of deposition for this material. Radar illumination on this and all other Magellan image products is from the left to the right in the scene.

  14. Doublet craters on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Cheryl M.; Melosh, H. Jay; Bottke, William F.

    2003-09-01

    Of the impact craters on Earth larger than 20 km in diameter, 10-15% (3 out of 28) are doublets, having been formed by the simultaneous impact of two well-separated projectiles. The most likely scenario for their formation is the impact of well-separated binary asteroids. If a population of binary asteroids is capable of striking the Earth, it should also be able to hit the other terrestrial planets as well. Venus is a promising planet to search for doublet craters because its surface is young, erosion is nearly nonexistent, and its crater population is significantly larger than the Earth's. After a detailed investigation of single craters separated by less than 150 km and "multiple" craters having diameters greater than 10 km, we found that the proportion of doublet craters on Venus is at most 2.2%, significantly smaller than Earth's, although several nearly incontrovertible doublets were recognized. We believe this apparent deficit relative to the Earth's doublet population is a consequence of atmospheric screening of small projectiles on Venus rather than a real difference in the population of impacting bodies. We also examined "splotches," circular radar reflectance features in the Magellan data. Projectiles that are too small to form craters probably formed these features. After a careful study of these patterns, we believe that the proportion of doublet splotches on Venus (14%) is comparable to the proportion of doublet craters found on Earth (10-15%). Thus, given the uncertainties of interpretation and the statistics of small numbers, it appears that the doublet crater population on Venus is consistent with that of the Earth.

  15. Lunar secondary craters, part K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overbeck, V. R.; Morrison, R. H.; Wedekind, J.

    1972-01-01

    Formation of V-shaped structures surrounding the fresh Copernicus Crater and its secondary craters are reviewed, and preliminary observations of the more extensively eroded secondary crater field of Theophilus are presented. Results of laboratory simulation of secondary lunar craters to examine their effects on V-shaped ridges are also described.

  16. An Inverted Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-01

    There is a circular feature in this observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft that appears to stand above the surrounding terrain. This feature is probably an inverted crater that was filled in with sediment. The fill became indurated, or hardened, until it was more resistant to subsequent erosion than the surrounding material. Other craters in this image are not inverted or substantially infilled. This suggests that they were formed after the events that filled in and later exposed the inverted crater. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20729

  17. Central Pit Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-13

    Crater floors can have a range of features, from flat to a central peak or a central pit. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an unnamed crater in Terra Sabaea has a central pit. This unnamed crater in Terra Sabaea has a central pit. The different floor features develop do due several factors, including the size of the impactor, the geology of the surface material and the geology of the materials at depth. Orbit Number: 60737 Latitude: 22.3358 Longitude: 61.2019 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-08-23 20:13 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20092

  18. Crater in Utopia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 March 2004 Craters of the martian northern plains tend to be somewhat shallow because material has filled them in. Their ejecta blankets, too, are often covered by younger materials. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example--a crater in Utopia Planitia near 43.7oN, 227.3oW. Erosion has roughened some of the surfaces of the material that filled the crater and covered its ejecta deposit. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. Venus - Crater Aurelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Magellan image shows a complex crater, 31.9 kilometers (20 miles) in diameter with a circular rim, terraced walls, and central peaks, located at 20.3 degrees north latitude and 331.8 degrees east longitude. Several unusual features are evidenced in this image: large dark surface up range from the crater; lobate flows emanating from crater ejecta, and very radar-bright ejecta and floor. Aurelia has been proposed to the International Astronomical Union, Subcommittee of Planetary Nomenclature as a candidate name. Aurelia is the mother of Julius Caesar.

  20. The origin of lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, A.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented of four hypotheses concerning the origin of lunar craters, taking into account the bubble hypothesis, the tide hypothesis, the volcanic hypothesis, and the impact hypothesis. A description is given of a series of experiments on impact craters and studies of a meteorite crater in Arizona are considered. It is concluded that the typical lunar craters can best be interpreted as impact craters.

  1. Secondary crater fields from 24 large primary craters on Mars: Insights into nearby secondary crater production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; Hynek, Brian M.

    2011-10-01

    Crater statistics are used across a wide variety of applications on planetary surfaces, one of the most notable being estimating relative and absolute ages of those surfaces. This requires an assumed cratering rate over time and that craters be randomly distributed. Secondary craters - craters that form from the ejecta of an impact event - belie this assumption by creating greater crater density in a local area at a single time, significantly affecting crater statistics. There has been substantial debate over the relative importance of secondary craters, and our findings in this Mars study indicate that these events can be very significant and cannot be ignored when age-dating surfaces. We have analyzed secondary crater fields found close to 24 primary craters on Mars. Among other findings such as terrain control over secondary crater field characteristics, we conclude that a single large impact event (>100 km) can significantly affect crater statistics at the ˜1-5-km-diameter level over a non-trivial fraction of a planetary surface (minimum secondary crater diameters examined were ˜0.9 km; the minimum primary crater diameter was ˜20 km). We also suggest a potential way to avoid significant contamination by the majority of secondary craters that occur close to the primary impact event without the need to manually classify every crater as primary or secondary. Our findings are specific to Mars, but further work may show the patterns are applicable to other solid bodies.

  2. Clouds Near Mie Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-572, 12 December 2003

    Mie Crater, a large basin formed by asteroid or comet impact in Utopia Planitia, lies at the center of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red wide angle image. The crater is approximately 104 km (65 mi) across. To the east and southeast (toward the lower right) of Mie, in this 5 December 2003 view, are clouds of dust and water ice kicked up by local dust storm activity. It is mid-winter in the northern hemisphere of Mars, a time when passing storms are common on the northern plains of the red planet. Sunlight illuminates this image from the lower left; Mie Crater is located at 48.5oN, 220.3oW. Viking 2 landed west/southwest of Mie Crater, off the left edge of this image, in September 1976.

  3. Ravi Vallis Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    This image shows another portion of Ravi Vallis. In this image taken by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, a small crater and the resistant material formed during the impact form a donut on the floor of the valley.

  4. Craters in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

  5. Shackleton Crater Illumination

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Simulated illumination conditions near the lunar South Pole. The 30km x 30km region highlights the Shackleton crater. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, ...

  6. Hazardous crater lakes studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Minoru

    Crater lakes usually sit on top of volcanic conduits and act as condensers of magmatic vapor. Studies of crater lakes can therefore provide information on both deep magmatic activity and variations in the degassing state of a shallow magmatic body. The Lake Nyos gas disaster of August 1986 and a similar event in August 1984 at Lake Monoun, both in Cameroon, resulted from the accumulation of magmatic CO2 in the bottom layers of the lakes. Geochemical monitoring of crater lakes is a promising tool for forecasting not only limnic but also volcanic eruptions. Acid-mineralized waters formed by condensation of hot magmatic volatiles in crater lakes are thought to bear some resemblance to hydrothermal fluids acting in the genesis of acid-sulfate alteration and Au-Cu-Ag mineralization of volcanic-hosted precious metal deposits.

  7. Trouvelot Crater Deposit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-04

    Like many of the craters in the Oxia Palus region of Mars, Trouvelot Crater, shown in this NASA Mars Odyssey image, hosts an eroded, light-toned, sedimentary deposit on its floor. Compared with the much larger example in Becquerel Crater to the NE, the Trouvelot deposit has been so eroded by the scouring action of dark, wind-blown sand that very little of it remains. Tiny outliers of bright material separated from the main mass attest to the once, more really extensive coverage by the deposit. A similar observation can be made for White Rock, the best known example of a bright, crater interior deposit. The origin of the sediments in these deposits remains enigmatic but they are likely the result of fallout from ash or dust carried by the thin martian atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04017

  8. Exhumed Crater with Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-575, 15 December 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a crater in Arabia Terra that has been exhumed. The picture was acquired less than 1 week ago, on 9 December 2003. The crater was buried beneath layered material, but erosion later brought it back to the surface. A thick blanket of dust mantles the scene; dark streaks have formed as some of this dust slid down the crater walls. Old, dust-covered ripples of windblown sediment occur on the floor of the exhumed crater. The image is located near 20.9oN, 320.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. Craters in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

  10. Rubria and Occia Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-09

    This image from NASA Dawn spacecraft of asteroid Vesta shows Rubria and Occia craters. Both Rubria and Occia contain dark and bright material and both have reasonably sharp, well-defined and regularly shaped rims.

  11. Poynting Crater Ejecta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-05

    Located roughly equidistant between two massive volcanoes, the approximately 60 km Poynting Crater and its ejecta, shown in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, have experienced an onslaught of volcanic activity.

  12. Chipped Paint Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-09

    In the high northern latitudes northwest of Alba Patera, a smooth mantle of material that covers the landscape appears chipped away from the rim of a large crater, as observed in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

  13. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-06

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km about 7.5 mile diameter crater imaged by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft looks vaguely like a stop sign.

  14. Exhumed Craters near Kaiser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 August 2004 The upper left (northwest) corner of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a crater within which are several layers of eroded material. This crater, and probably all of its degraded neighbors, was once filled and buried, and was later exhumed. The burial and exhumation theme is one that repeats all over the surface of Mars, as ancient rocks are eroded to expose previously filled and buried craters, valleys, and landscapes. This particular image is located near the northwest rim of Kaiser Crater, in Noachis Terra, near 45.2oS, 342.7oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  15. Zhamanshin meteor crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, P. V.; Dabizha, A. I.

    1987-01-01

    A historical survey and geographic, geologic and geophysical characteristics, the results of many years of study of the Zhamanshin meteor crater in the Northern Aral region, are reported. From this data the likely initial configuration and cause of formation of the crater are reconstructed. Petrographic and mineralogical analyses are given of the brecciated and remelted rocks, of the zhamanshinites and irgizite tektites in particular. The impact melting, dispersion and quenching processes resulting in tektite formation are discussed.

  16. Multivariate analyses of crater parameters and the classification of craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegal, B. S.; Griffiths, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Multivariate analyses were performed on certain linear dimensions of six genetic types of craters. A total of 320 craters, consisting of laboratory fluidization craters, craters formed by chemical and nuclear explosives, terrestrial maars and other volcanic craters, and terrestrial meteorite impact craters, authenticated and probable, were analyzed in the first data set in terms of their mean rim crest diameter, mean interior relief, rim height, and mean exterior rim width. The second data set contained an additional 91 terrestrial craters of which 19 were of experimental percussive impact and 28 of volcanic collapse origin, and which was analyzed in terms of mean rim crest diameter, mean interior relief, and rim height. Principal component analyses were performed on the six genetic types of craters. Ninety per cent of the variation in the variables can be accounted for by two components. Ninety-nine per cent of the variation in the craters formed by chemical and nuclear explosives is explained by the first component alone.

  17. Juling and Kupalo Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-17

    This region on Ceres, located in the vicinity of Toharu Crater, presents two small craters: Juling at top (12 miles, 20 kilometers in diameter) and Kupalo at bottom (16 miles, 26 kilometers in diameter). Both craters are relatively young, as indicated by their sharp rims. These features are located at about the same latitude (about 38 degrees south) as Tawals Crater and show similar crater shapes and rugged terrain. These features may reflect the presence of ice below the surface. Subtle bright features can be distinguished in places. These likely were excavated by small impacts and landslides along the slopes of the crater rims. This suggests that a different type of material, likely rich in salts, is present in the shallow subsurface. Juling is named after the Sakai/Orang Asli spirit of the crops from Malaysia, and Kupalo gets its name from the Russian god of vegetation and of the harvest. NASA's Dawn spacecraft acquired this picture on August 24, 2016. The image was taken during Dawn's extended mission, from its low altitude mapping orbit at about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 38 degrees south latitude, 165 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21753

  18. Mercury's Densely Cratered Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10 took this picture (FDS 27465) of the densely cratered surface of Mercury when the spacecraft was 18,200 kilometers (8085 miles) from the planet on March 29. The dark line across top of picture is a 'dropout' of a few TV lines of data. At lower left, a portion of a 61 kilometer (38 mile) crater shows a flow front extending across the crater floor and filling more than half of the crater. The smaller, fresh crater at center is about 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter. Craters as small as one kilometer (about one-half mile) across are visible in the picture.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  19. Granular Crater Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Abe; Behringer, Robert; Brandenburg, John

    2009-11-01

    This project characterizes crater formation in a granular material by a jet of gas impinging on a granular material, such as a retro-rocket landing on the moon. We have constructed a 2D model of a planetary surface, which consists of a thin, clear box partially filled with granular materials (sand, lunar and Mars simulants...). A metal pipe connected to a tank of nitrogen gas via a solenoid valve is inserted into the top of the box to model the rocket. The results are recorded using high-speed video. We process these images and videos in order to test existing models and develop new ones for describing crater formation. A similar set-up has been used by Metzger et al.footnotetextP. T. Metzger et al. Journal of Aerospace Engineering (2009) We find that the long-time shape of the crater is consistent with a predicted catenary shape (Brandenburg). The depth and width of the crater both evolve logarithmically in time, suggesting an analogy to a description in terms of an activated process: dD/dt = A (-aD) (D is the crater depth, a and A constants). This model provides a useful context to understand the role of the jet speed, as characterized by the pressure used to drive the flow. The box width also plays an important role in setting the width of the crater.

  20. Pandora Fretum Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 26 July 2002) Another in a series of craters with unusual interior deposits, this THEMIS image shows an unnamed crater in the southern hemisphere Pandora Fretum region near the Hellas Basin. Craters with eroded layered deposits are quite common on Mars but the crusty textured domes in the center of the image make this crater more unusual. Looking vaguely like granitic intrusions, there erosional style is distinct from the rest of the interior deposit which shows a very obvious layered morphology. While it is unlikely that the domes are granite plutons, it is possible that they do represent some other shallowly emplaced magmatic intrusion. More likely still is that variations in induration of the layered deposit allow for variations in the erosional morphology. Note how the surface of the crater floor in the northernmost portion of the image has a texture similar to that of the domes. This may represent an incipient form of the erosion that has produced the domes but has not progressed as far. An analysis of other craters in the area may shed light on the origin of the domes.

  1. Named Venusian craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Joel F.; Schaber, Gerald G.

    1993-03-01

    Schaber et al. compiled a database of 841 craters on Venus, based on Magellan coverage of 89 percent of the planet's surface. That database, derived from coverage of approximately 98 percent of Venus' surface, has been expanded to 912 craters, ranging in diameter from 1.5 to 280 km. About 150 of the larger craters were previously identified by Pioneer Venus and Soviet Venera projects and subsequently formally named by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Altogether, the crater names submitted to the IAU for approval to date number about 550, a little more than half of the number of craters identified on Magellan images. The IAU will consider more names as they are submitted for approval. Anyone--planetary scientist or layman--may submit names; however, candidate names must conform to IAU rules. The person to be honored must be deceased for at least three years, must not be a religious figure or a military or political figure of the 19th or 20th century, and, for Venus, must be a woman. All formally and provisionally approved names for Venusian impact craters, along with their latitude, longitude, size, and origin of their name, will be presented at LPSC and will be available as handouts.

  2. Geology and ore deposits of Johnny M mine, Ambrosia Lake District

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The Johnny M mine is one of very few mines in the Ambrosia Lake district with uranium ore in two members of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic); these members are the Westwater Canyon Sandstone and the Brushy Basin Shale. The Westwater Canyon ore is contained in the two upper sandstone units of the member, and the Brushy Basin ore is contained in the Poison Canyon sandstone (informal usage). The sedimentary features and structures in the Westwater Canyon sandstones indicate that the sediments were deposited by a system of aggrading braided streams, possibly at the distal end of coalescing alluvial fans. The Poison Canyon sandstone was probably the result of deposition in a complex environment of meandering and braided streams. Paleocurrent-direction indicators, such as fossilized-log orientation, foreset azimuths, and the axes of crossbeds and channel scours, suggest that the local palostream flow was to the east and southeast. The uranium mineralization is closely associated with 1) local accumulations of carbonaceous (humate) matter derived from the decay of organic material and 2) paleostream channels preserved in the rocks. The ore elements were derived from the leaching of volcanic air-fall tuffs and ash, which were introduced into the fluvial system during volcanic activity in the western United States. The mobile ore-element ions were reduce and concentrated by humic acids and bacteria present in the fluvial system and ultimately remobilized into the forms present today. The uranium is thus envisioned as forming either essentially on the surface as the sediments were being deposited or at very shallow depth.

  3. Puberty in boys

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000650.htm Puberty in boys To use the sharing features on this page, ... body changes, when you develop from being a boy to a man. Learn what changes to expect ...

  4. Supporting Boys as Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The challenges associated with boys and reading are focused on such factors as society's lack of focus on literacy skills, parents failings to inspire reading in boys, and internal motivational factors rather than looking at the environments created for reading in and out of school. In this column, several ideas for helping boys develop a…

  5. Raising Better Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Geoffrey

    2000-01-01

    The author of "Reaching Up For Manhood" discusses troubling social/environmental conditions confronting boys. Raising better boys requires caring adults, safer risk-taking situations, positive reinforcement, and role models. Parents should monitor boys' media exposure, provide moral education, broaden their cultural and natural-world…

  6. Bring Back the Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr-Chellman, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Boy culture is out of sync with school culture. There are several reasons for this, including zero tolerance policies that are too often taken to extremes, the lack of male teachers, and the compression of the curriculum. What's more, boy culture is not socially accepted, and boys quickly come to feel that they are not good at school. For many…

  7. Supporting Boys as Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The challenges associated with boys and reading are focused on such factors as society's lack of focus on literacy skills, parents failings to inspire reading in boys, and internal motivational factors rather than looking at the environments created for reading in and out of school. In this column, several ideas for helping boys develop a…

  8. Raising Better Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Geoffrey

    2000-01-01

    The author of "Reaching Up For Manhood" discusses troubling social/environmental conditions confronting boys. Raising better boys requires caring adults, safer risk-taking situations, positive reinforcement, and role models. Parents should monitor boys' media exposure, provide moral education, broaden their cultural and natural-world…

  9. The Mythical "Boy Crisis"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husain, Muna; Millimet, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The popular press has put forth the idea that the US educational system is experiencing a "boy crisis," where boys are losing ground to girls across multiple dimensions. Here, we analyze these claims in the context of math and reading achievement during early primary school. We reach two conclusions. First, white boys outperform white girls in…

  10. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  11. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  12. Mars cratering chronology: new estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B.

    Many interpretations of Mars geologic evolution is making with the cratering chronology technique (e.g. Hartmann and Neukum, Space Sci. Rev. 96, 165-194, 2001). The core idea of the technique is that older planetary surfaces accumulate more impact craters of a given size than younger surfaces. Two issues are important for the cratering chronology: (i) the estimate of the Moon/Mars cratering ratio to transfer the absolute time scale form the Moon, studied with return sample missions, and (2) the relative importance of secondary impact craters in the interpretation of the available crater counts. In this presentation I describe a progress in both topics listed above. Modern impact rates on planets are defined by orbital evolution of small bodies under weak gravity and non-gravity forces, including resonances with large planets and effects of solar irradiation. In parallel with the celestial mechanics modeling we use the database of observed asteroids, converted into a planetary impact rate. The test of this technique is done for the Earth/moon cratering rate comparison with an independent verification with observed terrestrial atmospheric bursts of bolides and fireballs. For small craters (D<300 m) and young lunar surfaces (age < 100 Ma) the independent measurements of the lunar cratering rate and modern terrestrial bolide/fireball flux match pretty well, giving more confidence for the approach. However, for larger craters (300 m < D <3 km) one should assume the porous-like scaling law for lunar craters to match the astronomically estimated impact rate. This fact demands a reconsideration of Mars/moon cratering rate ratio, as the porosity of upper 1 km under Martian surface may be quite different from the lunar one due to larger Martian gravity and possible filling of porous space with ice/brine. The problem of secondary crater share among crater counts used for surface dating is analyzed by size-frequency distribution (SFD) of secondary and primary craters. The

  13. Physical properties of lunar craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Maitri P.; Bhatt, Kushal P.; Jain, Rajmal

    2017-02-01

    The surface of the Moon is highly cratered due to impacts of meteorites, asteroids, comets and other celestial objects. The origin, size, structure, age and composition vary among craters. We study a total of 339 craters observed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). Out of these 339 craters, 214 craters are known (named craters included in the IAU Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature) and 125 craters are unknown (craters that are not named and objects that are absent in the IAU Gazetteer). We employ images taken by LROC at the North and South Poles and near side of the Moon. We report for the first time the study of unknown craters, while we also review the study of known craters conducted earlier by previous researchers. Our study is focused on measurements of diameter, depth, latitude and longitude of each crater for both known and unknown craters. The diameter measurements are based on considering the Moon to be a spherical body. The LROC website also provides a plot which enables us to measure the depth and diameter. We found that out of 214 known craters, 161 craters follow a linear relationship between depth (d) and diameter (D), but 53 craters do not follow this linear relationship. We study physical dimensions of these 53 craters and found that either the depth does not change significantly with diameter or the depths are extremely high relative to diameter (conical). Similarly, out of 125 unknown craters, 78 craters follow the linear relationship between depth (d) and diameter (D) but 47 craters do not follow the linear relationship. We propose that the craters following the scaling law of depth and diameter, also popularly known as the linear relationship between d and D, are formed by the impact of meteorites having heavy metals with larger dimension, while those with larger diameter but less depth are formed by meteorites/celestial objects having low density material but larger diameter. The craters with very high depth and with very small

  14. Small Odyssey Crater on Rim of Huge Endeavour Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-10

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity arrived at the rim of Endeavour crater on Aug. 9, 2011, after a trek of more than 13 miles 21 kilometers lasting nearly three years since departing the rover previous major destination, Victoria crater.

  15. Haulani Crater Topographic Map

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-28

    Haulani Crater (21 miles, 34 kilometers in diameter) is one of the youngest craters on Ceres, as evidenced by its sharp rims and bright, bluish material in enhanced color composite images from the framing camera on NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Haulani is also a good example of a polygonal crater. This high-resolution topography map of the crater's floor and northern rim displays a prime example of pitted terrains. Those features were likely formed through the rapid vaporization of subsurface water upon impact, and suggest that there is abundant water in Ceres' crust. Pitted terrains have also been found on Mars and Vesta. This topographic map was produced from the combination of images acquired under multiple illumination angles while the Dawn spacecraft was in its low-altitude mapping orbit, at a distance of about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The colors represent elevations ranging from 1.3 miles (2.1 kilometers) below the surface to 0.75 miles (1.2 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of the crater are 5.8 degree north latitude and 10.77 east longitude. An unannotated version of this image is also available. Haulani is named after the Hawaiian plant goddess. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21748

  16. Axomama Crater on Ceres

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-06

    This image from NASA's Dawn spacecraft highlights Axomama Crater, the small crater shown to the right of center. It is 3 miles (5 kilometers) in diameter and located just inside the western rim of Dantu Crater. Axomama is one of the newly named craters on Ceres. Its sharp edges indicate recent emplacement by a small impact. This picture also shows details on the floor of Dantu, which comprises most of the image. The many fractures and the central pit (see also PIA20303) are reminiscent of Occator Crater and could point to a similar formation history, involving activity driven by the presence of liquid water in the subsurface. Axomama is named after the Incan goddess of potato, or "Potato-mother." NASA's Dawn spacecraft acquired this picture during its extended mission on July 24, 2016, from its low altitude mapping orbit at about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 24 degrees north latitude, 131 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21908

  17. Proctor Crater Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-26

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, located near 30E and 47.5S, displays sand dunes within Proctor Crater. These dunes are composed of basaltic sand that has collected in the bottom of the crater. The topographic depression of the crater forms a sand trap that prevents the sand from escaping. Dune fields are common in the bottoms of craters on Mars and appear as dark splotches that lean up against the downwind walls of the craters. Dunes are useful for studying both the geology and meteorology of Mars. The sand forms by erosion of larger rocks, but it is unclear when and where this erosion took place on Mars or how such large volumes of sand could be formed. The dunes also indicate the local wind directions by their morphology. In this case, there are few clear slipfaces that would indicate the downwind direction. The crests of the dunes also typically run north-south in the image. This dune form indicates that there are probably two prevailing wind directions that run east and west (left to right and right to left). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04011

  18. Barringer Meteor Crater, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Barringer Crater, also known as 'Meteor Crater,' is a 1,300-meter (0.8 mile) diameter, 174-meter (570-feet) deep hole in the flat-lying desert sandstones 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) west of Winslow, Arizona. Since the 1890s geologic studies here played a leading role in developing an understanding of impact processes on the Earth, the moon and elsewhere in the solar system.

