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  1. Sustaining Reliability on Accountability Measures at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Callender, Tiffany; Demski, Renee; Winner, Laura; Day, Richard; Austin, J Matthew; Berenholtz, Sean M; Miller, Marlene R

    2016-02-01

    In 2012 Johns Hopkins Medicine leaders challenged their health system to reliably deliver best practice care linked to nationally vetted core measures and achieve The Joint Commission Top Performer on Key Quality Measures ®program recognition and the Delmarva Foundation award. Thus, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality implemented an initiative to ensure that ≥96% of patients received care linked to measures. Nine low-performing process measures were targeted for improvement-eight Joint Commission accountability measures and one Delmarva Foundation core measure. In the initial evaluation at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, all accountability measures for the Top Performer program reached the required ≥95% performance, gaining them recognition by The Joint Commission in 2013. Efforts were made to sustain performance of accountability measures at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Improvements were sustained through 2014 using the following conceptual framework: declare and communicate goals, create an enabling infrastructure, engage clinicians and connect them in peer learning communities, report transparently, and create accountability systems. One part of the accountability system was for teams to create a sustainability plan, which they presented to senior leaders. To support sustained improvements, Armstrong Institute leaders added a project management office for all externally reported quality measures and concurrent reviewers to audit performance on care processes for certain measure sets. The Johns Hopkins Hospital sustained performance on all accountability measures, and now more than 96% of patients receive recommended care consistent with nationally vetted quality measures. The initiative methods enabled the transition of quality improvement from an isolated project to a way of leading an organization.

  2. Changing Environment and the Academic Medical Center: The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyssel, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Johns Hopkins Hospital expanded its health care delivery capabilities and strengthened its position in the marketplace by acquisitions of and mergers with other hospitals and a health maintenance organization. The resulting conglomerate has achieved its goals of expanding patient care, broadening the patient base, and enlarging the asset base and…

  3. Neurology Falls. Patient Falls Risk Assessment, Neurology Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-06

    currently valid ()MB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOf IR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 21 JUL 2008 2. REPORT TYPE Final...Hospital, Baltimore, MD 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) LT John M Gardner, MSC, USN 5d. PROJECT...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD Residency Site

  4. The History of Heart Surgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishant D; Alejo, Diane E; Cameron, Duke E

    2015-01-01

    Johns Hopkins has made many lasting contributions to cardiac surgery, including the discovery of heparin and the Blalock-Taussig Shunt, which represents the dawn of modern cardiac surgery. Equally important, Johns Hopkins has trained some of the world's leaders in academic cardiac surgery, and is committed to training the future leaders in our specialty. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Harvey Cushing at Johns Hopkins.

    PubMed

    Long, D M

    1999-11-01

    Harvey Cushing began surgical training with William Halsted at Johns Hopkins in 1896. Cushing joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 1900 and spent 1 year in Europe in the laboratory of Theodore Kocher. He returned to Johns Hopkins, where he founded neurosurgery as an independent specialty, established the concept of the clinician scientist, discovered the hormonal properties of the pituitary gland and founded endocrinology, introduced intraoperative x-rays into surgical practice, introduced blood pressure monitoring into the operating room, and wrote the first definitive text on neurosurgery. Although there have been many pioneers in our field, Cushing, more than anyone else, developed neurosurgery as a specialty and left a legacy of talented neurosurgeons to develop and expand the field.

  6. Walter E. Dandy: his contributions to pituitary surgery in the context of the overall Johns Hopkins Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Corsello, Andrea; Di Dalmazi, Giulia; Pani, Fabiana; Chalan, Paulina; Salvatori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Background Walter E. Dandy (1886–1946) was an outstanding neurosurgeon who spent his entire career at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. After graduating from medical school in 1910, he completed a research fellowship in the Hunterian laboratory with Harvey Cushing and then joined the Department of Surgery as resident, rising to the rank professor in 1931. Dandy made several contributions that helped building the neurosurgical specialty, most famously the introduction of pneumo-ventriculography to image brain lesions for which he received a Nobel prize nomination. He also performed many pituitary surgeries, although his role in this area is less known and overshadowed by that of Cushing’s. Purpose This retrospective cohort study was designed to unveil Dandy’s pituitary work and place it in the context of the overall pituitary surgeries performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Methods Pituitary surgery data were obtained by screening the paper and electronic surgical pathology records of the Department of Pathology, as well as the general operating room log books of the Johns Hopkins Hospital housed in the Chesney Medical Archives. Results A total of 3211 pituitary surgeries associated with a pathological specimen were performed between February 1902 and July 2017 in 2847 patients. Most of the surgeries (2875 of 3211 89%) were done by 21 neurosurgeons. Dandy ranks 4th as number of surgeries, with 287 pituitary operations in 35 years of activity. He averaged 8 pituitary surgeries per year, a rate that positions him 6th among all Hopkins neurosurgeons. With the exception of his first operation done in July 1912 while Cushing was still at Hopkins, Dandy approached the pituitary gland transcranially, rather than transphenoidally. The majority of Dandy’s pituitary patients had a pathological diagnosis of pituitary adenomas, followed by craniopharyngiomas and sellar cysts. In the decades Dandy operated, pituitary surgeries represented 0.56% of the total Johns Hopkins

  7. Harvey Cushing's Treatment of Skull Base Infections: The Johns Hopkins Experience

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Aravind; Pendleton, Courtney; Raza, Shaan M.; Boahene, Kofi; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this report, we review Dr. Cushing's early surgical cases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, revealing details of his early operative approaches to infections of the skull base. Design Following institutional review board (IRB) approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, we reviewed the Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical files from 1896 to 1912. Setting The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1896 to 1912. Participants Eleven patients underwent operative treatment for suspected infections of the skull base. Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measure was operative approach, postoperative mortality, and condition recorded at the time of discharge. Results Eleven patients underwent operative intervention for infections of the skull base. The mean age was 30 years (range: 9 to 63). Of these patients, seven (64%) were female. The mean length of stay was 16.5 days (range: 4 to 34). Postoperatively eight patients were discharged in “well” or “good” condition, one patient remained “unimproved,” and two patients died during their admission. Conclusion Cushing's careful preoperative observation of patients, meticulous operative technique, and judicious use of postoperative drainage catheters contributed to a remarkably low mortality rate in his series of skull base infections. PMID:24083129

  8. Sellar door: Harvey Cushing's entry into the pituitary gland, the unabridged Johns Hopkins experience 1896-1912.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Adams, Hadie; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2013-02-01

    To review the original surgical records from the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and analyze the records of patients Cushing treated for pituitary disorders from 1896 to 1912. Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, we reviewed the original surgical files from the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Patients presenting with pituitary-related symptoms, who underwent surgical treatment directed at the pituitary gland, were selected for further review. Thirty-seven patients who underwent surgical intervention for pituitary disorders were found. Of these patients, 12 were mentioned only briefly in Cushing's 1912 monograph, whereas 6 were not described at all. The remaining 19 were documented by Cushing in his 1912 monograph. Cushing used three main surgical approaches to the pituitary: transsphenoidal, transcranial, and the subfrontal "omega incision." There were 6 inpatient deaths. The mean time to last follow-up was 41.0 months. At follow-up, headache was the most common unresolved symptom. This review highlights Cushing's accomplishments in the surgical treatment of suspected pituitary pathology during his early career as a young attending at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It reveals new information about patients whom Cushing did not include in his publications detailing his surgical experience at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sellar Door: Harvey Cushing’s Entry into the Pituitary Gland, the Unabridged Johns Hopkins Experience 1896-1912

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Courtney; Adams, Hadie; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the original surgical records from the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and analyze the records of patients Cushing treated for pituitary disorders from 1896 to 1912. METHODS Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, we reviewed the original surgical files from the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Patients presenting with pituitary-related symptoms, who underwent surgical treatment directed at the pituitary gland, were selected for further review. RESULTS Thirty-seven patients who underwent surgical intervention for pituitary disorders were found. Of these patients, 12 were mentioned only briefly in Cushing’s 1912 monograph, whereas 6 were not described at all. The remaining 19 were documented by Cushing in his 1912 monograph. Cushing used three main surgical approaches to the pituitary: transsphenoidal, transcranial, and the subfrontal “omega incision.” There were 6 inpatient deaths. The mean time to last follow-up was 41.0 months. At follow-up, headache was the most common unresolved symptom. CONCLUSION This review highlights Cushing’s accomplishments in the surgical treatment of suspected pituitary pathology during his early career as a young attending at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It reveals new information about patients whom Cushing did not include in his publications detailing his surgical experience at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. PMID:22079823

  10. The Johns Hopkins Hospital: identifying and addressing risks and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Paine, Lori A; Baker, David R; Rosenstein, Beryl; Pronovost, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    At The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH), a culture of safety refers to the presence of characteristics such as the belief that harm is untenable and the use of a systems approach to analyzing safety issues. The leadership of JHH provides strategic planning guidance for safety and improvement initiatives, involves the patient safety committee in capital investment allocation decisions and in designing and planning new hospital facilities, and ensures that safety and quality head the agenda of board-of-trustees meetings. Although JHH takes a systems approach, structures such as monitoring staff behavior trends are used to hold people accountable for job performance. JHH encountered three major hurdles in implementing and sustaining a culture of safety. First, JHH's decentralized organizational structure contributes to a silo effect that limits the spread of ideas, practices, and culture. JHH intends to create an internal collaborative of departmental safety initiatives to foster opportunities for units to share ideas and results. Second, in response to the challenge of encouraging teams to think and act in an interdisciplinary fashion, communication and teamwork training are being used to enhance the effectiveness of interdisciplinary teams. Further development of valid and meaningful safety-related measurement and data collection methodologies is JHH's largest remaining challenge.

  11. Five scientists at Johns Hopkins in the modern evolution of neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Harrison, T S

    2000-08-01

    Neuroscience's evolution at Johns Hopkins, from neurophysiology to the new field of neurobiology, though unplanned, was rapid and important. Beginning in 1933 when Philip Bard became professor of physiology at Johns Hopkins, members of his department concentrated initially on neuroanatomical control of placing reactions and sexual activity. Vernon Mountcastle, extending available techniques, discovered vertical somato-sensory columns in the 1950's. Stephen Kuffler, who arrived at Hopkins in 1947, was a pioneer in single unit microelectrode recording techniques. He soon attracted scientists from all over the world to his laboratory. Among them, Torsten Wiesel and David Hubel discovered vertical neuronal columns in the visual cortex. During several decades at Johns Hopkins, these five scientists set extremely high scientific standards and established a climate of inquiry in which ideas were shared and young scientists encouraged. They contributed significantly to the emerging discipline of neuroscience.

  12. On the shoulders of giants: Harvey Cushing's experience with acromegaly and gigantism at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1896-1912.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Adams, Hadie; Salvatori, Roberto; Wand, Gary; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    A review of Dr. Cushing's surgical cases at Johns Hopkins Hospital revealed new information about his early operative experience with acromegaly. Although in 1912 Cushing published selective case studies regarding this work, a review of all his operations for acromegaly during his early years has never been reported. We uncovered 37 patients who Cushing treated with surgical intervention directed at the pituitary gland. Of these, nine patients who presented with symptoms of acromegaly, and one with symptoms of gigantism were selected for further review. Two patients underwent transfrontal 'omega incision' approaches, and the remaining eight underwent transsphenoidal approaches. Of the 10 patients, 6 were male. The mean age was 38.0 years. The mean hospital stay was 39.4 days. There was one inpatient death during primary interventions (10%) and three patients were deceased at the time of last follow-up (33%). The mean time to death, calculated from the date of the primary surgical intervention, and including inpatient and outpatient deaths, was 11.3 months. The mean time to last follow-up, calculated from the day of discharge, was 59.3 months. At the time of last follow-up, two patients reported resolution of headache; four patients reported continued visual deficits, and two patients reported ongoing changes in mental status. This review analyzes the outcomes for 10 patients who underwent surgical intervention for acromegaly or gigantism, and offers an explanation for Cushing's transition from the transfrontal "omega incision" to the transsphenoidal approach while practicing at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  13. The Johns Hopkins Address Registration System (JHARS): Anatomy of an Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyzyk, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Describes the registration system at Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, which allows centralized administration and self-signup for access to the Hopkins network. Reception of the system has been overwhelmingly positive. (SLD)

  14. Psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool for older Chinese inpatients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Min; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    To culturally adapt and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool among older inpatients in the mainland of China. Patient falls are an important safety consideration within hospitals among older inpatients. Nurses need specific risk assessment tools for older inpatients to reliably identify at-risk populations and guide interventions that highlight fixable risk factors for falls and consequent injuries. In China, a few tools have been developed to measure fall risk. However, they lack the solid psychometric development necessary to establish their validity and reliability, and they are not widely used for elderly inpatients. A cross-sectional study. A convenient sampling was used to recruit 201 older inpatients from two tertiary-level hospitals in Beijing and Xiamen, China. The Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool was translated using forward and backward translation procedures and was administered to these 201 older inpatients. Reliability of the tool was calculated by inter-rater reliability and Cronbach's alpha. Validity was analysed through content validity index and construct validity. The Inter-rater reliability of Chinese version of Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool was 97·14% agreement with Cohen's Kappa of 0·903. Cronbach's α was 0·703. Content of Validity Index was 0·833. Two factors represented intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors were explored that together explained 58·89% of the variance. This study provided evidence that Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool is an acceptable, valid and reliable tool to identify older inpatients at risk of falls and falls with injury. Further psychometric testing on criterion validity and evaluation of its advanced utility in geriatric clinical settings are warranted. The Chinese version of Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool may be useful for health care personnel to identify older Chinese inpatients at risk of falls and falls

  15. The metaphysical club at the Johns Hopkins University (1879-1885).

    PubMed

    Behrens, Peter J

    2005-11-01

    Of the earliest American universities, The Johns Hopkins in Baltimore holds a unique position for psychology. At Hopkins, many of America's first psychologists received their graduate training. Of special interest is the Hopkins Metaphysical Club, organized in 1879 by Charles Sanders Peirce. It provided a forum for research and scholarship by faculty and students. Papers related to topics of the "new" psychology began to appear in 1883, about the time G. Stanley Hall was given a 3-year appointment at Hopkins. When Peirce departed Hopkins in 1885, Hall was free to develop psychology in his image and disbanded the club. Nevertheless, the Metaphysical Club played an important role in the emergence of American scientific psychology.

  16. The past, present, and future of paediatric cardiology training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, in the tradition of Dr Helen Taussig.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Gary S; Murphy, Anne M; Brenner, Joel I; Ravekes, William J

    2016-12-01

    Johns Hopkins has been a leader in paediatric cardiology for over 85 years. In the 1940s, Dr Helen Taussig began training fellows in paediatric cardiology at Johns Hopkins at a time when the diagnosis and treatment of CHD were in the earliest stage. Under her leadership, the fellowship developed a strong foundation that has continued to evolve to meet the current needs of learners and educators. In the current era, the Johns Hopkins programme implements the current theories of adult education and actively engages our fellows in learning as well as teaching. The programme uses techniques such as flipped classroom, structured case-based small-group learning, observed and structured clinical examination, simulations, and innovative educational technology. These strategies combined with our faculty and rich history give our fellows a unique educational experience.

  17. Cultivating Hygiene as a Science: The Welch-Rose Report's Influence at Johns Hopkins and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen Kruse

    2016-03-01

    In 1915, William Henry Welch and Wickliffe Rose submitted a report to the Rockefeller Foundation that became the template for public health professional education in the United States and abroad. Based on the Welch-Rose Report's recommendations, the Foundation awarded a grant to Johns Hopkins University in 1916 to establish the first independent graduate school of public health, with Welch serving as the founding dean. The Welch-Rose Report and, by extension, the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health established and transmitted a new model of scientific training that wove the laboratory mindset together with the methods of public health administration and epidemiologic fieldwork. During the School's first quarter-century, faculty and alumni were remarkably active in frontline public health problem-solving, as well as launching public health agencies and schools of all types and sizes. The most lasting contribution of the Welch-Rose Report and the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, has been to "cultivate the science of hygiene" to bring about exponential growth in the evidence base for public health. The schools that have adopted the Johns Hopkins model of public health education worldwide have produced professionals who have worked to achieve wide-ranging reforms dedicated to preserving life, protecting health, and preventing injury across populations and continents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Celebrating the Centennial Through the Lens of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Surgical Pathology Records

    PubMed Central

    De Remigis, Alessandra; Chuang, Kelly; Dembele, Marieme; Iwama, Akiko; Iwama, Shintaro

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is now considered the most prevalent autoimmune disease, as well as the most common endocrine disorder. It was initially described in 1912, but only rarely reported until the early 1950s. To celebrate this centennial, we reviewed the surgical pathology archives of the Johns Hopkins hospital for cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, spanning the period from May 1889 to October 2012. Approximately 15,000 thyroidectomies were performed at this hospital over 124 years. The first surgical case was reported in 1942, 30 years after the original description. Then, 867 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis were seen from 1942 to 2012, representing 6% of all thyroidectomies. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was the sole pathological finding in 462 cases; it accompanied other thyroid pathologies in the remaining 405 cases. The most commonly associated pathology was papillary thyroid cancer, an association that increased significantly during the last two decades. The most common indication for thyroidectomy was a thyroid nodule that was cytologically suspicious for malignancy. Hashimoto's thyroiditis remains a widespread, intriguing, and multifaceted disease of unknown etiology one century after its description. Advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis and preoperative diagnosis will improve recognition and treatment of this disorder, and may one day lead to its prevention. PMID:23151083

  19. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    formerly at the Institute for Health, Social, and Community Research (IHSCR) Center for Survey Research ( CSR ) at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC...survey will be conducted at CSR which is now located at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHBSPH) located in Raleigh, NC. The Sons...Statement of Work must be approved by the Grants Officer. This approval must be obtained prior to initiating any change to the original Statement of

  20. The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions' Premise Distribution Plan

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Wendy; Buckholtz, Howard; Johnston, Mark; Lenhard, Raymond; Tolchin, Stephen; Vienne, Donald

    1987-01-01

    A Premise Distribution Plan is being developed to address the growing voice and data communications needs at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. More specifically, the use of a rapidly expanding Ethernet computer network and a new Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Digital Centrex system must be planned to provide easy, reliable and cost-effective data and voice communications services. Existing Premise Distribution Systems are compared along with voice and data technologies which would use them.

  1. URobotics—Urology Robotics at Johns Hopkins

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, D

    2011-01-01

    URobotics (Urology Robotics) is a program of the Urology Department at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions dedicated to the development of new technology for urologic surgery (http://urology.jhu.edu/urobotics). The program is unique in that it is the only academic engineering program exclusively applied to urology. The program combines efforts and expertise from the medical and engineering fields through a close partnership of clinical and technical personnel. Since its creation in 1996, the URobotics lab has created several devices, instruments, and robotic systems, several of which have been successfully used in the operating room. This article reviews the technology developed in our laboratory and its surgical applications, and highlights our future directions. PMID:11954067

  2. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health OpenCourseWare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanchanaraksa, Sukon; Gooding, Ira; Klaas, Brian; Yager, James D.

    2009-01-01

    The need for public health knowledge is ever increasing, but the educational options have been limited to coursework delivered by academics to individuals who can afford the cost of tuition at public health institutions. To overcome this disparity, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH) has joined the Massachusetts Institute of…

  3. Paradigm Lost: Public Administration at Johns Hopkins University, 1884-96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, M. Curtis

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the history of public administration at Johns Hopkins University from the late 1800s when a curriculum was developed to educate public servants. Suggests that the program made notable contributions to progressivism but was eclipsed by scientific management; however, it has new relevance in the current climate. (Contains 46 references.)…

  4. Validating the Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System of the elderly in Swedish primary health care.

    PubMed

    Halling, Anders; Fridh, Gerd; Ovhed, Ingvar

    2006-06-28

    Individualbased measures for comorbidity are of increasing importance for planning and funding health care services. No measurement for individualbased healthcare costs exist in Sweden. The aim of this study was to validate the Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System's predictive value of polypharmacy (regular use of 4 or more prescription medicines) used as a proxy for health care costs in an elderly population and to study if the prediction could be improved by adding variables from a population based study i.e. level of education, functional status indicators and health perception. The Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System was applied to primary health care diagnoses of 1402 participants (60-96 years) in a cross-sectional community based study in Karlskrona, Sweden (the Swedish National study on Ageing and Care) during a period of two years before they took part in the study. The predictive value of the Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System was modeled against the regular use of 4 or more prescription medicines, also using age, sex, level of education, instrumental activity of daily living- and measures of health perception as covariates. In an exploratory biplot analysis the Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System, was shown to explain a large part of the variance for regular use of 4 or more prescription medicines. The sensitivity of the prediction was 31.9%, whereas the specificity was 88.5%, when the Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System was adjusted for age. By adding covariates to the model the sensitivity was increased to 46.3%, with a specificity of 90.1%. This increased the number of correctly classified by 5.6% and the area under the curve by 11.1%. The Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System is an important factor in measuring comorbidity, however it does not reflect an individual's capability to function despite a disease burden, which has importance for prediction of comorbidity. In this study we have shown that information on such factors, which can be obtained from short

  5. Johns Hopkins University Announces Frederick CREST Classes for Fall 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Johns Hopkins University’s (JHU) Advanced Academic Programs (AAP) division recently announced two classes that will be hosted at the Frederick Center for Research and Education in Science and Technology (CREST) this fall. According to a JHU press release, the classes are Biochemistry, which is part of the M.S. in Biotechnology program at JHU AAP, and Molecular Biology, a part

  6. School-Based Health Clinics: An Analysis of the Johns Hopkins Study. Research Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demsko, Tobin W.

    School-based health clinics, adolescent pregnancy prevention programs offering comprehensive health services, represent the latest initiative to reduce the incidence of teenage pregnancy. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University designed and administered a pregnancy prevention program which offered sexuality education and family planning services…

  7. College Graduation before Age 19, Especially at Johns Hopkins University, 1876-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Julian C.; Sandhofer, Lois S.

    This paper describes some students, especially at Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, who have graduated from college 3 or more years before the usual age of 22 or older. Such early graduation is not common, but neither is it extremely rare. Some young graduates seem to have been propelled through college under parental pressure, while others have…

  8. Johns Hopkins University Announces Frederick CREST Classes for Fall 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Johns Hopkins University’s (JHU) Advanced Academic Programs (AAP) division recently announced two classes that will be hosted at the Frederick Center for Research and Education in Science and Technology (CREST) this fall. According to a JHU press release, the classes are Biochemistry, which is part of the M.S. in Biotechnology program at JHU AAP, and Molecular Biology, a part of the M.S. in Bioinformatics program at JHU AAP.

  9. William Henry Welch (1850–1934): the road to Johns Hopkins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    William Henry Welch's selection in 1884 as the first faculty member of the new medical school at Johns Hopkins created the invigorating atmosphere that generated the revolutionary changes in medical training and laboratory medicine that transformed medicine in America. Dr. Welch's family traditions, his New England upbringing, Yale education, and German university experience prepared a unique individual to lead American medicine into the 20th century. PMID:21738298

  10. NREL, Johns Hopkins SAIS Develop Method to Quantify Life Cycle Land Use of

    Science.gov Websites

    Life Cycle Land Use of Electricity from Natural Gas News Release: NREL, Johns Hopkins SAIS Develop Method to Quantify Life Cycle Land Use of Electricity from Natural Gas October 2, 2017 A case study of time provides quantifiable information on the life cycle land use of generating electricity from

  11. Tsinghua-Johns Hopkins Joint Center for Biomedical Engineering Research: scientific and cultural exchange in undergraduate engineering.

    PubMed

    Wisneski, Andrew D; Huang, Lixia; Hong, Bo; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    A model for an international undergraduate biomedical engineering research exchange program is outlined. In 2008, the Johns Hopkins University in collaboration with Tsinghua University in Beijing, China established the Tsinghua-Johns Hopkins Joint Center for Biomedical Engineering Research. Undergraduate biomedical engineering students from both universities are offered the opportunity to participate in research at the overseas institution. Programs such as these will not only provide research experiences for undergraduates but valuable cultural exchange and enrichment as well. Currently, strict course scheduling and rigorous curricula in most biomedical engineering programs may present obstacles for students to partake in study abroad opportunities. Universities are encouraged to harbor abroad opportunities for undergraduate engineering students, for which this particular program can serve as a model.

  12. Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative.

    PubMed

    Moran, Dane; Edwardson, Jill; Cuneo, Charles Nicholas; Tackett, Sean; Aluri, James; Kironji, Antony; Cox, Jacob; Carroll, Bryn; Lie, Erina; Fofana, Mariam; Bollinger, Robert C; Ziegelstein, Roy C; Chen, Chi C G

    2015-01-01

    Global health is increasingly present in the formal educational curricula of medical schools across North America. In 2008, students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) perceived a lack of structured global health education in the existing curriculum and began working with the administration to enhance global health learning opportunities, particularly in resource-poor settings. Key events in the development of global health education have included the introduction of a global health intersession mandatory for all first-year students; required pre-departure ethics training for students before all international electives; and the development of a clinical global health elective (Global Health Leadership Program, GHLP). The main challenges to improving global health education for medical students have included securing funding, obtaining institutional support, and developing an interprofessional program that benefits from the resources of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing. Strategies used included objectively demonstrating the need for and barriers to more structured global health experiences; obtaining guidance and modifying existing resources from other institutions and relevant educational websites; and harnessing institution-specific strengths including the large Johns Hopkins global research footprint and existing interprofessional collaborations across the three schools. The Johns Hopkins experience demonstrates that with a supportive administration, students can play an important and effective role in improving global health educational opportunities. The strategies we used may be informative for other students and educators looking to implement global health programs at their own institutions.

  13. Developing Therapies for Brain Tumors: The Impact of the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brem, Henry; Sankey, Eric W; Liu, Ann; Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty M

    2017-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine was created in 1904 by Harvey Cushing and William Halsted and has had a long history of fostering surgical training, encouraging basis science research, and facilitating translational application. Over the past 30 years, the laboratory has addressed the paucity of brain tumor therapies. Pre-clinical work from the laboratory led to the development of carmustine wafers with initial US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 1996. Combining carmustine wafers, radiation, and temozolomide led to a significant increase in the median survival of patients with glioblastoma. The laboratory has also developed microchips and immunotherapy to further extend survival in this heretofore underserved population. These achievements were made possible by the dedication, commitment, and creativity of more than 300 trainees of the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory. The laboratory demonstrates the beneficial influence of research experience as well its substantial impact on the field of biomedical research.

  14. Hepatobiliary Hands of Hopkins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Henry A

    2018-02-01

    This historical perspective documents the role that John L. Cameron played in advancing hepatobiliary research, education, and surgery at Johns Hopkins in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Dating back to William S. Halsted in the 19th century, leaders of the Department of Surgery at Johns Hopkins have been interested in hepatobiliary disease and surgery. John L. Cameron had broad hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) interests when he completed his surgical training. Over the next 3 decades, he focused on the pancreas. As a result, many faculty and trainee hepatobiliary careers were launched. This perspective is based on 18 years of service as a surgical resident and faculty member at Johns Hopkins. An extensive literature search on the hepatobiliary publications of Halsted, Trimble, Blalock, Longmire, Zuidema, and Cameron was undertaken for this manuscript. Numerous hepatobiliary publications from Johns Hopkins from the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and early 2000s were also reviewed. John L. Cameron's early biliary interests included stones, infections, malignancies, and strictures. He was innovative with respect to portal hypertension and Budd-Chiari surgery and supportive when liver transplantation emerged in the 1980s. Volume-outcome studies in the 1990s included hepatic and complex biliary surgery. He supported and encouraged studies of biliary lithotripsy, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, clinical pathways, hepatobiliary cysts, and gallstone pathogenesis. Lessons learned by many who worked with John L. Cameron included the importance of mentorship, innovation, friendship, and collaboration. He taught leadership and change management by example. He fostered a multidisciplinary approach and encouraged randomized controlled trials.

  15. Protecting Health and Saving Lives: The Part-Time/Internet-Based Master of Public Health Program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Linda; Gresh, Kathy; Vanchiswaran, Rohini; Werapitiya, Deepthi

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the part-time/Internet-based Master of Public Health (MPH) program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was the first school of public health in the United States to offer a Master of Public Health program via the Internet. The JHSPH MPH Program…

  16. “No Clinical Puzzles More Interesting”: Harvey Cushing and Spinal Trauma, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 1896-1912

    PubMed Central

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Pendleton, Courtney; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Although Harvey Cushing played a central role in the establishment of neurosurgery in the United States, his work on the spine remains largely unknown. This article is not only the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at Johns Hopkins have been reported, but also the first time his management of spinal trauma has been described. We report on 12 patients that Cushing treated from 1898 to 1911 who have never been reported before, including blunt and penetrating injuries, complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions, and both immediate and delayed presentations. Cushing performed laminectomies within 24 hours on patients with immediate presentations—both complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions. Among those with delayed presentations, Cushing did laminectomies on patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries. By the end of his tenure at Hopkins, Cushing advocated nonoperative treatment for all patients with complete spinal cord lesions. Four patients died while an inpatient, with meningitis and cystitis leading to the death of 1 and 3 patients, respectively. Cystitis was treated with intravesicular irrigation; an indwelling catheter was placed by a suprapubic cystostomy in four. Cushing was one of the first to report the use of x-ray in a spine patient, in a case that may have been one factor leading to his interest in the nervous system; Cushing also routinely obtained radiographs in those with spinal trauma. These cases illustrate Cushing's dedication to and rapport with his patients, even in the face of a dismal prognosis. PMID:21135734

  17. The Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool: A Study of Reliability and Validity.

    PubMed

    Poe, Stephanie S; Dawson, Patricia B; Cvach, Maria; Burnett, Margaret; Kumble, Sowmya; Lewis, Maureen; Thompson, Carol B; Hill, Elizabeth E

    Patient falls and fall-related injury remain a safety concern. The Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool (JHFRAT) was developed to facilitate early detection of risk for anticipated physiologic falls in adult inpatients. Psychometric properties in acute care settings have not yet been fully established; this study sought to fill that gap. Results indicate that the JHFRAT is reliable, with high sensitivity and negative predictive validity. Specificity and positive predictive validity were lower than expected.

  18. The Johns Hopkins Venous Thromboembolism Collaborative: Multidisciplinary team approach to achieve perfect prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Streiff, Michael B; Lau, Brandyn D; Hobson, Deborah B; Kraus, Peggy S; Shermock, Kenneth M; Shaffer, Dauryne L; Popoola, Victor O; Aboagye, Jonathan K; Farrow, Norma A; Horn, Paula J; Shihab, Hasan M; Pronovost, Peter J; Haut, Elliott R

    2016-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important cause of preventable harm in hospitalized patients. The critical steps in delivery of optimal VTE prevention care include (1) assessment of VTE and bleeding risk for each patient, (2) prescription of risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis, (3) administration of risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis in a patient-centered manner, and (4) continuously monitoring outcomes to identify new opportunities for learning and performance improvement. To ensure that every hospitalized patient receives VTE prophylaxis consistent with their individual risk level and personal care preferences, we organized a multidisciplinary task force, the Johns Hopkins VTE Collaborative. To achieve the goal of perfect prophylaxis for every patient, we developed evidence-based, specialty-specific computerized clinical decision support VTE prophylaxis order sets that assist providers in ordering risk-appropriate VTE prevention. We developed novel strategies to improve provider VTE prevention ordering practices including face-to-face performance reviews, pay for performance, and provider VTE scorecards. When we discovered that prescription of risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis does not ensure its administration, our multidisciplinary research team conducted in-depth surveys of patients, nurses, and physicians to design a multidisciplinary patient-centered educational intervention to eliminate missed doses of pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis that has been funded by the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. We expect that the studies currently underway will bring us closer to the goal of perfect VTE prevention care for every patient. Our learning journey to eliminate harm from VTE can be applied to other types of harm. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:S8-S14. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  19. Academic Medical Centers Forming Accountable Care Organizations and Partnering With Community Providers: The Experience of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Ishii, Lisa; Schulz, John; Poffenroth, Matt

    2016-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs)--which include teaching hospital(s) and additional care delivery entities--that form accountable care organizations (ACOs) must decide whether to partner with other provider entities, such as community practices. Indeed, 67% (33/49) of AMC ACOs through the Medicare Shared Savings Program through 2014 are believed to include an outside community practice. There are opportunities for both the AMC and the community partners in pursuing such relationships, including possible alignment around shared goals and adding ACO beneficiaries. To create the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients (JMAP), in January 2014, Johns Hopkins Medicine chose to partner with two community primary care groups and one cardiology practice to support clinical integration while adding approximately 60 providers and 5,000 Medicare beneficiaries. The principal initial interventions within JMAP included care coordination for high-risk beneficiaries and later, in 2014, generating dashboards of ACO quality measures to facilitate quality improvement and early efforts at incorporating clinical pathways and Choosing Wisely recommendations. Additional interventions began in 2015.The principal initial challenges JMAP faced were data integration, generation of quality measure reports among disparate electronic medical records, receiving and then analyzing claims data, and seeking to achieve provider engagement; all these affected timely deployment of the early interventions. JMAP also created three regional advisory councils as a forum promoting engagement of local leadership. Network strategies among AMCs, including adding community practices in a nonemployment model, will continue to require thoughtful strategic planning and a keen understanding of local context.

  20. Leadership of the Department of Epidemiology of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Its First Century.

    PubMed

    Celentano, David D

    2016-03-01

    This commentary reviews the contributions of each of the 7 Chairs of the Department of Epidemiology from the Department's inception in 1919 to the advent of the Centennial Celebration of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2016. The founding Chair, Wade Hampton Frost (1919-1938), was among the handful of foundational thinkers in the discipline of epidemiology. Kenneth Maxcy (1938-1954) and Philip Sartwell (1954-1970) oversaw the Department through the epidemiologic transition from a preponderance of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases to a preponderance of noncommunicable diseases. Abraham Lilienfeld (1970-1975) and Leon Gordis (1975-1993) were perhaps best known for their mastery of teaching, influencing generations of both medical and public health students. Jonathan Samet (1994-2008) oversaw a major curriculum revision and expanded the Department significantly, and David Celentano (2008-) is working to rebalance the practice of epidemiology with the etiological foundations of epidemiology. All Chairs were a product of their times, and their research focus and portfolios influenced the direction of the Department. Future generations of Johns Hopkins students will be influenced directly or indirectly by the heritage of these Chairs' actions and those of their faculty. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The Effect of Viral Suppression on Cross Sectional Incidence Testing in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Laeyendecker, Oliver; Rothman, Richard E.; Henson, Charlamaine; Jo Horne, Bobbi; Ketlogetswe, Kerunne S.; Kraus, Chadd K.; Shahan, Judy; Kelen, Gabor. D.; Quinn, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective(s) To determine the effect of viral suppression on cross sectional incidence testing. Methods In 2001 and 2003, patients entering the Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department (JHHED) were enrolled into an interview based, identity unlinked serosurvey. All HIV positive samples were tested by the Vironostika-less sensitive (LS) EIA and an avidity assay to determine recent HIV infection. Additionally 16 samples from 8 previously characterized elite suppressors (ES) were tested by cross sectional incidence assays. Results HIV prevalence was 12% for the 2001 survey and 11% for the 2003 survey. Of the HIV infected subjects 18% did not know they were infected. Vironostika-LS EIA determined that 6% (11/183) and 7% (17/243) of HIV+ individuals in 2001and 2003, respectively, were recently infected. Avidity testing confirmed 6 of 11 in 2001, and 5 of 17 in 2003 were newly infected, leaving 17 discrepant samples. All 17 discrepant samples were western blot positive, viral load undetectable and 7/17 had antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) in their serum. Ten individuals were virally suppressed without ARVs, appeared incident by Vironostika-LS EIA but chronic by avidity. These 10 subjects had similar testing profiles to the known 16 ES samples, as 9 of 16 were incident by Vironostika-LS EIA, and 0/16 were incident by avidity. Conclusions By removing the viral load negative individuals and by confirming the initial Vironostika-LS EIA results by avidity, the incidence estimate was lowered from 1.73 to 0.94 percent/year in 2001 and from 1.90 to 0.56 percent/year in 2003. Viral suppression affects the performance of the cross sectional incidence tests which rely on antibody titer. In additional 2% (10/426) of all HIV infected individuals who use the JHHED for medical care appear to suppress HIV to undetectable levels without ARVs. PMID:18520680

  2. 76 FR 67195 - Announcing the Award of a Single-Source Program Expansion Supplement Grant to the Johns Hopkins...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Announcing the... School of Public Health in Baltimore, MD, To Support the Development of a Human Services National... extend an award made to the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), Greenberg School of Public Health in...

  3. Fellowship training at John Hopkins: programs leading to careers in librarianship and informatics as informaticians or informationists.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jayne M; Roderer, Nancy K

    2005-01-01

    Preparing librarians to meet the information challenges faced in the current and future health care environments is critical. At Johns Hopkins University, three NLM-funded fellowship programs provide opportunities for librarians to utilize the rich environments of the Welch Medical Library and the Division of Health Sciences Informatics in support of life-long learning.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine leadership program for women faculty.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rachel B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Bodurtha, Joann; Skarupski, Kimberly A; Fivush, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Women continue to be underrepresented in top leadership roles in academic medicine. Leadership training programs for women are designed to enhance women's leadership skills and confidence and increase overall leadership diversity. The authors present a description and evaluation of a longitudinal, cohort-based, experiential leadership program for women faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. We compared pre- and post-program self-assessed ratings of 11 leadership skills and specific negotiation behaviors from 3 cohorts of leadership program participants (n=134) from 2010 to 2013. Women reported significant improvements in skills across 11 domains with the exceptions of 2 domains, Public Speaking and Working in Teams, both of which received high scores in the pre-program assessment. The greatest improvement in rankings occurred within the domain of negotiation skills. Although women reported an increase in their negotiation skills, we were not able to demonstrate an increase in the number of times that women negotiated for salary, space, or promotion following participation in the program. The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Leadership Program for Women Faculty has demonstrable value for the professional development of participants and addresses institutional strategies to enhance leadership diversity and the advancement of women.

  5. Lessons from the Johns Hopkins Multi-Disciplinary Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Prevention Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Streiff, Michael B; Carolan, Howard T; Hobson, Deborah B; Kraus, Peggy S; Holzmueller, Christine G; Demski, Renee; Lau, Brandyn D; Biscup-Horn, Paula; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Problem Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of potentially preventable mortality, morbidity, and increased medical costs. Risk-appropriate prophylaxis can prevent most VTE events, but only a small fraction of patients at risk receive this treatment. Design Prospective quality improvement programme. Setting Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Strategies for change A multidisciplinary team established a VTE Prevention Collaborative in 2005. The collaborative applied the four step TRIP (translating research into practice) model to develop and implement a mandatory clinical decision support tool for VTE risk stratification and risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis for all hospitalised adult patients. Initially, paper based VTE order sets were implemented, which were then converted into 16 specialty-specific, mandatory, computerised, clinical decision support modules. Key measures for improvement VTE risk stratification within 24 hours of hospital admission and provision of risk-appropriate, evidence based VTE prophylaxis. Effects of change The VTE team was able to increase VTE risk assessment and ordering of risk-appropriate prophylaxis with paper based order sets to a limited extent, but achieved higher compliance with a computerised clinical decision support tool and the data feedback which it enabled. Risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis increased from 26% to 80% for surgical patients and from 25% to 92% for medical patients in 2011. Lessons learnt A computerised clinical decision support tool can increase VTE risk stratification and risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis among hospitalised adult patients admitted to a large urban academic medical centre. It is important to ensure the tool is part of the clinician’s normal workflow, is mandatory (computerised forcing function), and offers the requisite modules needed for every clinical specialty. PMID:22718994

  6. NCAR Johns Hopkins/CDC Climate and Health Summer Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mearns, Linda O.

    2005-01-01

    The interactions between climate and health are rife with complexity and present many conceptual and methodological challenges. Possible effects of climate change on health are considered some of the most sensitive impacts of climate change and are a high priority for policy-makers and the public. As a first step toward improving tlit: quality of research, we developed a Climate and Health Workshop (Institute), geared toward teaching students various aspects of how to conduct integrated climate and health research. At the workshop scientists presented selected case studies of climate and health (e.g., heat mortality, vector-borne diseases), thus demonstrating a subset of key analytical tools and databases most useful to researchers in this field. Key research gaps in this research area were discussed. In this six-day Institute (21-28 July 2004, Boulder, Colorado), health scientists and students benefited from lectures and hands-on tools taught by top NCAR scientists. The attendees learned about health databases and epidemiologic methods from leading health scientists from CDC, Johns Hopkins, and other institutions from around the globe.