    This view was acquired by the Landsat 4 satellite on December 14, 1982. It shows the crater much as a lunar crater might appear through a telescope. Morning sun illumination is from the southeast (lower right). The prominent gully meandering across the scene is known as Canyon Diablo. It drains northward toward the Little Colorado River and eventually to the Grand Canyon. The Interstate 40 highway crosses and nearly parallels the northern edge of the scene.

    The ejecta blanket around the crater appears somewhat lighter than the surrounding terrain, perhaps in part due to its altered mineralogic content. However, foot traffic at this interesting site may have scarred and lightened the terrain too. Also, the roughened surface here catches the sunlight on the southerly slopes and protects a highly reflective patchy snow cover in shaded northerly slopes, further lightening the terrain as viewed from space on this date.

  19. Iturralde Crater, Bolivia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-09-17

    NASA scientists will venture into an isolated part of the Bolivian Amazon to try and uncover the origin of a 5 mile (8 kilometer) diameter crater there known as the Iturralde Crater. Traveling to this inhospitable forest setting, the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will seek to determine if the unusual circular crater was created by a meteor or comet. Organized by Dr. Peter Wasilewski of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will be led by Dr. Tim Killeen of Conservation International, which is based in Bolivia. Killeen will be assisted by Dr. Compton Tucker of Goddard. The team intends to collect and analyze rocks and soil, look for glass particles that develop from meteor impacts and study magnetic properties in the area to determine if the Iturralde site was indeed created by a meteor. This image was acquired on June 29, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03859

  20. Endeavour Crater in Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The largest crater in this mosaic of images taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is Endeavour Crater, which is 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter.

    The team operating NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars chose to drive the rover toward Endeavour after Opportunity ascended out of smaller Victoria Crater in August 2008.

    Opportunity caught its first glimpse of Endeavour's rim on March 7, 2008, during the 1,820th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars. The rover was about 12 kilometers (7 miles) from the closest point of the crater.

    Annotations on Figure 1 show vectors from Opportunity's position on that date toward the portions of the rim seen in images that Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) took from the Sol 1820 location. In addition to three portions of Endeavour's rim, the rim of a smaller, more distant crater, Iazu, appears faintly on the horizon in the Pancam images.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, provided and operates the Context Camera.

  1. The scaling of secondary craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1991-01-01

    Secondary craters are common features around fresh planetary-scale primary impact craters throughout most of the Solar System. They derive from the ejection phase of crater formation, thus secondary scaling relations provide constraints on parameters affecting ejection processes. Secondary crater fields typically begin at the edge of the continuous ejecta blankets (CEB) and extend out several crater radii. Secondaries tend to have rounded rims and bilateral symmetry about an axis through the primary crater's center. Prominent secondary chains can extend inward across the CEB close to the rim. A simple method for comparing secondary crater fields was employed: averaging the diameters and ranges from the center of the primary crater of the five largest craters in a secondary crater field. While not as much information is obtained about individual crater fields by this method as in more complete secondary field mapping, it facilitates rapid comparison of many secondary fields. Also, by quantifying a few specific aspects of the secondary crater field, this method can be used to construct scaling relations for secondary craters.

  2. Craters! A Multi-Science Approach to Cratering and Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, William K.; Cain, Joe

    This book provides a complete Scope Sequence and Coordination teaching module. First, craters are introduced as a generally observable phenomena. Then, by making craters and by investigating the results, students gain close-up, hands-on experience with impact events and their products. Real crater examples from the Moon and elsewhere are included…

  3. Craters! A Multi-Science Approach to Cratering and Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, William K.; Cain, Joe

    This book provides a complete Scope Sequence and Coordination teaching module. First, craters are introduced as a generally observable phenomena. Then, by making craters and by investigating the results, students gain close-up, hands-on experience with impact events and their products. Real crater examples from the Moon and elsewhere are included…

  4. Crater Wall With Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    8 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies formed in the terraced wall of an impact crater on the floor of a larger crater near 39.1oS, 200.7oW. Gullies such as these are fairly common in craters and depressions at southern middle latitudes. They also occur in some areas at northern middle latitudes and in both polar regions. They may have formed by liquid water, or not--the Mars science community is still debating and discussing the issue. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  5. 'Happy Face' Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-361, 15 May 2003

    Every day, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle instruments obtain a global view of the planet to help monitor weather and seasonal patterns of frost deposition and removal. The two pictures shown here are taken from the same daily global image mosaic (the only difference is that each was processed slightly differently). The pictures show Galle Crater, informally known as 'Happy Face,' as it appeared in early southern winter. The white-ish gray surfaces are coated with wintertime carbon dioxide frost. The pattern of frost distribution gives the appearance that 'Happy Face' has opened its mouth. Galle Crater is located on the east rim of Argyre at 51oS, 31oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left. Galle Crater is 230 km (143 mi) across.

  6. Layers in Galle Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-31

    This image shows a layered deposit in Galle Crater, located in the Southern cratered highlands. The geologic history of Galle Crater is not well constrained, and it contains a variety of features that have been interpreted as fluvial, lacustrine or glacial deposits. The deposit pictured here contains multiple unconformities (sudden or irregular changes from one deposit to another), indicating periods of erosion and non deposition. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 25.7 centimeters (10.1 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 77 centimeters (30.3 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21575

  7. 'Endurance Crater's' Dazzling Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity creeps farther into 'Endurance Crater,' the dune field on the crater floor appears even more dramatic. This approximate true-color panoramic camera image highlights the reddish-colored dust present throughout the scene.

    Sinuous tendrils of sand less than 1 meter (3.3 feet) high extend from the main dune field toward the rover. Scientists hope to send the rover down to one of these tendrils in an effort to learn more about the characteristics of the dunes. Dunes are a common feature across the surface of Mars, and knowledge gleaned from investigating the Endurance dunes close-up may apply to similar dunes elsewhere.

    Before the rover heads down to the dunes, rover drivers must first establish whether the slippery slope that leads to them is firm enough to ensure a successful drive back out of the crater. Otherwise, such hazards might make the dune field a true sand trap.

  8. Crater Wall With Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    8 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies formed in the terraced wall of an impact crater on the floor of a larger crater near 39.1oS, 200.7oW. Gullies such as these are fairly common in craters and depressions at southern middle latitudes. They also occur in some areas at northern middle latitudes and in both polar regions. They may have formed by liquid water, or not--the Mars science community is still debating and discussing the issue. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  9. Small Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    22 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small impact crater with a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern. The butterfly pattern results from an oblique impact. Not all oblique impacts result in an elliptical crater, but they can result in a non-radial pattern of ejecta distribution. The two-toned nature of the ejecta -- with dark material near the crater and brighter material further away -- might indicate the nature of subsurface materials. Below the surface, there may be a layer of lighter-toned material, underlain by a layer of darker material. The impact throws these materials out in a pattern that reflects the nature of the underlying layers.

    Location near: 3.7oN, 348.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  10. Kupalo Crater from LAMO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-12

    This image from NASA's Dawn spacecraft shows Kupalo Crater, one of the youngest craters on Ceres. The crater has bright material exposed on its rim and walls, which could be salts. Its flat floor likely formed from impact melt and debris. Kupalo, which measures 16 miles (26 kilometers) across and is located at southern mid-latitudes, is named for the Slavic god of vegetation and harvest. Kupalo was imaged earlier in Dawn's science mission at Ceres -- during Survey orbit (see PIA19624) and from the high altitude mapping orbit, or HAMO (see PIA20124). Dawn took this image on Dec. 21 from its low-altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) at an approximate altitude of 240 miles (385 kilometers) above Ceres. The image resolution is 120 feet (35 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20192

  11. Impact cratering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Okeefe, J. D.; Smither, C.; Takata, T.

    1991-01-01

    In the course of carrying out finite difference calculations, it was discovered that for large craters, a previously unrecognized type of crater (diameter) growth occurred which was called lip wave propagation. This type of growth is illustrated for an impact of a 1000 km (2a) silicate bolide at 12 km/sec (U) onto a silicate half-space at earth gravity (1 g). The von Misses crustal strength is 2.4 kbar. The motion at the crater lip associated with this wave type phenomena is up, outward, and then down, similar to the particle motion of a surface wave. It is shown that the crater diameter has grown d/a of approximately 25 to d/a of approximately 4 via lip propagation from Ut/a = 5.56 to 17.0 during the time when rebound occurs. A new code is being used to study partitioning of energy and momentum and cratering efficiency with self gravity for finite-sized objects rather than the previously discussed planetary half-space problems. These are important and fundamental subjects which can be addressed with smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) codes. The SPH method was used to model various problems in astrophysics and planetary physics. The initial work demonstrates that the energy budget for normal and oblique impacts are distinctly different than earlier calculations for silicate projectile impact on a silicate half space. Motivated by the first striking radar images of Venus obtained by Magellan, the effect of the atmosphere on impact cratering was studied. In order the further quantify the processes of meteor break-up and trajectory scattering upon break-up, the reentry physics of meteors striking Venus' atmosphere versus that of the Earth were studied.

  12. Craters Modified by Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 2 October 2003

    These craters, located in the southern highland heavily cratered terrain, show heavy degradation, most likely caused by the presence of water ice. A smaller crater is located in the floor of a larger crater, showing lobate ejecta thought to be created by water melted by the force of the impacting body. Gullies on the northern rim of the smaller crater may indicate accumulations of snow and subsequent melting. In the larger crater, the northern rim is greatly softened, with sinuous features suggestive of downslope flow, also potentially caused by creep of ground ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -40.4, Longitude 132.5 East (227.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Khensu Crater on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The dark-floored crater, Khensu, is the target of this image of Ganymede. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. Khensu is located at 2 degrees latitude and 153 degrees longitude in a region of bright terrain known as Uruk Sulcus, and is about 13 kilometers (8 miles) in diameter. Like some other craters on Ganymede, it possesses an unusually dark floor and a bright ejecta blanket. The dark component may be residual material from the impactor that formed the crater. Another possibility is that the impactor may have punched through the bright surface to reveal a dark layer beneath.

    Another large crater named El is partly visible in the top-right corner of the image. This crater is 54 kilometers (34 miles) in diameter and has a small 'pit' in its center. Craters with such a 'central pit' are common across Ganymede and are especially intriguing since they may reveal secrets about the structure of the satellite's shallow subsurface.

    North is to the top-left of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from nearly overhead. The image covers an area about 100 kilometers (62 miles) by 86 kilometers (54 miles) across at a resolution of 111 meters (370 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  14. Khensu Crater on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The dark-floored crater, Khensu, is the target of this image of Ganymede. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. Khensu is located at 2 degrees latitude and 153 degrees longitude in a region of bright terrain known as Uruk Sulcus, and is about 13 kilometers (8 miles) in diameter. Like some other craters on Ganymede, it possesses an unusually dark floor and a bright ejecta blanket. The dark component may be residual material from the impactor that formed the crater. Another possibility is that the impactor may have punched through the bright surface to reveal a dark layer beneath.

    Another large crater named El is partly visible in the top-right corner of the image. This crater is 54 kilometers (34 miles) in diameter and has a small 'pit' in its center. Craters with such a 'central pit' are common across Ganymede and are especially intriguing since they may reveal secrets about the structure of the satellite's shallow subsurface.

    North is to the top-left of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from nearly overhead. The image covers an area about 100 kilometers (62 miles) by 86 kilometers (54 miles) across at a resolution of 111 meters (370 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  15. Young Craters on Smooth Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-15

    This image, from NASA Mariner 10 spacecraft which launched in 1974, shows young craters superposed on smooth plains. Larger young craters have central peaks, flat floors, terraced walls, and radial ejecta deposits.

  16. Unusual Craters on Vesta III

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-22

    This image from NASA Dawn spacecraft shows craters with both sharp and smooth crater rims in asteroid Vesta southern hemisphere. Detailed structure is seen more readily in the the image with a smaller view at right.

  17. Cratered Cones in Tartarus Montes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Many types of craters exist on Mars. Most are generated by impacts of asteroids and comets. However, in this image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the craters may be due to steam explosions.

  18. Terraced Craters and Layered Targets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-12

    Small impact craters usually have simple bowl shapes; however, when the target material has different layers of different strength, then more complicated crater shapes can emerge as shown in image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  19. Anaglyph, Manicouagan Crater, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-27

    Manicouagan Crater is one of the world largest and oldest known impact craters and perhaps the one most readily apparent to astronauts in orbit. This anaglyph is from the instrument onboard NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. 3D glasses needed.

  20. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  1. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  2. Planetary cratering mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a quantitative understanding of the cratering process over a broad range of conditions, we have numerically computed the evolution of impact induced flow fields and calculated the time histories of the major measures of crater geometry (e.g., depth diameter, lip height ...) for variations in planetary gravity (0 to 10 exp 9 cm/sq seconds), material strength (0 to 140 kbar), thermodynamic properties, and impactor radius (0.05 to 5000 km). These results were fit into the framework of the scaling relations of Holsapple and Schmidt (1987). We describe the impact process in terms of four regimes: (1) penetration; (2) inertial; (3) terminal; and (4) relaxation.

  3. Gale Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-14

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of the interior mound of material within Gale Crater. The dark blue material is most likely basaltic sand. Gale Crater is the home of Curiosity Rover. Orbit Number: 44524 Latitude: -4.64054 Longitude: 137.663 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2011-12-28 07:29 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21164

  4. Gale Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of Gale Crater. Basaltic sands are dark blue in this type of false color combination. The Curiosity Rover is located in another portion of Gale Crater, far southwest of this image. Orbit Number: 51803 Latitude: -4.39948 Longitude: 138.116 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2013-08-18 09:04 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21312

  5. Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-25

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows an unnamed crater located on the floor of the much larger Schiaparelli Crater. The dark blue material located in the topographic lows is basaltic sand. Orbit Number: 19495 Latitude: -0.402445 Longitude: 14.3131 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2006-05-07 13:43 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20244

  6. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  7. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  8. Ernutet Crater - Enhanced Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-16

    This enhanced color composite image, made with data from the framing camera aboard NASA's Dawn spacecraft, shows the area around Ernutet crater. The bright red portions appear redder with respect to the rest of Ceres. In a 2017 study in the journal Science, researchers from the Dawn science team found that these red areas around Ernutet are associated with evidence of organic material. Images taken using blue (440 nanometers), green (750 nanometers) and infrared (960 nanometers) spectral filters were combined to create the view. Ernutet Crater measures about 32 miles (52 kilometers) in diameter and is located in the northern hemisphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21419

  9. Filled Crater and Scallops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-28

    In this observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter made for a study of ancient craters, we see the craters filled with smooth material that has subsequently degraded into scallops. These formations might be possibly due to ground ice sublimation. High resolution can help to estimate any differences in roughness on the smoother main mantle and in the eroded hollows. With the enhanced color swath, we might be able to view composition variations of the material. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19288

  10. Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-24

    The THEMIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an unnamed crater located on the floor of Newton Crater. Orbit Number: 57962 Latitude: -42.1218 Longitude: 201.814 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-01-07 07:47 https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21539

  11. Secrets of the Wabar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Shoemaker, Eugene M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the existence of craters in the Empty Quarter of Saudi Arabia created by the impact of meteors in early times. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor's encounter with impact craters; Elimination of craters in the Earth's surface by the action of natural elements; Impact sites' demand for careful scientific inspections; Location of the impact sites.

  12. Hakumyi Crater from LAMO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-20

    This close-up view of Hakumyi crater, as seen by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, provides insight into the origin of the small crater and lobe-shaped flow next to its southern rim. The sharp edges of these features indicate they are relatively recent with respect to the more subdued Hakumyi, which is 43 miles (70 kilometers) wide. The lobate flow ends in a tongue-shaped deposit. A more discrete feature slightly west (left) of the large lobe-shaped flow suggests an ancient or partially developed lobe. These kinds of flow features, which typically are found at high latitudes on Ceres, are expressions of what is termed "mass wasting," meaning the downslope movement of material. This process is initiated by slumping or detachment of material from crater rims. Here the process seems to have been triggered by small craters whose remnant shapes can be discerned at the top of each flow. Dawn took this image from its low-altitude mapping orbit, or LAMO, at a distance of about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 52 degrees North latitude and 26 degrees east longitude. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21414

  13. Cratered Surface of Ceres

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-02

    The surface of Ceres is covered with craters of many shapes and sizes, as seen in this new mosaic of the dwarf planet comprised of images taken by NASA Dawn mission on Feb. 19, 2015 from a distance of nearly 29,000 miles 46,000 kilometers.

  14. Daybreak at Gale Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    This computer-generated view depicts part of Mars at the boundary between darkness and daylight, with an area including Gale Crater beginning to catch morning light. NASA has selected Gale as the landing site for the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  15. Small Gullied Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    18 November 2004 Middle- and polar-latitude martian gullies remain as much a mystery today as they were when first announced in June 2000. Some have argued that they form by running water, others argue they required carbon dioxide in liquid or gas form, still others have proposed that these features form 'dry' by simple landsliding processes (although landslides elsewhere on Mars do not form features that look like the martian gullies). They occur almost exclusively at latitudes higher than 30o in both hemispheres, although they are more common in the southern hemisphere. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a very small gully example in a crater that is only about 1 km across -- roughly the size of the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona. The debris transported through the gullies was deposited on top of light-toned, windblown ripples on the floor of the crater, indicating that the ripples are older. This crater is located near 37.9oS, 169.3oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 490 feet long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. Reading 'Endurance Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image shows the area inside 'Endurance Crater' that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the further back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are 'reading' this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicate that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in 'Eagle Crater.' This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks.

    In figure 1, the layer labeled 'A' in this picture contains broken-up rocks that most closely resemble those of 'Eagle Crater.' Layers 'B,C and D' appear less broken up and more finely laminated. Layer 'E,' on the other hand, looks more like 'A.' At present, the rover is examining layer 'D.'

    So far, data from the rover indicates that the first four layers consist of sulfate-rich, jarosite-containing rocks like those observed in Eagle Crater. This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks, though the materials themselves may have been laid down by wind.

    This image was taken by Opportunity's navigation camera on sol 134 (June 9, 2004).

  17. Concentric Crater Fill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-24

    The bizarre patterns on the floor of this crater in Nilosyrtis Mensae imaged by NASA Mars Odyssey defy an easy explanation. It is possible that some form of periglacial process combined with the vaporization of ground ice to form these patterns.

  18. Reading 'Endurance Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image shows the area inside 'Endurance Crater' that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the further back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are 'reading' this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicate that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in 'Eagle Crater.' This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks.

    In figure 1, the layer labeled 'A' in this picture contains broken-up rocks that most closely resemble those of 'Eagle Crater.' Layers 'B,C and D' appear less broken up and more finely laminated. Layer 'E,' on the other hand, looks more like 'A.' At present, the rover is examining layer 'D.'

    So far, data from the rover indicates that the first four layers consist of sulfate-rich, jarosite-containing rocks like those observed in Eagle Crater. This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks, though the materials themselves may have been laid down by wind.

    This image was taken by Opportunity's navigation camera on sol 134 (June 9, 2004).

  19. Hypervelocity impact cratering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, D. E.; Moises, H.

    1971-01-01

    A summary is presented of prediction calculations on the mechanisms involved in hypervelocity impact cratering and response of earth media. Considered are: (1) a one-gram lithium-magnesium alloys impacting basalt normally at 6.4 km/sec, and (2) a large terrestrial impact corresponding to that of Sierra Madera.

  20. Mercury Heavily Cratered Surface

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-07

    As NASA Mariner 10 approached Mercury at nearly seven miles per second on March 29, 1974, its TV camera took this picture from an altitude of 35,000 kilometers 21,700 miles The picture shows a heavily-cratered surface with many low hills

  1. Rim of Henry Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 02 April 2002) This portion of the rim of Henry Crater has numerous dark streaks located on the slopes of the inner crater wall. These dark slope streaks have been suggested to have formed when the relatively bright dust that mantles the slopes slides downhill, either exposing a dust-free darker surface or creating a darker surface by increasing its roughness. The topography in this region appears muted, indicating the presence of regional dust mantling. The materials on floor of the crater (middle to lower left) are layered, with differing degrees of hardness and resistance to erosion producing cliffs (resistant layers) and ledges (easily eroded layers). These layered materials may have been originally deposited in water, although deposition by other means, such as windblown dust and sand, is also possible. Henry Crater, named after a 19th Century French astronomer, is 170 km in diameter and is located at 10.9o N, 336.7o W (23.3o E) in a region called Arabia Terra.

  2. Big Crater Down South

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-03

    A large crater can be seen in the southern hemisphere of Saturn two-tone moon Iapetus. Lit terrain seen here is on the trailing hemisphere while the leading hemisphere is extremely dark and whose trailing hemisphere is as white as snow.

  3. Rabe Crater Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-06

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows part of the dune field found in a depression on the floor of Rabe Crater. Orbit Number: 57843 Latitude: -43.347 Longitude: 34.6452 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2014-12-28 12:37 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19193

  4. Dunes in Becquerel Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-14

    Dark dunes on the floor of an interior crater in Becquerel, imaged here by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, supply the sand responsible for the erosion of the remarkable, layered deposit to the south. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04002

  5. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes of impact cratering on planetary surfaces and atmospheres as well as collisions of finite-size self-gravitating objects is vitally important to planetary science. The observation has often been made that craters are the most ubiquitous landform on the solid planets and the satellites. The density of craters is used to date surfaces on planets and satellites. For large ringed basin craters (e.g. Chicxulub), the issue of identification of exactly what 'diameter' transient crater is associated with this structure is exemplified by the arguments of Sharpton et al. (1993) versus those of Hildebrand et al. (1995). The size of a transient crater, such as the K/T extinction crater at Yucatan, Mexico, which is thought to be the source of SO,-induced sulfuric acid aerosol that globally acidified surface waters as the result of massive vaporization of CASO, in the target rock, is addressed by our present project. The impact process excavates samples of planetary interiors. The degree to which this occurs (e.g. how deeply does excavation occur for a given crater diameter) has been of interest, both with regard to exposing mantle rocks in crater floors, as well as launching samples into space which become part of the terrestrial meteorite collection (e.g. lunar meteorites, SNC's from Mars). Only in the case of the Earth can we test calculations in the laboratory and field. Previous calculations predict, independent of diameter, that the depth of excavation, normalized by crater diameter, is d(sub ex)/D = 0.085 (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1993). For Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) fragments impacting Jupiter, predicted excavation depths of different gas-rich layers in the atmosphere, were much larger. The trajectory and fate of highly shocked material from a large impact on the Earth, such as the K/T bolide is of interest. Melosh et al. (1990) proposed that the condensed material from the impact upon reentering the Earth's atmosphere induced. radiative

  6. Impact cratering record of Fennoscandia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesonen, L. J.; Henkel, H.

    1992-01-01

    A compilation of circular topographic, morphological, or geophysical structures in Fennoscandia and adjacent areas reveals 62 craterform structures of which 15 appear to be of extraterrestrial origin due to meteorite impact. The majority of the structures are probable and possible impact craters for which there is not yet sufficient proof for impact origin. Four of the proven impact craters contain large volumes of impact melt and many other features of intense shock metamorphism. The age of recognized impact craters vary from prehistoric to late Precambrian. We review the Fennoscandian impact cratering record giving examples of geophysical signatures of impact craters.

  7. Meteor Crater, AZ

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-12

    The Barringer Meteorite Crater (also known as "Meteor Crater") is a gigantic hole in the middle of the arid sandstone of the Arizona desert. A rim of smashed and jumbled boulders, some of them the size of small houses, rises 50 m above the level of the surrounding plain. The crater itself is nearly a 1500 m wide, and 180 m deep. When Europeans first discovered the crater, the plain around it was covered with chunks of meteoritic iron - over 30 tons of it, scattered over an area 12 to 15 km in diameter. Scientists now believe that the crater was created approximately 50,000 years ago. The meteorite which made it was composed almost entirely of nickel-iron, suggesting that it may have originated in the interior of a small planet. It was 50 m across, weighed roughly 300,000 tons, and was traveling at a speed of 65,000 km per hour. This ASTER 3-D perspective view was created by draping an ASTER bands 3-2-1image over a digital elevation model from the US Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset. This image was acquired on May 17, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03490

  8. Europa's Pwyll Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view of the Pwyll impact crater on Jupiter's moon Europa taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the interior structure and surrounding ejecta deposits. Pwyll's location is shown in the background global view taken by Galileo's camera on December 16, 1997. Bright rays seen radiating from Pwyll in the global image indicate that this crater is geologically young. The rim of Pwyll is about 26 kilometers (16 miles) in diameter, and a halo of dark material excavated from below the surface extends a few kilometers beyond the rim. Beyond this dark halo, the surface is bright and numerous secondary craters can be seen. The closeup view of Pwyll, which combines imaging data gathered during the December flyby and the flyby of February 20, 1997, indicates that unlike most fresh impact craters, which have much deeper floors, Pwyll's crater floor is at approximately the same level as the surrounding background terrain.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northeast. This closeup image, centered at approximately 26 degrees south latitude and 271 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 125 by 75 kilometers (75 by 45 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 250 meters (800 feet) across. This image was taken on at a range of 12,400 kilometers (7,400 miles), with the green filter of Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  9. Crater Wall and Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    3D Projection onto MOLA data [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The impact crater observed in this THEMIS image taken in Terra Cimmeria suggests sediments have filled the crater due to the flat and smooth nature of the floor compared to rougher surfaces at higher elevations. The abundance of several smaller impact craters on the floor of the larger crater indicate however that the flat surface has been exposed for an extended period of time. The smooth surface of the crater floor and rougher surfaces at higher elevations are observed in the 3-D THEMIS image that is draped over MOLA topography (2X vertical exaggeration).

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -22.9, Longitude 155.7 East (204.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  10. Europa's Pwyll Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view of the Pwyll impact crater on Jupiter's moon Europa taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the interior structure and surrounding ejecta deposits. Pwyll's location is shown in the background global view taken by Galileo's camera on December 16, 1997. Bright rays seen radiating from Pwyll in the global image indicate that this crater is geologically young. The rim of Pwyll is about 26 kilometers (16 miles) in diameter, and a halo of dark material excavated from below the surface extends a few kilometers beyond the rim. Beyond this dark halo, the surface is bright and numerous secondary craters can be seen. The closeup view of Pwyll, which combines imaging data gathered during the December flyby and the flyby of February 20, 1997, indicates that unlike most fresh impact craters, which have much deeper floors, Pwyll's crater floor is at approximately the same level as the surrounding background terrain.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northeast. This closeup image, centered at approximately 26 degrees south latitude and 271 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 125 by 75 kilometers (75 by 45 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 250 meters (800 feet) across. This image was taken on at a range of 12,400 kilometers (7,400 miles), with the green filter of Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  11. Cratering of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, William B.; Chapman, Clark R.; Housen, Kevin R.

    1991-01-01

    Available crater counts and their interpretations are reviewed, with emphasis on essential scaling considerations and comparisons with hypotheses developed for interpreting the cratering records on other planets and satellites. New approaches are employed to scaling based on new measurements of crater depths and morphology, which show craters in ice to be unexpectedly different from those in rock. It is found that the published crater counts on the Uranian satellites, despite mutual inconsistencies, can be interpreted as compatible with cratering by the heliocentric population of cometary bodies that was responsible for much of the cratering of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Scaling arguments are applied to the catastrophic breakup of icy satellites and ring particles. The importance of large-scale collisions in disrupting the inner Uranian satellites is found to depend on the shape of the size distribution of cometary bodies at large sizes.

  12. Cratering of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Chapman, Clark R.; Housen, Kevin R.

    Available crater counts and their interpretations are reviewed, with emphasis on essential scaling considerations and comparisons with hypotheses developed for interpreting the cratering records on other planets and satellites. New approaches are employed to scaling based on new measurements of crater depths and morphology, which show craters in ice to be unexpectedly different from those in rock. It is found that the published crater counts on the Uranian satellites, despite mutual inconsistencies, can be interpreted as compatible with cratering by the heliocentric population of cometary bodies that was responsible for much of the cratering of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Scaling arguments are applied to the catastrophic breakup of icy satellites and ring particles. The importance of large-scale collisions in disrupting the inner Uranian satellites is found to depend on the shape of the size distribution of cometary bodies at large sizes.

  13. 'Erebus Crater' on the Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is a mosaic assembled from some of the images taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 590th sol (Sept. 21, 2005). The view is toward the south and includes rock exposures north of 'Erebus Crater,' with the crater in the background. The rover will investigate the exposed rocks in the foreground and will take additional panoramic-camera images of Erebus Crater, which is about 300 meters (about 984 feet) across.

    Erebus Crater dwarfs the landing-site crater, 'Eagle Crater,' which measures about 22 meters (72 feet) in diameter. And, it is nearly twice the diameter of 'Endurance Crater,' which, at 130 meters (430 feet) wide, has been compared to a stadium.

    The camera's red filter was used for taking the images in this mosaic. It admits light with a wavelength of 750 nanometers.

  14. 'Erebus Crater' on the Horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-26

    This is a mosaic assembled from some of the images taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 590th sol (Sept. 21, 2005). The view is toward the south and includes rock exposures north of "Erebus Crater," with the crater in the background. The rover will investigate the exposed rocks in the foreground and will take additional panoramic-camera images of Erebus Crater, which is about 300 meters (about 984 feet) across. Erebus Crater dwarfs the landing-site crater, "Eagle Crater," which measures about 22 meters (72 feet) in diameter. And, it is nearly twice the diameter of "Endurance Crater," which, at 130 meters (430 feet) wide, has been compared to a stadium. The camera's red filter was used for taking the images in this mosaic. It admits light with a wavelength of 750 nanometers http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06341

  15. Central pit craters on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Barlow, Nadine G.

    2011-02-01

    Central pit craters are common on Mars, Ganymede and Callisto, and thus are generally believed to require target volatiles in their formation. The purpose of this study is to identify the environmental conditions under which central pit craters form on Ganymede. We have conducted a study of 471 central pit craters with diameters between 5 and 150 km on Ganymede and compared the results to 1604 central pit craters on Mars (diameter range 5-160 km). Both floor and summit pits occur on Mars whereas floor pits dominate on Ganymede. Central peak craters are found in similar locations and diameter ranges as central pit craters on Mars and overlap in location and at diameters <60 km on Ganymede. Central pit craters show no regional variations on either Ganymede or Mars and are not concentrated on specific geologic units. Central pit craters show a range of preservation states, indicating that conditions favoring central pit formation have existed since crater-retaining surfaces have existed on Ganymede and Mars. Central pit craters on Ganymede are generally about three times larger than those on Mars, probably due to gravity scaling although target characteristics and resolution also may play a role. Central pits tend to be larger relative to their parent crater on Ganymede than on Mars, probably because of Ganymede's purer ice crust. A transition to different characteristics occurs in Ganymede's icy crust at depths of 4-7 km based on the larger pit-to-crater-diameter relationship for craters in the 70-130-km-diameter range and lack of central peaks in craters larger than 60-km-diameter. We use our results to constrain the proposed formation models for central pits on these two bodies. Our results are most consistent with the melt-drainage model for central pit formation.

  16. Why Johnny Can't Learn to Read, or Sex Differences in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caukins, Sivan E.

    Beginning with the observation that sex differences affecting the learning process have largely been ignored in our schools, this dissertation reviews literature on the differences in learning characteristics of boys and girls and proposes a proprioceptor stimulation or multisensory approach of teaching. The author maintains that kinesthetic…

  17. National Boy Scout Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This video looks at a NASA sponsored exhibit at the National Boy Scout Jamboree in Fredricksburg, VA. Boy Scouts are shown interacting with NASA researchers and astronauts and touring mockups of Space Station Freedom and Apollo 11. NASA's program to encourage the researchers of tomorrow is detailed.

  18. Boys and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores key gender differences in motivation from a quantitative perspective and presents findings from a qualitative study into boys' perceptions of motivating teachers and motivating pedagogy. Data collected from 3773 high school students suggest that girls score significantly higher than boys in their belief in the value of school,…

  19. Eskimo Boy Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Byron

    "Eskimo Boy Today" provides the reader with an account of what it is like to be a young Eskimo boy living in Barrow, Alaska, today. Accounts of his life at school depict the typical curriculum and learning activities, while accounts of his home life depict typical foods, clothing, and housing. The natural resources and their relationship to the…

  20. Turn Your Boys into Readers!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Girls outscore boys in reading proficiency levels; the gender gap is startling and concerning. The myth that boys won't read or that it's not "cool" for boys to love reading plays a big part in how these low levels come to be. Low expectations from teachers, and an assumption that boys prefer physical activity, mean that boys often don't find…

  1. Degradation of Victoria crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, John A.; Wilson, Sharon A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-11-01

    The ~750 m diameter and ~75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, is a degraded primary impact structure retaining a ~5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by ~3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is 120-220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500-750 m across indicates that the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by ~150 m and infilled by ~50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for most crater modification, but lesser mass wasting or gully activity contributions cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for ~50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is ~20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when ~1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped <10-20 cm of darker, regional basaltic sands. Greater relief along the rim enabled meters of erosion. Comparison between Victoria and regional craters leads to definition of a crater degradation sequence dominated by eolian erosion and infilling over time.

  2. Crater in Cydonia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-16

    This image shows the dissected interior of a crater in the Cydonia region of Mars. The flat-topped buttes and mesas in the northern portion of the image were once a continuous layer of material that filled the crater. Since deposition, the material has been disturbed and dissected. The process that causes such landforms is not well known, but likely involves frozen subsurface water that may have found its way to the surface. The surfaces on the mesas are not rough, suggesting that the whole scene is mantled with fine dust, masking the details that may give clues to whether surface water was involved at some point in the past. Small recent channels can be seen in the lower left. This is an indication of relatively recent small-scale surface activity, which has been could have been volcanic, fluvial, or some process involving subsurface volatiles (ice). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04030

  3. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  4. Northern Plains 'Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 December 2004 The lower left (southwest) corner of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the location of a somewhat filled and buried meteor impact crater on the northern plains of Mars. The dark dots are boulders. A portion of a similar feature is seen in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image. This picture, showing landforms (including the odd mound north/northeast of the crater) that are typical of the martian northern lowland plains, was obtained as part of the MGS MOC effort to support the search for a landing site for the Phoenix Mars Scout lander. Phoenix will launch in 2007 and land on the northern plains in 2008. This image is located near 68.0oN, 227.4oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  5. Crater and Caldera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-07

    This VIS image shows two circular features. The flat floored feature at the top of the image is the summit caldera of Elysium Mons and was formed by volcanic activity. The bowl-shaped feature next to the caldera is an impact crater. Orbit Number: 65587 Latitude: 24.3248 Longitude: 146.842 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-09-26 07:14 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21159

  6. Fans on Crater Rims

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-14

    Gas under pressure will choose an easy escape route. In this image, the terrain is covered with a seasonal layer of dry ice. The weak spots, for gas sublimating from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer to escape, appear to be around craters, where the surface was broken and pulverized by an impact. Fans of surface material deposited on top of the seasonal ice layer show where the escape vents are. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21271

  7. Trouvelot Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Like many of the craters in the Oxia Palus region of Mars, Trouvelot Crater hosts an eroded, light-toned, sedimentary deposit on its floor. Compared with the much larger example in Becquerel Crater to the NE, the Trouvelot deposit has been so eroded by the scouring action of dark, wind-blown sand that very little of it remains. Tiny outliers of bright material separated from the main mass attest to the once, more really extensive coverage by the deposit. A similar observation can be made for White Rock, the best known example of a bright, crater interior deposit. The origin of the sediments in these deposits remains enigmatic but they are likely the result of fallout from ash or dust carried by the thin martian atmosphere.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Young Crater - Again

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-03

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the same young crater from earlier this week. In this image we can see how the thin radial ejecta has lapped up and over the ridge at the bottom of the image. Orbit Number: 66654 Latitude: -44.4179 Longitude: 139.201 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-12-23 04:04 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21303

  9. Galle Crater Floor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-05

    The unusual texture seen in this image of Galle Crater is likely layered deposits that have been eroded. Small dune and windstreak features in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, indicate that winds are part of the erosive process. Orbit Number: 57733 Latitude: -51.7743 Longitude: 329.135 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2014-12-19 11:13 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19191

  10. Small Craters on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's icy moon, Europa, reveals craters which range in size from about 30 meters to over 450 meters (slightly over a quarter of a mile) in diameter. The large number of craters seen here is unusual for Europa. This section of Conamara Chaos lies inside a bright ray of material which was ejected by the large impact crater, Pwyll, 1000 kilometers (620 miles) to the south. The presence of craters within the bright ray suggests that many are secondaries which formed from chunks of material that were thrown out by the enormous energy of the impact which formed Pwyll.

    North is to the upper right of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The image, centered at 9 degrees latitude and 274 degrees longitude, covers an area approximately 8 by 4 kilometers (5 by 2.5 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 20 meters (66 feet) across. The images were taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 960 kilometers (590 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  11. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  12. Occator Crater: Enhanced View

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-06

    The intriguing brightest spots on Ceres lie in a crater named Occator, which is about 60 miles (90 kilometers) across and 2 miles (4 kilometers) deep. This image comes from an animation, shown in PIA19619, generated using data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Vertical relief has been exaggerated by a factor of five. Exaggerating the relief helps scientists understand and visualize the topography much more easily, and highlights features that are sometimes subtle. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19617

  13. Crater gradation in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, J. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Crumpler, L.S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hahn, B.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Li, R.; Soderblom, L.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Wright, S.P.; Watters, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers investigated numerous craters in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum during the first ???400 sols of their missions. Craters vary in size and preservation state but are mostly due to secondary impacts at Gusev and primary impacts at Meridiani. Craters at both locations are modified primarily by eolian erosion and infilling and lack evidence for modification by aqueous processes. Effects of gradation on crater form are dependent on size, local lithology, slopes, and availability of mobile sediments. At Gusev, impacts into basaltic rubble create shallow craters and ejecta composed of resistant rocks. Ejecta initially experience eolian stripping, which becomes weathering-limited as lags develop on ejecta surfaces and sediments are trapped within craters. Subsequent eolian gradation depends on the slow production of fines by weathering and impacts and is accompanied by minor mass wasting. At Meridiani the sulfate-rich bedrock is more susceptible to eolian erosion, and exposed crater rims, walls, and ejecta are eroded, while lower interiors and low-relief surfaces are increasingly infilled and buried by mostly basaltic sediments. Eolian processes outpace early mass wasting, often produce meters of erosion, and mantle some surfaces. Some small craters were likely completely eroded/buried. Craters >100 m in diameter on the Hesperian-aged floor of Gusev are generally more pristine than on the Amazonian-aged Meridiani plains. This conclusion contradicts interpretations from orbital views, which do not readily distinguish crater gradation state at Meridiani and reveal apparently subdued crater forms at Gusev that may suggest more gradation than has occurred. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Fractured Craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two highly fractured craters are visible in this high resolution image of Jupiter's moon, Ganymede. NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The two craters in the center of the image lie in the ancient dark terrain of Marius Regio, at 40 degrees latitude and 201 degrees longitude, at the border of a region of bright grooved terrain known as Byblus Sulcus (the eastern portion of which is visible on the left of this image). Pervasive fracturing has occurred in this area that has completely disrupted these craters and destroyed their southern and western walls. Such intense fracturing has occurred over much of Ganymede's surface and has commonly destroyed older features. The image covers an area approximately 26 kilometers (16 miles) by 18 kilometers (11 miles) across at a resolution of 86 meters (287 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  15. Mare Chromium Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This crater, located in Mare Chromium, shows evidence of exterior modification, with little interior modification. While the rim is still visible, the ejecta blanket has been removed or covered. There is some material at the bottom of the crater, but the interior retains the bowl shape from the initial formation of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.4, Longitude 174.4 East (185.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Gale Crater Surface Materials

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-19

    Gale Crater, home to NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, shows a new face in this mosaic image made using data from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter. The colors come from an image processing technique that identifies mineral differences in surface materials and displays them in false colors. For example, windblown dust appears pale pink and olivine-rich basalt looks purple. The bright pink on Gale's floor appears due to a mix of basaltic sand and windblown dust. The blue at the summit of Gale's central mound, Mount Sharp, probably comes from local materials exposed there. The typical average Martian surface soil looks grayish-green. Scientists use false-color images such as these to identify places of potential geologic interest. The diameter of the crater is 96 miles (154 kilometers). North is up. THEMIS and other instruments on Mars Odyssey have been studying Mars from orbit since 2001. Curiosity landed in the northeastern portion of Gale Crater in 2012 and climbed onto the flank of Mount Sharp in 2014. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19674

  17. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  18. Mare Chromium Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This crater, located in Mare Chromium, shows evidence of exterior modification, with little interior modification. While the rim is still visible, the ejecta blanket has been removed or covered. There is some material at the bottom of the crater, but the interior retains the bowl shape from the initial formation of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.4, Longitude 174.4 East (185.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Xevioso Crater on Ceres

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-26

    Xevioso Crater is the small (5.3 miles, 8.5 kilometers in diameter) crater associated with bright ejecta toward the top of this image, taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft. It is one of the newly named craters on Ceres. Xevioso is located in the vicinity of Ahuna Mons, the tall, lonely mountain seen toward the bottom of the picture. Given that the small impact that formed Xevioso was able to excavate bright material, scientists suspect the material may be found at shallow depth. Its nature and relationship to other bright regions on Ceres is under analysis. The asymmetrical distribution of this bright ejecta indicates Xevioso formed via an oblique impact. Another view of Xevioso can be found here. Xevioso is named for the Fon god of thunder and fertility from the Kingdom of Dahomey, which was located in a region that is now the west African country of Benin. Dawn acquired this picture on October 15, 2015, from its high altitude mapping orbit at about 915 miles (1,470 kilometers) above the surface. The center coordinates of this image are 3.8 degrees south latitude, 314 degrees east longitude, and its resolution is 450 feet (140 meters) per pixel. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21907

  20. Fractured Craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two highly fractured craters are visible in this high resolution image of Jupiter's moon, Ganymede. NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The two craters in the center of the image lie in the ancient dark terrain of Marius Regio, at 40 degrees latitude and 201 degrees longitude, at the border of a region of bright grooved terrain known as Byblus Sulcus (the eastern portion of which is visible on the left of this image). Pervasive fracturing has occurred in this area that has completely disrupted these craters and destroyed their southern and western walls. Such intense fracturing has occurred over much of Ganymede's surface and has commonly destroyed older features. The image covers an area approximately 26 kilometers (16 miles) by 18 kilometers (11 miles) across at a resolution of 86 meters (287 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  1. Terra Cimmeria Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater in the Terra Cimmeria region of Mars. The unnamed crater hosting this image is just east of Molesworth Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.7, Longitude 152 East (208 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Isidis Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater located south of the Isidis Planitia region of Mars. As with the previous unnamed crater landslide, this one formed due to slope failure of the inner crater rim.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.9, Longitude 90.8 East (269.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Terra Cimmeria Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater in the Terra Cimmeria region of Mars. The unnamed crater hosting this image is just east of Molesworth Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.7, Longitude 152 East (208 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Isidis Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater located south of the Isidis Planitia region of Mars. As with the previous unnamed crater landslide, this one formed due to slope failure of the inner crater rim.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.9, Longitude 90.8 East (269.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Degradation studies of Martian impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    The amount of obliteration suffered by Martian impact craters is quantified by comparing measurable attributes of the current crater shape to those values expected for a fresh crater of identical size. Crater diameters are measured from profiles obtained using photoclinometry across the structure. The relationship between the diameter of a fresh crater and a crater depth, floor width, rim height, central peak height, etc. was determined by empirical studies performed on fresh Martian impact craters. We utilized the changes in crater depth and rim height to judge the degree of obliteration suffered by Martian impact craters.

  6. Iturralde Crater, Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA scientists will venture into an isolated part of the Bolivian Amazon to try and uncover the origin of a 5 mile (8 kilometer) diameter crater there known as the Iturralde Crater. Traveling to this inhospitable forest setting, the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will seek to determine if the unusual circular crater was created by a meteor or comet. Organized by Dr. Peter Wasilewski of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will be led by Dr. Tim Killeen of Conservation International, which is based in Bolivia. Killeen will be assisted by Dr. Compton Tucker of Goddard. The team intends to collect and analyze rocks and soil, look for glass particles that develop from meteor impacts and study magnetic properties in the area to determine if the Iturralde site was indeed created by a meteor.

    This image was acquired on June 29, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  7. Iturralde Crater, Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA scientists will venture into an isolated part of the Bolivian Amazon to try and uncover the origin of a 5 mile (8 kilometer) diameter crater there known as the Iturralde Crater. Traveling to this inhospitable forest setting, the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will seek to determine if the unusual circular crater was created by a meteor or comet. Organized by Dr. Peter Wasilewski of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will be led by Dr. Tim Killeen of Conservation International, which is based in Bolivia. Killeen will be assisted by Dr. Compton Tucker of Goddard. The team intends to collect and analyze rocks and soil, look for glass particles that develop from meteor impacts and study magnetic properties in the area to determine if the Iturralde site was indeed created by a meteor.

    This image was acquired on June 29, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  8. Mannann'an Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This composite view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the rim and interior of the impact crater, Mannann'an, on Jupiter's moon, Europa. A high resolution image (20 meters per picture element) was combined with lower resolution (80 meters per picture element) color images taken through violet, green and near-infrared filters, to produce this synthetic color composite image. The color data can be used to distinguish between regions of purer (clean) and more contaminated (dirty) ice on the surface, and also offers information on the size of the ice grains. The reddish brown material is thought to be dirty ice, while the bluish areas inside the crater are purer ice. The crater rim is on the left at the boundary between the reddish brown material and the gray material.