  7. Transcultural adaptation of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Maria Carmen; Iwamoto, Viviane Ernesto; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Noronha, Adriana Moreira; Oliveira, Ana Paula de Sousa; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Alves; Marques, Ifigenia Augusta Braga; Vendramim, Patrícia; Lopes, Paula Cristina; Sant'Ana, Thais Helena Saes de

    2016-08-29

    to perform the transcultural adaptation and content validity analysis of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool to assess both fall risk and fall-related injury risk for hospitalized elderly in Brazil. the transcultural adaptation consisted of translating the scale to Portuguese (Brazil), back-translating it into its language of origin, establishing a consensus version, and having an expert committee verify its transcultural equivalence. Content assessment was conducted by a committee of judges, ending with the calculation of the items and scales' content validity index. Nurses tested the tool. the scale's translated version went through two evaluation rounds by the judges, based on which, the items with unsatisfactory performance were changed. The content validity index for the items was ≥80.0% and the global index 97.1%. The experimental application showed the scale is user-friendly. the scale presents valid content for the assessment of fall risk and risk of fall-related injuries and is easy to use, with the potential to contribute to the proper identification of risks and the establishment of care actions. realizar a adaptação transcultural para uso no Brasil e a avaliação da validade de conteúdo da Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool para avaliação de risco de quedas e de danos por quedas em pacientes adultos hospitalizados. adaptação transcultural consistiu na tradução da escala para a língua portuguesa (Brasil), retrotradução para a língua de origem, versão de consenso e análise da equivalência transcultural por um comitê de especialistas. A avaliação do conteúdo foi realizada por meio de um comitê de juízes, finalizando com o cálculo do índice de validade de conteúdo dos itens e da escala. Foi realizada a aplicação experimental do instrumento por enfermeiros. a versão traduzida da escala passou por duas rodadas de avaliação pelos juízes, a partir das quais os itens com desempenho insatisfatório foram modificados

  8. Enter-educate: new word from Johns Hopkins.

    PubMed

    Coleman, P L

    1988-01-01

    Social development communication activities are competing with all of the other communication activities for the attention of the audience. The Johns Hopkins University/Population Communication Services (JHU/PCS) strongly believes that one of the best ways to get the attention of a designated audience, and to keep it, is to entertain the audience and educate it at the same time. They call this concept enter-educate. The basic precepts of this approach include: 1) Choose the most appropriate medium to reach the intended audience; 2) Enlist professionals experienced in the chosen medium in order to have access to the best available resources; 3) Develop a high-quality product that will attract the commercial sector; 4) Use a medium which has a big regional or national audience; and 5) Make the program appealing by including entertainment elements appropriate for the intended audience and not obviously preachy. The most successful project that JHU/PCS has supported that incorporated the concept of enter-educate is the Communication for Young People project in Latin America, better known as the Tatiana and Johnny project. This project used popular music, and its spin offs, to reach young people in 11 Spanish-speaking countries with a sexual responsibility message. Other successful projects in Nigeria and Mali are also described. Nigeria used television shows with family planning skits; in Mali the traditional Koteba theatrical format was made into films for short cinema showings before the main feature.

  9. Using the Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups (ADGs) to predict 1-year mortality in population-based cohorts of patients with diabetes in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Austin, P C; Shah, B R; Newman, A; Anderson, G M

    2012-09-01

    There are limited validated methods to ascertain comorbidities for risk adjustment in ambulatory populations of patients with diabetes using administrative health-care databases. The objective was to examine the ability of the Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups to predict mortality in population-based ambulatory samples of both incident and prevalent subjects with diabetes. Retrospective cohorts constructed using population-based administrative data. The incident cohort consisted of all 346,297 subjects diagnosed with diabetes between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2008. The prevalent cohort consisted of all 879,849 subjects with pre-existing diabetes on 1 January, 2007. The outcome was death within 1 year of the subject's index date. A logistic regression model consisting of age, sex and indicator variables for 22 of the 32 Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Group categories had excellent discrimination for predicting mortality in incident diabetes patients: the c-statistic was 0.87 in an independent validation sample. A similar model had excellent discrimination for predicting mortality in prevalent diabetes patients: the c-statistic was 0.84 in an independent validation sample. Both models demonstrated very good calibration, denoting good agreement between observed and predicted mortality across the range of predicted mortality in which the large majority of subjects lay. For comparative purposes, regression models incorporating the Charlson comorbidity index, age and sex, age and sex, and age alone had poorer discrimination than the model that incorporated the Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups. Logistical regression models using age, sex and the John Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups were able to accurately predict 1-year mortality in population-based samples of patients with diabetes. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  10. Biomedical research, development, and engineering at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Annual report 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    The Medical Institutions of The Johns Hopkins University and The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have developed a vigorous collaborative program of biomedical research, development, and systems engineering. An important objective of the program is to apply the expertise in engineering, the physical sciences, and systems analysis acquired by APL in defense and space research and development to problems of medical research and health care delivery. This program has grown to include collaboration with many of the clinical and basic science departments of the medical divisions. Active collaborative projects exist in ophthalmology, neurosensory research and instrumentation development, cardiovascular systems,more » patient monitoring, therapeutic and rehabilitation systems, clinical information systems, and clinical engineering. This application of state-of-the-art technology has contributed to advances in many areas of basic medical research and in clinical diagnosis and therapy through improvement of instrumentation, techniques, and basic understanding.« less

  11. Chemotherapy and treatment scheduling: the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center Outpatient Department.

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, F.; Enterline, J. P.; Ashley, B.; Fowler, M. E.; Ogorzalek, L. L.; Gaudette, R.; Stuart, G. J.; Fulton, M.; Ettinger, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The Chemotherapy and Treatment Scheduling System provides integrated appointment and facility scheduling for very complex procedures. It is fully integrated with other scheduling systems at The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center and is supported by the Oncology Clinical Information System (OCIS). It provides a combined visual and textual environment for the scheduling of events that have multiple dimensions and dependencies on other scheduled events. It is also fully integrated with other clinical decision support and ancillary systems within OCIS. The system has resulted in better patient flow through the ambulatory care areas of the Center. Implementing the system required changes in behavior among physicians, staff, and patients. This system provides a working example of building a sophisticated rule-based scheduling system using a relatively simple paradigm. It also is an example of what can be achieved when there is total integration between the operational and clinical components of patient care automation. PMID:8130453

  12. Examining Potential Predictors for Completion of the Gardasil Vaccine Sequence Based on Data Gathered at Clinics of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barat, Christopher E.; Wright, Courtney; Chou, Betty

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents categorical data that were gathered at two urban clinics and two suburban clinics of Johns Hopkins in an effort to identify characteristics of young female patients who successfully complete the three-injection sequence of the Gardasil quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4). Available categorical correlates included…

  13. Johns Hopkins Perceptual Test; Technical Report 9. Disadvantaged Children and Their First School Experiences. ETS-Head Start Longitudinal Study. Technical Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Lynn E.; Shipman, Virginia C.

    The Johns Hopkins Perceptual Test, a brief measure of intelligence in children, requires the child to choose a form identical to a standard. It consists of 3 practice and 30 test items, all involving black geometric figures printed on white cards. There is one booklet for stimulus cards and one for response cards. The child is presented with a…

  14. Educational research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a grassroots development.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Patricia A; Wright, Scott M; Kern, David E

    2004-10-01

    The Divisions of General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have been a rich source of educational research. To better understand the facilitators and barriers to educational research within the divisions, the authors reviewed published educational research from the divisions published between 1995-2004 and examined the history, leadership decisions, and sentinel events that have allowed educational scholarship within the divisions to grow. The authors' analysis suggests a grassroots model of programmatic growth that includes a growing cadre of clinician-educator scholars, effective mentorship, a faculty development program, access to learners, access to research expertise, protected time for scholarship, some funding, and an institutional culture that stimulates scholarship. A medical education fellowship was integral to the model; fellows were first authors for 47% of reviewed manuscripts. Extramural funding has helped build an infrastructure that supports educational scholarship; however, only 12% of the publications have had extramural funding. Protected time for faculty is the characteristic of this model most at risk. While there has been a move toward more institutional support of educational research, it is clear that further growth in the educational research program will require noninstitutional resources.

  15. Enhanced Tobacco Control Initiative at Johns Hopkins Health System: Employee Fairness Perception.

    PubMed

    Durrani, Shabnum; Lucik, Meg; Safeer, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Organizations often fail to establish a clear awareness of what employees consider fair when implementing changes to employee benefits in the workplace. In 2016, the Johns Hopkins Health System (JHHS) enhanced their tobacco control efforts. In addition to enhanced smoking cessation benefits, employees were offered an increased reduction in their insurance premiums if they were nonsmokers. To qualify for the reduction, employees participated in testing rather than relying on self-reporting as had been done in the past. The shift to testing prompted a concern by some senior management at JHHS who did not want employees to feel they were not trusted. As the program unfolded at JHHS, the four-component model of procedural justice was applied to provide a framework for reviewing the implementation of the new voluntary tobacco testing at JHHS from a fairness lens. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the application of the four-component procedural model of justice to the tobacco testing process at JHHS. As approximately 75% of employees participated in the program, the experience at JHHS can be instructive to other employers who are looking to implement changes in their workplaces and how to minimize unintended consequences with their employees.

  16. Aspects of Reading Acquisition; Proceedings of the Annual Hyman Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education (5th, Johns Hopkins University, Nov. 13-14, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T., Ed.

    Papers collected in this volume were presented at the Fifth Annual Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education, held at Johns Hopkins University in 1974. Selections include "Alexia" (D. Frank Benson), "Young Children's Expectations for Reading" (Doris R. Entwisle), "Relations between Acquisition of…

  17. One Hundred Years of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins: A Story of Meyer to McHugh.

    PubMed

    DePaulo, J Raymond

    2017-04-01

    This article describes a history of clinical methods and constructs that guide Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Phipps Clinic today. The contributions of Adolf Meyer and Paul McHugh are central and closely connected. Both emphasize the clinical examination as the central practice of psychiatry as a specialty within medicine. Meyer's comprehensive examination of the patient became the centerpiece of his approach and was the standard for psychiatrists in the English-speaking world. McHugh, with Phillip Slavney, developed a pluralistic and practical framework for interpreting that history and examination. Both argued against the uncritical use of the modern disease construct. McHugh argues that the disease construct, although fundamental, is but one of four useful "perspectives of psychiatry" and is, thus, an insufficient basis for psychiatric practice. The perspectives could be used as an organizing framework by all physicians who seek a practical and truly personalized approach to the care of patients.

  18. AIDS: just the facts from specialists at Johns Hopkins.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, A

    1985-12-01

    This article, based on information from specialists at Johns Hopkins, poses and then answers 3 broad questions about the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). 1st, it is asked, "What is AIDS and how serious is it?" It is noted that AIDS is only 1 of several forms taken by infection with the human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). The earliest form of infection is believed to occur within a few weeks of exposure to the virus, and some patients develop an acute syndrome that resembles infectious mononucleosis. These symptoms disappear after 4-6 weeks, by which time the patient has developed antibodies to the virus. About 2-4%/year of asymptomatic carriers go on to develop AIDS-related complex (ARC), and 15-30% of ARC patients develop AIDS within 5 years. The 2nd question posed is, "How do you catch AIDS?" To cause infection, the virus must go directly into the blood, although the virus alone may not be enough to cause sickness. Previous viral infections such as hepatitis B, herpes, cytomegalovirus, and intestinal parasites have been suggested as co-factors of AIDS. Promiscuity increases the chances of contracting AIDS. Observations of the families of AIDS patients and health care personnel who work with AIDS patients suggest that AIDS cannot be caught by casual contact. Finally, it is asked, "What is being done about AIDS?" 4 strategies are outlined: 1) as a result of donor screening for antibodies to HTLV-III/LAV, AIDS has been completely removed from the blood banks; 2) virologists are attempting to understand the virus so that it can be attacked, and understanding has been advanced by the theory that HTLV-III might be what is called a "slow virus;" 3) education about AIDS is changing the sexual practices that transmit AIDS; and 4) epidemiologists are carefully following those who are at risk, have been exposed, or are already sick.

  19. Financial impact of surgical site infections on hospitals: the hospital management perspective.

    PubMed

    Shepard, John; Ward, William; Milstone, Aaron; Carlson, Taylor; Frederick, John; Hadhazy, Eric; Perl, Trish

    2013-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) may increase health care costs, but few studies have conducted an analysis from the perspective of hospital administrators. To determine the change in hospital profit due to SSIs. Retrospective study of data from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010. The study was performed at 4 of The Johns Hopkins Health System acute care hospitals in Maryland: Johns Hopkins Bayview (560 beds); Howard County General Hospital (238 beds); The Johns Hopkins Hospital (946 beds); and Suburban Hospital (229 beds). Eligible patients for the study included those patients admitted to the 4 hospitals between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, with complete data and the correct International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code, as determined by the infection preventionist. Infection preventionists performed complete medical record review using National Healthcare Safety Network definitions to identify SSIs. Patients were stratified using the All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups to estimate the change in hospital profit due to SSIs. Surgical site infections. The outcomes of the study were the difference in daily total charges, length of stay (LOS), 30-day readmission rate, and profit for patients with an SSI when compared with patients without an SSI. The hypothesis, formulated prior to data collection, that patients with an SSI have higher daily total costs, a longer LOS, and higher 30-day readmission rates than patients without an SSI, was tested using a nonpaired Mann-Whitney U test, an analysis of covariance, and a Pearson χ2 test. Hospital charges were used as a proxy for hospital cost. RESULTS The daily total charges, mean LOS, and 30-day readmission rate for patients with an SSI compared with patients without an SSI were $7493 vs $7924 (P = .99); 10.56 days vs 5.64 days (P < .001); and 51.94 vs 8.19 readmissions per 100 procedures (P < .001). The change in profit due SSIs was $2 268 589. The data suggest that

  20. John B. Watson's Alleged Sex Research: An Appraisal of the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Ludy T. Jr.; Whitaker, Jodi L.; Ramsey, Russell M.; Zeve, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01

    In 1974, a story was published about clandestine research done by John B. Watson that was judged to be so reprehensible that it was offered as the real reason he was fired from his faculty position at Johns Hopkins University in 1920, at perhaps the peak of his academic career. Watson's dismissal from Johns Hopkins may have been the most important…

  1. Welch, Sedgwick, and the Hopkins model of hygiene.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, K. R.

    1999-01-01

    William H. Welch and William T. Sedgwick, two of the founding fathers of American public health, were both early generation "Hopkins Men." Sedgwick was part of the first group of graduate students to attend Johns Hopkins University, and Welch was part of the initial faculty at the University's medical school. While they never worked together as colleagues at Hopkins, both became interested in the exciting new discoveries of the microbial nature of human disease and developed similar public health programs based on this information. Sedgwick expanded upon these investigations in the new sanitary science program at MIT, where academic public health first emerged in the United States following Sedgwick's appointment in 1883. Welch, who had been exposed to European research in microbiology, promoted microbial research in pathology in Baltimore in 1884. His laboratory-based investigations expanded until they led to the formation of the country's first school of public health in 1916. Thus, a "Hopkins Model" for hygiene and public health emerged from the efforts of both Welch and Sedgwick. PMID:11049162

  2. Background and applications of astrodynamics for space missions of the johns hopkins applied physics laboratory.

    PubMed

    Dunham, David W; Farquhar, Robert W

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes astrodynamic techniques applied to develop special orbital designs for past and future space missions of the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) of Johns Hopkins University, and background about those techniques. The paper does not describe the long history of low Earth-orbiting missions at APL, but rather concentrates on the astrodynamically more interesting high-altitude and interplanetary missions that APL has undertaken in recent years. The authors developed many of their techniques in preparation for, and during, the Third International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) halo orbit mission while they worked for the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) of NASA during the 1970s and 1980s. Later missions owed much to the ground breaking work of the trajectory designs for ISEE-3 (later known as the International Cometary Explorer, or ICE). This experience, and other new ideas, were applied to the APL near Earth asteroid rendezvous (NEAR) and comet nucleus tour (CONTOUR) discovery missions, as well as to APL's future MESSENGER, STEREO, and New Horizons missions. These will be described in the paper.

  3. Bayesian lead time estimation for the Johns Hopkins Lung Project data.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyejeong; Kim, Seongho; Wu, Dongfeng

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer screening using X-rays has been controversial for many years. A major concern is whether lung cancer screening really brings any survival benefits, which depends on effective treatment after early detection. The problem was analyzed from a different point of view and estimates were presented of the projected lead time for participants in a lung cancer screening program using the Johns Hopkins Lung Project (JHLP) data. The newly developed method of lead time estimation was applied where the lifetime T was treated as a random variable rather than a fixed value, resulting in the number of future screenings for a given individual is a random variable. Using the actuarial life table available from the United States Social Security Administration, the lifetime distribution was first obtained, then the lead time distribution was projected using the JHLP data. The data analysis with the JHLP data shows that, for a male heavy smoker with initial screening ages at 50, 60, and 70, the probability of no-early-detection with semiannual screens will be 32.16%, 32.45%, and 33.17%, respectively; while the mean lead time is 1.36, 1.33 and 1.23 years. The probability of no-early-detection increases monotonically when the screening interval increases, and it increases slightly as the initial age increases for the same screening interval. The mean lead time and its standard error decrease when the screening interval increases for all age groups, and both decrease when initial age increases with the same screening interval. The overall mean lead time estimated with a random lifetime T is slightly less than that with a fixed value of T. This result is hoped to be of benefit to improve current screening programs. Copyright © 2013 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Johns Hopkins model of psychological first aid (RAPID-PFA): curriculum development and content validation.

    PubMed

    Everly, George S; Barnett, Daniel J; Links, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    There appears to be virtual universal endorsement of the need for and value of acute "psychological first aid" (PFA) in the wake of trauma and disasters. In this paper, we describe the development of the curriculum for The Johns Hopkins RAPID-PFA model of psychological first aid. We employed an adaptation of the basic framework for the development of a clinical science as recommended by Millon which entailed: historical review, theoretical development, and content validation. The process of content validation of the RAPID-PFA curriculum entailed the assessment of attitudes (confidence in the application of PFA interventions, preparedness in the application of PFA); knowledge related to the application of immediate mental health interventions; and behavior (the ability to recognize clinical markers in the field as assessed via a videotape recognition exercise). Results of the content validation phase suggest the six-hour RAPID-PFA curriculum, initially based upon structural modeling analysis, can improve confidence in the application of PFA interventions, preparedness in the application of PFA, knowledge related to the application of immediate mental health interventions, and the ability to recognize clinical markers in the field as assessed via a videotape recognition exercise.

  5. Adaptability in the Development of Data Archiving Services at Johns Hopkins University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, J.; DiLauro, T.; Fearon, D.; Pralle, B.

    2015-12-01

    Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Data Management Services provides archiving services for institutional researchers through the JHU Data Archive, thereby increasing the access to and use of their research data. From its inception our unit's archiving service has evolved considerably. While some of these changes have been internally driven so that our unit can archive quality data collections more efficiently, we have also developed archiving policies and procedures on the fly in response to researcher needs. Providing our archiving services for JHU research groups from a variety of research disciplines have surfaced different sets of expectations and needs. We have used each interaction to help us refine our services and quickly satisfy the researchers we serve (following the first agile principle). Here we discuss the development of our newest archiving service model, its implementation over the past several months, and the processes by which we have continued to refine and improve our archiving services since its implementation. Through this discussion we will illustrate the benefits of planning, structure and flexibility in development of archiving services that maximize the potential value of research data. We will describe interactions with research groups, including those from environmental engineering and international health, and how we were able to rapidly modify and develop our archiving services to meet their needs (e.g. in an 'agile' way). For example, our interactions with both of these research groups led first to discussion in regular standing meetings and eventually development of new archiving policies and procedures. These policies and procedures centered on limiting access to archived research data while associated manuscripts progress through peer-review and publication.

  6. Using the CDC Worksite Health ScoreCard to Assess Employer Health Promotion Efforts: A Case Study at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

    PubMed

    Safeer, Richard; Bowen, Wendy; Maung, Zaw; Lucik, Meg

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Worksite Health ScoreCard (ScoreCard) is an effective vehicle for measuring workplace health promotion programs and causing change in a large employer with multiple entities defined by different physical environments and types of workers. Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) representatives completed a baseline ScoreCard for each of their entities. In the subsequent year, improvement of the ScoreCard was tied to leadership performance evaluation. JHM year over year scores were analyzed, along with comparisons to national benchmarks. Eleven of the 12 JHM entities improved their overall score from year one to year two and the JHM enterprise surpassed national benchmarks in year two. Organizations can use the ScoreCard as an effective measurement tool and as a method to improve the number of evidenced-based health promotion strategies provided to their employees.

  7. The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory Philosophy: Mentoring Students in a Scientific Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Betty M; Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Mangraviti, Antonella; Barone, Michael A; Brem, Henry

    2016-06-01

    After over 50 years of scientific contribution under the leadership of Harvey Cushing and later Walter Dandy, the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory entered a period of dormancy between the 1960s and early 1980s. In 1984, Henry Brem reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory, with a new focus on localized delivery of therapies for brain tumors, leading to several discoveries such as new antiangiogenic agents and Gliadel chemotherapy wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Since that time, it has been the training ground for 310 trainees who have dedicated their time to scientific exploration in the lab, resulting in numerous discoveries in the area of neurosurgical research. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory has been a unique example of successful mentoring in a translational research environment. The laboratory's philosophy emphasizes mentorship, independence, self-directed learning, creativity, and people-centered collaboration, while maintaining productivity with a focus on improving clinical outcomes. This focus has been served by the diverse backgrounds of its trainees, both in regard to educational status as well as culturally. Through this philosophy and strong legacy of scientific contribution, the Hunterian Laboratory has maintained a positive and productive research environment that supports highly motivated students and trainees. In this article, the authors discuss the laboratory's training philosophy, linked to the principles of adult learning (andragogy), as well as the successes and the limitations of including a wide educational range of students in a neurosurgical translational laboratory and the phenomenon of combining clinical expertise with rigorous scientific training.

  8. The new and improved learning community at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine resembles that at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Rosalyn W; Barker, Allison R; Shochet, Robert B; Wright, Scott M

    2007-05-01

    In July 2005, a learning community was created at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) to foster camaraderie, networking, advising, mentoring, professionalism, clinical skills, and scholarship--The Colleges. The cultural and structural changes that emerged with the creation of this program have resulted in JHUSOM bearing a resemblance to J. K. Rowling's fictional Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. This manuscript will describe the similarities between these two revered schools, and highlight the innovations and improvements made to JHUSOM's learning environment. The intense, stressful, and lengthy professional training required to achieve competency in the practice of medicine and in the practice of witchcraft (albeit fictional) have meaningful parallels. The supportive learning environment at these two schools should afford the next generation of graduates to have an even more enriching experience than those who have come before them.

  9. December 2014 HeartWeek issue of cardiology in the young: highlights of HeartWeek 2014: diseases of the cardiac valves from the foetus to the adult.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2014-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 12th annual publication generated from the two meetings that compose "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine and entering its 15th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Pediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and entering its 18th year. This December, 2014 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 14th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, which was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from 15-18 February, 2014. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) and had as its special focus " Diseases of the Cardiac Valves from the Fetus to the Adult ". We acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care by Duke Cameron and Joel Brenner, and therefore we dedicate this December, 2014 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young to them. Duke Cameron is Professor of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University and Cardiac Surgeon-in-Charge at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Joel Brenner is Professor of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University and Director of the Taussig Heart Center at Bloomberg Children's Center, The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Together

  10. Impact of a New Palliative Care Program on Health System Finances: An Analysis of the Palliative Care Program Inpatient Unit and Consultations at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, Sarina R; Lu, Chunhua; McQuade, John; Chan, Kelvin K W; Gill, Natasha; Cardamone, Michael; Torto, Deirdre; Langbaum, Terry; Razzak, Rab; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-05-01

    Palliative care inpatient units (PCUs) can improve symptoms, family perception of care, and lower per-diem costs compared with usual care. In March 2013, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (JHMI) added a PCU to the palliative care (PC) program. We studied the financial impact of the PC program on JHMI from March 2013 to March 2014. This study considered three components of the PC program: PCU, PC consultations, and professional fees. Using 13 months of admissions data, the team calculated the per-day variable cost pre-PCU (ie, in another hospital unit) and after transfer to the PCU. These fees were multiplied by the number of patients transferred to the PCU and by the average length of stay in the PCU. Consultation savings were estimated using established methods. Professional fees assumed a collection rate of 50%. The total positive financial impact of the PC program was $3,488,863.17. There were 153 transfers to the PCU, 60% with cancer, and an average length of stay of 5.11 days. The daily loss pretransfer to the PCU of $1,797.67 was reduced to $1,345.34 in the PCU (-25%). The PCU saved JHMI $353,645.17 in variable costs, or $452.33 per transfer. Cost savings for PC consultations in the hospital, 60% with cancer, were estimated at $2,765,218. $370,000 was collected in professional fees savings. The PCU and PC program had a favorable impact on JHMI while providing expert patient-centered care. As JHMI moves to an accountable care organization model, value-based patient-centered care and increased intensive care unit availability are desirable.

  11. Hopkins in Cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-14

    ISS037-E-011232 (14 Oct. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, like all International Space Station inhabitants, enjoys time in the Cupola, which affords the most broad views of Earth. "Behind" Hopkins can be seen the northern coast of Brazil, including the Acarau River delta in the state of Ceara, just west of the city of Fortaleza (out of frame).

  12. The mortality risk score and the ADG score: two points-based scoring systems for the Johns Hopkins aggregated diagnosis groups to predict mortality in a general adult population cohort in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C; Walraven, Carl van

    2011-10-01

    Logistic regression models that incorporated age, sex, and indicator variables for the Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups (ADGs) categories have been shown to accurately predict all-cause mortality in adults. To develop 2 different point-scoring systems using the ADGs. The Mortality Risk Score (MRS) collapses age, sex, and the ADGs to a single summary score that predicts the annual risk of all-cause death in adults. The ADG Score derives weights for the individual ADG diagnosis groups. : Retrospective cohort constructed using population-based administrative data. All 10,498,413 residents of Ontario, Canada, between the age of 20 and 100 years who were alive on their birthday in 2007, participated in this study. Participants were randomly divided into derivation and validation samples. : Death within 1 year. In the derivation cohort, the MRS ranged from -21 to 139 (median value 29, IQR 17 to 44). In the validation group, a logistic regression model with the MRS as the sole predictor significantly predicted the risk of 1-year mortality with a c-statistic of 0.917. A regression model with age, sex, and the ADG Score has similar performance. Both methods accurately predicted the risk of 1-year mortality across the 20 vigintiles of risk. The MRS combined values for a person's age, sex, and the John Hopkins ADGs to accurately predict 1-year mortality in adults. The ADG Score is a weighted score representing the presence or absence of the 32 ADG diagnosis groups. These scores will facilitate health services researchers conducting risk adjustment using administrative health care databases.

  13. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Sean; Bakar, Hamidah Abu; Shilkofski, Nicole A; Coady, Niamh; Rampal, Krishna; Wright, Scott

    2015-01-01

    While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES) for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM), the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%). After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%), with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%). The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92) and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85). The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention.

  14. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale

    PubMed Central

    Tackett, Sean; Bakar, Hamidah Abu; Shilkofski, Nicole A.; Coady, Niamh; Rampal, Krishna; Wright, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES) for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. Methods: First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM), the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. Results: The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%). After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%), with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%). The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92) and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85). Conclusion: The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention. PMID:26165949

  15. A Hospital Local Area Communication Network—The First Year's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Simborg, D. W.; Chadwick, M.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Q. E.; Tolchin, S. G.; Stewart, R. L.; Kahn, S. A.; Bergan, E. S.; Gafke, G. P.

    1982-01-01

    A local area communications network has been implemented at the University of California, San Francisco Hospital to integrate major components of the hospital's information system. This microprocessor-based network technology was developed by The Applied Physics Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University. The first year's experience has demonstrated the basic feasibility of this technology in simplifying the integration of diverse hardware and software systems. Four minicomputer-based UCSF systems now use the network to synchronize key patient identification and registration information among the systems. Clinical uses of the network will begin during the second year of the project.

  16. The life, times, and health care of Harry L Hopkins: Presidential advisor and perpetual patient.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Theodore N; Swanson, Sven

    2018-02-01

    Harry Hopkins was the most important nontitled allied leader in World War II. He was the advisor to President Roosevelt who managed the diplomacy between Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin from 1941 to 1946. Throughout these times, Hopkins was ill and required transfusions, admissions to the hospital, and nutritional supplementation to keep him well enough to travel the world and manage the allied war diplomacy. There has been no unifying theory to account for all his symptoms and his reported pathologic and autopsy findings. In this paper, we will review his political and medical history and a differential diagnosis of his illness.

  17. Haircut for Hopkins

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-05

    ISS037-E-006568 (5 Oct. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 37 commander, trims the hair of NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, flight engineer, in the Node 1 module, called Unity. Yurchikhin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  18. Haircut for Hopkins

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-05

    ISS037-E-006571 (5 Oct. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 37 commander, trims the hair of NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, flight engineer, in the Unity node of the International Space Station. Yurchikhin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  19. Haircut for Hopkins

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-05

    ISS037-E-006565 (5 Oct. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 37 commander, trims the hair of NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, flight engineer, in the Unity node of the International Space Station. Yurchikhin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  20. Cecostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a physician at another Johns Hopkins Member Hospital: Howard County General Sibley Memorial Hospital Suburban Hospital Connect ... Center: Pediatric Trauma Find Additional Treatment Centers at: Howard County General Sibley Memorial Hospital Suburban Hospital Maryland ...

  1. Results of an academic promotion and career path survey of faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Patricia A; Diener-West, Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Martin, Don R; Post, Wendy S; Streiff, Michael B

    2004-03-01

    Clinician-educator faculty are increasing in numbers in academic medical centers, but their academic advancement is slower than that of research faculty. The authors sought to quantify the magnitude of this difference in career advancement and to explore the characteristics of faculty that might explain the difference. In 1999, a questionnaire was administered to all MD faculty at the rank of instructor and above (259) in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. A total of 180 (69%) faculty returned questionnaires. Of these, 178 identified with one of four career paths: basic researcher (46), clinical researcher (69), academic clinician (38), or teacher-clinician (25). Career path did not differ by age, gender, rank, years on faculty, hours worked per week, family responsibility, or global work satisfaction. After adjusting for age, gender, time at rank, and work satisfaction, the odds of being at a higher rank were 85% less for academic clinicians (odds ratio,.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.40) and 69% less for teacher-clinicians (odds ratio,.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.88) than for basic researchers. Clinical researchers did not differ from basic researchers in the likelihood of being at higher rank. Similarly, compared with basic research faculty, the adjusted odds of being more satisfied with progress towards academic promotion were 92% lower for academic clinicians and 87% lower for teacher-clinicians. Clinician-educator faculty were less likely to be at higher rank at this institution than were faculty in research paths. Differences in rank may be explained by lower rank at hire for faculty in these career paths, time available for scholarly activities, or other resources available to support scholarship. Retaining clinician-educators will require further exploration of barriers to promotion inherent to these career paths and methods of modifying these barriers.

  2. An Analysis of Emergency Department Overcrowding at The Johns Hopkins Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-20

    Jefferson 3rd floor (JEF3), Medical Care Progressive Unit ( MPC4 ), Nelson 4th floor (NEL4), Osler 4th floor (OSL4), Osler 5th floor (OSL5), and Osler...ranged from a low of 73.78% for OSL5 to a high of 94.60% for JEF3. The LOS for the DOM units ranged from 2.89 days for HAL5 to 10.39 days for MPC4

  3. What do we know about noise in hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, James E.; Busch-Vishniac, Ilene

    2005-09-01

    Little is known about noise levels inside hospitals and its effect on healing, safety, staff, and doctors. Many independent studies of noise levels in a wide range of hospital venues in many countries have been reported in the literature authored mainly by physicians and nurses. The World Health Organization (WHO) has set guidelines for noise levels in hospitals, but none of the reported studies meet WHO guidelines. In most cases noise levels are more then 15 dB A-weighted higher then those specified by WHO guidelines. Since 1960 the average noise levels in hospitals has increased an average of 0.38 dB per year during daytime hours and 0.42 dB during the night. This talk reviews the state of the art on interior hospital noise control and the remaining challenging issues. Equivalent sound pressure levels as a function of location, frequency and time of day were measured in five different venues at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore Maryland. Results of our measurements, which confirm the trends seen in prior studies, will be used to describe patterns of hospital interior noise and avenues ripe for further investigation.

  4. Undeclared exposure to St. John's Wort in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Facklam, Meret; Rieger, Karin; Riedel, Klaus-Dieter; Burhenne, Jürgen; Walter-Sack, Ingeborg; Haefeli, Walter E

    2004-01-01

    Aim The herbal medicine St. John's Wort (SJW) causes substantial decreases in the plasma concentrations of a range of co-administered drugs. Therefore, we evaluated the extent of systemic exposure to hyperforin and hypericin, two of the main constituents of SJW, in patients on admission and during hospital stay, and compared the results with known use of SJW as documented in the drug chart and detected in additional interviews. Methods One hundred and fifty patients aged ≥ 18 years and admitted, between August 2000 and February 2002, to an internal medicine ward of a large German university hospital were included. Hyperforin and hypericin was determined in plasma by a sensitive liquid chromotography/mass spectometry (LC/MS/MS) method. To assess undeclared use of SJW the data were compared to information obtained from drug charts and from up to three interviews that had a particular focus on intake of herbal medicines and self-medication during hospitalization. Results Hyperforin was detected in 12 patients (plasma concentration on the first day of hospitalization = 12–100 ng ml−1 in five patients and <3 ng ml−1 in seven), and hypericin in five patients (0.5–4.3 ng ml−1). Nine patients (6%) were taking/had taken SJW without the knowledge of the medical team and the pharmacist, who conducted the additional interviews, and 11 (7.3%) were taking/had taken SJW without the knowledge of the medical team alone. Seven of these patients were treated concurrently with drugs that can interact with SJW. Conclusions Unrecognized use of SJW is frequent and may have an important influence on the effectiveness and safety of drug therapy during hospital stay. PMID:15373938

  5. SCI Hospital in Home Program: Bringing Hospital Care Home for Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Madaris, Linda L; Onyebueke, Mirian; Liebman, Janet; Martin, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    The complex nature of spinal cord injury (SCI) and the level of care required for health maintenance frequently result in repeated hospital admissions for recurrent medical complications. Prolonged hospitalizations of persons with SCI have been linked to the increased risk of hospital-acquired infections and development or worsening pressure ulcers. An evidence-based alternative for providing hospital-level care to patients with specific diagnoses who are willing to receive that level of care in the comfort of their home is being implemented in a Department of Veterans Affairs SCI Home Care Program. The SCI Hospital in Home (HiH) model is similar to a patient-centered interdisciplinary care model that was first introduced in Europe and later tested as part of a National Demonstration and Evaluation Study through Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Public Health. This was funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The objectives of the program are to support veterans' choice and access to patient-centered care, reduce the reliance on inpatient medical care, allow for early discharge, and decrease medical costs. Veterans with SCI who are admitted to the HiH program receive daily oversight by a physician, daily visits by a registered nurse, access to laboratory services, oxygen, intravenous medications, and nursing care in the home setting. In this model, patients may typically access HiH services either as an "early discharge" from the hospital or as a direct admit to the program from the emergency department or SCI clinic. Similar programs providing acute hospital-equivalent care in the home have been previously implemented and are successfully demonstrating decreased length of stay, improved patient access, and increased patient satisfaction.

  6. Astronaut Mike Hopkins Visit to Maryland Science Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-09

    NASA Astronaut Mike Hopkins explains what it was like to live on the International Space Station for 6 months to visitors at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore, MD on Monday, June 9, 2014. Hopkins served on Expeditions 37 and 38 with Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy and returned home in March, 2014. (Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  7. Gerard Manley Hopkins and the kinesthetics of conviction.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S

    2008-01-01

    This essay explores the link in Gerard Manley Hopkins's imagination between sensations of the body and the changing textures of intensity that characterize experiences of the mind. I argue that one of the first functions of Hopkins's stylistic experiments in The Wreck of the Deutschland and later poems is to call attention to the ways in which our experiences of knowing, reasoning, and believing have parallels in bodily sensations. Hopkins's manipulations of the kinesthetic properties of language - especially the capacity of syntax to evoke sensations of pressure, balance, momentum, and tension - are directed toward a mimesis of consciousness, in which the poet strives to represent the feeling in the mind as it cranes toward an insight or relishes the renewal of conviction.

  8. A case of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome with absence of hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Inati, Adlette; Abbas, Hussein A; Korjian, Serge; Daaboul, Yazan; Harajeily, Mohamad; Saab, Raya

    2013-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is characterized by mental retardation, hyperventilation, and dysmorphic features due to TCF4 mutations. We report a case of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome in a 2½-year-old boy presenting with psychomotor retardation, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and dysmorphic features with absence of hyperventilation or other breathing abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to confirm TCF4 haploinsufficiency. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a rare debilitating disease that should be in the differential diagnosis of other neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by mental retardation and hypotonicity despite the absence of hyperapnea and seizures. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is another method to identify TCF4 and to confirm Pitt-Hopkins syndrome diagnosis.

  9. Astronaut Mike Hopkins Visit to Maryland Science Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-09

    NASA Astronaut Mike Hopkins explains what it was like to live on the International Space Station for 6 months to seventh graders from Clear Spring Middle School at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore, MD on Monday, June 9, 2014. Hopkins served on Expeditions 37 and 38 with Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy and returned home in March, 2014. (Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Loss of PTEN as a Predictive Biomarker of Response to Lithium Chloride, A Potential Targeted Treatment for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...The grant was awarded on June 1st 2010. Dr. Higgins graduated from her Oncology Fellowship Program in Johns Hopkins Hospital on June 30th and... grant to support Dr. Higgins as she continued this work was submitted and processed in June 2010 in anticipation of this move. Johns Hopkins University

  11. Current and Future Management of Bilateral Loss of Vestibular Sensation – An update on the Johns Hopkins Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis Project

    PubMed Central

    Della Santina, Charles C.; Migliaccio, Americo A.; Hayden, Russell; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Fridman, Gene Y.; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan S.; Dai, Chenkai; Carey, John P.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Anderson, Iee-Ching; Park, HongJu; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Tang, Shan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation can disable individuals whose vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications, infection, Ménière’s disease or other insults to the labyrinth including surgical trauma during cochlear implantation. Without input to vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body, affected patients suffer blurred vision during head movement, postural instability, and chronic disequilibrium. While individuals with some residual sensation often compensate for their loss through rehabilitation exercises, those who fail to do so are left with no adequate treatment options. An implantable neuroelectronic vestibular prosthesis that emulates the normal labyrinth by sensing head movement and modulating activity on appropriate branches of the vestibular nerve could significantly improve quality of life for these otherwise chronically dizzy patients. This brief review describes the impact and current management of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting the feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, and a vestibular prosthesis designed to restore sensation of head rotation in all directions. Similar to a cochlear implant in concept and size, the Johns Hopkins Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis (MVP) includes miniature gyroscopes to sense head rotation, a microcontroller to process inputs and control stimulus timing, and current sources switched between pairs of electrodes implanted within the vestibular labyrinth. In rodents and rhesus monkeys rendered bilaterally vestibular-deficient via treatment with gentamicin and/or plugging of semicircular canals, the MVP partially restores the vestibulo-ocular reflex for head rotations about any axis of rotation in 3-dimensional space. Our efforts now focus on addressing issues prerequisite to human implantation, including refinement of electrode designs and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve

  12. 4. PHOTOCOPY OF MAP, G. M. HOPKINS, ATLAS OF HUDSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PHOTOCOPY OF MAP, G. M. HOPKINS, ATLAS OF HUDSON COUNTY, NEW JERSEY. G. M. HOPKINS, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, 1873. - Lembeck & Betz Eagle Brewery, 164-190 Ninth Street, 515-519 Luis Munez Marin Boulevard, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  13. Hopkins during ITCS PWR Retrieval

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-31

    ISS038-E-040140 (31 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, uses the Fluid Servicing System (FSS) to refill Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) loops with fresh coolant in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  14. Hopkins during ITCS PWR Retrieval

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-31

    ISS038-E-040139 (31 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, uses the Fluid Servicing System (FSS) to refill Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) loops with fresh coolant in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  15. 6. PHOTOCOPY OF MAP, G. M. HOPKINS COMPANY, ATLAS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. PHOTOCOPY OF MAP, G. M. HOPKINS COMPANY, ATLAS OF HUDSON COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, VOL. 1. G. M. HOPKINS AND COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, 1908. - Lembeck & Betz Eagle Brewery, 164-190 Ninth Street, 515-519 Luis Munez Marin Boulevard, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  16. 7. PHOTOCOPY OF MAP, G. M. HOPKINS COMPANY, PLATBOOK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PHOTOCOPY OF MAP, G. M. HOPKINS COMPANY, PLATBOOK OF JERSEY CITY AND BAYONNE, HUDSON COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, VOL. 1. G. M. HOPKINS COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, 1919. - Lembeck & Betz Eagle Brewery, 164-190 Ninth Street, 515-519 Luis Munez Marin Boulevard, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  17. Hopkins installs wire harnesses

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-24

    ISS038-E-008291 (24 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, installs wire harnesses in the International Space Station?s Harmony node to support the installation of Ethernet video cables for the station?s local area network. These new cables will provide Ethernet connectivity to the visiting vehicles that dock to Harmony?s Earth-facing port.

  18. Hopkins works with the MDCA hardware replacement, and CIR maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-31

    ISS038-E-024145 (30 Dec. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on combustion research hardware in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Hopkins replaced a Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) fuel reservoir inside the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR).

  19. Multidisciplinary Difficult Airway Course: An Essential Educational Component of a Hospital-Wide Difficult Airway Response Program.

    PubMed

    Leeper, W Robert; Haut, Elliott R; Pandian, Vinciya; Nakka, Sajan; Dodd-O, Jeffrey; Bhatti, Nasir; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Saheed, Mustapha; Dalesio, Nicholas; Schiavi, Adam; Miller, Christina; Kirsch, Thomas D; Berkow, Lauren

    2018-04-05

    A hospital-wide difficult airway response team was developed in 2008 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital with three central pillars: operations, safety monitoring, and education. The objective of this study was to assess the outcomes of the educational pillar of the difficult airway response team program, known as the multidisciplinary difficult airway course (MDAC). The comprehensive, full-day MDAC involves trainees and staff from all provider groups who participate in airway management. The MDAC occurs within the Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center approximately four times per year and uses a combination of didactic lectures, hands-on sessions, and high-fidelity simulation training. Participation in MDAC is the main intervention being investigated in this study. Data were collected prospectively using course evaluation survey with quantitative and qualitative components, and prepost course knowledge assessment multiple choice questions (MCQ). Outcomes include course evaluation scores and themes derived from qualitative assessments, and prepost course knowledge assessment MCQ scores. Tertiary care academic hospital center PARTICIPANTS: Students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians from the departments of Surgery, Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine, and Emergency Medicine; advanced practice providers (nurse practitioners and physician assistants), nurse anesthetists, nurses, and respiratory therapists. Totally, 23 MDACs have been conducted, including 499 participants. Course evaluations were uniformly positive with mean score of 86.9 of 95 points. Qualitative responses suggest major value from high-fidelity simulation, the hands-on skill stations, and teamwork practice. MCQ scores demonstrated significant improvement: median (interquartile range) pre: 69% (60%-81%) vs post: 81% (72%-89%), p < 0.001. Implementation of a MDAC successfully disseminated principles and protocols to all airway providers. Demonstrable

  20. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope Data Archive: Old Data in a New Format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Dixon, V.; Kruk, J.; Romelfanger, M.