    The high resolution data show small features inside the crater, including concentric fractures and a spider-like set of fractures near the right (east) edge of the image. For a more regional perspective, the Mannann'an crater can be seen as a large circular feature with bright rays in the lower left corner of a regional image from Galileo's first orbit of Jupiter in June 1996.

    North is to the top of the picture and the Sun illuminates the scene from the east (right). The image, centered at 3 degrees north latitude and 240 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 18 by 4 kilometers (11 by 2.5 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 40 meters (44 yards) across. The images were taken by the spacecraft's onboard solid state imaging camera when Galileo flew by Europa on March 29th, 1998 at a distance of 1,934 kilometers (1,200 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo

  9. Mannann'an Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This composite view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the rim and interior of the impact crater, Mannann'an, on Jupiter's moon, Europa. A high resolution image (20 meters per picture element) was combined with lower resolution (80 meters per picture element) color images taken through violet, green and near-infrared filters, to produce this synthetic color composite image. The color data can be used to distinguish between regions of purer (clean) and more contaminated (dirty) ice on the surface, and also offers information on the size of the ice grains. The reddish brown material is thought to be dirty ice, while the bluish areas inside the crater are purer ice. The crater rim is on the left at the boundary between the reddish brown material and the gray material.

    The high resolution data show small features inside the crater, including concentric fractures and a spider-like set of fractures near the right (east) edge of the image. For a more regional perspective, the Mannann'an crater can be seen as a large circular feature with bright rays in the lower left corner of a regional image from Galileo's first orbit of Jupiter in June 1996.

    North is to the top of the picture and the Sun illuminates the scene from the east (right). The image, centered at 3 degrees north latitude and 240 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 18 by 4 kilometers (11 by 2.5 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 40 meters (44 yards) across. The images were taken by the spacecraft's onboard solid state imaging camera when Galileo flew by Europa on March 29th, 1998 at a distance of 1,934 kilometers (1,200 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo

  10. Proctor Crater Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image, located near 30E and 47.5S, displays sand dunes within Proctor Crater. These dunes are composed of basaltic sand that has collected in the bottom of the crater. The topographic depression of the crater forms a sand trap that prevents the sand from escaping. Dune fields are common in the bottoms of craters on Mars and appear as dark splotches that lean up against the downwind walls of the craters. Dunes are useful for studying both the geology and meteorology of Mars. The sand forms by erosion of larger rocks, but it is unclear when and where this erosion took place on Mars or how such large volumes of sand could be formed. The dunes also indicate the local wind directions by their morphology. In this case, there are few clear slipfaces that would indicate the downwind direction. The crests of the dunes also typically run north-south in the image. This dune form indicates that there are probably two prevailing wind directions that run east and west (left to right and right to left).

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project

  11. Carbon associated nitrate (CAN) in the Ediacaran Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, California and links to the Shuram negative carbon isotope excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, Z. Y. G.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Bergmann, K.; Loyd, S. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Berelson, W.; Gaines, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen, a major nutrient of marine primary production whose many redox states are linked through biological processes to O2, may afford better understanding of changes in post-Great Oxidation Event (GOE) environmental redox conditions. Using a novel approach to quantify nitrate content in carbonates, we identified a trend of CAN increase in the late-Proterozoic, including several distinct peaks within a carbonate succession of the Sonora province, Mexico, deposited ~630-500 Ma. The goal of the current study was to investigate CAN variability in the context of the global "Shuram" event, a large negative δ13C excursion expressed in Rainstorm member carbonates of the Johnnie Formation in Death Valley, CA. The lower Rainstorm Member "Johnnie Oolite", a time-transgressive, regionally extensive, shallow dolomitic oolite, was sampled. CAN concentrations ranged from 7.31 to 127.36 nmol/g, with higher values measured toward the base of the bed. This trend held at each sampled locality, along with a tendency towards decreasing CAN with larger magnitude negative δ13C excursions. Modern analog ooids formed in low-latitude marine environments lack CAN, consistent with their formation in low-nitrate waters of the euphotic zone characteristic of the modern ocean nitrogen cycling. In contrast, maximum values within the Johnnie oolite exceed by a factor of five to seven CAN measured in carbonates deposited below the main nitracline in the modern ocean, implying high nitrate content within shallow depositional environments. Johnnie oolite data, broadly consistent with the Sonora sequence findings, may indicate large perturbations in the Ediacaran nitrogen cycle immediately preceding the negative δ13C excursion. The implication of these findings for possible changes in the Ediacaran nitrogen, oxygen and carbon biogeochemical cycling will be further discussed.

  12. Secondary Craters in Bas Relief

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-17

    NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) captured this region of Mars, sprayed with secondary craters from 10-kilometer Zunil Crater to the northwest. Secondary craters form from rocks ejected at high speed from the primary crater, which then impact the ground at sufficiently high speed to make huge numbers of much smaller craters over a large region. In this scene, however, the secondary crater ejecta has an unusual raised-relief appearance like bas-relief sculpture. How did that happen? One idea is that the region was covered with a layer of fine-grained materials like dust or pyroclastics about 1 to 2 meters thick when the Zunil impact occurred (about a million years ago), and the ejecta served to harden or otherwise protect the fine-grained layer from later erosion by the wind. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21591

  13. The Martian impact cratering record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Croft, Steven K.; Barlow, Nadine G.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the Martian impact cratering record is presented. The major differences in impact crater morphology and morphometry between Mars and the moon and Mercury are argued to be largely the result of subsurface volatiles on Mars. In general, the depth to these volatiles may decrease with increasing latitude in the southern hemisphere, but the base of this layer may be at a more or less constant depth. The Martial crustal dichotomy could have been the result of a very large impact near the end of the accretion of Mars. Monte Carlo computer simulations suggest that such an impact was not only possible, but likely. The Martian highland cratering record shows a marked paucity of craters less than about 30 km in diameter relative to the lunar highlands. This paucity of craters was probably the result of the obliteration of craters by an early period of intense erosion and deposition by aeolian, fluvial, and glacial processes.

  14. The Martian impact cratering record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Croft, Steven K.; Barlow, Nadine G.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the Martian impact cratering record is presented. The major differences in impact crater morphology and morphometry between Mars and the moon and Mercury are argued to be largely the result of subsurface volatiles on Mars. In general, the depth to these volatiles may decrease with increasing latitude in the southern hemisphere, but the base of this layer may be at a more or less constant depth. The Martial crustal dichotomy could have been the result of a very large impact near the end of the accretion of Mars. Monte Carlo computer simulations suggest that such an impact was not only possible, but likely. The Martian highland cratering record shows a marked paucity of craters less than about 30 km in diameter relative to the lunar highlands. This paucity of craters was probably the result of the obliteration of craters by an early period of intense erosion and deposition by aeolian, fluvial, and glacial processes.

  15. The Martian impact cratering record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Croft, Steven K.; Barlow, Nadine G.

    A detailed analysis of the Martian impact cratering record is presented. The major differences in impact crater morphology and morphometry between Mars and the moon and Mercury are argued to be largely the result of subsurface volatiles on Mars. In general, the depth to these volatiles may decrease with increasing latitude in the southern hemisphere, but the base of this layer may be at a more or less constant depth. The Martial crustal dichotomy could have been the result of a very large impact near the end of the accretion of Mars. Monte Carlo computer simulations suggest that such an impact was not only possible, but likely. The Martian highland cratering record shows a marked paucity of craters less than about 30 km in diameter relative to the lunar highlands. This paucity of craters was probably the result of the obliteration of craters by an early period of intense erosion and deposition by aeolian, fluvial, and glacial processes.

  16. Fluidized Crater Ejecta Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft continued to obtain high resolution images of the red planet into August 1998. At this time, each ground track (the portion of Mars available for MOC imaging on a given orbit) covers areas from about 40oN on the late afternoon side of the planet, up over the sunlit north polar cap, and down the early morning side of Mars to about 20oN latitude. Early morning and late afternoon views provide good shadowing to reveal subtle details on the martian surface. Views of Mars with such excellent lighting conditions will not be seen by MOC once MGS's Science Phasing Orbits end in mid-September 1998.

    The image shown here, MOC image 47903, was targeted on Friday afternoon (PDT), August 7, 1998. This picture of ejecta from a nameless 9.1 kilometer (5.7 mile)-diameter crater was designed to take full advantage of the present lighting conditions. When the image was taken (around 5:38 p.m. (PDT) on Saturday, August 8, 1998), the Sun had just risen and was only about 6o above the eastern horizon. With the Sun so low in the local sky, the contrast between sunlit and shadowed surfaces allowed new, subtle details to be revealed on the surface of the crater ejecta deposit.

    The crater shown here has ejecta of a type that was first identified in Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images as 'fluidized' ejecta. Ejecta is the material that is thrown out from the crater during the explosion that results when a meteor--piece of a comet or asteroid--collides with the planet. Fluidized ejecta is characterized by its lobate appearance, and sometimes by the presence of a ridge along the margin of the ejecta deposit. In the case of the crater shown here, there are two ridges that encircle the crater ejecta--this type of ejecta deposit is sometimes called a double-lobe rampart deposit. The MOC image shows that this particular crater also has 'normal' ejecta that occurs out on the plains, beyond the outermost ridge of

  17. Fluidized Crater Ejecta Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft continued to obtain high resolution images of the red planet into August 1998. At this time, each ground track (the portion of Mars available for MOC imaging on a given orbit) covers areas from about 40oN on the late afternoon side of the planet, up over the sunlit north polar cap, and down the early morning side of Mars to about 20oN latitude. Early morning and late afternoon views provide good shadowing to reveal subtle details on the martian surface. Views of Mars with such excellent lighting conditions will not be seen by MOC once MGS's Science Phasing Orbits end in mid-September 1998.

    The image shown here, MOC image 47903, was targeted on Friday afternoon (PDT), August 7, 1998. This picture of ejecta from a nameless 9.1 kilometer (5.7 mile)-diameter crater was designed to take full advantage of the present lighting conditions. When the image was taken (around 5:38 p.m. (PDT) on Saturday, August 8, 1998), the Sun had just risen and was only about 6o above the eastern horizon. With the Sun so low in the local sky, the contrast between sunlit and shadowed surfaces allowed new, subtle details to be revealed on the surface of the crater ejecta deposit.

    The crater shown here has ejecta of a type that was first identified in Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images as 'fluidized' ejecta. Ejecta is the material that is thrown out from the crater during the explosion that results when a meteor--piece of a comet or asteroid--collides with the planet. Fluidized ejecta is characterized by its lobate appearance, and sometimes by the presence of a ridge along the margin of the ejecta deposit. In the case of the crater shown here, there are two ridges that encircle the crater ejecta--this type of ejecta deposit is sometimes called a double-lobe rampart deposit. The MOC image shows that this particular crater also has 'normal' ejecta that occurs out on the plains, beyond the outermost ridge of

  18. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  19. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  20. Identification of craters on Moon using Crater Density Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    Lunar craters are the most noticeable features on the face of the moon. They take up 40.96% of the lunar surface and, their accumulated area is approximately three times as much as the lunar surface area. There are many myths about the moon. Some says moon is made of cheese. The moon and the sun chase each other across the sky etc. but scientifically the moon are closest and are only natural satellite of earth. The orbit plane of the moon is tilted by 5° and orbit period around the earth is 27-3 days. There are two eclipse i.e. lunar eclipse and solar eclipse which always comes in pair. Moon surface has 3 parts i.e. highland, Maria, and crater. For crater diagnostic crater density parameter is one of the means for measuring distance can be easily identity the density between two craters. Crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) is being computed for lunar surface using TMC and MiniSAR image data and hence, also the age for the selected test sites of mars is also determined. The GIS-based program uses the density and orientation of individual craters within LCCs (as vector points) to identify potential source craters through a series of cluster identification and ejection modeling analyses. JMars software is also recommended and operated only the time when connected with server but work can be done in Arc GIS with the help of Arc Objects and Model Builder. The study plays a vital role to determine the lunar surface based on crater (shape, size and density) and exploring affected craters on the basis of height, weight and velocity. Keywords: Moon; Crater; MiniSAR.

  1. Cratered terrain in Terra Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 30 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a region in Terra Meridiani near -12o S, 358o W (2o E). An old, heavily degraded channel can be seen from the lower (southern) portion of the image toward the top. This channel appears to terminate abruptly at the rim of a 10 km diameter crater. This apparent 'superposition' of the crater on top of the channel suggests that the impact crater was created after the channel was formed. This crater has two 3-km sized blocks of material that have slumped off from the lower left segment of the original crater rim. These immense blocks must have moved as a single unit because the rock layers that can be seen in the original wall of the crater can still be seen in these detached blocks. The walls of several craters in this image show vague hints of possible gully formation at the bottom of pronounced rock layers, with the suggestion of alcoves above the individual gullies. Well-developed gullies that were imaged by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on Mars Global Surveyor have been suggested to form by seepage and runoff of a fluid. The MOC has observed these gullies in numerous craters and channels further south, but they are uncommon at latitudes this close to the equator. Several sections of the crater walls appear to have ridges and troughs formed by the dry avalanche of loose rock, and a similar process of dry avalanche may account for the gullies seen in this THEMIS image. Patches of lighter material, possibly small dunes ripples, can be seen in several places throughout this image. The Story When the walls come tumbling down! Take a closer look at the bright linear ridges within a deep crater near the center of this image (bottom, left-hand side of the crater). Almost 2 miles long, these chunks of material slumped off the crater side in one fell swoop. Phoozhj! Down they came as one massive unit. You can tell, because the rock layers seen in the original wall of the crater are also still there in the

  2. Why do complex impact craters have elevated crater rims?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Sturm, Sebastian; Krueger, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Most of the complex impact craters on the Moon and on Mars have elevated crater rims like their simple counterparts. The raised rim of simple craters is the result of (i) the deposition of a coherent proximal ejecta blanket at the edge of the transient cavity (overturned flap) and (ii) a structural uplift of the pre-impact surface near the transient cavity rim during the excavation stage of cratering [1]. The latter occurs either by plastic thickening or localized buckling of target rocks, as well as by the emplacement of interthrust wedges [2] or by the injection of dike material. Ejecta and the structural uplift contribute equally to the total elevation of simple crater rims. The cause of elevated crater rims of large complex craters [3] is less obvious, but still, the rim height scales with the final crater diameter. Depending on crater size, gravity, and target rheology, the final crater rim of complex craters can be situated up to 1.5-2.0 transient crater radii distance from the crater center. Here the thickness of the ejecta blanket is only a fraction of that occurring at the rim of simple craters, e.g. [4], and thus cannot account for a strong elevation. Likewise, plastic thickening including dike injection of the underlying target may not play a significant role at this distance any more. We started to systematically investigate the structural uplift and ejecta thickness along the rim of complex impact craters to understand the cause of their elevation. Our studies of two lunar craters (Bessel, 16 km diameter and Euler, 28 km diameter) [5] and one unnamed complex martian crater (16 km diameter) [6] showed that the structural uplift at the final crater rim makes 56-67% of the total rim elevation while the ejecta thickness contributes 33-44%. Thus with increasing distance from the transient cavity rim, the structural uplift seems to dominate. As dike injection and plastic thickening are unlikely at such a distance from the transient cavity, we propose that

  3. The Noachian Impact Cratering Record Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, N. G.

    2017-10-01

    New image and topographic data are being used to revised the author's Catalog of Large Martian Impact Craters. Additional craters have been identified, which adjusts the crater size-frequency distribution curves of Noachian terrains.

  4. Heavily Cratered Terrain at South Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-08-05

    NASA Mariner 10 photo reveals a heavily cratered terrain on Mercury with a prominent scrap extending several hundred kilometers across the upper left. A crater, nested in a larger crater, is at top center.

  5. Sedimentary Rock Layers on a Crater Floor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-20

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter covers layered sedimentary rocks on the floor of an impact crater north of Eberswalde Crater. There may have been a lake in this crater billions of years ago.

  6. Dark Material Associated with and between Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-18

    This image from NASA Dawn spacecraft shows areas of dark material which are both associated with impact craters and between these craters on asteroid Vesta. Dark material is seen cropping out of the rims and sides of the larger craters.

  7. Martian Cratering 4: Mariner 9 Initial Analysis of Cratering Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1973-01-01

    Early analyses of cratering and other Martian surface properties that indicated extensive ancient erosion have been strongly supported by Mariner 9 data. By their great variations in density, these craters indicate a history of Martian erosion and crustal development intermediate between earth and the moon.

  8. Bizarre Crater Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 June 2003

    The height of the interior mound of sediment inside this crater exceeds the crater rim heights by 900 meters (3,000 ft). This is a confounding problem. How does all this material get inside this crater and actually rise higher than its holding chamber? What is this material? Where did it come from? Why is it still here? It is exactly these kinds of enigmas that makes Mars so very interesting.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.2, Longitude 26.3 East (333.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Becquerel Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 28 May 2002) The finely layered deposit in Becquerel crater, seen in the center of this THEMIS image, is slowly being eroded away by the action of windblown sand. Dark sand from a source north of the bright deposit is collecting along its northern edge, forming impressive barchan style dunes. These vaguely boomerang-shaped dunes form with their two points extending in the downwind direction, demonstrating that the winds capable of moving sand grains come from the north. Grains that leave the dunes climb the eroding stair-stepped layers, collecting along the cliff faces before reaching the crest of the deposit. Once there, the sand grains are unimpeded and continue down the south side of the deposit without any significant accumulation until they fall off the steep cliffs of the southern margin. The boat-hull shaped mounds and ridges of bright material called yardangs form in response to the scouring action of the migrating sand. To the west, the deposit has thinned enough that the barchan dunes extend well into the deeply eroded north-south trending canyons. Sand that reaches the south side collects and reforms barchan dunes with the same orientation as those on the north side of the deposit. Note the abrupt transition between the bright material and the dark crater floor on the southern margin. Steep cliffs are present with no indication of rubble from the obvious erosion that produced them. The lack of debris at the base of the cliffs is evidence that the bright material is readily broken up into particles that can be transported away by the wind. The geological processes that are destroying the Becquerel crater deposit appear active today. But it is also possible that they are dormant, awaiting a particular set of climatic conditions that produces the right winds and perhaps even temperatures to allow the erosion to continue.

  10. Gale Crater Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The eroded, layered deposit in Gale Crater is a mound of material rising 3 km above the crater floor. It has been sculpted by wind and possibly water to produce the dramatic landforms seen today. The origin of the sedimentary material that composes the mound remains a contested issue: was it produced from sedimentation in an ancient crater lake or by airfall onto dry land?

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -5.1, Longitude 137.5 East (222.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  11. Impactites from Popigai Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masaitis, V. L.

    1992-01-01

    Impactites (tagamites and suevites) from Popigai impact crater, whose diameter is about 100 km, are distributed over an area of 5000 sq km. The continuous sheet of suevite overlies the allogenic polymict breccia and partly authogenic breccia, and may also be observed in lenses or irregular bodies. The thickness of suevites in the central part of the crater is more than 100 m. Suevites may be distinguished by content of vitroclasts, lithoclasts, and crystalloclasts, by their dimensions, and by type of cementation, which reflects the facial settings of ejection of crushed and molten material, its sedimentation and lithification. Tagamites (impact melt rocks) are distributed on the surface predominantly in the western sector of the crater. The most characteristic are thick sheetlike bodies overlying the allogenic breccia and occurring in suevites where minor irregular bodies are widespread. The maximal thickness of separate tagamite sheets is up to 600 m. Tagamites, whose matrix is crystallized to a different degree, include fragments of minerals and gneiss blocks, among them shocked and thermally metamorphosed ones. Tagamite sheets have a complex inner structure; separate horizontal zones distinguish in crystallinity and fragment saturation. Differentiation in the impact melt in situ was not observed. The average chemical compositions of tagamites and suevites are similar, and correspond to the composition of biotite-garnet gneisses of the basement. According to the content of supplied Ir, Ni, and other siderophiles, impact melt was contaminated by 5 percent cosmic matter of collided body, probably ordinary chondrite. The total volume of remaining products of chilled impact melt is about 1750 cu km. Half this amount is represented by tagamite bodies. Though impact melt was in general well homogenized, the trend analysis showed that the concentric zonation is distribution of SiO2, MgO, and Na2O and the bandlike distribution of FeO and Al2O3 content testifies to a

  12. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 April 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the wall of a large impact crater in Newton Basin near 41.9oS, 158.1oW. Such gullies may have formed by downslope movement of wet debris--i.e., water. Unfortunately, because the responsible fluid (if there was one) is no longer present today, only the geomorphology of the channels and debris aprons can be used to deduce that water might have been involved. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  13. Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-07

    The THEMIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color images shows an unnamed crater in Acidalia Planitia. The "dark blue" material is likely basaltic sand. Orbit Number: 19321 Latitude: 42.1856 Longitude: 359.705 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2006-04-23 05:40 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20231

  14. Firsoff Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-21

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of the interior deposit of Firsoff Crater. The dark blue material is most likely basaltic sand. Orbit Number: 43854 Latitude: 2.72924 Longitude: 350.449 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2011-11-03 05:57 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21018

  15. Firsoff Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-13

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of the interior deposit in Firsoff Crater. The dark blue material is most likely basaltic sand. Orbit Number: 43467 Latitude: 2.73971 Longitude: 350.606 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2011-10-02 09:29 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21011

  16. Galle Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-22

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of the floor of Galle Crater. Dark dunes are visible in the center of the image. The dark blue color typically indicates basaltic sand. Orbit Number: 58800 Latitude: -51.5789 Longitude: 328.788 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-03-17 07:20 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20243

  17. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 April 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the wall of a large impact crater in Newton Basin near 41.9oS, 158.1oW. Such gullies may have formed by downslope movement of wet debris--i.e., water. Unfortunately, because the responsible fluid (if there was one) is no longer present today, only the geomorphology of the channels and debris aprons can be used to deduce that water might have been involved. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  18. Pair of Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.5 meters per pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a pair of small meteor impact craters in the Arena Colles region of Mars, located north of Isidis Planitia.

    Location near: 22.7oN, 278.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  19. Newton Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-04

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows some of the floor of Newton Crater. The small dark bluish features are sand dunes. Orbit Number: 50864 Latitude: -41.5788 Longitude: 201.592 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2013-06-02 02:53 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21280

  20. Newton Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-24

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. THe data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of Newton Crater in Terra Sirenum. Orbit Number: 59753 Latitude: -38.4654 Longitude: 199.631 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-06-03 18:38 https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21793

  1. Newton Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-11

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple way to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of Newton Crater in Terra Siremun. Orbit Number: 59678 Latitude: -41.9838 Longitude: 202.593 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-05-28 14:26 https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21703

  2. Newton Crater - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-30

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color images shows part of the large ridge on the floor of Newton Crater in Terra Sirenum. Orbit Number: 59416 Latitude: -41.0768 Longitude: 200.911 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-05-07 00:38 https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21672

  3. Oblique view of Copernicus crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-13

    AS17-145-22287 (7-19 Dec. 1972) --- An oblique view of the large crater Copernicus on the lunar nearside, as photographed from the Apollo 17 spacecraft in lunar orbit. This view is looking generally southwest toward the crater on the horizon. The coordinates of the center of Copernicus are approximately 20 degrees west longitude and 9.5 degrees north latitude.

  4. Dune Symmetry Inside Martian Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-13

    Dunes of sand-sized materials have been trapped on the floors of many Martian craters, as seen in this view captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. This is one example, from a crater in Noachis Terra, west of the giant Hellas impact basin.