    2011-05-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a key component of the Astro Observatory, a package of telescopes that flew on the space shuttle as part of two dedicated astronomy missions, Astro-1 in December 1990 (STS-35), and Astro-2 in March 1995 (STS-67). HUT was a 0.9m telescope and prime-focus spectrograph operating primarily in the far-ultraviolet 900 - 1800 Angstrom spectral region, returning spectra with about 3 Angstrom resolution. Over 330 objects were observed during the two shuttle missions, and the data were originally archived at the NSSDC (NASA/GSFC), before moving to MAST, the Multimission Archive at Space Telescope. As part of a NASA Astrophysics Data Program grant, we are reprocessing and re-archiving this unique data set in a modern and more user-friendly format. Additional file-header keywords include the RA and Dec in J2000 coordinates, the aperture position angle, and target-magnitude and color information. A new data product, similar to the Intermediate Data Files developed for the FUSE mission, provides a flux- and wavelength-calibrated photon-event list with two-second time resolution. These files will allow users to customize their data extractions (e.g., to search for temporal variations in flux or exclude times of bad pointing). The reprocessed data are fully compliant with NVO specifications. They will be available from MAST starting in late 2011. We acknowledge support from NASA ADP grant NNX09AC70G to the Johns Hopkins University.

  1. Case Study: The Venous Thromboembolism Collaborative Team at the Johns Hopkins Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-21

    the use of evidence based medicine as well as a Collaborative of medical and administrative staff, the team developed a computer based decision...audits were conducted for some of the high-risk departments to validate adherence to compliance with evidence - based medicine supporting prevention

  2. The development of a model of psychological first aid for non-mental health trained public health personnel: the Johns Hopkins RAPID-PFA.

    PubMed

    Everly, George S; Lee McCabe, O; Semon, Natalie L; Thompson, Carol B; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness, which houses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center, has been addressing the challenge of disaster-caused behavioral health surge by conducting training programs in psychological first aid (PFA) for public health professionals. This report describes our approach, named RAPID-PFA, and summarizes training evaluation data to determine if relevant knowledge, skills, and attitudes are imparted to trainees to support effective PFA delivery. In the wake of disasters, there is an increase in psychological distress and dysfunction among survivors and first responders. To meet the challenges posed by this surge, a professional workforce trained in PFA is imperative. More than 1500 participants received a 1-day RAPID-PFA training. Pre-/postassessments were conducted to measure (a) required knowledge to apply PFA; (b) perceived self-efficacy, that is, belief in one's own ability, to apply PFA techniques; and (c) confidence in one's own resilience in a crisis context. Statistical techniques were used to validate the extent to which the survey successfully measured individual PFA constructs, that is, unidimensionality, and to quantify the reliability of the assessment tool. Statistically significant pre-/postimprovements were observed in (a) knowledge items supportive of PFA delivery, (b) perceived self-efficacy to apply PFA interventions, and (c) confidence about being a resilient PFA provider. Cronbach alpha coefficients ranging from 0.87 to 0.90 suggested that the self-reported measures possessed sufficient internal consistency. Findings were consistent with our pilot work, and with our complementary research initiatives validating a variant of RAPID-PFA with faith communities. The RAPID-PFA model promises to be a broadly applicable approach to extending community behavioral health surge capacity. Relevant next steps include evaluating the effectiveness

  3. Hopkins in the A/L

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-18

    View of Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 Flight Engineer (FE), during remove and replace (R&R) of Hard Upper Torso (HUT) of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), in the airlock (A/L) during preparation for EVA-24. Photo was taken during Expedition 38. Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.

  4. The autopsy was conducted "Under most inauspicious circumstances:" John Turner, Harvey Cushing's case XXXII, and his unwitting contributions to the early understanding of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Wand, Gary; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2010-12-01

    Harvey Cushing's monograph The Pituitary Body and Its Disorders describes Case XXXII, a 36-year-old man who presented with gigantism in 1910. The detailed post-mortem exam findings are prefaced with a cryptic statement, describing "inauspicious circumstances" surrounding the autopsy. Although contemporary biographies of Cushing have offered insight into these circumstances, the original surgical file for Case XXXII has not been previously reviewed. The original Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical records were reviewed, and the case of John Turner, who Cushing identified by name in his monograph The Pituitary Body and Its Disorders, was selected for further review. A review of the original surgical file revealed a typewritten note by Dr. Crowe, one of the surgeons who performed the post-mortem exam, with a handwritten addendum by Dr. Cushing. This document provides detail regarding the "inauspicious circumstances" surrounding the autopsy. Namely, the autopsy was conducted without permission of the family, during the funeral service, following a payment to the undertaker. The new information regarding the autopsy of John Turner offers insight into the previously incompletely described circumstances surrounding the autopsy. Additionally, the case illuminates the obligations and ethical quandaries that physician-scientists face.

  5. Hopkins using FSS to refill ITCS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-31

    ISS038-E-040111 (31 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, uses the Fluid Servicing System (FSS) to refill Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) loops with fresh coolant in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Pitt-Hopkins syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hollander NS, Jongmans M, Kant SG, King MD, Lynch SA, McKee S, Midro AT, Park SM, Ricotti V, Tarantino E, Wessels M, Peippo M, Rauch A. Further delineation of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: phenotypic and genotypic description of 16 novel patients. ...

  7. Hopkins works on T2 COLBERT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-12

    ISS038-E-046404 (12 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works on the COLBERT treadmill in the Unity node of the International Space Station. He replaced a failed accelerometer in the exercise device then activated COLBERT for a speed test.

  8. Hopkins works on T2 COLBERT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-12

    ISS038-E-046401 (12 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works on the COLBERT treadmill in the Unity node of the International Space Station. He replaced a failed accelerometer in the exercise device then activated COLBERT for a speed test.

  9. Hopkins works on T2 COLBERT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-12

    ISS038-E-046405 (12 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works on the COLBERT treadmill in the Unity node of the International Space Station. He replaced a failed accelerometer in the exercise device then activated COLBERT for a speed test.

  10. "The most important professorship in the English-speaking domain": Adolf Meyer and the beginnings of clinical psychiatry in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Susan

    2012-12-01

    Historians recognize Adolf Meyer (1866-1950), first psychiatrist-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital, as one of the principal architects of clinical psychiatry in the United States. This wholesale influence on the fledgling discipline had much to do with the authority he wielded as a Hopkins chief, but an important question remains: why was Meyer the obvious candidate to establish a department of psychiatry at the nation's foremost institution for medical research and teaching? Taking examples from Meyer's employment in three large American asylums before his appointment to Johns Hopkins in 1908, this article explores how he transformed an improvised set of practices into a clinical system for psychiatry that he implemented on a widespread scale, something that garnered him a reputation as a modernizer of outdated asylums and pegged him, in the minds of Hopkins authorities, as a psychiatric exemplar of commitment to pathological research and clinical teaching.

  11. Hopkins during BASS II Setup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-12

    ISS038-E-046393 (12 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, sets up the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  12. Hopkins during BASS II Setup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-12

    ISS038-E-046394 (12 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, sets up the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  13. Hopkins works with tanks from the ARFTA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-24

    ISS038-E-008287 (24 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with tanks from the Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  14. Hopkins works with tanks from the ARFTA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-24

    ISS038-E-008289 (24 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with tanks from the Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  15. Investigating the relationship between weather and violence in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Michel, Samuel J; Wang, Han; Selvarajah, Shalini; Canner, Joseph K; Murrill, Matthew; Chi, Albert; Efron, David T; Schneider, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    It is a common refrain at major urban trauma centers that caseloads increase in the heat of the summer. Several previous studies supported this assertion, finding trauma admissions and crime to correlate positively with temperature. We examined links between weather and violence in Baltimore, MD, through trauma presentation to Johns Hopkins Hospital and crime reports filed with the Baltimore Police Department. Crime data were obtained from the Baltimore City Police Department from January 1, 2008 to March 31, 2013. Trauma data were obtained from a prospectively collected registry of all trauma patients presenting to Johns Hopkins Hospital from January 1, 2007 to March 31, 2013. Weather data were obtained from the National Climatic Data Center. Correlation coefficients were calculated and negative binomial regression was used to elucidate the independent associations of weather and temporal variables with the trauma and crime data. When adjusting for temporal and meteorological factors, maximum daily temperature was positively associated with total trauma, intentional injury, and gunshot wounds presenting to Johns Hopkins Hospital along with total crime, violent crime, and homicides in Baltimore City. Associations of average wind speed, daily precipitation, and daily snowfall with trauma and crime were far weaker and, when significant, nearly universally negative. Maximum daily temperature is the most important weather factor associated with violence and trauma in our study period and location. Our findings suggest potential implications for hospital staffing to be explored in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspects of Vitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2009-01-01

    Musgrave Park Hospital in 1942 was the site of an Anglo-American Vitamin A caper. A threatened court-martial was pre-empted. Subsequently the Queen's lecturer in Anatomy, JW Millen, who was the other lecturer to the first editor of this journal, RH Hunter, did much distinguished work. The neurological effects of Vitamin A were elucidated. Further work on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), placenta, thalidomide and poliomyelitis led to the pre-eminence in applied anatomy and teratology of now Reader James Wilson Millen and Professors JD Boyd and WJ Hamilton, all Queen's Medical School graduates. Training of RH Hunter, JH Biggart and JD Boyd at Johns Hopkins University profoundly influenced these seminal discoveries. The Garretts, a family of Lisburn, County Down origin, saved Johns Hopkins Hospital and Medical School from financial disaster. The Garretts founded a commercial and mercantile empire that took control of the Baltimore and Ohio (B and O) Railroad and enabled the Garretts to dictate that women should be admitted to the Hopkins Medical School and Hospital on exactly the same terms as men. All women and men should already be university honours graduates. Winston S Churchill on his progress up and down the B and O main line in March 1946, recounted to President Harry S Truman and Harry Hopkins his mother's tales of the Garrett boys' adventures. PMID:19907684

  17. Microcosm to Cosmos: The Growth of a Divisional Computer Network

    PubMed Central

    Johannes, R.S.; Kahane, Stephen N.

    1987-01-01

    In 1982, we reported the deployment of a network of microcomputers in the Division of Gastroenterology[1]. This network was based upon Corvus Systems Omninet®. Corvus was one of the very first firms to offer networking products for PC's. This PC development occurred coincident with the planning phase of the Johns Hopkins Hospital's multisegment ethernet project. A rich communications infra-structure is now in place at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions[2,3]. Shortly after the hospital development under the direction of the Operational and Clinical Systems Division (OCS) development began, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine began an Integrated Academic Information Management Systems (IAIMS) planning effort. We now present a model that uses aspects of all three planning efforts (PC networks, Hospital Information Systems & IAIMS) to build a divisional computing facility. This facility is viewed as a terminal leaf on then institutional network diagram. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy that this leaf, the divisional resource in the Division of Gastroenterology (GASNET), has a rich substructure and functionality of its own, perhaps revealing the recursive nature of network architecture. The current status, design and function of the GASNET computational facility is discussed. Among the major positive aspects of this design are the sharing and centralization of MS-DOS software, the high-speed DOS/Unix link that makes available most of the our institution's computing resources.

  18. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025870 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  19. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025868 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  20. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025866 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  1. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025872 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  2. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025879 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saethre-Chotzen syndrome Johns Hopkins Collaboration for Craniofacial Development and Disorders MalaCards: saethre-chotzen syndrome Orphanet: Saethre-Chotzen syndrome Seattle Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (4 ...

  4. A retrospective analysis of eye conditions among children attending St. John Eye Hospital, Hebron, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Banayot, Riyad G

    2016-04-05

    Eye diseases are important causes of medical consultations, with the spectrum varying in different regions. This hospital-based descriptive study aimed to determine the profile of childhood eye conditions at St. John tertiary Eye hospital serving in Hebron, Palestine. Files of all new patients less than 16 years old who presented to St. John Eye Hospital-Hebron, Palestine between January 2013 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Age at presentation, sex, and clinical diagnosis were extracted from medical records. Data were stored and analyzed using Wizard data analysis version 1.6.0 by Evan Miller. The Chi square test was used to compare variables and a p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. We evaluated the records of 1102 patients, with a female: male ratio of 1:1.1. Patients aged 0-5 years old were the largest group (40.2%). Refractive errors were the most common ocular disorders seen (31.6%), followed by conjunctival diseases (23.7%) and strabismus and amblyopia (13.8%). Refractive errors were recorded more frequently and statistically significant (p < 0.001) among (11-15) age group. Within the conjunctival diseases category, conjunctivitis and dry eyes was more prominent and statistically significant (p < 0.001) among the 6-10 year old age group. Within the strabismus and amblyopia category, convergent strabismus was more common and statistically significant among the youngest age group (0-5 years old). The most common causes of ocular morbidity are largely treatable or preventable. These results suggest the need for awareness campaigns and early intervention programs.

  5. How Far Can Autistic Children Go in Matters of Social Adaptation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanner, Leo; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The case histories of nine autistic children, eight boys and one girl, selected from a total of 96 so diagnosed at The John Hopkins Hospital prior to 1953, are presented in some detail and discussed. (Author)

  6. Genetics Home Reference: immune thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... spots of bleeding under the skin are called purpura and larger spots are called ecchymoses. People with ... links) Johns Hopkins Medicine MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) Seattle Children's Hospital General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  7. Are regional hospital pharmacies prepared for public health emergencies?

    PubMed

    Hsu, Edbert B; Casani, Julie A; Romanosky, Al; Millin, Michael G; Singleton, Christa M; Donohue, John; Feroli, E Robert; Rubin, Melvin; Subbarao, Italo; Whyne, Dianne M; Snodgrass, Thomas D; Kelen, Gabor D

    2006-01-01

    In the event of a major chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosive (CBRNE) attack or a natural disaster, large quantities of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies may be required with little or no warning. Pharmaceutical surge capacity for immediate response, before Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) supplies become available, remains a significant gap in emergency preparedness. To date, limited attempts have been made to assess collective regional hospital pharmaceutical response capabilities. In this project, we characterized the level of hospital pharmaceutical response preparedness in a major metropolitan region. The Johns Hopkins Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response (CEPAR) convened a collaborative partnership to assess hospital pharmaceutical response capabilities. A survey was developed to characterize pharmaceutical response preparedness to CBRNE threats. All 22 acute care hospitals in the Maryland region were sent pharmaceutical response surveys, and responses were received from 86% (19/22). Within the past year, 84% (16/19) of hospitals had implemented an exercise with pharmacy participation. More than half of the hospitals expect to receive assistance from the SNS in 48 hours or less. Seventy-four percent (14/19) of the hospitals reported an additional dedicated reserve supply for biological events, 74% (14/19) for chemical events, and 58% (11/19) for radiological events. Many hospitals in this metropolitan region have taken important steps toward enhancing pharmaceutical preparedness. However, hospitals generally remain underprepared for CBRNE threats and collectively have limited supplies of antibiotics to provide prophylaxis or treatment for hospital staff, their families, and patients in the event of a significant biological incident.

  8. 75 FR 52006 - Granting of Request for Early Termination of the Waiting Period Under the Premerger Notification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... Equity Partners Fund Ill, L.P. G SumTotal Systems, Inc. G SumTotal Systems, Inc. 17-JUN-09 20090503 G... G Novant Health, Inc. G Prince William Health System. G Prince William Health System. 20090499 G The Johns Hopkins Health System Corporation. G Suburban Hospital Healthcare System, Inc. G Suburban Hospital...

  9. Hopkins during CFE-2 Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-20

    ISS038-E-005962 (19 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE-2) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids behave in microgravity which could benefit water and fuel delivery systems on future spacecraft. Scientists designed the Capillary Flow Experiment-2 to study properties of fluids and bubbles inside containers with a specific 3-D geometry.

  10. The development of pediatric critical care medicine at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: an interview with Dr. John J. 'Jack' Downes.

    PubMed

    Mai, Christine L; Schreiner, Mark S; Firth, Paul G; Yaster, Myron

    2013-07-01

    Dr. John J. 'Jack' Downes (1930-), the anesthesiologist-in-chief at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (1972-1996), has made numerous contributions to pediatric anesthesia and critical care medicine through a broad spectrum of research on chronic respiratory failure, status asthmaticus, postoperative risks of apnea in premature infants, and home-assisted mechanical ventilation. However, his defining moment was in January 1967, when The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia inaugurated its pediatric intensive care unit--the first of its kind in North America. During his tenure, he and his colleagues trained an entire generation of pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists and set a standard of care and professionalism that continues to the present day. Based on an interview with Dr. Downes, this article reviews a career that advanced pediatric anesthesia and critical care medicine and describes the development of that first pediatric intensive care unit at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effectiveness and Value of Prophylactic 5-Layer Foam Sacral Dressings to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injuries in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and value of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings to prevent hospital-acquired pressure injury rates in acute care settings. DESIGN: Retrospective observational cohort. SAMPLE AND SETTING: We reviewed records of adult patients 18 years or older who were hospitalized at least 5 days across 38 acute care hospitals of the University Health System Consortium (UHC) and had a pressure injury as identified by Patient Safety Indicator #3 (PSI-03). All facilities are located in the United States. METHODS: We collected longitudinal data pertaining to prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings purchased by hospital-quarter for 38 academic medical centers between 2010 and 2015. Longitudinal data on acute care, hospital-level patient outcomes (eg, admissions and PSI-03 and pressure injury rate) were queried through the UHC clinical database/resource manager from the Johns Hopkins Medicine portal. Data on volumes of dressings purchased per UHC hospital were merged with UHC data. Mixed-effects negative binomial regression was used to test the longitudinal association of prophylactic foam sacral dressings on pressure injury rates, adjusted for hospital case-mix and Medicare payments rules. RESULTS: Significant pressure injury rate reductions in US acute care hospitals between 2010 and 2015 were associated with the adoption of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings within a prevention protocol (−1.0 cases/quarter; P = .002) and changes to Medicare payment rules in 2014 (−1.13 cases/quarter; P = .035). CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings are an effective component of a pressure injury prevention protocol. Hospitals adopting these technologies should expect good value for use of these products. PMID:28816929

  12. Hopkins in U.S. Lab with FIR/FCF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-15

    ISS037-E-013951 (14 Oct. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, works at the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack / Fluids Combustion Facility (FIR/FCF) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  13. 76 FR 62046 - Defense Science Board; Notice of Advisory Committee Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723. The mission of the Defense... Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723. FOR FURTHER...

  14. Effectiveness and Value of Prophylactic 5-Layer Foam Sacral Dressings to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injuries in Acute Care Hospitals: An Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Padula, William V

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and value of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings to prevent hospital-acquired pressure injury rates in acute care settings. Retrospective observational cohort. We reviewed records of adult patients 18 years or older who were hospitalized at least 5 days across 38 acute care hospitals of the University Health System Consortium (UHC) and had a pressure injury as identified by Patient Safety Indicator #3 (PSI-03). All facilities are located in the United States. We collected longitudinal data pertaining to prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings purchased by hospital-quarter for 38 academic medical centers between 2010 and 2015. Longitudinal data on acute care, hospital-level patient outcomes (eg, admissions and PSI-03 and pressure injury rate) were queried through the UHC clinical database/resource manager from the Johns Hopkins Medicine portal. Data on volumes of dressings purchased per UHC hospital were merged with UHC data. Mixed-effects negative binomial regression was used to test the longitudinal association of prophylactic foam sacral dressings on pressure injury rates, adjusted for hospital case-mix and Medicare payments rules. Significant pressure injury rate reductions in US acute care hospitals between 2010 and 2015 were associated with the adoption of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings within a prevention protocol (-1.0 cases/quarter; P = .002) and changes to Medicare payment rules in 2014 (-1.13 cases/quarter; P = .035). Prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings are an effective component of a pressure injury prevention protocol. Hospitals adopting these technologies should expect good value for use of these products.

  15. Hopkins and Mastracchio in the A/L

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-20

    ISS038-E-019271 (20 Dec. 2013) --- In the Quest airlock onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, on the eve of their first spacewalk together, NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio, right, and Mike Hopkins are completely suited in their extravehicular mobility unit spacesuits. NASA has scheduled at least two sessions of extravehicular activity for the two flight engineers to troubleshoot a faulty coolant pump on the orbital outpost.

  16. Validation of Autoclave Protocols for Successful Decontamination of Category A Medical Waste Generated from Care of Patients with Serious Communicable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Mallory; Ernst, Neysa; Bova, Gregory; Nowakowski, Elaine; Bukowski, James; Ellis, Brandon C.; Smith, Chris; Sauer, Lauren; Dionne, Kim; Carroll, Karen C.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Parrish, Nicole M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014, many hospitals designated specific areas to care for patients with Ebola and other highly infectious diseases. The safe handling of category A infectious substances is a unique challenge in this environment. One solution is on-site waste treatment with a steam sterilizer or autoclave. The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) installed two pass-through autoclaves in its biocontainment unit (BCU). The JHH BCU and The Johns Hopkins biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) clinical microbiology laboratory designed and validated waste-handling protocols with simulated patient trash to ensure adequate sterilization. The results of the validation process revealed that autoclave factory default settings are potentially ineffective for certain types of medical waste and highlighted the critical role of waste packaging in successful sterilization. The lessons learned from the JHH validation process can inform the design of waste management protocols to ensure effective treatment of highly infectious medical waste. PMID:27927920

  17. Validation of Autoclave Protocols for Successful Decontamination of Category A Medical Waste Generated from Care of Patients with Serious Communicable Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; Reimers, Mallory; Ernst, Neysa; Bova, Gregory; Nowakowski, Elaine; Bukowski, James; Ellis, Brandon C; Smith, Chris; Sauer, Lauren; Dionne, Kim; Carroll, Karen C; Maragakis, Lisa L; Parrish, Nicole M

    2017-02-01

    In response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014, many hospitals designated specific areas to care for patients with Ebola and other highly infectious diseases. The safe handling of category A infectious substances is a unique challenge in this environment. One solution is on-site waste treatment with a steam sterilizer or autoclave. The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) installed two pass-through autoclaves in its biocontainment unit (BCU). The JHH BCU and The Johns Hopkins biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) clinical microbiology laboratory designed and validated waste-handling protocols with simulated patient trash to ensure adequate sterilization. The results of the validation process revealed that autoclave factory default settings are potentially ineffective for certain types of medical waste and highlighted the critical role of waste packaging in successful sterilization. The lessons learned from the JHH validation process can inform the design of waste management protocols to ensure effective treatment of highly infectious medical waste. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Harvey Cushing's Approaches to Tumors in His Early Career: From the Skull Base to the Cranial Vault

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Courtney; Raza, Shaan M.; Gallia, Gary L.; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we review Dr. Cushing's early surgical cases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, revealing details of his early operative approaches to tumors of the skull base and cranial vault. Following Institutional Review Board approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, we reviewed the Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical files from 1896 to 1912. Participants included four adult patients and one child who underwent surgical resection of bony tumors of the skull base and the cranial vault. The main outcome measures were operative approach and condition recorded at the time of discharge. The indications for surgery included unspecified malignant tumor of the basal meninges and temporal bone, basal cell carcinoma, osteoma of the posterior skull base, and osteomas of the frontal and parietofrontal cranial vault. While Cushing's experience with selected skull base pathology has been previously reported, the breadth of his contributions to operative approaches to the skull base has been neglected. PMID:22470271

  19. A History of the Development of the Navy Medical Department’s Workload Management System for Nursing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    efficient and rational methodology. Young, Giovannetti, Lewison , and Thomas (1981) offer the following comprehensive definition of a staffing methodology... Johns Hopkins Hospital. Connor used industrial engineering techniques, such as work sampling, time and motion studies, and continuous observation, to time...ADA 109883-ADA 109886). Young, J.P., Giovannetti, P., Lewison , D., & Thomas, M.L. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review

  20. Hopkins during SODI-DCMIX 2 Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-30

    ISS038-E-009255 (26 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, prepares to install and activate the Selectable Optics Diagnostic Instrument (SODI) cell array two in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for the Selectable Optics Diagnostic Instrument-Diffusion Coefficient in Mixtures 2 (SODI-DCMIX 2) experiment. SODI-DCMIX 2 is supporting research to determine diffusion coefficients in different petroleum field samples and refine petroleum reservoir models to help lead to more efficient extraction of oil resources.

  1. Hopkins during SODI-DCMIX 2 Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-30

    ISS038-E-009253 (26 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, prepares to install and activate the Selectable Optics Diagnostic Instrument (SODI) cell array two in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for the Selectable Optics Diagnostic Instrument-Diffusion Coefficient in Mixtures 2 (SODI-DCMIX 2) experiment. SODI-DCMIX 2 is supporting research to determine diffusion coefficients in different petroleum field samples and refine petroleum reservoir models to help lead to more efficient extraction of oil resources.

  2. El Niæo linked to increase in childhood diarrheal disease, a leading cause of premature death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    William Checkley recalled plotting into his computer the data for the number of hospital admissions and the time of year.When we did the analysis and started looking at the relative increase, thats when it hit us, said Checkley, a medical student at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland.

  3. Hopkins during SPHERES Slosh Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-22

    ISS038-E-033884 (22 Jan. 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, holds a plastic container partially filled with green-colored water which will be used in a new experiment using the soccer-ball-sized, free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, which are already on the station. For the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, two SPHERES robots are attached to opposite ends of a metal frame holding the plastic tank with the green-colored water. The new hardware for the SPHERES-Slosh study was delivered to the station aboard Orbital Sciences' Cygnus cargo craft on Jan. 12.

  4. Hopkins syndrome and phantom hernia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Elizabeth, K E; Guruprasad, C S; Sindhu, T G

    2011-06-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), other than paralytic poliomyelitis, are usually due to demyelination like Guillian Barre syndrome (GBS), transverse myelitis and traumatic neuritis. Poliomyelitis like illness, Hopkins syndrome or Post Asthmatic Amotrophy, associated with bronchial asthma and hyperIgEemia has been reported in literature. We present a two and a half year old child who developed AFP with phantom hernia following an episode of bronchial asthma.

  5. Power, Language, and Literacy in "The Great Gilly Hopkins"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Sue Ann

    2008-01-01

    To compensate for her feelings of anger and helplessness over her mother's abandonment and subsequent displacements, the foster child Gilly Hopkins seeks power and agency through the primary means at her disposal: through the use of language and fairy tales. She constructs a Cinderella fantasy of an idealized mother who will rescue her. She also…

  6. Aflatoxin: An Old Carcinogen Teaches Us New Tricks | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Speaker John D. Groopman, PhD Anna M. Baetjer Professor of Environmental Health Sciences Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Associate Director for Population Sciences Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Baltimore, MD |

  7. Characterizing Hospital Workers' Willingness to Respond to a Radiological Event

    PubMed Central

    Balicer, Ran D.; Catlett, Christina L.; Barnett, Daniel J.; Thompson, Carol B.; Hsu, Edbert B.; Morton, Melinda J.; Semon, Natalie L.; Watson, Christopher M.; Gwon, Howard S.; Links, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Terrorist use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD, or “dirty bomb”), which combines a conventional explosive device with radiological materials, is among the National Planning Scenarios of the United States government. Understanding employee willingness to respond is critical for planning experts. Previous research has demonstrated that perception of threat and efficacy is key in the assessing willingness to respond to a RDD event. Methods An anonymous online survey was used to evaluate the willingness of hospital employees to respond to a RDD event. Agreement with a series of belief statements was assessed, following a methodology validated in previous work. The survey was available online to all 18,612 employees of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from January to March 2009. Results Surveys were completed by 3426 employees (18.4%), whose demographic distribution was similar to overall hospital staff. 39% of hospital workers were not willing to respond to a RDD scenario if asked but not required to do so. Only 11% more were willing if required. Workers who were hesitant to agree to work additional hours when required were 20 times less likely to report during a RDD emergency. Respondents who perceived their peers as likely to report to work in a RDD emergency were 17 times more likely to respond during a RDD event if asked. Only 27.9% of the hospital employees with a perception of low efficacy declared willingness to respond to a severe RDD event. Perception of threat had little impact on willingness to respond among hospital workers. Conclusions Radiological scenarios such as RDDs are among the most dreaded emergency events yet studied. Several attitudinal indicators can help to identify hospital employees unlikely to respond. These risk-perception modifiers must then be addressed through training to enable effective hospital response to a RDD event. PMID:22046238

  8. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Hopkins, Draftsman of Hebbard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Hopkins, Draftsman of Hebbard and Gill, Architects October 21, 1904 BLUEPRINT OF ORIGINAL DRAWING OF FIRST FLOOR PLAN From the Collection of the San Diego Historical Society - George W. Marston House, 3525 Seventh Avenue, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  9. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Hopkins, Draftsman of Hebbard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Hopkins, Draftsman of Hebbard and Gill, Architects October 22, 1904 BLUEPRINT OF ORIGINAL DRAWING OF SECOND FLOOR PLAN From the Collection of the San Diego Historical Society - George W. Marston House, 3525 Seventh Avenue, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  10. Harvey Cushing, the spine surgeon: the surgical treatment of Pott disease.

    PubMed

    Bydon, Ali; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Pendleton, Courtney; McGirt, Matthew J; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-08-01

    Review of historical archival records. Describe Harvey Cushing's patients with spinal pathology. Harvey Cushing was a pioneer of modern surgery but his work on spine remains largely unknown. Review of the Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. This is the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, including those with Pott disease, have been described.Cushing treated three young men with psoas abscesses secondary to Pott disease during his residency: he drained the abscesses, debrided any accompanying necrotic vertebral bodies, irrigated the cavity with salt, and left the incision open to close by secondary intention. Although Cushing used Koch's "tuberculin therapy" (of intravenous administration of isolated tubercular bacilli) in one patient, he did not do so in the other two, likely because of the poor response of this first patient. Later in his tenure, Cushing performed a laminectomy on a patient with kyphosis and paraplegia secondary to Pott disease. These cases provide a view of Cushing early in his career, pointing to the extraordinary degree of independence that he had during his residency under William Steward Halsted; these cases may have been important in the surgical upbringing both of Cushing and his coresident, William Stevenson Baer, who became the first professor of Orthopedics at Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the turn of the last century, Pott disease was primarily treated by immobilization with bed rest, braces, and plaster-of-paris jackets; some surgeons also employed gradual correction of the deformity by hyperextension. Patients who failed a trial of conservative therapy (of months to years) were treated with a laminectomy. However, the limitations of these strategies led to the development of techniques that form the basis of contemporary spine surgery-instrumentation and fusion.

  11. Harvey Cushing, the Spine Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Ali; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Pendleton, Courtney; McGirt, Matthew J.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Review of historical archival records. Objective Describe Harvey Cushing's patients with spinal pathology. Summary of Background Data Harvey Cushing was a pioneer of modern surgery but his work on spine remains largely unknown. Methods Review of the Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. Results This is the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, including those with Pott disease, have been described. Cushing treated three young men with psoas abscesses secondary to Pott disease during his residency: he drained the abscesses, debrided any accompanying necrotic vertebral bodies, irrigated the cavity with salt, and left the incision open to close by secondary intention. Although Cushing used Koch's “tuberculin therapy” (of intravenous administration of isolated tubercular bacilli) in one patient, he did not do so in the other two, likely because of the poor response of this first patient. Later in his tenure, Cushing performed a laminectomy on a patient with kyphosis and paraplegia secondary to Pott disease. Conclusion These cases provide a view of Cushing early in his career, pointing to the extraordinary degree of independence that he had during his residency under William Steward Halsted; these cases may have been important in the surgical upbringing both of Cushing and his coresident, William Stevenson Baer, who became the first professor of Orthopedics at Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the turn of the last century, Pott disease was primarily treated by immobilization with bed rest, braces, and plaster-of-paris jackets; some surgeons also employed gradual correction of the deformity by hyperextension. Patients who failed a trial of conservative therapy (of months to years) were treated with a laminectomy. However, the limitations of these strategies led to the development of techniques that form the basis of contemporary spine surgery—instrumentation and fusion. PMID

  12. Hopkins works with the Vaccine-21 GAP

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-15

    ISS038-E-031400 (14 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, accesses the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus-2 (CGBA-2) while working with the Vaccine-21 Group Activation Pack (GAP) experiment in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. This experiment also referred to as Antibiotic Effectiveness in Space-1 (AES-1) tests the hypothesis that antibiotics used to treat bacterial grown in space will exhibit reduced efficacy and will be associated with specific changes in bacterial gene expression that correlate with cell survival.

  13. Proceedings of the High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) Contractors’ Conference Held 1-3 June 1997 in Chantilly, VA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    David R. Yarkony, Johns Hopkins University 3:00 - 3:30 Break 3:30 - 4:00 Calorimetric Measurements of O Atom Recombination Dr. Peter Taborek and...University Stillwater, OK 74078 405-744-5174 405-744-6007 dlt@osuunx.ucc.okstate.edu Dr. David R. Yarkony Dept. of Chemistry Johns Hopkins...Chemistry Johns Hopkins University 3400 N. Charles St., Remsen Baltimore, MD 21218 410-516-4669 410-516-8420 yangxin@jhunix.hcf.jhu.edu Prof. David

  14. A meteorological report for the Mt. Hopkins Observatory: 1968-1971. [Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Hogan, D.; Goodwin, K.; Kurtenbach, D.

    1972-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the weather data collected at the Mt. Hopkins Observatory in southern Arizona from 1968 to 1971. It is the second meteorological report aimed at assisting scientists in the scheduling of experiments at the Observatory site.

  15. International surgical telementoring: our initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, B R; Caddedu, J A; Janetschek, G; Schulam, P; Docimo, S G; Moore, R G; Partin, A W; Kavoussi, L R

    1998-01-01

    Telesurgical laparoscopic telementoring has successfully been implemented between the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 27 prior operations. In this previously reported series, telerobotic mentoring was achieved between two institutions 3.5 miles away. We report our experience in performing two international surgical telementoring operations. To determine the clinical utility of international surgical telementoring during laparoscopic surgical procedures. A laparoscopic adrenalectomy was telementored between Innsbruck, Austria (5,083 miles) and Baltimore, MD. As well, a laparoscopic varicocelectomy was telementored between Bangkok, Thailand and Baltimore, MD (10,880 miles) both over three ISDN lines (384 kbps) with an approximate 1 sec delay. Both procedures were successfully accomplished with an uneventful postoperative course. International telementoring is a viable method of instructing less experienced laparoscopic surgeons through potentially complex laparoscopic procedures, as well as potentially improving patient access to specialty care.

  16. An Evaluative Study of the Navy Medical Department’s Patient Classification System and Staffing Allocation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    the greatest impact on the modern patient classification system were conducted by R.J. Connor in the late 50’s and early 60’s at Johns *Hopkins...Administration 10 (December 1980): 25-31. Bartko, John J., and Carpenter, W.T. "On the Method and Theory of Reliability." The Journal of Nervous and Mental...Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and A Critique of the Literature by J. Young.- P. Giovannetti, D. Lewison , and M.L. Thomas. DHEW Publication

  17. Business planning. Reasons, definitions, and elements.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Michael A; Shaver, Mark; Werthman, Ronald

    2004-04-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System has developed a centralized business planning structure that provides for creativity while incorporating a system of checks and balances. Combining standardization with flexibility allows for customization and variability. Using a team approach, the organization allows key players to contribute their experience and expertise to the planning for each new project.

  18. Phoretic symbionts of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins)

    Treesearch

    Javier E. Mercado; Richard W. Hofstetter; Danielle M. Reboletti; Jose F. Negron

    2014-01-01

    During its life cycle, the tree-killing mountain pine beetle Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins interacts with phoretic organisms such as mites, nematodes, fungi, and bacteria. The types of associations these organisms establish with the mountain pine beetle (MPB) vary from mutualistic to antagonistic. The most studied of these interactions are those between beetle and...

  19. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  20. Books, children, dogs, artists: library programs for the entire family.

    PubMed

    Haver, Mary Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The promotion of library resources and services is a continuous process for all libraries, especially hospital family resource center libraries. Like public libraries, a family resource center can utilize programs as a pathway for connecting with and developing awareness of library resources and services available to patient families. This column describes the programs currently offered for All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine patient families, marketing initiatives to promote these programs, and utilization of grant funding to supplement a program.

  1. Mode and Intermediate Waters in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanadesikan, Anand; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    This report describes work done as part of a joint Princeton-Johns Hopkins project to look at the impact of mode and intermediate waters in Earth System Models. The Johns Hopkins portion of this work focussed on the role of lateral mixing in ventilating such waters, with important implications for hypoxia, the uptake of anthropogenic carbon, the dynamics of El Nino and carbon pumps. The Johns Hopkins group also collaborated with the Princeton Group to help develop a watermass diagnostics framework.

  2. "Can't walk nor raise arms to head": Harvey Cushing's surgical treatment of poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Dorsi, Michael J; Belzberg, Allan J; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2012-02-15

    This study was a retrospective chart review for patients undergoing operative treatment by Dr. Harvey Cushing at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1896 and 1912. To illustrate the early use of peripheral nerve anastomoses for the treatment of postpoliomyelitis paralysis. At the turn of the 20th century, poliomyelitis was recognized as a disease of neurons; neurological surgeons sought to find a surgical cure for the paralysis occurring after the disease onset. Peripheral nerve anastomoses were an attractive option employed during this time. Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the surgical records of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912 were reviewed. A single case of peripheral nerve anastomosis for the treatment of postpoliomyelitis paralysis was selected for further analysis. Cushing performed a multiple peripheral nerve anastomoses in a 3-year-old girl. Although the patient experienced no postoperative complications, there was no improvement in her function at the time of discharge from the hospital, and no long-term follow-up was available. While unsuccessful, Cushing's use of peripheral nerve anastomoses to restore motor function in the pediatric patient described here demonstrates his commitment to pushing the boundaries of neurological surgery at the turn of the 20th century.

  3. John Hughlings-Jackson: a sesquicentennial tribute.

    PubMed

    Swash, M

    1986-09-01

    One hundred and fifty years have elapsed since the birth of John Hughlings-Jackson, a pivotal figure in the development of clinical neuroscience. In this review the origin of Jackson's postulate of a hierarchical organisation of function in the nervous system is described in the context of his education and his contacts with contemporaries, both in his clinical practice at The London Hospital and at the National Hospital, Queen Square, and in relation to the evolutionary approach to the organisation and ideas on biology and society set out by the philosopher Herbert Spencer.

  4. Age and Sex Differences in Rates of Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Ling; Yang, Lin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chan, King-Pan; Cao, Pei-Hua; Lau, Eric Ho-Yin; Peiris, J S Malik; Wong, Chit-Ming

    2015-08-15

    Few studies have explored age and sex differences in the disease burden of influenza, although men and women probably differ in their susceptibility to influenza infections. In this study, quasi-Poisson regression models were applied to weekly age- and sex-specific hospitalization numbers of pneumonia and influenza cases in the Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China, from 2004 to 2010. Age and sex differences were assessed by age- and sex-specific rates of excess hospitalization for influenza A subtypes A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza B, respectively. We found that, in children younger than 18 years, boys had a higher excess hospitalization rate than girls, with the male-to-female ratio of excess rate (MFR) ranging from 1.1 to 2.4. MFRs of hospitalization associated with different types/subtypes were less than 1.0 for adults younger than 40 years except for A(H3N2) (MFR = 1.6), while all the MFRs were equal to or higher than 1.0 in adults aged 40 years or more except for A(H1N1)pdm09 in elderly persons aged 65 years or more (MFR = 0.9). No MFR was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) for hospitalizations associated with influenza type/subtype. There is some limited evidence on age and sex differences in hospitalization associated with influenza in the subtropical city of Hong Kong. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The Impact of Pharmaceutical Expenses and the Use of Flexible Budgets at The Johns Hopkins Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    Newborns & Other Neonates, “Blood, Blood Forming Organs, & Immulogical”, Myeloproliferative Diseases & Poorly Diff Neoplasm , Infectious & Parasitic Diseases...1,716.1) Endocrine, Nutritional, & Metabolic (n=412) 3.2 2.2 38 268 (1,807.7) 81.4 2,140 (5,366.3) Myeloproliferative Diseases & Poorly Diff Neoplasm (n...pharmaceutical expenditures were for drugs utilized in six of the twenty-five MDG’s, Myeloproliferative Diseases at 18.5%, Circulatory System at 14.7

  6. Whipple Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center For Patients & Family Cancer Clinic Cyst Clinic NFPTR Medical Professionals Donate Blog Expand All Collapse All Johns Hopkins & You Our Pledge to You Choosing Johns Hopkins Importance of Experienced Surgeon Our Multidisciplinary Approach Meet Our ...

  7. Quieting Weinberg 5C: a case study in hospital noise control.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Mark; Dunn, Jeffrey; Busch-Vishniac, Ilene J; West, James E; Reedy, Anita

    2007-06-01

    Weinberg 5C of Johns Hopkins Hospital is a very noisy hematological cancer unit in a relatively new building of a large medical campus. Because of the requirements for dealing with immuno-suppressed patients, options for introducing sound absorbing materials are limited. In this article, a case study of noise control in a hospital, the sound environment in the unit before treatment is described, the chosen noise control approach of adding custom-made sound absorbing panels is presented, and the impact of the noise control installation is discussed. The treatment of Weinberg 5C involved creating sound absorbing panels of 2-in.-thick fiberglass wrapped in an anti-bacterial fabric. Wallpaper paste was used to hold the fabric to the backing of the fiberglass. Installation of these panels on the ceiling and high on corridor walls had a dramatic effect. The noise on the unit (as measured by the equivalent sound pressure level) was immediately reduced by 5 dB(A) and the reverberation time dropped by a factor of over 2. Further, this drop in background noise and reverberation time understates the dramatic impact of the change. Surveys of staff and patients before and after the treatment indicated a change from viewing the unit as very noisy to a view of the unit as relatively quiet.

  8. Response of Dendroctonus mexicanus (Hopkins) to two optical isomers of verbenone

    Treesearch

    Vicente Diaz-Nunez; Guillermo Sanchez-Martinez; Nancy E. Gillette

    2006-01-01

    Given the need for diminishing the use of pesticides in natural environments, in this research we investigated the efficacy of two optical isomers of verbenone (4, 6, 6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1] hepto-3-en-e-1) as controls of the attack of Dendroctonus mexicanus (Hopkins) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).Two experiments were established in the...

  9. Data Management Consulting at the Johns Hopkins University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varvel, Virgil E., Jr.; Shen, Yi

    2013-01-01

    As research data complexity and quantity grows and funding agency requirements for data management are articulated, there is a growing need for data management services (DMS). Within these services, one important role emerging is that of data management consultant (DMC). Roles were analyzed that these professionals play through case study analysis…

  10. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    and significance will be determined by a p-value less than 0.05. All analyses will be conducted using SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary , NC...prostate cancer. · Each participant will receive a call from a trained interviewer who will ask questions about his health, health care, diet

  11. Pneumonia Hospitalization Risk in the Elderly Attributable to Cold and Hot Temperatures in Hong Kong, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hong; Sun, Shengzhi; Tang, Robert; Chan, King-Pan; Tian, Linwei

    2016-10-15

    The growth of pathogens potentially relevant to respiratory tract infection may be triggered by changes in ambient temperature. Few studies have examined the association between ambient temperature and pneumonia incidence, and no studies have focused on the susceptible elderly population. We aimed to examine the short-term association between ambient temperature and geriatric pneumonia and to assess the disease burden attributable to cold and hot temperatures in Hong Kong, China. Daily time-series data on emergency hospital admissions for geriatric pneumonia, mean temperature, relative humidity, and air pollution concentrations between January 2005 and December 2012 were collected. Distributed-lag nonlinear modeling integrated in quasi-Poisson regression was used to examine the exposure-lag-response relationship between temperature and pneumonia hospitalization. Measures of the risk attributable to nonoptimal temperature were calculated to summarize the disease burden. Subgroup analyses were conducted to examine the sex difference. We observed significant nonlinear and delayed associations of both cold and hot temperatures with pneumonia in the elderly, with cold temperatures having stronger effect estimates. Among the 10.7% of temperature-related pneumonia hospitalizations, 8.7% and 2.0% were attributed to cold and hot temperatures, respectively. Most of the temperature-related burden for pneumonia hospitalizations in Hong Kong was attributable to cold temperatures, and elderly men had greater susceptibility. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. 75 FR 62407 - Office of Administration; Single-Source Cooperative Agreement Award; Announcing the Award a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Agreement to the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Lab (APL) and School of Public Health, To Support... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Office of... a single-source cooperative agreement to the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), Applied Physics Lab...

  13. 77 FR 68831 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ..., Inc., Rolls-Royce Corporation, Black & Decker (U.S.) Inc., Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, LLC, and Winter's Performance Products as defendants. The complaint... payment to: Consent Decree Library, U.S. DOJ--ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044-7611. Please...

  14. A Revised STONEMAN for Distributed Ada (Trademark) Support Environments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    MA 02154 San Diego, CA 92152 Chuck Waltrip Philip Myers Johns Hopkins University Dave Pasterchik Applied Physics Lab NRVELEX Johns Hopkins Road FLEX...Georgia Tech Atlanta, GA 30332 Reed Kotler Lockheed Missiles & Space Dick Drake 1111 Lockheed Way IBM Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Federal Systems Division 102/075

  15. “Can't Walk Nor Raise Arms to Head”

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Courtney; Dorsi, Michael J.; Belzberg, Allan J.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design This study was a retrospective chart review for patients undergoing operative treatment by Dr. Harvey Cushing at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1896 and 1912. Objective To illustrate the early use of peripheral nerve anastomoses for the treatment of postpoliomyelitis paralysis. Summary of Background Data At the turn of the 20th century, poliomyelitis was recognized as a disease of neurons; neurological surgeons sought to find a surgical cure for the paralysis occurring after the disease onset. Peripheral nerve anastomoses were an attractive option employed during this time. Methods Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the surgical records of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912 were reviewed. A single case of peripheral nerve anastomosis for the treatment of postpoliomyelitis paralysis was selected for further analysis. Results Cushing performed a multiple peripheral nerve anastomoses in a 3-year-old girl. Although the patient experienced no postoperative complications, there was no improvement in her function at the time of discharge from the hospital, and no long-term follow-up was available. Conclusion While unsuccessful, Cushing's use of peripheral nerve anastomoses to restore motor function in the pediatric patient described here demonstrates his commitment to pushing the boundaries of neurological surgery at the turn of the 20th century. PMID:21301395

  16. Toward a Common Language for Measuring Patient Mobility in the Hospital: Reliability and Construct Validity of Interprofessional Mobility Measures.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Erik H; Young, Daniel L; Klein, Lisa M; Kreif, Julie; Shumock, Kara; Hiser, Stephanie; Friedman, Michael; Lavezza, Annette; Jette, Alan; Chan, Kitty S; Needham, Dale M

    2018-02-01

    The lack of common language among interprofessional inpatient clinical teams is an important barrier to achieving inpatient mobilization. In The Johns Hopkins Hospital, the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) Inpatient Mobility Short Form (IMSF), also called "6-Clicks," and the Johns Hopkins Highest Level of Mobility (JH-HLM) are part of routine clinical practice. The measurement characteristics of these tools when used by both nurses and physical therapists for interprofessional communication or assessment are unknown. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the reliability and minimal detectable change of AM-PAC IMSF and JH-HLM when completed by nurses and physical therapists and to evaluate the construct validity of both measures when used by nurses. A prospective evaluation of a convenience sample was used. The test-retest reliability and the interrater reliability of AM-PAC IMSF and JH-HLM for inpatients in the neuroscience department (n = 118) of an academic medical center were evaluated. Each participant was independently scored twice by a team of 2 nurses and 1 physical therapist; a total of 4 physical therapists and 8 nurses participated in reliability testing. In a separate inpatient study protocol (n = 69), construct validity was evaluated via an assessment of convergent validity with other measures of function (grip strength, Katz Activities of Daily Living Scale, 2-minute walk test, 5-times sit-to-stand test) used by 5 nurses. The test-retest reliability values (intraclass correlation coefficients) for physical therapists and nurses were 0.91 and 0.97, respectively, for AM-PAC IMSF and 0.94 and 0.95, respectively, for JH-HLM. The interrater reliability values (intraclass correlation coefficients) between physical therapists and nurses were 0.96 for AM-PAC IMSF and 0.99 for JH-HLM. Construct validity (Spearman correlations) ranged from 0.25 between JH-HLM and right-hand grip strength to 0.80 between AM-PAC IMSF and the Katz Activities of

  17. Taking Flight Internationally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how Dr. Ben Vinson III, the new director of the Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University and a specialist in Latin American history, is strengthening the center's internationalist orientation. While it took more than three decades for Johns Hopkins University to approve a Black studies program in its arts and…

  18. Hopkins works with the MDCA inside the CIR in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-12

    ISS038-E-001298 (12 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with the Multi-user Drop Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) inside the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. The MDCA contains hardware and software to conduct unique droplet combustion experiments in space.

  19. Risk factors for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in critically ill children following cardiothoracic surgery or therapeutic cardiac catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Atchison, Christie M; Amankwah, Ernest; Wilhelm, Jean; Arlikar, Shilpa; Branchford, Brian R; Stock, Arabela; Streiff, Michael; Takemoto, Clifford; Ayala, Irmel; Everett, Allen; Stapleton, Gary; Jacobs, Marshall L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Goldenberg, Neil A

    2018-02-01

    Paediatric hospital-associated venous thromboembolism is a leading quality and safety concern at children's hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in critically ill children following cardiothoracic surgery or therapeutic cardiac catheterisation. We conducted a retrospective, case-control study of children admitted to the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital (St. Petersburg, Florida, United States of America) from 2006 to 2013. Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism cases were identified based on ICD-9 discharge codes and validated using radiological record review. We randomly selected two contemporaneous cardiovascular intensive care unit controls without hospital-associated venous thromboembolism for each hospital-associated venous thromboembolism case, and limited the study population to patients who had undergone cardiothoracic surgery or therapeutic cardiac catheterisation. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between putative risk factors and hospital-associated venous thromboembolism were determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 2718 admissions to the cardiovascular intensive care unit during the study period, 65 met the criteria for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism (occurrence rate, 2%). Restriction to cases and controls having undergone the procedures of interest yielded a final study population of 57 hospital-associated venous thromboembolism cases and 76 controls. In a multiple logistic regression model, major infection (odds ratio=5.77, 95% confidence interval=1.06-31.4), age ⩽1 year (odds ratio=6.75, 95% confidence interval=1.13-160), and central venous catheterisation (odds ratio=7.36, 95% confidence interval=1.13-47.8) were found to be statistically significant independent risk factors for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in these children. Patients with all three

  20. Web Connects K-12 Students with Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that Derek Cummings and Justin Lessler, Johns Hopkins University epidemiologists, have come to the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) to give a live webinar on the spread of swine flu. This web-based audio and video presentation is one of many efforts by universities and science organizations to put K-12 students in…

  1. Welfare effects of reduced milk production associated with Johne's disease on Johne's-positive versus Johne's-negative dairy operations.

    PubMed

    Losinger, Willard C

    2006-08-01

    An examination of the economic impacts of reduced milk production associated with Johne's disease on Johne's-positive and Johne's-negative dairy operations indicated that, if Johne's disease had not existed in US dairy cows in 1996, then the economic surplus of Johne's-negative operations would have been $600 million+/-$530 million lower, while the economic surplus of Johne's-positive operations would have been higher by $28 million+/-$79 million, which was not significantly different from zero. The data available for projecting changes in surplus were not sufficiently precise to allow an exact statement on whether Johne's-positive operations would have been better or worse off economically, in terms of the value received for producing more milk if they had not been affected by Johne's disease. The changes in producer surplus, based upon eliminating specific epidemiological risk factors for Johne's disease, were disaggregated between Johne's-positive dairy operations exposed to the risk factor and all other US dairy operations. Eliminating the risk factor of having any cows not born on the operation would have had a significant positive effect on the economic surplus of Johne's-positive operations that had any cows not born on the operation.

  2. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    journals appeared under the banner of his own publishing house, Astral Press, until 2005 when JAH2 was transferred to the Centre of Astronomy at James Cook University. When cancer was first diagnosed, this did not deter John, and he continued to pursue his astronomical and editorial interests. Early in 2005 the cancer was in remission and John decided to make one final overseas trip, a long-anticipated visit to St. Petersburg. It was while he was returning to Australia that the illness aggressively reappeared, and he was taken off the airplane at Dubai and died peacefully in Rashid Hospital three days later. He was just three days short of his seventy-ninth birthday. Always the consummate gentleman, John Perdrix had a keen sense of humor and was wonderful company. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Our condolences go to his six children, Louise, John, Timothy, Fleur, Lisa and Angella.

  3. Telesurgical laparoscopic cholecystectomy between two countries.

    PubMed

    Cheah, W K; Lee, B; Lenzi, J E; Goh, P M

    2000-11-01

    Telesurgery is a form of operative videoconferencing in which a remotely located surgeon observes a procedure through a camera and provides visual and auditory feedback to the operative site. With the use of more robotic devices in laparoscopic surgery, various forms of telesurgery have been tried. We describe the first two international telesurgical, telementored, robot-assisted laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed in the world, between the Johns Hopkins Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, and the National University Hospital, Singapore.

  4. Hospital accounting and information systems: a critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, N B

    1991-01-01

    Public sector organisations seem to be caught up in the global wave of 'neo-Thatcherism'. As such, they are being held 'accountable' today by their respective government finance departments for the costs and benefits of the services they provide to the general public. As the public purse tightens, hospitals (and related health service units) more and more compete with other public sector organisations (old-age pensions and services, post-secondary education, day-care centres, port authorities, unemployment insurance, parks and recreation, elite sport programs, aboriginal peoples aid and development, and so on) for a diminishing piece of what seems a smaller and smaller pie. In this 'fight-for-funding', hospitals seem particularly vulnerable. Sky-rocketing costs, public resentment of doctors' high income and a deliberate restriction and limiting of medical school places, among other things, contribute to general public antagonism. The message for hospitals is that cost-effective accountability will loom large when hospitals come begging at the public trough. Even left-wing politicians today seem to be heeding the words of free-market economists like Freedman of Chicago. 'Privatisation' is the constant threat for those deemed inefficient. As a consequence, hospital administrators around the world, caught up in this trend, seem to be stampeding to 'boot-up' some kind of new accounting information system. For example, at my own university hospital (Queen's University, Kingston, Canada), the hospital administrators are in the process of introducing a version of the Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, Maryland) case-mix-loading cost-accumulation system. In other parts of the world they are known by other fancy names such as 'patient-costing', 'diagnosis-related-groups' (or DRGs). Trendy accounting systems seem to be the order of the day, a sort of panacea for the current plague of problems hospitals face. As the new systems become operational, however, traditional

  5. The UCD/FLWO extensive air shower array at Mt. Hopkins Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillanders, G. H.; Fegan, D. J.; McKeown, P. K.; Weekes, T. C.

    The design and operation of an extensive air shower (EAS) array being installed around the 10-m optical Cerenkov reflector at F.L. Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy are described. The advantages of an EAS array colocated with a Cerenkov facility at a mountain location are reviewed; the arrangement of the 13 1-sq m scintillation detectors in the array is indicated; the signal-processing and data-acquisition procedures are explained; and preliminary calibration data indicating an effective energy threshold of 60 TeV are presented.

  6. David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel.

    PubMed

    Hubel, David; Wiesel, Torsten

    2012-07-26

    While attending medical school at McGill, David Hubel developed an interest in the nervous system during the summers he spent at the Montreal Neurological Institute. After heading to the United States in 1954 for a Neurology year at Johns Hopkins, he was drafted by the army and was assigned to the Neuropsychiatry Division at the Walter Reed Hospital, where he began his career in research and did his first recordings from the visual cortex of sleeping and awake cats. In 1958, he moved to the lab of Stephen Kuffler at Johns Hopkins, where he began a long and fruitful collaboration with Torsten Wiesel. Born in Sweden, Torsten Wiesel began his scientific career at the Karolinska Institute, where he received his medical degree in 1954. After spending a year in Carl Gustaf Bernhard's laboratory doing basic neurophysiological research, he moved to the United States to be a postdoctoral fellow with Stephen Kuffler. It was at Johns Hopkins where he met David Hubel in 1958, and they began working together on exploring the receptive field properties of neurons in the visual cortex. Their collaboration continued until the late seventies. Hubel and Wiesel's work provided fundamental insight into information processing in the visual system and laid the foundation for the field of visual neuroscience. They have had many achievements, including--but not limited to--the discovery of orientation selectivity in visual cortex neurons and the characterization of the columnar organization of visual cortex through their discovery of orientation columns and ocular-dominance columns. Their work earned them the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1981, which they shared with Roger Sperry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Television microscopy for education and consultation in pathology via coaxial cable, laser beam, and COMSAT satellite.

    PubMed

    Frost, J K

    1979-11-01

    In this article, the author describes how the closed circuit TV microscopy system used at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions facilitates discussion and diagnosis in consultation and promotes continuing education in, and out, of the institutions. The research, development, implementation, and use of this system at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions is supported in part by a grant from The William Penn Foundation and NCI contract NIH-NO1-CB-92172.

  8. Photochemical Ignition Studies. I. Laser Ignition of Flowing Premixed Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Combustion," Army Science Conference, West Point, 1984. 1 ? -A.W. Miziolek, R.C. Sausa, and A.J. Alfano , "Efficient Detection of Carbon Atoms Produced...Science Conference, West Point, 1984. 12. A.W. Miziolek, R.C. Sausa, and A.J. Alfano , "Efficient Detection of Carbon Atoms Produced by Argon...61801 Johns Hopkins University/APL Chemical Propulsion Information Agency ATTN: T.W. Christian Johns Hopkins Road Laurel, MD 20707

  9. Breast Cancer Epidemiology in Puerto Rico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    cancer epidemiology. Dr. Rosario took a course on Social Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Baltimore, MD. June 29 to...July 3, 2009. This course offered an overview of conceptual and methodological approaches relevant to the study of the impact of social factors on...conference call. 2. Training: a. Courses: i. Attended a course on Social Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

  10. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    approved by the Curriculum Committee of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and is approved for 6 hours of academic ...approved by the Curriculum Committee of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and is approved for 6 hours of academic credit...Impact of Session These workshops are designed to explain the guidelines for academic promotion and tenure review. Expectations, criteria and tools to

  11. Reconfiguration of acute care hospitals in post-socialist Serbia: spatial distribution of hospital beds.

    PubMed

    Matejic, Marko

    2017-04-01

    In the context of healthcare reforms in post-socialist Serbia, this research analyses the reconfiguration of acute care hospitals from the aspect of the spatial distribution of hospital beds among and within state-owned hospitals. The research builds a relationship between the macro or national level and the micro or hospital level of the spatial distribution of hospital beds. The aim of the study is to point out that a high level of efficiency in hospital functionality is difficult to achieve within the current hospital network and architectural-urban patterns of hospitals, and to draw attention to the necessity of a strategically planned hospital spatial reconfiguration, conducted simultaneously with other segments of the healthcare system reform. The research analyses published and unpublished data presented in tables and diagrams. The theoretical platform of the research covers earlier discussions of the Yugoslav healthcare system, its post-socialist reforms and the experiences of developed countries. The results show that the hospital bed distribution has not undergone significant changes, while the hospital spatial reconfiguration has either not been carried out at all or, if it has, only on a small scale. All this has contributed to overall inadequate, inflexible, inefficient, defragmented and unequal bed distribution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of the summit of Mt. Hopkins for the MMT Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, S.

    2010-07-01

    Over the past three decades, the staff of the MMT observatory used a variety of techniques to predict the summit wind characteristics including wind tunnel modeling and the release of smoke bombs. With the planned addition of a new instrument repair facility to be constructed on the summit of Mt. Hopkins, new computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models were made to determine the building's influence on the thermal environment around the telescope. The models compared the wind profiles and density contours above the telescope enclosure with and without the new building. The results show the steeply-sided Mount Hopkins dominates the summit wind profiles. In typical winds, the height of the telescope remains above the ground layer and is sufficiently separated from the new facility to insure the heat from the new building does not interfere with the telescope. The results also confirmed the observatories waste heat exhaust duct location needs to be relocated to prevent heat from being trapped in the wind shadow of the new building and lofting above the telescope. These useful models provide many insights into understanding the thermal environment of the summit.

  13. Co-occurrence of Pacific sleeper sharks Somniosus pacificus and harbor seals Phoca vitulina in Glacier Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taggart, S. James; Andrews, A.G.; Mondragon, Jennifer; Mathews, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    We present evidence that Pacific sleeper sharks Somniosus pacificus co-occur with harbor seals Phoca vitulina in Glacier Bay, Alaska, and that these sharks scavenge or prey on marine mammals. In 2002, 415 stations were fished throughout Glacier Bay on a systematic sampling grid. Pacific sleeper sharks were caught at 3 of the 415 stations, and at one station a Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis was caught with a fresh bite, identified as the bite of a sleeper shark. All 3 sharks and the shark-bitten halibut were caught at stations near the mouth of Johns Hopkins Inlet, a glacial fjord with the highest concentration of seals in Glacier Bay. Using a bootstrap technique, we estimated the probability of sampling the sharks (and the shark-bitten halibut) in the vicinity of Johns Hopkins Inlet. If sharks were randomly distributed in Glacier Bay, the probability of sampling all 4 pots at the mouth of Johns Hopkins Inlet was very low (P = 0.00002). The highly non-random distribution of the sleeper sharks located near the largest harbor seal pupping and breeding colony in Glacier Bay suggests that these 2 species co-occur and may interact ecologically in or near Johns Hopkins Inlet.

  14. Osler usque ad mare: the SS William Osler

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, C S; Fransiszyn, M

    1999-01-01

    William Osler's connections with the sea included a strong family history of seafaring, his own transatlantic crossings (of which there were at least 32) and the occasional use of nautical imagery in his inspirational writings. An unusual Oslerian connection with the sea emerged after his death in the form of a World War II Liberty ship. Through the SS William Osler and its sister ships, Osler was symbolically reunited with colleagues associated with the early days of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The William Osler circumnavigated the globe in 1943 without engaging the enemy. She was then converted into an army hospital ship and renamed the USHS Wisteria. PMID:10530306

  15. Photochemical Ignition Studies. 3. Ignition by Efficient and Resonant Multiphoton Photochemical Formation of Microplasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Fragments," Chem. Phys., Vol. 33, p. 161, 1978. 5. R.C. Sausa, A.J. Alfano , and A.W. Miziolek, "ArF Laser Photoproduction and Sensitive Detection of Carbon...Unlversity/APL Chemical Propulsion I Purdue University Information Agency Department of Chomistry ATTN: TW. Christian ATTN: H. Grant Johns Hopkins...of Chemistry ATTN: T.W. Christian ATTN: E. Grant Johns Hopkins Road West Lafayette, IN 47906 Laurel, MD 20707 2 Purdue University University of

  16. The Israeli Nuclear Alert of 1973: Deterrence and Signaling in Crisis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    limiting war, see Shlomo Aronson, Conflict and Bargaining in the Middle East (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1978), 178-9; Shlomo Aronson...Ismail Fahmy, Negotiating for Peace in the Middle East (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983), 24-7. Indeed, Evron points out that...attaché. Yair Evron offered a similar report in Israel’s Nuclear Dilemma, 72. 50. See, for instance, Walter Boyne , The Two O’Clock War: The 1973 Yom

  17. Validation of a Tibetan Translation of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lhewa, Dechen; Banu, Sophia; Rosenfeld, Barry; Keller, Allen

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to translate and validate the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL) and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) in a Tibetan population. Translated questionnaires were administered to 57 Tibetan survivors of torture/human rights abuses living in the United States and receiving services in a torture treatment program. Participants…

  18. John Twysden and John Palmer: 17th-century Northamptonshire astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    John Twysden (1607-1688) and John Palmer (1612-1679) were two astronomers in the circle of Samuel Foster (circa 1600-1652), the subject of a recent paper in this journal. John Twysden qualified in law and medicine and led a peripatetic life around England and Europe. John Palmer was Rector of Ecton, Northamptonshire and later Archdeacon of Northampton. The two astronomers catalogued observations made from Northamptonshire from the 1640s to the 1670s. In their later years Twysden and Palmer published works on a variety of topics, often astronomical. Palmer engaged in correspondence with Henry Oldenburg, the first secretary of the Royal Society, on topics in astronomy and mathematics.

  19. Cases from the Osler Medical Service at Johns Hopkins University.

    PubMed

    Blank, Susan; Le, Dung; Hemnes, Anna

    2004-07-01

    PRESENTING FEATURES: An 18-year-old white man was admitted to the Osler Medical Service with the chief complaint of back pain. Two weeks prior to admission, the patient developed diffuse and aching upper back pain. Over the next couple of days, he also developed severe anterior chest pain that was somewhat pleuritic in nature but diffuse and extending bilaterally into the shoulders. One week prior to admission, he developed intermittent fevers and night sweats. The patient denied any lymphadenopathy, pharyngitis, sick contacts, shortness of breath, rash, or bleeding. He was seen by a physician and told that he had thrombocytopenia. There was no history of recent or remote unusual bleeding episodes. His medical history was unremarkable except for a childhood diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. He was not taking any medications and had no history of tobacco, alcohol, or illicit drug use. He had no risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Physical examination showed that he was afebrile and had normal vital signs. He was a well-appearing man who was lying still because of pain. HEENT examination was unremarkable. There was no pharyngeal erythema or exudates. His lungs were clear. His neck was supple and without lymphadenopathy. Examination of his back and chest revealed no focal tenderness. There was no hepatosplenomegaly, and his skin was without petechiae or rashes. Examination of the patient's joints showed pain on passive and active movement of his shoulders bilaterally, but no frank arthritis. There was no rash, petechiae, or echymoses. Chest radiograph and electrocardiogram were unremarkable. On admission, the laboratory examination was notable for a hematocrit level of 32.5%, with a mean corpuscular volume of 79 fL, and white blood cell count of 2.8 x 10(3)/microL. Platelet count was 75 x 10(3)/microL. A white blood cell differential revealed 7% bands, 53% polys, 34% lymphs, 5% atypical lymphocytes, 2% nucleated red cells, and a few young unidentified cells. His chemistry studies were unremarkable. What is the diagnosis?

  20. The Effects of a Comprehensive Coping Strategy on Clinical Outcomes in Breast Cancer Bone Marrow Transplant Patients and Primary Caregiver.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    Doctoral Candidate Graduate Research Assistant Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Joy P. Nanda , MS, MHS Johns Hopkins University School of...It takes about one year and 2 months for a complete set of data to be collected for each subject. Baseline data were collected by the clinical nurse ...also instructed to document their use of the CCSP in a diary. The CCSP was reinforced in the patient’s room by the research nurse participating in the

  1. 2005 Precision Strike Technology Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-20

    Radars in  Production  Mission Computer  Software   Functionality to drive Mission System Requirements  Liquid  Cooling   Expanded  Cooling   Capability and Flow...Targeting Demonstration Using the APL Precision Target Locator Demonstrator, Mr. Ben Huguenin and Mr. Joe Schissler, Johns Hopkins University, Applied ...Forces October 18-20, 2005 Kossiakoff Conference Center The Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD David K. Sanders

  2. Atlantic Conjunctures in Anglo-American Neurology:

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The emergence of neurology at Johns Hopkins presents a case study for reconsidering the international and institutional contexts of neurology generally. Using a variety of sources, Hopkins's interwar plans for neurology are presented and contextualized in the international environment of neurology, medical research, and philanthropy. During this period, neurology across the world, especially in Britain, was undergoing vast institutional changes. In order for Hopkins to remain at the forefront of excellence in both medicine and medical education, a program in neurology was deemed essential, and this would seem now to have been an unproblematic advance. Spearheading the project for the establishment of neurology at Hopkins was the dean of the medical school, Lewis H. Weed. Weed attempted from 1919 until 1942 to establish a department of neurology but had only limited success. The fact that finding support proved challenging for Weed and Johns Hopkins casts a provocative light on the broader historiography of neurology and illustrates the important role of the international context in defining neurology professionally. PMID:18791299

  3. Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Trauma Patients and Validation of a Novel Scoring System: The Risk of Clots in Kids with Trauma (ROCKIT score)

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jennifer; Van Arendonk, Kyle J.; Streiff, Michael B.; McNamara, LeAnn; Stewart, F. Dylan; Conner G, Kim G; Thompson, Richard E.; Haut, Elliott R.; Takemoto, Clifford M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Identify risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and develop a VTE risk assessment model for pediatric trauma patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS We performed a retrospective review of patients 21 years and younger who were hospitalized following traumatic injuries at the John Hopkins level 1 adult and pediatric trauma center (1987-2011). The clinical characteristics of patients with and without VTE were compared, and multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for VTE. Weighted risk assessment scoring systems were developed based on these and previously identified factors from patients in the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB 2008-2010); the scoring systems were validated in this cohort from Johns Hopkins as well as a cohort of pediatric admissions from the NTDB (2011-2012). MAIN RESULTS Forty-nine of 17,366 pediatric trauma patients (0.28%) were diagnosed with VTE after admission to our trauma center. After adjusting for potential confounders, VTE was independently associated with older age, surgery, blood transfusion, higher Injury Severity Score (ISS), and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. These and additional factors were identified in 402,329 pediatric patients from the NTDB from 2008-2010; independent risk factors from the logistic regression analysis of this NTDB cohort were selected and incorporated into weighted risk assessment scoring systems. Two models were developed and were cross-validated in 2 separate pediatric trauma cohorts: 1) 282,535 patients in the NTDB from 2011 to 2012 2) 17,366 patients from Johns Hopkins. The receiver operator curve using these models in the validation cohorts had area under the curves that ranged 90% to 94%. CONCLUSIONS VTE is infrequent after trauma in pediatric patients. We developed weighted scoring systems to stratify pediatric trauma patients at risk for VTE. These systems may have potential to guide risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis in children after

  4. Characterizing hospital workers' willingness to report to duty in an influenza pandemic through threat- and efficacy-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Balicer, Ran D; Barnett, Daniel J; Thompson, Carol B; Hsu, Edbert B; Catlett, Christina L; Watson, Christopher M; Semon, Natalie L; Gwon, Howard S; Links, Jonathan M

    2010-07-26

    Hospital-based providers' willingness to report to work during an influenza pandemic is a critical yet under-studied phenomenon. Witte's Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) has been shown to be useful for understanding adaptive behavior of public health workers to an unknown risk, and thus offers a framework for examining scenario-specific willingness to respond among hospital staff. We administered an anonymous online EPPM-based survey about attitudes/beliefs toward emergency response, to all 18,612 employees of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from January to March 2009. Surveys were completed by 3426 employees (18.4%), approximately one third of whom were health professionals. Demographic and professional distribution of respondents was similar to all hospital staff. Overall, more than one-in-four (28%) hospital workers indicated they were not willing to respond to an influenza pandemic scenario if asked but not required to do so. Only an additional 10% were willing if required. One-third (32%) of participants reported they would be unwilling to respond in the event of a more severe pandemic influenza scenario. These response rates were consistent across different departments, and were one-third lower among nurses as compared with physicians. Respondents who were hesitant to agree to work additional hours when required were 17 times less likely to respond during a pandemic if asked. Sixty percent of the workers perceived their peers as likely to report to work in such an emergency, and were ten times more likely than others to do so themselves. Hospital employees with a perception of high efficacy had 5.8 times higher declared rates of willingness to respond to an influenza pandemic. Significant gaps exist in hospital workers' willingness to respond, and the EPPM is a useful framework to assess these gaps. Several attitudinal indicators can help to identify hospital employees unlikely to respond. The findings point to certain hospital-based communication and

  5. John Lewis | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Lewis John Lewis John Lewis Researcher IV-Chemical Engineering John.Lewis@nrel.gov | 303-275-3021 Education Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 1996 M.S. Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 1993 B.S. Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M

  6. Society of Thoracic Surgeons Risk Score predicts hospital charges and resource use after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Alejo, Diane E; Merlo, Christian A; Baumgartner, William A; Cameron, Duke E; Shah, Ashish S

    2011-09-01

    The impact of Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted mortality risk score on resource use has not been previously studied. We hypothesize that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk scores in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement are associated with greater hospital charges. Clinical and financial data for patients undergoing aortic valve replacement at The Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 10-year period (January 2000 to December 2009) were reviewed. The current Society of Thoracic Surgeons formula (v2.61) for in-hospital mortality was used for all patients. After stratification into risk quartiles, index admission hospital charges were compared across risk strata with rank-sum and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Linear regression and Spearman's coefficient assessed correlation and goodness of fit. Multivariable analysis assessed relative contributions of individual variables on overall charges. A total of 553 patients underwent aortic valve replacement during the study period. Average predicted mortality was 2.9% (±3.4) and actual mortality was 3.4% for aortic valve replacement. Median charges were greater in the upper quartile of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (quartiles 1-3, $39,949 [interquartile range, 32,708-51,323] vs quartile 4, $62,301 [interquartile range, 45,952-97,103], P < .01]. On univariate linear regression, there was a positive correlation between Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score and log-transformed charges (coefficient, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.07; P < .01). Spearman's correlation R-value was 0.51. This positive correlation persisted in risk-adjusted multivariable linear regression. Each 1% increase in Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score was associated with an added $3000 in hospital charges. This is the first study to show that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score predicts greater charges after aortic valve replacement. As competing therapies, such as percutaneous valve replacement, emerge to

  7. Air Force Project Competition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-22

    FA9550-11-1-0235 final report The Johns Hopkins University Dr Nathan Scott 7 Team BRX 2012-13: Will Crawford, Ben Wasser , Renata Smith, Danny Fisher...custom sock and braced with guy ropes. See Fig. 8. Fig. 8 Ben Wasser and Will Crawford testing the bridge in April 2013. FA9550-11-1-0235 final report...The Johns Hopkins University Dr Nathan Scott 8 Fig. 9 Ben Wasser carrying the folded, stowed bridge in its backpack. The pack weighed about 45lb

  8. Air Force Project Competition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-17

    FA9550-11-1-0235 final report The Johns Hopkins University Dr Nathan Scott 7 Team BRX 2012-13: Will Crawford, Ben Wasser , Renata Smith, Danny Fisher...custom sock and braced with guy ropes. See Fig. 8. Fig. 8 Ben Wasser and Will Crawford testing the bridge in April 2013. FA9550-11-1-0235 final report...The Johns Hopkins University Dr Nathan Scott 8 Fig. 9 Ben Wasser carrying the folded, stowed bridge in its backpack. The pack weighed about 45lb

  9. Medical device innovation and the value analysis process.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Heidi; Strain, Barbara; Torzewski, Jane

    2017-09-01

    Heidi A. Krantz, RN, BSN is the Director of Value Analysis at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in the Johns Hopkins Health System. Barbara Strain, MA, CVAHP is the Director of Value Management at the University of Virginia Health System. Jane Torzewski RN, MAN, MBA is a Senior Category Manager for the Mayo Clinic Physician Preference Contracting team. She previously was a Senior Clinical Value Analyst on the Mayo Clinic Value Analysis team. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Final Report on A. R. A. P.’s Model for the Atmospheric Marine Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Around Airports," NASA CR-2752, prepared by A.R.A.P. for Marshall Space Center. 25. Brost , R.A. and Wyngaard, N.C., 1978: "A Model Study of the...FRANCE DR. R. A. BROST NCAR P.O. BOX 3000 BOULDER, CO 80307 JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV. APPLIED PHYSICS LAB R.E. GIBSON LIBRARY JOHNS HOPKINS ROAD...RESEARCH LABS BOULDER, CO 80303 DR. GEORGE L. HELLOR GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS LAE PRINCETON, NJ 08540 DR. TETSUJI YAMADA LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LAB

  11. Adolf Meyer: His Achievements and Legacy.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Paul R

    2017-04-01

    This lecture, given to celebrate the centennial of the founding of the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Service at Johns Hopkins, addresses the career and contributions to psychiatry and neurology of Adolf Meyer, the first Phipps Professor. It reviews his achievements historically describing the bleak clinical situation of psychiatry when he began as a neuropathologist at Kankakee Hospital in Illinois in 1892, what he did to address them, the sources of help he found and exploited from leading figures in the emerging Progressive Era (1890-1917) in American life, and how he confronted and overcame resistances to his empirical, psychobiological conceptions of mental illness as he advanced. His legacy is reflected in the signal contributions of four leaders of American psychiatry (Drs. Leo Kanner, Alexander Leighton, Jerome Frank, and Paul Lemkau) who had been his residents and in those aspects of contemporary teaching and research at Hopkins that reflect his thought.

  12. An audience with...Marc Cluzel.

    PubMed

    Cluzel, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Executive Vice President, R&D, Sanofi-Aventis, Paris, France. In November 2009, Marc Cluzel was appointed executive Vice President (VP) of R&D at Sanofi-Aventis. He has a medical and biochemical education from the university of Montpellier, France, and was a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA, then a Research Associate at Guy's Hospital in London, UK, before joining Sanofi-Aventis in 1991. He was appointed VP of International Development in 2001, Senior VP of International Development in 2005 and Senior VP of R&D in January 2007.

  13. Primary vulvar neoplasia: a review of in situ and invasive carcinoma, 1935-1972.

    PubMed

    Japaze, H; Garcia-Bunuel, R; Woodruff, J D

    1977-04-01

    This survey reports the past 38 years of experience with 192 cases of carcinoma of the vulva seen and treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The review stresses the increased incidence of in situ neoplasia and the importance of individualization of therapy. Also the changing concepts in terminology (eg, the leukoplakic vulvitis of the past is the dystrophy of the present) suggest that the precursory alterations of previous discussions must be reviewed in the light of such an altered nomenclature. Features of epidemiologic and histologic importance are discussed.

  14. John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety Awards. System innovation: Concord Hospital.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Paul N; Brown, Jeffrey; Nason, Anne K; Camelio, Addie; Kendall, Elise

    2002-12-01

    The Cardiac Surgery Program at Concord Hospital (Concord, NH) restructured clinical teamwork for improved safety and effectiveness on the basis of theory and practice from human factors science, aviation safety, and high-reliability organization theory. A team-based, collaborative rounds process--the Concord Collaborative Care Model--that involved use of a structured communications protocol was conducted daily at each patient's bedside. The entire care team agreed to meet at the same time each day (8:45 AM to 9:30 AM) to share information and develop a plan of care for each patient, with patient and family members as active participants. The cardiac surgery team developed a structured communications protocol adapted from human factors science. To provide a forum for discussion of team goals and progress and to address system-level concerns, a biweekly system rounds process was established. Following implementation of collaborative rounds, mortality of Concord Hospital's cardiac surgery patients declined significantly from expected rates. Satisfaction rates of open heart patients scores were consistently in the 97th-99th percentile nationally. A quality of work life survey indicated that in every category, providers expressed greater satisfaction with the collaborative care process than with the traditional rounds process. Practice patterns in the Cardiac Surgery Program at Concord Hospital have changed to a much more collaborative and participatory process, with improved outcomes, happier patients, and more satisfied practitioners. A culture of continuous program improvement has been implemented that continues to evolve and produce benefits.

  15. Hazardous Chemical Fluorometer Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    RD-0129 997 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL FLUOROMETER DEYELOPNENT(U) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV LAUREL RD APPLIED PHYSICS LAB 6 S KEYS FEB Bi JHU/RPL/EED-Bi-6B USCO-D...TEST CHART REr-CRT NO: Cr-n-79-81 Hazardous Chemical Fluorometer Development -- Gary S. Keys q Ft THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYqFt. ill) APPLIED PHYSICS...Connecticut 06340 - 0 I CG-D-79-81/ Ah 7_> Hazardous Chemical Fluorometer Development February 1981 88898 7. ,~rrro z 9. NO-0.C as, 0-a ., AII=q1. Wo

  16. Commemorating John Dyson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, Julian M.

    2015-03-01

    John Dyson was born on the 7th January 1941 in Meltham Mills, West Yorkshire, England, and later grew up in Harrogate and Leeds. The proudest moment of John's early life was meeting Freddie Trueman, who became one of the greatest fast bowlers of English cricket. John used a state scholarship to study at Kings College London, after hearing a radio lecture by D. M. McKay. He received a first class BSc Special Honours Degree in Physics in 1962, and began a Ph.D. at the University of Manchester Department of Astronomy after being attracted to astronomy by an article of Zdenek Kopal in the semi-popular journal New Scientist. John soon started work with Franz Kahn, and studied the possibility that the broad emission lines seen from the Orion Nebula were due to flows driven by the photoevaporation of neutral globules embedded in a HII region. John's thesis was entitled ``The Age and Dynamics of the Orion Nebula`` and he passed his oral examination on 28th February 1966.

  17. Laboratory assays of select candidate insecticides for control of Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins Pesticide Management Science 67: 548−555

    Treesearch

    C.J. Fettig; C.J. Hayes; S.R. McKelvey; S.R. Mori

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosaeHopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is the most destructive bark beetle in western North America. Dendroctonus ponderosae can be prevented from successfully colonizing and killing individual trees by ground-based sprays of insecticides applied directly to...

  18. Stand characteristics and downed woody debris accumulations associated with a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak in Colorado

    Treesearch

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Jose F. Negron; Sheryl L. Costello; Charles C. Rhoades; Daniel R. West; John Popp; Rick Caissie

    2009-01-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.)-dominated ecosystems in north-central Colorado are undergoing rapid and drastic changes associated with overstory tree mortality from a currentmountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak. To characterize stand characteristics and downed woody debris loads during...

  19. Comment on ''The velocity field due to an oscillating plate in an Oldroyd-B fluid'' by C.C. Hopkins and J.R. de Bruyn [Can. J. Phys. 92, 533 (2014)

    DOE PAGES

    Christov, Ivan C.

    2015-09-11

    We correct certain errors and ambiguities in the recent pedagogical article by Hopkins and de Bruyn. The early-time asymptotics of the solution to the transient version of Stokes’ second problem for an Oldroyd-B fluid in a half-space is presented, as Appendix A, to complement the late-time asymptotics given by Hopkins and de Bruyn.

  20. Obituary: John Leroy Climenhaga, 1916-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfe, Colin

    2009-01-01

    and interested in new discoveries that might be reported to him by visiting colleagues. On 29 September 1943 John married Margaret Grace Garratt, who remained with him until her death on 17 August 2001. They had two children, Joan and David, who survive him, along with their spouses and David's two daughters, to whom John was a proud and loving grandfather. Their home was always a warm, welcoming, and hospitable one to the younger colleagues who joined the Department of Physics (now Physics and Astronomy) during John's tenure as Head and Dean. On 26 July 2003, John was married again, to Ila Buffam, whose gentle care softened his last years, and who survives him. I am indebted to Harry Dosso, a colleague for many years to both John and myself, for providing some of the above details, particularly those of John's early life.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is secure after transfer to the work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is secure after transfer to the work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, workers check the placement of NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft on a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, workers check the placement of NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft on a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers move NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into a high bay clean room. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers move NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into a high bay clean room. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane moves NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft toward a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane moves NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft toward a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane lowers NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane lowers NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is revealed. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is revealed. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  7. Flight periodicity of the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Colorado, U.S.A

    Treesearch

    Jose F. Negron; Willis C. Schaupp; Lee Pederson

    2011-01-01

    There are about 500 species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the United States (Wood 1982). A number of them are important disturbance agents in forested ecosystems, occasionally creating large tracts of dead trees. One eruptive species is the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins, which utilizes Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga...