  5. Opportunity Route to Endeavour Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-05

    The yellow line on this map shows where NASA Mars Rover Opportunity has driven from the place where it landed in January 2004, inside Eagle crater, at the upper left end of the track, to a point approaching the rim of Endeavour crater.

  6. Teaching Boys and Gender Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Martin; Keddie, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores issues in the teaching of boys within a gender just framework. It identifies the productive pedagogies model as an appropriate means by which the specifics of boys' education can be considered. It avoids essentialist accounts of boys' pedagogies to suggest that pedagogies directed towards boys have to foreground issues of…

  7. Teaching Boys: A Relational Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raider-Roth, Miriam B.; Albert, Marta K.; Bircann-Barkey, Ingrid; Gidseg, Eric; Murray, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Focus of Study: This article investigates how teachers' relationships with boys can be central in bolstering boys' resilience and connection to their work in schools. Specifically, we examine how teachers understand the ways that their relationships with boys shape their teaching practice as well as their understandings of boys' learning in…

  8. Aniakchak Crater, Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Walter R.

    1925-01-01

    The discovery of a gigantic crater northwest of Aniakchak Bay (see fig. 11) closes what had been thought to be a wide gap in the extensive series of volcanoes occurring at irregular intervals for nearly 600 miles along the axial line of the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. In this belt there are more active and recently active volcanoes than in all the rest of North America. Exclusive of those on the west side of Cook Inlet, which, however, belong to the same group, this belt contains at least 42 active or well-preserved volcanoes and about half as many mountains suspected or reported to be volcanoes. The locations of some of these mountains and the hot springs on the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands are shown on a map prepared by G. A. Waring. Attention has been called to these volcanoes for nearly two centuries, but a record of their activity since the discovery of Alaska is far from being complete, and an adequate description of them as a group has never been written. Owing to their recent activity or unusual scenic beauty, some of the best known of the group are Mounts Katmai, Bogoslof, and Shishaldin, but there are many other beautiful and interesting cones and craters.

  9. Dunes in Darwin Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03039 Dunes in Darwin Crater

    The dunes and sand deposits in this image are located on the floor of Darwin Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 57.4S, Longitude 340.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Landslide in a Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater in the Elysium region of Mars. The unnamed crater is located at the margin of the volcanic flows from the Elysium Mons complex.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.2, Longitude 134 East (226 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Landslide in a Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater in the Elysium region of Mars. The unnamed crater is located at the margin of the volcanic flows from the Elysium Mons complex.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.2, Longitude 134 East (226 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Expanding Enceladus' Impact Crater Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchoff, M. R.; Schenk, P.

    2016-12-01

    Enceladus is a mid-sized, icy satellite of Saturn with a diameter of 500 km. Most of its surface has been modified by the formation of tectonic grooves and ridges throughout Enceladus' history and only a relatively small area of ancient cratered terrain remains - mostly in the northern latitudes. Examining impact crater density variations is currently the only way to constrain how old the cratered terrains are and when tectonic activity occurred. Analyzing crater distributions also provides insight into other types of activity modifying craters, such as viscous relaxation due to increased heat flow and burial by plume material [e.g., 1,2]. Since the original release of our Enceladus crater database in [1], which only covered the trailing hemisphere, there have been several new images from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem cameras at pixel scales of 100 m/pixel or better, including complete coverage of the leading hemisphere. Therefore, we are recording the diameter and location of craters 1 km and larger in these new images to expand the areal coverage of the database. We are also aligning the original database to the new coordinate system [3], which has changed by a few degrees longitude and also has a minor latitude shift. Finally, we are adding the following information for all craters: crater morphology, crater degradation (or preservation) class, observer confidence that the feature is a crater, and if the crater is cut by tectonic features. This additional information will increase the scientific usefulness of the crater database. We report on progress and similarity/differences to crater distributions derived in previous work [1,4-6].References: [1] Kirchoff, M. R. & P. Schenk. Icarus 202 (2009): 656-68. [2] Bland, M. T., et al. GRL 39 (2012): L17204, doi:10.1029/2012GL052736. [3] Roatsch, Th., et al. PSS 77 (2013): 118-25. [4] Plescia, J. B. & J. M. Boyce. Nature 301 (1983): 666-70. [5] Pozio, S. & J. S. Kargel. LPSC XXI (1990): 975-76. [6] Kinczyk, M

  13. Eastern Floor of Holden Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 15 April 2002) The Science Today's THEMIS image covers territory on the eastern floor of Holden Crater, which is located in region of the southern hemisphere called Noachis Terra. Holden Crater is 154 km in diameter and named after American Astronomer Edward Holden (1846-1914). This image shows a mottled surface with channels, hills, ridges and impact craters. The largest crater seen in this image is 5 km in diameter. This crater has gullies and what appears to be horizontal layers in its walls. The Story With its beautiful symmetry and gullies radially streaming down to the floor, the dominant crater in this image is an impressive focal point. Yet, it is really just a small crater within a much larger one named Holden Crater. Take a look at the context image to the right to see just how much bigger Holden Crater is. Then come back to the image strip that shows the mottled surface of Holden Crater's eastern floor in greater detail, and count how many hills, ridges, channels, and small impact craters can be seen. No perfectly smooth terrain abounds there, that's for sure. The textured terrain of Holden Crater has been particularly intriguing ever since the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft found evidence of sedimentary rock layers there that might have formed in lakes or shallow seas in Mars' ancient past. This finding suggests that Mars may have been more like Earth long ago, with water on its surface. Holden Crater might even have held a lake long ago. No one knows for sure, but it's an exciting possibility. Why? If water was once on the surface of Mars long enough to form sedimentary materials, maybe it was there long enough for microbial life to have developed too. (Life as we know it just isn't possible without the long-term presence of liquid water.) The question of life on the red planet is certainly tantalizing, but scientists will need to engage in a huge amount of further investigation to begin to know the answer. That

  14. Hydrothermal Processes in Impact Craters on Mars: Implications From Lonar Crater, India, and Other Craters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Misra, S.

    2004-12-01

    Impact craters played an important role in aqueous and geochemical processes in the near-surface environment of Mars, including chemical transport and soil formation. The formation of large craters on Mars resulted in hydrothermal systems that lasted for tens to hundreds of thousands of years and probably resulted in the mobilization of salts onto the surface of Mars. We have been carrying out extensive studies of impact deposits from several terrestrial analog craters, including Mistastin, Lonar, and Chicxulub using SIMS, XRF, XRD and EMP techniques. Even small craters may have been important for surface processes on Mars based on our recent work at the Lonar, India crater. The relatively small Lonar crater (1.8 km diameter) is one of only two known terrestrial craters to be emplaced in basaltic target rock [1], and our work has led to a new model for the rock component of the martian soil involving a component of hydrothermally altered basalt [2]. Based on the work of Hagerty and Newsom [1], this crater is the smallest known crater with a substantial post-impact hydrothermal system. Our work on the nature of hydrothermal alteration in drill cores from the crater floor of Lonar and Chicxulub includes mobilization of trace elements, such as lithium, beryllium, and boron, based on our new SIMS analyses. In January of 2004 during fieldwork at the Lonar crater we discovered previously unknown alteration zones in the ejecta blanket around the rim of the crater. The ejecta blanket at Lonar extends beyond 1350 m from the rim with discontinuous patches as far as 3000 m. These consist of areas in the ejecta blanket on the order of 20 to 50 meters in extent that are moderately to highly altered. Preliminary analysis shows a depletion of K2O, Na2O and Fe2O3 in the material from the altered zones compared to the fresher basalt blocks. The recent fieldwork at the crater and examination of drill core material from the ejecta blanket suggests that the ejecta blanket is far more

  15. Crater density differences: Exploring regional resurfacing, secondary crater populations, and crater saturation equilibrium on the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Povilaitis, R Z; Robinson, M S; van der Bogert, C H; Hiesinger, Harald; Meyer, H M; Ostrach, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    The global population of lunar craters >20 km in diameter was analyzed by Head et al., (2010) to correlate crater distribution with resurfacing events and multiple impactor populations. The work presented here extends the global crater distribution analysis to smaller craters (5–20 km diameters, n = 22,746). Smaller craters form at a higher rate than larger craters and thus add granularity to age estimates of larger units and can reveal smaller and younger areas of resurfacing. An areal density difference map generated by comparing the new dataset with that of Head et al., (2010) shows local deficiencies of 5–20 km diameter craters, which we interpret to be caused by a combination of resurfacing by the Orientale basin, infilling of intercrater plains within the nearside highlands, and partial mare flooding of the Australe region. Chains of 5–30 km diameter secondaries northwest of Orientale and possible 8–22 km diameter basin secondaries within the farside highlands are also distinguishable. Analysis of the new database indicates that craters 57–160 km in diameter across much of the lunar highlands are at or exceed relative crater densities of R = 0.3 or 10% geometric saturation, but nonetheless appear to fit the lunar production function. Combined with the observation that small craters on old surfaces can reach saturation equilibrium at 1% geometric saturation (Xiao and Werner, 2015), this suggests that saturation equilibrium is a size-dependent process, where large craters persist because of their resistance to destruction, degradation, and resurfacing.

  16. Pictures of Tethys' large crater.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This series of Voyager 2 pictures of Tethys shows its distinctive large crater, 400 kilometers (250 miles) in diameter, as it rotates toward the termination and limb of this satellite of Saturn. These images were obtained at four-hour intervals beginning late Aug. 24 and ending early the next day; the distances were 1.1 million km. (670,000 mi.), 826,000 km. (510,000 mi.) and 680,000 km. (420,000 mi.), respectively. The crater, the remnant of a large impact, has a central peak and several concentric rings. Some grooves radiating from the center may be formed of material thrown from the crater during the impact. The bottom frame, with the crater in profile, reveals that its floor has risen back to the spherical shape of the satellite, unlike the large crater seen on Tethys sister moon Mimas. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  17. Western Edge of Marth Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-30

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft shows the nature of the terrain at the rim of Marth Crater. In the book "The Martian" by Andy Weir, stranded astronaut Mark Watney is headed for the Ares 4 landing site but encounters the rim of Marth Crater just as a dust storm arrives. This HiRISE image shows the nature of this terrain. The crater rim is not very distinct and from the ground it would be quite difficult to tell that you are even on the rim of a crater. The terrain is hummocky and rolling, punctuated by smaller impact craters and wind-blown drifts of sand or dust. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19959

  18. Meteor Crater, AZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Barringer Meteorite Crater (also known as 'Meteor Crater') is a gigantic hole in the middle of the arid sandstone of the Arizona desert. A rim of smashed and jumbled boulders, some of them the size of small houses, rises 50 m above the level of the surrounding plain. The crater itself is nearly a 1500 m wide, and 180 m deep. When Europeans first discovered the crater, the plain around it was covered with chunks of meteoritic iron - over 30 tons of it, scattered over an area 12 to 15 km in diameter. Scientists now believe that the crater was created approximately 50,000 years ago. The meteorite which made it was composed almost entirely of nickel-iron, suggesting that it may have originated in the interior of a small planet. It was 50 m across, weighed roughly 300,000 tons, and was traveling at a speed of 65,000 km per hour. This ASTER 3-D perspective view was created by draping an ASTER bands 3-2-1image over a digital elevation model from the US Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset.

    This image was acquired on May 17, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along

  19. Degradation of Victoria crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S.A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M.P.; Geissler, P.E.; Sullivan, R.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Parker, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ???750 m diameter and ???75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, is a degraded primary impact structure retaining a ???5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by ???3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is 120-220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500-750 m across indicates that the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by ???150 m and infilled by ???50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for most crater modification, but lesser mass wasting or gully activity contributions cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for ???50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is ???20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when ???1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped <10-20 cm of darker, regional basaltic sands. Greater relief along the rim enabled meters of erosion. Comparison between Victoria and regional craters leads to definition of a crater degradation sequence dominated by eolian erosion and infilling over time. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Floor-fractured crater models for igneous crater modification on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, R. W.; Schultz, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    Although crater modification on the Earth, Moon, and Mars results from surface erosion and crater infilling, a significant number of craters on the Moon also exhibit distinctive patterns of crater-centered fracturing and volcanism that can be modeled as the result of igneous crater modification. Here, we consider the possible effects of Venus surface conditions on this model, describe two examples of such crater modification, and then briefly discuss the constraints these craters place on conditions at depth.

  1. From Crater to Graph: Manual and Automated Crater Counting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Werner, S. C.; Brumby, S. P.; Foing, B. H.; Asphaug, E.; Neukum, G.; Team, H.; Team, I.

    2005-12-01

    Impact craters are some of the most abundant, and most interesting features on Mars. They hold a wealth of information about Martian geology, providing clues to the relative age, local composition and erosional history of the surface. A great deal of effort has been expended to count and understand the nature of planetary crater populations (Hartman and Neukum, 2001). Highly trained experts have developed personal methods for conducting manual crater surveys. In addition, several efforts are underway to automate this process in order to keep up with the rapid increase in planetary surface image data. These efforts make use of a variety of methods, including the direct application of traditional image processing algorithms such as the Hough transform, and recent developments in genetic programming, an artificial intelligence-based technique, in which manual crater surveys are used as examples to `grow' or `evolve' crater counting algorithms. (Plesko, C. S. et al., LPSC 2005, Kim, J. R. et al., LPSC 2001, Michael, G. G. P&SS 2003, Earl, J. et al, LPSC 2005) In this study we examine automated crater counting techniques, and compare them with traditional manual techniques on MOC imagery, and demonstrate capabilities for the analysis of multi-spectral and HRSC Digital Terrain Model data as well. Techniques are compared and discussed to define and develop a robust automated crater detection strategy.

  2. Secondary craters on Europa and implications for cratered surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bierhaus, Edward B; Chapman, Clark R; Merline, William J

    2005-10-20

    For several decades, most planetary researchers have regarded the impact crater populations on solid-surfaced planets and smaller bodies as predominantly reflecting the direct ('primary') impacts of asteroids and comets. Estimates of the relative and absolute ages of geological units on these objects have been based on this assumption. Here we present an analysis of the comparatively sparse crater population on Jupiter's icy moon Europa and suggest that this assumption is incorrect for small craters. We find that 'secondaries' (craters formed by material ejected from large primary impact craters) comprise about 95 per cent of the small craters (diameters less than 1 km) on Europa. We therefore conclude that large primary impacts into a solid surface (for example, ice or rock) produce far more secondaries than previously believed, implying that the small crater populations on the Moon, Mars and other large bodies must be dominated by secondaries. Moreover, our results indicate that there have been few small comets (less than 100 m diameter) passing through the jovian system in recent times, consistent with dynamical simulations.

  3. Geology of five small Australian impact craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Macdonald, F.A.; Shoemaker, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present detailed geological maps and cross-sections of Liverpool, Wolfe Creek, Boxhole, Veevers and Dalgaranga craters. Liverpool crater and Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater are classic bowlshaped, Barringer-type craters, Liverpool was likely formed during the Neoproterozoic and was filled and covered with sediments soon thereafter. In the Cenozoic, this cover was exhumed exposing the crater's brecciated wall rocks. Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater displays many striking features, including well-bedded ejecta units, crater-floor faults and sinkholes, a ringed aeromagnetic anomaly, rim-skirting dunes, and numerous iron-rich shale balls. Boxhole Meteorite Crater, Veevers Meteorite Crater and Dalgaranga crater are smaller, Odessa-type craters without fully developed, steep, overturned rims. Boxhole and Dalgaranga craters are developed in highly follated Precambrian basement rocks with a veneer of Holocene colluvium. The pre-existing structure at these two sites complicates structural analyses of the craters, and may have influenced target deformation during impact. Veevers Meteorite Crater is formed in Cenozoic laterites, and is one of the best-preserved impact craters on Earth. The craters discussed herein were formed in different target materials, ranging from crystalline rocks to loosely consolidated sediments, containing evidence that the impactors struck at an array of angles and velocities. This facilitates a comparative study of the influence of these factors on the structural and topographic form of small impact craters. ?? Geological Society of Australia.

  4. A Dragonfly-Shaped Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-10

    The broader scene for this image is the fluidized ejecta from Bakhuysen Crater to the southwest, but there's something very interesting going on here on a much smaller scale. A small impact crater, about 25 meters in diameter, with a gouged-out trench extends to the south. The ejecta (rocky material ejected from the crater) mostly extends to the east and west of the crater. This "butterfly" ejecta is very common for craters formed at low impact angles. Taken together, these observations suggest that the crater-forming impactor came in at a low angle from the north, hit the ground and ejected material to the sides. The top of the impactor may have sheared off ("decapitating" the impactor) and continued downrange, forming the trench. We can't prove that's what happened, but this explanation is consistent with the observations. Regardless of how it formed, it's quite an interesting-looking "dragonfly" crater. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.69 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 55.7 centimeters (21.92 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 167 centimeters (65.7 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21454

  5. Laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lednev, Vasily N; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Filippov, Mikhail N; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N; Pershin, Sergey M

    2017-02-01

    Raman signal enhancement by multiple scattering inside laser crater cones was observed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy (LCERS) yielded a 14-fold increase in the Raman spectra bands due to efficient multiple scattering of laser irradiation within the laser crater walls. The same pulsed Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns) was used for both laser crater formation and Raman scattering experiments by varying the output pulse energy. First, powerful pulses are used to produce the laser crater; then low-energy pulses are used to perform Raman scattering measurements. The laser crater profile and its alignment with the laser beam waist were found to be the key parameters for the optimization of the Raman spectrum intensity enhancement. Raman intensity enhancement resulted from increased surface scattering area at the crater walls, rather than spatially offset Raman scattering. The increased signal-to-noise ratio resulted in limits of detection improvement for quantitative analysis using LCERS.

  6. Craters Crowd the North

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-15

    This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows battered terrain around the north pole of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus. Craters crowd and overlap each other, each one recording an impact in the moon's distant past. The moon's north pole lies approximately at the top of this view from Cassini's wide-angle camera. A companion view from the narrow-angle camera (PIA19660) shows the pole at a resolution about ten times higher. North on Enceladus is up. The image was taken in visible light by Cassini on Oct. 14, 2015. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 4,000 miles (6,000 kilometers) from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 8 degrees. Image scale is 1,093 feet (333 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20010

  7. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  8. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  9. Lakebeds in Holden Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-13

    Holden Crater was once filled by at least two different lakes. The sediments deposited in those lakes are relatively light-toned where exposed, as seen in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Each layer represents a different point in time and perhaps a changing environment for Martian life, if it existed. The elongated ridges with sharp crests are sand dunes. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 25.9 centimeters (10.2 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 78 centimeters (30.7 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21587

  10. Holden Crater Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    A common location for dune fields on Mars is in the basin of large craters. This dune field is located in Holden Crater at 25 degrees South atitude.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -25.5, Longitude 326.8 East (33.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Tikhonravov Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located within a small crater inside Tikhonravov Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.6, Longitude 37.1 East (322.9 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Layering in Spallanzani Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-22

    In this image from NASA Mars Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we can see quite a spectacular layering pattern inside an impact crater called Spallanzani. Seeing layering is always exciting to geologists because it implies that the region has experienced multiple climatic conditions or geologic processes through time. The study of layering is so important in geology that it has its own dedicated branch of study: stratigraphy! Commonly, layering implies different lithologies (i.e., rock types). However, sometimes the layers could be of very similar composition but formed in different periods of time. This could happen for example in the case of annual flood deposits from rivers, multiple volcanic eruptions, or annual or periodic deposition of ice-rich material. We can also see in this image another feature called terracing, which happens when the layers form distinctive planes on top of one another like terraces. This could imply that the layers are being eroded with time but some of the layers are being eroded quicker than others because they are less resistant to erosion. So what is the composition of these layers? Spallanzani Crater lies in the high latitudes of the Southern hemisphere (around 60 degrees in latitude) so there is a good possibility that the deposits are ice-rich. If we look more closely we will notice fractured mounds, which sometimes indicate the presence of subsurface ice. Another interesting observation is the presence of grooves in the shaded slopes of some of the layers. Perhaps these grooves formed because of the sublimation (the direct transfer of solid ice to water vapor) of ice from these slopes since slopes tend to get warmer than the surrounding terrains. A close inspection of this image may help answer this question and investigate the multiple cycles in which these deposits were laid down as well as the duration of these individual cycles. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19367

  13. Kaiser Crater DCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 29, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering a portion of Kaiser Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    In this image, the basaltic sand dunes in bottom of Kaiser crater are colored a bright pink/magenta. The spectral features are clean and prominent on these dust-free surfaces and the dark color of the basaltic dunes helps them to absorb sunlight and produces higher surface temperatures, which also contributes to the image colors.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -46.5, Longitude 20.3 East (339.7 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin

  14. Upside Down Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 August 2003

    This image shows an area not too far south of Meridiani, the area where the mineral hematite was found on the Martian surface. In the center of the image the terrain becomes quite rugged, where a great amount of material has eroded away, leaving behind buttes and mesas. Note how some of the mesas are quite circular. This is an example of 'inverted terrain,' in which a topographically low feature, like a crater or a trench, becomes filled in with material. Later, the surrounding terrain erodes away while the feature protects the material filling it. These circular mesas are most likely inverted craters that were once holes in the ground.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -28.2, Longitude 8.7 East (351.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Tikhonravov Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located within a small crater inside Tikhonravov Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.6, Longitude 37.1 East (322.9 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Endogenic cratering distribution on the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grudewicz, E. B.

    1973-01-01

    Medium-resolution Lunar Orbiter V photographs are used for counting and measuring endogenic craters in the Hyginus Rille floor. A Poisson-type crater distribution consisting of the smaller craters, and a Gaussian-type endogenic size-frequency distribution are established on a diameter vs frequency diagram of the craters.

  17. Geographical Distribution of Crater Depths on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    2010-03-01

    Global maps of crater depths on Mars are constructed using a new dataset that lists depths of >75,000 craters. Distribution of crater depths is interpreted in terms of cryosphere extent, and the locations of deepest craters on Mars are identified.

  18. King of the Crater Ledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a screenshot from software used by engineers to drive the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit up toward the rim of the crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The software simulates the rover's movements across the martian terrain, helping to plot a safe course. The virtual 3-D world around the rover is built from images taken by Spirit's stereo navigation cameras. Regions for which the rover has not yet acquired 3-D data are represented in beige.

    In this picture, the rover is seen in its projected final position at the rim of the crater. Later today, Spirit will travel 16 more meters (52 feet) to reach the crater ledge.

  19. Largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Weitz, C. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution radar images from the Magellan spacecraft have allowed us to perform a detailed study on 25 large impact craters on Venus with diameters from 70 to 280 km. The dimension of these large craters is comparable with the characteristic thickness of the venusian lithosphere and the atmospheric scale height. Some physical parameters for the largest impact craters on Venus (LICV), such as depth, ring/diameter ratio, and range of ballistic ejecta deposits, have been obtained from the SAR images and the altimetry dataset produced by MIT. Data related to each of these parameters is discussed.

  20. Pits in Hale Crater Ejecta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-28

    The pits visible in this image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter arent impact craters. The material they are embedded into is ejecta stuff thrown out of an impact crater when it forms from a large crater called Hale not seen in this image. Substances called "volatiles" -- which can explode as gases when they're quickly warmed by the immense heat of an impact-exploded out of the ejecta and caused these pits. Unrelated sand dunes near the top of the image have since blown over portions of the pits. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19289

  1. Unlocking Boys' Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Long stereotyped as not being interested in building relationships with teachers, boys actually search for--and are in need of--teachers who make meaningful connections with them, writes Reichert in this article. The author examines how school practices of the past and present have contributed to the so-called gender achievement gap and stresses…

  2. Of Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, much has been written about threats to boys' and girls' healthy participation in dance. This Viewpoints essay considers some of the causes and proposed remedies, which focus almost exclusively on the roles and responsibilities of dance educators and administrators. I suggest that what is missing from recent research,…

  3. Of Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, much has been written about threats to boys' and girls' healthy participation in dance. This Viewpoints essay considers some of the causes and proposed remedies, which focus almost exclusively on the roles and responsibilities of dance educators and administrators. I suggest that what is missing from recent research,…

  4. Unlocking Boys' Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Long stereotyped as not being interested in building relationships with teachers, boys actually search for--and are in need of--teachers who make meaningful connections with them, writes Reichert in this article. The author examines how school practices of the past and present have contributed to the so-called gender achievement gap and stresses…

  5. How Boys Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurian, Michael; Stevens, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors talk about the state of boyhood in education and explain the idea that not all elements of the brain--especially not gender--are plastic. They discuss the mismatch between boys and conventional education and how gender "really" happens in the brain and describe the three biological stages in which human nature…

  6. Lyell Panorama inside Victoria Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-24

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called Duck Bay in the western portion of Victoria Crater.

  7. Mountain Winds at Gale Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-15

    This graphic shows the pattern of winds predicted to be swirling around and inside Gale Crater, where NASA Curiosity rover landed on Mars. Modeling the winds gives scientists a context for the data from Curiosity Rover Environmental Monitoring Station

  8. Holden Crater/Uzboi Valles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-21

    This NASA Mars Odyssey image shows the intersection of Holden Crater with Uzboi Valles. This region of Mars contains a number of features that could be related to liquid water on the surface in the Martian past.

  9. LRO/LOLA - Counting Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), NASA scientists have created the first-ever comprehensive catalog of large craters on the moon. In this animation, lun...

  10. Each Crater Tells a Story

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-07

    The unusual shapes of craters at the Flamsteed Constellation region of interest provide information about the thickness of the lunar regolith in this region in this image taken by NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  11. Flooded Crater in Terra Sirenum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-22

    The floor of the crater in this NASA Mars Odyssey image displays interesting textures and it appears to have been flooded by some type of material. It is unclear if this material was fluvially emplaced mud hyperconcentrated flows or lava.

  12. Impact Craters in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, R. A. F.; Wood, C. A.; Garvin, J. B.; McLaughlin, G.; McHone, J. F.

    1988-03-01

    Meteor Crater Upheaval Dome Sierra Madera Middlesboro Pilot Lake Carswell Gow Lake Deep Bay Nicholson Lake West Hawk Lake Haughton Sudbury Wanapitei Brent Lac Couture New Quebec Clearwater Lakes Manicouagan Charlevoix Lac La Moinerie Mistastin

  13. Mountainous Crater Rim on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-17

    This is a screen shot from a high-definition simulated movie of Mojave Crater on Mars, based on images taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment HiRISE camera on NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  14. A Tale of Two Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-12

    In this NASA Mars Odyssey image of western Acidalia, two craters of similar size dramatically display the effects of geologic activity. The younger one on the left has been left relatively well preserved.

  15. Hourly Illumination of Shackleton Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Illumination of Shackleton crater, a 21-km-diameter (12.5 mile-diameter) structure situated adjacent to the Moon’s south pole. The resolution is 30 meters (approximately 100 feet) per pixel. Fra...

  16. Impact cratering through geologic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Shoemaker, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    New data on lunar craters and recent discoveries about craters on Earth permit a reassessment of the bombardment history of Earth over the last 3.2 billion years. The combined lunar and terrestrial crater records suggest that the long-term average rate of production of craters larger than 20 km in diameter has increased, perhaps by as much as 60%, in the last 100 to 200 million years. Production of craters larger than 70 km in diameter may have increased, in the same time interval, by a factor of five or more over the average for the preceding three billion years. A large increase in the flux of long-period comets appears to be the most likely explanation for such a long-term increase in the cratering rate. Two large craters, in particular, appear to be associated with a comet shower that occurred about 35.5 million years ago. The infall of cosmic dust, as traced by 3He in deep sea sediments, and the ages of large craters, impact glass horizons, and other stratigraphic markers of large impacts seem to be approximately correlated with the estimated times of passage of the Sun through the galactic plane, at least for the last 65 million years. Those are predicted times for an increased near-Earth flux of comets from the Oort Cloud induced by the combined effects of galactic tidal perturbations and encounters of the Sun with passing stars. Long-term changes in the average comet flux may be related to changes in the amplitude of the z-motion of the Sun perpendicular to the galactic plane or to stripping of the outer Oort cloud by encounters with large passing stars, followed by restoration from the inner Oort cloud reservoir.

  17. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sharon A.; Grant, John A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Mathew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The $\\sim$750 m diameter and $\\sim$75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, presents evidence for significant degradation including a low, serrated, raised rim characterized by alternating alcoves and promontories, a surrounding low relief annulus, and a floor partially covered by dunes. The amount and processes of degradation responsible for the modified appearance of Victoria crater were evaluated using images obtained in situ by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in concert with a digital elevation model created using orbital HiRISE images. Opportunity traversed along the north and northwest rim and annulus, but sufficiently characterized features visible in the DEM to enable detailed measurements of rim relief, ejecta thickness, and wall slopes around the entire degraded, primary impact structure. Victoria retains a 5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by 3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is $\\sim$120 to 220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500 to 750 m across indicate the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by approximately 150 m and infilled by about 50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for modification at Victoria, but lesser contributions from mass wasting or other processes cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for $\\sim$50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is $\\sim$20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when $\\sim$1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped darker, regional

  18. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sharon A.; Grant, John A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Mathew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The $\\sim$750 m diameter and $\\sim$75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, presents evidence for significant degradation including a low, serrated, raised rim characterized by alternating alcoves and promontories, a surrounding low relief annulus, and a floor partially covered by dunes. The amount and processes of degradation responsible for the modified appearance of Victoria crater were evaluated using images obtained in situ by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in concert with a digital elevation model created using orbital HiRISE images. Opportunity traversed along the north and northwest rim and annulus, but sufficiently characterized features visible in the DEM to enable detailed measurements of rim relief, ejecta thickness, and wall slopes around the entire degraded, primary impact structure. Victoria retains a 5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by 3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is $\\sim$120 to 220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500 to 750 m across indicate the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by approximately 150 m and infilled by about 50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for modification at Victoria, but lesser contributions from mass wasting or other processes cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for $\\sim$50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is $\\sim$20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when $\\sim$1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped darker, regional

  19. Unlocking an Impact Crater Clues

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-09

    Mars is a dynamic planet. HiRISE has witnessed many surface changes over the past ten years, including hundreds of new craters formed by ongoing impacts. Most of these impacts are likely caused by asteroids that have strayed into collision courses with Mars. The planet's much thinner atmosphere compared to Earth makes small asteroids less likely to burn up prior to hitting the Martian surface. This new crater, which formed explosively at the point of impact, has a diameter of roughly 8 meters (about 25 feet), but its surrounding blast zone and ejecta extend over a kilometer (about one mile) beyond the crater itself. The materials exposed nearest the crater have distinctive yellowish and lighter grey appearances, while more distant ejected materials range from dark brown to bright bluish in an enhanced-color view. These varied materials may have originated from different layers penetrated by the impact. This new impact was discovered using the lower-resolution Context Camera (CTX), also on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. An older CTX image of this region from May 2012 shows a uniformly dust-covered surface, while a newer CTX image from September 2016 reveals the crater's dark blast zone. New craters on Mars are easiest to locate in such dust-coated terrains, where they provide opportunistic "road cuts" that allow scientists to see beneath the dust blanket and determine the underlying rock compositions and textures. This particular crater formed about 300 kilometers (roughly 200 miles) east of the Spirit rover's final resting spot in Gusev Crater. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 26.2 centimeters (10.3 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 79 centimeters (31 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21451

  20. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF STEINS' CRATERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, S.; Lamy, P. L.; Marchi, S.; Jorda, L.

    2009-12-01

    The ROSETTA spacecraft, on its way to rendez-vous comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, has successfully flew by asteroid 2867 Steins in September 2008. The OSIRIS experiment (Keller et al, 2007) has imaged the asteroid both with the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). The resolutions of the images are sufficient to distinguish features on the surface, especially craters which are detected all over the observed part of the asteroidal surface (44%). In this study, we focus on the physical properties of the craters and particularly theirs diameters and depths which we can compare with others small bodies previously observed. Starting from the first shape model of the asteroid (Besse et al, 2009), we add artificial craters that best match the observations and correlate the simulated images and the real images. The highest correlation yields the diameter and the depth of the craters. The average Depth/Diameter ratio for Steins is 0.12. However, these values are quite heterogeneous and ranged from 0.04 to 0.25. These results are in agreement with previous studies: 0.15 for Ida (Sullivan et al, 1996) and 0.14 for Gaspra (Carr et al,1994). The difference is likely due to the resurfacing of the surface by the large impact that occurs on the south pole of Steins with a diameter of 2100 meters. Craters with extreme values of the Depth/Diameter ratio are located in the vicinity of this large crater and may be related to the large impact. Shallower craters could have been filled by ejecta or regolith displacement, while steeper craters could result from fault basin related to the impact or simply be recent events.

  1. Limb of Copernicus Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Copernicus is 93 km wide and is located within the Mare Imbrium Basin, northern nearside of the Moon (10 degrees N., 20 degrees W.). Image shows crater floor, floor mounds, rim, and rayed ejecta. Rays from the ejecta are superposed on all other surrounding terrains which places the crater in its namesake age group: the Copernican system, established as the youngest assemblage of rocks on the Moon (Shoemaker and Hackman, 1962, The Moon: London, Academic Press, p.289- 300).

  2. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, S. A.; Grant, J. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Geissler, P. E.; Sullivan, R. J.; Kirk, R. L.; Parker, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    The approximately 750 m diameter and 75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, presents evidence for significant degradation including a low, serrated, raised rim characterized by alternating alcoves and promontories, a surrounding low relief annulus, and a floor partially covered by dunes. The amount and processes of degradation responsible for the modified appearance of Victoria crater were evaluated using images obtained in situ by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in concert with a digital elevation model (DEM) created using orbital HiRISE images. Opportunity traversed along the north and northwest rim and annulus and sufficiently characterized features visible in the DEM, thereby enabling detailed measurements of rim relief, ejecta thickness, and wall slopes around the entire degraded, primary impact structure. Victoria retains a 5 m raised rim consisting of 1 to 2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by 3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is 120 to 220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500 to 750 m across indicate the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by approximately 150 m and infilled by about 50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for modification at Victoria, but lesser contributions from mass wasting or other processes cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for roughly 50 m widening across a WNW to ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is about 20 percent less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when less than 1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that

  3. Lava-Filled Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 June 2003

    Craters and hills form high standing streamlined plateaus or islands in a channeled area. The plateaus are rounded in the upstream direction and taper to a point in the downstream direction, indicating that the direction of flow in this area was roughly south to north, or bottom to top. The channels appear to be filled with lava flow deposits that are raised above the channel in some areas. A lava flow diverges around a small streamlined hill near the bottom of the image and then merges again around the northern end of it. Near the top of the image is a crater with a breach on the east (right) side that allowed the lava to flow in, leaving a lobate, high standing deposit. The channels may have been formed by the lava flows that currently fill them or there may have been flow of liquid water that created them before the lava was emplaced.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 183 East (177 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built

  4. Lava-Filled Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 June 2003

    Craters and hills form high standing streamlined plateaus or islands in a channeled area. The plateaus are rounded in the upstream direction and taper to a point in the downstream direction, indicating that the direction of flow in this area was roughly south to north, or bottom to top. The channels appear to be filled with lava flow deposits that are raised above the channel in some areas. A lava flow diverges around a small streamlined hill near the bottom of the image and then merges again around the northern end of it. Near the top of the image is a crater with a breach on the east (right) side that allowed the lava to flow in, leaving a lobate, high standing deposit. The channels may have been formed by the lava flows that currently fill them or there may have been flow of liquid water that created them before the lava was emplaced.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 183 East (177 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built

  5. Geology of Lofn Crater, Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Heiner, Sarah; Klemaszewski, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Lofn crater is a 180-km-diameter impact structure in the southern cratered plains of Callisto and is among the youngest features seen on the surface. The Lofn area was imaged by the Galileo spacecraft at regional-scale resolutions (875 m/pixel), which enable the general geology to be investigated. The morphology of Lofn crater suggests that (1) it is a class of impact structure intermediate between complex craters and palimpsests or (2) it formed by the impact of a projectile which fragmented before reaching the surface, resulting in a shallow crater (even for Callisto). The asymmetric pattern of the rim and ejecta deposits suggests that the impactor entered at a low angle from the northwest. The albedo and other characteristics of the ejecta deposits from Lofn also provide insight into the properties of the icy lithosphere and subsurface configuration at the time of impact. The "target" for the Lofn impact is inferred to have included layered materials associated with the Adlinda multiring structure northwest of Loh and ejecta deposits from the Heimdall crater area to the southeast. The Lofn impact might have penetrated through these materials into a viscous substrate of ductile ice or possibly liquid water. This interpretation is consistent with models of the current interior of Callisto based on geophysical information obtained from the Galileo spacecraft.

  6. Geology of Lofn Crater, Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Heiner, Sarah; Klemaszewski, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Lofn crater is a 180-km-diameter impact structure in the southern cratered plains of Callisto and is among the youngest features seen on the surface. The Lofn area was imaged by the Galileo spacecraft at regional-scale resolutions (875 m/pixel), which enable the general geology to be investigated. The morphology of Lofn crater suggests that (1) it is a class of impact structure intermediate between complex craters and palimpsests or (2) it formed by the impact of a projectile which fragmented before reaching the surface, resulting in a shallow crater (even for Callisto). The asymmetric pattern of the rim and ejecta deposits suggests that the impactor entered at a low angle from the northwest. The albedo and other characteristics of the ejecta deposits from Lofn also provide insight into the properties of the icy lithosphere and subsurface configuration at the time of impact. The "target" for the Lofn impact is inferred to have included layered materials associated with the Adlinda multiring structure northwest of Loh and ejecta deposits from the Heimdall crater area to the southeast. The Lofn impact might have penetrated through these materials into a viscous substrate of ductile ice or possibly liquid water. This interpretation is consistent with models of the current interior of Callisto based on geophysical information obtained from the Galileo spacecraft.

  7. Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Chicago teen center renovation 03/03/2017 Kaplan and Boys & Girls Clubs of America Launch Campaign ... award Boys & Girls Clubs of America with a Kaplan test prep course for every 1,000 free ...

  8. Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cause Donate Now Retailers Team Up to Support Boys & Girls Clubs of America During Holiday Season Sixteen ... back to nation’s leading advocate for youth MORE» Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the UPS Foundation ...

  9. The origin of lunar concentric craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, David; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Hawke, B. Ray

    2016-11-01

    Lunar concentric craters are a unique class of impact craters because the interior of the craters contains a concentric ridge, but their formation mechanism is unknown. In order to determine the origin of concentric craters, we examined multiple working hypotheses, which include eight impact-related and endogenic processes. We analyzed data sets that originated from instruments onboard Clementine, Kaguya, and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to characterize the morphology, spatial distribution, composition, and absolute model ages of 114 concentric craters. Concentric craters contain five key properties: (1) a concentric ridge, (2) anomalously shallow floors, (3) their occurrence is concentrated near mare margins and in mare pond regions (4) the concentric ridge composition is similar to the surrounding area and (5) concentric crater ages are Eratosthenian and older. These five key properties served as constraints for testing impact-related and endogenic mechanisms of formation. We find that most impact-related hypotheses cannot explain the spatial and age distribution of concentric craters. As for endogenic hypotheses, we deduce that igneous intrusions are the likely mechanism that formed concentric craters because of the close relationship between concentric craters and floor-fractured craters and the concentration of both features near mare-highland boundaries and in mare ponds. Furthermore, we observe that floor-fractured craters are common at crater diameters > 15 km, whereas concentric craters are common at crater diameters < 15 km. We suggest that igneous intrusions underneath small craters (<15 km) are likely to form concentric craters, whereas intrusions under large craters (>15 km) produce floor-fractured craters.

  10. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  11. Mountains, Craters and Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-17

    New Horizons views of the informally named Sputnik Planum on Pluto (top) and the informally named Vulcan Planum on Charon (bottom). Both scale bars measure 20 miles (32 kilometers) long; illumination is from the left in both instances. The Sputnik Planum view is centered at 11°N, 180°E, and covers the bright, icy, geologically cellular plains. Here, the cells are defined by a network of interconnected troughs that crisscross these nitrogen-ice plains. At right, in the upper image, the cellular plains yield to pitted plains of southern Sputnik Planum. This observation was obtained by the Ralph/Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) at a resolution of 1,050 feet (320 meters) per pixel. The Vulcan Planum view in the bottom panel is centered at 4°S, 4°E, and includes the "moated mountain" Clarke Mons just above the center of the image. As well as featuring impact craters and sinuous troughs, the water ice-rich plains display a range of surface textures, from smooth and grooved at left, to pitted and hummocky at right. This observation was obtained by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at a resolution of 525 feet (160 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20535

  12. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km diameter crater looks vaguely like a stop sign.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 329.2 East (30.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  13. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km diameter crater looks vaguely like a stop sign.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 329.2 East (30.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  14. Concentric Crater Fill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The bizarre patterns on the floor of this crater in Nilosyrtis Mensae defy an easy explanation. At 34 degrees north latitude, this location hardly qualifies as 'Arctic' yet it is likely that some form of periglacial process possibly combined with the vaporization of ground ice is responsible for this intriguing landscape.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 10.3, Longitude 24.5 East (284.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  15. Galle Crater Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-547, 17 November 2003

    This November 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies, sand dunes, and streaks formed by dust devils in southern Galle Crater. The gullies are seen in the upper left (northwest) corner; they originate at layered rock exposures on a hillslope, and meander downslope through a deposit of dark, windblown sand. The gullies might have formed by running water. All of the darker surfaces in this image are dunes; these dunes were covered with bright dust during the previous winter (it is now summer in the southern hemisphere of Mars). Dust devils have been darkening the dunes by removing or disrupting the coating of dust, leaving behind a chaotic plethora of darks streaks. The image is located near 51.9oS, 31.4oW. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide by 6.8 km (4.2 mi) high. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. Boys with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Hatmaker, Grace

    2005-12-01

    Although commonly associated with girls and women, eating disorders do not discriminate. School nurses need to be aware that male students also can suffer from the serious health effects of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, anorexia athletica, and eating disorders not otherwise specified. Sports that focus on leanness and weight limits can add to a growing boy's risk of developing an eating disorder. Issues of body image and sexual development can complicate and can distort previously normal eating habits. Students may use powerful and dangerous drugs readily available via the Internet, including growth hormone, creatine, testosterone, and aminophylline, to build muscle and to eliminate fat, potentially causing serious health consequences. School nurses can partner with health and physical education teachers, coaches, school staff, parents, and students to identify and to support boys with eating disorders

  17. Boys' Bodies in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Murray

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on qualitative research data from a project investigating early childhood boys' constructions of masculinities in relation to sport, health and the body. The focus group data, with 33 boys, has been collected in each of the boys' first three years at school. It is part of the data that will be collected over eight years with…

  18. Boys' Bodies in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Murray

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on qualitative research data from a project investigating early childhood boys' constructions of masculinities in relation to sport, health and the body. The focus group data, with 33 boys, has been collected in each of the boys' first three years at school. It is part of the data that will be collected over eight years with…

  19. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do…

  20. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do…

  1. Boy Scouts for Henry.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard E

    2006-01-01

    "Can we do anything for you?" The question was embarrassing. Henry had been poked and prodded and preserved far beyond his wishes. In a medical system that scorns comfort care, a resident physician is troubled by the case of an elderly man with poor quality of life. An awkward attempt at a Boy Scout service project emphasizes how poorly we comfort the terminally ill despite modern technology and interventionalism.

  2. A Tale of 3 Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image captures some of the complexity of the martian upper crust. Mars does not simply have an impact-cratered surface, it's upper crust is a cratered volume. Over time, older craters on Mars have been eroded, filled, buried, and in some cases exhumed and re-exposed at the martian surface. The crust of Mars is layered to depths of 10 or more kilometers, and mixed in with the layered bedrock are a variety of ancient craters with diameters ranging from a few tens of meters (a few tens of yards) to several hundred kilometers (more than one or two hundred miles).

    The picture shown here captures some of the essence of the layered, cratered volume of the upper crust of Mars in a very simple form. The image shows three distinct circular features. The smallest, in the lower right quarter of the image, is a meteor crater surrounded by a mound of material. This small crater formed within a layer of bedrock that once covered the entire scene, but today is found only in this small remnant adjacent to the crater. The intermediate-sized crater, west (left) of the small one, formed either in the next layer down--that is, below the layer in which the small crater formed--or it formed in some layers that are now removed, but was big enough to penetrate deeply into the rock that is near the surface today. The largest circular feature in the image, in the upper right quarter of the image, is still largely buried. It formed in layers of rock that are below the present surface. Erosion has brought traces of its rim back to the surface of Mars. This picture is located near 50.0oS, 77.8oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this October 2004 image from the upper left.

  3. [Precocious puberty in boys].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Szkróbka, Witold; Kowalska, Beata; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Precocious puberty in boys is defined as the onset of puberty before the age of 9 years. It is divided into two categories: central precocious puberty, characterized by the premature activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and peripheral precocious puberty presents when premature sexual development is dependent on steroid production regardless of gonadotropin secretion. Although precocious puberty occurs more frequently in girls, in the case of boys it is more often associated with identifiable organic disorders of the central nervous system, adrenal glands or testes. The diagnosis should include detailed anamnesis and clinical examination, measurement of pituitary and sex hormones, assessment of bone age, and imaging of the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, adrenal glands and testes. Indications for treatment are based on the type of precocious puberty and its progression rate, advancement of bone age, predicted adult height and psychological evaluation. The purpose of this article was to discuss the etiopathogenesis of precocious puberty in boys and to provide the approach to its diagnosis, differentiation and treatment.

  4. Shape of impact craters in granular media.

    PubMed

    de Vet, Simon J; de Bruyn, John R

    2007-10-01

    We present the results of experiments studying the shape of craters formed by the normal impact of a solid spherical projectile into a deep noncohesive granular bed at low energies. The resultant impact crater surfaces are accurately digitized using laser profilometry, allowing for the detailed investigation of the crater shape. We find that these impact craters are very nearly hyperbolic in profile. Crater radii and depths are dependent on impact energy, as well as the projectile density and size. The precise crater shape is a function of the crater aspect ratio. While the dimensions of the crater are highly dependent on the impact energy, we show that the energy required to excavate the crater is only a tiny fraction (0.1%-0.5%) of the kinetic energy of the projectile.

  5. Martian crater size distributions and terrain age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.; Strom, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The crater size/frequency distributions of large ( 8 km) craters on the Moon and terrestrial planets display two very different curves representing two crater populations. The heavily cratered regions of the Moon, Mercury, and Mars show the same highly structured curve which cannot be represented by a single slope distribution function. In contrast, the lunar post mare crater population has a size/frequency distribution which differs significantly from that in the highlands over the same diameter range, and can be represented by a single-slope distribution function of -2.8 differential. On areas of martian lightly cratered northern plains, the crater population is essentially identical to that of the post mare population. This indicates that the same two families of impacting objects were responsible for the cratering records on both Moon and Mars. The thickness of mantling material varies among the various plains units, and can be calculated from the depth/diameter scaling relations for martian craters.