  8. An improved synthetic attractant for the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), in northeastern California

    Treesearch

    Brian Strom; Sheri Smith; D.A. Wakarchuk

    2008-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins 1902, is found in pine forests throughout the western U.S., north to northern British Columbia and Alberta, Canada and south to Mexico. It causes high levels of pine mortality throughout its range. Hosts include many species of Pinus (Pinaceae); in northern California,

  9. The sixteenth presentation of the John Adam Fleming medal to Thomas M. Donahue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Andrew F.; Donahue, Thomas M.

    Citations are supposed to begin with a statement of the sort ‘It is an honor and a pleasure for me to introduce…’ however, in the case of Tom Donahue I do not think that I have to introduce him, since most everyone here this evening already knows him. His 30-plus-year career spans a very broad field of scientific endeavors as well as numerous institutions. We at Michigan are lucky to have had him with us since 1974. He has made his lasting mark in the field of aeronomy through his publications, which number over 140, his many graduate students, postdocs, and colleagues who have had the good fortune to have worked with him. Sydney Chapman must have been thinking of someone like Tom Donahue when he coined the word aeronomy. Tom was born in Oklahoma, receive his B.A. from Rockhurst College in Kansas City and his Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University in 1947. Perhaps it is appropriate that he is now receiving the Fleming Award here in Baltimore, where his professional career began. His deep lifelong involvement in solar system studies really began when he moved to The University of Pittsburgh in 1951, and he has been going full steam ever since.

  10. A Computational Chemo-Fluidic Modeling for the Investigation of Patient-Specific Left Ventricle Thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Abd, Thura; George, Richard T.

    2015-11-01

    Patients recovering from myocardial infarction (MI) are considered at high-risk for cardioembolic stroke due to the formation of left ventricle thrombus (LVT). The formation of LVT is the result of a complex interplay between the fluid dynamics inside the ventricle and the chemistry of coagulation, and the role of LV flow pattern on the thrombogenesis was not well understood. The previous computational study performed with the model ventricles suggested that the local flow residence time is the key variable governing the accumulation of coagulation factors. In the present study, a coupled, chemo-fluidic computational modeling is applied to the patient-specific cases of infracted ventricles to investigate the interaction between the LV hemodynamics and thrombogensis. In collaboration with the Johns Hopkins hospital, patient-specific LV models are constructed using the multi-modality medical imaging data. Blood flow in the left ventricle is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the biochemical reactions for the thrombus formation are modeled with convection-diffusion-reaction equations. The formation and deposition of key coagulation chemical factors are then correlated with the hemodynamic flow metrics to explore the biophysics underlying LVT risk. Supported by the Johns Hopkins Medicine Discovery Fund and NSF Grant: CBET-1511200, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  11. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Limits Chronic Constipation in a Child with Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Alessandro; Perini, Mattia; Cosmai, Silvia; Zanon, Silvia; Pisa, Viviana; Castagna, Carmine; Uberti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PTHS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by insufficient expression of the TCF4 gene. Children with PTHS typically present with gastrointestinal disorders and early severe chronic constipation is frequently found (75%). Here we describe the case of a PTHS male 10-year-old patient with chronic constipation in whom Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) resulted in improved bowel functions, as assessed by the diary, the QPGS-Form A Section C questionnaire, and the Paediatric Bristol Stool Form Scale. The authors suggested that OMT may be a valid tool to improve the defecation frequency and reduce enema administration in PTHS patients.

  12. Promoting mobility and reducing length of stay in hospitalized general medicine patients: A quality-improvement project.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Erik H; Friedman, Michael; Lavezza, Annette; Wagner-Kosmakos, Kathleen; Lewis-Cherry, Robin; Skolnik, Judy L; Byers, Sherrie P; Atanelov, Levan; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Brotman, Daniel J; Needham, Dale M

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether a multidisciplinary mobility promotion quality-improvement (QI) project would increase patient mobility and reduce hospital length of stay (LOS). Implemented using a structured QI model, the project took place between March 1, 2013 and March 1, 2014 on 2 general medicine units in a large academic medical center. There were 3352 patients admitted during the QI project period. The Johns Hopkins Highest Level of Mobility (JH-HLM) scale, an 8-point ordinal scale ranging from bed rest (score = 1) to ambulating ≥250 feet (score = 8), was used to quantify mobility. Changes in JH-HLM scores were compared for the first 4 months of the project (ramp-up phase) versus 4 months after project completion (post-QI phase) using generalized estimating equations. We compared the relative change in median LOS for the project months versus 12 months prior among the QI units, using multivariable linear regression analysis adjusting for 7 demographic and clinically relevant variables. Comparing the ramp-up versus post-QI phases, patients reaching JH-HLM's ambulation status increased from 43% to 70% (P < 0.001), and patients with improved JH-HLM mobility scores between admission and discharge increased from 32% to 45% (P < 0.001). For all patients, the QI project was associated with an adjusted median LOS reduction of 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.57 to -0.21, P < 0.001) days compared to 12 months prior. A subgroup of patients expected to have a longer LOS (expected LOS >7 days), were associated with a significantly greater adjusted median reduction in LOS of 1.11 (95% CI: -1.53 to -0.65, P < 0.001) days. Increased mobility was not associated with an increase in injurious falls compared to 12 months prior on the QI units (P = 0.73). Active prevention of a decline in physical function that commonly occurs during hospitalization may be achieved with a structured QI approach. In an adult medicine population, our QI project was associated with improved

  13. Interview: Professor Andrew Feinberg speaks to Epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Andrew Feinberg studied mathematics and humanities at Yale University (CT, USA) in the Directed Studies honors program, and he received his BA (1973) and MD (1976) from the accelerated medical program at Johns Hopkins University (MD, USA), as well as an MPH from Johns Hopkins (1981). He performed a postdoctoral fellowship in developmental biology at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD, CA, USA), clinical training in medicine and medical genetics at the University of Pennsylvania (PA, USA) and genetics research with Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins, discovering altered DNA methylation in human cancer. Dr Feinberg continued to perform seminal work in cancer epigenetics as a Howard Hughes investigator at the University of Michigan (MI, USA), discovering human imprinted genes and loss of imprinting in cancer, and the molecular basis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. He returned to John Hopkins in 1994 as King Fahd Professor of Medicine, Molecular Biology & Genetics and Oncology, and he holds an Adjunct Professorship at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Dr Feinberg is Director of the Center for Epigenetics, a National Human Genome Research Institute-designated Center of Excellence in Genome Sciences. The Center is pioneering genome-scale tools in molecular, statistical and epidemiological epigenetics, and is applying them to the study of cancer, neuropsychiatric disease and aging. As part of the center, Dr Feinberg has organized a highly innovative program to bring gifted minority high-school students into genetics and genomics. Dr Feinberg has also invented a number of widely used molecular tools, including random priming. His honors include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as membership on the ISI most-cited authors list, a MERIT Award of the National Cancer Institute, a

  14. SciTech Connect

    Hristov, Boris; Reddy, Sushanth; Lin, Steven H.

    Purpose: Surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation (CRT) offers patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma a chance for extended survival. In some patients, however, resection is difficult because of vascular involvement by the carcinoma, necessitating resection and grafting of the mesenterico-portal vessels. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes between pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with and without mesenterico-portal vein resection (VR) in patients receiving adjuvant CRT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 160 patients underwent PD with 5-FU-based adjuvant CRT followed by maintenance chemotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Hospital; 20 (12.5%) of the 160 underwent VR. Clinical outcomes,more » including median survival, overall survival, and complication rates were assessed for both groups. Results: Patients who underwent VR had significantly longer operative times (p = 0.009), greater intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.01), and longer postoperative lengths of stay (p = 0.03). However, postoperative morbidity, median survival, and overall survival rates were similar between the two groups. Most patients (70%) from both groups were able to complete CRT, and a subgroup analysis demonstrated no appreciable differences in terms of complications. None of the VR patients who received adjuvant CRT developed veno-occlusive disease or graft failure/leakage. Conclusion: In a cohort of patients treated with adjuvant 5-FU-based CRT at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, having a VR at the time of PD resulted in similar complication rates and survival. These data support the feasibility and safety of adjuvant CRT in patients undergoing VR at the time of PD.« less

  15. Development, cognition, and behaviour in Pitt-Hopkins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Balkom, Ingrid D C; Vuijk, Pieter Jelle; Franssens, Marijke; Hoek, Hans W; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to collect detailed data on behavioural, adaptive, and psychological functioning in 10 individuals with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), with specific attention to manifestations of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The participants (four females, six males), residing in the Netherlands and Belgium, were ascertained through the Dutch national PTHS support group. Median age of participants was 10 years, the age range was between 32 and 289 months. They underwent psychiatric examinations and neuropsychological measurements using a comprehensive assessment battery. Additionally, parental information was gathered through standardized interviews and questionnaires. Findings were compared with those from the literature. All participants showed profound intellectual disability, amiable demeanour with minimal maladaptive behaviours, severe impairments of communication and language, and intense, frequent motor stereotypies. Impairments in all participants were beyond what would be expected for cognitive abilities, fitting a classification of ASD. Patients with PTHS are characterized not only by specific physical and genetic manifestations but also by specific behavioural and cognitive characteristics. Studying behaviour and cognition may improve diagnosis and prognosis, allows recognition of comorbidities, and contributes to adequate counselling of families. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Implementation of Get with the Guideline Acute Myocardial Infarction Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital and Its Effect on Core Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-25

    allergy E Patient is discharged on hydralazine/nitrate therapy* E Hypotension* El Moderate or severe aortic stenosis El Worsening renal function* E...Hypotension* E Moderate or severe aortic stenosis El Worsening renal function* E Hyperkalemia* E Bilateral renal artery stenosis * E Pregnancy* E Other...Hyperkalemia* El Bilateral renal artery stenosis * E Pregnancy* El Other - must be documented in medical record Angiotension Receptor Blocker (ARB

  17. Test of the decaying dark matter hypothesis using the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, A. F.; Kriss, G. A.; Ferguson, H. C.; Blair, W. P.; Bowers, C. W.; Kimble, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Sciama's hypothesis that the dark matter associated with galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the intergalactic medium consists of tau neutrinos of rest mass 28-30 eV whose decay generates ultraviolet photons of energy roughly 14-15 eV, has been tested using the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope flows aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. A straightforward application of Sciama's model predicts that a spectral line from neutrino decay photons should be observed from the rich galaxy cluster Abell 665 with an SNR of about 30. No such emission was detected. For neutrinos in the mass range 27.2-32.1 eV, the observations set a lower lifetime limit significantly greater than Sciama's model requires.

  18. Assessing hospital disaster preparedness: a comparison of an on-site survey, directly observed drill performance, and video analysis of teamwork.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Amy H; Langford, Vinette; Lewis, Roger J

    2008-09-01

    There is currently no validated method for assessing hospital disaster preparedness. We determine the degree of correlation between the results of 3 methods for assessing hospital disaster preparedness: administration of an on-site survey, drill observation using a structured evaluation tool, and video analysis of team performance in the hospital incident command center. This was a prospective, observational study conducted during a regional disaster drill, comparing the results from an on-site survey, a structured disaster drill evaluation tool, and a video analysis of teamwork, performed at 6 911-receiving hospitals in Los Angeles County, CA. The on-site survey was conducted separately from the drill and assessed hospital disaster plan structure, vendor agreements, modes of communication, medical and surgical supplies, involvement of law enforcement, mutual aid agreements with other facilities, drills and training, surge capacity, decontamination capability, and pharmaceutical stockpiles. The drill evaluation tool, developed by Johns Hopkins University under contract from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, was used to assess various aspects of drill performance, such as the availability of the hospital disaster plan, the geographic configuration of the incident command center, whether drill participants were identifiable, whether the noise level interfered with effective communication, and how often key information (eg, number of available staffed floor, intensive care, and isolation beds; number of arriving victims; expected triage level of victims; number of potential discharges) was received by the incident command center. Teamwork behaviors in the incident command center were quantitatively assessed, using the MedTeams analysis of the video recordings obtained during the disaster drill. Spearman rank correlations of the results between pair-wise groupings of the 3 assessment methods were calculated. The 3 evaluation methods demonstrated

  19. [David H. Hubel, Torsten N. Wiesel, Nigel W. Daw: the creators of modern visual neurophysiology].

    PubMed

    Czepita, D

    1999-01-01

    Curriculum vitae as well as scientifical out-put of the Nobel Price winners--David Hunter Hubel and Torsten Nils Wiesel, and the Friedenwald Memorial Award laureate--Nigel Warwick Daw are described. D.H. Hubel was born in 1926 in Windsor, Canada. In 1951 he received a medical degree from McGill University. From 1955-1958 he worked at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, from 1958-1959 at Johns Hopkins University, and since 1959 at Harvard University. T.N. Wiesel was born in 1924 in Uppsala, Sweden. In 1954 he received a medical degree from Karolinska Institute. From 1955-1959 he worked at Johns Hopkins University, from 1959-1982 at Harvard University, and since 1983 at the Rockefeller University, New York. N.W. Daw was born in 1933 in London, England. In 1961 he received a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Trinity College. In 1967 he became a doctor of philosophy in biophysics at Johns Hopkins University. From 1967-1969 he worked at Harvard University, from 1969-1992 at Washington University, and since 1992 at Yale University.

  20. Isolation and characterization of 16 microsatellite loci in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    C. S. Davis; K. E. Mock; B. J. Bentz; S. M. Bromilow; N. V. Bartell; B. W. Murray; A. D. Roe; J. E. K. Cooke

    2009-01-01

    We isolated 16 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) and developed conditions for amplifying these markers in four multiplex reactions. Three to 14 alleles were detected per locus across two sampled populations. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.000 to 0.902 and from 0.100 to 0.830, respectively...

  1. Predictors of outcome in acute encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Kiran T.; Motta, Melissa; Asemota, Anthony O.; Kirsch, Hannah L.; Benavides, David R.; Schneider, Eric B.; McArthur, Justin C.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of outcome in patients with all-cause encephalitis receiving care in the intensive care unit. Methods: A retrospective analysis of encephalitis cases at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center was performed. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we examined mortality and predictors of good outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale scores of 1–3) and poor outcome (scores 4 and 5) in those surviving to hospital discharge. Results: In our cohort of 103 patients, the median age was 52 years (interquartile range 26), 52 patients (50.49%) were male, 28 patients (27.18%) had viral encephalitis, 19 (18.45%) developed status epilepticus (SE), 15 (14.56%) had cerebral edema, and 19 (18.45%) died. In our multivariate logistic regression analysis, death was associated with cerebral edema (odds ratio [OR] 18.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.14–103.92), SE (OR 8.16, 95% CI 1.55–43.10), and thrombocytopenia (OR 6.28, 95% CI 1.41–28.03). Endotracheal intubation requirement with ventilator support was highly correlated with death (95%). In addition, in those patients who survived, viral, nonviral, and unknown causes of encephalitis were less likely to have a poor outcome at hospital discharge compared with an autoimmune etiology (viral encephalitis: OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.01–0.57; nonviral encephalitis: OR 0.02, 95% CI 0.01–0.31; unknown etiology: OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.04–0.91). Conclusions: Our study suggests that predictors of death in patients with encephalitis comprise potentially reversible conditions including cerebral edema, SE, and thrombocytopenia. Further prospective studies are needed to determine whether aggressive management of these complications in patients with encephalitis improves outcome. PMID:23892708

  2. The effect of race on incidence and clinical course in systemic lupus erythematosus: The Hopkins Lupus Cohort.

    PubMed

    Petri, M

    1998-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease of young women, has a higher incidence and prevalence in African Americans. The Hopkins Lupus Cohort, a prospective longitudinal study of SLE outcomes, has shown that race is a major predictor of clinical manifestations, laboratory and serologic tests, and disease-related morbidity. The effect of race on musculoskeletal morbidity remains even after adjustment for education, insurance status, and smoking.

  3. Lightening the Load

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-09

    Research, Engineering and Systems) Dr. John C. Sommerer NRAC, Vice Chair; Director, S&T, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory Dr. Walt...O’Donohue, Staff Officer General Dynamics Robotic Systems John H. Northrop & Associates Mr. John H. Northrop, Executive Director General Dynamics...Equipment, US Army LtCol John Lemondes, PM Soldier as a System LTL Efforts US Army Mr. Bob Conklin, Staff UK LTL Efforts Equipment Capability

  4. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Limits Chronic Constipation in a Child with Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Mattia; Pisa, Viviana

    2017-01-01

    Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PTHS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by insufficient expression of the TCF4 gene. Children with PTHS typically present with gastrointestinal disorders and early severe chronic constipation is frequently found (75%). Here we describe the case of a PTHS male 10-year-old patient with chronic constipation in whom Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) resulted in improved bowel functions, as assessed by the diary, the QPGS-Form A Section C questionnaire, and the Paediatric Bristol Stool Form Scale. The authors suggested that OMT may be a valid tool to improve the defecation frequency and reduce enema administration in PTHS patients. PMID:28251008

  5. The Armstrong Institute: An Academic Institute for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement, Research, Training, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Molello, Nancy E; Paine, Lori; Winner, Laura; Marsteller, Jill A; Berenholtz, Sean M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Demski, Renee; Armstrong, C Michael

    2015-10-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) could advance the science of health care delivery, improve patient safety and quality improvement, and enhance value, but many centers have fragmented efforts with little accountability. Johns Hopkins Medicine, the AMC under which the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Health System are organized, experienced similar challenges, with operational patient safety and quality leadership separate from safety and quality-related research efforts. To unite efforts and establish accountability, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality was created in 2011.The authors describe the development, purpose, governance, function, and challenges of the institute to help other AMCs replicate it and accelerate safety and quality improvement. The purpose is to partner with patients, their loved ones, and all interested parties to end preventable harm, continuously improve patient outcomes and experience, and eliminate waste in health care. A governance structure was created, with care mapped into seven categories, to oversee the quality and safety of all patients treated at a Johns Hopkins Medicine entity. The governance has a Patient Safety and Quality Board Committee that sets strategic goals, and the institute communicates these goals throughout the health system and supports personnel in meeting these goals. The institute is organized into 13 functional councils reflecting their behaviors and purpose. The institute works daily to build the capacity of clinicians trained in safety and quality through established programs, advance improvement science, and implement and evaluate interventions to improve the quality of care and safety of patients.

  6. St. John Health integrating new corporate identity, brand. Brand/logo to be rolled out over two-year period.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    St. John Health, Warren, Mich., is integrating a new corporate identity and brand strategy for its network of nine wholly-owned and two affiliated hospital, along with more than 100 physician offices and specialty centers in southeast Michigan. "A new identity is a great rallying cry. It automatically says. 'We have a new mission. We have a new system. We are reaching new people,'" said Eunice O'Loughlan, VP, corporate communications for St. John Health.

  7. [Epilepsy treatment in Serbian medieval monastery hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ilić-Tasić, Slobodanka; Pantović, Mihailo; Jović, Nebojsa; Ravanić, Dragan; Obradović, Dejan; Sretenović, Srdjan; Pantović, Maja; Pantović, Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Emperor John III Ducas Vatatzes (ruled from 1222-1254) and his son Theodore II Lascaris (ruled from 1254-1258) both suffered from epilepsy. On his journeys to Nicaea, St Sava visited emperors Theodore I Lascaris (ruled from 1204-1222) and John II Vatatzes, who richly rewarded him, which was probably of crucial importance for the foundation of hospitals in the Monastery of Hilandar and the Monastery of Studenica These hospitals had special departments for the treatment of patints with epilepsy. According to researches conducted up-to-date, these departments are considered to be the oldest institutions for epilepsy treatment. Monastery hospitals in the West served primarily as a shelter for the poor and patients with chronic incurable diseases. The development of Serbian monastery hospitals was a long process and it included institutions that lasted for a long time (for over two centuries) in which, among others, those affected by epilepsy were cured.

  8. An undergraduate placemement at the St John Eye Hospital, Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Ruth

    2017-06-08

    The elective placement is an opportunity for nursing undergraduates to independently decide where to go and what to do to widen their clinical experience. Being able to decide on and participate in an elective placement provides student nurses with a chance to work in a different area and explore personal ambitions. This reflective account examines a student nurse's experiences while on an elective placement at an eye hospital in East Jerusalem and the West Bank.

  9. Analysis of field permeability and laboratory shear stress for Western Kentucky Parkway, milepost 18.240 to milepost 25.565, Caldwell-Hopkins counties

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-02-01

    This report lists and discusses results of field permeability tests and laboratory shear tests on samples from a construction project on the Western Kentucky Parkway in Caldwell-Hopkins Counties. Approximately 6,500 tons of asphaltic concrete overlay...

  10. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    John Pendry John Inglesfield and Pedro Echenique write: John Pendry's 65th birthday is on 4 July 2008, and this issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to him, with articles by friends, colleagues, and former students. By any standards, John Pendry is a great scientist, who has made—and continues to make—an enormous contribution to physics; the wide range of his interests is reflected in the scope of these articles. Not many scientists can establish a completely new and unexpected area of research, but this has been John's achievement in the last few years in the field of metamaterials, materials whose electromagnetic properties depend on their structure rather than the materials of which the structure is built. In this way, structures with effectively negative electrical permittivity and negative magnetic permeability can be constructed, demonstrating negative refraction; through metamaterials scientists now have access to properties not found in nature, and never previously explored experimentally. Never a week goes by without a potential new application of metamaterials, whether it is perfect lensing, or the cloak of invisibility. This has certainly led to tremendous visibility for John himself, with guest lectures all over the world, and radio and television appearances. John Pendry's first paper was published exactly 40 years ago, 'Analytic properties of pseudopotentials' [1], and since then he has published 310 articles at the latest count. But this first paper already reflected something of the way John works. His PhD project, with Volker Heine at the Cavendish Laboratory, was to interpret the scattering of low energy electrons from surfaces, the technique of LEED which was to become the method of choice for determining surface structure. Although the energy of the electrons in LEED is relatively low—say 50 eV—it is much higher than the energy of the conduction electrons, for which pseudopotentials had been devised, and John

  11. St. John's Wort (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or ...

  12. John Whitridge Williams' contribution to democracy abroad. (The fetus treated as a patient).

    PubMed

    Vasicka, A

    1999-04-01

    The idealism of American pioneers was a driving force in the development of science, democracy, and sociology in the United States. It also served as a model for the development of new democracies abroad. The first American grafted democracy was established in Czechoslovakia in 1918, under Thomas Garrigue Masaryk as President. As a former professor of philosophy, at Charles University in Prague, he built the foundation of Czechoslovakian democracy on the historical principles of Jan Hus' search for the truth (1415), Jan Amos Komensky's use of Science and Humanism (1630), and on the values of American democracy as he conceived it from multiple visits to the United States and from the practical philosophy of his American wife. His major educational means was the use of science. He became a founder of political science. As president he recognized, that democracy, as a state form, does not educate people, they educate themselves through family, school, church, physician and life experience. In the last quarter of the nineteenth century, on the eve of the opening of John Hopkin's University Hospital, a young American scientist by the name John Whitridge Williams came to Prague, Vienna, and other Europeans cities for the purpose of studying scientific obstetrics. He believed in the power of the truth in the power of the truth equally as Masaryk did and used science uncompromisingly in his speciality. He became the founder of American scientific obstetrics. He was shy of political science and ethnic problems. There was no personal connection between Masaryk and Williams. In 1903, John Whitridge Williams published his review of European and American obstetrics: he abolished the craft of obstetrics and worked the science of physiology and pathology into the practice of obstetrics. For Czechoslovaks the political democracy coming out of America through Masaryk was attractive, but of particular interest was native and personal democracy of Americans as a way of life. John

  13. Does It Pay to Penalize Hospitals for Excess Readmissions? Intended and Unintended Consequences of Medicare's Hospital Readmissions Reductions Program.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Jennifer; Daly, Michael; Smith, Molly

    2017-08-01

    To incentivize hospitals to provide better quality care at a lower cost, the Affordable Care Act of 2010 included the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP), which reduces payments to hospitals with excess 30-day readmissions for Medicare patients treated for certain conditions. We use triple difference estimation to identify the HRRP's effects in Virginia hospitals; this method estimates the difference in changes in readmission over time between patients targeted by the policy and a comparison group of patients and then compares those difference-in-differences estimates in patients treated at hospitals with readmission rates above the national average (i.e., those at risk for penalties) and patients treated at hospitals with readmission rates below or equal to the national average (those not at risk). We find that the HRRP significantly reduced readmission for Medicare patients treated for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We find no evidence that hospitals delay readmissions, treat patients with greater intensity, or alter discharge status in response to the HRRP, nor do we find changes in the age, race/ethnicity, health status, and socioeconomic status of patients admitted for AMI. Future research on the specific mechanisms behind reduced AMI readmissions should focus on actions by healthcare providers once the patient has left the hospital. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Jasper Johns' Painted Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinger, Esther

    1989-01-01

    States that the painted words in Jasper Johns' art act in two different capacities: concealed words partake in the artist's interrogation of visual perception; and visible painted words question classical representation. Argues that words are Johns' means of critiquing modernism. (RS)

  15. John G. Bartlett: Contributions to the discovery of Clostridium difficile antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Sherwood L

    2014-09-15

    In 1975 John Bartlett began trials investigating the problem of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. His work led the discovery of Clostridium difficile and he identified it as the leading cause of hospital-associated infections. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A 20-year and 46,000-specimen journey to Paris reveals the influence of reporting systems and passive peer feedback on pathologist practice patterns.

    PubMed

    VandenBussche, Christopher J; Allison, Derek B; Gupta, Mohit; Ali, Syed Z; Rosenthal, Dorothy L

    2018-05-14

    An important goal of The Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology (TPS) is to reduce unnecessary atypical diagnoses given to urinary tract cytology (UTC) specimens. Since implementation of TPS at the study institution in 2016, the institutional atypical rate has declined only slightly. The authors speculated that TPS might not have had an immediate impact because several faculty members were involved in TPS committees and because TPS contains elements that already had been integrated into institutional practice. To identify factors contributing to alterations in the institutional atypical rate, the authors examined their practice over the last 22 years. UTC specimens submitted to the study laboratory between August 11, 1995, and August 10, 2017, were identified. Specimens were linked to the responsible pathologist, specimen diagnosis and type, association with high-grade urothelial carcinoma, and relevant cytomorphologic features. An increase in the institutional atypical rate occurred between 2002 and 2005. The atypical rate among individual pathologists also peaked during this same time. The increase coincided with an increase in the use of UTC and the arrival of a pathologist with a higher rate of atypical diagnoses. A substantial decrease in the institutional atypical rate occurred between 2005 and 2010 and coincided with the creation of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Template, the authors' first standardized reporting system for UTC specimens. The use of reporting systems (Johns Hopkins Hospital Template and TPS) has coincided with decreases in the institutional atypical rate at the study institution. An individual pathologist may influence the practice patterns of his or her colleagues, resulting in fluctuations in the institutional rate of atypia over time. Cancer Cytopathol 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  17. Instruction at the Hopkins Marine Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-29

    foI homtadcodnaio.. caronavirus nucleocapsid protein. wheat germ bial ~ ~ %~H2A (5), mussel sperm nuclear protein 03 [6), and man chromofsome...wvpi,~Tninev PM"p Johne HiWA~aa Unuw~rsaty &Dio of Medicine, Balw,,.vv, Manh land 21205 The two germ -line- specific Sp histione classes Treatment of...composit conical morphology of the male pronucleus- Mal, pro- serine-proline adjacent to two basic amino acids (lyo hucl*I inhibite’d with I nsMGDMAP

  18. Helen Brooke Taussig and Edwards Albert Park: the early years (1927-1930).

    PubMed

    Evans, William N

    2010-08-01

    The conventional history of paediatric cardiology teaches that it was Helen Taussig who founded the cardiac clinic for children at the Harriet Lane Home of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1930, when Edwards Park appointed her director of the clinic.1,2 However, the story was more complex than that, and involved the collaboration of institutions and the frustrations, doubts, and passions of both Park and Taussig. In this article, I explore the history in more depth through published works, and material preserved at the McGill University Archives, the Rockefeller Foundation Archives, and the Alan Chesney Medical Archives at Johns Hopkins.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is lifted off the pallet for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is lifted off the pallet for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers get ready to remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers get ready to remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  3. New Prostheses and Orthoses Step Up their Game: Motorized Knees, Robotic Hands, and Exosuits Mark Advances in Rehabilitation Technology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Summer

    2016-01-01

    Forty years ago, Les Baugh lost both of his arms in an electrical accident. With bilateral shoulder-level amputations, his options for prosthetic arms were limited. That changed two years ago, when Baugh underwent a surgical procedure at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore that allowed him to control state-of-the-art robotic arms using nerves that had been rerouted to his chest. Within ten days of training, he was able to control both arms simultaneously and move a cup from a lower shelf to a higher shelf-a task that previously had been impossible-just by thinking about how he wanted to move his arm.

  4. Development of a breast navigation program.

    PubMed

    Shockney, Lillie D; Haylock, Pamela J; Cantril, Cynthia

    2013-05-01

    To review the development of a navigation program in a major US academic health care institution, and provide guidance for navigation programmatic development in other settings. The Johns Hopkins Breast Center Steering Committee minutes, Hospital Cancer Registry; administrative data, and literature. Incorporating navigation services throughout the cancer continuum, from diagnosis to survivorship, provides guidance for patients with cancer. Navigation processes and programs must remain dynamic, reflecting patient and community needs. Oncology nurses have traditionally performed many tasks associated with navigation, including patient education, psychosocial support, and addressing barriers to care. This article provides an exemplar for nurses developing or enhancing comprehensive breast programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence for Shock-heated Gas in the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope Spectrum of NGC 1068: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Blair, William P.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Long, Knox S.

    1992-10-01

    In the Letter "Evidence for Shock-heated Gas in the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope Spectrum of NGC 1068" by Gerard A. Kriss, Arthur F. Davidsen, William P. Blair, Henry C. Ferguson, and Knox S. Long (ApJ, 394, L37 C1992]), Figure 1 (Plate L5) was printed as a mirror image due to a printer's error. The figure has been reprinted correctly as Plate L10 of this issue. The Journal regrets the error. We also apologize for the incorrect spelling of Knox S. Long in the author list in the table of contents for the 1992 August 1 issue.

  6. Maniac Talk - John Mather

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-19

    John Mather Maniac Lecture, November 19, 2014 Nobel Laureate John Mather presented a Maniac Talk entitled "Creating the Future: Building JWST, what it may find, and what comes next?" In this lecture, John takes a rear view look at how James Webb Space Telescope was started, what it can see and what it might discover. He describes the hardware, what it was designed to observe, and speculate about the surprises it might uncover. He also outlines a possible future of space observatories: what astronomers want to build, what we need to invent, and what they might find, even the chance of discovering life on planets around other stars.

  7. “I’LL DIE WITH THE HAMMER IN MY HAND”: JOHN HENRYISM AS A PREDICTOR OF HAPPINESS

    PubMed Central

    Angner, Erik; Hullett, Sandral; Allison, Jeroan

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the association between John Henryism – a behavioral predisposition to cope actively with psychosocial environmental stressors – and happiness. On the basis of previous research on aspiration and goal regulation, we predicted that John Henryism would be negatively associated with happiness when controlling for demographic factors and attainment in various domains of life. We tested the prediction in a sample of hypertensive participants (n=758) drawn from an inner-city, mainly African-American, safety-net hospital in Jefferson County, Alabama. Bivariate analysis revealed no association between John Henryism and attainment in six domains of life: marriage, children, education, employment, income, and health. However, a significant negative association between John Henryism and happiness was found both in bivariate analysis (Spearman’s ρ= −0.335; p<.001) and when controlling for demographic factors and attainment using ordinal logistic regression analysis. There was a significant interaction effect between John Henryism and gender: being male was positively associated with happiness among participants with low John Henryism, but negatively associated with happiness among participants with high John Henryism. While further study would be required in order to establish the extent to which these findings can be generalized as well as their causal underpinnings, the results indicate that John Henryism is negatively associated with happiness, especially among men, and underscore the limitations of using self-reported measures of happiness as proxies for well-being for purposes of public policy. PMID:21666864

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Hennekam syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia Information Johns Hopkins Medicine: Lymphedema Management (PDF) VascularWeb: Lymphedema General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  9. John Dewey, an Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the annual Presidential address of Phi Kappa Phi, presented on May 8, 1962, was John Dewey. Dewey is identified in the public mind chiefly as an educational philosopher. In this address, the author describes the life and work of John Dewey as an indefatigable student of life whose interests ranged, like those of Aristotle, over the…

  10. Genetics Home Reference: MECP2-related severe neonatal encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Johns Hopkins Children's Center: Failure to Thrive Kennedy Krieger Institute: Epilepsy (Seizure Disorder) Kennedy Krieger Institute: Intellectual Disability MalaCards: mecp2-related severe neonatal ...

  11. Art in wartime: The First Wounded, London Hospital, August 1914.

    PubMed

    Park, M P; Park, R H R

    2011-06-01

    John Lavery's The First Wounded, London Hospital, August 1914 records a memorable event in the First World War. This painting and the archives of the Royal London Hospital provide a fascinating insight into the nursing and medical care of these early war casualties.

  12. Conceptions of Childhood in the Educational Philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2015-01-01

    This article compares progressive conceptions of childhood in the educational philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey. Although the lives of the two philosophers were separated by an ocean and two centuries of history, they had in common the following things: (1) a relatively high level of experience working with, and observing, children that is…

  13. Archaeological Survey of Cooper Lake, Number 6, 1989. Cultural Resource Studies for Cooper Lake, Hopkins and Delta Counties, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    area in the Cooper Lake project are-a, ca. 145 kmf (90 mi) northerst of Dallas, Texas. The study area includes two recreatioa’al areas, South Sulphur...Number 6 study area, Delta and Hopkins counties, Texas, showing the locations of project segments defined for the geomorphological investigations...32 Figure 6-5 Representative stratigraphic profiles from the Finley Iranch, Branam Creek, and South Sulphur River floodplain project segments

  14. LANDMARK-BASED SPEECH RECOGNITION: REPORT OF THE 2004 JOHNS HOPKINS SUMMER WORKSHOP.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Baker, James; Borys, Sarah; Chen, Ken; Coogan, Emily; Greenberg, Steven; Juneja, Amit; Kirchhoff, Katrin; Livescu, Karen; Mohan, Srividya; Muller, Jennifer; Sonmez, Kemal; Wang, Tianyu

    2005-01-01

    Three research prototype speech recognition systems are described, all of which use recently developed methods from artificial intelligence (specifically support vector machines, dynamic Bayesian networks, and maximum entropy classification) in order to implement, in the form of an automatic speech recognizer, current theories of human speech perception and phonology (specifically landmark-based speech perception, nonlinear phonology, and articulatory phonology). All three systems begin with a high-dimensional multiframe acoustic-to-distinctive feature transformation, implemented using support vector machines trained to detect and classify acoustic phonetic landmarks. Distinctive feature probabilities estimated by the support vector machines are then integrated using one of three pronunciation models: a dynamic programming algorithm that assumes canonical pronunciation of each word, a dynamic Bayesian network implementation of articulatory phonology, or a discriminative pronunciation model trained using the methods of maximum entropy classification. Log probability scores computed by these models are then combined, using log-linear combination, with other word scores available in the lattice output of a first-pass recognizer, and the resulting combination score is used to compute a second-pass speech recognition output.

  15. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Delta)lambda equals 3 A) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original datareduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quicklook plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  16. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-04-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Δλ = 3 Å) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original data-reduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quick-look plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  17. Celebrating John Glenn’s Legacy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-02

    Sen. John Glenn, left, shakes hands with former Astronaut Steve Lindsey as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden smiles at an event celebrating John Glenn's legacy and 50 years of americans in orbit held at the Cleveland State University Wolstein Center on Friday, March 3, 2012 in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1998 Lindsey flew onboard the space shuttle Discovery along with then 77 year-old Sen. John Glenn for the STS-95 mission. Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth in 1962. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Improving Health Care Quality and Patient Safety Through Peer-to-Peer Assessment: Demonstration Project in Two Academic Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Mort, Elizabeth; Bruckel, Jeffrey; Donelan, Karen; Paine, Lori; Rosen, Michael; Thompson, David; Weaver, Sallie; Yagoda, Daniel; Pronovost, Peter

    Despite decades of investment in patient safety, unintentional patient harm remains a major challenge in the health care industry. Peer-to-peer assessment in the nuclear industry has been shown to reduce harm. The study team's goal was to pilot and assess the feasibility of this approach in health care. The team developed tools and piloted a peer-to-peer assessment at 2 academic hospitals: Massachusetts General Hospital and Johns Hopkins Hospital. The assessment evaluated both the institutions' organizational approach to quality and safety as well as their approach to reducing 2 specific areas of patient harm. Site visits were completed and consisted of semistructured interviews with institutional leaders and clinical staff as well as direct patient observations using audit tools. Reports with recommendations were well received and each institution has developed improvement plans. The study team believes that peer-to-peer assessment in health care has promise and warrants consideration for wider adoption.

  19. Soft Budget Constraints in Public Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Donald J

    2016-05-01

    A soft budget constraint arises when a government is unable to commit to not 'bailout' a public hospital if the public hospital exhausts its budget before the end of the budget period. It is shown that if the political costs of a 'bailout' are relatively small, then the public hospital exhausts the welfare-maximising budget before the end of the budget period and a 'bailout' occurs. In anticipation, the government offers a budget to the public hospital that may be greater than or less than the welfare-maximising budget. In either case, the public hospital treats 'too many' elective patients before the 'bailout' and 'too few' after. The introduction of a private hospital reduces the size of any 'bailout' and increases welfare. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope determination of the Io torus electron temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. T.; Bednar, C. J.; Durrance, S. T.; Feldman, P. D.; Mcgrath, M. A.; Moos, H. W.; Strobel, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfur ion emissions from the Io plasma torus observed by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) in 1990 December have been analyzed to determine the effective temperature of the exciting electrons. Spectra were obtained with a long slit that extended from 3.1 to 8.7 Jupiter radii R(sub J) on both dawn and dusk torus ansae. The average temperature of electrons exciting S(2+) emissions from the dawn ansa is (4800 +/- 2400) K lower than on the dusk ansa, a dawn-dusk asymmetry comparable in both sign and magnitude to that measured by the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) experiment. Emissions from S(2+) ions are generated in a source region with electron temperatures in the range 32,000-56,000 K; S(3+) ion emissions are excited by electrons that average 20,000-40,000 K hotter. This distinct difference suggests that the S(3+) emission source region is spatially separate from the S(2+) source region. Estimated relative aperture filling factors suggest that the S(3+) emissions originate from a region more extended out of the centrifugal plane than the S(2+) emissions.

  1. Children's Hospital visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-04

    NASA senior staff members from John C. Stennis Space Center traveled to Children's Hospital in New Orleans on Feb. 4 for a morning of educational outreach, offering interactive demonstrations and activities for children. Staff members offered cryogenic demonstrations, informative and interactive exhibits and a chance for children to take photos 'wearing' a space suit. Children also had a chance to interact with Stennis' astronaut mascot.

  2. The Impact of Hospital Payment Schemes on Healthcare and Mortality: Evidence from Hospital Payment Reforms in OECD Countries.

    PubMed

    Wubulihasimu, Parida; Brouwer, Werner; van Baal, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    In this study, aggregate-level panel data from 20 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries over three decades (1980-2009) were used to investigate the impact of hospital payment reforms on healthcare output and mortality. Hospital payment schemes were classified as fixed-budget (i.e. not directly based on activities), fee-for-service (FFS) or patient-based payment (PBP) schemes. The data were analysed using a difference-in-difference model that allows for a structural change in outcomes due to payment reform. The results suggest that FFS schemes increase the growth rate of healthcare output, whereas PBP schemes positively affect life expectancy at age 65 years. However, these results should be interpreted with caution, as results are sensitive to model specification. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. ICU early physical rehabilitation programs: financial modeling of cost savings.

    PubMed

    Lord, Robert K; Mayhew, Christopher R; Korupolu, Radha; Mantheiy, Earl C; Friedman, Michael A; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Needham, Dale M

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the potential annual net cost savings of implementing an ICU early rehabilitation program. Using data from existing publications and actual experience with an early rehabilitation program in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Medical ICU, we developed a model of net financial savings/costs and presented results for ICUs with 200, 600, 900, and 2,000 annual admissions, accounting for both conservative- and best-case scenarios. Our example scenario provided a projected financial analysis of the Johns Hopkins Medical ICU early rehabilitation program, with 900 admissions per year, using actual reductions in length of stay achieved by this program. U.S.-based adult ICUs. Financial modeling of the introduction of an ICU early rehabilitation program. Net cost savings generated in our example scenario, with 900 annual admissions and actual length of stay reductions of 22% and 19% for the ICU and floor, respectively, were $817,836. Sensitivity analyses, which used conservative- and best-case scenarios for length of stay reductions and varied the per-day ICU and floor costs, across ICUs with 200-2,000 annual admissions, yielded financial projections ranging from -$87,611 (net cost) to $3,763,149 (net savings). Of the 24 scenarios included in these sensitivity analyses, 20 (83%) demonstrated net savings, with a relatively small net cost occurring in the remaining four scenarios, mostly when simultaneously combining the most conservative assumptions. A financial model, based on actual experience and published data, projects that investment in an ICU early rehabilitation program can generate net financial savings for U.S. hospitals. Even under the most conservative assumptions, the projected net cost of implementing such a program is modest relative to the substantial improvements in patient outcomes demonstrated by ICU early rehabilitation programs.

  4. Observations of Comet Levy (1990c) with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Davidsen, A. F.; Blair, W. P.; Bowers, C. W.; Dixon, W. V.; Durrance, S. T.; Henry, R. C.; Ferguson, H. C.; Kimble, R. A.; Gull, Theodore R.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of Comet Levy (1990c) were made with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope during the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission on December 10, 1990. The spectrum, covering the wavelength range 415-1850 A at a spectral resolution of 3 A, shows the presence of carbon monoxide and atomic hydrogen, carbon, and sulfur in the coma. Aside from H I Lyman-beta, no cometary features are detected below 1200 A, although cometary O I and O II would be masked by the same emissions present in the day airglow spectrum. The 9.4 x 116 arcsecond aperture corresponds to 12,000 x 148,000 km at the comet. The derived production rate of CO relative to water is 0.11 + or - 0.02, compared with 0.04 + or - 0.01 derived from IUE observations (made in September 1990) which sample a much smaller region of the coma. This suggests the presence of an extended source of CO, as was found in comet Halley. Upper limits on Ne and Ar abundance are within one order of magnitude of solar abundances.

  5. Sources and dynamics of fluorescent particles in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M L; Knibbs, L D; He, C; Grzybowski, P; Johnson, G R; Huffman, J A; Bell, S C; Wainwright, C E; Matte, D L; Dominski, F H; Andrade, A; Morawska, L

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent particles can be markers of bioaerosols and are therefore relevant to nosocomial infections. To date, little research has focused on fluorescent particles in occupied indoor environments, particularly hospitals. In this study, we aimed to determine the spatial and temporal variation of fluorescent particles in two large hospitals in Brisbane, Australia (one for adults and one for children). We used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) to identify fluorescent particle sources, as well as their contribution to total particle concentrations. We found that the average concentrations of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent particles were higher in the adults' hospital (0.06×10 6 and 1.20×10 6  particles/m 3 , respectively) than in the children's hospital (0.03×10 6 and 0.33×10 6  particles/m 3 , respectively) (P<.01). However, the proportion of fluorescent particles was higher in the children's hospital. Based on the concentration results and using activity diaries, we were able to identify sources of particle production within the two hospitals. We demonstrated that particles can be easily generated by a variety of everyday activities, which are potential sources of exposure to pathogens. Future studies to further investigate their role in nosocomial infection are warranted. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Concurrent Validity Between a Shared Curriculum, the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination, and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Stephen D; Bertram, Amanda; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2015-03-01

    A core objective of residency education is to facilitate learning, and programs need more curricula and assessment tools with demonstrated validity evidence. We sought to demonstrate concurrent validity between performance on a widely shared, ambulatory curriculum (the Johns Hopkins Internal Medicine Curriculum), the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE), and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination (ABIM-CE). A cohort study of 443 postgraduate year (PGY)-3 residents at 22 academic and community hospital internal medicine residency programs using the curriculum through the Johns Hopkins Internet Learning Center (ILC). Total and percentile rank scores on ILC didactic modules were compared with total and percentile rank scores on the IM-ITE and total scores on the ABIM-CE. The average score on didactic modules was 80.1%; the percentile rank was 53.8. The average IM-ITE score was 64.1% with a percentile rank of 54.8. The average score on the ABIM-CE was 464. Scores on the didactic modules, IM-ITE, and ABIM-CE correlated with each other (P < .05). Residents completing greater numbers of didactic modules, regardless of scores, had higher IM-ITE total and percentile rank scores (P < .05). Resident performance on modules covering back pain, hypertension, preoperative evaluation, and upper respiratory tract infection was associated with IM-ITE percentile rank. Performance on a widely shared ambulatory curriculum is associated with performance on the IM-ITE and the ABIM-CE.

  7. Concurrent Validity Between a Shared Curriculum, the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination, and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination

    PubMed Central

    Sisson, Stephen D.; Bertram, Amanda; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Background A core objective of residency education is to facilitate learning, and programs need more curricula and assessment tools with demonstrated validity evidence. Objective We sought to demonstrate concurrent validity between performance on a widely shared, ambulatory curriculum (the Johns Hopkins Internal Medicine Curriculum), the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE), and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination (ABIM-CE). Methods A cohort study of 443 postgraduate year (PGY)-3 residents at 22 academic and community hospital internal medicine residency programs using the curriculum through the Johns Hopkins Internet Learning Center (ILC). Total and percentile rank scores on ILC didactic modules were compared with total and percentile rank scores on the IM-ITE and total scores on the ABIM-CE. Results The average score on didactic modules was 80.1%; the percentile rank was 53.8. The average IM-ITE score was 64.1% with a percentile rank of 54.8. The average score on the ABIM-CE was 464. Scores on the didactic modules, IM-ITE, and ABIM-CE correlated with each other (P < .05). Residents completing greater numbers of didactic modules, regardless of scores, had higher IM-ITE total and percentile rank scores (P < .05). Resident performance on modules covering back pain, hypertension, preoperative evaluation, and upper respiratory tract infection was associated with IM-ITE percentile rank. Conclusions Performance on a widely shared ambulatory curriculum is associated with performance on the IM-ITE and the ABIM-CE. PMID:26217421

  8. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope - Performance and calibration during the Astro-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, Arthur F.; Long, Knox S.; Durrance, Samuel T.; Blair, William P.; Bowers, Charles W.; Conard, Steven J.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fountain, Glen H.; Kimble, Randy A.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported of spectrophotometric observations, made with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), of 77 astronomical sources throughout the far-UV (912-1850 A) at a resolution of about 3 A, and, for a small number of sources, in the extreme UV (415-912 A) beyond the Lyman limit at a resolution of about 1.5 A. The HUT instrument and its performance in orbit are described. A HUT observation of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B is presented, and the photometric calibration curve for the instrument is derived from a comparison of the observation with a model stellar atmosphere. The sensitivity reaches a maximum at 1050 A, where 1 photon/sq cm s A yields 9.5 counts/s A, and remains within a factor of 2 of this value from 912 to 1600 A. The instrumental dark count measured on orbit was less than 0.001 counts/s A.

  9. [Tunisian adaptation of Hopkins Verbal Learning Test , Form 1].

    PubMed

    Dellagi, Lamia; Ben Azouz, Olfa; Johnson, Ines; Kebir, Oussama; Amado, Isabelle; Tabbane, Karim

    2009-10-01

    Memory impairment and verbal learning are the most common cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) is considered to be the most reliable test to asses memory and verbal learning in this mental illness. to create one form of the HVLT which would suit our linguistic and cultural context and to study the characteristics of this test in a group of healthy subjects. The HVLT consists of a list of 12 words belonging to 3 semantic categories and which are read orally to the subject with an immediate and differed recall. The first part of this work was to select words from a lexical database in order to create the list of the HVLT. The test was then administered to 103 subjects aged from 17- to 45-years-old (mean=27,4; SD =7,3) and having between 1 and 20 years of education ( mean=12,2; SD=5,3). No statistical difference was found within performances of the HVLT across gender and sex. Whereas, years of education was found to have an impact on performances. Although statistically difference was found across level of education. Our study permitted us to create one form of the HVLT which well suits our Tunisian context and which we could use to evaluate memory functions among people suffering from schizophrenia.

  10. Promising New Directions in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2003-01-01

    "Biochemistry," by Lubert Stryer, has become one of the standard textbooks for the field. The Fifth Edition has two new authors: Jeremy Berg, Professor and Director of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and John Tymoczko, the Towsley Professor of Biology at Carleton College. The new edition does,…

  11. Impairment of different protein domains causes variable clinical presentation within Pitt-Hopkins syndrome and suggests intragenic molecular syndromology of TCF4.

    PubMed

    Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Marangi, Giuseppe; Calvello, Maria Rosaria; Ricciardi, Stefania; Leone, Francesca Pia Chiara; Baccarin, Marco; Guerneri, Silvana; Orteschi, Daniela; Murdolo, Marina; Lattante, Serena; Frangella, Silvia; Keena, Beth; Harr, Margaret H; Zackai, Elaine; Zollino, Marcella

    2017-11-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability and a distinctive facial gestalt. It is caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene. The TCF4 protein has different functional domains, with the NLS (nuclear localization signal) domain coded by exons 7-8 and the bHLH (basic Helix-Loop-Helix) domain coded by exon 18. Several alternatively spliced TCF4 variants have been described, allowing for translation of variable protein isoforms. Typical PTHS patients have impairment of at least the bHLH domain. To which extent impairment of the remaining domains contributes to the final phenotype is not clear. There is recent evidence that certain loss-of-function variants disrupting TCF4 are associated with mild ID, but not with typical PTHS. We describe a frameshift-causing partial gene deletion encompassing exons 4-6 of TCF4 in an adult patient with mild ID and nonspecific facial dysmorphisms but without the typical features of PTHS, and a c.520C > T nonsense variant within exon 8 in a child presenting with a severe phenotype largely mimicking PTHS, but lacking the typical facial dysmorphism. Investigation on mRNA, along with literature review, led us to suggest a preliminary phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants affecting TCF4. An intragenic phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants in TCF4 is suggested here for the first time: variants within exons 1-4 and exons 4-6 give rise to a recurrent phenotype with mild ID not in the spectrum of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (biallelic preservation of both the NLS and bHLH domains); variants within exons 7-8 cause a severe phenotype resembling PTHS but in absence of the typical facial dysmorphism (impairment limited to the NLS domain); variants within exons 9-19 cause typical Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (impairment of at least the bHLH domain). Understanding the TCF4 molecular syndromology can allow for proper nosology in the current era of whole genomic investigations. Copyright

  12. Developing hospital accreditation standards in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Galukande, Moses; Katamba, Achilles; Nakasujja, Noeline; Baingana, Rhona; Bateganya, Moses; Hagopian, Amy; Tavrow, Paula; Barnhart, Scott; Luboga, Sam

    2016-07-01

    Whereas accreditation is widely used as a tool to improve quality of healthcare in the developed world, it is a concept not well adapted in most developing countries for a host of reasons, including insufficient incentives, insufficient training and a shortage of human and material resources. The purpose of this paper is to describe refining use and outcomes of a self-assessment hospital accreditation tool developed for a resource-limited context. We invited 60 stakeholders to review a set of standards (from which a self-assessment tool was developed), and subsequently refined them to include 485 standards in 7 domains. We then invited 60 hospitals to test them. A study team traveled to each of the 40 hospitals that agreed to participate providing training and debrief the self-assessment. The study was completed in 8 weeks. Hospital self-assessments revealed hospitals were remarkably open to frank rating of their performance and willing to rank all 485 measures. Good performance was measured in outreach programs, availability of some types of equipment and running water, 24-h staff calls systems, clinical guidelines and waste segregation. Poor performance was measured in care for the vulnerable, staff living quarters, physician performance reviews, patient satisfaction surveys and sterilizing equipment. We have demonstrated the feasibility of a self-assessment approach to hospital standards in low-income country setting. This low-cost approach may be used as a good precursor to establishing a national accreditation body, as indicated by the Ministry's efforts to take the next steps. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. John Bahcall and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta

    2016-03-01

    ``I feel like dancing'', cheered John Bahcall upon hearing the exciting news from the SNO experiment in 2001. The results confirmed, with remarkable accuracy, John's 40-year effort to predict the rate of neutrinos from the Sun based on sophisticated Solar models. What began in 1962 by John Bahcall and Ray Davis as a pioneering project to test and confirm how the Sun shines, quickly turned into a four-decade-long mystery of the `Solar Neutrino Problem': John's models predicted a higher rate of neutrinos than detected by Davis and follow-up experiments. Was the theory of the Sun wrong? Were John's calculations in error? Were the neutrino experiments wrong? John worked tirelessly to understand the physics behind the Solar Neutrino Problem; he led the efforts to greatly increase the accurately of the solar model, to understand its seismology and neutrino fluxes, to use the neutrino fluxes as a test for new physics, and to advocate for important new experiments. It slowly became clear that none of the then discussed possibilities --- error in the Solar model or neutrino experiments --- was the culprit. The SNO results revealed that John's calculations, and hence the theory of the Solar model, have been correct all along. Comparison of the data with John's theory demanded new physics --- neutrino oscillations. The Solar Neutrino saga is one of the most amazing scientific stories of the century: exploring a simple question of `How the Sun Shines?' led to the discovery of new physics. John's theoretical calculations are an integral part of this journey; they provide the foundation for the Solar Neutrino Problem, for confirming how the Sun shines, and for the need of neutrino oscillations. His tenacious persistence, dedication, enthusiasm and love for the project, and his leadership and advocacy of neutrino physics over many decades are a remarkable story of scientific triumph. I know John is smiling today.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers begin moving NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into the building MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - is being taken into a high bay clean room where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers begin moving NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into the building MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - is being taken into a high bay clean room where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift begins lowering NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto the ground. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift begins lowering NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto the ground. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare to attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare to attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers check the moveable pallet holding NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers check the moveable pallet holding NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., is offloaded. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., is offloaded. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  20. Marcel Breuer at Saint John's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    A visitor to Saint John's University and Saint John's Abbey, in north-central Minnesota, sees something of Gothic heritage while standing in front of the abbey church, designed and built around 1960. The church's 112-foot campanile--a trapezoidal slab made of 2,500 tons of steel and concrete--stands boldly in front of a huge concrete honeycomb…

  1. Demythologizing John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharya, N. C.

    1974-01-01

    This article takes a brief but critical look at John Dewey's version of pragmatism, his contribution to philosophical scholarship generally as well as his theory and practice of liberalism. (Author/RK)

  2. Hospital admissions for dental treatment among children with cleft lip and/or palate born between 1997 and 2003: an analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics in England.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Kate J; Copley, Lynn P; Smallridge, Jacqueline A; Clark, Victoria J; van der Meulen, Jan H; Deacon, Scott A

    2014-05-01

    Children with clefts have an increased tendency for dental anomalies and caries. To determine the pattern of hospital admissions for dental treatment during primary dentition among children with clefts. Cohort study based on Hospital Episode Statistics, an administrative database of all admissions to National Health Service hospitals in England. Patients born alive between 1997 and 2003 who had both a cleft diagnosis and cleft repair were included. The number of hospital admissions for surgical removal of teeth, simple extraction of teeth, and restoration of teeth before the age of seven was examined. Eight hundred and fifty-eight hospital admissions for dental treatment among 6551 children (<7 year) with a cleft were identified. 66.4% of admissions were primarily for caries and 95.6% involved extractions. 11.4% of children had at least one admission for dental treatment. The presence of additional anomalies, having a more severe cleft type, and living in relatively deprived areas increased the risk of hospital admission. Factors increasing the risk of hospital admission among cleft children should be taken into account when planning services. Efforts to reduce the number of hospital admissions should be focused on disease prevention, particularly among those most at risk of caries. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. SciTech Connect

    Rodland, Karin

    New research identifies critical proteins present in the tumors of women with ovarian cancer. Karin Rodland discusses the work led by PNNL and Johns Hopkins researchers, working with collaborators across the nation.

  4. The Inner Workings of Ovarian Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Rodland, Karin

    2018-06-12

    New research identifies critical proteins present in the tumors of women with ovarian cancer. Karin Rodland discusses the work led by PNNL and Johns Hopkins researchers, working with collaborators across the nation.

  5. It's a Lot of Pun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, Leslye Donner

    1986-01-01

    Humor in college and university publications is helping editors and designers communicate to target audiences. Successful campus punmakers are identified at LaGuardia Community College, Brigham Young University, and Johns Hopkins. (MLW)

  6. John Leask Lumley: Whither Turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibovich, Sidney; Warhaft, Zellman

    2018-01-01

    John Lumley's contributions to the theory, modeling, and experiments on turbulent flows played a seminal role in the advancement of our understanding of this subject in the second half of the twentieth century. We discuss John's career and his personal style, including his love and deep knowledge of vintage wine and vintage cars. His intellectual contributions range from abstract theory to applied engineering. Here we discuss some of his major advances, focusing on second-order modeling, proper orthogonal decomposition, path-breaking experiments, research on geophysical turbulence, and important contributions to the understanding of drag reduction. John Lumley was also an influential teacher whose books and films have molded generations of students. These and other aspects of his professional career are described.

  7. Logos Announced the Light of Salvation: Interpreting How John Presented His Message in John 1:1-18, According to Functional Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollinger, Seth

    2014-01-01

    This study of John 1:1-18 describes how John (the speaker) presented his message to his audience within their activity of verbal communication. By focusing on verbal meaning, this interpretation analyzes how John presented and expressed his meanings through language by interpreting this text based on the seamless interrelation between John's…

  8. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    John W. Firor, a former Director of the High Altitude Observatory and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and a founder of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, died of Alzheimer's disease in Pullman, Washington on November 5, 2007, he was 80. He was born in Athens Georgia on October 18, 1927, where his father was a professor of agricultural economics. John had an unusually diverse scientific career. His interest in physics and astrophysics began while serving in the army, during which time he was assigned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he guarded highly radioactive materials (many have heard him describe how informal the protections were compared to later times). After his service he returned to college and graduated in physics from Georgia Tech in 1949. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1954, writing his thesis on cosmic rays under John Simpson. John Firor would later remark that: "If you needed cosmic rays to actually do anything, you are sunk." That thought, partly in jest, may help explain his motivation for moving to so many new scientific and management pursuits. John moved from cosmic ray physics to radio astronomy (particularly of the Sun) when he began work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, where he remained until 1961. During this time, he met Walter Orr Roberts, then the Director of the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) in Boulder, Colorado. HAO was then affiliated with the University of Colorado. In 1959, a movement began to upgrade the atmospheric sciences in the United States by establishing a National Center, where the largest, most important atmospheric research problems could be addressed. Roberts became the first Director of NCAR, as well as the first president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the consortium of universities that was commissioned to manage and staff the new Center. HAO became a

  9. A New Way to Manage TCGA Data - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Rachel Karchin, of Johns Hopkins University's Department of Biomedical Engineering, is developing a tool that will help researchers sort through the massive amounts of genomic data gathered from TCGA's ovarian cancer tumor samples.

  10. The Small Body Mapping Tool (SBMT) for Accessing, Visualizing, and Analyzing Spacecraft Data in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnouin, O. S.; Ernst, C. M.; Daly, R. T.

    2018-04-01

    The free, publicly available Small Body Mapping Tool (SBMT) developed at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is a powerful, easy-to-use tool for accessing and analyzing data from small bodies.

  11. Training Postbac JHU | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Johns Hopkins University and the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have partnered to create a new concentration in the Master of Science in Biotechnology program, called

  12. Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR)

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) Program at The Johns Hopkins University provides high-quality next generation sequencing and genotyping services to investigators working to discover genes that contribute to common diseases.

  13. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  14. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  15. Hospitalization costs and complications in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Chao; Fang, Kai; Shi, Moye; Yu, Guopei; Hu, Yonghua

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate hospitalization costs, diabetes complications, and their relationships using a large dataset in Beijing, China. Data for 2006-10 from the 38 top-ranked (Grade 3 A) hospitals in Beijing, obtained from electronic Hospitalization Summary Reports (HSRs), were analyzed for hospitalization costs and diabetic complications. Patient demographics, types of costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS) were also evaluated. During the period evaluated, 62 523 patients with diabetes were hospitalized, of which 41 875 (67.0 %) had diabetes-associated complications. The median cost of hospitalization for diabetic patients was 7996.11 RMB. Prescribed drugs and laboratory tests were two major contributors to hospitalization costs, accounting for 36.2 % and 22.4 %, respectively. Hospitalization costs were significantly associated with LOS, number of complications, age, year of admission, admission status, sex, and medical insurance (P < 0.001). Both hospitalization costs and LOS increased substantially with an increase in the number of complications (P < 0.001). The highest hospitalization costs were seen in those diabetic patients with foot complications. Diabetic complications have a significant effect on increases in hospitalization costs and LOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Cochlear Implants Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together

    MedlinePlus

    ... University. Photo: Johns Hopkins University Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together Mia and Isabelle Jeppsen, 10, share ... her mother, gratefully, "There's the obvious benefit of learning to read, write and communicate with facility and ...

  17. Trustworthy Research Institutions: The Challenging Case of Studying the Genetics of Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Josephine; Banerjee, Mohini P; Geller, Gail

    2015-01-01

    It is simple enough to claim that academic research institutions ought to be trustworthy. Building the culture and taking the steps necessary to earn and preserve institutional trust are, however, complex processes. The experience motivating this special report--a request for the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University to collaborate on research regarding the genetics of intelligence--illustrates how ensuring institutional trustworthiness can be in tension with a commitment to fostering research. In this essay, we explore the historical context for biomedical research institutions like Johns Hopkins that have worked to build local community trust. In so doing, we consider how the example under focus in this special report can lead to greater consideration of how research institutions balance fostering trust with their other commitments. © 2015 The Hastings Center.

  18. Recent Observations and Structural Analysis of Surge-Type Glaciers in the Glacier Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, H.; Herzfeld, U. C.

    2003-12-01

    The Chugach-St.-Elias Mountains in North America hold the largest non-polar connected glaciated area of the world. Most of its larger glaciers are surge-type glaciers. In the summer of 2003, we collected aerial photographic and GPS data over numerous glaciers in the eastern St. Elias Mountains, including the Glacier Bay area. Observed glaciers include Davidson, Casement, McBride, Riggs, Cushing, Carroll, Rendu, Tsirku, Grand Pacific, Melbern, Ferris, Margerie, Johns Hopkins, Lamplugh, Reid, Burroughs, Morse, Muir and Willard Glaciers, of which Carroll, Rendu, Ferris, Grand Pacific, Johns Hopkins and Margerie Glaciers are surge-type glaciers. Our approach utilizes a quantitative analysis of surface patterns, following the principles of structural geology for the analysis of brittle-deformation patterns (manifested in crevasses) and ductile deformation patterns (visible in folded moraines). First results will be presented.

  19. Episiotomy - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap 166. Review Date 5/16/2016 Updated by: Irina Burd, ... Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  20. Introduction - NCS Dietary Assessment Literature Review

    Cancer.gov

    To assist in the planning of the National Children's Study, investigators at the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, NCI and Johns Hopkins University contracted with Westat to conduct a comprehensive review of the scientific literature.

  1. Celebrating John Glenn’s Legacy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-02

    Former NASA Astronaut Steve Lindsey gives remarks at an event celebrating John Glenn's legacy and 50 years of americans in orbit held at the Cleveland State University Wolstein Center on Friday, March 3, 2012 in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1998 Lindsey flew onboard the space shuttle Discovery along with then 77 year-old Sen. John Glenn for the STS-95 mission. Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth in 1962. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Celebrating John Glenn’s Legacy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-02

    Wife of former astronaut and Senator John Glenn, Annie Glenn, listens intently to Cleveland State University Master of Music Major James Binion Jr. as he sings a musical tribute during an event celebrating John Glenn's legacy and 50 years of americans in orbit held at the university's Wolstein Center on Friday, March 3, 2012 in Cleveland, Ohio. Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth in 1962. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. 175.4 The Relationship of Aging and Inflammatory Biomarkers to Gray Matter Volume and Episodic Memory Performance in Schizophrenia: Evidence of Pathological Accelerated Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Clarissa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with increased somatic morbidity and mortality, in addition to cognitive impairments similar to those seen in normal aging, which may suggest that pathological accelerated aging occurs in SZ. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the relationships of age, telomere length (TL) and CCL11 (aging and inflammatory biomarkers), and gray matter volumes (GM) to episodic memory performance in individuals with SZ compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods: 112 participants (48 SZ and 64 HC) underwent clinical and memory assessments, structural MRI, and had their peripheral blood drawn for biomarkers analysis. Comparisons of group means and correlations were performed. Results: Participants with SZ had decreased TL and GM residual volume, increased CCL11, and worse memory performance compared to HC. In SZ, shorter TL was related to increased CCL11, and they were both related to reduced GM residual volume, all of which were related to worse memory performance. Older age was only associated with reduced GM, but longer duration of illness was related with all the aforementioned variables. Younger age of disease onset was related with increased CCL11 levels and worse memory performance. In HC, there were no significant correlations except for between memory and GM. Conclusion: Our results are consistent with accelerated aging in SZ. These results may indicate that it is not age itself, but the impact of the disease associated with a pathological accelerated aging that leads to impaired outcomes in SZ. Akira Sawa, johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Hospital and Medical Institutions

  4. John N Bahcall (1934 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    John Norris Bahcall, passed away on August 17, 2005, in NewYork City, USA. He was born on December 30, 1934, in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. He was Richard Black Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Natural Sciences at the Institute forAdvanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, USA and a recipient of the National Medal of Science. In addition, he was President of the American Astronomical Society, President-Elect of the American Physical Society, and a prominent leader of the astrophysics community. John had a long and prolific career in astronomy and astrophysics, spanning five decades and the publication of more than five hundred technical articles, books, and popular papers. John's most recognized scientific contribution was the novel proposal in 1964, together with Raymond Davis Jr, that scientific mysteries of our Sun `how it shines, how old it is, how hot it is' could be examined by measuring the number of neutrinos arriving on Earth from the Sun. Measuring the properties of these neutrinos tests both our understanding of how stars shine and our understanding of fundamental particle physics. However, in the 1960s and 1970s, the observations by Raymond Davis Jr showed a clear discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions, based on standard solar and particle physics models, and what was experimentally measured. This discrepancy, known as the `Solar Neutrino Problem', was examined by hundreds of physicists, chemists, and astronomers over the subsequent three decades. In the late 1990s through 2002, new large-scale neutrino experiments in Japan, Canada, Italy, and Russia culminated in the conclusion that the discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions and the experimental results required a modification of our understanding of particle physics: neutrinos must have a mass and `oscillate' among different particle states. In addition to neutrino astrophysics, John contributed to many areas of astrophysics including the study of dark matter in

  5. SAO/NASA joint investigation of astronomical viewing quality at Mount Hopkins Observatory: 1969-1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Bufton, J. L.; Hogan, D.; Kurtenbach, D.; Goodwin, K.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the astronomical seeing conditions have been made with a stellar-image monitor system at the Mt. Hopkins Observatory in Arizona. The results of this joint SAO-NASA experiment indicate that for a 15-cm-diameter telescope, image motion is typically 1 arcsec or less and that intensity fluctuations due to scintillation have a coefficient of irradiance variance of less than 0.12 on the average. Correlations between seeing quality and local meteorological conditions were investigated. Local temperature fluctuations and temperature gradients were found to be indicators of image-motion conditions, while high-altitude-wind conditions were shown to be somewhat correlated with scintillation-spectrum bandwidth. The theoretical basis for the relationship of atmospheric turbulence to optical effects is discussed in some detail, along with a description of the equipment used in the experiment. General site-testing comments and applications of the seeing-test results are also included.

  6. Obituary: John Louis Africano III, 1951-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Edwin, S.

    2007-12-01

    The orbital debris, space surveillance, and astronomical communities lost a valued and beloved friend when John L. Africano passed away on July 27, 2006, at the young age of 55. John passed away in Honolulu, Hawaii, from complications following a heart attack suffered while playing racquetball, which was his avocation in life. Born on February 8, 1951, in Saint Louis, Missouri, John graduated with a B.S. in Physics from the University of Missouri at Saint Louis in 1973, and received a Master's degree in Astronomy from Vanderbilt University in 1974. John had a real love for astronomical observing and for conveying his many years of experience to others. He encouraged many young astronomers and mentored them in the basics of photometry and astronomical instrumentation. John was author or co-author on nearly one-hundred refereed publications ranging from analyses of cool stars to the timing of occultations to space surveillance. He was honored for his contributions to minor planet research when the Jet Propulsion Laboratory named Minor Planet 6391 (Africano) after him. John held operational staff positions at several major observatories including McDonald Observatory in Texas, Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, and the Cloudcroft Telescope Facility in New Mexico. He observed at numerous observatories worldwide, including Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile, developing a world-wide network of friends and colleagues. John's ability to build diverse teams through his managerial and technical skills, not to mention his smiling personality, resulted in numerous successes in the observational astronomy and space surveillance arenas. As an astronomer for Boeing LTS Inc., he worked for many years at the Advanced Maui Optical and Space Surveillance site (AMOS) on Maui, Hawaii, where he contributed his operational and instrumental expertise to both the astronomy and space surveillance communities. He was also the co-organizer of the annual AMOS

  7. Women's health

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 25. Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina Burd, ... Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  8. Imperforate hymen

    MedlinePlus

    ... 149. Sucato GS, Murray PJ. Pediatric and adolescent gynecology. In: Zitelli, BJ, McIntire SC, Norwalk AJ, eds. ... by: Irina Burd, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of ...

  9. Preterm labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL, et al, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Burd, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked cardiac valvular dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis), abnormal blood clots, or sudden death. X-linked ... Johns Hopkins Medicine: Mitral Valve Prolapse MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Endocarditis MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Mitral Valve Prolapse General Information from ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Small fiber neuropathy is considered a form of peripheral neuropathy because it affects the peripheral nervous system, which ... Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Educational Resources (4 links) Johns Hopkins ...

  12. John locke on personal identity.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body.

  13. Obituary: John Sulston (1942-2018).

    PubMed

    White, John

    2018-05-08

    John Sulston, a pioneer in the developmental studies of the nematode C. elegans who went on to spearhead the sequencing of the genome of this organism and ultimately the human genome, died on 6th March 2018, shortly after being diagnosed with stomach cancer. Here, I reflect on John's life and work, with a particular focus on his time working on the developmental genetics and lineage of C. elegans . © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. SETI group let by Barney Oliver, John Wolfe and John Billingham (in middle standing) lead a 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    SETI group let by Barney Oliver, John Wolfe and John Billingham (in middle standing) lead a 1976 discussion on the best strategies in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. Joining the discussion are L-R; Charles Seeger, Dario Black, Mary Connors, (Oliver, Wolfe, Billingham) and Larry Lesyna, (seated) Mark Stull.

  15. What hospitals need to know about guidelines-A mixed-method analysis of guideline implementation in Dutch hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blume, Louise H K; van Weert, Nico J H W; Busari, Jamiu O; Stoopendaal, Annemiek M V; Delnoij, Diana M J

    2017-12-01

    This study provides insight into how Dutch hospitals ensure that guidelines are used in practice and identifies what key messages other hospitals can learn from existing practices. We examine current practices in handling compliance and, therefore, focus on hospitals that reported that they do not experience problems in the implementation of guidelines. A survey of Dutch hospital boards and 9 semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 3 hospitals. Interviews were held with 3 representatives of each hospital, specifically, with a member of the board of directors, a member of the executive medical staff, and the manager of the quality and safety department. Hospitals find guidelines necessary and useful. Hospitals have the power to improve implementation if boards of directors and medical staff are committed, intrinsically motivated, cooperate with each other, and use guidelines pragmatically. Even then, they prioritize guidelines, as resources are scarce. Despite their good work, all hospitals in this study appeared to struggle to adhere to guidelines. If hospitals experience problems with guideline implementation, they tend to focus more on external expectations, leading to defensive behaviour. Hospitals that do not experience implementation problems focus more on integrating guidelines into their own policies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. John Collins Warren: Master educator and pioneer surgeon of ether fame.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alexander Horacio

    2006-01-01

    John Collins Warren (1778-1856) represented the apex of surgery and medicine of the first half of nineteenth century Boston. Educated at Harvard College where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts in 1797, he contemplated the idea of a business career prior to setting sail for a traditional medical education at Europe's finest universities. From 1799 to 1802, he attended prestigious medical and surgical lectures in London, Edinburgh, and Paris. Warren received an honorary MD from Scotland's St. Andrews University in 1802. He then returned to Boston and joined his father's practice. In 1815, he followed his accomplished father as the Hersey Professor of Anatomy and Surgery at Harvard Medical School. He held this position with great distinction until 1847 when he retired as professor emeritus. From 1816 to 1819 he served as Harvard Medical School dean and received an honorary medical degree at the end of his term.John Collins Warren had numerous surgical accomplishments during his illustrious career. Clinically, he was active and varied in his practice, operating on strangulated hernias, tumors, and cataracts, in addition to performing vascular surgery and amputations. He published many articles and books of widespread circulation. Professor Warren also performed the first reported case of ether anesthesia administered by William T. Morton on October 16, 1846. Outside the operating theatre, Doctor Warren and his colleagues were revered for founding the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1821, and years before, in 1812, Warren and his associates established the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery. In light of his varied contributions, John Collins Warren is remembered as a dedicated and innovative surgeon, as well as a committed medical educator, able administrator and effective leader.

  17. A century-old leadership style revitalizes the heroic hospital.

    PubMed

    Kania, A J

    1993-01-01

    "Those who fail history are destined to repeat it." Emmett C. Murphy, Ph.D., an international business consultant found that the key to individual and organizational leadership is a heroic commitment to service and the reengineering of the work that it requires. Murphy, whose clients include IBM, General Motors, Johns Hopkins, Centers for Disease Control, Johnson & Johnson, and Memorial Sloan Kettering; was a consultant with Booz-Allen Hamilton and served on the faculties of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the State University of New York before founding E. C. Murphy, Ltd. His firm focuses on the application of quality improvement and work reengineering strategies for creating a patient-focused "heroic" organization. Recently, Dr. Murphy and Michael Snell co-authored an intriguing management book based on the fundamental business strategies historically found in an unlikely western figure. The The Genius of Sitting Bull (Prentice Hall, 1993), Murphy and Snell examine the leadership styles of the Sioux chief and General Custer at the peaks of their careers and used 13 heroic strategies common to Sitting Bull's management style as a metaphor for for successful leadership on the great plains of American health care and business life.

  18. Celebrating John Glenn’s Legacy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-02

    Cleveland State University Master of Music Major James Binion Jr. sings a musical tribute during an event celebrating John Glenn's legacy and 50 years of americans in orbit held at the university's Wolstein Center on Friday, March 3, 2012 in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1998 Lindsey flew onboard the space shuttle Discovery along with then 77 year-old Sen. John Glenn for the STS-95 mission. Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth in 1962. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Dr. Cila Herman, G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. She is the principal investigator for the Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields.

  20. A to Z with Jasper Johns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2008-01-01

    One contemporary artist that kindergarten students can easily relate to is Jasper Johns. In this article, the author discusses how she introduced John's numeric and alphabetic paintings to her kindergarten students. The young artists were amazed that art can be created from the familiar symbols that they are learning to make in their regular…

  1. Artificial Neural Network Approaches in Guidance and Control (Les Reseaux Neuroniques Artificiels, Voie a Explorer dans le Domaine du Guidage et du Pilotage)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    34 ofetworker eqmpleuoaorreation withbounethat basis vectors (Lawley & Maxwell , 1963). naletwk arn ungd eqatsi wthe boune E It is possible to think of the...passive sonar system IJCNN- signal Aerospace Technology Center, John 89 Washington proceedings Hopkins University) Analysis of hidden Succesful use of...establish the weighted equations and C3 applications interconnmctions of the net and electronic feedback based AUTH: A/CONNELL, JOHN C ., JR. CORP, Naval

  2. John Henry--The Steel Driving Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David E.; Gulley, Laura L.

    2005-01-01

    The story of John Henry provided the setting for sixth-grade class to participate in a John Henry Day of mathematics experiments. The students collected data from experiments where students competed against machines and technology. The student analyzed the data by comparing two box plots, a box plot of human data, and a box plot of machine or…

  3. John C. Mather, the Big Bang, and the COBE

    Science.gov Websites

    Additional Information * Videos John C. Mather Courtesy of NASA "Dr. John C. Mather of NASA's Goddard excerpt from NASA Scientist Shares Nobel Prize for Physics 2Edited excerpt from John Mather: The Path to a Spacecraft Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Additional Web Pages: Dr. John C Mather, NASA

  4. Design of the optical communication system for the asteroid impact mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, C.; Sodnik, Z.; Carnelli, I.

    2017-09-01

    The Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is part of the joint Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) project of ESA, DLR, Observatoire de la Côte d'Ázur, NASA, and Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL).

  5. Lean healthcare in developing countries: evidence from Brazilian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luana Bonome Message; Filho, Moacir Godinho; Rentes, Antonio Freitas; Bertani, Thiago Moreno; Mardegan, Ronaldo

    2017-01-01

    The present study evaluates how five sectors of two Brazilian hospitals have implemented lean healthcare concepts in their operations. The main characteristics of the implementation process are analyzed in the present study: the motivational factor for implementation, implementation time, form (consultancy or internal), team (hospital and consultants), lean implementation continuity/sustainability, lean healthcare tools and methods implemented, problems/improvement opportunities, lean healthcare barriers faced during the implementation process, and critical factors that affected the implementation and the results obtained in each case. The case studies indicate that reducing patient lead times and costs and making financial improvements were the primary factors that motivated lean healthcare implementation in the hospitals studied. Several tools and methods were used in the cases studied, especially value stream mapping and DMAIC. The barriers found in both hospitals are primarily associated with the human factor. Additionally, the results obtained after implementation were analyzed and improvements in financial aspects, productivity and capacity, and lead time reduction of the analyzed sectors were observed. Further, this study also exhibited four propositions elaborated from the results obtained from the cases that highlighted barriers and challenges to lean healthcare implementation in developing countries. Two of these barriers are hospital organizational structure (and, consequently, how the senior management works with medical staff), and outsourcing hospital activities. This study also concluded that the initialization and maintenance of lean healthcare implementation rely heavily on external support because lean healthcare subject knowledge is not yet available in the healthcare organization, which represents a challenge. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and the...

  7. KSC-06pd0009

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-01-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Hal Weaver, New Horizons project scientist with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, signs the fairing enclosing the New Horizons spacecraft. The fairing protects the spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned. The compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe carries seven scientific instruments that will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015.

  8. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying within an area bounded by a line beginning at a point located at the west bank of St. Johns River at...

  9. Heavy Fermion Materials and Quantum Phase Transitions Workshop on Frontiers of the Kondo Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-12

    Stefan Kirchner (Max Planck) discussed the role of quantum criticality on the superconducting condensation in heavy-fermion superconductors , and...Collin Broholm (Johns Hopkins) discussed magnetic excitations of heavy fermion superconductors . The workshop concluded with a wide-ranging talk by

  10. Cardiology in the young : where we have been. Where we are. Where we are going.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2014-12-01

    , Jeffrey P. Jacobs, MD, FACS, FACC, FCCP, became Editor-in-Chief of Cardiology in the Young . Jeffrey P. Jacobs, MD, FACS, FACC, FCCP is Director of the Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program at Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute and Professor of Cardiac Surgery in the Division of Cardiac Surgery of the Department of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University. He is also Surgical Director of the Heart Transplantation Program and Director of the Extracorporeal Life Support Program at Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute. Dr Jacobs has been a cardiothoracic surgeon at All Children's Hospital since 1998.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift helps offload NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft shipped from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift helps offload NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft shipped from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  12. Johns Hopkins nursing evidence-based practice Johns Hopkins nursing evidence-based practice Sandra L Dearholt and Deborah Dang Sigma Theta Tau International £24.70 256pp 9781935476764 1935476769 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2012-10-26

    EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE has become the accepted term for a systematic approach by all healthcare professionals to service provision. However, as this and other recent publications demonstrate, even though there is acceptance in theory that practice should be evidence based, making the concept a reality in clinical and educational settings still requires work.

  13. Analysis performed in support of the Ad-Hoc Working Group of RTCA SC-159 on RAIM/FDE issues

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, the FAA requested that RTCA SC-159 address one of the recommendations from the study performed by the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Applied Physics Lab (APL) on the use of GPS and augmented GPS for aviation applications. This recommendation...

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PREPARATION OF STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (G01)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to develop a consistent method and style for all Emory University/Harvard University/Johns Hopkins University standard operating procedures. SOPs are necessary to document all procedures, methods, and techniques used in the NHEXAS investigations. Deve...

  15. Pressure Points: Preventing and Controlling Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead author of a February 2006 report in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association , which links healthier eating habits to lowered blood pressure. "While an individual's blood ... of high blood pressure," says Appel, a professor at Johns Hopkins University ...

  16. Stephen Baylin, M.D., Explains Genetics and Epigenetics - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen Baylin, M.D., at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discusses the how alterations in the DNA code are deciphered in a combined effort with The Cancer Genome Atlas at the National Cancer Institute to decode the brain cancer genome.

  17. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2014-01-01

    We describe the instrument architecture of the Johns Hopkins University-led CLASS instrument, a groundbased cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter that will measure the large-scale polarization of the CMB in several frequency bands to search for evidence of inflation.

  18. Reflections on Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Kerryn A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes programmatic changes in reference services at the Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical library and speculates on the future. Topics include institutional restructuring and consolidation; improvements in technology infrastructure; external economic pressure; and fiscal accountability, including library funding and cost center…

  19. 46 CFR 7.90 - St. Johns River, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false St. Johns River, FL. 7.90 Section 7.90 Shipping COAST... § 7.90 St. Johns River, FL. A line drawn from the southeasternmost extremity of Little Talbot (Spike) Island to latitude 30°23.8′ N. longitude 81°20.3′ W. (St. Johns Lighted Whistle Buoy “2 STJ”); thence to...