  6. Locating the K/T boundary impact crater(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan M.

    Stratigraphic, mineralogical, chemical and isotopic evidence have led to the large (˜10-km) asteroid or comet impact theory as the cause of the Cretaceous period coming to an end. However, a suitable crater has not yet been found. Although the crater may have been destroyed because half of what was then the ocean floor has since been subducted, researchers are still hot on the trail of the impact site(s).A. R. Hildebrand and W. V. Boynton, Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, believe that locating the original crater(s) would resolve the volcanism versus impact debate over what ended the Cretaceous period. Based on a large concentration of shocked mineral grains and the largest grains occurring in North America, and impact-wave deposits at the K/T boundary only from the Caribbean and southern North America, they suggest that the K/T boundary impact occurred between North and South America. They suggest the 300-km-diameter buried basement structure in the Columbia Basin as a possible K/T impact crater. The location of impact-wave deposits and possibly seismically triggered slumps also helped the two decide that impact(s) musthave occurred in the Caribbean region.

  7. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay.

    Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.'

    This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce an approximately true-color panorama. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

    Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  8. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay.

    Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.'

    This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce an approximately true-color panorama. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

    Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  9. Crater Floor Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    Our final dune image shows a small dune field inside an unnamed crater south of Nili Fossae.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.6, Longitude 79 East (281 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located in a small canyon within a crater rim northeast of Naktong Vallis.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 7.1, Longitude 34.7 East (325.3 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    This region of dust avalanches is located in and around a crater to the west of yesterday's image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.7, Longitude 32.7 East (327.3 West). 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Chipped Paint Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 April 2003

    In the high northern latitudes NW of Alba Patera, a smooth mantle of material that covers the landscape appears chipped away from the rim of a large crater. The prominent scarp that has formed from the retreat of the mantle lacks the rounded appearance of other ice-rich mantles found in the mid-latitudes. The nature of this mantling layer therefore is more enigmatic.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 62.9, Longitude 226.2 East (133.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  13. Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located in a small canyon within a crater rim northeast of Naktong Vallis.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 7.1, Longitude 34.7 East (325.3 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. How old is Autolycus crater?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Pasckert, Jan Henrik; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Robinson, Mark S.

    2016-04-01

    Accurately determining the lunar cratering chronology is prerequisite for deriving absolute model ages (AMAs) across the lunar surface and throughout the Solar System [e.g., 1]. However, the lunar chronology is only constrained by a few data points over the last 1 Ga and there are no calibration data available between 1 and 3 Ga and beyond 3.9 Ga [2]. Rays from Autolycus and Aristillus cross the Apollo 15 landing site and presumably transported material to this location [3]. [4] proposed that at the Apollo 15 landing site about 32% of any exotic material would come from Autolycus crater and 25% would come from Aristillus crater. [5,6] proposed that the 39Ar-40Ar age of 2.1 Ga derived from three petrologically distinct, shocked Apollo 15 KREEP basalt samples, date Autolycus crater. Grier et al. [7] reported that the optical maturity (OMAT) characteristics of these craters are indistinguishable from the background values despite the fact that both craters exhibit rays that were used to infer relatively young, i.e., Copernican ages [8,9]. Thus, both OMAT characteristics and radiometric ages of 2.1 Ga and 1.29 Ga for Autolycus and Aristillus, respectively, suggest that these two craters are not Copernican in age. [10] interpreted newer U-Pb ages of 1.4 and 1.9 Ga from sample 15405 as the formation ages of Aristillus and Autolycus. If Autolycus is indeed the source of the dated exotic material collected at the Apollo 15 landing site, than performing crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements for Autolycus offers the possibility to add a new calibration point to the lunar chronology, particularly in an age range that was previously unconstrained. We used calibrated and map-projected LRO NAC images to perform CSFD measurements within ArcGIS, using CraterTools [11]. CSFDs were then plotted with CraterStats [12], using the production and chronology functions of [13]. We determined ages of 3.72 and 3.85 Ga for the interior (Ai1) and ejecta area Ae3, which we

  15. Spatial distribution of impact craters on Deimos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Naoyuki

    2017-05-01

    Deimos, one of the Martian moons, has numerous impact craters. However, it is unclear whether crater saturation has been reached on this satellite. To address this issue, we apply a statistical test known as nearest-neighbor analysis to analyze the crater distribution of Deimos. When a planetary surface such as the Moon is saturated with impact craters, the spatial distribution of craters is generally changed from random to more ordered. We measured impact craters on Deimos from Viking and HiRISE images and found (1) that the power law of the size-frequency distribution of the craters is approximately -1.7, which is significantly shallower than those of potential impactors, and (2) that the spatial distribution of craters over 30 m in diameter cannot be statistically distinguished from completely random distribution, which indicates that the surface of Deimos is inconsistent with a surface saturated with impact craters. Although a crater size-frequency distribution curve with a slope of -2 is generally interpreted as indicating saturation equilibrium, it is here proposed that two competing mechanisms, seismic shaking and ejecta emplacement, have played a major role in erasing craters on Deimos and are therefore responsible for the shallow slope of this curve. The observed crater density may have reached steady state owing to the obliterations induced by the two competing mechanisms. Such an occurrence indicates that the surface is saturated with impact craters despite the random distribution of craters on Deimos. Therefore, this work proposes that the age determined by the current craters on Deimos reflects neither the age of Deimos itself nor that of the formation of the large concavity centered at its south pole because craters should be removed by later impacts. However, a few of the largest craters on Deimos may be indicative of the age of the south pole event.

  16. The Wolf Boy

    PubMed Central

    Leckman, James F.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2005-01-01

    An adolescent boy presented with episodic wolf-like aggressive behaviors, for which his rural community planned an exorcism. Admission to a tertiary care hospital revealed an adolescent suffering an array of severe psychiatric symptoms, which best fit the diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder (RAD). The differential diagnosis included delusional disorder, mood problems, anxiety, schizophrenia, and “feral child” syndrome. Nosology and pathophysiology as well as pharmacological and psychosocial treatments are discussed. We highlight the importance of early life events in determining mental health risk and resiliency. PMID:21120097

  17. Impact Crater in Coastal Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Antoni, Hector L; Lasta, Carlos A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Impact craters are geological structures attributed to the impact of a meteoroid on the Earth's (or other planet's) surface (Koeberl and Sharpton. 1999). The inner planets of the solar system as well as other bodies such as our moon show extensive meteoroid impacts (Gallant 1964, French 1998). Because of its size and gravity, we may assume that the Earth has been heavily bombarded but weathering and erosion have erased or masked most of these features. In the 1920's, a meteor crater (Mark 1987) was identified in Arizona and to this first finding the identification of a large number of impact structures on Earth followed (Hodge 1994). Shock metamorphic effects are associated with meteorite impact craters. Due to extremely high pressures, shatter cones are produced as well as planar features in quartz and feldspar grains, diaplectic glass and high-pressure mineral phases such as stishovite (French 1998).

  18. Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, E.W.; Light, T.D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in 1980 in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas.

  19. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  20. Degradation of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Crumpler, L. S.; Parker, T. J.; Golombek, M. P.; Wilson, S. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Opportunity rover has traversed portions of two western rim segments of Endeavour, a 22 km-diameter crater in Meridiani Planum, for the past three years. The resultant data enables the evaluation of the geologic expression and degradation state of the crater. Endeavour is Noa-chian-aged, complex in morphology, and originally may have appeared broadly similar to the more pristine 20.5 km-diameter Santa Fe complex crater in Lunae Palus (19.5degN, 312.0degE). By contrast, Endeavour is considerably subdued and largely buried by younger sulfate-rich plains. Exposed rim segments dubbed Cape York (CY) and Solander Point/Murray Ridge/Pillinger Point (MR) located approximately1500 m to the south reveal breccias interpreted as remnants of the ejecta deposit, dubbed the Shoemaker Formation. At CY, the Shoemaker Formation overlies the pre-impact rocks, dubbed the Matijevic Formation.

  1. Floor of Alexey Tolstoy Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The circular, polar orbit of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) achieved in early 1999 has begun to provide many opportunities to examine features in the martian southern hemisphere at high resolution. One of our favorite examples (thus far) is this picture of a small portion of the floor of Alexey Tolstoy Crater.

    The top of the image shows a dark surface that is extremely rough and rocky. The rest of the image shows a brighter, smoother material. It appears that the bright material has been eroded back, exposing the lower, darker surface. The small crater that dominates this picture is only about 850 meters (930 yards) wide and has also been partly exhumed/exposed from beneath the bright, smooth material. Illumination is from the upper left.

    Alexey (or Aleksey) Tolstoy Crater, in which the small unnamed crater seen in this picture occurs, was named by the International Astronomical Union in 1982 to honor the Soviet writer who died in 1945. It is one of only a few craters on Mars designated by both the first and last names of the honored person. The Alexey Tolstoy Crater has a diameter of 94 kilometers (58 miles) and is centered at 47.6oS latitude, 234.6oW longitude in eastern Promethei Terra.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  2. The Youngest Crater on Charon?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-29

    NASA's New Horizons scientists have discovered a striking contrast between one of the fresh craters on Pluto's largest moon Charon and a neighboring crater dotting the moon's Pluto-facing hemisphere. The crater, informally named Organa, caught scientists' attention as they were studying New Horizons' highest-resolution infrared compositional scan of Charon. Organa and portions of the surrounding material ejected from it show infrared absorption at wavelengths of about 2.2 microns, indicating that the crater is rich in frozen ammonia -- and, from what scientists have seen so far, unique on Pluto's largest moon. The infrared spectrum of nearby Skywalker crater, for example, is similar to the rest of Charon's craters and surface, with features dominated by ordinary water ice. This composite image is based on observations from the New Horizons Ralph/LEISA instrument made at 10:25 UT (6:25 a.m. EDT) on July 14, 2015, when New Horizons was 50,000 miles (81,000 kilometers) from Charon. The spatial resolution is 3 miles (5 kilometers) per pixel. The LEISA data were downlinked Oct. 1-4, 2015, and processed into a map of Charon's 2.2 micron ammonia-ice absorption band. Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) panchromatic images used as the background in this composite were taken about 8:33 UT (4:33 a.m. EDT) July 14 at a resolution of 0.6 miles (0.9 kilometers) per pixel and downlinked Oct. 5-6. The ammonia absorption map from LEISA is shown in green on the LORRI image. The region covered by the yellow box is 174 miles across (280 kilometers). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20036

  3. Fall Frost Accumulation on Russell Crater Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-05

    In an area like Russell Crater, very ancient impact crater, NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter can follow changes in the terrain by comparing images taken at different times. Frost carbon dioxide ice is seen in this image.

  4. Bedrock in a Trough in Asimov Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-26

    This image, acquired by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, in southern winter over part of Asimov Crater, shows the crater appears to have been completely filled by a thick sequence of materials, perhaps including sediments and lava flows.

  5. Dark Areas in Cratered Terrain on Vesta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-14

    In this image from NASA Dawn spacecraft, a number of small dark areas, mostly clustered in the center and left of the image, are visible in asteroid Vesta cratered landscape. A lot of these dark patches are small impact craters.

  6. Automated and Manual Rocket Crater Measurement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip; Immer, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    An update has been performed to software designed to do very rapid automated measurements of craters created in sandy substrates by rocket exhaust on liftoff. The previous software was optimized for pristine lab geometry and lighting conditions. This software has been enhanced to include a section for manual measurements of crater parameters; namely, crater depth, crater full width at half max, and estimated crater volume. The tools provide a very rapid method to measure these manual parameters to ease the burden of analyzing large data sets. This software allows for rapid quantization of the rocket crater parameters where automated methods may not work. The progress of spreadsheet data is continuously saved so that data is never lost, and data can be copied to clipboards and pasted to other software for analysis. The volume estimation of a crater is based on the central max depth axis line, and the polygonal shape of the crater is integrated around that axis.

  7. Robust Automated Identification of Martian Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Bue, B. D.

    2007-03-01

    Robust automatic identification of martian craters is achieved by a computer algorithm acting on topographic data. The algorithm outperforms manual counts; derived crater sizes and depths are comparable to those measured manually.

  8. Sedimentation and Erosion in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-08

    This image depicts how a mountain inside a Mars Gale Crater might have formed. At left, the crater fills with layers of sediment. Yellow is for deposits in alluvial fans, deltas, and drifts during both wet and dry periods.

  9. Dome and Barchan Dunes in Newton Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-01

    This observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows both dome and barchan dunes in a small sand dune field on the floor of Newton Crater, an approximately 300 kilometer 130 mile wide crater in the Southern hemisphere of Mars.

  10. Cratering time scales for the Galilean satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Wolfe, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the present cratering rate for each Galilean satellite within the correct order of magnitude and to extend the cratering rates back into the geologic past on the basis of evidence from the earth-moon system. For collisions with long and short period comets, the magnitudes and size distributions of the comet nuclei, the distribution of their perihelion distances, and the completeness of discovery are addressed. The diameters and masses of cometary nuclei are assessed, as are crater diameters and cratering rates. The dynamical relations between long period and short period comets are discussed, and the population of Jupiter-crossing asteroids is assessed. Estimated present cratering rates on the Galilean satellites are compared and variations of cratering rate with time are considered. Finally, the consistency of derived cratering time scales with the cratering record of the icy Galilean satellites is discussed.

  11. Crater Formed in 2008 Reveals Subsurface Ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-24

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera on NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals subsurface ice in a crater formed in 2008. The impact that dug the crater excavated water ice from beneath the surface.

  12. Gullies in Terraced Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-375, 29 May 2003

    Gullies--possibly formed by a liquid such as water in the recent martian past--formed at two different levels in the walls of a meteor impact crater near 36.2oS, 185.5oW. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the upper crater wall (top of the image) and emergent from the slope of a lower terrace (bottom of the image). Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  13. Crater Ejecta Deposition on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmedemann, Nico; Otto, Katharina; Schulzeck, Franziska; Krohn, Katrin; Gathen, Isabell v. d.; Kneissl, Thomas; Neesemann, Adrian; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    Since March 6 2015 the Dawn spacecraft (Russell et al., 2012) is orbiting the dwarf planet Ceres inside the asteroid main belt. Color ratio data of the Framing Camera instrument show distinct bluish characteristics of recently exposed materials such as impact ejecta of young craters. Besides the common radial pattern of proximal ejecta, the distribution of remote ejecta is heavily affected by the relatively fast rotation of Ceres. We compare results from n-body simulations of impact ejecta with specific patterns in the color ratio data of the Dawn Framing Camera. Results of this work can also be used in order to predict prominent regions and patterns of secondary cratering.

  14. Gullies in Terraced Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-375, 29 May 2003

    Gullies--possibly formed by a liquid such as water in the recent martian past--formed at two different levels in the walls of a meteor impact crater near 36.2oS, 185.5oW. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the upper crater wall (top of the image) and emergent from the slope of a lower terrace (bottom of the image). Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  15. Moon - 'Ghost' craters formed during Mare filling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Hartmann, W. K.; Wood, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses formation of 'pathological' cases of crater morphology due to interaction of craters with molten lavas. Terrestrial observations of such a process are discussed. In lunar maria, a number of small impact craters (D less than 10 km) may have been covered by thin layers of fluid lavas, or formed in molten lava. Some specific lunar examples are discussed, including unusual shallow rings resembling experimental craters deformed by isostatic filling.

  16. Moon - 'Ghost' craters formed during Mare filling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Hartmann, W. K.; Wood, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses formation of 'pathological' cases of crater morphology due to interaction of craters with molten lavas. Terrestrial observations of such a process are discussed. In lunar maria, a number of small impact craters (D less than 10 km) may have been covered by thin layers of fluid lavas, or formed in molten lava. Some specific lunar examples are discussed, including unusual shallow rings resembling experimental craters deformed by isostatic filling.

  17. Meteor Crater (Barringer Meteorite Crater), Arizona: Summary of Impact Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1995-09-01

    Meteor Crater in northern Arizona represents the most abundant type of impact feature in our Solar System, i.e., the simple bowl-shaped crater. Excellent exposures and preservation of this large crater and its ejecta blanket have made it a critical data set in both terrestrial and planetary cratering research. Recognition of the value of the crater was initiated in the early 1900's by Daniel Moreau Barringer, whose 27 years of exploration championed its impact origin [1]. In 1960, Shoemaker presented information that conclusively demonstrated that Meteor Crater was formed by hypervelocity impact [2]. This led the U.S. Geological Survey to use the crater extensively in the 1960-70's as a prime training site for the Apollo astronauts. Today, Meteor Crater continues to serve as an important research site for the international science community, as well as an educational site for over 300,000 visitors per year. Since the late 1950's, studies of this crater have presented an increasingly clearer view of this impact and its effects and have provided an improved view of impact cratering in general. To expand on this data set, we are preparing an upgraded summary on the Meteor Crater event following the format in [3], including information and interpretations on: 1) Inferred origin and age of the impacting body, 2) Inferred ablation and deceleration history in Earth's atmosphere, 3) Estimated speed, trajectory, angle of impact, and bow shock conditions, 4) Estimated coherence, density, size, and mass of impacting body, 5) Composition of impacting body (Canyon Diablo meteorite), 6) Estimated kinetic energy coupled to target rocks and atmosphere, 7) Terrain conditions at time of impact and age of impact, 8) Estimated impact dynamics, such as pressures in air, meteorite, and rocks, 9) Inferred and estimated material partitioning into vapor, melt, and fragments, 10) Crater and near-field ejecta parameters, 11) Rock unit distributions in ejecta blanket, 12) Estimated far

  18. Fans and Crater Floor Deposits Southeast of Vinogradov Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-14

    This white, purple, and pink surface is located on the floor of an impact crater on the southeast rim of the larger Vinogradov Crater in southern Margaritifer Terra. The surface consists of what is left of a series of thin layers that subsequently eroded to create a "bullseye" pattern. The rough, etched appearance of the surface is similar-looking to deposits in other craters in the region and that are often associated with alluvial fans. The apparent ease and manner in which the materials are eroded relative to nearby fans and crater materials suggests they are fine-grained and the dominant agent of erosion is the wind. Although the origin of the deposits remains speculative, their physical character and common association with alluvial fans suggests they may be the result of deposition into a shallow lake or playa enabled by water flowing off the adjacent fan surfaces. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 26 centimeters (10.2 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 78 centimeters (30.7 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21560

  19. Geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic Johnnie Formation and Stirling Quartzite, southern Nopah Range, California: Deciphering the roles of climate, tectonics, and sedimentary process in reconstructing the early evolution of a rifted continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenborn, William A.

    The Neoproterozoic Stirling Quartzite and Johnnie Formation in the southern Nopah Range, southeastern California, comprise a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic sediment that is exposed along the Cordilleran margin. Located above the syn-rift Kingston Peak Formation, they mark the early deposits of passive margin sedimentation during the breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. Disagreement exists between field-based observations and subsidence modeling as to whether these units represent rift or passive margin deposition. In this study, major-, trace-, and rare earth--element (REE) geochemistry, and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology are used to determine their provenance, paleoclimatic information, and, consequently their paleotectonic setting. Geochemical and petrologic evidence confirm that Johnnie Formation mudstones and sandstones were the initial siliciclastic deposits laid along the Cordilleran Laurentian margin following the Neoproterozoic break-up of Rodinia. Johnnie Formation sediment has corrected CIA values between 63 and 83, and likely higher, which suggests moderate to intense weathering of the source. Modeling suggests the unweathered source likely possessed a composition of a 90% granodiorite + 10% high-K granite. This mixture balances petrographic observations, major element geochemistry, and the REE: (La/Sm)N = 4.19 +/- 1.26, (Gd/Yb)N = 1.34 +/- 0.38, Eu/Eu* = 0.63 +/- 0.09 and (La/Yb)N = 9.55 +/- 2.27. The hypothesis of a primary tectonic control on sediment composition (i.e. rift-basin deposition) is rejected because Johnnie Formation sediments largely lack lithic fragments that are indicative of derivation from a source area with rugged topography. Feldspars are distributed unevenly in finer grained sediments. Observed fluctuations in feldspar content of sediments from the lower to upper Johnnie Formation are attributed to increased abrasion and hydrodynamic sorting, which differentially segregated feldspars into finer grained

  20. The self-secondary crater population of the Hokusai crater on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Prieur, Nils C.; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2016-07-01

    Whether or not self-secondaries dominate small crater populations on continuous ejecta deposits and floors of fresh impact craters has long been a controversy. This issue potentially affects the age determination technique using crater statistics. Here the self-secondary crater population on the continuous ejecta deposits of the Hokusai crater on Mercury is unambiguously recognized. Superposition relationships show that this population was emplaced after both the ballistic sedimentation of excavation flows and the subsequent veneering of impact melt, but it predated the settlement and solidification of melt pools on the crater floor. Fragments that formed self-secondaries were launched via impact spallation with large angles. Complex craters on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars probably all have formed self-secondaries populations. Dating young craters using crater statistics on their continuous ejecta deposits can be misleading. Impact melt pools are less affected by self-secondaries. Overprint by subsequent crater populations with time reduces the predominance of self-secondaries.

  1. Interior Slopes of Copernican Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Burns, K.; Stelling, R.; Speyerer, E.; Mahanti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) routinely acquires high resolution (50 to 200 cm pixel scales) stereo pairs from adjacent orbits through spacecraft slews; parallax angles are typically >20°, and the local incidence angle between 40° and 65°. These observations are reduced to digital elevation models (DEM) using a combination of ISIS (USGS) and SOCET Set (BAE Systems). For this study DEMs originally sampled at 2 m scales were reduced (averaging technique) to 5 m scales to provide slopes calculated over 3x3 pixel boxes (15 m x 15 m). The upper 50% of interior walls of Copernican craters (2 to 20 km diameter) typically have average slopes of 36°, with slopes locally above 40° not uncommon (i.e. Fig 1: 2.3 km diam, 17.68°S, 144.41°E). Giordano Bruno (GB; 35.97N°, 102.86°E) is likely the youngest 20-km diameter class crater on the Moon. Its floor is dominated by impact forms (ponds and flows), and inner walls exhibit a series of coalesced flow lobes emanating from steep upper slopes. The lobes appear to be composed of dry granular material based on the observation of boulder trails superposed on many examples. The upper slopes average 36° or more, with some slopes above 40°. For much of GB, slopes exceed 30° all the way to the crater floor (especially in the SE). The high slopes imply angular grains, some level of cohesion, and/or higher angles of repose due to the Moon's relatively low gravity. Larmor Q (28.56°N, 176.33°E), another large Copernican crater, is elliptical in plan (23 x 18 km diameter), with an interior floor dominated by large slump blocks. Like GB its walls exhibit overlapping lobes (granular materials) emanating from interior wall slopes that range from 30° to 36°. Other Copernican craters exhibit similar steep slopes on interior walls: Moore F (23 km diam), Necho (30 km), and two unnamed craters (9 km,13.31°S, 257.55°E; 9 km, 15.72°, 177.39°E). Slopes of the central peaks of Tycho crater (0

  2. New morphometric data for fresh lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.; Anderson, L.

    1978-01-01

    Morphometric relations have been determined for 2598 fresh craters on the lunar nearside using data given in the catalog of Wood and Andersson (1978). For each of five principal morphological types, typified by Albategnius C, Biot, Sosigenes, Triesnecker, and Tycho, statistical relations are documented for the following: crater diameter and depth; floor diameter and crater diameter; central peak height and crater diameter; average wall slope and crater depth; central peak occurrence and crater diameter; occurrence of scallops or terraces and crater diameter. The first four relations generally confirm the conclusions of Pike (1977), but the last two differ from results reported by Smith and Sanchez (1973). Small (diameter less than 20 km) flat-floored craters formed in mare terrains are as much as 10% deeper than those formed in the highlands, and the depths of small bowl-shaped craters reflect even greater dependence on terrain. Larger, scalloped-walled craters are deeper in highland terrain than on the maria. Although wall failure does not occur until the crater diameter reaches 13 km, central peaks are found in flat floor craters as small as 2 km.