  20. St. John's wort: a new alternative for depression?

    PubMed

    Josey, E S; Tackett, R L

    1999-03-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to review the existing literature concerning the therapeutic uses, adverse effects, and possible drug interactions of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) as compared to other antidepressant medications. Reference material was obtained through database searches with time restrictions of 1985 to the present. Studies selected were those written in the English language which compared the role of St. John's wort, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of depression. Other studies were selected based on their evaluation of the safety and efficacy of St. John's wort as an antidepressant for a minimum of four weeks. A review of existing literature recognized nine clinical trials that reported the efficacy of St. John's wort as compared to placebo and to other antidepressant medications. Of these nine, four controlled studies were chosen based upon their large patient populations and their consistency in brand and dosage of St. John's wort used. These four studies demonstrated that St. John's wort was as effective as other antidepressant medications and more effective than placebo, as the clinical symptoms of depression greatly decreased upon administration of H. perforatum. The side-effect profile of H. perforatum at this time appears to be superior to any current U.S.-approved antidepressant medication. From the existing literature, St. John's wort appears to be a safe and effective alternative in the treatment of depression. Tricylic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors can produce serious cardiac side-effects, such as tachycardia and postural hypotension, and many unwanted anticholinergic side-effects, including dry mouth and constipation. St. John's wort has proven to be free of any cardiac, as well as anticholinergic, side-effects normally seen with antidepressant medications. Based upon limited studies, St. John's wort appears to be an

  1. Price Changes in Regulated Healthcare Markets: Do Public Hospitals Respond and How?

    PubMed

    Verzulli, Rossella; Fiorentini, Gianluca; Lippi Bruni, Matteo; Ugolini, Cristina

    2017-11-01

    This paper examines the behaviour of public hospitals in response to the average payment incentives created by price changes for patients classified in different diagnosis-related groups (DRGs). Using panel data on public hospitals located within the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, we test whether a 1-year increase in DRG prices induced public hospitals to increase their volume of activity and whether a potential response is associated with changes in waiting times and/or length of stay. We find that public hospitals reacted to the policy change by increasing the number of patients with surgical treatments. This effect was smaller in the 2 years after the policy change than in later years, and for providers with a lower excess capacity in the pre-policy period, whereas it did not vary significantly across hospitals according to their degree of financial and administrative autonomy. For patients with medical DRGs, instead, there appeared to be no effect on inpatient volumes. Our estimates also suggest that an increase in DRG prices had no impact on the proportion of patients waiting more than 6 months. Finally, we find no evidence of a significant effect on patients' average length of stay. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  3. 33 CFR 117.325 - St. Johns River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Johns River. 117.325 Section 117.325 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.325 St. Johns River. (a) The drawspan...

  4. Hospital agenda to prioritize. Interview by Donald E. Johnson..

    PubMed

    Forsyth, J D

    1991-09-01

    How does a teaching hospital balance the needs of patient care with its educational mission? What changes in focus must the CEO make to accommodate reductions in federal funding while maintaining academic excellence? In the following interview with Health Care Strategic Management's Donald E. L. Johnson, John D. Forsyth, executive director of the University of Michigan Hospitals, discusses the challenges facing his institution. The interview focuses on many topics including setting priorities, funding researchers and countering any "anti-science" perceptions.

  5. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    John J. Hillman, a dedicated NASA civil servant, spectroscopist, astrophysicist, planetary scientist, and mentor, died on February 12, 2006 of ocular melanoma at his home in Columbia, Maryland. His professional and personal interests were wide-reaching and varied, and he devoted his career to the advancement of our understanding of the beauty and wonder in the world around us. His love of nature, art, and science made him a true Renaissance man. John was born in Fort Jay, New York, on November 22, 1938, and was raised in Washington, D.C. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from American University in 1967, 1970, and 1975, respectively. He began working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, then in its infancy, in 1969, juggling a full-time position as a Research Physicist, the completion of his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, and a young family. His background in molecular spectroscopy enabled him to apply his skills to numerous disciplines within NASA: infrared and radio astronomy; electronic, vibrational, and rotational structure of interstellar molecules; solar and stellar atmospheres; and planetary atmospheres. He published more than 70 journal papers in these disciplines. He was a frequent contributor to the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, and possessed a rare ability to bridge the gap between laboratory and remote sensing spectroscopy, bringing scientists from different disciplines together to understand our Universe. The last fifteen years of John's career were devoted to the development of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) cameras. He championed this technology as a low-cost, low-power alternative to traditional imaging cameras for in situ or remotely sensed planetary exploration. It was within this context that I got to know John, and eventually worked closely with him on the demonstration and application of this technology for planetary science using ground-based telescopes in New Mexico, California

  6. The retrospectroscope-the invention of the rechargeable cardiac pacemaker: vignette #9.

    PubMed

    Fischell, R E

    1990-01-01

    The idea for a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker came to the author in the late 1960s after reading an advertisement stating that a company's batteries were so good they would last two years in a heart pacemaker. This meant that pacemaker patients would have to undergo surgery for their replacement frequently. Having worked on the development of hermetically sealed, nickel-cadmium batteries that could function for a decade or longer in an orbiting spacecraft, the author constructed the first prototype of a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker around 1968 to show cardiologists at Johns Hopkins Hospital that a pacemaker of indefinitely long life and much smaller size and weight could be built readily. The subsequent development and marketing of the device, which came on the market in 1973, is recounted.

  7. Predictors of severity in childhood pancreatitis: correlation with nutritional status and racial demographics.

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, Alexandra; Cuffari, Carmen; Santo Domingo, Lisa; Scheimann, Ann O

    2015-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the leading causes of rising pediatric hospitalizations in North America. The aim of this study was to assess the role of nutritional status and racial influences on the severity of acute pancreatitis in children. The institutional review board approved this retrospective chart review of children with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis between the ages of 0 and 18 years hospitalized at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Parameters studied included biochemical markers associated with pancreatitis, review of severity of illness reflected through the length of stay, and pediatric intensive care unit admission. The length of in-patient hospitalization was longer for children with imaging findings of pseudocyst or pancreatic necrosis (23.1 ± 26.4 days vs 4.4 ± 10.6 days; P = 0.0074) and malnourished children versus normal weight and obese children (16.5 days for malnourished vs 10.6 days for normal weight vs 10.7 days for obese; P = 0.04). There was also a significant difference in the need for pediatric intensive care unit admission across ethnic groups (18% African American vs 7% white) (P = 0.04). Ethnicity and nutritional status may influence the severity and duration of hospitalization among children with pancreatitis.

  8. Genealogy of John and Charles Bell: their relationship with the children of Charles Shaw of Ayr.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, M

    2005-11-01

    The Reverend William Bell had six children who survived infancy. Two of his sons entered the legal profession and two other sons became distinguished anatomists and surgeons--John Bell, said for 20 years to have been the leading operating surgeon in Britain and throughout the world--and Sir Charles Bell, possibly the most distinguished anatomist and physiologist of his day. Information is not known about the fifth son or their sister. Charles Shaw, a lawyer of Ayr, had four sons and two daughters who survived infancy. Two of his sons, John and Alexander, became anatomists and later surgeons at the Middlesex Hospital, and both worked closely with Charles Bell at the Great Windmill Street School of Anatomy. His third son entered the law and his fourth son became a distinguished soldier. The two daughters of Charles Shaw married into the Bell family: Barbara married George Joseph Bell and Marion married Mr (later Sir) Charles Bell.

  9. Angiogenesis and Therapeutic Approaches to NF1 Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    history, and pathogenesis. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Rizvi TA, Huang Y, Sidani A, Atit R, Largaespada DA, Boissy RE, Ratner N. 2002...29 plexiform and 4 MPNSTs) were immunostained for PR. Interestingly, half of the women contributing tumors to this immunohistochemical analysis

  10. 76 FR 65517 - National Institute on Drug Abuse Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, including.... Place: Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus..., Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Baltimore...

  11. 78 FR 55265 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, including.... Place: Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus..., Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Baltimore...

  12. Feature Extraction and Classification of FLIR Imagery Using Relative Locations of Non-Homogeneous Regions with Feedforward Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Proceedings of Tri-Service Data Fusion Symposium, Johns Hopkins University, May 1989. 39. F. Rosenblatt. Principles of Neurodynamics : Perceptrons and the...104 47. David E. Rummelhart and James L. McClelland. Parallel Distributed Processing: Explorations in the Microstructure of Cognition , volume 1. The

  13. In memoriam - John M. Young (1942-2013)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is with sadness that friends and colleagues of John Young learnt of his death at home in Auckland, New Zealand on 30th September 2013. John began his scientific career at the Plant Diseases Division (PDD) of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR), New Zealand after completing...

  14. General medicine advanced training: lessons from the John Hunter training programme.

    PubMed

    Jackel, D; Attia, J; Pickles, R

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in the number of advanced trainees pursuing general medicine as a specialty. This reflects an awareness of the need for broader training experiences to equip future consultant physicians with the skills to manage the healthcare challenges arising from the demographic trends of ageing and increasing comorbidity. The John Hunter Hospital training programme in general medicine has several characteristics that have led to the success in producing general physicians prepared for these challenges. These include support from a core group of committed general physicians, an appropriate and sustainable funding model, flexibility with a focus on genuine training and developing awareness of a systems approach, and strong links with rural practice. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  15. Patient goal setting as a method for program improvement/development in partial hospitalization programs.

    PubMed

    Gates, A

    1991-12-01

    Data were collected from a study of 49 patients in 1990 and 106 patients in 1991 admitted into Country View Treatment Center and Green Country Counseling Center. Country View is a 30-bed chemical dependency residential center operating under St. John Medical Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Green Country is an evening partial hospital chemical dependency program operating under St. John Medical Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, The tools used in this study were the Country View Patient Self-Reporting Questionnaire, the global Rating Scale, and the Model of Recovering Alcoholics Behavior Stages and Goal Setting (Wing, 1990). These assessments were specifically designed to measure the patient's perceptions of goal setting and the patient's perspective on treatment outcome. The study outcome resulted in program improvement (Green Country evening partial hospital program) and the development of the Country View Substance Abuse Intermediate Link (SAIL) Program (day partial hospital).

  16. With the best intentions: lead research and the challenge to public health.

    PubMed

    Rosner, David; Markowitz, Gerald

    2012-11-01

    In 2001, Maryland's court of appeals was asked to decide whether researchers at Johns Hopkins University had engaged in unethical research on children. During the 1990s, Johns Hopkins's Kennedy Krieger Institute had studied 108 African American children, aged 6 months to 6 years, to find an inexpensive and "practical" means to ameliorate lead poisoning. We have outlined the arguments in the case and the conundrum faced by public health researchers as they confront new threats to our health from environmental and industrial insults. We examined the case in light of contemporary public health ideology, which prioritizes harm reduction over the historical goals of prevention. As new synthetic toxins-such as bisphenyl A, polychlorinated biphenyls, other chlorinated hydrocarbons, tobacco, vinyl, and asbestos-are discovered to be biologically disruptive and disease producing at low levels, lead provides a window into the troubling dilemmas public health will have to confront in the future.

  17. A Flight Through the Universe, by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Miguel; Subbarao, Mark; Szalay, Alex

    This animated flight through the universe was made by Miguel Aragon of Johns Hopkins University with Mark Subbarao of the Adler Planetarium and Alex Szalay of Johns Hopkins. There are close to 400,000 galaxies in the animation, with images of the actual galaxies in these positions (or in some cases their near cousins in type) derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. Vast as this slice of the universe seems, its most distant reach is to redshift 0.1, corresponding to roughly 1.3 billion light years from Earth. SDSS Data Release 9 from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopicmore » Survey (BOSS), led by Berkeley Lab scientists, includes spectroscopic data for well over half a million galaxies at redshifts up to 0.8 -- roughly 7 billion light years distant -- and over a hundred thousand quasars to redshift 3.0 and beyond.« less

  18. KSC-99pp0381

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-05

    At Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite is unveiled before prelaunch processing. FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17

  19. Improved data illustration in complex multi-ligament knee reconstruction surgery: using the historical principles of Florence Nightingale and John Venn.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Paul D; McNicholas, Mike J

    2008-04-01

    The collection of multi-ligament knee reconstruction procedure data generates long tabulated lists of featureless abbreviations, which are often difficult to interpret and present. As demonstrated with the launch of the Scandinavian anterior cruciate ligament registries, such data are under increasing scrutiny. When developing a visual tool to improve the interpretation, presentation, and ongoing collection of data within this field, much can be learnt from the historical teachings of Florence Nightingale and John Venn. Unknown to many, Florence Nightingale was a pioneer of graphic data illustration, becoming a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society in 1858. Further advances in the visualization of complex data relations were made by John Venn, who introduced the Venn diagram in 1880. With this background in mind, the present work has been based upon the senior author's case series of 70 patients undergoing complex knee-ligament reconstruction at Warrington Hospital, from 2001 to the present time. Although obviously not negating the need for tabulated data, the graphic representation put forward here successfully supplements featureless tabulated lists of abbreviations and can be updated easily and regularly. Providing a clear, bright illustration that is free from patient identifiers, it can be used in presentations and publications, and freely accessed by a multidisciplinary team. It assists in the identification of injury patterns, can accommodate illustration of associated factors such as meniscal injury, and clearly demonstrates each hospital's multi-ligament knee reconstruction experience. This facilitates comparison and collaboration between hospitals and promotes research.

  20. Quality competition and hospital mergers-An experiment.

    PubMed

    Han, Johann; Kairies-Schwarz, Nadja; Vomhof, Markus

    2017-12-01

    On the basis of a Salop model with regulated prices, we investigate quality provision behaviour of competing hospitals before and after a merger. For this, we use a controlled laboratory experiment where subjects decided on the level of treatment quality as head of a hospital. We find that the post-merger average quality is significantly lower than the average pre-merger quality. However, for merger insiders and outsiders, average quality choices are significantly higher than predicted for pure profit-maximising hospitals. This upward deviation is potentially driven by altruistic behaviour towards patients. Furthermore, we find that in the case where sufficient cost synergies are realised by the merged hospitals, there is a significant increase in average quality choices compared to the scenario without synergies. Finally, we find that our results do not change when comparing individual decisions to team decisions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. MIMoSA: An Automated Method for Intermodal Segmentation Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Brain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Valcarcel, Alessandra M; Linn, Kristin A; Vandekar, Simon N; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Muschelli, John; Calabresi, Peter A; Pham, Dzung L; Martin, Melissa Lynne; Shinohara, Russell T

    2018-03-08

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for in vivo detection and characterization of white matter lesions (WMLs) in multiple sclerosis. While WMLs have been studied for over two decades using MRI, automated segmentation remains challenging. Although the majority of statistical techniques for the automated segmentation of WMLs are based on single imaging modalities, recent advances have used multimodal techniques for identifying WMLs. Complementary modalities emphasize different tissue properties, which help identify interrelated features of lesions. Method for Inter-Modal Segmentation Analysis (MIMoSA), a fully automatic lesion segmentation algorithm that utilizes novel covariance features from intermodal coupling regression in addition to mean structure to model the probability lesion is contained in each voxel, is proposed. MIMoSA was validated by comparison with both expert manual and other automated segmentation methods in two datasets. The first included 98 subjects imaged at Johns Hopkins Hospital in which bootstrap cross-validation was used to compare the performance of MIMoSA against OASIS and LesionTOADS, two popular automatic segmentation approaches. For a secondary validation, a publicly available data from a segmentation challenge were used for performance benchmarking. In the Johns Hopkins study, MIMoSA yielded average Sørensen-Dice coefficient (DSC) of .57 and partial AUC of .68 calculated with false positive rates up to 1%. This was superior to performance using OASIS and LesionTOADS. The proposed method also performed competitively in the segmentation challenge dataset. MIMoSA resulted in statistically significant improvements in lesion segmentation performance compared with LesionTOADS and OASIS, and performed competitively in an additional validation study. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  2. Baclofen dosage after traumatic spinal cord injury: a multi-decade retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Veerakumar, Ashan; Cheng, Jennifer J; Sunshine, Abraham; Ye, Xiaobu; Zorowitz, Richard D; Anderson, William S

    2015-02-01

    To perform an analysis of oral baclofen dosage in patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries over time and to ascertain the clinical determinants of long-term baclofen dosage trends. Retrospective cohort study of patient records from the PM&R units at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. A total of 115 PM&R patients suffering spinal cord injury due to trauma leading to either complete or incomplete paralysis. The modes of injury included were motor vehicle accidents (MVA) (n=39), gunshot wounds (GSW) (n=55), falls (n=17), diving (n=2), workplace (n=1) and swimming (n=1) accidents. The location of injury in the spinal cord was categorized into either cervical (n=52), thoracic (n=59), lumbar (n=2), or unspecified (n=2). From time of injury, an aggregate of all dosage assignments for each patient demonstrated a significant yearly increase in baclofen dosage (1.26 mg/year, p<0.01). Baclofen dosage for MVA cases were seen to rise at 4.99 mg/year (p<0.0001). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that GSW patients received their first baclofen dosage earlier than MVA patients (log-rank p<0.05, unadjusted). We observed a marginal increase in baclofen dosage over nearly 25 years in a single provider's patient database and observed different timings of first dose between two causes of traumatic SCI. These results provide an estimate of baclofen dosage trends over time after spinal cord injury and may be useful for patient counseling or as a method to assess costs of providing SCI patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Max Brödel: his art, legacy, and contributions to neurosurgery through medical illustration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2011-07-01

    Max Brödel is considered the father of modern medical illustration. This report reviews his contributions to neurosurgery as a medical illustrator. Max Brödel, a young artist from Leipzig, Germany, was hired at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1894, where he illustrated an operative textbook of gynecology for Howard A. Kelly. Although Brödel did not have any formal medical training, he quickly acquired knowledge of anatomy, pathology, physiology, and surgery. Brödel's extraordinary illustrations were characterized by an aerial perspective that conveyed the surgeon's operative viewpoint and precise surgical anatomy. He masterfully incorporated tissue realism with cross-sectional anatomy to accentuate concepts while maintaining topographical accuracy. Brödel's reputation spread quickly and resulted in collaborations with prominent surgeons, such as Cushing, Halsted, and Dandy. Cushing, who also possessed artistic talent, became a pupil of Brödel and remained a very close friend. In 1911, Brödel was appointed the director of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine at Johns Hopkins, the first academic department of its kind in the world. For the next several decades, he trained generations of renowned medical illustrators. Just as Osler, Halsted, and Cushing passed their skills and knowledge to future leaders of medicine and surgery, Brödel did the same for the field of medical illustration. The advancement of neurosurgical education has been greatly facilitated by Max Brödel's artistic contributions. His unique ability to synthesize art and medicine resulted in timeless illustrations that remain indispensable to surgeons. The art produced by his legacy of illustrators continues to flourish in neurosurgical literature today.

  4. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Mechanisms of Asthma-Dietary Interventions against Environmental Triggers - Johns Hopkins University

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    this center, researchers focus on children living in the inner city of Baltimore, Maryland to study how certain foods cause asthmatic responses and whether certain foods make a person’s asthma better or worse

  5. Cost efficiency of US hospitals: a stochastic frontier approach.

    PubMed

    Rosko, M D

    2001-09-01

    This study examined the impact of managed care and other environmental factors on hospital inefficiency in 1631 US hospitals during the period 1990-1996. A panel, stochastic frontier regression model was used to estimate inefficiency parameters and inefficiency scores. The results suggest that mean estimated inefficiency decreased by about 28% during the study period. Inefficiency was negatively associated with health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration and industry concentration. It was positively related with Medicare share and for-profit ownership status. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome: A Review of Current Literature, Clinical Approach, and 23-Patient Case Series.

    PubMed

    Goodspeed, Kimberly; Newsom, Cassandra; Morris, Mary Ann; Powell, Craig; Evans, Patricia; Golla, Sailaja

    2018-03-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is a rare, genetic disorder caused by a molecular variant of TCF4 which is involved in embryologic neuronal differentiation. PTHS is characterized by syndromic facies, psychomotor delay, and intellectual disability. Other associated features include early-onset myopia, seizures, constipation, and hyperventilation-apneic spells. Many also meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder. Here the authors present a series of 23 PTHS patients with molecularly confirmed TCF4 variants and describe 3 unique individuals. The first carries a small deletion but does not exhibit the typical facial features nor the typical pattern of developmental delay. The second exhibits typical facial features, but has attained more advanced motor and verbal skills than other reported cases to date. The third displays typical features of PTHS, however inherited a large chromosomal duplication involving TCF4 from his unaffected father with somatic mosaicism. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first chromosomal duplication case reported to date.

  7. John Kotter on Leadership, Management and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencivenga, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Excerpts from interview with John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership at the Harvard Business School, about his thoughts on the role of the superintendent as leader and manager. Describes his recent book "John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do," 1999. Lists eight-step change process from his book "Leading Change," 1996. (PKP)

  8. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  9. The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing - Europe (CAAT-EU): a transatlantic bridge for the paradigm shift in toxicology.

    PubMed

    Daneshian, Mardas; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing - Europe (CAAT-EU) was founded based collaboration between the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Konstanz. CAAT-EU, housed at the University of Konstanz, will coordinate transatlantic activities to promote humane science in research and education, and participate, as partner or coordinator, in publicly and privately funded European projects. Thomas Hartung will serve as program liaison representing Johns Hopkins University and Marcel Leist as the University of Konstanz liaison. CAAT-EU aims to: 1) Set up transatlantic consortia for international research projects on alternative methods. 2) Establish a CAAT Europe faculty and advisory board composed of sponsor representatives and prominent academics from Europe . 3) Participate in the Transatlantic Think Tank for Toxicology (t4) devoted to conceptual work for the paradigm shift in toxicology. 4) Coordinate a series of information days in Europe on relevant developments in the US, similar to the 2009 series CAAT held in the US on EU issues (one on the 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and one on EU and US chemical regulation). 5) Support ALTEX as the official journal of CAAT and CAAT-EU. 6) Develop strategic projects with sponsors to promote humane science and new toxicology, especially with CAAT faculty members. 7) Develop a joint education program between Johns Hopkins and the University of Konstanz, such as e-courses and the existing Humane Science Certificate program developed by CAAT, a student exchange program, and collaboration with the International Graduate School "Cell-based Characterization of De- and Regeneration" in Konstanz.

  10. In memoriam: John Warren Aldrich, 1906-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    John Aldrich was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on 23 February 1906, and went to the Providence public schools. He developed a broad interest in natural history at an early age, being stimulated by his mother, a kindergarten teacher, who introduced him to nature books. His interest was strengthened by Harold L. Madison, Director of the Park Museum in Providence, an Associate ( = member) of the AOU. As a high school student, John taught nature study at the Rhode Island Boy Scout Camp in summers. John was President of his class at Classical High School, and manager of the school's football team in his senior year. Also in that year, 1923, John published his first paper, a note in Bird-Lore on the occurrence of the Mockingbird in Rhode Island. That paper is a literary gem, showing that his skill in writing developed as early as his knowledge of birds. His early interest in football continued as well; he was a devoted fan of the Washington Redskins in his later years.

  11. Optimizing Airborne Networking Performance with Cross-Layer Design Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Schiavone , L.J.; “Airborne Networking –Approaches and Challenges,” Military Communications Conference IEEE, Oct 31 – Nov 3, 2004, Vol. 1, pp. 404...www.ccny.cuny.edu/cint/ [5] John Seguí and Esther Jennings,’’ Delay Tolerant Networking – Bundle Protocol Simulation’’ [6] DTNRG website...throughput route selection in multi-rate ad hoc wireless networks,” Technical report, Johns Hopkins CS Dept, March 2003. v 2. [15] R. Draves, J

  12. Quantum Optoelectronics Technical Digest, 1993. Volume 8. Postconference Edition. Summaries of Papers Presented at the Quantum Optoelectronics Topical Meeting Held in Palm Springs, California on March 17-19, 1993.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Japan Wayne Knox AT&T Bell Laboratories Emilio Mendez IBM T J Watson Research Center Manfred PlIkuhn Universit~t Stuttgart, Germany John Ryan University...B. Khurgin, Shaozhong Li, Johns Hopkins Univ. Nonlinear optical fundamental-mode photons is demonstrated. (p. 6) properties of quantum wells, based on...OThAl Microcavity VCSELs, J. L. Jewell, Photonics Research 2:45 pm Inc.; A. Scherer, B. Van der Gaag, L. M. Schiavone , J. P. Harbison, QWC4 Semiconductor

  13. Dedication: John Reuben Clark.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volume 40 of Horticultural reviews is dedicated to John Reuben Clark (University of Arkansas) for his outstanding contributions to horticulture. While known particularly for his impact on blackberry, blueberry, table grape, and peach cultivar development, he has also been a strong and enthusiastic v...

  14. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #16: POTENTIAL HEALTH IMPACTS OF CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CHANGE FOR THE UNITED STATES, EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF THE REPORT OF THE HEALTH SECTOR OF THE U.S. NATIONAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The health sector assessment was sponsored by and conducted in partnership with EPA's Global Change Research Program. The report was produced by a Health Sector Work Group, co-chaired by Dr. Jonathan Patz (Johns Hopkins University) and Dr. Michael McGeehin (CDC), and this report ...

  15. One Small Collection of Images, Many Giant Strides Forward for MESSENGER

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-23

    This image compilation shows some of the most exciting images taken thus far on the MESSENGER mission. A mural-sized copy hangs next to the MESSENGER Science Operations Center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16364

  16. Lagged PM2.5 effects in mortality time series: Critical impact of covariate model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two most common approaches to modeling the effects of air pollution on mortality are the Harvard and the Johns Hopkins (NMMAPS) approaches. These two approaches, which use different sets of covariates, result in dissimilar estimates of the effect of lagged fine particulate ma...

  17. Full Text Journal Subscriptions: An Evolutionary Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luther, Judy

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of companies offering Web accessible subscriptions to full text electronic versions of scientific, technical, and medical journals (Academic Press, Blackwell, EBSCO, Elsevier, Highwire Press, Information Quest, Institute of Physics, Johns Hopkins University Press, OCLC, OVID, Springer, and SWETS). Also lists guidelines for…

  18. No Vacancy: Inn Provides Revenue Source for Financially Troubled Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Jerry G.; Brant, Joseph F.

    1994-01-01

    The Peabody Institute of Baltimore (Maryland), the Johns Hopkins University's music school, addressed its financial problems by converting four campus buildings into an inn used to house Elderhostel participants. Annual program revenues cover all costs and yield a financial reserve for the school. (MSE)

  19. The Making of the Modern University: Intellectual Transformation and the Marginalization of Morality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuben, Julie A.

    This book, which is based on research at eight universities--Harvard (Massachusetts), Yale (Connecticut), Columbia (New York), Johns Hopkins (Maryland), Chicago (Illinois), Stanford (California), Michigan, and California at Berkeley explores the transition from the classical college, with its broad nineteenth-century conceptions of morality and…

  20. An Assessment of Some Watch Schedule Variants Used in Cdn Patrol Frigates: OP Nanook 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Original signed by Stephen Boyne Stephen Boyne Section Head, Individiual Behavior and Performance Approved for release by Original sighed by Joseph V...with the US Army, is employed by SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation) and Johns Hopkins University and is currently under contract to

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Mozart Effect on Childhood Epilepsy--A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackney, Dana E.; Brooks, Jessica L.

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review examines the effectiveness of Mozart's music in decreasing seizures in children with epilepsy (Mozart Effect) using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice rating scale©. A search for articles with "Mozart Effect," "child*," and "epilepsy" was conducted in CINAHL Complete, Science…

  2. John Dewey: Su filosofia y filosofia de la educacion (John Dewey: His Philosophy and Philosophy of Education). Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    This paper forms part of an investigation about how the philosophy of John Dewey (1859-1952) can illuminate the practice of the teaching of English as a foreign language. The paper seeks to interpret and synthesize John Dewey's philosophical works to construct a "Deweyian lens" with which to analyze and evaluate the field of the teaching…

  3. Hospital CIO Explains Blockchain Potential: An Interview with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's John Halamka.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Leslie

    2018-01-01

    Work is already underway to bring blockchain technology to the healthcare industry, and hospital administrators are trying to figure out what it can do for them, their clinicians, and their patients. That includes administrators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a leading academic medical center located in Boston.

  4. Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, Clinton, Missouri) Circa 1900, photographer unknown JOHN AND ALMIRA FRENCH IN FRONT OF WEST AND SOUTH FACADES - John French Farm, South Grand River, Deepwater, Henry County, MO

  5. The association of hospital governance with innovation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen-Wei; Yan, Yu-Hua; Fang, Shih-Chieh; Inamdar, Syeda Noorein; Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Hospitals in Taiwan are facing major changes and innovation is increasingly becoming a critical factor for remaining competitive. One determinant that can have a significant impact on innovation is hospital governance. However, there is limited prior research on the relationship between hospital governance and innovation. The purpose of this study is to propose a conceptual framework to hypothesize the relationship between governance mechanisms and innovation and to empirically test the hypotheses in hospital organizations. We examine the relationship between governance mechanisms and innovation using data on 102 hospitals in Taiwan from the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation and Quality Improvement. We model governance mechanisms using board structure, information transparency and strategic decision-making processes. For our modeling and data analysis we use measurement and structural models. We find that in hospital governance, information transparency and strategic decision making did impact innovation. However, governance structure did not. To facilitate innovation, hospital boards can increase information transparency and improve the decision-making process when considering strategic investments in innovative initiatives. To remain competitive, hospital boards need to develop and monitor indices that measure hospital innovation to ensure ongoing progress. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Warrens and other pioneering clinician pathologists of the Massachusetts General Hospital during its early years: an appreciation on the 200th anniversary of the hospital founding.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert H; Louis, David N

    2011-10-01

    To celebrate the bicentennial of the 1811 charter to establish the Massachusetts General Hospital, we tell the stories of the physicians and surgeons of the hospital who practiced pathology until the discipline was more firmly established with the recruitment of James Homer Wright who became the first full-time pathologist at the hospital in 1896. One of the two co-founders of the hospital, John Collins Warren (famed primarily for being the surgeon at the first public demonstration of ether anesthesia) had a major interest in pathology; he published a book focused on gross pathology (1837) and began the important specimen collection subsequently known as the Warren Anatomical Museum at Harvard Medical School (HMS). An early physician, John Barnard Swett Jackson, became the first professor of pathology in the United States (1847) and was a noted collector whose specimens were added to the Warren Museum. Dr Jackson showed no interest in microscopy when it became available, but microscopy was promoted from circa the late 1840s at Harvard and likely at the hospital by Oliver Wendell Holmes, the famed essayist who was on the staff of the hospital and faculty at the medical school. Microscopy was probably first used at the Hospital with any frequency on examination of fluids by the first officially designated 'Microscopist,' John Bacon Jr, in 1851, and after the mid-1850s by Calvin Ellis on anatomic specimens; Ellis went on to pioneering reform of the HMS curriculum. Reginald Heber Fitz succeeded Ellis in 1871 and was the first to be officially designated as 'Pathologist' at the hospital. Fitz is remembered for two major contributions: his paper showing the nature of, and potential surgical cure for, the disease that he termed 'appendicitis'; and his description of acute pancreatitis. With the microscope now firmly entrenched and with the increase in surgery after Fitz's work on appendicitis, surgical pathology grew quickly. J Collins Warren, the grandson of the co

  7. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  8. Air and Space Power Joumal. Volume 25, Number 3, Fall 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Navarre, Florida Mr. Charles Tustin Kamps USAF Air Command and Staff College Dr. Tom Keaney Johns Hopkins University Col Merrick E. Krause , USAF, Retired...fighter pilots such as Wolfgang Falck, Hajo Herrmann, and Hans-Joachim Jabs. In this aspect, Heaton (a professor at the American Military University

  9. Information Technology Challenges Facing the Strategic Leaders of Homeland Security in the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-03

    A special thanks to all of these folks (Glenn Starnes, Lee Gutierrez, Bill Rapp, Joel Hillison, Carlos Gomez, Steve Fraunfelter, Janie Hopkins, Dave ...DiClemente, Joe Nunez, John Bonin , and Steve Nerheim). viii INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CHALLENGES FACING THE STRATEGIC LEADERS OF HOMELAND SECURITY IN THE 21ST

  10. X-Box Binding Protein-1 in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    analysis of gene expression (SAGE) as previously described (13), using the "SAGE" software (Dr. Kinzler, Johns Hopkins University). Most genes...rationale for endocrine therapy in breast cancer. Best Pract. Res. Clin. Endocrinol. Metabol. 18, 1–32. Molinari, A. M., Bontempo, P., Schiavone , E. M

  11. Center of Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences Annual Report, Year 9

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    faculty at INSEAD in Paris, France, THESEUS in Sophia, Antibe, and the London Business School. Gave an invited presentation and chaired a panel at...the conference on digital cash held at THESEUS . Visited the Department of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University with Nabil Adam (Rutgers

  12. Beyond the Wild Blue Yonder: Creating an Air and Space Culture in Today’s Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Organizational Change . 2nd ed. Westport, C.T.: Praeger Publishers, 1994. Estes III, Gen Howell M. “Air Force at a Crossroad” Speech, Air Force...American Military Styles in Strategy and Analysis. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989. Conner, Patrick E., and Linda K. Lake. Managing

  13. Empowerment of the General Educator through Effective Teaching Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Dianne F.; And Others

    Johns Hopkins University and Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland, jointly sponsor the program "SUPPORTS for Least Restrictive Environment," a graduate program in special education which supports the vision of educating all students together in the general education classroom. In the practicum phase of their program, general…

  14. What Students Do in the Summer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Discusses results of a study and report on the academic achievement of low-socioeconomic students. The study, conducted by Johns Hopkins University researchers Alexander, Entwisle, and Olson, appears in summer 2001 issue of "Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis." The report, "Raising Achievement and Reducing Gaps," by…

  15. CIDR

    Science.gov Websites

    Diagnostic Laboratory and the Molecular Pathology Laboratory. Johns Hopkins Genomics is staffed with clinical molecular geneticists, bioinformaticists, statistical geneticists, clinical geneticists and molecular shape Claes, Peter et al, Nature Genetics, 2018 February GAME-ON & OncoArray: An International

  16. John Ross, Cherokee Chief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Gary Evan

    Emphasizing the dedication with which John Ross (1790-1866) labored to achieve Cherokee social and political cohesion, this biography details the historical and political events which influenced Ross's attempts to make the U.S. honor its treaty obligations and thwart the Federal "Removal Policy" (removal of American Indians from their…

  17. Is the hospital decision to seek accreditation an effective one?

    PubMed

    Grepperud, Sverre

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion in the number of accredited hospitals justifies inquiry into the motives of hospitals in seeking accreditation and its social effectiveness. This paper presents a simple decision-theoretic framework where cost reductions and improved quality of care represent the endpoint benefits from accreditation. We argue that hospital accreditation, although acting as a market-signaling device, might be a socially inefficient institution. First, there is at present no convincing evidence for accreditation causing output quality improvements. Second, hospitals could seek accreditation, even though doing so is socially inefficient, because of moral hazard, consumer misperceptions, and nonprofit motivations. Finally, hospitals that seek accreditation need not themselves believe in output quality improvements from accreditation. Consequently, while awaiting additional evidence on accreditation, policy makers and third-party payers should exercise caution in encouraging such programs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. KSC-2012-4772

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-30

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A postlaunch news conference is held at NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site in Florida following the launch of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes, or RBSP, mission atop a United Launch Alliance, or ULA, Atlas V rocket at 4:05 a.m. EDT from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. From left, are Richard Fitzgerald, RBSP project manager at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory? in Laurel, M.D., Michael Luther, deputy associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate? at NASA Headquarters?, and Nicky Fox, RBSP deputy project scientist at Johns Hopkins. RBSP will explore changes in Earth's space environment caused by the sun -- known as "space weather" -- that can disable satellites, create power-grid failures and disrupt GPS service. The mission also will provide data on the fundamental radiation and particle acceleration processes throughout the universe. For more information on RBSP, visit http://www.nasa.gov/rbsp. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  19. KSC-99pp0380

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-05

    Workers in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, begin removing the plastic covering from NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite before prelaunch processing. FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17

  20. KSC-99pp0382

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-05

    At Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite stands alone after workstands have been removed. As part of prelaunch processing, FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17

  1. KSC-99pp0379

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-05

    Workers in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, get ready to remove the protective shipping cover from NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite for prelaunch processing. FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17

  2. An Interpolation Procedure to Patch Holes in a Ground and Flight Test Data Base (MARS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    FAIRFAX VA 22030 DR N RAO CHAGANTY 1 DEPT OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY HAMPTON BLVD NORFOLK VA 23529 DR SAID E SAID 1 DEPT OF...DR EDWARD R SCHEINERMAN 1 DEPT OF MATHEMATICS JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 104 WHITEHEAD HALL BALTIMORE MD 21218 DR BENJAMIN KADEM 1 DEPT OF MATHEMATICS ... ACTUARIAL SCIENCE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 241 SCHAEFFER HALL IOWA CITY IA 52242-1409 DR JOHN E BOYER 1 DEPT OF STATISTICS KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY DICKENS HALL

  3. A Systems Engineering Approach to Multiple Attribute Utility Theory and Multiple Objective Optimization Theory: With Application To Aircraft Retrofit Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    me produce this dissertation. I wish to thank Professors John E. Gibson and Chelsea C. White, III for their advice and contributions in this effort. My...National Meeting, Los Angeles, Ca., 1ov., 97$ Everett, J., Hax, A., Lewison , V. and 4utts, D., "Optimization of a Fleet of Large Tarkers and Bulkers...Arrow, C. J., Mardecai, K., Public Investment, The Rate of Return and Optimal Fiscal Policy, Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, Maryland, 1970. Banker

  4. 75 FR 5803 - John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ...] John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council; Meetings AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Federal Land..., Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council (JDSRAC) will meet as indicated...

  5. Astronaut John H. Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-6 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, was the first manned orbital launch by the United States, and carried Astronaut Glenn aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft to orbit the Earth.

  6. Conversations with John Williams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jack

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the views of John Williams, Hollywood's premier composer, who has written more than 300 scores, about the future of classical and film music. A gregarious person in a field requiring monklike isolation, Williams values the "association with the soloists, and the wonderful inspiration from players." His…

  7. Who Killed John Keats?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Two months before he died, John Keats claimed he had been poisoned. Although most scholars and biographers have attributed Keats's fears of persecution, betrayal, and murder to consumptive dementia, Keats's suspicions had begun long before 1820 and were not without some justification. In this article, the author talks about the death of John…

  8. Chemistry of St. John's Wort: Hypericin and Hyperforin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, John J.; Rosenson, Jon

    2004-01-01

    The appeal as natural antidepressant is the major selling point of St. John's Wort, which is referred to as "Prozac from the plant kingdom". Hypericin and hyperforin, two major constituents with significant biological activity of St. John's Wort and which are complex molecules with unusual features, are examined.

  9. Pioneering efforts for minority appointments and academic surgery. A narrative.

    PubMed

    Southwick, W O

    1999-05-01

    The author gives a narrative chronologic explanation for the early inclusion of African Americans and other minorities into the Yale University Orthopaedic Surgical Residency Training Program. The author's early isolation from racial problems living in rural Nebraska and the paucity of racial friction at the University of Nebraska gave him a more neutral or positive view of other cultures. Sudden exposure to the racial tension and police brutality toward African Americans in Boston followed by the well defined racial bias in the Southern city of Baltimore showed the plight of minorities. At that same time the author encountered many gentle and extremely intelligent African Americans who performed outstanding medical tasks for the Johns Hopkins Hospital hospital with little educational background. The author's experience with Shirley Moore and Augustus White at Yale made it possible to recruit a diverse group of gifted and loyal resident staff. The high number of academic appointments in minority and majority residents has evolved from the Academic Training and Research Program and a special selection process for choosing residents.

  10. A web-based tool for the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP).

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; King, Jay; Holzmueller, Christine G; Sawyer, Melinda; Bivens, Shauna; Michael, Michelle; Haig, Kathy; Paine, Lori; Moore, Dana; Miller, Marlene

    2006-03-01

    An organization's ability to change is driven by its culture, which in turn has a significant impact on safety. The six-step Comprehensive Unit-Based Safety Program (CUSP) is intended to improve local culture and safety. A Web-based project management tool for CUSP was developed and then pilot tested at two hospitals. HOW ECUSP WORKS: Once a patient safety concern is identified (step 3), a unit-level interdisciplinary safety committee determines issue criticality and starts up the projects (step 4), which are managed using project management tools within eCUSP (step 5). On a project's completion, the results are disseminated through a shared story (step 6). OSF St. Joseph's Medical Center-The Medical Birthing Center (Bloomington, Illinois), identified 11 safety issues, implemented 11 projects, and created 9 shared stories--including one for its Armband Project. The Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore) Medical Progressive Care (MPC4) Unit identified 5 safety issues and implemented 4 ongoing projects, including the intravenous (IV) Tubing Compliance Project. The eCUSP tool's success depends on an organizational commitment to creating a culture of safety.

  11. Susceptibility of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa (Dougl. Ex Laws.), to mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, attack in uneven-aged stands in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming USA

    Treesearch

    Jose F. Negron; Kurt Allen; Blaine Cook; John R. Withrow

    2008-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins can cause extensive tree mortality in ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws., forests in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. Most studies that have examined stand susceptibility to mountain pine beetle have been conducted in even-aged stands. Land managers...

  12. Impact of hospital volume on hospital mortality, length of stay and total costs after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, R; Yasunaga, H; Hasegawa, K; Horiguchi, H; Fushimi, K; Aoki, T; Sakamoto, Y; Sugawara, Y; Kokudo, N

    2014-04-01

    High morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) have led to concentration of this surgery in high-volume centres, with improved outcomes. The extent to which better outcomes might be apparent in a healthcare system where the mortality rate is already low is unclear. The Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database was used to identify patients undergoing PD between 2007 and 2010. Patient data included age, sex, co-morbidities at admission, type of hospital, type of PD, and the year in which the patient was treated. Hospital volume was defined as the number of PDs performed annually at each hospital, and categorized into quintiles: very low-, low-, medium-, high- and very high-volume groups. The Charlson co-morbidity index was calculated using the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision, codes of co-morbidities. A total of 10 652 patients who underwent PD in 848 hospitals were identified. The overall in-hospital mortality rate after PD was 3·3 per cent (350 of 10 652), and for the groups ranged from 5·0 per cent for the very low-volume group to 1·4 per cent for the very high-volume group (P < 0·001). Multivariable analysis revealed a significant linear relationship between higher hospital volume and shorter postoperative length of stay compared with the very low-volume group, and between increasing hospital volume and lower total costs. A significant relationship exists between increasing hospital volume, lower in-hospital mortality, shorter length of stay and lower costs for patients undergoing PD in Japan. Centralization of PD in this healthcare system is therefore justified. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dietary and medication adjustments to improve seizure control in patients treated with the ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Selter, Jessica H.; Turner, Zahava; Doerrer, Sarah C.; Kossoff, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike anticonvulsant drugs and vagus nerve stimulation, there are no guidelines regarding adjustments to ketogenic diet regimens to improve seizure efficacy once the diet has been started. A retrospective chart review was performed of 200 consecutive patients treated with the ketogenic diet at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2007-2013. Ten dietary and supplement changes were identified, along with anticonvulsant adjustments. A total of 391 distinct interventions occurred, of which 265 were made specifically to improve seizure control. Adjustments lead to >50% further seizure reduction in-18%, but only 3% became seizure-free. The benefits of interventions did not decrease over time. There was a trend towards medication adjustments being more successful than dietary modifications (24% vs. 15%, p = 0.08). No single dietary change stood out as the most effective, but calorie changes were largely unhelpful (10% with additional benefit). PMID:24859788

  14. "Who should survive?: one of the choices on our conscience": mental retardation and the history of contemporary bioethics.

    PubMed

    Antommaria, Armand Matheny

    2006-09-01

    The film "Who Should Survive?: One of the Choices on Our Conscience" contains a dramatization of the death of an infant with Down syndrome as the result of the parents' decision not to have a congenital intestinal obstruction surgically corrected. The dramatization was based on two similar cases at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and was financed by the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Foundation. When "Who Should Survive?" was exhibited in 1971, the public reaction was generally critical of the parents' decision and the physicians' inaction. Although technological developments in medicine were a necessary condition for the production of this film and its unanticipated reception, they were not a sufficient condition. The proximate cause was a changed understanding of the capabilities of individuals with Down syndrome. Part of the impetus for this change was data showing the adverse effects of institutionalization on normal children.

  15. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73 Section 110.73 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying...

  16. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73 Section 110.73 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying...

  17. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73 Section 110.73 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying...

  18. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73 Section 110.73 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying...

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Doors are open on the air-conditioned transportation van that carried NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., to the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC. After offloading, MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Doors are open on the air-conditioned transportation van that carried NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., to the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC. After offloading, MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  20. John Newsom-Davis: clinician-scientist and so much more

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    John Newsom-Davis was born in 1932 and died, aged 74, in 2007. After national service in the Royal Air Force, he read Natural Sciences at Cambridge. Following clinical studies at the Middlesex Hospital, he began research into respiratory neurophysiology with Tom Sears at the National Hospital, Queen Square, in London, and spent 1 year with Fred Plum at Cornell University in New York. After neurology specialist training at Queen Square, he became the director of the Batten Unit, continuing his interest in respiratory physiology. There he began to work on myasthenia gravis in collaboration with Ricardo Miledi at University College London and in 1978, after performing the first studies on plasma exchange in that disease, he established a myasthenia gravis research group at the Royal Free Hospital. There he investigated the role of the thymus in this disease and demonstrated an autoimmune basis for the Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome and ‘seronegative’ myasthenia. He was awarded the first Medical Research Council Clinical Research Professorship in 1979 but moved to Oxford in 1987 when he was elected Action Research Professor of Neurology. While at Oxford, he continued to run a very successful multidisciplinary group, researched further into the thymic abnormalities and cellular immunology of myasthenia, identified antibody-mediated mechanisms in acquired neuromyotonia, and began the molecular work that identified the genetic basis for many forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. Meanwhile, he was also involved in university and college governance and contributed widely to the Medical Research Council, government committees, research charities and the Association of British Neurologists. Among many honours, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991, appointed Commander of the British Empire in 1996 and made a Foreign Associate Member of the Institute of Medicine of the United States in 2001. Nearing and following retirement from Oxford, where he

  1. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 25, Number 3, Fall 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Charles Tustin Kamps USAF Air Command and Staff College Dr. Tom Keaney Johns Hopkins University Col Merrick E. Krause , USAF, Retired Department of Homeland...conducted face-to-face interviews with many of the air war leaders and noble night-fighter pilots such as Wolfgang Falck, Hajo Herrmann, and Hans

  2. Language Mission Project: A Report of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, David; Johnston, Joseph S., Jr.; Sperling, Jane

    1999-01-01

    Describes the structure and major accomplishments of the Language Mission Project, a cooperative initiative of the Association of American Colleges and Universities and the National Foreign Language Center at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) to help 14 selected colleges and universities rethink and develop their foreign language programs.…

  3. Science as a Cultural Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Harry

    This collection of four essays brings together the outer, external public aspect of scientific activities, and the internal, private world of scientific thought. Originally delivered as lectures at Johns Hopkins University for the Shell Companies Foundation Lectures on Science, Technology, and Society, these essays touch upon the broader aspects…

  4. Case Studies in Fracture Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    34, Proceedings of the JANNAF OSWG & SMBWG Combined Annual Meeting, CPIA Publication No. 264 , The John Hopkins Uriversity, p. 383, May 1975. 9. Macbeth, A...Performing Structural Analyses", Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, WAPD -TM-1140, February 1975. 3. J. L. Gordon, "OUTCUR: An Automated Evaluation of Two

  5. Strike Up the Score: Deriving Searchable and Playable Digital Formats from Sheet Music; Smart Objects and Open Archives; Building the Archives of the Future: Advanced in Preserving Electronic Records at the National Archives and Records Administration; From the Digitized to the Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudhury, G. Sayeed; DiLauro, Tim; Droettboom, Michael; Fujinaga, Ichiro; MacMillan, Karl; Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Thibodeau, Kenneth; Thaller, Manfred

    2001-01-01

    These articles describe the experiences of the Johns Hopkins University library in digitizing their collection of sheet music; motivation for buckets, Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) and the Open Archives Initiative (OAI), and initial experiences using them in digital library (DL) testbeds; requirements for archival institutions, the National…

  6. Addressing Quandaries in Early Education through Research Practice Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Carla; Connolly, Faith; Doss, Chris; Grigg, Jeffrey; Gorgen, Perry; Wentworth, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This panel examines research on early education from two research practice partnerships, the Baltimore Education Research Consortium (BERC) with Baltimore City Schools and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and the Stanford-SFUSD Partnership with San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) and Stanford University in San Francisco,…

  7. Hunt for Federal Funds Gives Classified Research a Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2012-01-01

    For some colleges and professors, classified research promises prestige and money. Powerhouses like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Johns Hopkins University have for decades run large classified laboratories. But most other universities either do not allow such research or conduct it quietly, and in small doses. The…

  8. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #470

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Research led by the Consortium on Chicago Public School Research (University of Chicago) and the Center for Social Organization of Schools (Johns Hopkins University), has identified specific indicators--students' academic characteristics--that provide early signals that students are on a path toward dropping out of high school. Measured at…

  9. 78 FR 66948 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus, Baltimore, MD, 21223... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Board of...

  10. A Specification Technique for the Common APSE (Ada Programming Support Environments) Interface Set.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    NOSC So fTech Code 8322 460 Totten Pond Road San Diego, CA 92152 Waltham, MA 02154 Philip Myers Chuck Waltrip Dave Pasterchik Johns Hopkins University...06856 Georgia Tech Atlanta, GA 30332 Reed Kotler Lockheed Missiles & Space Dick Drake 1111 Lockheed Way IBM Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Federal Systems

  11. Healthy Brain Development: Precursor to Learning. National Health/Education Consortium (1st, Baltimore, Maryland, December 6, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Educational Leadership, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the proceedings of a consortium at which leading developmental neuroscientists from across the United States and Canada met at Johns Hopkins University to explore the relationship between children's health and learning and to propose policy changes. Early brain development and its relationship to intelligence, learning, and…

  12. Promising Practices for Education Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielezinski, Molly B.

    2017-01-01

    Despite all of the celebratory rhetoric around our nation's declining dropout rates, during a given year, nearly 20 percent of students expected to graduate do not. Furthermore, according to Johns Hopkins University and Civic Enterprises, "unacceptably low levels of minority, low-income, English Language Learners, and special education…

  13. Talking theory, talking therapy: Emmy Gut and John Bowlby.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lynda R

    2006-06-01

    Emmy Gut was a psychotherapist who developed, in her later years, a unique theory distinguishing between "productive" and "unproductive" depression. Dr. John Bowlby was a leading psychoanalyst famous for his work on attachment theory. After the death of her second husband, Emmy contacted John because his work on mourning and grief spoke to her own depressed state. Although her views of the world and of her relationship with John were clearly coloured by bouts of depression, she was profoundly influenced by her personal, therapeutic, and intellectual involvement with him. Evidence of his influence is seen in the volumes of correspondence flowing between them beginning in 1971 and continuing until John's death in 1990. During that time, Emmy wrote more than 100-some very lengthy-letters to John. Much of her correspondence was devoted to discussions about their often ambiguous and conflicted therapeutic relationship. Through an analysis of attachment theory and the nature of the client-therapist alliance, this paper offers insights into the effects that imbalances in power, expectations, and shifting needs can play in the recovery process.

  14. Peter Pindar (John Wolcot).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vales, Robert L.

    This book is designed as an introduction to John Wolcot's works for the general reader, the college student, and the college teacher. Wolcot, whose pen name was Peter Pindar, wrote topical satire on public personalities of the eighteenth century, and his methods of criticism are the motif which guides each chapter and which unites all the satires…

  15. Stirling Microregenerators Fabricated and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2004-01-01

    A mesoscale Stirling refrigerator patented by the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently under development. This refrigerator has a predicted efficiency of 30 percent of Carnot and potential uses in electronics, sensors, optical and radiofrequency systems, microarrays, and microsystems. The mesoscale Stirling refrigerator is most suited to volume-limited applications that require cooling below the ambient or sink temperature. Primary components of the planar device include two diaphragm actuators that replace the pistons found in traditional-scale Stirling machines and a microregenerator that stores and releases thermal energy to the working gas during the Stirling cycle. Diaphragms are used to eliminate frictional losses and bypass leakage concerns associated with pistons, while permitting reversal of the hot and cold sides of the device during operation to allow precise temperature control. Three candidate microregenerators were fabricated under NASA grants for initial evaluation: two constructed of porous ceramic, which were fabricated by Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, and one made of multiple layers of nickel and photoresist, which was fabricated by Polar Thermal Technologies. The candidate regenerators are being tested by Johns Hopkins Applied Physics in a custom piezoelectric-actuated test apparatus designed to produce the Stirling refrigeration cycle. In parallel with the regenerator testing, Johns Hopkins is using deep reactive ion etching to fabricate electrostatically driven, comb-drive diaphragm actuators. These actuators will drive the Stirling cycle in the prototype device. The top photograph shows the porous ceramic microregenerators. Two microregenerators were fabricated with coarse pores and two with fine pores. The bottom photograph shows the test apparatus parts for evaluating the microregenerators, including the layered nickel-and-photoresist regenerator fabricated using LIGA techniques.

  16. A conditional approach for modelling patient readmissions to hospital using a mixture of Coxian phase-type distributions incorporating Bayes' theorem.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Andrew S; Marshall, Adele H; Cairns, Karen J

    2016-09-20

    The number of elderly patients requiring hospitalisation in Europe is rising. With a greater proportion of elderly people in the population comes a greater demand for health services and, in particular, hospital care. Thus, with a growing number of elderly patients requiring hospitalisation competing with non-elderly patients for a fixed (and in some cases, decreasing) number of hospital beds, this results in much longer waiting times for patients, often with a less satisfactory hospital experience. However, if a better understanding of the recurring nature of elderly patient movements between the community and hospital can be developed, then it may be possible for alternative provisions of care in the community to be put in place and thus prevent readmission to hospital. The research in this paper aims to model the multiple patient transitions between hospital and community by utilising a mixture of conditional Coxian phase-type distributions that incorporates Bayes' theorem. For the purpose of demonstration, the results of a simulation study are presented and the model is applied to hospital readmission data from the Lombardy region of Italy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Magic moments with John Bell

    SciTech Connect

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.

    John Bell, with whom I had a fruitful collaboration and warm friendship, is best known for his seminal work on the foundations of quantum physics, but he also made outstanding contributions to particle physics and accelerator physics.

  18. Geology of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Douglas W.

    2002-01-01

    The rocks of St. John, which is located near the eastern end of the Greater Antilles and near the northeastern corner of the Caribbean plate, consist of Cretaceous basalt, andesite, keratophyre, their volcaniclastic and hypabyssal intrusive equivalents, and minor calcareous rocks and chert. These rocks were intruded by Tertiary mafic dikes and tonalitic plutons. The oldest rocks formed in an extensional oceanic environment characterized by abundant keratophyre and sheeted dikes. Subduction-related volcanism of the east-west-trending marine Greater Antilles volcanic arc began on St. John near the transition between the Early and Late Cretaceous. South-directed compression, probably caused by the initial collision between the Greater Antilles arc of the Caribbean plate and the Bahama platform of the North American plate, deformed the Cretaceous strata into east-west-trending folds with axial-plane cleavage. Late Eocene tonalitic intrusions, part of the Greater Antilles arc magmatism, produced a contact aureole that is as much as two kilometers wide and that partly annealed the axial-plane cleavage. East-west compression, possibly related to the relative eastward transport of the Caribbean plate in response to the beginning of spreading at the Cayman Trough, produced long-wavelength, low-amplitude folds whose axes plunge gently north and warp the earlier folds. A broad north-plunging syncline-anticline pair occupies most of St. John. The last tectonic event affecting St. John is recorded by a series of post-late Eocene sinistral strike-slip faults related to the early stages of spreading at the Cayman Trough spreading center and sinistral strike-slip accommodation near the northern border of the Caribbean plate. Central St. John is occupied by a rhomb horst bounded by two of these sinistral faults. Unlike other parts of the Greater Antilles, evidence for recent tectonic movement has not been observed on St. John.

  19. Symptomatic subsyndromal depression in hospitalized hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Iannucci, Gino; Paroli, Marino; Salviati, Massimo; Caredda, Maria; Pasquini, Massimo; Biondi, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Clinicians generally agree on the association between depression and hypertension. Less clear is if the nature of the link is direct or indirect and if this should be considered confined only to syndromal forms or if it concerns also subsyndromal affective presentations. This study investigated the nature of the association between hypertension and subsyndromal depression in hospitalized hypertensive patients. 196 hypertensive and 96 non hypertensive inpatients underwent a SCID interview, to exclude patients positive for any Axis I or Axis II diagnosis. Symptomatic Subsyndromal Depression (SSD) was identified according to criteria proposed by Judd. Psychopathological assessment was performed with Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) and Hopkins Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). Clinical assessments included blood pressure measurement, evaluation of general health conditions and screening cardiovascular risk factors (smoke, alcohol, body weight, sedentary life style). Hypertensives met more frequently criteria for SSD. They also scored higher on ASI and SCL-90. However, those with more severe physical conditions, if compared with more healthy patients, did not show increased psychopathological severity. Similarly, psychopathological symptom severity did not differ among hypertensives positive for other cardiovascular risk factors, commonly more frequent among depressed subjects. Further analyses are needed to explore the potential advantage obtained on blood pressure control by treating SSD. Hospitalized hypertensives, more frequently satisfied criteria for Symptomatic Subsyndromal Depression. These milder affective forms are probably directly linked to the presence of hypertension, rather than being indirectly associated to physical impairment or to higher prevalence of other cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. The impact on hospital resource utilisation of treatment of hepatic encephalopathy with rifaximin-α.

    PubMed

    Orr, James G; Currie, Craig J; Berni, Ellen; Goel, Anurag; Moriarty, Kieran J; Sinha, Ashish; Gordon, Fiona; Dethier, Anne; Dillon, John F; Clark, Katie; Richardson, Paul; Middleton, Paul; Patel, Vishal; Shawcross, Debbie; Preedy, Helen; Aspinall, Richard J; Hudson, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Rifaximin-α reduces the risk of recurrence of overt hepatic encephalopathy. However, there remain concerns regarding the financial cost of the drug. We aimed to study the impact of treatment with rifaximin-α on healthcare resource utilisation using data from seven UK liver treatment centres. All seven centres agreed a standardised data set and data characterising clinical, demographic and emergency hospital admissions were collected retrospectively for the time periods 3, 6 and 12 months before and following initiation of rifaximin-α. Admission rates and hospital length of stay before and during therapy were compared. Costs of admissions and drug acquisition were estimated using published sources. Multivariate analyses were carried out to assess the relative impact of various factors on hospital length of stay. Data were available from 326 patients. Following the commencement of rifaximin, the total hospital length of stay reduced by an estimated 31-53%, equating to a reduction in inpatient costs of between £4858 and £6607 per year. Taking into account drug costs of £3379 for 1-year treatment with rifaximin-α, there was an estimated annual mean saving of £1480-£3228 per patient. Initiation of treatment with rifaximin-α was associated with a marked reduction in the number of hospital admissions and hospital length of stay. These data suggest that treatment of patients with rifaximin-α for hepatic encephalopathy was generally cost saving. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. American radium engenders telecurie therapy during World War I.

    PubMed

    Robison, R

    2000-06-01

    From 1899 to 1912 there was a European monopoly controlling the sale of radium for cancer therapy. This trust was finally broken, albeit only temporarily, in 1912/13 by American entrepreneurs J. Flannery, H. Kelly, and J. Douglas. Joe Flannery was a former mortician turned mining magnate. Dr. Howard Kelly was the renowned gynecological surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and Medical School who defied tradition by maintaining his own private hospital. Professor James Douglas was the Arizona copper king who helped support Memorial Hospital in New York City as America's first cancer hospital. During 1913-1916 surgeons Howard Kelly (Baltimore) and H. H. Janeway (Memorial Hospital) began using radium and radon for the treatment of deep seated cancers. Their technique required placement of the sources several centimeters away from the skin surface. As this new concept, telecurie therapy, resulted in a significant decrease in dose rate, it was necessary for both surgeons to have several grams of radium, costing $180000/gram, in their possession. Fortunately, Kelly and Janeway were the sole beneficiaries of a radium mining company, the National Radium Institute, from 1913 to 1916. With this unique American source of radium and with Europe otherwise preoccupied, these two American surgeons pioneered megavoltage telecurie therapy, using the 1.2 MeV gamma rays of "mass radium."

  2. Possibility of using salivary ultra-weak chemiluminescence as a biomarker for feelings of anxiety in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Mitsuo; Chida, Kingo; Hashimoto, Dai; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Honzawa, Katsu; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Kimitsugu; Takagi, Kuniaki

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether a particular value of noninvasive salivary ultra-weak chemiluminescence (UCL) could be used as a biomarker of psychological stress. Our study covered two groups. Group 1 comprised six healthy volunteers who stayed in a hospital for one night and group 2 comprised 15 patients with lung cancer and 24 patients with respiratory diseases other than lung cancer who were in hospital for an extended stay. First, we evaluated the UCL of saliva from six healthy volunteers before and after one night in hospital. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentrations were also measured. The integrated intensity value of UCL was correlated with the IgA concentration (correlation coefficient 0.90). Second, in the case of a long hospital stay, we found that the maximum salivary UCL intensities were higher in patients with lung cancer than in those with respiratory diseases other than lung cancer or in 28 healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Readiness for hospital discharge: A concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Eileen Catherine; Wills, Teresa; Coffey, Alice

    2017-11-01

    To report on an analysis on the concept of 'readiness for hospital discharge'. No uniform operational definition of 'readiness for hospital discharge' exists in the literature; therefore, a concept analysis is required to clarify the concept and identify an up-to-date understanding of readiness for hospital discharge. Clarity of the concept will identify all uses of the concept; provide conceptual clarity, an operational definition and direction for further research. Literature review and concept analysis. A review of literature was conducted in 2016. Databases searched were: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Full Text (H.W. Wilson) and SocINDEX with Full Text. No date limits were applied. Identification of the attributes, antecedents and consequences of readiness for hospital discharge led to an operational definition of the concept. The following attributes belonging to 'readiness for hospital discharge' were extracted from the literature: physical stability, adequate support, psychological ability, and adequate information and knowledge. This analysis contributes to the advancement of knowledge in the area of hospital discharge, by proposing an operational definition of readiness for hospital discharge, derived from the literature. A better understanding of the phenomenon will assist healthcare professionals to recognize, measure and implement interventions where necessary, to ensure patients are ready for hospital discharge and assist in the advancement of knowledge for all professionals involved in patient discharge from hospital. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Values and strategies: management of radical organizational change in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Orvik, Arne

    2017-04-01

    Managers' experiences of radical change were studied in a Norwegian university hospital, which was relocated from a traditional building to a new, high-tech building. The university hospital was also accredited as a health promoting hospital. Thirteen managers at different levels in the organization and a personnel safety representative were interviewed as part of a trailing research project. The aim of the study was to elucidate the managers' value orientation and strategies for dealing with value tensions. A combination of a hermeneutical, reflective method and a template for quality, efficiency and integrity guided the analysis. The template was based not only on the main findings but also on the core values of a model of organizational health. The results show that clinical managers focus on quality and top managers, not unexpectedly, focus on efficiency. Managers at both levels were concerned about their own integrity, and also about the integrity of their clinician colleagues, as well as showing concern for the hospital's mission, in terms of organizational effectiveness. The discussion was conducted in terms of dominance, cycling and balancing strategies, of which the last was the most prevalent. However, sustainable strategies for dealing with value tensions also call for value-based management and value-conscious leadership. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. John Hennessey, Barrier Breaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    John Hennessey lived a remarkable, full life as a professor, as a leader in his field of management and business, and moral, ethical leadership, and as dean at Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business and provost at the University of Vermont. He was extraordinary on many fronts, a great man who lived in tumultuous times marked by world war as a…

  6. Human Factors in Teleconferencing Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapanis, Alphonse

    The major findings and generalizations of nine separate experiments summarized in this report have come out of a program of research on human factors in telecommunications and teleconferencing systems at Johns Hopkins University. These findings, already published in greater detail in the open literature, relate to (1) how people naturally…

  7. Making the Most of Ability Grouping. Research in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Laurie

    This summary presents the major findings of recent research carried out at the Center for Research on Elementary and Middle Schools at Johns Hopkins University and published in "Ability Grouping and Student Achievement in Elementary Schools: A Best-Evidence Synthesis." The center examined more than 100 studies of five ability-grouping…

  8. Using Simulation Games in the Classroom. Report Number 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harry, Lindy

    The Center for the Study of Social Organizations at Johns Hopkins University has developed suggestions for evaluating, preparing, introducing, playing, discussing, and modifying simulation games for classroom use. The teacher must first evaluate the game materials and the simulation model in the light of the abilities and interests of his…

  9. Success for All in Acre, Israel: Effects on Hebrew and Arabic Reading and Writing. (First Year).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Schaedel, Bruria

    A study investigated the effectiveness of the Success for All (SFA) program developed at Johns Hopkins University. The program emphasizes prevention of failure, personal tutoring, family-school program, and regular evaluation of student progress. In 1996, the program involved schools in northern Israel--Arabic and Jewish, religious and secular.…

  10. Human Dimensions of Strategic Leadership: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009. 409pp. (UA23 .A45 2009) Rosenthal, Seth A., et al. National Leadership Index: A National Study of Confidence in...ADA471230 Watkins , Michael. Shaping the Game: The New Leader’s Guide to Effective Negotiating. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2006. 196pp

  11. 'Shaped like a Question Mark': Found Poetry from Herbert Blau's "The Audience"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Monica

    2004-01-01

    Performance theorist Herbert Blau's "The Audience" (Baltimore and London, Johns Hopkins Press, 1990) is an important yet neglected theoretical text on theatre audience. Deconstructive, dense and allusive in nature, Blau's text creates a real challenge for his reader. This paper presents a study of "The Audience" employing what I am calling…

  12. Interview with Dick Whiteside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winarski, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    Dick Whiteside, Vice President for Enrollment Management at Tulane University, is one of the leading strategists in the field of enrollment management. Dr. Whiteside has held influential positions at the University of Hartford, in West Hartford, Connecticut, The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, the City University of New York in…

  13. Publication Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. Center for the Study of Social Organization of Schools.

    This booklet contains abstracts of 62 documents published by the Johns Hopkins University Center for the Study of Social Organization of Schools from September 1967 to May 1970. The majority of the documents are research studies in the areas of desegregation, language development, educational opportunity, and educational games--most of them…

  14. Female condoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Birth Control Read more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  15. Birth control pills - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Birth Control Read more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  16. Low Birth Weight and Cognitive Outcomes: Evidence for a Gradient Relationship in an Urban, Poor, African American Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Noonan, Kelly; Martin, Roy P.

    2007-01-01

    This study is one of the first to investigate the relationship between low birth weight and cognitive outcomes in an urban, poor, prospectively designed African-American birth cohort. Multivariate analyses of the Pathways to Adulthood study, a subset of the Johns Hopkins Collaborative Perinatal study, compared low birth weight African-American…

  17. The Biomes of Homewood: Interactive Map Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingles, Richard; Feist, Theron; Brosnan, Rae

    2005-01-01

    To build a learning community, the General Biology faculty at Johns Hopkins University conducted collaborative, problem-based learning assignments outside of class in which students are assigned to specific areas on campus, and gather and report data about their area. To overcome the logistics challenges presented by conducting such assignments in…

  18. Ultraviolet Excimer Laser-Based Ignition of H2/Air and H2/O2 Premixed Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Gases and Liquids," Proceedings of the 23rd JANNAF Combustion Meeting, Vol. III, p. 203, 1986. 8. R.C. Sausa, A.J. Alfano , and A.W. Miziolek...Chemical Propulsion Department of Chemistry Information Agency ATTN: E. Grant ATTN: T.W. Christian West Lafayette, IN 47906 Johns Hopkins Road Laurel, MD

  19. Human Trafficking and the Impact on National Security for the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    governments in Southeast Asia to crack down on pedophile sex tourism – and many nations in that region have made progress.34 There is also a problem...Protection Project at Johns Hopkins University found that Cuba has “replaced Southeast Asia as a destination for pedophiles and sex tourists.” As

  20. Data Mining and Predictive Modeling in Institutional Advancement: How Ten Schools Found Success. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luperchio, Dan

    2009-01-01

    This technical report, produced in partnership by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) and SPSS Inc., explores the promise of data mining alumni records at educational institutions. Working with individual alumni records from The Johns Hopkins Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, a predictive regression model is…

  1. Nex-Gen Space Observatory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-26

    Adam Reiss, recipient of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics and professor of astronomy and physics at Johns Hopkins University speaks at the presentation of the permanent exhibit of the James Webb Space Telescope at the Maryland Science Center on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 in Baltimore. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Public hospital autonomy in China in an international context.

    PubMed

    Allen, Pauline; Cao, Qi; Wang, Hufeng

    2014-01-01

    Following decades of change in health care structures and modes of funding, China has recently been making pilot reforms to the governance of its public hospitals, primarily by increasing the autonomy of public hospitals and redefining the roles of the health authorities. In this paper, we analyse the historical evolution and current situation of public hospital governance in China, focussing the range of governance models being tried out in pilot cities across China. We then draw on the experiences of public hospital governance reform in a wide range of other countries to consider the nature of the Chinese pilots. We find that the key difference in China is that the public hospitals in the pilot schemes do not receive sufficient funding from government and are able to distribute profits to staff. This creates incentives to charge patients for excessive treatment. This situation has undermined public service orientation in Chinese public hospitals. We conclude that the pilot reforms of governance will not be sufficient to remedy all the problems facing these hospitals, although they are a step in the right direction. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Informal caregivers in hospitals: Opportunities and threats.

    PubMed

    Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Emrani, Zahra

    2018-05-20

    High hospital costs are a challenge that health system face. Additionally, studies identified manpower deficiency as a problem in health system. Hospital is a place where patients with different physical and mental conditions come to. Their families and friends' companionship can facilitate this situation for them. This study illustrates the roles of informal caregivers in hospital. This is a phenomenological qualitative study. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. We interviewed 22 informal caregivers and 9 nurse staffs from different departments of hospital. They were selected through purposeful and snowball sampling approach. The framework method was used for data analysis. We found 3 main themes including (a) roles of informal caregivers, (b) opportunities of presence of the informal caregivers in the hospital, and (c) threats of presence of informal caregivers. This study shows some roles for informal caregivers including mental supports, consultation, decision-making, and care roles. Concerning the shortage of manpower in Iran's hospitals, nurses have less time to take care of each patient; therefore, using informal caregivers as an implicit strategy to overcome nursing shortage and to reduce hospital costs seems to be beneficial. We suggest that an appropriate plan is necessary to make use of them for filling this gap to some extent, as well as providing training sessions and facilities for companions acting as informal caregivers. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. John Bell (1763-1820): brother artist and anatomist.

    PubMed

    Gardner-Thorpe, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    John Bell, brother-surgeon of Charles Bell, was, like Charles, an outstanding surgeon and a good artist. John was one of the few who illustrated his work with their own drawings in the days before audiovisual aids were available and without the benefit of reliable drawing aids, photography and computer-aided design. Charles, on the other hand, was the better artist and illustrated much of the normal anatomy of the nervous system. Each brother undertook extensive surgery of men who had been wounded in war; John Bell left us his engravings from the textbooks, more numerous perhaps than Charles, but Charles left us a series of oil paintings and watercolours in addition to the illustrations in his textbooks. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Selection of asset investment models by hospitals: examination of influencing factors, using Switzerland as an example.

    PubMed

    Eicher, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals are responsible for a remarkable part of the annual increase in healthcare expenditure. This article examines one of the major cost drivers, the expenditure for investment in hospital assets. The study, conducted in Switzerland, identifies factors that influence hospitals' investment decisions. A suggestion on how to categorize asset investment models is presented based on the life cycle of an asset, and its influencing factors defined based on transaction cost economics. The influence of five factors (human asset specificity, physical asset specificity, uncertainty, bargaining power, and privacy of ownership) on the selection of an asset investment model is examined using a two-step fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The research shows that outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are particularly favored in the presence of two combinations of influencing factors: First, if technological uncertainty is high and both human asset specificity and bargaining power of a hospital are low. Second, if assets are very specific, technological uncertainty is high and there is a private hospital with low bargaining power, outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are favored too. Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis, it can be demonstrated that investment decisions of hospitals do not depend on isolated influencing factors but on a combination of factors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Inpatient hospital burden of hepatitis C-diagnosed patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Scott A; Innes, Hamish A; Aspinall, Esther J; Hayes, Peter C; Alavi, Maryam; Valerio, Heather; Goldberg, David J; Hutchinson, Sharon J

    2017-12-30

    To describe the burden on inpatient hospital resources over time from patients diagnosed with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and who have reached the decompensated stage of cirrhosis (DC), as existing estimates of hospital stay in these patients are limited. A retrospective longitudinal dataset was formed via record-linkage between the national HCV diagnosis database and inpatient/daycase hospitalisation and death registers in Scotland. The study population consisted of HCV-diagnosed patients with a first DC admission in 1996-2013, with follow-up available until 31 May 2014. We investigated and quantified the mean cumulative length of hospital stay, distributions over discharge diagnosis categories, and trends in admission rates. Among our study population (n = 1543), we identified 10 179 admissions with any diagnosis post-first DC admission. Between 1996 and 2013 there was a 16-fold rise in annual total admissions (from 112 to 1791) and an 11-fold rise in hospital stay (719-8045). When restricting minimum possible follow-up to 2 years, DC patients (n = 1312) had an overall admission rate of 7.3 per person-year, and spent on average 43 days (26 days during first 6 months) in hospital; for all liver-related, liver-related other than HCC/DC, and non-liver related only admissions, this was 39, 14, and 5 days respectively. HCV-infected DC patients impose a considerable inpatient hospital burden, mostly from DC- and other liver-related admissions, but also from admissions associated with non-liver comorbidities. Estimates will be useful for monitoring the impact of prevention and treatment, and for computing the cost-effectiveness of new therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hospitalization and other risk factors for depressive and anxious symptoms in oncological and non-oncological patients.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Cerminara, Gregorio; Ruberto, Stefania; Caroleo, Mariarita; Puca, Maurizio; Rania, Ornella; Suffredini, Elina; Procopio, Leonardo; Segura-Garcìa, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common in hospitalized patients. In particular, oncological patients might be vulnerable to depression and anxiety. The aim of this study is to assess and compare different variables and the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms between oncological and medically ill inpatients and to identify variables that can influence depressive and anxious symptoms during hospitalization of patients. A total of 360 consecutive hospitalized patients completed the following questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Patients Health Questionnaire-9, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), 12-Item Short-Form Survey: physical component summary (PCS), and mental component summary (MCS). Patients were divided into oncological patients and non-oncological patients: groups 1 and 2. Only two significant differences were evident between the groups: the PCS of 12-item Short-form Survey was higher in non-oncological patient (p < 0.000), and the GHQ total score was higher in oncological patients. Variables significantly associated with HADS-D ≥ 8 were lower MCS, higher GHQ-12 score, lower PCS, more numerous previous hospitalizations, longer duration of hospitalization, and positive psychiatric family history. Variables significantly associated with HADS-A ≥ 8 were lower MCS, higher GHQ-12 score, positive psychiatric family history, longer duration of hospitalization, and younger age. Anxiety and depression symptoms in concurrent general medical conditions were associated with a specific sociodemographic profile, and this association has implications for clinical care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Hospital competition and financial performance: the effects of ambulatory surgery centers.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs), limited-service alternatives for treating surgery patients not requiring an overnight stay, are a health-care service innovation that has proliferated in the U.S. and other countries in recent years. This paper examines the effects of ASC competition on revenues, costs, and profit margins of hospitals that also provided these services as a subset of their general services in Arizona, California, and Texas during the period 1997-2004. We identified all ASCs operating during the period in the 49 Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions in the three states. The results of fixed effects models suggested that ASCs are meaningful competitors to general hospitals. We found downward pressure on revenues, costs, and profits in general hospitals associated with ASC presence. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Seasonal shifts in accumulation of glycerol biosynthetic gene transcripts in mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), larvae.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Jordie D; Bonnett, Tiffany R; Keeling, Christopher I; Huber, Dezene P W

    2017-01-01

    Winter mortality is a major factor regulating population size of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Glycerol is the major cryoprotectant in this freeze intolerant insect. We report findings from a gene expression study on an overwintering mountain pine beetle population over the course of 35 weeks. mRNA transcript levels suggest glycerol production in the mountain pine beetle occurs through glycogenolytic, gluconeogenic and potentially glyceroneogenic pathways, but not from metabolism of lipids. A two-week lag period between fall glycogen phosphorylase transcript and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript up-regulation suggests that gluconeogenesis serves as a secondary glycerol-production process, subsequent to exhaustion of the primary glycogenolytic source. These results provide a first look at the details of seasonal gene expression related to the production of glycerol in the mountain pine beetle.

  10. Chemistry of St. John's Wort: Hypericin and Hyperforin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, John J.; Rosenson, Jon

    2004-10-01

    St. John's wort is a common plant that has been used medicinally for over 20 centuries. This herb is currently used by millions of people, primarily as natural antidepressant; yet, its efficacy is still under constant debate. St. John's wort contains a large aromatic molecule, hypericin, twisted by steric interactions into the shape of a propeller. For use as antidepressant, St. John's wort is standardized to the content of hypericin, but this molecule was recently found not to be the active ingredient. A totally different bicyclic molecule with complex substitution pattern, hyperforin, was then studied as the causative agent. Both molecules are strongly active in biological systems. Hypericin has shown antiviral activity and is a potent natural photosensitizer that has been used in photodynamic therapy against cancer and against HIV in stored blood. Hyperforin was found to activate a particular receptor in the liver that induces the production of an enzyme used for the metabolism of medications. This effect causes more rapid breakdown of many prescription medications and can interfere with their effectiveness. This finding should prompt a reevaluation of regular use of St. John's wort.

  11. A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the play alerts Elizabethans not just to military and political threats, but to a changing cosmic world view, all especially threatening as they arise in Catholic countries. (a) Personification characterizes the play. John personifies the old order, while Arthur and the Dauphin's armies personify the new. I suggest that Shakespeare decenters King John just as Copernicus decentered the world. (b) Hubert menaces Arthur's eyes for a whole scene (4.1), but the need for such cruelty is not explained and is especially odd as Arthur is already under sentence of death (3.3.65-66). This hitherto unexplained anomaly suggests that the old order fears what the new might see. (c) Eleanor's confession is made only to Heaven and to her son the King (1.1.42-43), yet by echoing and word play the Messenger from France later reveals to John that he is privy to it (4.2.119-124). This circumstance has not been questioned heretofore. I suggest that the Messenger is like the wily Hermes (Mercury), chief communicator of the gods and patron of the sciences; by revealing that he moves in the highest circles, he tells John that he speaks with an authority that transcends even that of a king. The message from on high presages more than political change; it warns of a new cosmic and religious world order (d) Most agree that John is a weak king, so Shakespeare must have suspected flaws in the old ways. He would have known that Tycho Brahe's new star of 1572, the comet of 1577, and the 1576 model of his compatriot Thomas Digges, were shattering old ideas. (e) The tensions of the play are not resolved because in 1594 the new order was

  12. The Role of Learning in Health Technology Assessments: An Empirical Assessment of Endovascular Aneurysm Repairs in German Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Blankart, Carl Rudolf; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2017-02-01

    Changes in performance due to learning may dynamically influence the results of a technology evaluation through the change in effectiveness and costs. In this study, we estimate the effect of learning using the example of two minimally invasive treatments of abdominal aortic aneurysms: endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (fEVAR). The analysis is based on the administrative data of over 40,000 patients admitted with unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to more than 500 different hospitals over the years 2006 to 2013. We examine two patient outcomes, namely, in-hospital mortality and length of stay using hierarchical regression models with random effects at the hospital level. The estimated models control for patient and hospital characteristics and take learning interdependency between EVAR and fEVAR into account. In case of EVAR, we observe a significant decrease both in the in-hospital mortality and length of stay with experience accumulated at the hospital level; however, the learning curve for fEVAR in both outcomes is effectively flat. To foster the consideration of learning in health technology assessments of medical devices, a general framework for estimating learning effects is derived from the analysis. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Artificial Earth Satellites Designed and Fabricated by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Revised

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    occurred. The attitude detection system included a three-axis fluxgate vector magnetometer and solar attitude detectors that produced both analog and digital ...heliogoniometer ( digital solar attitudeIsensing system) Three axis analog solar detection - Rubidium vapor magnetometer Three axis fluxgate magnetometer ...Telemetry: 35 channels modulating 150 MHz carrier on command Three axis solar attitude detector system Three axis fluxgate magnetometer system

  14. Incidence and early outcomes associated with pre-transplant antivimentin antibodies in the cardiac transplantation population.

    PubMed

    Young, Raymond K; Dale, Bethany; Russell, Stuart D; Zachary, Andrea A; Tedford, Ryan J

    2015-08-01

    In cardiac transplant recipients, the development of antibodies to the endothelial intermediate filament protein vimentin (antivimentin antibodies, AVA) has been associated with rejection and poor outcomes. However, the incidence of these antibodies prior to transplantation and their association with early rejection has not been investigated. Pre-transplant serum was analyzed from 50 patients who underwent de novo cardiac transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2004 to 2012. Demographic, one-yr rejection, and survival data were obtained from the transplant database. The incidence of pre-transplant AVA was 34%. AVA-positive patients were younger (p = 0.03), and there was an a trend toward incidence in females (p = 0.08). Demographic data were similar among both groups. AVA positivity did not predict rejection in the first year post-transplant. There was no difference in rejection-free graft survival (53 vs. 52%, p = 0.85) at one yr. Similarly, there was no difference in graft survival at one yr (82 vs. 88%, p = 0.56) or graft survival at a median follow-up of 23 and 26 months, respectively (76 vs. 85%, p = 0.41). AVA is common in the cardiac pre-transplant population with a higher incidence in the young. The presence of detectable AVA did not correlate with early post-transplant rejection or graft survival. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The spectrum of the tropical oxygen nightglow observed at 3 A resolution with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Davidsen, A. F.; Blair, W. P.; Bowers, C. W.; Durrance, S. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Ferguson, H. C.; Kimble, R. A.; Long, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the tropical oxygen nightglow in the range of 830 to 1850 A (in first order) at 3 A resolution were obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope in December 1990. The data are presented which were obtained on a setting celestial target as the zenith angle of the line-of-sight varied from 77 to 95 deg. The dominant features in the spectrum (other than geocoronal hydrogen) are O I 1304 and 1356 and the radiative recombination continuum near 911 A. The continuum is resolved and found to be consistent with an electron temperature in the range 1000-1250 K. The observed ratio of the brightness of O I 1356 to the continuum suggests that O(+)-O(-) mutual neutralization contributes about 40 percent to the 1356 A emission. The dependence of the optically thin emissions on zenith angle is consistent with a simple ionospheric model. Weak O I 989 emission is also detected, but there is no evidence for any similarly produced atomic nitrogen emissions.

  16. Making Constructive Simulations Relevant for Today’s Fight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-08

    Afghanistan. Dr. Michael Vlahos , a member of the National Security Assessment team of the National Security Analysis Department (NSAD) at the Johns Hopkins...www.carlisle.army.mil/DIME/documents/Szepesy%5B1%5D.pdf (accessed February 23, 2010). 20 13 Michael Vlahos , Culture’s Mask: War & Change after Iraq (Laurel

  17. Learning by Doing--Teaching Systematic Review Methods in 8 Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Tianjing; Saldanha, Ian J.; Vedula, S. Swaroop; Yu, Tsung; Rosman, Lori; Twose, Claire; Goodman, Steven N.; Dickersin, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to describe the course "Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis" at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Methods: A distinct feature of our course is a group project in which students, assigned to multi-disciplinary groups, conduct a systematic review. In-class sessions comprise…

  18. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  19. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  20. Effective Aspects of Reengagement and Recovery Programs in Southeastern Wisconsin High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litzau, Christopher; Rice, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    The number of students in the United States who did not complete high school decreased by 27% from 2008 to 2012 (Alliance for Excellent Education, America's Promise Alliance, Civic Enterprises, & The Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University, 2015). This is a positive trend. High schools can help students complete school and…