  3. Impact Melt in Small Lunar Highlands Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Cintala, M. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Barnouin, O.; Hawke, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    Impact-melt deposits are a typical characteristic of complex impact craters, occurring as thick pools on the crater floor, ponds on wall terraces, veneers on the walls, and flows outside and inside the rim. Studies of the distribution of impact melt suggested that such deposits are rare to absent in and around small (km to sub-km), simple impact craters. noted that the smallest lunar crater observed with impact melt was approximately 750 m in diameter. Similarly, theoretical models suggest that the amount of melt formed is a tiny fraction (<1%) of the total crater volume and thus significant deposits would not be expected for small lunar craters. LRO LROC images show that impact-melt deposits can be recognized associated with many simple craters to diameters down to approximately 200 m. The melt forms pools on the crater floor, veneer on the crater walls or ejecta outside the crater. Such melt deposits are relatively rare, and can be recognized only in some fresh craters. These observations indicate that identifiable quantities of impact melt can be produced in small impacts and the presence of such deposits shows that the material can be aggregated into recognizable deposits. Further, the present of such melt indicates that small craters could be reliably radiometrically dated helping to constrain the recent impact flux.

  4. Venus - Oblique View of Crater Riley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full resolution radar mosaic centered at 14 degrees north latitude, 72 degrees east longitude, shows an oblique view of the impact crater Riley, named for Margaretta Riley, a 19th Century botanist. This view was prepared from two left-looking Magellan radar images acquired with different incidence angles. Because the relief displacements of the two images are different, depths from the crater rim to the crater floor and heights of the crater rim and flanks above the surrounding plains can be measured. The crater is 25 kilometers (15.5 miles) in diameter. The floor of the crater is 580 meters (1,914 feet) below the plains surrounding the crater. The crater's rim rises 620 meters (2,046 feet) above the plains and 1,200 meters (3,960 feet) above the crater floor. The crater's central peak is 536 meters (1,769 feet) high. The crater's diameter is 40 times the depth resulting in a relatively shallow appearance. The topography is exaggerated by 22 times to emphasize the crater's features. This oblique view was produced from two left-looking radar stereo image mosaics utilizing photogrammetric software developed by the Solar System Visualization Project and the Digital Image Animation Laboratory at JPL's Multimission Image Processing Laboratory.

  5. Characteristics of Polygonal Craters on (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Katharina A.; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Buczkowski, Debra L.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Kersten, Elke; Mest, Scott C.; Naß, Andrea; Neesemann, Adrian; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Schröder, Stefan E.; Schulzeck, Fanziska; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; Williams, David A.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chistopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres in March 2015. There, the on-board Framing Camera (FC) collects image data with a resolution of up to 35 m/pixel, which reveal a large variety of impact crater morphologies including polygonal craters. Polygonal craters show straight rim sections aligned to form an angular shape. They are commonly associated with fractures in the target material, which may be preserved as linear structures on Ceres [3, 4]. On Ceres, we find polygonal craters with a size ranging between 5 km and 280 km in diameter. However, the majority of polygonal craters have diameters ranging between 10 km and 50 km diameter. A preferential hexagonal shape is observed and some polygonal craters exhibit central peaks or relaxed crater floors. On average there are eight to ten polygonal craters per 100,000 km², however the northern latitudes have a slightly higher and the southern latitudes a slightly lower polygonal crater density. This may hint at an older and younger age of the northern (> 60° N) and southern regions (> 60° S) compared to the mid latitudes, respectively. Alternatively, the relaxation of craters may be advanced in the mid latitudes which are generally warmer than the poles and thus support the relaxation of depressions. Also, the southern region harbors relatively large craters which may have altered or destroyed preexisting structures in the crust which are necessary for the formation of polygonal craters. Most polygonal craters have six or seven straight rim sections; however, there is a tendency for fewer edges with decreasing crater size. Although this observation may be biased due to the map resolution, it is also possible that the impactor creating a relatively small polygonal crater embeds less energy and thus forms the straight rim sections during the excavation stage. This may result in fewer straight rim sections compared to more energetic impactors which form their polygonal shape during the modification stage. Straight rim

  6. Crater Gradation in Gusev Crater, Meridiani Planum, and on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Crumpler, L.; Li, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity have examined multiple impact craters since landing in Gusev Crater (14.569 deg. S, 175.473 deg. E) and Meridiani Planum (1.946 deg. S, 354.473 deg. E), respectively. Craters at both locations are in varying states of preservation and comparison between their evolved gradation signatures and those around simple, unglaciated terrestrial craters provide clues to the processes and amount of Martian crater modification.

  7. Ismenia Fossae: Craters or Pits?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-15

    The circular depressions prevalent throughout this scene from NASA Mars Odyssey at first glance appear to be craters, but are they? Could they be pits formed by devolatilization? It is not clear. Scientists are studying these features in search of answe

  8. Cracks in a Crater Ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-07

    Many impact craters on Mars were filled with ice in past climates. Sometimes this ice flows or slumps down the crater walls into the center and acquires concentric wrinkles as a result. This image shows an example of this. There are other ways that scientists know the material in the crater is icy. Surface cracks that form polygonal shapes cover the material in the crater. They are easy to see in this spring-time image because seasonal frost hides inside the cracks, outlining them in bright white. These cracks form because ice within the ground expands and contracts a lot as it warms and cools. Scientists can see similar cracks in icy areas of the Earth and other icy locations on Mars. If you look closely, you'll see small polygons inside larger ones. The small polygons are younger and the cracks shallower while the large ones are outlined with cracks that penetrate more deeply. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21215

  9. Side View of 'Endurance Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This picture from the rear hazard-avoidance camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a side view of 'Endurance Crater.' Opportunity took the image on sol 188 (Aug. 4, 2004), before transmitting it and other data to the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter. The orbiter then relayed the data to Earth.

  10. Limb of Copernicus Impact Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-03

    Copernicus is 93 km wide and is located within the Mare Imbrium Basin, northern nearside of the Moon 10 degrees N., 20 degrees W.. This image from NASA's Lunar Orbiter shows crater floor, floor mounds, rim, and rayed ejecta. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00094

  11. Craters in an Icy Surface

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    The crater in the center of this HiRISE image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is unusual because there is a wide, flat bench, or terrace, between the outer rim and the inner section, making it appear somewhat like a bullseye.

  12. Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image is the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside 'Eagle Crater,' the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions--each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across---that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as 'lag deposit,' or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as 'Homeplate' and the one behind it as 'First Base.' The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

  13. Intrepid Crater on Mars Stereo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Intrepid crater on Mars carries the name of the lunar module of NASA Apollo 12 mission, which landed on Earth moon Nov. 19, 1969. NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this stereo view on Nov. 11, 2010. 3D glasses are necessary.

  14. At Home in the Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The wheel tracks seen above and to the left of the lander trace the path the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has traveled since landing in a small crater at Meridiani Planum, Mars. After this picture was taken, the rover excavated a trench near the soil seen at the lower left corner of the image. This image mosaic was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

  15. Miranda Fractures, Grooves and Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This image of the Uranian moon, Miranda, was taken Jan 24, 1986 by NASA's Voyager 2. This image reveals a bewildering variety of fractures, grooves and craters, as well as features of different albedos reflectancea. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00140

  16. The current martian cratering rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daubar, I. J.; McEwen, A. S.; Byrne, S.; Kennedy, M. R.; Ivanov, B.

    2013-07-01

    The discovery of 248 dated impact sites known to have formed within the last few decades allows us to refine the current cratering rate and slope of the production function at Mars. We use a subset of 44 of these new craters that were imaged before and after impact by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera - a thoroughly searched data set that minimizes biases from variable image resolutions. We find the current impact rate is 1.65 × 10-6 craters with an effective diameter ⩾3.9 m/km2/yr, with a differential slope (power-law exponent) of -2.45 ± 0.36. This results in model ages that are factors of three to five below the Hartmann (Hartmann, W.K. [2005]. Icarus 174, 294-320) and Neukum et al. (Neukum, G., Ivanov, B.A., Hartmann, W.K. [2001]. Space Sci. Rev. 96, 55-86)/Ivanov (Ivanov, B.A. [2001]. Space Sci. Rev. 96, 87-104) model production functions where they overlap in diameter. The best-fit production function we measure has a shallower slope than model functions at these sizes, but model function slopes are within the statistical errors. More than half of the impacts in this size range form clusters, which is another reason to use caution when estimating surface ages using craters smaller than ˜50 m in diameter.

  17. Gullies on Martian Crater (THEMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This visible-light image, taken by the thermal emission imaging system on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, indicates that gullies on martian crater walls may be carved by liquid water melting from remnant snow packs. The gullies in the top right-center appear to emerge from beneath and within a gradually disappearing blanket of snow. The current snow pack in this crater (located at 43 degrees south, 214 degrees east) appears to remain only on the cold, pole facing crater wall (top). On the less-shaded, warmer sides of the crater (left), the snow cover has completely disappeared, leaving the gullies exposed. The image shows an area 14.8 kilometers (9.2 miles) by 21.6 kilometers (13.4 miles). North is toward the top, and illumination is from the left.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The thermal emission imaging system was provided by Arizona State University, Tempe. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Stratigraphy of the crater Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paquette, R.

    1984-01-01

    The stratigraphy of copernicus based on its olivine absorption bands is presented. Earth based spectral data are used to develop models that also employ cratering mechanics to devise theories for Copernican geomorphology. General geologic information, spectral information, upper and lower stratigraphic units and a chart for model comparison are included in the stratigraphic analysis.

  19. Small Crater Expedient Repair Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Crater 4, the timed polymer-concrete repair, failed due to material quality. An estimated 20 of the 464 bags of SilikalO lacked the benzoyl ... peroxide catalyst required for polymerization. As a result of this omission, several areas of the repair failed to harden, causing the unpolymerized mateiial

  20. Revisiting the crater of doom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2015-09-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure in Mexico is widely believed to be the site of the asteroid impact that allegedly killed the dinosaurs. As Sergio de Régules reports, scientists are now preparing to glean from it new insights into crater formation, materials science and the mechanisms of mass extinction.

  1. Degradation of Endeavour crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J. A., III; Crumpler, L. S.; Parker, T. J.; Golombek, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Opportunity rover is traversing the western rim segments of the 22 km diameter Endeavour crater in Meridiani Planum, with resultant data enabling evaluation of the craters's degradation state. The crater is Noachian in age, complex in morphology, and largely buried by younger sulfate-rich rocks. Nevertheless, exposed rim segments dubbed Cape York (CY) and Solander Point/Murray Ridge (S/M) ~1500 m to the south reveal breccias interpreted as remnants of the ejecta deposit (Shoemaker Formation or SF) that at CY overlie the pre-impact country rocks (Matijevic Formation or MF). At CY, relief is ~10 m and consists of 6-7 m of SF over at least several m of MF. By contrast, the MF/SF contact is not visible at S/M despite outcrops some 20 m below and 60 m above the elevation of the contact at CY. This implies some structural offset between the rim segments and suggests up to 70 m section is preserved at S/M. The lack of information about the orientation of the SF at S/M makes the true thickness difficult to establish, though it appears to be 10's of m more than at CY. Comparison to similar sized, fresh, complex craters on Mars and the Moon suggests there was originally 100-200 m of ejecta at Endeavour's rim. Ejecta comprise only 20-25% of the rim relief around lunar craters of similar size, thereby implying an original rim height of up to 500-1000 m at Endeavour. If accurate, then ~400-800 m of the rim remains buried; the higher end of this range is close to the 800-900 m section interpreted elsewhere. If 200 m ejecta were present, then CY and S/M experienced ~190 m and over 100 m erosional lowering, respectively. If 100 m ejecta were present then rim lowering was ~90 m and 10's of m, respectively. Such differences between rim segments likely relate to changing efficiency of responsible processes and/or varying characteristics of the rocks and indicate portions of Endeavour crater experienced significant degradation. A paucity of exposed debris shed from SF and MT

  2. The Politics of Policy in Boys' Education: Getting Boys "Right"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B.

    2008-01-01

    This book explores boy-focused education policy and how different educators struggle to implement or resist it in their schools. Weaver-Hightower examines masculinity politics in Australia and the United States, mapping how these politics create panic over raising and educating boys the "Right" way. Contextualizing this policy with…

  3. Investigating Evolved Compositions Around Wolf Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Glotch, T. D.

    2017-01-01

    Wolf crater is an irregularly shaped, approximately 25 km crater in the south-central portion of Mare Nubium on the lunar nearside. While not previously identified as a lunar "red spot", Wolf crater was identified as a Th anomaly by Lawrence and coworkers. We have used data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to determine the area surrounding Wolf crater has composition more similar to highly evolved, non-mare volcanic structures than typical lunar crustal lithology. In this presentation, we will investigate the geomorphology and composition of the Wolf crater and discuss implications for the origin of the anomalous terrain.

  4. On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the three exposures combined into this view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

    The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  5. The Explorer's Guide to Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, F.; Pierazzo, E.; Osinski, G.

    2005-01-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geologic process of our solar system. It competes with other processes, such as plate tectonics, volcanism, fluvial, glacial and eolian activity, in shaping the surfaces of planetary bodies. In some cases, like the Moon and Mercury, impact craters are the dominant landform. On other planetary bodies impact craters are being continuously erased by the action of other geological processes, like volcanism on Io, erosion and plate tectonics on the Earth, tectonic and volcanic resurfacing on Venus, or ancient erosion periods on Mars. The study of crater populations is one of the principal tools for understanding the geologic history of a planetary surface. Among the general public, impact cratering has drawn wide attention through its portrayal in several Hollywood movies. Questions that are raised after watching these movies include: How do scientists learn about impact cratering? , and What information do impact craters provide in understanding the evolution of a planetary surface? Fundamental approaches used by scientists to learn about impact cratering include field work at known terrestrial craters, remote sensing studies of craters on various solid surfaces of solar system bodies, and theoretical and laboratory studies using the known physics of impact cratering.

  6. Low-emissivity impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Elachi, C.; Moore, H. J.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Ivanov, B. A.; Schaber, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of 144 impact craters on Venus has shown that 11 of these have floors with average emissivities lower than 0.8. The remaining craters have emissivities between 0.8 and 0.9, independent of the specific backscatter cross section of the crater floors. These 144 impact craters were chosen from a possible 164 craters with diameters greater than 30 km as identified by researchers for 89 percent of the surface of Venus. We have only looked at craters below 6053.5 km altitude because a mineralogical change causes high reflectivity/low emissivity above the altitude. We have also excluded all craters with diameters smaller than 30 km because the emissivity footprint at periapsis is 16 x 24 km and becomes larger at the poles.

  7. Serving Boys through Readers' Advisory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Based on more than twenty years' experience working to get boys interested in reading, the author now offers his first readers' advisory volume. With an emphasis on nonfiction and the boy-friendly categories of genre fiction, the work offers a wealth of material including: (1) Suggestions for how to booktalk one-on-one as well as in large groups;…

  8. Boys and Puberty (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... own pace. Here are some of the questions boys have. Why Are Girls Taller Than Me? You might have noticed that ... own likes and dislikes. And during puberty, some boys are very friendly with girls and others might be nervous about talking to ...

  9. Car Hits Boy on Bicycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we present the fascinating reconstruction of an accident where a car hit a boy riding his bicycle. The boy dramatically flew several metres through the air after the collision and was injured, but made a swift and complete recovery from the accident with no long-term after-effects. Students are challenged to determine the speed of…

  10. Are Girls Behaving like Boys?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnott, Rosie

    2008-01-01

    This article explores some of the issues that have given rise to the perception of an increase in aggressive behaviour by females. It asserts that merely comparing girls' behaviour with that of boys, especially the claim that "girls are behaving like boys", trivialises the very real issues associated with females and aggression. This paper will…

  11. Serving Boys through Readers' Advisory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Based on more than twenty years' experience working to get boys interested in reading, the author now offers his first readers' advisory volume. With an emphasis on nonfiction and the boy-friendly categories of genre fiction, the work offers a wealth of material including: (1) Suggestions for how to booktalk one-on-one as well as in large groups;…

  12. Car Hits Boy on Bicycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we present the fascinating reconstruction of an accident where a car hit a boy riding his bicycle. The boy dramatically flew several metres through the air after the collision and was injured, but made a swift and complete recovery from the accident with no long-term after-effects. Students are challenged to determine the speed of…

  13. Floor Fractured Craters around Syrtis Major, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, M.; Jaumann, R.; Asche, H.

    2012-04-01

    Craters around Syrtis Major are eroded and/or refilled. Syrtis Major is one of the large Hesperian-aged volcanic regions on Mars. Basaltic deposits originating from nearby Syrtis Major cover the floor of impact craters. In particular some craters exhibit a fractured floor. Floor Fractured Craters can be divided in types. The grade of erosion and the geologic process, which formed the crater, can be different. Type 1: Crater floor affected by pit chains or narrow crevices which are sometimes discontinuous. Type 2: More developed and dense networks of crevices as type 1. Crevices are wide and deep enough to be detected. A circular moat starts to develop as crevices concentrate along the rim. Type 3: Mainly distinguished from type 2 by the presence of a fully developed circular moat. The flat central part is divided into several blocks by crevices. Type 4: They show also a continuous moat along the rim but the central part consists of many flat-top blocks and small conical mounds. Type 5: Crater floor has many mounds of irregular sizes, but the flattop blocks are absent. It should be noted that the knobby surface shows typical characteristics of chaotic terrains and could be alternatively classified as such. Type 6: Crater without a circular moat, crevices are not fully developed, flat-top blocks are present. Fractured floor could have been reshaped through geologic processes. Floor fractured craters can be found in three different areas. The first area is located in the south-eastern part of Syrtis Major, bordering to the highlands. Volcanic features like lava flow fronts, lava flows and wrinkle ridges dominate this region. The crater floor is separated in sharp-edged plates and the interior seems to be flooded by basaltic material. The second area is in the north of Syrtis Major and transcend to the chaotic terrain further north. Near the martian dichotomy boundary fluvial activity was the decisive process. The crater rims are highly eroded, channels are cutting

  14. An analytical model of crater count equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Minton, David A.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2017-06-01

    Crater count equilibrium occurs when new craters form at the same rate that old craters are erased, such that the total number of observable impacts remains constant. Despite substantial efforts to understand this process, there remain many unsolved problems. Here, we propose an analytical model that describes how a heavily cratered surface reaches a state of crater count equilibrium. The proposed model formulates three physical processes contributing to crater count equilibrium: cookie-cutting (simple, geometric overlap), ejecta-blanketing, and sandblasting (diffusive erosion). These three processes are modeled using a degradation parameter that describes the efficiency for a new crater to erase old craters. The flexibility of our newly developed model allows us to represent the processes that underlie crater count equilibrium problems. The results show that when the slope of the production function is steeper than that of the equilibrium state, the power law of the equilibrium slope is independent of that of the production function slope. We apply our model to the cratering conditions in the Sinus Medii region and at the Apollo 15 landing site on the Moon and demonstrate that a consistent degradation parameterization can successfully be determined based on the empirical results of these regions. Further developments of this model will enable us to better understand the surface evolution of airless bodies due to impact bombardment.

  15. Excavating Stickney crater at Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Rovny, Jared; Owen, J. Michael; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-10-24

    Stickney crater, at 9 km across, dominates the morphology of ~22 km Phobos, the larger of the two moons of Mars. The Stickney impact event had global repercussions for Phobos, including extensive resurfacing and fracturing of the moon. Understanding the initial conditions and dynamical consequences of the collision is necessary to test competing hypotheses for the origin of peculiar grooved terrain that striates much of the surface. Previous modeling of the impact event was unable to replicate Stickney without globally fragmenting the satellite. We also describe high-resolution numerical simulations that successfully generate Stickney crater while maintaining the large-scale structure of Phobos. Target porosity, which is estimated to be significant, aids in keeping the moon intact. Damage follows patterns centered on Stickney that are inconsistent with the observed alignment of grooved terrain on Phobos. We ejected low-velocity boulders at shallow angles in sufficient numbers to support a rolling-boulder origin for grooved terrain.

  16. Is that an Impact Crater?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-04

    This image was acquired to take a closer look at a circular feature that might be an impact structure on the South Polar layered deposits. Measuring the sizes and frequency of impact craters provides a constraint on the age of the landscape. However, craters in icy terrain are modified by processes that flatten and change them in such a manner that it is hard to say for sure if it had an impact origin. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 49.8 centimeters (19.6 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 150 centimeters (59 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21576

  17. Hues in a Crater Slope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-02

    Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on steep slopes. However, these slopes often experience rockfalls and debris avalanches that keep the surface clean of dust, revealing a variety of hues, like in this enhanced-color image, representing different rock types. The bright reddish material at the top of the crater rim is from a coating of the Martian dust. The long streamers of material are from downslope movements. Also revealed in this slope are a variety of bedrock textures, with a mix of layered and jumbled deposits. This sample is typical of the Martian highlands, with lava flows and water-lain materials depositing layers, then broken up and jumbled by many impact events. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA14454

  18. Danielson Crater Dunes - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-02

    The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of the floor of Danielson Crater. This crater has deposits of material on the floor that have the appearance of wind erosion. The ridges and elongate hills are indications of wind direction. The dark blue material in this image is sand, most likely basaltic. The sand has formed dunes, but also can be seen filling small valleys to the upper right of the main dune. Orbit Number: 13206 Latitude: 7.82772 Longitude: 353.071 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2004-12-05 18:35 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20082

  19. Along Endurance Crater's Inner Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This view from the base of 'Burns Cliff' in the inner wall of 'Endurance Crater' combines several frames taken by Opportunity's navigation camera during the NASA rover's 280th martian day (Nov. 6, 2004). It is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction. The cliff dominates the left and right portions of the image, while the central portion looks down into the crater. The 'U' shape of this mosaic results from the rover's tilt of about 30 degrees on the sloped ground below the cliff. Rover wheel tracks in the left half of the image show some of the slippage the rover experienced in making its way to this point. The site from which this image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 37.

  20. Excavating Stickney crater at Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Rovny, Jared; Owen, J. Michael; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-10-01

    Stickney crater, at 9 km across, dominates the morphology of 22 km Phobos, the larger of the two moons of Mars. The Stickney impact event had global repercussions for Phobos, including extensive resurfacing and fracturing of the moon. Understanding the initial conditions and dynamical consequences of the collision is necessary to test competing hypotheses for the origin of peculiar grooved terrain that striates much of the surface. Previous modeling of the impact event was unable to replicate Stickney without globally fragmenting the satellite. Here we describe high-resolution numerical simulations that successfully generate Stickney crater while maintaining the large-scale structure of Phobos. Target porosity, which is estimated to be significant, aids in keeping the moon intact. Damage follows patterns centered on Stickney that are inconsistent with the observed alignment of grooved terrain on Phobos. Low-velocity boulders are ejected at shallow angles in sufficient numbers to support a rolling-boulder origin for grooved terrain.